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CATALOG

1957


CHAPEL路 MUSIC - SPEECH

BUILDING


TACOMA

FROM

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13.

Old Main Classroom Building Science Ha II Chapel-Music-Speech Building North Hall South Hall West Hall College Union Parking Lots Stuen Hall Business Administration No. Adelphan Hall BU5iness Administration No.

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library

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14. President's Residence

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Pacific Lutheran College Bulletin Vo l u me XXXVI I

AP R I L, 1 957

Nu mber 2

Announcements for 1957 -1958 Catalog, 1956-1957

Tacoma 44, Washington

P u b l, ished quarterly by Pacific lutheran Col'lege, Tacoma 44, Wa shi ngton . Entered as second-class matter Sept. 1, 1943, a t the post office at Park l and, Wa s h i n gton, under the act of Cong ress of August 24, 1912.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

SCHOOL CAL E N DAR

5

THE COLLEGE

6-10

COLLEGE L I F E

11-19

ACADEMIC ADMIN I'STRA TlON

2()"'28

REQ U I REMENTS FO R DEGREES

29-50

COLLEGE COSTS

51-58

CO U RSES OF I NSTRUCT I O N

59-117

REGISTER

118-138

I N DEX

139-140


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SCHOOL CAlENDA:R

SUMMER SESS ION - 1 957Registration begins 8 : 00 a . m . C I asses begin 7 :40 a . m Independence Day, a h o l iday First Term endL Second Term cl asses beg in 7:40 a.m . Summer Session closes

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Monday, June 1 0 Tuesday, June 1 1 Thursday, J u l y 4 Friday, July 1 2 Monday, Jury 1 5 Friday, August 1 6

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FI RST SEMESTER - 1 957 Registration and Freshman Days' Monday, Sept. 1 6-Saturday, Sept. 2 1 Classes begin 7:50 a . m . Monday, September 2 3 Mid-semester Saturday, November 1 6 Thanksgiving Recess begins 1 2:30 p.m. Wednesday, November 2 7 Thanksgiving Recess e n d s 7:50 a . m . Monday, December 2 .Friday, December 20 Christmas Recess begins 9 : 00 p.m . ___

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-1 958Christmas Recess ends 7:50 a . m . Semester ends

Monday, January 6 Thursday, January 30

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SECO N D SEMESTER -1 958Registration for new students Cl asses beg in 7:50 a . m . M id-semester Easter Recess begins 9:00 p.m. Easter Recess ends 7:50 a . m . Memoria I Day, a hoi iday Bacca l a u reate Services 1 1 :00 a . m . Com mencement 3: 30 p. m . Exam i n ations

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Saturday, Feb. 1 and Monday, Feb. 3 Tuesday, February 4 Wed n esd ay, Apri I 2 Wednesday, Apri l 2 Tuesday, Apri l 8 Friday, May 30 Su nday, June 1 Sunday, June 1 May 28, 29 and Ju n e 2-4

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路See "Registration" Page

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THE COLLEGE

HISTORY I n the keystone of the a rch above the central entrance to Old Main, the i nscription, PLU 1 894, is i nd icative of the d reams of the Lutheran Church leaders. For the vision of these men, a u niversity, led them to the wilderness to open on October 1 4, 1894, at Park足 l a n d , Washington, what was later to become the present Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege. Through the years - both of p rivation and prosperity - the Col lege has conti nued to grow. I ncorporated with i t have been the former Col u mbia Lutheran Col lege and Spokane Col l ege so that now Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege is the o n l y senior col l ege west of the Rockies owned by a Lutheran Church. The Co l l ege receives much of its suppo rt from The Evangel ica l Lutheran C h u rch, The American Luther足 an C h u rch, and the Augustan a Lutheran Church. Through the years, Pacific Lutheran has grown from a n Academy to a Ju n ior Col l ege ( 1 92 1 ), a th ree-year Norma l School ( 1 93 1 ), a Co l lege of Education (1939), a n d f i n a l ly a Co l l ege of Liberal Arts ( 1 94 1 ) . Now it a l so offers courses lead i n g to a degree of Master of Arts in the field of Ed u cation . Through the years, Pacific Lutheran h as a i med to give the stu足 dents understa n d i ng of thei r cultural heritage as they prepare for thei r futu re, of bel ievi ng that Christian ity is tru ly the center of their l i ves, a nd of rea l izi ng that the term "Pacific Lutheran Col l ege Fam i ly" actu a l l y defines the true spirit of the Col l ege.

lOCATION Pacific Lutheran ColI'ege is located in Parkland, Washi n gton, with i n the Greater Tacoma a rea, a pproximately seven m i les south of City Center. It is a bout two b l ocks west of H ighway No. 5 and a bout two m i les east of H ighway No. 99. From downtown Tacoma, 6


ACCREDITATION, OBJECTIVES

it is accessi b l e by the Span away b us l i ne which has a regu l a r stop immediately in front of Old Main.

ACCREDITATION Pacific Luthera n Col l ege is f u l l y accredi ted by the Northwest Associ ation of Secondary and Higher Schools as a fou r-year l i bera l arts col l ege a nd by the Washi ngton State Board of Ed ucation as a Teacher Tra i ning institution offering a complete p rogra m for the tra i n i ng of teachers i n the elementary and secondary schools. The Col lege is a lso a mem ber of the Associ ation of American Col leges, the America n Cou nci l o n Ed ucation, and the National Lutheran Educatio n a l Conference. I t has a lso been approved by the American Associ ation of U niversity Women.

OBJECTIVES OF THE COLLEGE The Ph ibsophy Pacific Lutheran Col l ege is a Col l ege of Li bera l Arts, but more than that, it is a C h ristian Co l lege. As such its prim a ry p u rpose must be the prepa ration of a trai ned Ch risti a n citizenry th rough a n u n h a m pered search for truth in a l l a reas and aspects of l ife.

Academi c Objectives 1 . To i m pa rt to the student a fund of i nformation coveri ng the important areas of h u m a n knowledge which w i l li serve as material for d iscussion a n d a basis for fu rther development. 2 . To tra i n the stu dent in the processes and procedu res for obta i n i ng specific i nformation. 3 . To arouse in the student an i ntel l ectu a l cu riosity and i nterest in his surroundings a n d in m a n kind in genera l , so that he w i l l desire to grow i n knowledge and u ndersta ndi ng. 4. To develop in the student a sense of Intel l ectu a l honesty or integrity. 5. To give tra i n i ng in profession a l a n d pre-professional courses, while conti n uing to emph asize the broad genera l tra i n i ng as a base for a col lege education.

Social Ob,jectives 1. To provide an opportunity for the expression of Ch ristia n attitudes and faith.

development

and

2 . To furnish wholesome recreation and Ch ristian fel lowship. 7


COLLEGE OWNERSH I P, CAMPUS

3. To provide opportunities for perso n a l d evelopment, g ro u p recogn ition, and at t h e same time to foster student morale a n d loy a l ty to the col lege. 4. To encourage students to be active a n d creative, g a i ning satisfaction from accomplishing th i ngs that to them a re i nteresting a nd worthwh i l e . 5 . T o give the students a n opportunity to a p p l y through extra足 curricu l a r activities ski l l s a nd knowl ed ge gai ned in the cl assroom.

OWNERSHIP, GOVERNMENT, AND SUPPORT Pacific Luthera n Co l l ege is one of the five maj,or col l eges of the Eva ngelica l Lutheran C h u rch in America a l though it is rea l ly owned by the Pacific luthera n Col lege Association. The latter name coincides with the Pacific District of the Eva ngelical Luthera n Church . For several years now s upport h a s a l so come to Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege from the American Luthera n C h u rch, the A ug usta n a Lutheran C h u rch, the Pacific Lutheran Col lege A l u m n i Associatio n . From a mong these g ro u ps, the seventeen mem bers of the Board of Trustees a re elected . This Board , under the leadership of its Ch air足 m a n , Dr. H. L. Foss, meets reg u l a rly to co nd uct the affairs of m a i n足 tai ning a n d bui,ld i ng the Col l ege. I n add ition to the reg u l a r s u pport from the churches, Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege enjoys a considera ble gift-giving from the two Dorm itory Auxi l i a ries and other friend's of Ch risti a n ed ucation in m a ny pa rts of the wor l d .

THE CAMPUS The CoUege occupies a ca mpus of a pproximately 1 25 acres in the center of the Parkland a rea . The u pper campus i ncl udes the prinCipa l College buildings. O n the lower cam p u s to the south are located the Gym n asium, Fami ly Apartments, Men's Residence Halls, a nd the Athletic Fie l d with its basebal l diamond, footb a l l practice field, r u n ning track, ten nis courts, a n d n i n e-ho'le golf course. The bea uty of the campus is enha nced by its natu ra l su rrou ndings足 the evergreens and lofty Mou nt Rainier being especia 'l ly noteworthy.

COLLEGE BUILDINGS O l d Main, a six-story b rick structu re, houses the administration offices, the student hea l th center, six c l assrooms, a reception room, a dormitory for men, the heating p l a nt, and a fi reproof vau lt. There a re concrete fireproof stairways at either end of the bui lding which insure adequ ate f i re escapes. An el evator, serving the dormitory, is in the center of the b uilding. Equipped with a modern sprinkler system, the buil d i ng is virtu a l ly fireproof. The Library, the heart and center of college life, was erected 8


COLLEGE BUILDI NGS

in 1 939 and completed in 1 948 . The reading rooms on the m ain floo r will seat 200 students. The stacks, with a capa city of 75,000 volu mes, are furnished with study tables accessible to all students. Cl assrooms a n d professo rial offices a re o n the first floor of the buildi ng. Aside from the main collections of 44,8 00 catalogued volumes on all phases of knowledge.. the l ibra ry has specia l col ­ lections i n Germa nic languages, rare books, a nd a growing a rchiv a l collection rel ative t o the development of the Lutheran Chu rch i n the Northwest. T h e library receives 369 m a gazines a n d newspapers. Since the library is a member of the Paci fic f\lorthwest Bibliographic Center, the resources of other l ibraries in the region are also avail­ able through inter-library loa n . I ncluded in its services is the pro­ cu rement of audio-visual materials. The Science Hall, Cl three-story brick building, completed in the fa ll of 1 947, acco m modates the departments of biology, chem­ istry, geology, and physics. In this buildi n g a re a l a rge lecture room , three classrooms, and eight well-equipped l aboratories, a s well a s stockroom s and offices for the staff m embers. The Memorial Gymnasi u m was completed in the s u mmer of 1 947. The building, which has a seating capacity of 2,300, provides classroom space as well as faci l ities for physical educatio n classes and ma i or spo rts. The Ch apel -Music-Speech Building was completed in 1952 . The 1 ,238-seat auditorium is used for da i l y chapel exercises, con certs, speci al gath erings and pl ays. A stage 36 feet deep, 72 feet wide, and 72 feet hig h permits the production of all types of pl ays. The auditoriu m is eq u i pped with a n orchestra pit, and a new Casavant four-m a n u a l o rgan. Above the m a i n lobby is a small lounge. On the third floor is a devotion a l chapel seaiing about seventy-five people. Music facilities include seventeen individua l practice rooms, seven studios for m usic teachers, a large band a n d o rchestra room, a choir and chorus room and a music l ibrary. Speech facilities, in addition to the stage, include classrooms, offices and a l a rge radio studio . The Classroom Buildi ng, formerly the Student U nion , was made very attractive a nd adequate for cl ass use in 1955-56. The m ain auditorium is used as a ,lecture room whi l e four classrooms a n d severa l offices for facu l ty a re now i n use there. The Old Chapel, a two-s,tory frame building, is now u sed for classes in Art. The Co l l ege U n ion Building was completed in 1956. B u ilt of cedarwall with brick and glass trim, after a beautiful contem­ por a ry design, this building houses much that is con nected with student l i fe. Here a re a l a rge dining room (seating 7 00) with its necessary kitchen plus a smaller dining room for intimate groups, the Coffee Shop, the Col l ege Booksto re, several lounges, a T-V Room , and a recreation room. The official college m ailboxes for 9


RESIDENCES

stude nts and facu lty a re a l so here as wel l as offices for the Associ足 ated Students, the Col l ege p u b l i cations, and the Co llege Alumni Associ ation. Cramer Cottage is now the home of the Col l ege Pastor a nd his family. The President's Res id ence, a lovely brick home, is located north of the Campus. Busi ness Admi nistration Cl assroom Bui l d i ngs No. 1 and No. 2 a re located north of the l i bra ry. Co l l ege Apa rtments for m arried students are mai ntained on the lower campus. The Warehouse and Shops, i nc l u d i ng the Ind ustrial Arts Work足 shop, a re located north of the Gymnasium. WOMEN'S RESI DEN CES South H a l l houses 1 2 9 women in 63 double rooms. The faci l ities include two large lounges small kitchen uni ts, l a u nd ry faci l ities, a n d two roo ms. Speci a l accom mod ations are provided for on the ground floor.

rooms and 3 single with kitchens, two small lou nge-study off-campus women

North H a l l houses 1 33 women with each room providing for one, two, or three students. There are two large lounges a nd a comp lete self-service I,aundry. West H a l l , opened i n 1 9 56, hou ses 1 51 women. It is a l most identical in plan with North Hal l . MEN'S RESI DENCES Old Mai n Residence H a l l has room for about 230 men in rooms usua l l y accom modating two students; however some of the larger ones may h ave th ree residents . Two lounges, a kitchen, and a self足 service l a u nd ry add to the faci lities. The automatic sprin kler system ma kes the H a l l fi reproof. Ivy H a l l , on the lower campus, h a s accom modations for 36 men. It has a reception room, kitchen, and self-service l a u ndry. Clover Creek H a l l , also on the lower campus, accommodates 24 men. A large reception room a nd a self-service l a u ndry are i n t h e building. Adelphon H a l l , north of the library, houses ten men. The accommodations provide four double rooms, two single rooms, a n d a reception room. Stuen H a l l , formerly the home of the Ole J. Stuen fami ly, was converted i nto a residence for 1 6 men i n 1 95 6. 10


COLLEGE LIFE

I n addition to successfu l academic performance, the College chaUenges the student to p rofit by experience in extra-cu rricu l a r activities . Here a l so the student develops h i s leadership s ki l ls and learns how to work wel l with his neighbor. Organizations and cl ubs are for the most part under control of the PAC I F I C LUTH ERAN COLLEGE ASSOCIATED STUDENTS as part of a student government. This organization co mposed of the whole stu dent body has reg u l a r meetings where general student affairs are di scussed . T h e Student Cou nci l, representi ng the enti re student body, admi nisters a l l student activities a n d orga nizati ons on campus a n d al so many co-cu rri cular activities. COLL EGE ACTIVITI ES General ALPHA PHI OMEGA is a n atio nal service fraternity composed of col lege men who are or have been affi l i ated with the Boy Scouts of America. Requi rements for membership are previous tra i n i n g in Scouti ng, the des i re t o b e o f service to others, and the mainten足 ance of sati sfactory scholastic standing. Ad visers: Mr. E klund, Mr. Sal'zman. ASSOCIATED WOMEN STUDENTS is a n organization for a l l women o n the camp us. I t i ntrod uces its members to the privi leges and problems of socia l l ife. Adviser: Miss Wickstrom. I NTER-CLUB CO UNCi l is a g roup composed of offici a l repre足 sentatives from each of the campus cl ubs. Its p u rpose is to coord in足 ate a l l student activities. Adviser: Miss Wickstrom. C IRCLE K is an aff i l i ate of N ational Kiwa nis. Axford, Mr. Ra mstad, Mr. Vigness.

Advisers: Mr.

DELTA RHO GAMMA is a socia l orga nization of all off-ca mpus women students . Adviser: Mrs. Miles . 11


HONORARY, ATHLETIC ORGA N I ZATIONS

LADY L UTES is an orga nization of wives of co l l ege stud ents . Adviser: Mrs. Knorr. OM ICRON MU ALPHA is a social organization of a l l off-campus men. Advisers: Mr. E k l u n d, Mr. C. K. M a l m i n . TOASTMASTERS i s a n affi l iate o f Toastmasters C l u b o f America . The pu rpose of the c l u b is to f u rther speech ed ucatio n. Adviser: Mr. Harshman. Honorary ALPHA PSI OMEGA, the is represented on the campus for membership is determined dent directors, and stage crew E l berso n .

l a rgest nation a l dra matic fraternity, by the Theta Pi Chapter. Eligibil ity by acting abi l ity, experience as stu足 experience. Advisers: Mr. Karl, Mr.

BLUE K EY NATIO NAL HONOR FRATERN ITY i s a men's honorary for selected juniors and seniors . Membership is dependent u pon scho l a rship, character, personal ity, and l eaders hip. Adviser: Mr. Pflueger. P I KAPPA DELTA, the l a rgest national speech fraternity, is represented on the campus by the Washington Epsilon Cha pter. Membership is determi ned by fo rensic abil ity a nd partici pation in intercollegiate competition and forensic activities. Members of this organization represent the Co l lege at the national convention and com petitive to ur na ments . Adviser: Mr. Karl. SPURS is a national honorary for soph omore girls, i nstal led on the campus April, 1 950. Adviser: Mrs . Karl . TASSELS is an honorary for senior girls. Mem bers hip is based on a scho lastic average of 3 .00, character, and contributions to the soci a l a nd cultural life of the Col l ege. Ad viser: Miss Blomquist. Ath l etic T H E ATH LETIC ASSOCIATION is a member of the Evergreen Intercollegiate Conference. Major sports i nc l ude footb a l l , baseball, basketba l l , and track. Minor spo rts are ten nis and golf. LETTE RMEN'S CLUB is an organization of men who have won letters in one or more of the major sports . Adviser: Mr. Harshman . S K I CLUB is a n organization of students interested i n individ ual and com petitive skiing. Its activities include frequ ent visits to Mt. Rai nier and other ski bowls in the vicinity. Adviser: Miss Nelson. MEN'S I NTRAMURALS is a program designed to meet the needs of those students who wish to participate in sports i n a limited capacity. Activities offered a re touch footb a l l , basketba l l , free-throw contest, vol l eyb a l l , table tennis, badmi nton, track, softbal l , tennis, golf and ho rseshoes. Di recto r, Mr. Salzman. 12


DEPARTMENTAL, LlTIERARY ORGANIZATIONS

Departmental ALP HA S I GMA LAMBDA is a service a nd ach i evement g roup open to all students majoring in the social sciences. Advisers: Mr. Axfo rd, Mr. Dizmang. THE AMERICAN CHEMICAL SOCiETY, a natio n a l organ izatio n for those i nterested i n chemistry, o rgan ized a student ch apter o n the ca m pus Februa ry 13, 11952 . Student aHi liation is open t o a nyone who has completed one semester of chemis"i - ry. Advisers: Mr. Ram­ stad, Mr. Olsen. KAPPA Greek. The lectures and a ry studies.

RHO KAPPA is a n orga nization open to all students of g roup meets monthly with the pu rpose of presenti ng discussions valuable to the student prepa ring for sem i n­ Adviser: Mr. Roe.

L I N N E SOCI ETY is a club for biology students. Leraas, Mr. Ostenso n .

Advisers: Mr.

P.Le. ART LEAGUE. T h e purpose o f t h i s organization is t o g ive to the student a deeper appreci ation for the a rts th rough contacts, lectures, a rt ex h ibits, a nd projects, and to further a closer fellowship among the a rt students of the CoHege . Adviser: Mr. Kittleso n . R H O ILAM BDA C H I is t h e Il'ocal ch apter of the Future Teachers of America, an organ ization for all students in the field of educatio n . This chapter is affiliated as a junior member with t h e N ational Edu­ cation Associ ation a nd the Washington Education Associatio n . Ad­ visers: Miss Niel,sen, Miss Runbeck, Mr. Sjoding, Mr. Hagen, Mr. Pederson . DELTA IOTA CH I is a c l u b fo r all n u rsing students a nd graduate nurses in attendance at Pacific 'lutheran Col lege. Adviser: Mrs. Morken .

Literary LI TERARY BOARD. This Board is composed of student a nd faculty representatives. The problems of the SAGA and MOORING MAST come u nder its jurisdictio n . CURTA I N CALL CLUB i s a n organ ization devoted t o t h e promo­ tion of dramatic activities on the campus. Each month of the school year students from this group sponsor o ne-act plays a nd other forms of enterta i n ment, working toward fulfill ing requirements of Alpha Psi Omeg a . Adviser: Mr. Nord holm. THE DEBATE SQUADS i n dude j u n io r a nd va rsity division. They represent the school i ntercollegiate competition i n forensics which i ncl ude debate, extempore speaki ng, i mpromptu spea k i ng, a nd oratory. Credit is given toward speech m i nors a n d m a jors as a result of successfu l competition records. Coach: Mr. Karl!. 13


MUSICAL, RELIGI OUS ORGANIZATIONS

FRENCH CLUB a nd GE RMAN CLUB are orga nizations co mple­ menting the respective l a ngu age cou rses with prog rams that offer i nteresting as pects of historica l, literary, and artistic vai'ue. Adviser: Mrs. Little. V I K I NG CLUB is an organ ization promoti ng interest in the study of Sca ndinavian l a ngu ages, m usic, and cu lture . Adviser: Mr. Svare. Musical THE CHOI R OF T H E WEST, fou nded in 1 92 6 by Mr. Joseph O . Edwards, w a s one of the fi rst a cappe l l a choirs in the West. The fifty yo ung si ngers devote themse lves to an intensive study of some of the greatest sacred choral m u sic from the 1 5th a n d 1 6th centuries to the present. An extensive tou r is m ade by the choir each yea r. Director: Mr. Mal m i n . Manager: Mr. Nesv ig. THE PACI FIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE CHORUS is a si nging orga n­ ization of about eighty-five voices ded icated to the artistic perform­ a nce of the g reat choral masterpieces of oratorio, opera , cantata, and other representative works of both the past and the contem­ porary. The Chorus m akes use of Band, Orchestra, Pipe Organ, a nd other ensemble med i a for accompan iment and in addition to radio, television, and concert appeara nces makes use of the art of stagi ng a nd drama i n chora l concerts. Di rector: Mr. Fritts. THE ORCHESTRA is an organ ization open to any student having adequate knowledge of an orchestra l instru ment. Besides giving students practical experience in playing the works of wel l-known composers, the orchestra appears in concert several' times d u ri ng the schoo l year. Di rector: Mr. Gilbertso n. THE COLLEGE BAND is a n a l l-col lege organ ization which per­ forms at various fu nctions. Capable students a re given the oppor­ tun ity to appear as solo ists with the band. The Pep Band pl ays for basketba l l and footba l l games. Di rector: Mr. Gilbertso n . THE ORGAN G U I LD is a student chapter of the America n G u i l d o f Organ ists. It promotes the adva ncement o f music for the organ a nd sponsors student recita ls, field trips, a n d a nationally famous o rg a n ist in concert on ca mpus. Req u i rements for mem bersh i p i ncl ude only a si ncere i nterest in orga n music. Adviser: Mr. Newn ham. MU P H I EPSI LON is a N ational Music Sorority i n the professional field, having as its purpose the recog nition of schol arship and m u sicianship, and the promotion of friendship within its sisterhood. Advi ser: Miss Christensen. Re l i gious fHE PACIFIC LUTHERAN CO LLEGE STUDENT CONGREGATION. This congregation is u nder the leadership of the Col lege Pastor, 14


PUBLICATI ONS, COLLEGE R U LES

Robert W. Lutnes. It is not an i ncorporated and legal congregationj it is an organization desig ned to promote the C h risti a n l ife a nd to trai n the students for i nformed a nd active Ileaders h i p in the church. It a n n u a l l y e lects a Board of Deacons, a Board of Trustees, a Genera l Cou nci l a nd promotes a stewardship prog ram. Students are i nvited to affi l iate with this org a nization d uring their col lege career. This affi liation does not consist of a transfer from, nor affect in a n y way, their members h i p i n the 'home congregation. Morn i ng wors h i p is conducted each Sunday a nd the Lord's Supper i s celebrated the first Sunday evening of each month in the Col lege Chapel . The fol lowi ng rel igious organ izations are promoted and coor­ d i nated by the Student Congregation: WTH ERAN STUD ENTS ASSOC IAT I O N . This is an a l l-col lege rel igious orga nization in which the students have fu l l charge of the program with meetings being held each Sunday eveni ng . It i s a n aff i l i ate o f t h e Luthera n Student Association o f America a nd works with the Division of Col lege and University Wor k of the N ational Luthera n Cou nci l . MISSION CRUSADERS, ALL STUDENT IP R AYER SERVICE, and CAMPUS D EVOT IONS meet reg u l ar'ly throughout the year with student-p l a n ned programs. LUTH ERAN DAUGHTERS OF T H E REFORMAT ION, a n aff i l i ate of the Women's Missionary Federation of the Eva ngelical Lutheran Chu rch, meets month ly. Adviser: Miss Knudso n . P H I DELTA EPSI LON is a n organization for you n g women i nterested in f u l l-time Ch risti a n service as a vocati o n . Adviser: Miss Wickstro m .

Col lege Pu b'lications T H E MOOR�NG MAST is a weekly pa per p u b l i shed by the students. Adviser: Mr. Nesvig. T H E SAGA is the Col lege annual p u b l ished by the students. The editor-i n-ch i ef and the business manager a re elected by the Associated Students. Adviser: Mr. Nesvig .

POliCIES GOVERN ING COMMU NITY LI FE for the Col lege com m u nity o n l y such ru les h ave been adopted 8S h ave been found necessary for the promotion of the h i g h est interest of the students. The Col l ege adm i ts students with the express understanding that they w i l l cheerfu l l y comp l y with its rutes and regu l ations in every respect a nd conduct themselves a s Christia n ladies and gentlemen. The Col l ege m a i ntai ns the right to exercise su pervision over the work, conduct, and recreational activities of a l l students. 15


CHAPEL ATTEN DANCE, ROOM ASSI GNMENTS

Students are expected to employ their time to the best advan足 tage and to avoid activities w h ich might i nterfere with leg i t i m ate class work. Specifically the College disapproves and does not sanc足 tion d a nc i n g . Smoking by women is not i n harmony with the po l icies of the Co l l ege . Gambl i ng, visit i ng places of q u estionabl,e nature, and the use of intoxicati ng liquors a re strictly forbidden. Al l a utomobiles used by students m u st be reg istered at the Coillege. The Adm i n istration does not encou rage students to keep an a utomobile w h i l e attend i ng College.

Chapel Chapel exercises are held Monday th rough Friday and attend足 ance is required except on student body day. Excuses for absences must be fi led with the Dea n of Men or the Dea n of Women within o n e week after the absence has occurred. Unexcused absences (cuts) a re not permitted. More than fo u r u nexcused absences du r i ng a ny one semester m a y result i n suspension of the student from a l l classes.

Scheduling A l l soci a l a n d col lege activities arranged by departments, c a m足 pus c l u bs, or groups of students m u st be sched uled through the office of the Dean of Women. Approved chaperones are required for all sched u led activities held on and off campus. The sched u l i n g of activities b y students i s the ioi nt responsibi l ity o f the I nter-Cl u b Cou ncil a n d the office of the Dea n of Women.

Room Assig nments A l l students, except those l iving w ith pa rents, a re req u i red to l i ve in college dorm itories to the extent that rooms are available, u n l ess perm issio n to l ive off-campus is granted by the respective Dea ns. Such perm i ssion m usi' be g i ven on or before reg istration day a nd before other arrangements a re completed. When students can not be accommodated in the dormitories, the Col lege w i l l find su itable l ivi ng q uarters off the campus. Housing facilities off the campus a re a rra nged for by the Dean of Women a nd the Dean of Men, and such housing should be obtai ned th rough them. Appl ication for housi ng either on or off campus shou ld be made as early as possible. No stu d ent, except those l i ving at home o r with relatives, may complete regi stration who has not previously made appl'ication for housi ng th rough the Dean of Men's o r the Dean of Women's Office. A d eposit of $ 1 0 shou ld accompany every app l ication for a room reservatio n . If the reservation is canceled before August 1 0, the d eposit is refunded, but no refund is made after t h at date. Appl ications for housi ng a re fi led in the o rder of 16


RESIDENCE HALLS

the date of appl icatio n . No room reservation w i ll be held beyond the officia l date of reg istration u n less the Dean of Men or De an of Women is notified on or before that date. Priority :Iisti ngs of old housi ng appl ications a re not ca rried over from semester to semester. New applications for desi red housing m u st be made at a designated time for each semester. A l l students must have i n their possession a n identification and housing assignment card to present to the busi ness office during reg istration, showi ng that their housi ng has been com p leted and approved by the Dea n of Men and Dea n of Wome n . This identifica足 tion card a l so serves as a temporary meal ticket during the fi rst two weeks of school . A l l those assig ned rooms i n private homes w i l l have their $ 1 0 deposit refu nded after registration un'less students desi re to keep their application i n force for the current year. I n such case the $10 is left o n deposit and the Dea n of Men or Women is notified . The College dorm itories will not be open for occupa ncy during the recess periods a n nou nced i n the catalog or i n adva nce of the open i ng date except by adva nce arra ngements and payment of a speci a l fee. The Col lege reserves the right to use the dormitory rooms during' the vacation periods for conventions or s i m i l a r sched足 uled meetings if it is necessary. The dormitories open on Sunday afternoon, September 1 5, 1 957. The closing date is J u ne 4, 1 95 8 a t 6:00 P . M. Housing assig nments do not autom atica lly co nti nue from year to year. The Col lege reserves the right to ch an ge student's location when it is necessary. A $25 deposit must accompany a rese rvati on for fam i l y apartments. I n April, the time to be a n nou nced, students in reside nce who plan to re-e nroll for the fa l l te rm may m a ke their room reservation accompanied by a $10 deposit. After that date reservations w i l l be received a n d assig ned on the same basis as new students. Rooms are assigned in the order of receipt of room appl ications. Men and women l iving off the campus may not room at the same house. Residence H a l l s The College mainta ins seven residence h a l l s for students. The Dean of Women, Dea n of Me n, Housemothers, or Resident Heads have general supervision of residence h a lls. All students registering for rooms i n any of the Col lege residence h a l ls a re req u i red to conti nue res id ence in that hal l for the year (two semesters). Release from a year's reservation and accom panying renta l ch arge can be obtai ned only with the approva l of the Dea n of Men or Dea n of 17


H EALTH SERVI CES

Women, a nd by having another student (new or off-campus) take over the room reservation at the time of withdraw a l or the cha nge of residence. North Hall, South Hall, and West Hall rooms a re provided with draperies and bed spreads; residents of other dorm itories furnish thei r own. All dormitory rooms are provided with single bed's, chests of drawers, study desks and cha irs. Students furnish perso n a l items w h ich i nclude sheets, pillow cases, pi l l ows, b l a nkets, mattress pads, towels, a nd other furnishi ngs accordi ng to their own taste. The use of electrical appli'a nces except radios, clocks, a nd reading l a mps m u st h ave the approval of the respective Deans. Occupa nts a re held respo nsible for breakage or dam age to the room or its furnishings. The rooms a re subject to inspection by either the Dean of Women or of the Dean of Men . A f i n a l inspection of each room mllst be made before a student may Ileave at the end of t�e spring semester o r at any time that he w ithdraws from the College. If the room has been approved by the Dea n of Men or the Dea n of Women, the $ 1 0 room deposit is retu rned at the e nd of the school year to students who rema i n in residence duri ng both semesters.

SERVICES Health and Medical Services The Student Health Service, staffed by an adm i n i strative head, a resident physici a n , one fu ll-time n u rse and assistants, supervises a l l perso n a l a nd comm u n ity hea lth problems on the campus. At the beg i n n i n g of the school year, a l l new students are req u i red to take a physical exa m i nation g iven at the Co'llege. Regis­ tration requirements a re not fulfi lled u ntil the completion of th is free exa m i natio n . I n addition, a l l students a re required a n n u ally to take a free chest X-ray. Consultation service a nd fu rther exa m i n ation may be made avai l able if the need is i ndicated by the physical exa m i n ation. The College does not provide for extended medica l care by the College doctors, exa m i n ation or treatment by speci a l ists, or any X-ray service in addition to the f ree chest X-ray. Every assistance will be g iven, however, in m a k i ng a rrangements for special medica l or surgica l care. Whenever practica l , the student is u rged to avai l h imself o f the services o f h i s fam i l y doctor. I nfirmary care is avail able at the rate of $ 1 .50 a day. Students who a re not registered w ith the College Boardi ng Club m u st pay an addition a l $ 1 .80 a day for board. All students a re req uired to pay $8 .00 a semester for a health fee, wh ich i ncludes i n j ury a nd medica l coverage to $500 .00 as medica l a n d $50.00 as denta l on a n y one in j u ry. 18


BOA R D I N G CLUB

BOOK STORE, COFFEE SHOP, PLACEMENT SERV I C E

All students who have been absent due to i l l ness must report to the Health Center before return ing to cl asses. Medica l excuses for classes mi ssed are issued only to students who have notified the Center at the time of their i l l ness. Complete information covering hea lth service is to be fou nd i n the Stu dent Hea lth Service b u l letin.

Boarding Club Residents of the dormitories are requ i red to take their meals at the board i ng club located i n the new Col l ege U n ion Building . No ded uctions are made for stu dents who eat fewer than three meals per day at the Col lege or who are absent weekends. A charge is made for students enterta i n ing gu ests. Students rooming off the ca mpus may board at the boardi n g club if they wish .

Book Store The Col l ege maintains a book store in the new Col lege Un ion Building for the convenience of the students, where books, station足 ery, and school supplies may be obtained. The book store i s operated o n a strictl y cash basis.

Coffee Shop The Col lege Coffee Shop is located in the new Col l ege Union B u i l d i ng a n d is open d a i ly.

Pl acement Service A fee of $5 is charged to cover the cost of records a nd corre足 spondence necessary for pl acement of gradu ates receiving the degree of Bach elor of Arts in Education or Bachelor of Education. An effort is made to pl ace all gradu ates, but positions a re not guara nteed. After the fi rst position has been secured a charg e of one dol lar wil l be ma de for each additional issue of credentials. Gradu ates receiving the degree of Bach elor of Arts are assisted by their respective ma j or professors in obta i ning desira ble positions.

19


ACADEMIC ADMINISTRATION

ADMISSIONS In accordance with its general purpose, Pacific Lutheran Co l lege w i l l admit as students men and wome n of good mora l character and health who are qua lified by previous tra i n i ng and s how p romise of bei ng a ble to benefit from the cou rses they i ntend to p u rsue. The a pprov al of an application is based u pon a thorough study of the various factors sig nificant as criteria for success in college. No ar bitrary entra nce requ i rements a re set up, but experience s hows th at in order to do satisfactory co l lege work, a student s ho u l d have at least a C average in high school and rank in the u pper seventy­ five percent of his grad u ating class. Applicants will be notified of acceptance or rejection. Ad mission Proced ures Anyone seeking adm ission to Pacific Lutheran Cotlege sho u l d address a letter o f inqu iry to t h e Di rector of P u b l i c Relations. I n order to be co nsidered for admission, prospective students must submit the fol l owing credenti a ls: 1 . A formal appl ication for admission, made on the uniform application blank used by the i nstitutio ns of higher learn­ ing in the State of Was h i ngton. These forms may be pro­ cured from high schoo l pri ncipals or u pon request from the Di rector of P u b l i c Relations . App lications for admission should be made as soon as possible after gradu ation i n order to a l low time for the Col lege to determine whether the stu­ dent q u a l ifies. A student may su bmit an application after the completion of seven semesters of high school work. In such cases the Co l lege w i l l supply the high school principal with a form on which he w i l l certify graduation a nd comp letion of the cou rses listed on the ori g i n a l appl ication. An appl icant tra nsferring from another i n stitution of col leg­ iate rank must have that i nstitution forward an offici a l trans­ scri pt, incl uding a statement of honorable d ismissal . 20


ADMISS ION PROCEDURES

2 . Recommendations from two people persona l l y acq u a i nted with the appl ica nt, preferably a pastor, teacher or em­ p 'l oyer. Recommendation forms may be obtai ned from the Col lege. Such recommendations s ho u l d be m a i led directly to the Commi ttee on Admissions. If poss i b le, a perso n a l interview with representatives o f t h e Col lege s h o u l d be arra nged . Ad mis sion to Fres h m a n Stand i n g Admission to Fres hman sta n d i n g m a y be granted in one of the fo l lowing ways: (1 ) si xteen un its earned i n an accredited four-year high school or equivalent; (2) twelve u n its earned in a n accredited senior high school (plus reg u l ar n i nth grade u nits); (3) entrance exam­ ination administered by Col lege officials. It i s recom mended but not req u ired that the high school course of the appl icant inc l ude: English, 3 un its; el ementary algebra, 1 un it; p l a ne geometry, 1 u n it; history a n d civics, 2 u nits; one foreign langu age, 2 u n its; one l a boratory science, 1 u n it; electives, 6 u n its . Ad mission to Adva nced Sta n d i n g Students who transfer from accred ited institutions o f collegi ate ran k may be admitted to adva nced standing by subm itting com­ plete offici a l tra nscripts of high schoo l and co l lege record s, i nclud i ng statements of honorable d i smissa l . a . Credit wi l l be gra nted for subjects which meet the req uire­ ments of the cou rse chosen by the student a nd for wh ich the student has made grades of not less than C. b . Credit for su bjects i n wh ich the student has a grade of D w i l l be with held u nt i l the student has successfu l l y com­ p leted one semester's work. c.

I n order to be a candidate for a degree, the l ast fu l l year of work must be ta ken in residence. A m i n i m u m of 30 semes­ ter credits must be earned durin g the senior year. Ad mission As Special Student

The following persons, u pon securing the consent of the Dean , may be admitted a s special students: 1.

Mature i ndividuals who are not el igible for ad mission as regu l ar students but who have suppleme nted their incom­ plete preparation by practical tra i n i n g a n d experience a nd who are j udged com petent to benefit from the courses they desi re to take. 21


AUOiITORS,

REGISTRAT I O N

2 . Teachers who wish to take fou n dation courses as backgro u nd for sub jects they teach or who wish to meet requirements for profession a l certification .

3 . Graduates of accredited high schools who desire to register for a limited n u m ber of cou rses.

4. Applicants who are g radu ates of u naccredited hig h schools. Special students are not admitted as candidates for degrees. However, if their schol astic record revea ls evidence of abil ity, they may become reg ular students by f u l filling the adm ission require足 ments of the College.

AUDITORS A reg u l a r or special student m a y a udit a course provided he secures the ap proval of the dea n a n d the instructor of the course. An auditor attends classes but may not participate or receive credit. No person m a y audit a course without being properly registered. This involves the payment of a specia l fee.

REGISTRATION The registration of students is conducted on the days scheduled in the school c a lendar. A l l freshmen m u st be present at the Col lege by 8:00 a . m . Monday, September 1 0, to ta ke part i n the orienta足 tion, testing and registration p rogram w h ich wil l be conducted Mon足 day through Saturday. Uppercl assmen will com p l ete their registration on Tu esday and Wednesday, September 1 7 and l 8 . Thursday, September 1 9, w i l l be sophomore registration . Registration prior to these dates may be completed by special appointment. Students who do not register on the days desig nated w i l l be c h a rged a l ate registratio n fee. Students transferri ng from a nother col lege may not com p l ete registration u nt i l officia l transcripts a nd statements of honorable dismissa'i h ave been received. Registration is not com p l,eted u nti l the fol lowing steps have been taken:

1 . Physic a l examination has been completed a n d evidence of same presented by the student to the student's adviser or Registrar. 2. Schedu l e of cl asses has been made in consultation with the student's adviser. 3 . Program of studies has been a pproved by the Dean . 22


STUDENT PERSON NEL SERVICES

4. Class sections have been checked . 5 . Class cards have been sig ned by the student. 6. Satisfactory financi a l arra ngements have been made with the B us i ness Office. The nor m a l prog ram for a f u l l-time student is 1 6 hours, in­ cluding Physical Ed ucation activity. A credit hour represents one full period of prepared cl ass work a wee k, or, if a la boratory sub­ ject, at least two periods per week, for not less than seventeen weeks. Only students with a B average or better may register for more th a n 1 7 hours without the speci a l consent of the Dea n . A student engaged i n m uch outside work for self-s u pport may be restricted to a red uced prog ram. A f u l l-time student who passes i n less than eight hours i n any semester s h a l l not be permitted to re-regi ster. Students d ropped for low scholarship a re el igi ble for re-adm is sion after exp iration of one semester un less otherwise i ndicated . A l l changes ,in reg istration m u st h ave the special approv a l of the Dea n . STU DENT PERSO N N EL SERVICES The p urposes of student perso nnel services a re to aid the individ u a l student i n m a k i n g the best poss ible a d j ustment to co l lege l i fe. Knowi ng that students have a constant need for assistance with person a l p roblems, academic adjustments, a nd vocational p l a nn i ng, together with problems of attendance, health, emp'loyment, recrea­ tion, and so forth, a rrangements have been made to ma ke ava i l a ble special services a nd offices to s u pply the needs of students, what­ ever those needs may be . The student is encou raged to m a ke use of the facil ities freely ava i l able to h i m as outl ined below. THE COLLEGE TEST ING AND COUNSELI NG S'ERV ICE i s u nder the d i rection of Mr. l. O. E k l u n d . This service is res ponsible for a d m i nistration a n d i nterpretation of the guidance exa minations given to a l l fresh men d u ri ng orientation week as wel l as other depart­ mental testing programs. However, its major emphasis is giving service to col lege men and wome n at a ny time for personal, voca­ tio n a l , and educational cou nse l i ng. I ndividual testing is the basis of the services rendered . Batteries of tests a re avai l a b le for the various p rofessions for those students concerned about their aptitudes a nd interests as well as genera l fitness for col lege tra i n i ng . Counse l i ng is based on test 23


G U I DANCE PERSONNEL

resu lts a n d other personal data assembled to solve individual prob­ lems such as nature of a b i l ity, identification of aptitudes, identifica­ tion of vocational interests, i nventory of personality traits, choice of vocation, rea d i n g habits and the identification of rel igious a n d other personal problems. Students with u n resolved problems and difficulties of long d u ration, the seve rity of wh ich is creating a h aza rd to their success in col lege, a re i nvited to visit the Testi ng and Co u nsel i ng Service. The res u lts of this service a re confidenti a l and w i l l not be given to anyo ne without the pe rmission of the student. Gu ida nce Personnel T H E DEAN OF THE CO LLEGE welcomes students for co unsel relative to course p l a n n i ng and other m atte rs as the student may desi re. T H E DEAN OF MEN AND THE D EAN OF WOMEN a re avail­ ab,le as general cou nselors to whom students may ta ke their prob­ lems. Students may be further d i rected to other members of the co unse l i ng service who can best help them with their problems. The Dea n of Men and Dea n of Women are the d i rectors of their respective dorm itories and off-ca mpus hous i n g . They a lso ap prove general li ving cond itions with i n the housing u nits of a l l students l iv i n g away from home. T H E DEAN OF MEN counsels the men relative to various prob­ lems, i ncluding ed ucational and vocational p l a n n i ng, soci a'i adjust­ ment, dormitory l ife, employment and f i n a ncial needs, attendance and other matters. THE DEAN OF WOMEN cou nsels women students concerning vocation a l and educational planni n g, soci al activities, employment needs, dorm itory l i fe, attenda nce, and other personal and educa­ tion a l needs wh ich a rise in col lege l ife. This office a l so coordinates a n d sched u les a l l campus activities. FRESHMAN ADVISERS cou nsel students in lower division aca­ demic p l a n n i n g a nd general col lege orientatio n. Fresh m a n advisers are assigned to students as they a re accepted by the Col lege. This student-adviser re lationship is mai nta i ned throughout the fresh m a n and sophomore yea rs s o that the student m a y have a faculty member fo l l ow his plans and course in deta i l . At the close of the sophomore year the student is req u i red to choose a major and have it accepted by the department concerned and the Dea n of the Col lege. O n acceptance of the student in a major department the student i s assi gned an adviser i n t h a t department. I n some insta nces students may be assigned m a jor adv isers at the end of their fresh m a n year if they have determi ned thei r field of major i nterest. 24


ATTENDANCE, GRAD I N G

MAJ OR ADVIS ERS a re assig ned to coun sel students i n upper d ivision academic pla nning. A student, for example, majoring i n chemistry w i l l have a ma jor adviser who i s a member of the depa rt­ ment of chemistry . VETERAN'S ADVISER. Vetera ns u nder Public Law 550 may make appl ication for training at their nea rest Vete rans Ad m i n istration Office or to I... o . Eklund, Dea n of Men, who i s the veteran's adviser. If at all possible, veterans shou l d not wait u nti ,1 they come to college to m a ke th i s appl ication . All problems, related papers, and documents sho uld be cleared through his office to obta i n the best poss i b le service. To make origina� appl ication at the college, veterans should come prepa red with documentary proof of m i l itary service or bring a certificate obtai ned previously from the Veterans Ad ministration. Married veterans m ust submit leg a l proof of ma rriage a nd fur nish county or state-authorized birth certificates of chi ldre n . Del ay i n furnishing evidence of status means del a y i n receiving subsistence. Req uests for fu rther i nformation should be d i rected to the Dea n of Men . ATIEN DANCE Reg u l a r class attenda nce is required. Excuses for a bsences must be approved by the Dea n of Men or Dea n of Women concerned and fi led with the i nstructor with i n one week after the absence has occurred . An excu sed absence gives the student permission to ma ke up the work m issed . U nexcused a bsences (cuts) are not permitted . Unexcused ab­ sences eq ual to the nu mber of credits given in the course may result in the suspension of the student from the class. Before and after vacations unexcused absences cou nt dou ble. GRADI N G AND SCH OLARSH I P GRAD ES. The grad i ng system is as fol lows : A, superior; B , good; C , average; D, low; E, fa i l u re; K , conditioned; I , incom pl ete; W, with drawa l by pe rmission; P, passed. K GRADE. A K grade may be removed by examination or special assignment. A grade of K may not 'be raised above a D. If the condition is not removed with i n the first six weeks of the fol lowing semester of residence, it will be converted to a grade of E. I GRADE. An incomplete may be given to a student doing passing work i n the course, but who, because of factors beyond his control, has been u nable to take a f i n a l exa m i nation or comp lete 25


GRAD I N G AND SCHOLARS H I P

a major assignment. The i nstructor giVing a n i ncomp l ete (I) m ust f i l e with the Dean of the Co l lege the reason for the i ncomp l ete a n d a statement of the work that the student m ust finish i n order to remove the i ncom p l ete. An I grade m ust be removed with i n the fi rst six weeks of the fol lowing semester of residence or previous to that date m ust receive an offic i a l extension of time from the Dean of the COl l ege. P GRADE. A P grade is recorded when credit has been a l lowed without d efi n i n g the grade. WITHDRAWALS. A student wishing to withdraw from the Col lege or from a specific cou rse m ust secure the a p p rova l' of the Dean of the Co l lege. The student is entitled to honorab l e d is missal if his record of con d uct i s satisfactory a nd he has satisfied a U f i n a nci a l obl igations. Offici a l withdrawal's from cou rses d u ring the semester w i l l be i n d icated on the student's record as fo l lows: W, withdrawal d u ri ng the fi rst fou r weeks; W, withd rawa l after the first fou r weeks if the student's work i n the course is satisfactory a n d if recommended by the i n structor; E, with d rawa l after the fi rst four weeks if the student's work is u nsatisfactory. U noffic i a l withdrawa l s s h a l l be i n d icated on the student's record as fo l lows: UW, u noffici a l withdrawa l , if the student's work is satisfactory; E, if the student's work is u nsatisfactory. Withdrawal d u ri n g the fin a l six weeks w i l l be approved o n l y u pon consideration o f factors beyond t h e control of t h e student. Grade points a re gra nted as fo 'll o ws: A, fou r grade points for each credi t hour; B, three grade points for each credi t hou r; C, two grade points for each credit hour; D, one grade poi nt for each cred i t hou r; E, no grade point. Freshmen or Sophomores recei ving a D or E i n any cou rse may repeat the cou rse and i n such case the second grade w i l l be cou nted in computi n g the Grade Point Average, p rovided the repetition is done with i n the second suc足 ceedi n g semester. When j u n iors a n d seniors receive a "D" or a n "En i n a ny course and repeat it, they wi l l receive t h e average of the two grades for the c u m ul'ative grade point average. ACADEMIC PROBATIO N . Students a re p l a ced on probation if they f a i l to m a i nta i n the m i n i m u m grade point average accordi n g to t h e fol lowi n g sca le: Freshmen, 1 .75; Sophomores, 1 .90; Upper足 c l assmen, 2 .00. P robation i n the academic sense, as here used, is not a d isci p l i n a ry measure, but i n stead is a n attempt to encourage the student in the d i rection of his highest efficiency. A student who has been p l aced on probation beca use of low scholarship w i l l be requi red to reduce either his academic or extra-cu rric u l a r activities, 26


CLASS I FI CATION, HONORS, ELIGI B I LITY

or both, u nti .1 his schol arsh i p average sha l l warrant his removal from probation. A student o n probation who f a i ls to show adequ ate improve­ ment d u ri ng t he fo l lowi ng semester wi l l not be a l lowed to re­ register u n l ess, because of exten u ating ci rcu msta nces, he is rein­ stated by the Scholars h i p Committee. Students d ropped for low schol a rs h i p a re e l i gi b l e for re-admission after the expi ration of one semester u n 'less otherwise i n d icated . The student and h is parents are notified offici a l l y when he is p laced on probation . H e rem a i ns o n probation u n ti l h i s grade point average eq uals the mini m u m grade point average l isted a bove. A senior on p robation wil l not be i n c l u ded o n the l ist of ca ndid ates for gra d u ation.

CLASSI FICATION OF STUDENTS Students are classified as fol lows: Freshmen: Students who have met the entra nce req u i rements. Sophomores: Students who h ave com pleted 24 semester credit hou rs a nd have earned 48 grade points . J u n iors: Regu l a r students w h o have fulfi l l ed lower d ivision req u i rements a nd h ave completed 56 semester cred it hours a n d' h ave earned 1 1 2 g r a d e points. Seniors: Reg u l a r students who have com pleted 88 semester cred it hou rs and h ave ea rned 1 76 grade poi nts.

GRADUATION HONORS Degrees with honors of Cum La ude, Magna Cum Laude a n d Summa Cum L a u d e a re granted to students receivi ng t h e req u i red grade poi nt average. To be e l igi b l e for these honors a student must h ave earned an average of 3 .30 for Cum Laude, 3 .60 for Magna Cum Laude and 3 .90 for Summa Cum Laude.

ELIGI BILITY I n o rder to be eligible to hold office i n student organ izations, to represent the Col l ege in i nterco l l egiate contests of any char­ acter, to p a rticipate i n d ra matic or musical performances, to be on the staff of either the SAGA or the MOO R I NG MAST, a student m ust be registered for at I'east twelve hours and m a i ntain a grade point average of 2.00. Any student on probation w i l l not be per­ mitted to pa rticipate. Participation in interco l l egiate ath·l etics, however, is governed by the code of the Evergreen I ntercol legi ate Conference. 27


SUMM ER, SPECIAL, 'EVEN I N G CLASSES

SUMMER SESSION The Su mmer Session i s a n i nteg ra l part of the program of Pacific Luthera n Col lege. I t is divided i nto two terms of five weeks each. The i nstructio nal staff i nc ludes members of the reg u l a r faculty of Pacific Lutheran Co l lege. Visiti ng teachers supp 'lement the regu l a r staff. A l l laboratory, l ibra ry, and reg u l a r facil ities are ava i l a ble. The sta ndards preva i l ing d uri ng the s um mer session are the same as those maintai ned d u ring the regular school year. The courses for the summer session a re p l a n ned to meet the needs of students who are enrol l i ng in col lege for the f irst ti me, those who are attending the summer session in order to accelerate their co l lege program, and teachers who a re working for one of the degrees offered by the col lege or for ce rtification requirements. The courses are a rra nged so that students may ta ke classes w h ich meet for the fi rst five-week term, the seco nd five-week term, or cl asses wh ich meet for the full' ten-week summer sess ion. Ten semester hours i s considered a normal load for the ten-week s u m mer session. SPECIAL AND EVEN I NG CLASSES Speci a l a n d evening cla sses a re offered d u r i ng the regu l a r school year to t h e reg u l a r students a n d the publ ic. These courses are given on the campus in the l ate afternoon a nd early evening. Upon demand, however, certain courses may be given i n other cities. These courses are primaril'y given for students working for a deg ree or for those i nterested in a particu lar field. If there i s a sufficient demand for a ny courses not l i sted i n the curricu l u m , the new courses w i l l be added to the prog ra m . A l l requests for addi足 tional courses shoul d be d i rected to the Registrar's office. MUSIC PREPARATORY DEPARTMENT As a service to the Parkland a rea, the Col lege offers instruc足 tion i n piano for young beg i n ners up to col lege age.

28


REQU I REMENTS FOR D EGREES

The Col lege desi res to provide for each student the educa足 tion a l experiences which wi l l be of most value to h i m . For this reason, at Pacific luthera n Col lege the often-sepa rated a i ms of " I i bera l " and of "professiona l " or "vocationa l " education a re brought into m utuaBy helpf u l rel ation to each other. Pacific luthera n Coillege, a l i bera l a rts col l ege, gra nti ng degrees in l i beral a rts, education, medical tech nology and nu rsi ng education, a lso offers prepa ratory cou rses for students of engi neering, dentistry, l aw, medicine, parish work, social work, and theology. Pacific lutheran Co l l ege offers cou rses lead ing to the degrees of Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Arts in Education, Bachelor of Science in Med ica l Technology, Bachel'or of Science in Nursing, Bachelor of Education and Master of Arts (in Education). A candidate for a bachelor's degree must present academic cred it i n approved cou rses amou nti ng to 1 28 semester hou rs, except in Nursing Education where it is 1 48, and a minimum g rade point average of 2 .00 except i n Education where it is 2 .25. T h e candidate m u s t meet t h e genera l req ui rement o f o ne year in residence and must have earned a m i n imum of t h i rty semester hours at Pacific luthera n Col l ege du ring his senior year. A m i nimum of forty semester hours of u pper d ivision courses earned in the j u nior and senior years is required . The requi rements for the bachelor's degrees offered by the Col l ege a re described l ater i n this section. The student must accept fu l l responsi bi l ity for meeti ng a l l graduation requi rements. 29


BACHEtoR OF ARTS DEGREE

BACHELOR OF ARTS DEGREE A. Freshma n-Sophomore Req ui rements: 64 semester hours cred it at the end of the sophomore year. 1.

Eng l ish Composition and literature. Req uirement: 9 hours. Composition 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 (6 semester hours) is requ i red of a l l fresh足 men. A th ree-semester-hour course in literature is to be com p 'l eted by the end of the sophomore yea r .

2.

Fine Arts.

Req u i rement: 3 hours.

This req u i rement may be met by a course in Art o r Music. Appl ied music cou rses w i l li' not meet this requirement. 3.

C l assical o r Modern Languages. Requi rement: 14 hours. All students must have a m i n i m u m of fourteen semester hours of classical o r modern I'anguage i n high school and co l l eg e combined. Students who present two u n its i n one classical o r modern langu足 age at entrance a re requi red to earn s i x additional credit hours in the same language. Students presenting fou r u n its in one l a n g uage at entrance a re not req u i red to take a foreign l a ngu age i n col lege.

4.

Physica l Education. Req u i rement: 4 hours. Physica l Education activities must be taken during the freshman and sophomore years.

5.

Rel i g io n . Req u i rement: 8 hours. U nderclassmen must co mplete eight semester hours in 1 0 1 , 1 1 2, 20 1 , 202.

6.

Science.

Re l igion

Req u i rement: 8 hours.

Before the end of the sophomore year, eight hours i n one science is to be co m p l eted . This req u i rement may be satisfied by any one of the fol low i n g year courses: Bio l' ogy 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 or 1 3 1 , 1 32 or 1 4 1 , 1 4 2; Chem istry 1 0 5, 1 0 6 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8; Geology 1 0 1 , 1 0 2; Physics 26 1 , 1 62. 7.

Soci a l Studies. Req u i rement: 1 5 hou rs. The fifteen hours required in Social Studies must be taken i n the departments of Economics and Busines s Adm i n istration, Geog raphy, H istory, Po l itical Science, Psychology a n d / o r Sociology. A year course (six hou rs) i n h istory is req u i red. The rem a i n i n g n i n e hours must i nclude work i n at least two departments other than h istory. O n l y courses in economic theory in the department of Econom ics a nd Busi ness Adm i n istration w i l l be accepted.

B. Junior-Senior Requ irements: 64 semester hours credit to bri ng the total for the degree to a m i n i m u m of 1 28 credit hours. 1.

Phi losophy. Req u i rement: 3 hours. This req u i rement may be met by Phi losophy 20 1 o r 3 1 2 .

2.

Major Requirements. The selection of the field of concentration must be made by the end of the sophomore year. The choice must be approved by the department concerned and the Dean of the Col lege. The approva'l form may be obtained at the Registrar's Office. It is recommended that students desiring advice about the selection of a major see the Dean of the Co l lege. The general m i n i m u m req u i rements, as we l l as the specific n u m be r of hours, for a major a re determined 30


BACHELOR OF ARTS IN EDUCATION by the department concerned. within one department.

A major ,is

II

sequence of courses

a.

At least twelve h o u rs of the work for II major must be taken d u r i n g the j u n i o r and sen ior years. Six hours of the m a j'or must be taken i n the senior year. b . The q u a l ity of wo rk m u st be C or better. Any student receiv­ ing a grade of D may count the credit toward graduation but not toward the m a j or. 3.

M i nor Requirement. A m i n o r field of concentration is a l so req u i red . The m i nor consists of fifteen hours or more of work taken in a single field of study outside the major department, the program to be a p proved by the major adviser i n accordance with the reg u l ations of the m inor department. It is recommended that the m i nor be chosen outside a student's m a j or field of concentration i n order to provide a broader and more thorou gh educati o n a l backgrou nd. The sch olar­ s h i p req u i rements for majors are also a p p l i ca ble to m i nors.

I n order to f u lfiU these req u i rements, it is s u ggested that norm a l l y a fres h m a n w i l l ta ke a prog ram of courses comparable to this: Re l igion 1 0 1 , 1 1 2; Composition 1 0 1 , 1 02; Soci a l Stu d ies or Mathematics (6 or 1 0 hours); Science (8 or 1 0 hou rs); Langu age (6 or 8 hours); P . E. (2 hoursJ. BACH ELOR O F ARTS IN EDUCATION The Bachelor of Arts i n Ed ucation cu rricu l u m requirements as listed below meet the certificatio n pattern i n the state of Washi ng,ton for the Provis ional Generall Certificate. This certifi cate m ust be converted to the Sta ndard General Certificate upon the co mpletion of at least one yea r of teaching (1 80 days) p l u s an add itio n a l year of col l ege tra i n i ng . The additiona l year of col lege work m ust be completed before the sixth year of teaching. Experienced teachers working toward the princi pa l's credential a nd those wishing to con­ vert or renew certifi cates w i l l find opportunities to fu lfi l l their requ i rements here. The department w i l l assist, in every poss ible way, those stu­ dents or experienced teachers wishing to fol low the certification pattern in other states. Freshmen a n d sophomores p l a n n i ng to enter the ed ucation field should co u nsel with the members of the department concern­ i ng their p l a ns a nd ,programs. C u rricu l u m Req u ireme nts GENERAL EDUCATION 'k ART I n troduction to Fine Arts 10 1 o r Fund amenta ls of Art I I I 3 hours *-Students p l a n n i n g to be e l ementary teachers should elect Art I l l . ____________ . _ ___________

31

_ ____________________ ________


BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION ENGLISH Composition 1 0 1 , 1 02 Li teratu re el ective

___________________ ______________________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________________________________________________

MUSIC Fundamenta Is of Music 1 0 1 or Music Su rvey 1 2 0

______ ___ _ _ _ _ __ __ _____ ______ __ __ ___ ___ ___ __ __ _ _ ___ __ _

P H I LOSOPHY I n troduction to Phi losophy 201 or Ethics 3 1 2

_____ _ _ _ ____ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ ____ _

3 hours

3 hours

_ _ __ ______ _ __ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ __ __ , ______ _ __ _ _ _

PHYSICAL EDUCAT I O N AND HEALTH Physica l Education Acti vity Me n : ] 0 7, 1 0 8, 1 09, 1 1 0 Wo men : l O t , 1 02, 1 0 3, 1 04 or Men and Wome n : 20 1 , 202, 203_ Prerequisites: 2 hours from the courses l isted above. Hea I th Essenti a I s 2 1 0

6 hours 3 hou rs

4 hours

_ _ __ ___ ___ _ __ __ __ ____ __ ___ ____ ___ __ _ _ _ _ ,_______ , ____

_________________________________________,________________

PSYCHOLOGY Ge neral Psychology 1 0 1

3 hou rs

_ _ _____________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

3 hours

____________________________________________________________

2 hours

__ __ _ _ .

RELIGION Life of Christ 1 0 1

Hi story of the Christian Church 1 1 2 The Bib le-Old Testament 20 1

____________________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _________ ___________________________

The Bible-New Testa ment 202

_______________________ _____________________

2 ho urs 2 hours 2 hours

路 SC I ENCE I ntroduction to Bio log ical Science 1 2 1

______________________________________

I ntroduction to Physical Sciences 1 2 2

_________ ___________________________

4 hou rs

.4 hours

SOCIAL STUDIES World Geography 1 0 1

_____________ _ _ _ _ ______________________________ ___________

History of Western Eu rope 1 0 3, 1 04 or American History 203, 204

_____________________ , ___ __ ________ __ _ ___________

The Pacific Northwest 2 1 0

3 hours

6 hours

_ _ ________ ______,______________________ ________________

2 hours

_____________ _____

3 hours

________________________________________________

3 hours

Elective: Economics, Po l itical Science, o r SOciology SPEECH Fundamenta 'I's of Speech 1 0 1

PROFESS IONAL COURSES EDUCATION Introduction to Education 202 Human Development 30 1

__________________________________

4 hours

________________ _______________________________________

3 hours

Methods and Observation

_________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

31 L

_ _ _ _ _ __________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________ _____

Te8ch ing of Readi ng 3 1 2 Mathematics i n E l ementary School 3 1 9

.4 hou rs

_______________________ _____________________________________

Principles of Guidance 370

_____ ___ ____ ____

_ _ ____ _ ____ _, ,_____ _ ____

_____________________ _____________________________ _____

Curricu l u m , Met hods, Mate r i a l s and Student Teaching 46 1 a b or cd Student Teaching 463 a, b, c o r d

_______________________________________________

_ __ _ _ ____ ____ ____ _ _ _ _ _ , ____ ____ ___________ _

2 hours

2 hours 2 hours 5 hours

9 hours

路-Students planning to concentrate in science should not enro l l for these courses without the consent of the department concerned.

32


OUTS I D E

THE

COLLEGE

UNION


ACADEMIC

PROC ESS I O N


MAY

QUEEN

AND

HER

COU RT


N EW

WEST

HALL


BACHELOR OF ARTS I N EDUCATION

B ROAD AREA OF CONCENTRATION (40 sem. hr. m i n i m u m) Areas of Concentration a re to be orga n i zed around the fol lowi ng centers: 1.

Fine and AppUed A rts-i ncl uding a rt, m usic, and commerci a l .

2.

Health-including physica 'l education a n d hea lth.

3.

Language Arts-includ ing composition, a l ism, l iterature, and speech .

4.

Science and Mathematics-including biological and physica'i sciences and mathematics.

5.

Socia l Studies-i ncluding h i story, sociology, pol itica l science, eco足 nom ics, and geography.

foreign

language,

jou rn足

Areas of Concentration may be p l a n ned in any one of the fol lowi ng options: Option 1 . One b road a rea: Not more than 2 4 semester ho u rs i n one field to b e su pported by the work i n the "broad a rea." Option 2. Two b road a reas of 24 to 2 8 hours a nd 1 2 to 1 5 hours respective,ly. Option 3. Th ree b road a reas of approximately 1 2 hours each . Should not i nclude more than two fields in each a rea of study. Professional ized subject matter (see page 42) may be considered as one a rea u n der this optio n . I f this a rea is chosen Art 3 2 5 and 425 and Music 340 a re req u i red .

COURSE PLANNING Fresh man Engl ish 1 0 1 , 1 02-Composition History 1 03 , 1 04-H istory of Western Europe o r 203, 204-American H istory

semester hours 6

_____________ ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

___________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Re lligion 1 0 1 , 1 1 2-Life of C h r ist and Hi story of the Ch risti a n C h u rch

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________

'Science 1 2 1 - l n troduction to Biologica l Science 1 22-ln troduction to Physical Sciences Speech 1 0 1 -Fundamentals of Speech Electives P. E. Activ ity

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________________________________

6

A

A A 3

____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________________

_____________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________________________________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________________ ___________________ ___ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

3 2

Sophomore Art 1 0 1 -l ntroduction to Fine Arts o r 1 1 1 -Fu ndamentals o f Art Ed ucation 202-1 ntrod uction to Ed ucation Geography 1 0 1 -World Geography H istory 2 1 0-The Pacific No rthwest * *

3 A 3 2

_ _ _ _ _ _ __________________________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________________

___ _ _ __ ______________

___________________________

_ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ ________________________

'Students p l a n n i n g to concentrate in science should not en rol l for these courses without the consent of the department conce rned. " Students p l a n n i n g to teach elementary g rades; others should e l ect Art I I I . 33


F I N E A N D APPli E D ARTS Music 1 0 I -Fundamenta ls of Music or 1 20-Music Su rvey P. E. & Hea lth 2 1 0-Hea lth Essentials Psychology 1 0 I -General Psychology Religion 20 I , 202-The Bib le-Old Testament a n d The Bible-New Testament En g lis h E lective Soc i a l Studies E l ective-May be for field of Soc., Po l . Sci. or Econ. P. E. Acti v i ty

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ____ ________________ __________________________________

_____________________________________________

_______________ ___________________________

3 3 3

4 3

____________________________________________ ______________

_ _ _ _ _ _ ____________ ________________________________________________________

_ _ _ ________________________ _____________________________________

___ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ __ ______________________ ______________ _ _ _ _____________________

3 2

J u n ior Education Education Education Education E I ecti ve s

3 0 I -Human Development 3 1 I -Methods a n d Observation 3 1 2-Teaching of Reading 3 1 9-Mathematics in E lementary SchooL

3 .4 2 2 22

______________ ________________________________

____ ______________________________

_______________________________________

_ _ _ ______________________

__________________________________________________________________________________

Senior Education 370-Princi ples of Guida nce Education 433 ab or cd-Curricu l u m, Methods, Materials and Student Teaching Education 463 a, b, c, or d-Student Teaching Phi losophy 20 I -I ntroduction to Phi losophy or 3 1 2 -Et h ics EJectives

2

____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________________

5 9

________________ _____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______________

___________________________________

3 1I

____________________________________________________________ _ _ _ ______________

____________________________________________________________________________________________

Tota l 1 2 8 hours

FINE AND APPLIED ARTS The F i n e a n d Appl ied Arts a rea i ncl udes Art, Music, a n d Econ足 om ics and Busi ness Adm i nistration.

Prog ram Option U nder Option I 40 semester hou rs a re req u i red with not more than 24 semester hours devoted to one field (department) i n the a rea of concentratio n . Field (department) concentrations in this a rea a re offered i n Art (Program 1 ), Music (Programs 2 a nd 3), Econom ics a n d Busi ness Ad m i nistration (Programs 4 a nd 5). The ba l a nce of the work carried i n this a rea should i ncl ude one of the suggested com足 bi nations fou nd u nder Prog ram a, b, c, d or e. Program l -Art REQU I RED: Art 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 , 2 1 0, 2 1 5, 2 1 9, 3 1 1 , 3 1' 2 , 325, 4 1 1 , 4 1 2 .

P rogram 2-Music REQU I R ED: Music 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 , 1 20 , 34 1 or 342, 340 or 440e, plus four hours of private study a n d four hours of choir, chorus, band, orchestra. ELECTIVES: Six hours. R ECOMMEN DED: Progrllm II , c, or d as a supporting combination. 34


F I N E AND APPLI ED ARTS

Prog ram 3-Music Education and Theory REQ U I RED: Music I l l , 1 1 2, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 243 or 244, 34 1 or 342, 340 or 440e. Program e as a supporting combination. ELECTIVES: Six hours.

Prog ram 4-Commercia l-Secreta rial REQUI RED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 42 , 11 43 , 1 44, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 2 4 3 , 244, 3 5 4 .

Program 5-Com merci a 'l Accou nti ng REQU I R ED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 42 , 1 4 3, 1 44, 2 1 1 . 2 1 2, 2 4 1 , 3 1, 1 , 354.

Program a-Art REQU I 'R ED: Art 1 0 1 or 1 1 1 , 2 1 5, 2 1 9, 325, 4 1 2 . ELECTIVES : Four hours.

Prog ram b-Music

REQUI RED: Music I l l , 1 20, 340 plus four hours of private studiy and two to four hours of choir, chorus, blind, orchestra. ELECTIVES: N ine hours.

Prog ram c-Com mercial-Secreta rial

R EQ U I RED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 42, 1 43, 1 44, 24 1 , 243.

Program d-Commerci al-Accou nting REQU I R ED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 , 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 24 1 , 3 1 1 .

Program e--A ppl ied Music a nd Art REQU I R ED: Art 1 0 1 or 1 1 1 p l us six to eight hours of private study In music and six to eight hours of choir, chorus, band, orchestra. This prog ram appli cabl e on l y to those ta k i n g Program 3 .

Prog ram Option I I T h e prog ram under Option I I perm its concentration in two broad a reas with 24 to 28 hou rs in one area and 1 2 to 1 6 hou rs in a d if足 ferent area. In Fine a nd Applied Arts the m a jor area may i ncl ude any one of the com binations outli ned under Prog ram 1 , 2 , 3, 4 or 5. The minor a rea may i nclude one of the suggested co mbi nations l isted u nder Program a, b, c, or d . Program 1 -Art REQU I R ED: Same

liS

Option I , P rog rll m 1 .

Program 2-Music REQU I R ED: Same as Option 1 , Program 2 .

Program 3-Art and Music REQU I R ED: Twenty-four hours.

Program 4-Commerc i a l-Secreta rial REQ U I RED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 42 , 1 4 3, 1 4 4, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 243, 244, 354.

Program 5-Commercia l-Acco u nting REQUI RED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 4 2 , 1 4 3, 1 44, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 24 1 , 3 1 1 , 354.

Prog ram a-Art REQ U I RED: Art 1 0 1 or 1 1 1 , 2 1 5, 2 1 9, 325, 4 1 2 . ELECTIV,ES: Four hours.

35


H EALTH

Prog ram b-Music REQ U I R E D : Music 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 , 1 20, 340 o r 440e, plus two hours of private study. Two to four h o u rs of choir, chorus, band, orchestra.

Prog ram c-Com merci al-Secreta rial R E Q U I R E D : E B A 1 4 1 , 1 4 2, 1 43 , 1 4 4, 24 1 , 243.

Program d-Commerci al-Acco u nting R EQUI RED: EBA 1 4 1 , 1 4 2, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 243, 3 1 1 .

Prog ram Option I I I I n the area of Fine a nd Applied Arts u nder Option I I I , 1 2 to 1 4 hou rs a re req u i red i n one of the fol lowi ng prog rams: Program 1 -Art REQ U I R ED : Art 1 0 1 or 1 1 1 , 2 1 5 , 325, 4 1 2 . ELECTIVES: Three hours.

Program 2�Music R EQUI RED: Same as Option I I , Prog ram b.

Program 3-Art and Music REQU I RED: Art 1 1 1 , 2 1 5 , 325; Music 1 1 1 , 340 or 440e, pia no, o r voice.

H EALTH The Health area i ncl u des courses offered in the department of Physical Ed ucation and Hea lth. Program Option I I The prog ram u nder Option I I permits concentration i n two broad a reas with 24 to 28 hours i n one a rea and 1 2 to 1 6 hours in a d if­ ferent area. The student selecting Hea lth as the major area should fol low Prog ram 1 . If he chooses Hea lth as a m i nor a rea, he sho u l d fol l ow Prog ram a . Program 1 -Physica'l Education R EQU I RE D : Men-Physical Education 2 1 0 , 274, 292, 3 1 2 or 363, 322, 34 1 , 345, 450, 497, and two hou rs selected from 270, 2 7 1 , 2 72, 2 7 3 . Women-Physica l Education 2 1 0, 290, 292, 3 1 2 , 3 2 2 , 3 33, 34 1 , 345, 450, 497. ELECTIVES: Men-fo u r hours. Women-two hours.

Prog ram a-Phys ica l Education R EQU I R E D : Men-Physica l Education 2 1 0 , 292, 34 1 , 345, 3 6 3 . Women-Physical Education 2 1 0, 2 9 2 , 333, 34 1 , 3 4 5 , 2 9 0 , 3 1 2 . ELECT I V ES: Men-four hours selected from 270, 27 1 , 272, 273, 274, 346, 450, 465 . Women-two hours selected from 346, 450, 465. 36


LANGUAGE ARTS

Prog ra m Option I I I I n the area of P hysical Ed ucation under Option I I I, 1 2 to 1 4 hou rs are req u i red . Prog ram 1 -Physical Education R EQU I R ED: Thi rteen hours i n c l ud i n g Physical Education 2 1 0, 292, 3 1 2 , 34 1 , 345. ELE CTIVES : Two h o u rs selected from Physical Education 333, 346, 363, 450, 465.

LA NGUAGE ARTS The lang uage Arts a rea i ncl udes Co mposition, Foreig n la ng足 uages, Journ a l i sm, literature, a n d Speech. Prog ra m Option U nder Option I, 40 semester hours are req u i red with not more than 24 semester hou rs devoted to one field (depa rtment) in the area of concentration. Field (department) concentrations in this area a re offered in literature (Prog ram 1 ), Speech (Program 2), and German (Prog ram 3). The balance of the work carried in this area should i nc l u d e one of the suggested com binations fo und u nder Prog ram a, b, c , d, or e. Program l -literature REQU I R ED: Twelve hours selected from E n g l ish 233, 234, 25 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342; English 302 and 440a or 440b. ELECT I V ES : Ten hours (at least six hours to be upper division courses). RECOMMENDED: Program c, d, or e l isted below as a supporting combination.

Program 2-Speech REQUIRED: Speech 1 0 1 , 1 04, 250 and six hours from 222, 256 or 270. ELECTIVES : N ine hours. RECOMM E N D ED: Program II o r b as a supporting co mbinatio n .

Prog ram 3-Germ an-1 6-24 ho urs determ i ned by num ber of u n its earned i n high school. R E Q U I R E D : Ge rman 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 0 1 , 202, 30 1 , 302, 35 1 , 352, 40 1 , 402. RECOMM EN DED: Program 8 , b, or e 8S a supporting combination.

Program a-literature REQUI RED: Twelve hours selected from English 233, 2 34 , 25 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342; English 302 and 440a o r 440b. ELECTIVES: Upper division courses.

Program b-Com position and literature ,R EQ U I RED: Six hours selected from Eng l i s h 233, 25 1 , 2 5 2 , 34 1 , 342, 384 . Two hours selected from English 3 2 1 , 4408, 440b. Six to eight 'hours selected from Engl ish 2 1 7, 2 1 8 , 404, 4 1 8, or Journ a l i s m . 37


LANGUAGE ARTS

Program c-Com position and Speech R EQ U I R E D : Seven hours of Advanced Composition and nine hours of Speech and Drama.

and Journa lism

Prog ram d-Speech REQU I R ED: Sixteen hours of Speech and Drama.

Program e--- F oreign Languages R EQ U I R E D : Sixteen hours of French, German or Latin.

Prog ra m Option I I The p rogram u nder Option ( ( permits concentration i n two broad a reas with 2 4 to 28 hours in one a rea and 1 2 to 1 6 hours in a dif足 ferent m a j or a rea. I n the a rea of the Langu age Arts the m a jor a rea may i nclude any one of the com b i n ations outli ned u nder Programs 1 , 2, and 3. The m i nor a rea may include one of the suggested com足 bi nations l i sted under Prog rams a a n d b. Program 1 -Em p h asis o n Literature REQUIRED: Twelve hours selected from Eng lish 233, 234, 25 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342; and two hours from Engl ish 32 1 , 440a or 440b. ELECTIVES: Four to six hours of upper division e lectives i n literature or six hours from EngHsh 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 404, 4 1 8 or Journalism. Balance of the work to be taken In the field of Speech.

Prog ram 2-Germ a n (Possi b le o n l y for a student offeri ng two years of h i g h school Germ a n) . REQUI RED: Sixteen hours in t h e same sequence as under Option J . ELECTIVES: N i n e hours se lected from English 2 3 3 , 2 5 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342, 383 o r 384; o r six hours from the above group, p l us four hours from English 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 302, 404, 4 1 8 , or Journalism. Students el ect足 ing this program are urged to add English 32 1 , 440a, 440b to the required courses.

Prog ram 3-Speech REQU I RED: Fifteen to eighteen hours. ELECTIVES: Same as the electives under Prog ram 2 .

Program a-literature or Literature a n d Composition REQU I RED: Nine hours selected from Eng lish 233, 25 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342, 383 or 384; or six hours from the above group, plus four hours from English 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 404, 4 1 8, 302, or Journa lism. Students are u rged to add English 32 1 , 440a, 440b to the required courses. Balance of the work to be taken in Speech .

Prog ram b-S peech a n d literature REQUIRED: Speech 1 0 1 , 1 04, and 250. ELECTIVES: Six hours selected from Engl ish 233, 25 1 , 252, 34 1 , 342, 383 or 384; or six hours from English 2 1 7, 2 1 8, 302, 404, 4 1 8, or Journa l i s m .

38


SCI ENCES AND MATHEMATICS

Prog r a m O ption I I I I n the a rea of langu age Arts u n der Option I I I, 1 2 to 1 6 hours a re req u i red in one of the fo l lowi ng programs: P rogram l -literature or Composition and Literature Same as Program a, Option I I .

Program 2-Speech and literature o r Composition Same as Program b, Option I I .

Program 3-Literature-Speech Combination REQUIRED: Six hours selected from Engl ish 2 33, 25 1 , 252, 3 4 1 , 342, 383 o r 3 8 4, and six hours from Speech.

SCI ENCES AND MAT H EMATICS The area of Science and Mathem atics includes Biology, Chem­ istry, Physics, and Mathematics. Prog r a m Option I Under Option I, 40 semester hours required with not more than 24 semester hours devoted to o n e field (department) in the a rea of concentratio n . Field (department) concentrations i n this a rea a re offered i n Biology (Program 1 ), Chemistry (Program 2), Mathematics (Program 3), and Physics (P rog ram 4). Program l �B iology REQU I R E D: Biology 1 3 1 , 1 32 and 1 0 1 , 1 02 or 1 4 1 , 1 4 2. ELECTIVES: Eight hours from courses above 200. RECOMMENDED: Chemistry 1 05, 1 06 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8 and Physics 26 1 , 262 o r General Science 1 22 .

Program 2-Chemistry R EQUIRE D: Chemistry 1 0 5, 1 06 or 1 07, 1 0 8, and 2 0 1 , 202, 3 2 1 , 322. R ECOMMENDED: Physics 26 1 , 262; Mathem atics 1 1 2 , 1 3 1 o r 1 6 1 ; and General Science 1 2 1 .

Program 3-Mathematics REQUIRED: Mathematics 1 0 1 , 1 06; 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 (or 1 1 2 , 1 3 1 , 1 54); 25 1 , 252. RECOMMENDED: Phys ics 2 6 1 , 2 6 2 ; Chemistry 1 0 5, 1 06 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8; General Science 1 2 1 .

Program 4-Physics PREREQUISITES: Higher a lgebra, solid geometry and one yea r of high school chemistry. REQU I R E D: Physics 26 1 , 2 6 2 and 3 1 1 ; Mathematics 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 and 25 1 , 2 5 2; General Science 1 2 1 . ELECTIVES: Upper division cou rses ,in physics, General Science S 1 3 6. 39


SCIE NCES A N D MATHEMATICS

Prog ram Option I I Under Option I I , 2 4 to 2 8 semester hours are req ui red i n one broad a rea, and 1 2 to 1 6 hours in a d ifferent area. Concentrations in the broad area a re offered in General Science (Program 1 ), Biology (Program 2), Chemistry (P rogram 3), Physics (Prog ram 4), Mathe足 matics (Program 5). The minor a rea of emphasis should include one of the com足 binations a, b, c, or d . Program 1 a-Ge neral Science PREREQUISITE: Mathematics 1 0 1 . REQ U I RED: Biology 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 , and 1 4 1 or 1 4 2; Chemistry 1 05, 1 0 6 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8; Physics 2 6 1 , 262.

Prog ram 1 b-General Science REQ U I R E D: General Science 1 2 1 ; Chemistry 1 05, 1 06, or 1 0 7, 1 08; Physics 26 1 , 262; and Mathematics 1 0 1 , 1 06 and/ or 1 6 1 .

Program 2-Biology REQ U I R ED: Biology 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 and 1 4 1 or 1 4 2; Chemi stry or 1 0 7, 1 08 .

1 05, 1 06

ElECTIVES: Four hours upper division Biology courses. RECOMME NDED: PhYSics 2 6 1 or General Science 1 22 .

Prog ra m 3-C hemistry PREREQU ISITE: Mathematics 1 0 1 , Genera l, Science 1 2 1 . REQ U I R E D : Chemistry 1 05, 1 06, or 1 0 7, 1 0 8, 200, 32 1 . ELECTI VES: One course chosen from Mathematics 1 6 1 , Chemistry 202 and Physics 26 1 .

Program 4-Physics PR EREQ U ISITE: H ighe r a l gebra, solid geometry and (p refe rably) one year of high school chemistry. REQU I R ED: PhysiCS 26 1 , 262, 3 1 1 ; Mathematics 1 6 1 , 1 62 or eq uiva lent.

Prog ram 5-Math ematics PREREQUISITE: Higher a lgebra, solid geometry lind (prefe ra bly) one year of high school chemistry. REQUI RED: Mathematics 1 6 1 , 1 62 or eq u ivalent; Mathematics 25 1 , 252; Physics 26 1 , 262.

Program a-Biology REQU I R ED: Twe lve to 1 6 hours chosen from Biology 1 3 1' , 1 3 2, 1 4 1 or 1 4 2; and General Science 1 2 2 .

Program b-Chemi stry REQU I RED: Twelve to 1 6 hours chosen from Chemistry 1 0 5, 1 06 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8; 20 1 , 202 or 32 1 , 322.

Program c-Mathematics REQ U I RED: Mathematics 1 0 1 and 1 06 (unless offered from high school) and 1 2 to 1 6 hours chosen from Mathema tics 1 6 1 , 1 62 or 1 1 2 , 1 3 1 , 1 5 4; 25 1 , 252.

40


SOCIAL STU D I ES AREA

Program d-General Science REQU I RED: Science 1 2 1 , 1 22 and eight hours sel ected from Genera l Science courses or a year of Bio 'l,ogy, Chemistry or Physics.

Program Optio n I II Prog ram � �enera l Science Twel ve to 1 6 ho u rs in Science and Mathematics selected to give m a x i m u m breadth of prepa ration. Courses selected and tota l hours a re s u bject to a pprova l of science depa rtments a nd wi l l vary depend i n g u po n h i g h school background of the i ndividual student.

SOCIAL STUDIES AREA The Social Studies a rea i ncl udes H i story, Pol itica l Sociology, Economics, Geography, and Psychology.

Science,

Program Option I Under Option I, 40 semester hours a re req u i red with not more than 24 semester hou rs devoted to one field (department) i n the a rea of concentration. The field (department) concentration in this a rea is offered in H i story (Prog ram 1 ). Progra m 1 -H istory R EQ U I R ED: History 1 03, 1 04, 203, 204, 2 1 0 plus Economics 1 0 1 , Geography I' 0 1 , Po litica I Science 25 1 , Sociology 1 0 l . ElECTIVES: Ten hou rs i n H istory, plus fou r hou rs of the Soci a l Sciences.

Prog ram 2�eneral Social Studies REQU I R ED: H istory 1 0 3, 1 04, 203, 204, 2 1 0, plus Economics 1 0 1 , Geography 1 0 1 , Po l itica l Science 25 1 , Sociology 1 0 1 , and Psychology or Socio logy 44 1 . ELECTIVES: Eleven hours to be taken from not more than two of these fields-Economics, Political Science, Psychology or Sociology. A mini­ mum of eight hours must be taken in one field.

Program O ptio n I I U nder Option I I, the progra m permits concentration i n two broad areas with 24 to 26 hou rs i n one a rea and 1 2 to 1 6 hou rs i n a d ifferent a rea . The student selecting Soc i a l Studies a s the broader a rea sho u l d fo l low Program 1 . 'If he chooses Social Studies as a I'esser a rea, 'he shou l d fol low P rogram a . Progra m 1 R EQ U I R ED : H istory 1 03, 1 04, 203, 204, 2 1 0, Po l i tical Science 2 5 1 , Socio logy 1 0 1 , Economics 1 0 1 , Geog raphy 1 0 l . 41


PROFESSIONALIZED S U BJ ECT MAHER

Program a REQU I RE D: Eight hours of H'istory and six to eight hours of Po l ltlcel Science, Economics, or Sociology.

Program Option III In the area of Soci a l Studies u nder Option I'll , 1 2 hours are req uired. Program 1 -History a nd Pol itical Science REQU IRED: Twelve hours.

Program 2-5ociology a nd Econom ics REQU I RED: Twelve hours.

Program 3 REQUIRED: Twelve hou rs selected from any two fields of Sode l Studies.

PRO FESSIONALIZED SUBJ ECT MATTER Program Option I II I n the a rea of P rofession a l ized Subject Matter under Option I I I, a minimum of 1 2 hours ,is requ i red. Art-325 ( 1 43) Art i n the Elementary School 425 ( 1 42) C lllssroom Art Techniq ues 427 C lllssroom Art Guidance Educatlon-3 1 2 ( 38) The Teach ing of Rellding 3 1 5 ( 1 35) I n struction a l Meteria l s 3 1 9 ( 1 4 1 ) Mathematics i n t h e Elementllry School 4 1 3 ( 1 1 8) Science i n the Elementary School 4 1 4 ( 1 82) Social Studies i n the Elementllry School 4 1 6 ( 1 89) Pllrent-Teacher Conference 423 (Sl 1 9) Functionll'l English i n the Elementary School 426 (S 1 3 6) Primary Read ing 429 ( 1 39) Diag nosis of Reading Problems 442 ( 1 3 1 ) Speech Problems in the E l ementary School English-3 2 1 ( 1 46) Chi ldren's literature 4 2 1 (S 1 46) Advanced Child ren's literature Music-340 ( 1 49) Music in the Elementary School Physical Education-3 1 2 ( 1 34) Physical Ed'ucation in the Elementllry School 3 4 1 ( 1 4 1 ) Methods in Folk Games 342 ( 10 42) Problems in Teaching Rhythmics 42


BACHELOR OF EDUCAT I O N OR FI FTH YEAR

BACHELOR OF EDUCATION OR FI FTH YEAR The fifth year of teacher education is to fol low a period of 8t least one year of i nitial teach ing experience. The student m ust com足 plete a m i n i m u m of eight semester hours in residence before be足 ginning the third year of teach i ng . The tot a l th i rty hours m ust be completed before beg i n n i ng the sixth year of teaching.

,jf the first teach ing is for a part of a year o n l y, col lege study taken the next s u m mer may be a p p l i ed with permission of the department. The student may choose the institution in which h e wishes to take this advanced work as fol lows: 1.

If he chooses to work at Pacific Lutheran Col l ege or any other of the teacher education i n stitutions i n this state, that i nstitution sha l l be responsible for recommending him for the Sta ndard Genera l Certificate u pon successfu l com p l etion.

2.

If he wis hes to underta ke the fifth year i n a n out-of-state i nstitution, h is pre-service i nstitution wi l l be responsible for recommending h i m for the Sta ndard General Certificate upon successf u l com p l etion . The student m ust secure gen足 eral ap proval of his p l a n from his p re-service institution in adva nce.

There a re fou r provisions governing, the fifth year pattern of work: 1.

The fifth col lege yea r m ust incl ude a m i n i m u m of thirty semester hours of which at least 50 per cent a re in studies of the third, fourth and postgrad uate col lege years .

2.

No more than eight semester hours of extension a nd/or correspondence study m a y be approved as a part of the thirty semester hours in the student's fifth year progra m .

3.

One semester o f t h e fifth col lege year must be taken i n residence i n t h e recommending i n stitution i n t h e State o f Wash i ngton or a single i nstitution i f out-of-state.

4.

The student m ay take ten of the req u i red thirty semester hours p rior to or d u r i ng the first year of teaching experience.

Fol lowi ng a re certain procedu res for the approva l of fifth yea r prog rams of work: 1.

The program of stud ies for this year of col lege work is to be selected by the student with the g u id ance of those who h ave worked with him d u r i ng his period of i n itia l teachi ng a n d the advisers in the recommending i nstitution .

2 . T h e student will need t o secure ap prova l o f t h e recom足 mend ing i nstitution for work taken i n other ,i nstitutions before the work i s beg u n . 43


MASTER OF ARTS

For those who choose to do thei r fifth year wo rk at Pacific Lutheran Col l ege, we sh a l l consider their desi res and needs in the ilight of the evidence from the school system in which they had experience a nd from evidence of their pre-service p repa ration. Some of the wo rk taken d u ri ng the fifth year may also apply toward the M.A. degree for those who meet the req ui rements. A student m u st not p l a n that these two s h a l ll coi ncide. The program as set u p for the fifth year s h a l l take precedence and m ust be f i n ished fi rst. Students completing the req u i rements for the Standard General Certificate a re eligible for the Bachelor of Education degree. REQU I R EMENTS FOR THE MASTER OF ARTS Ad m i ssion Req u i reme nts A grad uate of any accred ited co l lege or university may be accepted fo r adm ission to g raduate study if his und ergrad u ate record is satisfactory. This record m ust be better than average in genera l ed ucation a n d superior i n the fields of speci a l i zation i n which the student wishes to concentrate i n his g rad u ate work. An appl icant whose grade poi nt average d u ri ng his l ast year of co l l ege was below 3 .0 w i l l not be considered for g raduate status until he has demonstrated his a b i l ity to do g raduate work. A m i n i m u m of one q u a rter or sem ester's work with a g rade poi nt of 3.0 at Pacific Luthera n Co l lege wi l l be req u i red before the student can be con足 sidered for gradu ate status. H is accepta nce to graduate status is determined by the Dean of the CoL lege and the Chairman of the Education Department. General Req u i re ments 1.

A minimum of one year's teachi ng experience.

2. A m i n i m u m of 30 semester hours of work taken in resi足 dence with a g rade point average of 3 .0 in both the major and the m i nor. 3.

Six semester hours of grad uate work may be taken at a nother i nstitution provided that a pprov al has been g iven by h i s Gradu ate Comm ittee.

4. The m ajor must be i n the department of ed ucatio n. Twenty to twenty-two hours, i ncluding a thesis or research as speci足 fied below, a re req u i red. Candidates m ust concentrate a m i n i m u m of 1 0 semester hours i n one of the fo l lowi ng fields: ( l ) Classroom Teachi ng (elementary or seconda ry), (2) Ad min istration and Supervision, or (3) Guida nce. 44


BACH ELOR OF SCI ENCE I N MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY

5.

Mi nors are offered i n the departments of a rt, biology, chem­ istry, econom ics, and busi ness admin istrati on, Engl i s h , his­ tory, mus ic, sociology, a nd speech . Eight to ten hours a re req u i red for this minor. A student wish i n g to m i no r i n other departments may complete the w o r k a t another insti­ tution if he has the approva l of his Gradu ate Com mittee.

6.

A l l work for the M. A. degree m ust be completed with i n f i ve years after acceptance b y t h e Gradu ate Comm ittee.

Procedure A student desi ring to apply for a d mission to g rad uate work should ind icate his i ntenHon on the a ppropri ate form before or d u ri ng the fi rst session of h i s registration in g raduate courses. His acceptance to g rad u ate status is determi ned by the Dean of the Col l ege a n d the Chairman of the Ed ucation Department. His Grad­ uate Com mittee, composed of the Dean of the Col l ege, the C h a i r­ man of the Education Depa rtment, the Resea rch Probl ems Di rector, a nd the chairman of the depa rtment of the m i no r field, will su per­ vise his g raduate program after his accepta nce. As an i ntegral part of his Master's program, the stud ent is requ ired to show that he can do independent research . For purposes of this research he may el ect to fol low one of two pla ns, na mely, complete a thesis or write two o r th ree research pa pers . I n either case the research must be compl eted and presented to the Grad uate Committee for its approval four weeks before the award i ng of the degree. If he fol lows the fi rst plan he wi l l register for Education 559 Thesis, for which he may el ect to earn two to four cred its. If he fol lows the second plan he wi l l reg ister for Ed ucation 558 I ndividual Research, in which case the research may a l l be done in his m a jor field or partly in the m a jor a nd partly in the m i nor. Und er the l atter p l a n he must earn a total of not less than two a nd not more than four credits. All research m ust be approved by the Research Problems Di rector. Under the thesis p l a n the student wil l be requ i red to su bmit two bound typewritten copies of his thesis, one for deposit in the col l eg e l i brary a nd one for the major department. Under the research paper p l a n, the student m u st deposit typewritten copies of each paper with the major department. Each candidate i s req u ired to take a comprehensive exami na­ tion in the a rea of concentration of his ma jor field a nd over his thesis and research.

Requireme nts for Pr incipa l 's Credenti als Beg i n n i ng October 1 95 7 those prepa ring for a pri ncipal's cre­ dentia l must fol l ow a new program of prepa ration. 45


BACHELOR OF SCI ENCE I N MED I CAL TECH NOLOGY

* The candidate for these credentia ls wi l l be gu ided by the fo l lowi ng: 1.

He m ust meet grad u ate sta ndards for the Master's degree.

2.

He must work toward the provision a 'i credenti a l at his chosen leve l . To rece ive this i t is req ui red that he have co m p l eted work for his standard general teaching certificate p l u s six semester hours.

3.

He mus t co mpl ete experience and study requ i rements for the standard cred ential at his chosen level. To receive this he needs to have ( l ) had admi nistrative experi ence, (2) earned a m i n imum of eight more semester hours, and (3) earned his M .A. degree.

BACH ELOR OF SCI ENCE IN MEDICAL TECHN O LOGY Students who disire to take a course in Medical Technology (la boratory techn ici a n) may complete three years of col l ege work at Pacific lutheran Co l l ege and spend thei r fourth year (1 2 months) in a technica l l a boratory affi li ated with this col l ege. U pon successfu l completion of the course, the degree of Bachelor o f Science i n Med ica l Tech nology wi l l b e conferred. The graduate is eligible to take the exami nation given by the Registry of Medica l Tech nologists of the American Society of Cli nica l Pathologists. The Medical Tech no logy C u rricu l u m Freshmen Year

Sophomore Year Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62 Chemistry 20 1 , 2 0 2 Music or ArL Sociology 1 0 1 liter atu re Psychology Religion 2 0 1 , 202 P. E. 1 03, 1 04 or 1 09, 1 1 0

H r•.

Biology 1 3 1 , 1 3 2 Chemistry 1 05, 1 0 6 or 1 0 7, 1 08 Eng l ish 1 0 1 , 1 02 History 1 03 , 1 0 4 or 203, 204 Relig ion 1 0 1 , 1 1 2 P. E. 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8

________________________

8

Hrs. 8 8 3 3 3 3 4 2

_______________________

_____________________

______________________________

______ __________________

______

__ _ ___________________

________

8 6 6 4 2

_______________________________

______________________________

_________________________________

______________________________

________________________

_______

34

34 Sen ior Year (Hospital Lab.) Bacteriology and Parasitology Basa l Meta bolism Blood Grouping B i oc hem is try Hematology H istologic Tech nique I mmuno logy and Serology Uri na I ys is

H rs

J u n io r Year

Hrs. 5 1 4 8 6 4 2 2

______

Bio logy 2 0 1 Biology E l ective Chemistry 32 1 , 322 Phi losophy 20 1 or 3 1 2 Social Study E l e ct iv e Electives (Upper Division)

___________________________

________________________

______________________

________________

___________________

____________

4 4 8 3 3 10

_____________________

________________________

______________________________

_____________________________

__________________

__________

___________________________________

32

" Deta i ls of the program are available at the Col lege upon request. 46

32


BACHELOR OF SCIENCE I N N U RSI NG EDUATION

Students entering col l ege without three semester hours of high school a lgebra will be req u ired to register for Mathematics 5 1 d uring the Freshman Yea r. BACH ELOR OF SC I EN C E IN N U RS I N G EDUCATION Pacific Lutheran Col lege offers a 48-month nursing curricu l u m leading to a Bachelor o f Science i n N u rsi ng degree. Students ad足 mitted to this program spend the fu l l freshman year, ten weeks at summer school , a n d the fa l l semester of the sophomore yea r on the co l l ege ca mpus. Students then spend a pproximately two fu l l years at Emanuel Hospital', Portland, Oregon, and at other health agencies, where they receive clinical tra i n i ng and experience. At the completion of two years of this experience, the students return to the college campus the second semester of their senior year, and then in turn complete thei r c l i n i cal education i n twelve additional weeks of advanced tra i ning at Emanuel Hospita l . Nu rses who are graduates of a d i ploma school of n u rsing a n d have completed the req u i red cli nical experience may earn a deg ree, Bachelor of Science in N u rsing, by completing the col l egiate course requirements on the campus. Each stud ent's previous work is i nd i足 vid u a l ly eva l u ated . The student with no previous academic credits may complete the requ i red eighty-fo u r semester h o u rs in five semesters, whereas the candidate transferring with col l egiate credits whi ch are tra nsferable may com plete her work ea rl ier. Nu rsing Curricu l u m Sophomore Year Co l lege Campus Biology 2 0 1 . . .. . Rel igion 2 0 1 or 30 1 . .. . Psychology 20 1 or 3 2 1 N u rsing 20 1 . . .

Freshman Year Hrs. Col lege Campus Biology 1 61 , 1 62_ . 8 Chemistry 1 0 1 , 1 02 . . . 6 Eng l i s h 1 0 1 , 1 0L . .... 6 History 1 0 3, 1 04 .. . 6 Psychology 1 0 1 . . 3 Religion 1 0 1 ... . . 2 P. E. 1 0 1 , 1 02 . . 2 .... . ...

. ........ ._.

... _._..

. ..... . .

........_

. __ ........

......_..._._.......

.....

..

...

... ......

.. . .._

....._.._

..

_

3 . 2 3 3

.........__._ ....

..

...

..._ ....

.... ........_ .

......... .

..

........ . . .

.... _

C l i n ica l Division

... ___

._ . . ...._...

__. ... . _

..

_..

Fres hman Year Summer Session Co l lege Campus Art 1 0 1 . .. Home Economics . . N u rs ing 1 0 1 ... . .. Sociology 1 0 1 .............................. ._.......

....

..

. .._ ._..._....._._

..._ ..........

......._........

..

.._

..._....

.

.

...

._.....

N u rsing Nursing N u rsing N u rsing N u rsing N ursing N ursing N u rsing Rel igion

3 2 2 3

47

203 . .. . 2 05 . 211 ..... 215 221 .. .. 223 . . . 224 . 226 . 204 . ..

.

..

4 3 . 2 2 1 ............... 3 3 3 .. . 2

._. ..............._ .

.

. ........_. _....._... ___. . . . .. _ .......

...

.._......

_. _..................__..._ .

....

..

.

.

..

............._ ..__.._.....

._.. __

_ .... _. _ .

.

.......... __..

..

.. _......_._._.

.............

. .... . .... __


PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS

J u n i or Year

Sen ior Yellr

Hrs.

C l i n ical Division N u rsing 330 N u rsing 3 5 1 Nu rs in g 3 5 2

C l inical Division N u rsing N u rsing N u rs i n g Nursing Nursing N u rsing Nursing Nu rsi ng N u rsing Nursing Religion

310 320 324 325 326 327 331 332 341 342 21 1

_______ _____ __ ___

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ _ __ __ __

__ ___ __ ____ ______ __ ___

___ ________ _________ _

______ ____________________

______________________ ___

_ _ _ _ ____________________

_______________________ _______

__________ _________________

_ __________ _______ ____ ______

__________________________

3 4 2 4 2 4 3 4 3 4 2

______________ ______ _________

_______________________________

_____

__ _________ ______________

3 3 4

Senior Year Col lege Campus Nu rsi ng 40 1 N u rs i ng 402 P h i losophy 3 1 2 Psych o l ogy 473 Sociology E l ective E I ecti ves

3 2 3 2 3 8-9

_ _ _ _________________________

______________________________

_____ ___________________

_______________ _ _ _ ________

______________________

______________________________________

Senior Year, Summer Quarter C l i nical, Divi sion Nursing 403 N u rsing 420 Nu rsing 428

______________ _ _ _ _ ___________

__ __ _____ ___ ___ ___ __

________ _ _ _ _ _ ________________

2 3 2

PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS Prepa ration for Engi neering In l i ne with the trend to au gment engi neering education with a l ibera l arts backgrou nd, Pacific Lutheran Col 'l ege offe rs, in coop足 eration with certa i n select u niversities, a 3-2 program of l i beral arts a nd engi neer ing. A student w i l l spend three years at the Col lege. If his work is of satisfactory g rade he w i l l , u pon recom mendation by the facu lty, be accepted by one of the cooperati ng engi neering schools (Oregon State Co l lege, Stanford University, or University of Denver). At the dose of his first year of engi neeri ng, he w i l l be eligi ble for the Bachelor of Arts degree from Pacific Lutheran Col lege. At the com pletion of his second year of engi neering, 'he wiH receive his degree in eng i neeri ng from the affi l i ated college or un iversity. In order to q u a l ify without deficie ncy for this 3-2 engi neering p rogram, entering freshmen must have had th ree yea rs of high school mathematics, i nclud i ng higher al gebra and solid geometry, a nd a m i n i m u m of one year of l a boratory science, prefera b l y chem足 istry or physics. A proficiency in the English l a ngu age, 'both in reading a n d writing, is essenti a l . Two years of modern foreign l a ng足 u ag e a re highly recommended . The student who can pass a profic足 iency exa m i n ation i n trigonometry u pon entrance can reduce his load i n the freshman year by one hour per semester. Students who have deficiencies may be accepted for this program only with the understa nding that the deficiencies w i l l be made up (preferably by s u mmer school work) before the beg i n n i n g of the sophomore year. The p rogram for the first two years is the same for a 'll branches of engi neering . El ectives for the third yea r must be chosen to meet 48


PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS

the requirements for the particu lar engi neeri ng school and the branch of eng i neering chosen. Suggested sequence of courses. Freshman Year Chemistry Eng l i sh Composition 1 0 1 , 1 02 Fine Arts General Engineering 1 0 1 Mathematics Religion 1 0 1 , 1 1 2 P. E. Activity

Sophomore Year General Engineering 1 5 1 , 1 5 2 H istory Mathematics 25 1 , 252 Physics 2 6 1 , 2 6 2 Rel igion P. E. Activity

H rs.

_______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __________

______

__ ___________ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ ____ _ _

__ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _________________________

_______________

______ _ _ _____ . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

8 6 3 2 8 4 2

_____ ____ _ .. _____________

_ _ _ __________

____ ______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ ____

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _______

_

_________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

33

Total

H rs. ______

34

Totll l

J u n i o r Year H rs. Eco n . & Bus. Ad min. 1 0 1 , 1 02 6 Science Electives Eng I ish (literature E lective> 3 Socia I Science Elective: P h i l osophy 3 1 2 3 Psych . 1 0 1 o r Geog. 1 0 L Physics 3 4 2 4 Speech ______

4 6 8 10 4 2

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 2- 1 6

__________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______________

_______

_ _ _ _.._ _._ _ _ .____ .___ . __ ..... .

_ .__ ._ .. _ _ _ ... _.___ ._ _ _......._..

3 2

Preparation for Law The best law schools req u i re at least two years of Liberal Arts as a fo und ation for profession a l study. Th ree or fou r years of Libera l Arts a re regarded as excellent preparation for the study of l aw. I n addition t o the deg ree req u irements the p rospective l a w student is advised to i nclude in his progra m at least one add itio nal course in econom ics, history, p h i losop hy, political science, psychology, soci足 ology a nd speech. The student should p l a n his course accord i ng to the req u irements of the law schoo l in which he is i nterested . P repa ration for Med icine and Dentistry Students des i r i ng to enter the med ical or denta l p rofess ional fields should p l a n to devote not less th a n th ree years, and prefera bly fou r years, of study to secure the broad ed ucational background indispensable to a successfu l professional career. The professiona l schools in these fields require a thorough preparation in science. They al so recommend extensive study in other depa rtments, such as the socia l science a nd h u manities. The student should acquaint h i mself with the detai l ed req ui re足 ments of the p rofeSSional school of his choice. The fol lowing cou rses w i l l meet the m i ni m u m entra nce requi rements of most medical and dental schools: Biology 1 3 1 , 1 3 2, 3 6 1 , 364; Chem istry 1 05, 1 06, 20 1 , 202, 32 1 , 322; Physics 26 1 , 262 a nd English 1 0 1 , 1 02 . Prepa ration for Pa rish Ed ucation Students des i ri ng to enter parish work a re encou raged to obtai n the broad gen era ll ed ucation lead ing to the Bachelor of Arts degree. Experie nce revea ls that a parish worker is req uested to per足 form d uties i n more than one fiel d . Her responsibil ities may be 49


PROGRAMS FOR CAREERS

centered in one or more of these m a jor a reas: the education work of the c h u rch, the d i recting of youth activities, c h u rch visitation, office and secreta rial work, or d i recting the music activities of the c h u rch. D u r i ng the freshma n-sophomore years students entering the parish ed ucation co u rse a re advised to complete all genera l req u i re足 ments l i sted u nder the Bachelor of Arts Degree A. Besides the six hours i n h istory req u i red i n the a rea of soci a l stud i es, the student i s req u i red to i nc l ude Sociology 1 0 1 , 1 02 and Psychology 1 0 1 . If the student has not had a cou rse i n typewriti ng i n h igh school , she s h o u l d comp l ete the elementary course d u ri ng the fres h m a n or sophomore year . J u n ior-senior courses:

req u i rements

EBA 1 42 ___________________________________ M u s i c 4 2 1 or 422 _ ______________________ P h i llosophy 2 0 1 or 3 1 2 _____________ Psycho l ogy 32 1 ____________________________

i nclude

the

fo l lowi ng

specific

Re l i g ion 2 2 5 , 2 2 7, 3 0 1 _______________ 7 Soci o l ogy 332 or 4 3 1 , and 4 3 5 ____ 6 Speech 1 0 1 _________________________________ 3

2 2

3 3

Stro ngly recommended courses include Art 325; EBA 24 1 , 34 1 ; Education 30 1 , 3 1 1 ; Music 1 50; Phi losophy 352; P E 2 1 0; Psychology 42 1 ; Religion 33 1 ; SociOlogy 445. The recommended m a jor fields of concentration a re ReHgion, Socio logy, a nd Music; though m a jors in EBA, E n g U s h , and H i story a re a lso approved . A mi nor field of concentration is req u i red . T h i s req u i rement may be met by work taken in a ny of the departments l i sted a bove or in the Dep a rtment of Ed ucation.

Preparation for Socia II Work In add ition to completing the reg u l a r req u i rements for a degree i n Liberal Arts, students expecting to enter the field of socia l work s hou l d p l a n for a wel l -rou nded preparation in the soci a l sciences and some basic work in biology. P rospective workers in c h u rch and genera l agencies s hou l d concentrate on courses i n sociology and psychology, while those p l a n n i ng for govern ment service snould add a concentration i n economics or pol itica l science. Students ex足 pecting to enter this field a re asked to confer with the Department of Sociology i n regard to their prog rams.

Preparation for Theology As a broad cultural fou nd ation for the study of theology and entrance i nto the Gospel m i n i stry, a pre-theolog ica l student should com p l ete the req u i rements for a Bachelor of Arts degree. Besides the genera l degree req u i rements a student is u rged to supplement his program with additional courses in Engl is h , socia l sciences, speech a n d c l assical and modern l a nguages. A facu lty adviser wi l l assist t h e student i n the selection of courses necessary to meet the req u i re足 ments of the theological school of h i s choice. 50


COLLEGE COSTS

It is the pol icy of the Col lege to m a i nta i n the highest educa足 tional sta ndards with a m i n i m u m of cost to its student body. The support of the three cooperating Lutheran Synods and friends who contrib ute toward the operation of the schoo l enables the Col l ege to charge a lower tu ition rate tha n wou ld otherwise be poss ib le. GEN ERAL FEES T U I T I O N , per semester, 1 2 to 1 6 hours Private lessons a n d laboratory fees a re not included in the general tuition.

__ _ _ __ ____ __ __ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

MATRICULATION (Paid only by students entering for fi rst time} GEN ERAL FEE, per semester, 8 hours or more

$240.00

_______ _

_____________________________ _

HEALTH SERVICE FEE, per semester

__ _ ______ __________ __ __ _ ________ ___ __ . _ _ _____ _ _

SAGA (annua l), per year, paya ble first semeste L

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________

ST UD ENT ARTIST S E R I ES, payable first semester

____________________________

5.00 1 6 .00 8.00 5 .00 4.00

SPEOAL FEES AUDIT, per credit hOuL CHANGE

IN

__________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ _______________________________

REG I STRATI ON

______________ ____ ___________________________________ _

GRADUATION AND DI PLOMA (each deg ree}

________ ._ __ _ _______________ _

EVEN I N G AND SATU RDAY CLASSES (only), per credit hour No general fee. A l l l a boratory fees wi l l be extra. EXAM'I NATION, to remove cond itions or i ncompletes..

______ _

__ _ __ ___ _______. _

EXCESS REGISTRATION, above 1 6 hou rs, per credit hour

_____________

ROOM AND KEY DE POSIT, dormitory room (refu nded upon wi thd raw a I)

__________________________ . . _ _ _____________ _ ___ ____ _____

LATE R EGISTRATION, $ 1 . 00 per day, m a x i m u m. MAST ER'S DEGREE R ESEARCH, not to exceed

____________________________ _

_ _ _ _ _____________________________

MAST ER'S THESIS TYP I N G CHARGE, 2 5 c per page, not to exceed

1 0 .00 3.00 35.00

_ ______ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _

__ __ _ __ _______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ .

1 . 00

_____________________ _________________ _

_ _ _ _ ________________ ____________________________________________________________

---c SPECIAL STUDENT, per cred i t hOUL T h is charge does not i n cl' u de private ,lessons or the General Fee which will be prorated. _ _ __ _ __ ___ ___ _ _

TRANSCRI PT, first copy free, each addition a l copy..

51

1 .00 5 .00

45.00 5 .00 5 .00 20.00

_______________ ___________ ________________ _____________________ ___ _ _ _ _ _

MAST ER'S TH ESIS B I N D I NG CHARGE_. PLACEMENT

7.50 1 .00 1 0 .00 1 5 .00


CLASS, LABORATORY, MUSIC FEES

C LASS AN D LABORATORY FEES ART (a I I cou rses)

3 .00

__ ____________ ____ __ _ _ __ _ __ __ _ _______________ ___ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ ____________

BIOLOGY (a l l l a bo ratory courses except 274)

__________________________________

5 .00

BIOLOGY 2 7 4

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________________________ _____________________

7.50

CH EMISTRY (a l l l a borato ry cou rses)

ECONOMICS AND BUSI N ESS ADM I N I STRAT I ON 1 4 1 , 1 4 2, 354 E D U CATION 3 1 5

______ ._

1 0 .00

_ ..___..________....___ . . _.......____. .______._ _ _._ _________.._ .__.______

2.50

E D U CATION 463, a,b,c,d Student Teacher's Service.

_________. ._____ .________

GEOLOGY 1 0 1 , 1 02

1 2 .00 5 .0 0

___________.._._____. ._ ___________ .__.._____._______. _______._

I N DUSTRIAL ARTS 1 1 0

1 .5 0

.. ______._____._____ ___________..______ ____.__ ______.__________ ____. _

I N D USTRIAL ARTS 2 5 0, 275, 252

3 . 00

_______ .________________________________________

I N DUSTRIAL ARTS 26 1 , 262, 270, 49 1 , 4 9 2. MUS I C 1 40

5.00

____ __ _ _________ .._____ ...______.______ ._______

5 .00

_ _ _______________ ._ _.______________

5.00

_____________________. _____________ _________________________ ______________.___

PHYS I CAL EDUCAT I ON ACTIVITI ES, towel fee per semester 1 , 2, 3, 4 PHYSI CS (a I I l a bo ratory cou rses).

1 . 50

________________ .___________________.____

5 .00

_________________. ____ ._______________________________

PSY CHOL OG Y 35 3

__ . _____ _ __ __ _____ _ ____ __ __________ __ ________ ______________ __ ______ __

SCI ENCE 1 2 1 , 1 2 2

. _________________ __________________________________________ . ._ _ ._._ _ _ .____

3 .00

_; __.__________ _____________________________________________________________

3 .00

SP EEC H 270, 3 70

2 .00

PRIVATE MUS I C FEES C H O I R GOWN RENT, per year, payable f i rst semester in attendance

2.00

BAN D U N I FORM RENT, per year, paya b 'l e f i rst semester i n attendance

2.00

_________________________________

CASAVANT ORGAN RENT, one period dai ly, per semester.___________ ORGAN R ENT, one period daily, per semester (erectric)

_ _ _ _ _________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 0 .00

________________

1 5 .00

. _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ _____________________

5 .00

ORGAN RENT, two periods d a i l y , per semester (el ectric) PIANO RENT, one period daily, per semester

20.00

PIANO R ENT, two periods dai ly, per semester

_ _ __________________________

PR IVATE I NSTRUCTIONS, per lesson (semester schedule) Organ, orchestral instruments, piano, or voice. One thi rty-minute period per week.

_______________

7.50 2.50

MEMBERSHIP FEES FOR MUSIC ORGANI ZATI ONS CHO I R OF T H E WEST COLLEGE CHORUS

_____________ .________ _ _ _ _ __________ _____________________________________

___________________ ____________________________________________

COLLEGE CONCERT BAND

_ _ _ _ _ _ . ___ . _ . ___ . . _____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____________ _ _ _ _ _ ____ . _ _ _ _

COLLEGE CONCERT ORCHESTRA CO L L EG E MA D R I GA L S I N G E RS

_

__

.__________________________________________________

_____________________ ___ __________________________________

52

5 .00 3.00 3 .00 3.00 3.00


BOARD AND ROUM, ESTIMATED FEES

BOARD AND ROOM Board is furni shed in the Col lege D i n i ng H a l l at $ 1 70 per se mester for students rooming off campus, for th ree mea ls per d ay, except on Su nday when the even ing mea l is not p rovided . Mea l s are not served i n the College D i ni ng Hall duri ng Thanksgivi ng, Christmas a nd Easter vacations. Room a nd board are furnished to resident students, per semes足 ter, as fol lows: Women Sou th Hall, capacity 1 29 North H a l l , capacity 1 33 West H a l l , capacity 1 5 1

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________________

________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Men Old Main, capacity 235 Ivy H a II, ca pacity 36 Clover Creek H a l l, capacity 24 Clover Creek V i l lage, capacity 4 L Ad el phon H a l l , cap acity 1 2 Stuen H a l l , capacity 1 6

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________________

___________ ____ ._____

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

___ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _________ _ __

_____.

_______________

$260.00 260.00 260.00

$260.00 230.00 230.00 230.00 230.00 250.00

_ __ _ __ _ ___ _____ _

_ _ _ _ _ ________________________________

Fa m i l y Apartments Two bedroom ( 1 6 un its) inc. water, per month Th ree bedroom (8 u nits) inc. water, per month

__

____

$ 35.00 40.00

No room refund is g iven after the fi rst week u n less the room is su b let by the student u po n approval of the Dean of Men or Dea n of Women. One month adva nce rent for apa rtments is requ ired . No refund of the board i ng ch arges wi l l be made except i n case of a bsence extending beyond one week (not including the fi rst week, nor any col l ege sponsored trips of any kind, such as, Choi r, Chorus, Band, Orchestr a , Ath letics , etc.), or necess ary with足 d rawal from the Co l l ege, when a fair rebate wi l l be a l lowed. ESTIMATED FEES PER S EMESTER The fo l lowi ng table w i l l aid the stu dent i n estim ating the mi ni足 mum and maximum expenses, respectively: Tu i ti 0 n $ 240.00 $240.00 Board and Room 230.00 260.00 Genera I Fee 1 6 .00 1 6 .00 Other Req u i red Fees 1 7.50 22.50 Boo'ks and Su p p l ies 20.00 40.00 _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

_ ___ _ _ _ _ __ ___ _ _____ _ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _

_______________________________ _____________________

___ ___ _ ________ _ ___ ___________ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________ _______________________

$523 .50

$578.50

Add spending money a nd m u ltiply by two to obta i n estim ated cost for one school year of n i ne month s. 53


COlLEGE COSTS

PAYMENTS A N D ADJ USTMENTS Semester expenses are paya ble one-third at the time of regis­ tration, one-third at the beg i n n i n g of the seventh week, and one­ th i rd at the beg i n ning of the thi rteenth week of each semester. When deferred payments a re requested, the stud ent m ust pre­ sent to the a d m i n i stration a defin ite sched u l e of i nsta l l ments . An interest-bearing note w i l l be req ui red for unpaid ch a rges. A l l notes given at registration time m ust be paid wifhin the semester in which they are i ssued a nd req u i re acceptable endorsers. A carrying charge of $5 .00 w i l l be added to fi rst a nd second semester's accou nts not paid by Nov. 20, and April 20, respectively. In no case may a student be admitted to semester final exa mi nations u nti l a l l obl iga­ tions to the Col l ege have been met i n fu l l previous to the d ate o n w h ich such ex a m i n ations beg i n . R EGISTRAT I ON IS NOT COMPLETED UNTIL ALL FI NANCIAL OBLIGA­ T I ONS HAVE BEEN MET I N T H E BUSI N ESS OFFICE.

The Col ege reserves the right to withhold statement of hon­ orable dism issa l , transcript of record, or d i ploma, u ntil a l l co 'l lege b i l l s have been paid, or u nti l sati sfactory arra ngements have been made with the Busi ness Office. Credit for future services to be rendered by the student can i n no case be used to meet the i n itial payment. Money due a student from loa ns or scholarsh i ps, or for work performed for pay must be appl ied on the student's bi l l and is not given i n cash . Refund o f tu�ition charges m a y b e made when withdrawal from the Col l ege is caused by sickness or cau ses enti rely beyond the control of the student. In no case wi l l speci al fees be refunded . Refund may be made i n the fol lowi ng proportions: One week o r l ess 80% Between one and two weeks 80% Between two a nd th ree weeks 60% Between th ree and four weeks 40% 20% Between fou r a nd five weeks No refund after five weeks. � _______________________ ___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________________

_______________________________________________ _

_________________________ ________________ _

________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________________________ _

___________________________________________ _

D E POSI TORY FOR STU DENTS Students desiri ng to leave cash in the Business Office may do so. This cash may be drawn out at the req uest of the student. I NS U RANCE The Col l ege ca rries no i ns u rance coveri ng the personal effects of the students or the facu lty members. The Col lege cannot be held accou nta ble for any losses. COLLEGE RESERVATIONS The Coll ege reserves the right to change its charges at any time without previous notice. However, after the beg i n n i ng of any given semester no cha nge will be made to be effective with i n the semester, except in case of extreme emergency. 54


SCHOLARSH I PS

SCH OLARSH I PS To aid worthy students who have atta i ned schol a stic achieve足 ment, the Col lege has enlarged its scholars h i p prog ra m . A n u m ber of $400 a nd $200 scho l a rships are ava i l able. These a re payable at the rate of $ 1 00 and $50 per school yea r, appl icable the second semester. To be eligible for consideration, a high school student must have at least a B average a nd ra nk in the u pper 1 0 per cent of his class. Awards to students with outsta nding record s in such fields as m usic, speech, ath letics, and jou r n a l ism are a l so avaHable. The valu e of these awards i s the same a s that of the scholarships, a n d the awards a r e payable a t the rate of $ 1 00 a n d $50 per school yea r, appl icable the second semester. A l l students selected for these honors must be recommended by the high school principal and/or an ap propri ate facu lty scholar足 ship com m ittee. Appl ications for a l l schol arships shou l d be filed with the Dean of the Col lege on officia l b l a n ks furn ished by the Col lege. It is expected that these schol arships be accepted with i n a reasonable time after bei ng offered by the Col l ege. No student may receive the benefit of more than one Col lege scholars h i p at the same time. Pastors and ch ildren of pastors are to be g iven scholarships i n the amount of $ 1 00 for each school yea r. These schol arships are to be granted only duri ng the second semester i n attendance a n d o n l y if such students receive the main support o f their col lege ex足 penses from their parents, a nd prov id i ng that the students are regi stered for at least twelve hours during the school year. Recog nized dependents (not incl uding ma rried children) of facu lty staff members a re g ra nted special scholarsh ips, the amount to be announced at the time of registration. Schol arships in the a mount of $25 per semester shall be given to each of two or more students from the same fa mily attending school at the same ti me, provided that the m a i n su pport Is given by their parents. LEAF Schol arships. The Co nditional Aid Fund of the Evangelical Luthera n Church Educational Aid Fund g ra nts scho l a rships to students, providing no other form of scho l a rs h i p or gra nt-i n-aid has been given by the Col l ege. The Augustana Luthera n Church, California Conference, has provided five $ 1 00 scholarships to be given to students from the Conference each yea r, the g ra nts to be contingent upon need, schol'足 a rship, and cha racter. 55


ST UDENT LOAN FUNDS

The Board of Social Action of the American Lutheran Church a n n u a l l y offers a $300 sch olarship for a senior year A.L.C. student at Pacific Lutheran Col lege who is enrolled in the soci a l service cu rricu l u m . The scholarsh i p is awa rded at the end of the j u n ior yea r, selection bei ng made by the admin istrative officers of the Co'liege. The Brotherhood of the Aug ustana Lutheran Church awards one scholarsh ip each year on a fou r-year basis, paya ble at the rate of $ 1 2 5 per year and gra nted only to a bon a fide mem ber of an Augustana Lutheran Church congregation. The I d a A. Davis Fund, esta blished in 1 949, provides i ncome for scholarships to worthy students. The Evangel ica l Lutheran Church, through its Board of Ed uca­ tion, a n n u a l ly gives a scho l a rship to a senior who enro l l s at Luther Semi nary, St. Pau 'l , Minnesota. The Olaf Halvorson Scholarship is awarded to encourage the study of Norwegian cu lture a nd is offered as an ind ucement to worthy students i n the depa rtrnent of Norweg i a n . The Lad ies o f Kiwanis Award provides for an a n n u a l $75 schol­ arship to a Col l ege j u n ior g i r l . The Lutheran Brotherhood Lega l. Reserve Life I nsura nce Com­ pany grants two a n n u a l scholarships of $300 to high ra nking stu­ dents to be used d u r i ng their senior yea r. The selection is made by the administrative officers of the Col lege. The Tacoma Kiwa n i s Cl u b a n nu a l ly g ives a $300 scholarship to a Tacoma h i gh school: graduating senior chosen by the high school admin istration. This schol'a rs h i p to Pacific Lutheran College is ro­ tated every year between Li ncoln and Stad i u m High Schools. The Tacoma Rotary Club a n n u a l ly gives three $ 1 00 scholarshi ps, the reci pients to be selected by the Col lege. The Women of Rotary Scholarship provides for a $75 schol a r­ ship to a Co l lege j u nior girl . STU DENT LOAN F U N DS The col lege administration is ena bled to help students who are in need of financi a l assista nce through the various student loan funds. Unless otherwise stated, the loan funds are admin istered by the President of the Col l ege. The America n Lutheran Ch u rch Student Loan Found ation pro­ vides opportun ity for Co llege a n d Seminary stu dents of good Chris­ tian cha racter and abil ity who need financi a l help to complete their education. 56


STUDENT EMPLOYMENT

The Anton Anderson Loa n Fund was presented to the Col'lege to be used for needy students. The fund is a d m i n i stered by the Busi ness Office of the Col lege. The John S. Baker Loa n Fund in the amount of $ 1 0,000 was establ ished in 1 950. Th i s money is l ent to needy and worthy stu­ dents a t a nom i n a l rate of i n terest. Delta Kappa Gamma, a women's honora ry teacher orga n ization, has esta blished a Student Loa n Fund to give financial aid to worthy j u nior a n d senior g i r l s in the field of educatio n . The L i l y C. Ekern F u n d is used as a n a i d t o outstand i ng students need i ng f i n a ncial assistance. The Leo n a M . Hickman Student Loa n Fund, esta blis hed in 1 936, p rovides assista nce to men students resident i n King Cou nty on the basis of need, cha racter, schol astic record , a nd abi 'lity for self-help. The amount avai l a b l e is i n excess of $ 1 00,000. A l l loans bea r i nter­ est at 5% a nd m ust be approved by the H ickma n Student Loa n Fund Com mittee. Further i nformation may be obtai ned from the Trust Department of the Peoples N ational B a n k of Wash i ngton, 1 4 1 4 Fou rth Avenue, Seattle, Washi ngto n . T h e Marie H uth Loa n F u n d w a s estab l ished d u ri ng t h e school yea r of 1 95 1 -5 2 . This money is to be l ent to needy and worthy students at a nomi n a l rate of i nterest a n d thus be of perpetu a l assist­ ance to those who wi l l come u nder the provisions of this g ift. The J . P. Pfl ueger Student Loa n Fund was esta b l i shed d u ring the school year 1 952-53 i n memory of the l ate Myrt l e Pflueger and i n honor of Dr. Pfl ueger, Professor at the Col lege since 1 930. The O . J. Stuen A l u m n i Loan Fund, esta b l i shed in memory of Professor O . J . Stuen in 1 953, is a d m i n i stered by the Al u m n i Associa­ tion in con j u nction with the President of the Col lege. The O . A Ti ngelstad Loa n Fund was establ ished in memory of Dr. O . A. Ti nge'lstad in 1 953 by the Board' of Trustees of the Co l l ege. The Women's Missionary Federation of the Eva ngelical Lutheran Church, in 1 950, gave $ 1 ,500 as a loan fund to the Col lege. It is d i rected that the principal sh a l l be loa ned to needy a nd worthy j u n iors a nd seniors.

STUDENT EMPLOYMENT The Co l lege a i ms to assist worthy a n d needy students by h e l p­ i ng them to fi nd work . Appl ications for work sho u l d be m ade to either the Dea n of Men or Dea n of Women after the student h a s been accepted for admissio n . Students who w i l l need work shoul'd apply early i n the s u m mer beca use the n u m ber of jobs ava i l able is l i m ited. 57


COU RSES OF I' NSTRUCTION

The descri ptive summaries that fol low a re designed to consti足 tute both a record of the courses actu a l l y given in 1 956-57 a nd a n a n nouncement o f what w i l l b e offered i n 1 957-58.

The teachers

a re llisted by depa rtments in accorda nce with the division of the teaching load in 1 956-57 a nd the cou rses actu a l l y given d u ri ng the year have the na mes of the respective i nstructors added . Courses open to freshmen and sophomores a re n u mbered 1 0 1 299 and a re considered lower d ivision subjects. Cou rses open to ju niors and seniors a re n u mbered 300-499 or a bove and a re regarded as upper division subjects.

Courses n u mbered 500 are open to

graduate students only. The student should have his entire program made u p of sub足 Ijects i n the division in which he cl assifies.

I n exceptional cases

sophomore students may be assig ned to an upper division course if the prereq uisites for the course h ave been met. Courses with odd numbers a re usual l y offered the first semester and cou rses with even numbers are usua l ly offered' the second semester. The Col l ege reserves the right to modify specific course requIre足 ments, to disconti n ue classes in which the registration is rega rded as insufficient, a nd to withdraw courses. 58


ART

ART Mr. Roskos, Mr. Kittleson, Mr. Weiss The aim of this department is to offer instruction and guidance to those who des i re to give expression to their creative a b i l ity in the actual' practice of art, to those who wish to study art for its cu ltural val ue, to those who prepare to teach i n elementary, junior or senior high school . Req u i rements for a m a jor i n a rt a re 2 7 credit hours incl uding Art 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 2 1 0, 2 1 5, 2 1 9, 3 1 1 , 3 1 2, 3 1 5, 4 1 1 , 4 1 2 a n d electives to com plete requirements. Requirements for a m i nor a re 1 5 credit hou rs includ i ng Art 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 4 1 1 , 4 1 2 and electives to complete req u i rements. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Education deg ree who are plan n i ng to concentrate in the field of Art, should fol low the course outl ine as l isted in the section on Requirements for Degrees. 1 0 1 . I NTRODUCTION TO F I N E ARTS Either semester. Th ree hours Principles of aesthetics; the und ersta nding and ap preciation of beauty as it a ppears In the various a rts. Mr. Weiss

1 1 1 . FUNDAMENTALS OF ART

Either semester. Three hours

This is a course giving the basic fundamentals of a rt, including a thorough study of proportion, val ues, composition, perspective, and color theory, which are necessary for creative expression. Media a re pencil, charcoal, water colors, and paste l . Six hours l aboratory per week. Mr. Kittleson

1 1 2. DRAW I N G AND PA I NTING Prereq uisite: Art 1 1 1 .

Four hours laboratory per week.

2 1 o. CREATIVE DESIGN

Two hours Mr. Roskos

Two hours

Attention Is concentrated on the principles of design w h ich are de足 veloped through the study of line, mass, color, and space relation足 ships. The work is planned so as to develop appreciation and to sti m u l ate originality in the actual creation of good desig n. Four hours Mr. Roskos la boratory per week.

2 1 5. CLAY MO DELING

Two hours

This is a course in the various methods of modeling in clay. Appllce足 tion of these methods is made to pottery and sma l l figures. Individ u a l instruction is given in pl aster casting. Four h o u r s laboratory p e r week. Mr. Roskos

2 1 9 . POSTER DESIGN

Two hours

Princip les of lette ring and letter construction with a brief h istory of the a l phabet. This is fol lowed by the planning of the l a yout and painting of posters. Four hours of :Iaboretory per week. Mr. Rosko.

59


ART

Two hours per semester

3 1 1 , 3 1 2 . O I L PAI NT I NG

Pictorial a rrangements of sti l 'I-l ife, figure, and la ndscape work rend足 ered in o i ls. Em phasis pl aced on composition, va l ues, color, and b rush technique. Prerequisite: Art 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 . Fou r hours labo ratory per week. Mr. Roskos

Two hours

3 1 5 . SCULPT U R E

This course is concerned with scu l ptural form in plaster a nd concen足 trated study i n mass and space re lationships. Prerequisite: Art 2 1 5 . Mr. Roskos

325. ART I N T H E ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Two hours

A cou rse pla n n ed for those who intend to teach art in the elementary g rades. Appropriate projects in drawing, design and construction a re worked in va rious media to i l l ustrate the types of work wh ich are su itable to the inte rests and a b i l ities of these pupils. Prerequisite: Prefera b l y Art 1 1 1 . Fou r hours of combined lecture and l aboratory. Mr. Kittleson

4 1 1 , 4 1 2 . H ISTORY A N D A P P R EC IATI O N OF ART Th ree hours per semester The course is plan ned to in crease the studen t's appreciation of works of a rt. I n the first semester a general survey is made of a rch itecture, scu l ptu re, and painting from the pre-c l assical a rts through the a rts of the Renaissance. In the second semester a s i m i l a r su rvey is made from the Renaissa nce th rough the twentieth century. Mr. Kittleson

4 1 4. A EST H ET ICS

Th ree hours

See Phi losophy 4 1 4 .

Two to fou r hours

4 1 5 . SPECIAL PROB LEMS

A course plan ned for advanced students m a joring in art who wish to secure g reater proficiency in a n y partic u l a r field in wh ich the student Mr. 'Roskos feels more train i n g is needed.

425. CLASSROOM ART TECH N IQ U ES

Two hours

A l l media common to the classroom a re studied for fu l l use mani pu足 lation and tech niques. A l so media not so common to the classroom a re studied. Four hours laboratory per week. Formerly listed liS Elementa ry School Art Workshop.

427. CLASSROOM ART GU I DANCE

Two hours

This course is designed to meet the exp ressed needs of the classroom teacher (a l l levels) in giving chi ldren the assistance and encou rllge足 ment needed for reg u l a r development.

440a. A RT IN T H E SECO N DA RY SCHOOL

Two hours

A course p l a n n ed for those who intend to teach In the secondary g rades. P l a n ned simi l a rl y to Art 325. Fo u r hou rs combined lecture and la boratory per week. Prerequisite: Art 1 1 1 o r consent of i n structor. 60


BIOLOGY

BIOLOGY Mr. Strunk, Miss Ford, Mr. Leraas, Mr. Nothstein, Mr. Ostenson The wor k i n this department is desig ned to (a) give to the student a broad knowledge a n d cultural appreciation of the world of living th i ngs; (b) provide a sound tra i n i ng for teachers who enter the biol ogical sciences; (c) establish a biological found ation for prac足 tical work in fields such as agricu lture, forestry, fish a nd wi l d l ife, bacteriology, entomology and other rel ated fields; (d) lay an ade足 quate fou ndation for students who desire to enter the fields of medicine, dentistry, veteri n a ry med icine, medical and hospital tech足 nology, n u rsi ng, hea lth ed ucation; (e) prepare students for gradu ate a nd resea rch fields i n the bio logica l sciences. A major co nsists of a m i n i m u m of 24 hou rs, at 'l east 1 2 hours of which s h a l l be i n the u pper division courses (n umbers 300 or above). Biology 471 m u st be incl uded in the m a jor. Beg i n n i ng with the school year 1 957-5 8, req u i red su pporti n g subjects for the major a re: one yea r of Chemistry; Mathematics 1 0 1 , 1 1 2 or 1 3 l . Chemistry 32 1 and 322 and Physics 2M and 262 a re strongly recommended. A minor co nsists of a minimum of 1 5 hours. Candid ates for the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree who are p l a n n i n g to concentrate i n the field of Biology, shou ld fol l ow the cou rse outline as listed in the section on Req ui rements for Degrees. 1 0 1 , 1 02 . GENERAL BIOLOGY

Fo ur hours per semester

A genera l consideration of the most important princip les lind facts of the science of l i ving things. periods per week

Two

l ectures lind two

laboratory Miss Ford

Fou r hou rs per semester

1 3 1 , 1 32 . COLLEGE ZOOLOGY

A survey of the a n i m a l ki ngdom, lind of fundamenta l biologic!!1 principles.

Two lectures and two la boratory periods per week. Mr. Stru n k

Fo u rs hours per semester

1 4 1 , 1 42 . COLLEGE BOTANY

A su rvey of the plant kingdom, structure first semester, l ife history

second semester. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Miss Ford

Two hours

1 54 . THE FLOWE R I NG PLANTS Fie ld studies of the flowering p l ants of the reg ion. towa l"d a m a j or or m i nor in Bio logy.

Not to be counted

1 6 1 , 1 62 . H UMAN ANATOMY AND P HYSIOLOGY Four hours per semester A study of the structure and the functions of the h u m a n body.

The course is designed to meet the needs of pre-nursing students and ma iors i n Physical Education. Two lectu res and two la boratory periods per week. Mr. Nothstein

61


BI OLOGY

201 . MICROBIOLOGY

Fou r hours

Bacteria, yeasts, molds, viruses, and other microorgenisms, their cha racteristics and thei r role i n the home, medicine, agricu lture and industry. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. May be taken for upper division credit by jun iors or seniors with ,instruc足 Miss Ford tor's consent. Prerequisite: 1 3 2, 1 42 or 1 6 1 .

22 1 . BIOLOG ICAL TEC H N I Q U ES

Two hours

Methods of col lecting and preserving biologica l materials for cless足 room and research study. May be taken for upper division credit by juni ors and seniors with instructor's consent. Prerequisite: 1 3 2 or

1 42 .

222. CONSE RVAT ION OF NATURAL RESOURCES The conservation of netu rel lectures per week.

resou rces of the

2 3 1 . GEN ETICS

U nited

Two hours Stetes. Two Mr. Ostenson

Three hours

A study of the laws of i n heritance and specia l appl ication to man. May be taken for upper d ivision credit with consent of instructor. Formerly l i sted as Heredity. Prerequisite: Science ( 1 2 ],) or Bio'iogy 1 0 2, 1 32 or 1 42 . Miss Ford

232. GEN ETICS LABORATORY

Two hours

Methods of a n a l ysis and interpretation of genetical findings. Two l a boratory periods per week. May be taken for upper d ivision credit with consent of instructor. Prerequisite: Biology 2 3 1 .

S23 5. B IOLOGY OF THE SEASHORE A course especi a l ly deSigned for teachers. a major or mi nor.

Fou r hours

Not to be counted toward

Three hours

242. SYSTEMATIC BOTANY

The identification end classification of the seed plents represented in the local flore. Mey be taken for upper division credit by ju niors and seniors with instructor's consent. One lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 42 .

272. GENERAL ENTOMOLOGY

Four hours

The classification, natural h istory, economic importance and control of in sects. Two lecture end two leboratory periods per week. Pre足 requisite: Biology 1 3 2.

274. MICROTECHN IQUE

Two hours

Principles and practice in methods of preparing histo logical, embryo足 logica l and cytologica l specimens for microscopic study. May be taken for upper division credit with consent of instructor. Prerequ isite: 1 02 , 1 3 2, o r 1 62 .

3 1 1 . ORNITHOLOGY

Two hours

A study of the birds, with emphasis on Ilocal forms. Designed for students with a hobby interest i n birds as wel l es for advanced students in biology. Prerequisite: Biology 1 02 or 1 32 . Mr. Ostensen

323. NATURAL H ISTORY OF I NVERTEB RATES

Four hours

The classification, anatomy, natural history and importance to man of the invertebrates. Lectu res, laboratory studies and field co l l ections. Mr. Ostenson Prerequisite: Biology 1 02 or 1 3 2.

62


BIOLOGY

324 . NATURAL H ISTORY OF I NVERTEBRATES

Four hours

Classification, natural history and economic i m portance of the verte足 brates with the exception of birds. Lectures, l a boratory studies and field collections. Prerequisite: Biology 1 02 or 1 3 2, 361 reco m mended. Mr. Ostenson

Three hours

344. PLANT PHYSI O LOGY

A study of the p l a n t's internal mechanism. One lecture laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 42

and

two

S35 1 , 352. NATURAL H ISTORY OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST Th ree hours per semester An extensive field and laboratory course covering major phases of the natu ra l history of the region. Lectu res, laboratory studies and field work. Not to be counted toward a major or mino r in Biology. Prereq uisite: Instr uctor's consent.

361 . COMPARATIVE ANATOMY

Fou r hours

A comparative study of vertebrates with d issection of representative forms. Two lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prere足 quisite: Biology 1 02 or 1 32 .

364 . VERTEBRATE EMBRYOLOGY

Fou r hours

A study of the development of vertebrates. Two lectures and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1, 32, 3 6 1' recom足 mended. Mr. Leraas

4 1 1 . H ISTOLOGY

Fou r hours

A microsco pic study of the tissues and organs of vertebrates. Two lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 3 2 and 3 6 1 or 364. Mr. Leraas

Th ree hours

424. ECOLOGY

A study of p l ants and animals in relation to their env i ronment. Two lectures an d one la boratory period per week. Prerequisite: Biology 1 3 2 and 1 42.

432. COMPARAT IVE PSYCHOLOGY

Th ree hours

A course devoted to the neurological basis of animal reactions with emphasis on the mechanics of adj ustment to heat, l i ght, chemical and mecha n ica l sti mu lation. Prereq u isite: Instructor's consent.

Four hours

44 1 . GEN ERAL PHYS IOLOGY

A course designed to acq u aint the student with the fundamental principles of physiology. Prerequisite: Instructor's consent.

Two hours

471 . H ISTORY OF B I O LOGY

Rise and development of zoo logical theories and laws. Requi red of a l l Bio'logy majors. Prerequisite: 1 32 or 1 42 or Instructor's consent.

48 1 , 482. SEM I NAR

One hour

Student and staff presentation and discussion of selected topics i n biology o n the basis o f l iterature and/ o r orig i n a l research. Freshmen a nd sophomores are inv ited to attend.

497, 498 . IN DEPEN DENT STUDY

One to two hours per semester

I n vestigations in fields of special interest may be carried out by those students majoring in Biology who have demonstrated their a b i l ity to do independent work. Open to majors o n l y. Prerequisite: Consent of the department head.

5 1 0 . G RAD UATE SEMINAR

One to th ree hours 63


CHEMI STRY

C H EMISTRY Mr. Ra mstad, Mr. Olsen A m a jor req u i res 24 hours. In add ition, a year of physics, co l l ege a l gebra and trigonometry a re req u i red of a l l students ma jor足 ing in chem istry. A year of biology is a lso recommended . A m i nor req u i res 1 6 hours. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Ed ucation degree who are p l an n i ng to concentrate i n the field of Chem istry, shou ld fo l low the course outline as l isted under Teacher Education in the section on Req u i rements for Degrees . Three hours

1 0 1 . GEN ERAL A N D IN ORGANIC CH EMISTRY Open to non-majors. week.

Two lectures and

one l a boratory period per Mr. Ramstad

1 02 . ORGAN IC AND B IOC H EMISTRY Open to non-majors. week.

Th ree hours

Two lectures and one laboratory period per Mr. Ramstad

1 05, 1 06. GEN ERAL I NORGAN IC CH EMISTRY Four hours per semester The fundamental chem ical theories; the chemistry of the non-meta l l ic and meta l l i c elements. Two lectures, one quiz, a n d two l a boratory periods per week. Open o n l y to students who have not had h ig h Mr. Olsen school chem istry.

1 07, 1 0 8 . GEN ERAL I N ORGAN IC CH EMISTRY Fou r ho urs per semester The fundamenta l chemical theories; the chemistry of the non-meta l l ic and meta l l ic e lements. Two lectures, one quiz, and two la boratory periods per week. Open to students who have had chemistry i n Mr. Ra mstad h i g h school.

Fou r hours

20 1 . QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS Two lectures and two l a boratory Chemistry 1 05 , 1 0 6 or 1 0 7, 1 0 8 .

periods

per

week.

202. QUANTITAT IVE ANALYSIS

Prerequisite: M r . Olsen

Four hours

Volumetric and g ravimetric methods. Two lecture and tory periods per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 20 1 .

32 1 , 322. ORGANIC CH EMISTRY

two labora足 M r. Olsen

Fo ur hours per semester

A general study of the carbon compounds, both the a l i phatic and the aromatic. Th ree lectures and one th ree- hour l a boratory period per week. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1 06 or 1 0 8 . M r . Ramstad

64


ECONOMICS AND

BUS'I N ESS ADMI NISTRATION

43 1 , 432. PHYSICAL CH EMISTRY

Fou r ho urs per semester

A study of fundamental theory of chem ical reaction and measurement of physica l properties of chemical agents. Two lecture and two laboratory periods per week. Prerequ i s i te: Chem istry 202 and Math 1 3 1 or equivalent. Mr. Olsen

44 1 , 442 . BI O-C HEM ISTRY

Two hours per semester

Basic principles of biochemistry, i nc l ud i ng the structure and metabo足 lism of biologica l l y i m portant compounds. Prereq u isite: Chemistry 1 2 1 , 1 22 . M r . Ramstad

497, 498 . I N DEPEN DENT STU DY

One or two hours per semester

Open to students majoring in chemistry. by the department.

Arrangements to be made Mr. Ramstad, Mr. Olsen

505. INORGAN IC PREPARATIONS

One to three hours

A study of sma l l scale production of inorganic compounds.

Fou r hours

506. ADVANCED I NORGA N I C

A deta i l ed study of the Periodic Table and of the rare earth elements

One to th ree hours

5 1 2 . O RGAN IC P R EPARATIONS

An advanced study in appl ications of organic syntheses.

Two hours

520. H ISTORY OF CH EMISTRY

ECONOMICS AN D BUSI N ESS ADM I N I STRATION Mr. Axfo rd, Mr. Sta m polis, Miss Berge, Mr. Dizmang, Mr. Fau l k, Miss Moore The aim of the department is to prov ide a broad general tra in足 ing in basic business su bjects i n the Christi an Liberal trad ition a nd some opportu nity for special ization to the extent req ui red to start a ca reer i n busi ness im mediately u pon g raduation. At l east. one a rea of interest as l i sted below should be tentatively id entifi ed i n the sophomore year so that proper seq uence of courses may be arra nged . The cou rses offered i n each speci a l area of i nterest a re as fol lows. Accounti ng: 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 , 3 1 3, 3 1 4, 3 1 5 . Economics: 1 0 1 , 1 02, 20 1 , 30 1 , 302, 303, 304, 33 1 , 40 11 , 402; 432, S4 34 . Finance: 1 62 , 2 6 1 , 361 , 362, 363; 365, 366 . I ndustrial Rel ations: 3 2 1 , 322, 42 1 , 422 . Marketing: 272 , 273, 37 1 , 3 72, 373, 3 74 . Secreta rial Science: 1 4 1 , 1 42, 1 4 3, 1 44, 24 1 , 243, 244, 34 1 , 354. 65


ECONOMICS AND BUSI N ESS ADM I N ISTRATION

Ma jor: A m i n i m u m of 30 credit hours, including 1 0 1 , 1 02, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2, and 452 a nd six semester hours from the fol lowi ng 3 6 1 , 44 1 , 39 1 , 392. The requi rements shou ld be taken as fol lows: Fresh man, 1 0 1 a n d 1 02; Sophomore, 2 1 1 a nd 2 1 2; J u n ior, 36 1 , 44 1 , 3 9 1 , 392; and Sen ior 452. Majors may be exempt from the foreign l a nguage req u irement. M i nor: A m i n i m u m of 1 5 cred it hours i ncl uding 1 0 1 and 2 1 1 . 1 0 1 , 1 02. P R I N C I PLES OF ECONOMICS

Three hours per semester

National income, employment, and prices; economic growth, markets and the price system, theory of the firm, structure of ind ustry, dis足 tribution of i ncome, the public economy, cycles, the ,international Mr. Axford economy.

Two hours

1 40 . BUS I N ESS MATH EMAT I CS

Review of a rithmetic processes, decima ls, percentages; interest and discount, trade discounts, ma rkups. Not to be counted toward major or minor. Mr. R u n n i n g

1 4 1 . B EG I N N I NG TYPEW R I T I N G

Two hours

Touch typewriting, ski I I and speed b u i l d i n g exercises, letter writing, reports, manuscripts; for those who have never had typewriting before and who do not know the keyboard. Five hours of classwork per week Miss Berge

1 42 . ADVANCED TYPEWR I T I NG

Two hours

Review of fundamenta l s, development of speed and accuracy; pro足 duction work in busi ness forms, reports, and manuscripts; typing speed of 60 requi red by end of course. Fo u r hours of classwork per week. Prerequisite: BA 1 4 1 or equivalent high school typewriting. Miss Berge, Miss Moore

1 43 . B EG I N N I N G SHORTHAND

Three hours

Gregg s horthand, emphasis on read ing, writing, dictation a n d begin足 ning transcription; n o credit for one semester-must be fo l lowed by BA 1 44 . Five hours of cl asswork per week. Miss Berge

1 44. I NT E RMED IAT E SHORTHAND

Three hours

I ntensive review of funda menta ls, emphasis on speed in reading and copying, writing speed requi red at end of course, from 1 00 to 1 20 . F i v e h o u r s of classwork p e r week. Prerequisite: B A 1 4 3 o r equiva lent. Miss Moore

1 62. B U S I N ESS F I NANCE

T h ree hours

Dividend pol icy, expansion of the firm, fai l ure a n d reo rga n ization, instruments of finance, bonds and stocks, i nvestment banking, promo足 tion, short and long term financing. Mr. Axford

20 1 . I NT E RMED IATE ECONOM I C ANALYS IS

Three hours

Natio n a l i n come accounts, monetary theory, income theory, price theory, distribution of income, Keynesian II n ll l ysis. Prerequisite: BA 1 02 . 66


ECONOMICS A N D B US I N ESS ADM I N ISTRATION

2 1 1 , 2 1 2 . ELEMENTARY ACCOUNTING

Th ree hours per semester

Ba la nce sheet, income statement, the acco u nting cycle, accrued and deferred items, asset v a l u ation, corporation accounting, manufactu rin g accounts, ana lysis of financi a l statements. Mr. Dizmang

24 1 . BUSIN ESS COMMU N ICAT ION

Th ree hou rs

Letters of appl ication, letters of inquiry, orders, fo l low-up, credits and collections, devices, reports, publ ications, rules and instructions, minutes of meetings. Prerequisite: BA 1 4 1 or equiva lent. Miss Berge

243. ADVANCED SHORTHAND

Th ree hours

244. D I CTATION

Th ree hours

Continuation of intermedi ate shorthand, study cycle emphasizes s pe l l­ ing, style, vocabul ary building, speed dril ls, p h rasing, sustained speed bui lding and transcription speed b u i l d ing. Fo u r hours of classwork per week. Miss Berge

A te rminal cou rse for g rllduating seniors; stress is placed on a high competence i n di ctation and transcription, designed to meet high secreta rial employment standards. Four hou rs of classwork per week. Miss Moore

26 1 . INVESTMENTS

Two hours

Place of investment in economy, financi a l information, stock mllrkets lind brokers, financial ana lysis, risks of investment, i n vestment policies and management, investment companies; a company report is required during the course.

Three hours

272. MA RKETI NG

The prin ci ples, methods, and problems of ma rketing; marketing func­ tions; m a rketing of raw mater i a l s a n d man ufactured goods; m iddle­ men, channels of d istribution, costs, price po l icies, bra nds. Mr. Dizmang

273. CONSUMER ECONOMICS

Two hours

Consumption and production, consu mer demand, consumer educa­ tion, i n te l l igent buying, technology of consumption, the problems of consumers.

3 0 1 . BUS I N ESS CYCLES A N D FO R ECAST I NG

Two hours

Business conditions, causes of the cycle, theories of the cycle, dy­ namics of busine ss; phases, crises and turn ing points; stabil ization and forecasting.

302. ECO NOMIC H ISTORY OF THE UN ITED STATES

Three hours

H istory of American economic institutions from colon i a l times to the present.

303. ECO NOMIC GEOGRAPHY

Two hours

The m a jor ind ustries-ma nufactu ring, min ing, reta i l trade, services, transportation, public uti lities, finan ce-are considered from the point of view of the structure of the American ec.onomy.

3 04. H ISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT

Three hours

Merca ntil ism, p h ysiocracy, Adam Smith, classical thought, R icardo, the optimists, nation a l ists, and historica l schools; socia l i st thought, the Austrian schoo l . Prerequ isite: BA 1 0 2 . 67


ECO NO M I CS A N D BUS I N ESS ADM I N ISTRATI O N

3 1 1 , 3 1 2 . I NTERMED IATE ACCOUNTI NG Three hours per semester Fundamental processes, working capital items especia l l y inventories, non-current items w i th emphasis on i nvestments and plant and equip­ ment accounts, corporate capita l, a n a l ytical processes. Prereq uisite : BA 2 1 2 .

Two hours

3 1 3 . FEDERAL TAX

Perso n a l and corporate income tax, capital gains, soc i a l security; federal estate and gift taxes, p rincipal emphasis on the federal income Mr. Dizmang tax . Prereq uisite: BA 2 1 2

Two hours

3 1 4. AUD ITING

The theory, procedures, and practices of auditing as they ap ply to the major bala nce sheet accounts; d i scussion and problems of gener a l l y accepted methods o f verification used by CPA's. Prerequisite: B A 2 1 2 . Mr. Dizmang

Three hou rs

3 1 5. COST ACCOUNTING

Princip les of cost accounting, job lot and process systems. Manageri a l control through cost accounting, procedures, standard costs, estimated costs, and cost acco unting systems. Prereq uisite: BA 2 1 2 . Mr. Dizmang

Th ree hou rs

32 1 . LABOR P ROB LEMS

A study of the h i story, natu re and treatment of la bor problems i n t h e U n i ted States. Mr. Sta mpo l i s

322. RECENT LABOR LEGISLATI O N

Two hours

A su rvey of recent federa I and state legis ,lation affect ing the status of l a bo r in the U n i ted States.

33 1 . I N TERNATIONAL ECONOMICS

Three hours

Methods and problems of foreign trade; internation a l agencies for economic cooperation. Mr. Stampolis

34 1 . SECRETARIAL P ROCED U R E

Two hours

Funda menta ls of office procedures, uses of devices, s k i l ls, business ethics, attitudes, objectives and opportunities; for students p l a n n i n g Miss Moore to beco me profess ional secretaries.

35 1 . BUS I N ESS ORGAN IZAT ION AND MANAGEMENT

Th ree hou rs

Background of m a n agement, co mmittees and meetings, compensation of man agement, function of di rectors, leadership and management t ra i n i ng , organization structure, delegation, and principles of man­ Mr. Axford agement.

352. PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

Three hours

O rganization structure, location, physica l facilities, p l a nt a nd equ ip· ment layout, time and motion study, materi a l and production control, q u a l ity contro l . 68


ECONOMICS AND BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION Th ree hours

354 . OFFICE MANAGEMENT

Principles of organ ization and superVISion, physical facil ities, equip­ ment, flow of work, busi ness forms, business machines, fi l'ing, eva lu­ ation and standards. Three hours 3 6 1 . MO N EY AND BAN K I NG Money and credit, infl ation, Federa l Reserve System and chllrts, commercial ban ks, monetary theory and po licies, foreign exchange, consumer credit, building credit and agricu ltural credit. Mr. Axford Th ree hours 362 . P U B LIC F INANCE Federal, state, lind 10cIII tllxation; public expenditures-defense, sod!! 1 security; taxes-income, excise, property, death, gift; budgets, fiscal po licies, debt management. Mr. Axford Two hours 363. MATH EMATICS OF F I NANCE Mathematical foundations of investment, annuities, probabil ity, life insurance, amortization lind sinking funds, cllpital ized costs. 365. R EAL ESTAT E

Two hou rs

The city, land and bui ldings, leg a l forms, rea l estate market, appraisal, financing real estate, pubHc interest, property development and Mr. Axford management. 366. I NSURANCE Th ree hou rs An introduction to the u nderlying principles of insu rance fo l lowed by a descriptive study of the practices in the more important branches Mr. Fau l k of the insu rance business. 37 1 . ADVERT I S I NG Th ree hours The theory of advertising, problems involved, methods and media used; l ayout, typography, and copy writing; social and economic aspects. 3 7 2 . RETA I LI NG Three hours Problems of retailing from the standpoint of different classes of reta i l­ ers, study of underlying principles, buying, stock control, ethical and lega l phases. Prerequisite: BA 2 72 . 37 3 . SALES MANAGEMENT Th ree hours Principles of sa lesmanship, the prospect, the sa lesman, the product; sa les demonstrations, management of sa les depa rtments, planning, Mr. Fau l k quotas, contro l . 37 4 . TRANSPORTAT ION Two hours A general survey of rail, water, highway, air, lind pipeline transpor­ tation, place in society, services, traffic associations, freight classifi­ cations and tariffs, routes, rates, regul ations. 3 9 11 , 392. B US I N ESS LAW Th ree hours per semester Procedu res, contracts, negotiable instru ments, business organ izations, property, agency, trusts and w i l ls, transportation, insu rance and employment. Mr. Hanson 69


ECONOMICS AND

BUSI N ESS ADMIN ISTRATION

Three hours

40 1 . SEMINAR IN ECO NOMICS

Consideration w i l l be given to the various aspects of economics as a soci a l science. Principles w i l l be reviewed and clarified. Student research wil l be emphasized. Prereq uis ite: BA 1 02 .

402. CUR RENT ECO NOMIC PROBLEMS

Three hours

Significant problems arising during the semester in which the course is given.

42 1 . P E RSONNEL MANAGEMENT

T h ree hours

A survey of proced ures used in obtaining a n d maintaining an efficient Mr. Sta mpo l i s working force.

422. COLLECT IVE BARGA I N I NG

Three hours

The princip les of co llective bargaining are studied through the med i u m of actual, cases f r o m American industry dea l i n g with t h e negotiation and appl ication of un ion management agreements. Mr. Stampolis

432. COMPARATIVE ECO NOM IC SYSTEMS

Th ree hours

Comparison of the organization and operation of the ma jor contem足 Mr. Stampolis porary types of pol i tica l econo m i es.

434. GOV ERNMENT AND BUSINESS

Two hours

A study of the re lationship of government and busi ness in the United States with special attention to governmental regulation of business. Mr. Sta mpolis

440b. BUS I N ESS EDUCAT ION I N SECO NDA'RY SC HOOL

Two hours

A general methods course in the teach i n g of busi ness subjects. requisites: BA 1 4 2 , 1 44, and 2 1 2 .

44 1 . STAT ISTICAL METHODS

Pre足

Three hours

Use and i n terpretation of e lementary statistical techn iques; graphic representation; measures of central tendency; dispersion, sim ple cor足 relation ana lysis, proba b i l ity judgments, and sampling theory. M r. Ek l und

452. BUSINESS POLICY

Two hours

Po 'licy formula tion by busi ness man agements, requmng the over-al l i n tegration o f the various aspects o f business; students must b e grad足 Mr. Axford uating seniors with a busi ness major.

497. MAJOR CO NF ER ENCE

One hour

498. MAJOR CO NFER ENCE

Two hours

499. MAJOR CO NFERENCE

Three hours

I nd ividua l problems and assignments, group conferences and research reports, with special attention to the tech niques of writing reports. 70


EDUCATION

EDUCATION Miss N ielsen, Mr. Carlson, Mr. Eklund, Mr. Hagen, Mr. Pederson, Miss R u n beck, Mr. Sjod ing, Mr. Sol berg, and assistants This department a i ms: ( 1 ) to give students a thorough u n d er足 sta nding of the ed ucational problems facing democracy today; (2) to help form an educational phi losophy b u i l t u pon a know ledge of the needs of boys a nd gi rls attending schools; (3) to give practical experience through observatIon of instruction and teaching in the p u b l ic schools; and (4) to develop a professional attitude that is cond ucive to conscientious work in classrooms and that wil' l lead to a desire for conti n u ed professional growth. For a m i nor in education 1 6 hours are req uired, I nclud i ng Education 202, 30 1 , 3 1 1 or equival ents. A DMISS I O N TO TEACH E R E DUCATION A candid ate for Bachelor of Arts i n Education m ust be approved by the department d u ring the fou rth or fifth semester of h i s col l ege course. In order to receive this a pproval he m ust: 1.

Have idea l s and person a l ity qual ities which make for successf u l teach i ng .

2.

H ave a clearly defi ned pu rpose or goal.

3.

Have sel ected an Option to be fol l owed .

4.

Ha ve compl eted successfu l ly the course in I ntroduction to Education. (An accu m u l ative grade poi nt average of 2.25 is requ i red before registration.)

5.

Have completed satisfactori l y a series of screening tests including scholastic aptitude, ach ievement, i nterest, person足 al ity, English usage a n d mech anics, and speech and voice.

6. H ave received final approval fol lowi ng an i ndivid u a l con足 ference with representatives of the department. This con足 ference is held after screening tests have been compl'eted a n d prof i l es set up. Septem ber Experience Each student prepa ring for tea ching m ust spend a m i ni m u m of two weeks i n a p u b l ic school prior to the opening of the col l eg e yea r i n which he i s t o do h i s student teach i n g . The p u rpose o f this September Experience is to give the student the opportunity to experi ence the open i n g a nd org a n ization of a classroom at the beg i n n i n g of a school year. This experience may be i n his home 71


EDUCAT I O N

town if arra ngements are made with the education department to do SOi however, the students themselves are responsible for m a kin g a rrangements with the ed ucation department prior to their senior year. Stu d e nt Teach ing A successfu l ex perience in student teaching is vital to the student i n teacher ed ucation. It is therefore recommended that the student carry only fou rteen semester hours d u r ing this semester. It is a l so reco mmended that outside work or co l l ege activity be kept to a bare m i n i m u m . Students who for some reason c annot abide by these recommendations must get speci al permission from the edu­ cation department. 202. I NTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION

Fou r hours

A s u rvey of edu�ational problems a n d issues to orient new students to the professio n . A study of the State Manual and a "project" i n ­ volving actua l expe rience with ch i l d ren is included. Special tests and interviews are scheduled for the gu idance of the p rospective teacher. Miss Nielsen, Mr. Hagen

30 1 . H UMAN DEVELOPMENT

Three hours

A study of the developmenta l process of the h u m a n organism beg in­ n i ng with the prenata l period a n d continuing through adolescence. Emotio n a l , social, inte l l ectu a l , and physiological aspects of develop­ ment a re included. Students w i l l have oppo rt u n i ty to d o both longi­ tudinal and cross-section a l type observations. Students in the teacher education prog ram must e n ro l l for Education 202 p rior to 30 1 . Mr. Solberg

Th ree hours

305. C H I LD PSYCHOLOGY See Psychology 305.

307. P UBLIC SC HOOL SYSTEM

Two hours

A s u rvey of the school laws of Wash ington as they affect the man­ agement and administration of the schoo ! . A l so consideration of p ractical p roble ms in cl assroom organ ization. Not open to students who have co m p 'I'eted Education 2 0 2 . Mr. Hagen

3 1 1 a, b, a nd cd . METH ODS AND OBSERVATION

Fo ur hours

A study of curricu l u m, materials and methods of teaching at the v a rious lev e l s from primary th rough high schoo ! . Observations in actu a l schoo l situ atIons fol lowed by d iscussion. Those who wish to prepare primarily for kindergarten and p ri m a ry elect 3 1 1 a; those for i n termediate and u p per g rade, 3 1 1 b; and those for j u n io r and sen ior high school, 3 1 1 cd . Prerequisite: Ed. 202 and 30 1 . Given as a three-hour course d u ring 1 9 5 5 - 1 9 5 6 . Miss R u n beck, Mr. Sjoding, M i s s N i e lsen, Mr. Pederson

3 1 2. THE TEAC H I NG OF READ ING

Two hours

A comprehensive survey of the problems of teaching reading i n a l l t h e g rades. Effective materials, methods, tech n iq u es a n d procedu res a re studied. Miss R u n beck 72


EDUCATION Two hou rs

3 1 5 . ,I NSTRUCT IONAL MATER IALS

A s u rvey of eudio a n d vis u a l mater i a l s and a ids, their use i n the curricu l u m , and their organ ization and ad m i nistration i n the schoo l . Mr. Ha gen

3 1 9. MATH EMAT ICS IN T H E ELEMENTARY SCHOOL Either semester. Two hours An over-a l l study of the basic mathematica l ski l ls a nd a b i l i ties needed by the teacher i n the e l ementary and j u nior high school. Practice i n achievement tests i n a rithmetic a n d i n terp retation o f scores f o r diag­ Miss Nielsen nostic pu rposes.

353. PSYCHOLOGICAL TEST I NG

Two hours

370. P R I NC I P LES OF G U I DANCE

Two hours

405 . ADOLESCENT PSYCHOLOGY

Two hours

407. EDUCATIONAL SOC IOLOGY

Two hours

See Psychology 353.

A study of procedures used in h e l p i n g the student achieve suitable goa l s in schoo l and i n society. Emphasis wi l l be g i ven in testi n g methods f o r s o l v i n g v a r i o u s educatio n a l , perso n a l a n d vocatio n a l prob­ lems for the student. Mr. E k l u nd

See Psychology 405.

See Sociology 407.

408, 409. R EAD I NGS I N ED UCAT I ONAL PROBLEMS O n e to three hours

Students who desire to p u rsue a special l i n e of i n d i v i d u a l reading, investigation, o r research m a y do so for credit, receiving h e l p and g u idance from the facu l ty member best q u a lif ied to assist i n the pa rticu l a r prob l e m . Credit w i l l vary with the amount of work done. Staff

4 1 3 . SC I ENCE IN T H E ELEMENTARY SC HOOL

Two hours

A course designed to acq u a i nt the student with the ob jectives, mater­ i a l s a nd methods of tea ching the sciences in an i n teg rated prog r a m . Mr. Pederson

4 1 4 . SOCIAL STU D I ES IN T H E ELEM ENTARY SCHOOL

Two hou rs

A

co urse designed to a cq ua i nt the student with the objectives, ma­ teri a l s a n d methods of teach i n g the socia l sciences i n a n integrated prog ram.

4 1 6. PARENT-TEACHER CON F E R E NC E

Two hou rs

A study of the princi ples and tec h n iques of Pa rent-Teacher Confer­ ences. Procedures for introd ucing a pa rent-teacher conference pro­ gram to the school and com m u n i ty. Eva l u ation of va rious g rading systems.

4 1 8 . MORAL A N D SPI R HUAL VAL U ES IN ED UCAT I O N Two hou rs This course is based u pon the confidence that moral and s p i ritu a l v a l ues should g row in the context o f teach ing in a n y sub ject matter. l i me wi l l be g iven for def i n i n g what mora l' and s p i ritu a l va l ues sho u l d b e emph asized a n d f o r exploring ways a. n d means o f achieving them. 73


EDUCATION

423. FU N CT I:ONAL ENGLISH IN THE E L EMENTARY SCHOOL Two hou rs A course designed to give the e lementary teacher, g rades one through eight, a n understa n d i n g of how to teach the Engl ish lang uage i n a function a l manner. The fo l l ow ing s k i l l s w i l l be considered: usage, l i stening, spea king, read ing, and writi n g . M i s s Nielsen

Two hours

425. CLASSROOM ART TEC H N I Q U ES See Art 425.

426. P R IMARY R EA D I N G

Two hours

427. CLASSROOM ART GlJ ,l DANCE

Two hou rs

A study of the materials and methods of the modern read ing program and its relation to other activities.

See Art 4 2 7.

428. K I ND ERGARTEN

Two hours

429. D IAG NOSIS OF READ I NG P ROBLEMS

Two hours

A study of the kindergarten ch i ld and h i s adjustment problems. Special emphasis on activities and procedures for his development.

Causes, prevention, and correction of readi n g disab i l ity cases em足 phasized. Various types of read i n g disabi l ity cases diag nosed in cl ass. Members of the class wi l l diag nose, tutor, and com p i l e a case study of a rea d i n g prob lem, prefera b l y from their own schoo l . Prerequisite: Beg i n n i n g Reading course.

433. P R I NC I P LES AND TEC H N IQUES IN SECON DARY EDUCATION

Fou r hours

P u rposes, trends, cu rrent issues, a n d techn i q ues in secondary educlI足 tion. An opportun ity is provided for planning curricula on the second足 a ry l eve.l, individua l l y and cooperatively. Registration i n this cou rse is permitted o n l y to those students wishing to meet special certifi足 cation req u i rements. Not permitted for students who have had Education 3 1 1 cd .

436, 437, 438, 439. SUMMER WORKSHOPS

One to three hours

Workshops in specia l fields held during the summer for vllrying periods of time.

440. SP EC I F I C METHODS IN TEAC H I NG SECONDARY SCHOOL SUBJ ECTS

Two hours

Studies of the cu rricu l um, methods and materials of instruction i n t h e various fields o f the secondary school curric u l u m . These courses are offered by different depa rtments of the college as indicated below and may b e taken for g raduate credit.

440a. ART I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Two hours

See Art 440a.

440b . BUSI N ESS ED UCATION I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOL Two hours See EBA 440b.

74


EDUCATION

440c. ENGLISH :I N T H E SECON DARY SCHOOL

Two hours

See Eng'l ish 440c.

440d . L ITERATURE IN T H E SECON DA RY SCHOOL

Two hours

See Engl ish 440d.

440e. MATHEMATICS IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL

Two hours

440f. MUSIC IN THE SECONDARY SCHOOL

Two hou rs

See Music 440f.

440g. SCIENCE IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL

Two hours

440h. SOC I A L STU D I ES IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL Two hours 440i . SPEECH IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL

Two hours

Formerly Speech 1 99 .

440j. C H EMISTRY IN THE SECON DARY SCHOOL

Two hou rs Th ree hours

441 . STATISTICAL METHODS See Psychology 44 1 .

442. SPEECH PROBLEMS IN THE ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

Two hours

See Speech 442 .

449. R EAD I NG CENTER WOR KSHOP

Two hours

C l i n ica l study of reading problems and suggested corrective measures. To be taken concurrently with Education 469.

Two hours

457. EVALUATION

Eva l u ation of the outcomes of school experiences. Problems that a rise i n connection with development, organization, and administratiolil of tests (both stand a rdized a nd teacher made) wi l l be studied . Recom颅 mended for a l l fifth year students. Prereq uisite: Student teach i n g or teaching experience.

4 6 1 ab, cd C U R R I C U LUM, METHODS, AND STUDENT TEAC H I NG Five hours A course designed to give路 some know ledge, u nderstanding and study of c h i l d ren, subject matter fields and materials in the student's lesser preferred teach i n g level plans plus student teaching o n that 'level. The students who compl ete 463 a or b w i l l e n ro l l for 46 1 ; those who com plete 463 cd w i l l e n ro l l for 461 abo Mr. Hagen, Miss N i e lsen, Mr. Pederson

463. STU DENT TEAC H I N G a, b, c, and d

N i ne hours

Teach ing i n the p u b l i c schools u nder the d i rection and supervision of classroom teachers and co l l ege teachers. Those preparing primarily for kin dergarten and primary elect 463a; those for i n termediate and upper g rades, 463b; those for j u n io r h i g h schoo l , 463c; and those for senior h i g h schoo l , 463d. Prereq u isite: Education 3 1 1 . Miss R u n beck, Mr. Sjoding, Mr. Pederson 75


EDUCATION

One to five hours

465 . SPECIAL PROJ ECT

Students who desi,re additional supervised la boratory experience i n p u b l ic school classrooms m a y d o s o with specia l permission o f the department.

Three hours

468. LABORATORY WORKSHOP

A practical course using chi l d ren of elementa ry age in a classroom situation working out a specific problem. Provision w i l l be made for some active participation of the college students. A conference with the i n structor or the Di rector of Teacher Education w i l l be requi red before registretion can be completed.

469. D I RECTED T EAC H I N G IN R EADING CENTERS

Fou r hours

D i rected observation and teach i n g in summer remed i a l classes in pub l ic schoo ls. To be taken concurrently with Education 449.

Two hours

471 . I N D I V I D UAL INVENTORY See Psychology 4 7 1 .

472. OCCUPATIONAL I N FORMATI O N

Two hours

This course is desi gned for those who are interested' i n the vocational guida nce of young people. Specia l emphasis is placed upon the sources, ana lysis, filing, and methods of d isseminating occupational information.

473 . I N TRODUCTION TO COUNS E L I NG

Two hours

See Psychology 473.

475 . EMOTIONAL PROBLEMS OF C H I LDREN

Two hours

Emphasis is p l aced o n common emoti o n a l prob lems of school-ege chil d ren and the teache r's role when these arise in the classroo m . There i s opportunity to v i s i t local commun ity agencies offering re足 sou rces for help.

478. ME NTAL H EALTH FOR TEACH ERS

Two hours

Primarily concerned with the a d j ustment of the teacher to the class足 room situatio n . Some emphasis o n the various mecha nisms of ad足 justment.

5 0 1 . H ISTORY OF EDUCATION

Two hours

A study of the history of education, Occidentel and Orienta l , with particu l a r reference to its bea rings on contemporary education. Mr. Carlson

505. P H I LOSOPHY OF EDUCATION

Three hours

A study of the relaNons of ph i losophy to education and of phi loso足 Mr. Carlson phical impl ications of educational theories and practices.

507. ADVANCED EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY

Two hours

P rincip les and research in human learning and the i r i m p l ications fo r curricu lum and instruction. 76


EDUCATION

509. COMPARAT IVE EDUCAT I O N

Two hours

A comparative study of the backgrounds, developments, trends, and problems of major natio n a l systems of educatio n . M r . Carlson

Two hours

522. CORE C U R R IC U LUM

A study of the p h i losophical background of the core curricu l u m and the methods of teach i ng applicable to the core. Special attention wi l l be g i ven to problem so l v i n g and the preparation of un its of i nstruction.

526. I MPROVEMENT OF I NSTRUCTION IN THE Five hours

ELEMENTARY SCHOOL

A workshop course d i rected toward meeting the needs of membership dea l i ng with the improvements of i n struction, with a study of recent trends and research in the various e l ementary education; methods and experiences to be used ing the a i ms and o bj ectives set up by the group.

5 3 1 . a b and cd . TEAC H E R ED UCAT IO N SEM I NAR

the cl ass together areas of in attain­

One hour

This course brings together the co l lege teachers and the classroom teachers from the pub l ic schools who a re wo rking with student teach­ ers, so that they may b u i ld common u n dersta nd i ngs and goa l s toward wh ich to work in the tra i n i ng of teachers. 5 3 1 a b for e l ementary teachers and 5 3 1 cd for seco ndary teachers. Miss N i e lsen, Mr. Sjoding, Miss R u n beck, Mr. Hagen, Mr. Pederson

546. C U RR ICULUM DEVELOPMENT

Two hours

A study of types of curricu l u m organization and programs and tech­ n i q ues of curricu l u m development, with a view to prepa ring the student for his own work on curricu l u m problems. Mr. Sjod i n g

5 5 1 . EDUCAT II ONAL RESEARCH

Two hours

Methods and techn iques emp loyed in the i nvestigation and report of educational problems. Some practice in research is provided. Req u i r­ Mr. Sjod i n g ed of a l l grad uate students.

558. 'I N DI V I DUAL RESEARCH

One to four hou rs

For those M.A. candid ates electing to write two or three research papers. One research paper may be in the candidate's minor field written u nder the supervision of the minor adviser. Candidates wi l l be req u i red to review their research papers for the Graduate Com­ mittee.

559. THESIS

Two to four hou rs

For those M.A. ca n d idates e l ecting to write a thesis. The thesis prob­ lem w i l l be chosen from the candidate's a rea of concentration . The candidate w i l l be req u i red to o u t l i n e and defend his thesis i n a final oral examination conducted b y the Graduate Committee.

5 7 1 . SCHOOL G U I DANCE P ROGRAM

Two hours

A survey study of the g u idance program as organ ized a nd conducted by a public school system with emphasis on the ro le of the teacher. Mr. E k l u n d Req u i red for a l l M.A. candidates. 77


EDUCATION

572 . VOCAT I O NAL G U I DANCE

Two hours

A study of the techniques and proced u res of voca tional guida nce and counse l i ng . Topics emphasized are i nterviewing, tests necessary for study of vocation a l fitness, making and writing up interp retations from testing a nd other fact-f i nd i n g devices, practice in writing case reports, sou rces of vocatio n a l i nformation and classroom methods in voca­ tio n a l group g u idance. Students a re req u i red to take a li i representa­ tive tests studies and to g i ve vocational g u i da nce to at least one co l l ege undergraduate or h i g h school student, such work to be per­ formed o u tside of c l ass u nder periodic s u pervision.

578. SCHOOL G U I DANCE FOR ADM I N ISTRATORS

Two hours

Organization and ad m i n istration of g u idance services, selection of guida nce personne l , school pl'ant faci l i ties and services necessary for a n effective g u idance program, a nd eval uation of the program. Pre­ req u is i te : Education 5 7 1 .

58 1 . P U B L I C SCHOOL ADM I N ISTRATI O N

Th ree h o u rs

A beg i n n i n g course for those students p l a n n i n g to enter the field of public school admin istration and su pervision . Some consideration wi l l be given to the ro l e of the school board and superintendent, b u t major emphasis w i l l be on the role of the principal as his work rel ates to chi l d re n and youth, parents, teachers, and other school employees, bui ldings, transportation, and the community. Prerequisite: at least one year of teach ing experience. Mr. Hagen

584. P U B L I C RELAT I O NS

Two hours

Teaching and public school management critica l l y studied for oppor­ tun ities to improve p u b l i c re lations. Mr. Hagen

586. SCHOOL F I NANCE

Two hours

Loca l , State and Federal contributions to school fin ance, their p h i loso­ phy and development. Special emphasis on the development and a d m i n istration of a school budget. Mr. Hagen

5 9 1 . H IG H SCHOOL O RGA N IZATI O N AND ADM I N ISTRAT I O N Two hours Current viewpoints and issues in p l a n n i n g and orga n izing the h i g h school curric u l u m , sched u l e m a k i n g , extra-cu rricu l a r activities, teach­ ers' meetings, pupi ll accou nting and control', fin ance and reports. Prereq u isite: Education 5 8 1 .

593. P ROB LEMS OF T H E ELEMENTARY SCHOOL P R I N C I PAL Th ree hours A course dea l i ng with the practical problems faced by e l ementary school principa l s . Topics incl uded are schoo l organization, admission, and promotion po l icies, p u p i l accounting, records and reporting, dis­ cipl ine, p u b l i c re l ations, and profess ion a l g rowth.

594. ADM I N ISTRATI O N A N D SUPERV ISION WORKSHOP Fou r or five hou rs The projects d iscussed wi l l chiefly be derived from the interests and needs of the students. Typical projects are curricu l u m p'lanning and adjustment i n line with present needs, public relation programs, personnel emp loyment and in-service tra i n ing, a nd f inancing b u i l d i n g and educational programs. Prereq u isite: One course i n Ad m i n istration end/or Supervision. 78


ENGLISH

ENGLISH Mr. R a nson, Miss Blomquist, Mr. Carlson, Miss Chesterman, Mrs. Joh nson, Mr. Klopsch, Miss Knudson, Mr. Nesvig For the major i n l iterature in Liberal Arts at I'east 24 credit hours a re req u i red in add ition to English 1 0 1 a nd 1 02. These s h a l l i ncl ude: English 25 1 a nd 252 (or 25 1 and 484), 6 hours. Eng l is h 382 or 383 or 384 or 388, 3 hours. English 34 1 or 342 or 387 or 483 or 484, 3 hours. Another course from one of the above groups, 3 hours. U pper division electives, 9 hours. For the m i nor in 'literature at least 1 5 credit hours a re req u i red. These s h a l l incl ude six hours of Engl ish 233, 25 1 , 252, or 234. Of the remaining n i ne hours six m ust be upper division. N i ne of the 1 5 hours must be in Eng l ish or American literature. For the m i nor in composition at l east 1 5 cred it hours a re re足 qui red . These s h a l l include at least eight hours of Eng lish 204, 208, 2 1 7, 2 1 8 , 302, 404 or 4 1 8 (only two hours of journal istic composition may be counted) and at least six hours of u pper division electives in l iterature. The req ui rements for majors i'lnd mi nors should be regarded as bare m i n i m u ms. The student is u rged to take additio n a l courses, both lower and upper division, to round out his knowledge of the ma sterpieces of English a n d American literature and, to the extent possible, of world literature. At the beg i n ning of his j u n ior year the student's program should be pl'anned in co nsu ltation with the major adviser to insure the best possible trai ning in literature and i n rel ated fields. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree who are p l a n n i ng to concentrate in the field of Eng lish, should fo l low the course outli ne as listed in the section on Requi rements for Degrees. 5 1, . R EMEDIAL ENGLISH

No Credit

A review of grammar, punctulltlon, mechlln lcs. Students who fail in the English Placement Test are requi red to complete this course before being a l lowed to register for E n g ll ish 1 0 1 . Three hours per week.

1 0 1 . COMPOS ITION

Three hours

1 02 . COMPOSITION

Three hours

The course aims to trllin students to develop Idees eccurately e n d effectively in t h e sentence, I n t h e paragraph, and in extended written discussio n . Essays are read a n d a n a lyzed to provide models of good exposition, to sti m u l ate thought lind discussion, and to develop accur足 The Staff ecy in reading.

A b rief study of the tech nique of prepll ring a research paper. Other足 wise, further work in expository writing combined with the study of representative works of biography, fiction, d rama and poetry. The Staff 79


ENGLISH

S 1 0 3. COMPOSiTION WORKSHOP

Two hours

For students need i n g individ u a l 'Nork u po n elementary problems i n writing exposition. Students p l a n n i n g to enter col lege i n the fa l l o r students a t any point i n their col l ege work may register for this cou rse.

Two hou rs

203. JOU R NAL ISM

A study of the princip les of news writi ng and editing, and t h e i r a p p l ication i n the p reparation of news copy; head l i ne writing; proof Mr. Nesvig reading.

Two hours

204. JOURNALISM

Edito r i a l a n d feature writing; a study of the various types of edito r i a l and feature copy; co l u m n w riting; m a ke-u p; la bo ratory work in con­ nection w ith the MOO R I NG MAST a n d SAGA. Mr. Nesvig

208. ED ITORIAL CO NFERENCE

One to four hou rs

Provides opportu n i ty for the col l ege p u b l i cation staff to do practica l research work on jou rn a l istic prob lems. Open to advanced students i n j o u rn a l i sm with consent o f the instructor. Mr. Nesvig

2 1 7. T H E SHORT STORY

Two hours

2 1 8 . ADVANCED COMPOS ITION

Two hou rs

A study of the short story as a na rrative fo rm. Practice i n w riting short stories. (Upper division students may obtai n upper division credit.) Mr. Ranson

Ai med to hel p the student develop g reater accurllcy, faci l i ty, clarity a nd effectiveness in the ord i n a ry forms of written d iscourse. ( U pper di vision students may obta i n upper div ision credit.) Mrs. Johnso n

230. AN APPROACH TO LIT ERATURE

Either semester. Th ree hours

A study of representative types of d r ama, poetry, essays and prose fiction. The aIm of the course is to deve lop an a p p reciation of l i tera­ ture by considering the natu re of the creative experience a n d the q u a l ities and fu nctions of l iterature a s art. Not recomm ended for ma jors or m i nors in l i terature. Mr. K l o psch, Mrs. Johnson

233, 234. WORLD LITERATUR E

Th ree hours per semester

A reading cou rse in the l ,i teratu res of va rious nations, ancient, medie­ v a l , and modern. I ntended to g i ve p 'l easure and to deve l o p an u nder­ stand i n g of foreign poi n t of view. Readi ngs, reports, lectures, dis­ Miss Blomqu ist cussions.

242. MAJOR AM ERICAN WR ITERS

Th ree hours

Design ed especia l l y for students not majoring In En g l i sh. Not recom­ M r s . Joh nson mended for those who p l a n to take 34 1 , 3 4 2 .

2 5 1 , 252. L ITERARY BACKGROU N DS

Three hours per semester

A study of English classics from Beowulf to H a rdy, em phasizing the work of the major writers, the deve lopment of l i terary forms, an d M r . Ranson their relation to the genera l c u l tura l backgro u n d .

302 . THE ENGLISH LANGUAGE

Spr i ng semester. Two hours

A study of the development of the English l a n g u a ge, p l us i n tensive Miss Knudson reviews i n usage, spe l l i n g, an d voca b u l a ry. 80


ENGLISH

Fal l semester. Two hours

C H I LD RE N'S LITE RATU RE

32 1 .

A short h i story of chi l d ren's l iterature; a study of the l iterature for Miss Blomquist chi l d ren in the lower grades; story te l l i n g .

Three hours

THE CO N T I N E N TAL NOVEL

332.

A study of representative French, Russian, Ge rman, Scandin avian and Miss Knudson Spanish nove l s of the n ineteenth century.

Two ho urs

FOLKLORE A N D FO LK LITERATU R E

335.

A study of folk literature with pa rticu l a r emphasis on the ba l la d a nd the fol kta le; some attention to rel a ted fo l k customs and beliefs. Miss Blomquist 3 4 1 , 342.

AMER ICAN LITERATURE

Three hours per semester

From Edwards to Hawthorne a n d Me l v i l le. to Wor' l d War I . 5349.

From Whitman and Twa i n Mr. Ranson

Two hou rs

MO DERN PO ETRY A study of recent Eng l i sh and American poetry.

350.

CONTEMPORARY LITERATU R E

Three hours

A study of selected works by major writers, c h iefly English a n d American, representing m a i n trends i n poetry, fiction a n d d r a m a from Mr. Ranson World Wa r I to the present time. 35 7.

ENGLISH D RAMA

Th ree hours

P l ays representing the deve lopment of drama from the s'ixteenth cen­ tury to the n i n eteenth, exc lusive of Shakespeare. 358.

Th ree hours

MODERN DRAMA

Sel ected p lays represe nting the deve lopment of drama in the con­ temporary period: British, Continenta l, America " . Mr. Klopsch 382.

C HAUCER

Three hours

Especi a l l y TRO I LU S A N D CRISEYDE a n d THE CANTERBURY TALES. Some study wi l l be m a d e o f the development of the English l a n guage. To be offered Spri ng, 1 9 5 7 . Miss Blomquist 383.

Fa l l semester. Three hours

SHAKESPEA R E

LOVE'S LABOUR'S LOST, MIDSUMMER- N I G HT'S DREAM, AS YOU L I KE I T , R I CHARD I I I , Rm,�EO A N D J U L I ET, J U L I U S CAESAR, TROI LUS AND CRESSIDA, OTHELLO, MACBETH, ANTONY

384.

AND CLEOPATRA, CYMBE L I N E .

SHAKESPEARE COMEDY

OF

ERRORS,

Spring semester. Th ree hours MERCHANT

OF

V E N I CE, RICHARD

I I,

HENRY

N I GHT, MEASURE FOR MEASURE, HAMLET, LEAR, COR I O LANUS, TIMON

),V,

OF

TWELFTH ATHENS,

TEMPEST.

388.

389.

SEVENTEENTH CENTURY L I TERATU R E

Th ree hours

Donne, Mi lton, a n d their contemporaries.

Miss Knudson

E I GHTEENTH CENTURY LITERATU R E

Th ree hours

Defoe, Addison, Swift, Pope, Thomson, S. Johnson, Boswe l l , Gold­ s m i th , Gray, Co l l ins, Bu rns, Bl ake. 81


ENGLISH

Two or three hours

404. LIT ERARY C R I T IC ISM

The p ro b l ems of creating and eva l uating li terature as discussed by the g reat critics of the past century. Recommended m a i n l y for majors and minors in l iterature or compos ition. Third credit hou r may be earned by project in creative or critica l writing.

Three hours

4 1 8 . ADVANCED CREAT IVE WRITING

For those se riously interested in writing fiction, drama, or poetry. Miss Chesterman

42 1 . ADVANCED C H I LDRE N'S LITERATU RE

Two hours

A continuation of the study of ch i l dren's books with emphasis on the early w riting for ch i l d ren a nd o n the juve n i l e l iterature of the last five years; speci a l prob lems in book selection. Prerequ isite: E n g l i sh 32 1 .

440a. LI TERATURE I N THE SECONDARY SCHOOLS Spring semester. Two hou rs A study of literature for J u nior and Senior H i g h School students.

440b. ENGLISH IN T H E SECO NDARY SCHOOLS Fal l semester. Two hou rs Materials, prob lems, and methods.

Miss Knudson

441 . AMER ICAN NOVEL

Three hours

Survey of the development of the novel in the U. S. from the eight足 eenth century to the present day.

442 . AME R ICAN D RAMA

Th ree hours

A brief survey of 1 8t h and 1 9th century American d ram a, with more pa rticu l a r study of 20th century plays and playwrights. Miss Knudson

S471 . STU D I ES IN B RITISH AN D AMER ICAN WRITERS Three hours The major works of from one to three writers wi l l be studied each term. (Formerly l isted as Six American Writers).

483. EA RLY N I N ETEENTH CENTURY LI TERATU R E

Three hours

Wordsworth, Coleridge, Scott, Byron, Shel l ey , Keats; with supp lemen足 tary reading of essays and criticism of the period. Mr. Ranson

484. LATE N I N ETEENTH CENTU RY LITERATU R E

Three hours

An i n tensive study of the l iterature of the Victorian period ( 1 8301 900): poetry, criticism, drama and some fiction. Mr. Ranson

S486. B ROWN I N G

Two hours

497. MAJ O R CONFERENCE

One or two hours Mr. Ranson

550. G RADUATE SEM I NAR

One to three hou rs 82


FRENCH, GEN ERAL ENG I N E E R I NG, GEOGRAPHY

FRENCH Mrs . Little A m i nor in French must i ncl ude fifteen hours above French 1 02. 1 0 1 , 1 02. ELEMENTARY FRENCH

Fo u r ho u rs per semester

Pron unciation. Fundamenta ls of g ram mar. Reading of easy texts.

2 0 1 , 202. I NTERMEDIATE FRENCH

Oral a n d written work. Mrs. Little

Th ree hours per semester

Advanced gram mar and composition. Su rvey reading in the a reas of French history, geography, and cultura l development; supplemen ted by outstanding graded selections from ma sterpieces i n French li tera足 Mrs. Little ture.

3 0 1 , 302. SURVEY OF FRENCH LI TERAH J R E Three hours per semester I n tensive chronological studies of the h istory of French l i terature from earl iest beginning to the twentieth century, supplemented by reading of typical works from each period. Adva nced written and oral d r i l l .

40 1 , 402. ADVANCED LI TERATU RE

Th ree hours per semester

A l l wo rk w i l l be based u pon studies of selected ma sterpieces of French l i terature: d rama, poetry, and prose.

GEN ERAL EN G I N EE R I N G M r . Gai nes 1 0 1 . EN G I N EE R I NG PROBLEMS

Two hou rs

An in troduction to engi neering methods including mathematical re足 view, use of s l ide rule and logarithms, use of form u l as in solving problems with emphasis o n systematic proced ure and sta ndard form of reports. Mr. Gaines

1 5 1 , 1 52 . ENG I N E E R I N G DRAWING A N D Two hours per semester DESCR I PTIVE GEOMETRY Mr. Gaines

G EOGRAPHY Mr. Ostenson 1 0 1 . WORLD GEOGRAPHY

Either semester. Th ree hours

A s urvey of the physical featu res and resou rces of the various coun足 tries. Mr. Ostenson

303. ECO NOM IC GEOGRAPHY See 'EBA

Two hou rs

303. 83


GEOLOGY, GERMAN

GEOLOGY Mr. Gai nes Four hours per semester

1 0 1 , 1 02. GENERAL GEOLOGY

The earth; its mate r i a l s and history. Physical Geology the fi rst semes足 ter; H i storica l Geo l ogy the second semester. Two lectures and two I'a boratory periods per week Mr. Gaines

Two hours

S 1 2 1 . ROCKS AND M I N ERALS

A study of the composition, classification and identification of the common rocks; the i m portant economic and rock form ing m i nera.I's.

GERMAN Mrs . Little, Mrs. Dormer The course i n Germa n l a nguage a i ms to give the student the i nfo rmation, i nterest, faci l ity, and enjoyable experience wh ich he g a i ns in the course of ach ieving a new l a nguage, a wider field of co m prehension of other l a nds a nd peop'le, and to i ncrease his own cu ltural assets. A m i nor in German m ust include fifteen hours above Germ a n 1 02 . 1 0 1 , 1 0 2 . ELEMENTARY GERMAN

Four hours per semester

G ra m m a r; oral and w ritten work; g raded German reader.

2 0 1 , 202. I NTERMED IATE GERMAN

Mrs. Little Mrs. Dormer

Th ree hours per semester

Emph asis on reading a b i l ity; g r a m m a r; songs, poetry and read ing of ea r l y masterpieces of German l i terature. Outs ide read ing. Mrs. Dormer

301"

302. LITERATU RE: GERMAN CLASSICS Three hours per semester German classics of the 1 8th and/or early 1 9t h century such as lessing, Schi l l er, Goethe. Some em phasis o n cultural-historica l background. Mrs. little

40 1 , 402 . ADVANCED L ITERATU RE AND GRAMMAR

Th ree hours

Speci a l studies in the changing movements of German l iterature be足 tween 1 800- 1 900. Selected readings from classicism, romanticism, poetic rea lism, n a tu r a l i sm and expressionism. Studies in 20th cen足 tury Ge rman l iterature.

497, 498. I NDEPEN DENT STUDY 84

One or two hours per semester


G R E E K, H E BREW, HEALTH, HI STORY

GREEK Mr. Roe A m a jor in cl assica l la nguages consists of a m i n I m u m of 27 credit hours inc l u d i ng Greek 2 0 1 , 2 0 2, 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 , 3 5 1 or 3 5 2; Lati n 2 0 1 , 2 0 2; History 2 4 1 , 2 4 2 . A minor in Greek consists of 1 5 credit hours. 2 0 1 , 2 0 2 ELEMENTARY GREEK Four hours per semester I nf lections, voca b u l ary, and syntax; translations from Greek to English and Eng lish to Greek. Mr. Roe 3 1 1 , 3 1 2.

Three hours per semester

N EW TESTAMENT

Mr. Roe

35 1 , 352.

SEM I NAR I N GREEK LANGUAGE OR LITERATURE One to two hours per semester

Open t o seniors.

Mr. Roe

H EALTH See Department of Physica l Edu cation and Health. H E B REW Mr. Rosentha l 2 0 1 , 2 02 .

ELEMENTARY H EBREW

Two hours per semester Mr. Rosenthal

H I STORY Mr. Nodtvedt, Mr. Akre, Mr. Schnackenberg, Mr. Farmer The a i m of the study of history is to acqua int the student with ma n's past pol itical , economic, intel lectu al, soci al, artistic a n d relig足 ious activities i n order that he may orient h i mself i ntel l igently in contemporary world affairs. He w i l l then be b etter eq u ipped to interpret ma n's rol e in the rapidly evolving events of our changing soci a l order. Major for Libera l Arts students: 3 0 cred it hours i ncl uding H i s足 tory 1 0 3 , 1 04 a nd 2 03 , 2 04 . Minor i n Liberal Arts: 1 8 credit hours. A com bined m a jor i n H i story a n d Political Science req u i res a m i n i m u m of thirty hou rs, at least twelve hours in a department, a n d twelve hou rs o r more i n upper d ivision cou rses . The fol lowi ng courses a re req u ired: H istory 1 0 3 , 1 04 , 2 0 3, 2 04; Political Science 1 0 1 or 2 5 1 and 2 5 2 . Candidates for t h e Bachelor of Arts degree i n Education who are planning to concentrate in the field of History should fol low the course outl ine as l i sted in the section on Req u i rements for Degrees. 85


H I STORY

1 03, 1 04. HISTORY OF WESTERN EUROPE Three hours per semester A genera l su rvey of European ci vil ization from the fall of the Roman Empire to 1 9 1 4 . Mr. Nodtvedt, Mr. Schnackenberg

203, 204. AMER ICAN HISTORY

Three hours per semester

The origin and development of the American nation from co lon i a l times to the present. Emphasis upon t h e factors that have influenced and contributed to the American institutions and ways of li fe. Mr. Akre, Mr. Farmer

Either semester. Two hours

2 1 0. T H E PACIFIC NORTHWEST

A su rvey of the discoveries, explorations and settlements of the Pacific No rthwest. The international rival ries; the missionary, economic and po l itical background; the establ ishment of the state and local Mr. Akre governments.

23 1 . LAT I N AME R I CAN H I STORY

Th ree hours

Offered the Fail of 1 95 8 and a l ternate years.

241 , 242. HISTORY OF THE ANCI ENT WOR L D Three hours p e r semester

First semester: Su rvey of the ancient Mediterranean world through the history of ancient G reece and the conquest of Alexander the Great. Second semester: Roman hi story. The origin and rise of the Roman Empire and Roman civ i l ization; its po l i tica l , economic and soci a l devel足 opment and foreign policy. Mr. Akre

3 1 3 . MED I EVAL H ISTORY

Three hours

332. SCA N D INAV IAN H ISTORY

Three hours

33. THE OLD REG IME

Three hours

A study of the history of Eu rope from the fa l l of the Roman Empire to the beginnings of the Rena issance (476- 1 300). Documentary research in sel ected medieval sources. Offered Fa l l 1 9 58 and a lternate years. Mr. Nodtvedt

A survey of the history of the Sca ndinavian countries. The evolution of the i r nation a l governments. Their i n ter-relations with the major countries in Europe. See Norwegian 332.

An adva nced reading course in Eu rope from the peace of Westphalia to the outbreak of the French Revolution. Absol ute monarchies; mer足 canti l ism; institutions; colon i a l expansion; the e n l ightenment. Prere足 quisite: History 1 0 3 , 1 04 . Offered F a l l of 1 958 and a lternate years. Mr. Schnackenberg

334. T H E FRENCH R EVOLUTION AND NAPOLEON

Three hours

Readings and research in the revolutionary events in Europe from 1 78 9 to the Congress of Vienna. Effects upon po litica l, social, eco足 nomic and cu ltural institutions emphas ized. Prerequisite: History 1 0 3 , 1 04 . Offered Spring 1 9 59 and a l ternate years. Mr. Schnackenberg

S335. CULTU RAL-HISTORICAL STU D I ES OF EUROPE ( 1 500- 1 800) Two hours History, art and l iterature of Europe as correl ated studies. 86


HISTORY

S336. CULTURAL-H ISTO R I CAL STU D I ES OF EUROPE (1 800 to present) Two hours H istory, a rt and l iterature of Europe as corre lated studies.

Th ree hours

337. N I N ETEENT H CENTURY EUROPE

An adva nced study of Europe from the Congress of Vienna to 1 9 1 4 . Reaction; l i beral ism; n a tion a l ism; i m perial ism; d i p lomacy; industr i a l revol ution. Prerequi site: History 1 0 3 , 1 04 . Offered Fa l l 1 9 57 and a Iternate years.

338. TWE NT I ET H CENTURY EUROPE

Three hours

The Four Year's Wa r and peace settlements; natio n a l and internatio n a l movements; autarchy a n d col lective security; the proletarian advance; Co m m u n i sm; Fascism; the Second World War; reco nstruction; the new l i bera l i sm; the new conservatism. Prerequisite: Hi story 1 0 3, 1 0 4 . Offered S p r i n g 1 95 8 a n d a lternate years.

3 4 1 . AMERICAN COLO N I AL H ISTORY

Three hours

An intensive study of the colon i a l period i n the U n ited States to the American Revo l utio n . Backgrounds of co lonial settlements; co lonial governm ents and the econom ic, po l itica l , re l ig ious and cultural prog­ ress up to the independence period w i l l be carefu lly studied. Pre­ requisite: History 203, 204. Offered Fa l l of 1 9 5 8 and al ternate years.

342. AMER ICAN H ISTORY ( 1 789-1 860)

T h ree hours

The esta b l ishment of the Federal Government under the new con sti­ tutio n . The era of Andrew Jackson and the pre-Civil War trends. Prerequisite: H istory 203, 204. Offered 1 9 57-58 and a l ternate years.

36 1 , 362. ENGLISH H ISTORY

Three hours per semester

A study of the po litica l, economic, socia l , lega l, literary a rtistic a n d religious elements i n E n g l ish history. T h e first semester: E n g l a n d to 1 6 03. Second semester: Stuarts to 1 90 1 . Offered 1 9 5 8-59 and alternate years. Mr. Nodtvedt

423. T H E RENA ISSANCE

Three hou rs

A systematic study of th e Age of the Renaissance in Italy. I ta l ia n and trans-A l p i n e humanism. Rea dings and research i n selected areas of the Ren aissa nce by each student. Contributions to th e Reformation Era . Prereq u isite: History 1 03 , 1 04. Offered Fa l l 1 957 and a lternate years.

424. T H E REFO RMATI O N

Th ree hours

An intense study of the Reformation Era especiaUy in Germany, Swit­ ze rl and, France, E n g l a n d . Readings and research by each student. Also a study of the Catholic Reformation. Prereq uis ite: H i story 1 0 3, 1 0 4. Offered Spring 1 9 5 8 and a l ternate yea rs.

443. AMER ICAN H I STO RY (Civil Wa r

&

Reconstruction) (1 860-1 900) Three hours

Special emphasis on th e i m pact of the Civil War and the period of reco nstruction upon the country; th e politica l , soci a l , economic and diplomatic trends and ch a n ges. Prerequisite: H i story 203, 204. Offer­ ed 1 9 57-5 8 . 87


H ISTORY

444. REC ENT AME ,RlCAN H ISTORY

Th ree hou rs

A study of the polit ical, soc i a l , economic structure a n d c u l tura l in sti­ tutions of the U n i ted States in the ,present century. The U n i ted States in World h istory; the two World Wars; the League of Nations and the U n i ted States; the Co ld War. Prereq u i s ite: H i story 203, 2 0 4 . Offered 1 9 5 7-5 8 and a l ternate yea rs.

454. H ISTORY OF AME R I CAN D I PLOMACY

Th ree hours

A survey of the basic trends and developments in the foreign rela­ tions of the U n i ted States with spec i a l emphasis on such basic po l i cies as iso l a tion and neutra l i ty, the Mon roe Doctrine and the open door policy. Prereq u i site: Consent of instructor. Offered Spring 1 9 59 a n d a lternate yea rs . M r . A k re

456. H I STORY OF EUROPEAN D I PLOMACY S I NCE 1 8 70 Th ree hours The Bismarckian A l l i ance structure. France and Russia. B ritish isol8tion and its problems. Tri p l'e A i l li ance and Triple Entente. The League of Nations. French hegemony and col lective security. I n ternational a n a rchy and the rise of the Axis Powers. World War I I . The U n ited Nations and the Co l d Wa r . Readings and d i scussions. Prereq u isite: Consen t of in structor. Offered Fa l l 1 9 5 7 and a l tern ate years.

464. B R ITA I N IN T H E TWENT I ETH CENT U RY

Th ree hours

Studies in the Boer War; Parl iamenta ry refo rms; Conservative, L i beral a n d Labor Parties; social legis lati on; England in two wo rld wars; Bri·tish E m p i re relations; England and the League of Nations and the United Nations; the Far East. Prerequisite: H i story 1 03 , 1 04 . Offered Spring 1 9 5 8 a n d a l tern ate years.

471 . ENGLISH CONST ITUTIONAL H ISTORY

Th ree hours

Evo l u tion of the Eng l i s h concept of the crown and p a r l iamentary gove rnment fro m Ang lo-Saxon times to the present. The structure and the functions of Engl and's cen tral and loca l governmenta l institutions. Evolution of I m perial government and relations with do m i n ions and co lonies. Prerequisite: Consent of in structo r . Offered Fa l l 1 9 5 7 and a lternate years.

474. AMERICAN CONST ITUTI ONAL H ISTORY

Th ree hours

A s u rvey of the deve lopment of the constitution from co l o n i a l times. Stress i s laid upon the problems of i m perial organ ization, federal s u p remacy, politica l , soci a l and economic cha n g es. Prerequ i s i te: Con­ sent of instructor. Offered Spring 1 9 5 8 a n d a l ternate years.

48 1 . H I STORY OF RUSS I A

Th ree hours

A genera'i survey of the expansion of Russia, early experiments i n politica l a n d soci a l refo rms. The rise and spread of revo l utionary socia lism and the co l l a pse of Czarism during the war of 1 9 1 4- 1 9 1 8 . Emp hasis on Russia's part in the World War of 1 9 39 -1 945 and o n t h e p rese n t world relations. Offered Fa l 'l 1 9 5 8 and a l ternate years. Mr. Schnackenberg

484. H I STORY OF THE FAR EAST

Three hours

General geog raphica l a n d historical study of Far Eastern l ife a n d thought. Readi n gs and resea rch. Principal emphasis u pon J a p a n , C h i n a , I n d i a . The West in A s i a ; t h e rise o f natio n a l ism, re l i gious, artistic, i n te l lectu a l , social institutions. Offered Spring 1 95 9 and a l ter­ nate years. Mr. Schnackenberg 88


HOME ECONOMI CS, I N DUSTRIAL EDUCATION

49 1 , 492 . I N D E P E N D E N T READ I N G AND RESEARCH One or two hours 595 . 596. SEM I NAR I N EU ROPEAN H ISTORY

Th ree hours

597, 598. SEMI NAR I N AMER ICAN H ISTORY

Th ree hours

M r . Nodtvedt

HOME ECONOMICS Miss Q u a st Two hours

201 . PR I N C I P LES OF N U T R I T I O N

No rma l n u trition fOI' the p romotion and mai ntenance of hea l th for the i nd i v i d u a l . Selection a n d prepa ratio n of foods i n rel'atio n to their cha racte ristics. Miss Quast

INDU STRIAL EDUCATION Mr. Gai nes The Department of I n dustrial Education is to be dropped in the summer of 1 95 7 as a part of the curri culum of the college; how足 ever, a few co u rses will be offered during 1 957-58 th rough the Tacoma Vocational School fo r seni o rs majoring i n this field.

INDUSTRIAL ARTS Courses g iven cooperatively by the Department and the Tacoma Vocational-Techn ical School are arra nged o n an i ndividua l basis and are m a r ked with an asterisk.

1 0 1 . GENERAL SHOPWO R K

Two hours

1 2 1 . BAS IC D RAW I N G

Two hours

An introd uctory course in the v a rious areas of i n d u s t r i a l a rts involving a study of the common tool's, materia l s , p rocesses a n d p rod ucts of ind ustry. Lecture and l a b o ratory, four hours per wee k . Mr. Gaines

An i ntroduction to mechanica l d ra w i n g . Tech n ica l sketch i n g , ,letteri n g . u s e of i nstruments, a n d forms o f p rojection b a s i c t o m a c h i n e a n d a rch itectu ral d rawi n g . I n c l udes elements of home p l a n n i n g . Lecture a n d l a bo ratory practice, four hours per wee k . M r . Gaines

1 22 . E N GI N EER I N G D RAW I N G *

Three hours

2 6 1 . WOODWO R K I N G

Th ree h o u rs

262. WOODWO R K I NG

Two h o u rs

Tech n ica l d ravv i n g for engineering a i de s . The va riations in types of mach i n e projection in working d rawings a n d deta i l i n g . Laboratory and re l a ted work, s i x h o u rs p e r week. Prerequ isite: I n dustri a l Arts 1 2 1 o r equiva lent. Mr. Ga ines

Basic woodwo r k i n g . Incl udes study of woods, too l s , shop procedures and general f i n i s h i n g . Lecture and labora,tory, six h o u rs per wee k . M r . Ga ines

P rob lems in general wood construction and mach ine woodwo r k i n g . Furniture m a k i n g , f i n i s h i n g and reto u c h i n g . Lecture and l a boratory, fo u r h o u rs per wee k . Prerequisite: I n d u strial Arts 1 0 1 , 26 l . M r . Ga i nes

89


I N D USTRIAL ARTS

Two hours

265. CARPENTRY·

Woodwo rking as a pp l ied to the bu i l ding trades. laboratory and related work, four hours per week. Prerequisite: I ndustria l Arts 26 1 .

270. GEN ERAL METALWO R K *

Three hours

Units in sheet metalwork, welding, and fu ndamenta ls of mach ine shop. lecture and l a boratory, six hours per week. Prerequisite: I ndustri a l Arts 1 0 1 .

Two hours

272. WELD I NG·

Pri nci ples a n d p ractices in gas and arc welding, and flame cutting of metals.

3 1 0 . ADVANCED ELECTRICAL CONSTRUCTIO N * Two to four hours Study and practice in e l ectrica l usage, including automotive e lec­ tricity, wiring i n the building trades. la boratory and rel a ted work, four to eight hours per week. Prerequis ite: I ndustri a l Arts 1 2 1 .

32 1 . ENG I N EE R I NG D RAW I NG·

Three hours

Advanced study and practice in mach ine deta i l and representation for eng ineering a i des. laboratory and related work, six hours per week. Prerequis ite: I n dustr i a l Arts 1 22 .

322. ARCH ITECTURAL D RAWI N G·

Two hours

Theory of orthographic and pictorial drawing appl ied to the bui,lding trade. Laboratory and rel ated work, six hours per week. Prerequisite: I n dustr i a l Arts 1 0 1 , 1 2 1 .

360. ADVANCED WOODWO R K I NG P RACTICES* Two to four hours Study a n d practice in selected fields of woodworking. La boratory and related work, four to eight hours per week. Prerequ isite: Industri a l Arts 26 1 , 262.

3 6 1 . METHODS I N F I N IS H I NG *

Two hours

Current practices in use of finish mater i a l s as appl ied to various types of su rfaces. Brushwork, spray tech n iques, and fine rubbed finishes. lecture and l a boratory practice, four hours per week.

442 . O RGAN IZAT ION AND ADM I N ISTRATION OF THE GENERAL SHOP Three hours

Practice teachi n g experiences in General Shopwork, observation, and in struction in use of forms and speci a l techni ques in teach i n g genera l shop prog r a m . One hour of semin a r and four hours of laboratory experience week l y . Prerequisite: I n d ustr i a l Arts 1 0 1 , 1 1 0, 2 6 1 , 270, 440. By co nsent of the depa rtment.

479. COOR D I NATION AND S U PERVISION OF VOCATI O NAL ED UCATION* Apprenticeshi p tra i n i n g . in vocatio nal education.

Two to six hours

Problems in voclltional education. Se minar

49 1 , 492 . SPECIAL PROB LEMS

Two to four hours

Courses plan ned for adva nced students who wish to increase their proficiency in a special field of interest or to study specia l prob lems related to the teach ing of industrial arts. Prerequisite: consent of the department. 90


JOURNALISM, LATIN, MATH EMATICS

J O U RNALISM See Department of E ng l i s h .

LATI N Mr. Svare, Mr. G. Ma l m i n 101,

1 0 2 . ELEMENTARY LAT I N

Fo u r hours per semester

Gramm atica l forms and syntax, with exercises, first semester, followed by selections from Caesar, with prose compos itio n, second semester. Mr. Svare, Mr. M a l m i n

T h ree hours p e r semester

20 1 , 202 . I NTERMEDIATE LAT I N

A study of se'l ected works. Cont i n u ation of Latin 52. Open to studen ! s who have had two units of Latin in h i g h schoo l. Mr. Svare, Mr. M a l m m

Two hours per semester

497, 498. I N DEPEN DENT STUDY

Open to adva nced students by permission of the department.

MATHEMATICS Mr. Maier, Mr. R u n n i ng , Mr. Gai nes Modern tech nical developments h ave in l a rge meas u re been made poss i b l e by the use of mathem atics. There is a gro w i n g de足 m a n d for m athematici ans a n d scientists who are ski l l ed i n the use of mathematics. Some of the fields in w hich the use of mathema tics p l ays an i mportant ro le a re physics, chemistry, meteoro logy and astronomy; a l l bra nches of engi neering, but especi a l l y the e l ectrica l , mech a n ical a n d aero n a u tica l; statistics and actuarial science. Any student who contem plates adva nced work i n a ny of these fields sho u l d consider a m a jor o r a mi nor i n mathematics. A maior in mathematics s h a l l co nsist of a m i n i m u m of 24 credit hours i n c l u d i ng at least eight credit hours beyond the calcu l us ap足 proved by the department. A minor in ph ysics i s recommended, and a yea r of col l ege physics is req u i red as a su pporti ng su bject for a m a ,j or in mathematics. A m i no r in mathematics s h a l l consist of a m i n i m u m of 1 5 credit hours i nc l u d i n g a year of c a l cu l u s . Freshmen w h o expect t o enter science o r engineeri n g schoo l s a n d h a ve t h e prerequ isites should register for mathem atics 1 6 1 . Mathematics 1 06 i s requi red of a l l pre-engi neering students. C a n d i d ates for the Bachelor of Arts in Ed ucation degree who a re p l a n n i n g to concentrate in the field of Mathematics, shou l d fol low the course o u t l i n e as l isted in the section on R eq u i rements for Degrees. 91


MATHEMATICS

No credit

9 1 . P LA N E G EOMETRY

For students who have not had high school geometry. A study of angles, triang les, q u adril aterals, polygons, a nd c i rcles from the deduc­ tive sta ndpoint. Req u i red as a p rereq uisite for Mathematics 1 0 6, 1 1 2 , 1 3 1 and 1 6 1 in l ieu of high school geometry. Th ree c'lass periods per week. Staff

1 0 l . I NTERMED IATE ALGEBRA

Either semester. Th ree hours

A thorough review of high school a l gebra a n d a contin uation beyond qu adratics. Th ree periods per week. Prerequisite: one year of h i g h Mr. R u n n ing, Mr. Gaines school al gebra

Two hours

1 06. SO L I D GEOMETRY

The re lations of pl'anes and l i nes in space; the properties and measure­ ments of p risms, pyramids , cyl inders, cones, a n d spheres; original exercises and constructions. T h ree periods per week. Prerequisite: plane geometry, one yea r of high school a l geb ra. Required for pre­ engi neering students and for those who plan to teach secondary school mathematics. Mr. Running

Th ree hours

1 1 2 . P LA N E T R IGO NOMETRY

Circu l a r measurements of angles, p roofs of the principal fo rmulas, the use of inve,rse functions, sol ution of right a n d obl ique triang les. Mr. Runn ing Prereq u i s ite: Mathematics 1 0 1 o r equivalent.

1 3 1 . COLLEGE ALGEBRA

Three hours

A conti n u ation of course 1 0 1 : progressions, binomial theorem, com­ p lex n u mbers, theory of equations, determina nts, and partial frac­ Mr. Gai nes tions.

1 54. PLANE ANALYT ICAL GEOMETRY

Three hours

loci, the strai g h t line and the circle, po l a r coordinates, conic sections, tangents and norm a l s, the gen eral equation of the second degree. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 1 2 , 1 3 1 . MI'. Running

1 6 1 , 1 6 2 . GENERAL MATH EMAT ICS

Four hours

A un ified course cove ring the essentials of algebra, trigonometry, analytic geometry and the fundamental concepts of ca lculus. Pre­ Mr. Maier requisite: Mathematics 1 0 1 .

25 1 , 252. D I FFERENTIAL AND I NTEGRAL CALC ULUS Fou r hours per semester Th is course lays the foundation for a l l advanced wo rk in mathe matics and is 11 basic tool for advanced work in physics and engi neering . In volves review of previous mathematics courses. Prerequisite: Mathe­ Mr. Maler matics 1 3 1 and 1 54 o r Mathematics 1 62 .

3 3 l . ADVANCED COLLEGE ALGEBRA

Three hours

An extension of the work given in Mathematics 1 3 1 . Properties of rea l n u m be rs; polyno mia ls; determinants and matrices; theory of equations; cubic and q u a rtic equations; sequences, l imits and series. Prerequisite: Mathematics 1 1 2 and 1 3 1 or equiva lent.

4 1 1 . D I FFER ENT IAL EQUAT IONS

Th ree hours

P rerequisite: Mathematics 2 5 2 .

4 1 2. ADVANCED CALCULUS

Mr. Maier

Three hours

Prerequisite: Mathematics 252. 92

Mr. Maier


MUS I C

45 1 . T H EORY OF EQUATIONS

Three hours

Prerequis ite: Mathematics 2 5 2 .

452. I NTRODUCTION TO MODERN AlGE B RA

Th ree hours

Matrices; determ i n a nts; introduction to the theory of grou ps, ri ngs, fields. Prereq u isite: Mathema tics 2 5 2 .

497, 498. I N DEPEN DENT STUDY

One to three hours per semester

Open to advanced students with consent of the department. M r . Maier

MUSIC Mr. Weiss, Miss Christensen, Mr. Fritts, Mr. Gi l bertson, Mr. G. Ma 'l mi n, Mr. Newn h a m A m a jor i n m u s i c sha l l consist o f a m i n i mu m of 30 semester hours in music theory, hi story a n d l iterature including Music 1 1 1 , 1 1 2, 2 1 1 , 2 1 2 , 3 1 1 , 3 1 2 , 32 1 , 322, 4 1 1 , 4 1 2, plus 1 0 semester hours of applied and ensemble music. To q u a l ify as a music m a jor a student w i l l be requi red to pass an entrance exa mination. A m i nor in music sha l l co nsist of a m i ni m um of 22 semester hours includ i ng Music 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 , 32 1 , 3 2 2 and 8 semester hours of appl ied and ensemble music. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Education degree who a re p l a n n i ng to concentrate in the field of Music, should fol low the course outl ine a s l isted in the section o n Req ui rements for Degrees. Students m a joring in music or music education must excel i n one performa nce area . Students majoring o r m i nori ng in music must h ave a functional piano faci lity. A student majoring in music or music education is req u i red to be a mem ber of a l arge ensemble (choir, chorus, band, or orchestra) d u ring each semester with the exception of the peri od of student teachi n g . A l l students o f appl'ied music who m a ke public appea rances should receive the consent of their respective i nstructors or the d i rector of the department. A maximum of eight hours in choi r, chorus, band , orchestra may be applied toward a degree.

Appl ied

Music One hour per semester

1 50 . PIANO

Miss Ch ristensen, Mr. Fritts, Mr. Weiss

One hour per semester

1 52 . O RGAN

The tech nique of organ p 'l aying and style through preparatory exer足 cises a n d works of cl assic a n d contemporary composers. Prereq u i site: Satisfactory piano techn ique. Miss Christensen, Mr. Fritts, Mr. Newn h a m

93


MUSIC

1 54. VOICE

One hour per semester

Voice production, pl acement, 'breath control, diction, interpretation, reperto i re . Oratorio and operatic a rias and art songs. Recitals, broad足 Mr. Newn ham casts, chora l concert opportu n i ties.

One hour per semester

1 56. VIOLIN, VIOLA

M r. Gil bertson, Mr. Siegl

350. PIANO (Ad va nced)

One hour per semester Miss Ch ristensen, Mr. Fritts, Mr. Weiss

One hou r per semester

352. ORGAN (Advanced)

Miss C h ristensen, Mr. Fritts, Mr. Newn ham

One hour per sem ester

354. VOICE (Advanced)

Mr. Newnham

450. SEN I O R RECITAL

O ne or two hours per semester

Credit is gra nted according to the scope of the recita l at the discretion of the Faculty Committee.

Education 1 40. CLASS VO ICE I NSTR UCT ION

One hour per semester

Haywood method. A beg inning course in g roup voice instruction for students and teachers req u i ring an i ntroduction to the princip les of voice placement and automatic breath control. Mr. Newn ham

1 4 1 , 1 42. STR I N G I NSTRUMENTS

One hour per semester

Class study of bowed string instruments. Recommended as part of training for teachers of junior or senior high school instrumental music. Th ree periods per week.

1 43, 1 44. STR ING I N STRUMENTS

One hour per semester

Continuation of 1 4 1 , 1 42 but with the add ition of ensemble playing of easy music. Open to students with previous experience in strings. Three periods per week.

243. WOODWIND AND PERCUSSION I N STRUMENTS

Two hours

Basic techniques. Recommended as part of tra ining for teachers of j u n io r or senior high school instrumental music. Three periods per week.

244 . BRASS AND P ERCUSSION I NSTRUMENTS

Two hours

Basic tech niques. Recommended as part of tra i n i n g for teachers of j u n ior or senior high school instrumental music. Three periods per week.

340. MUSIC IN THE ELEMENTARY SC HOOL

Two hours

Tech n iques and procedures for the music program of the first six g rades. The rote song, child voice, rhythm activities, and the l i ke. Mr. Gil bertson 94


MUSIC

Two hours

3 4 1 . CHORAL COND UCTING

A study of the technique of the baton and examples of score re ading. Consent of instructor required. Three days per week. Offered a l ter足 Mr. M a l m i n nate years.

Two hours

342. I NSTR UMENTAL CON DUCTING

Baton tech n ique, score reading, l a boratory work i n conducting i n足 stru mental g roups. Consent of i n structor required. Three days per week. Offered a l tern ate years. Mr. Gi lbertson

440e. MUS I C I N T H E SECONDARY SCHOOL

Two hours

The place of music in adolescent development, the boys' changing voice, organ izing and directing a l l phases of vocal a n d i n strumental music activities in the j u n i or and senior hi gh schoo l .

442. MICTHODS OF TEACH I NG P IANO

One hour

Lectures, discussions, prescribed reading in methods of teaching children. R equired of piano ma jors. Open to others with sufficient preparation. Recommended for senior year.

History and Literature 1 20. MUSIC S U RVEY A course presenting other arts.

Either semester. Three hours music of different periods as rel ated to the Mr. G i l bertson, Mr. Malmin, Mr. Weiss

3 2 1 . H ISTORY A N D L ITERATURE

Three hours

Ancient music, the rise of ch urch music and polyphony. The beg i n n ing of opera and oratorio. The age of Bach and Hande l . Prereq ui site: Six semesters of music theory Mr. Fritts

3 2 2 . HISTORY A N D LITERATU RE

Three hours

The classical school, Beethoven, Roma n ticism. The music drama of . Richard Wagner. Modern schoo l . Prerequisite: Six semesters of music theory. Mr. Weiss

42 1 , 422. C H U RCH MUSIC

Two hours per semester

A su rvey of the history of music in the church; hymns and h y mn-tunes, liturgy, as wel l as practical problems connected with the actual music program of the church. Mr. Malmin

520. GRADUATE SEM I NA R

One to three hou rs Staff

Theory Either Semester. Fou r hou rs

1 0 1 . FUN DAMENTALS

A study of the rudi ments of music, including rhythms, s i g ht reading, elementary keyboard experience and creative music. Mr. Gi lbertson

95


MUSIC

Four hours per semester

1 1 1 , 1 1 2 . T H EO RY

Thorough tra i n ing i n the m(oIiod ic, h a rmonic and rhyt:h mic el ements of m usic. A co m p l ete corre l at i o n of the mate ria l s and tech n iques of s i g h t-singing, melodic a n d har monic d i ctation, rhythmic rea d i ng, a n d t h e el ements o f ha rmo ny i n c l u ding seventh chords a n d four-part w riting. Five periods per week. Miss Chri stensen

2 1 1 , 2 1 2 . T H EORY

Th ree hours per semester

Contin uation of Music 1 1 1 , 1 1 2 through a l tered chords, mod u l a tion, har moni c counterpoint in two, th ree a n d fo u r parts. Prereq u i s i te: Music 1 1 2. Mr. Fritts, Mr. Ma l m i n

Two hours per semester

3 1 1 , 3 1 2 . COUNTERPO I NT

The counterpoint tech n i q u e of The s i xteenth, seventeenth, and eight足 eenth cen tu ries . Prerequ isi'fe: Music 2 1 2 . Mr. M a l min

4 1 1 , 4 1 2 . FORM AND ANALYS IS

Two hours per semester

A study of form from the s i m p l e musica l phrase th rough the song fo rms to the l a rger forms of Bach, Beethoven, etc. Prereq u i s i te: Music Mr. Gil bertson 2 1 2 . Offered a l ternate years.

4 1 5, 4 1 6. O RCH ESTRAT I O N

Two hours per semester

A study of the ranges and cha racte ristics of a l l the instruments of the band and orchestra. Arran gements for co m b i n a tions, band and o r足 chestr a . Prereq uisite: Music 2 1 2 .

One to th ree hou rs

425. MAJ OR CON FERENCE

Staff

Voca l a n d I nstru menta l Ensem bles 1 3 2 . CHORUS

One hour per sem ester

Tryouts a re held at the be g i n n i n g of each fall semester. Singing of both sa cred and secu l a r m u s i c, with and without accompa n i ment. Mr. Fritts

1 34 . C H O I R

O n e hou r p e r semester

Me mbersh ip determined by tryo uts. A ca ppe l l a singing of sacred music. A l l members are req u i red to take a m i n i m u m of one semester Mr. M a l m i n of voice l essons.

1 35. MAD RIGALS

One hour per semester Mr. New n h a m

1 3 6. O RC H ESTRA

One hour per semester

Members h i p dete r m i n ed by tryouts.

1 3 8 . BAN D

Stand a rd orchest ral literature. Mr. Gi l bertson

One hou r per semester '

Me mbers h i p determi ned by tryouts. Varied band l iterature and march足 ing experience. Mr. G i l bertson 96


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P U M PS I N

J U M P S H O T AGA I NST E L O N ( N C . )


BAS K ETBALL IN

lEAM A R R I V E S AT A I R P O R T AFT E R P L AC I N G N A T I O N A L ( N A I A) TOU R N EY A T K A NSAS C I T Y

TH I R D


"AND

GLADLY

TEACH"


NORWEGIAN, N U R S I N G EDUCATION

NORWEGIAN M r . Svare, Mr. C. K. Ma l m i n A m i nor i n Norweg i a n comprises courses 1 0 1 , 1 02 , 2 0 1 , 202, p l u s 9 semester hours of upper division courses. 1 01 ,

Fo ur hours per semester

1 02. ELEMENTARY NORSE

Grammar and composition; easy readings, conversat ions. Mr. Svare, Mr. M a l m i n

20 1 , 202. NORSE LANGUAGE A N D L I T E RATU R E

Th ree hours p e r semester Advanced read i n g course; conversation and compos ition. Mr. Svare, Mr. Malmin

3 0 1 , 302. DRAMA AND POETRY

Th ree hours per semester

Bjo rnson, first semester; Ibsen, second' semester.

3 3 1 , H I STORY OF SCAN D I NAV IAN LITERATU RE

Three hours

3 3 2 . SCAN D I NAV IAN H I STORY

Th ree hours

4 0 1 , 402 . SCA N D I NAV IAN

ENGLISH TRANSLAT ION

MASTERP I ECES I N Three hours per semester

Novel, first semester; d ra m a , second semester.

NU RSING EDUCAT I O N Mrs . Morken a n d Assista nts The a i m of t h i s department is to prepare you n g women to recogn ize and partici pate in the respons i b i l ities and opportu nities for Ch risti an serv i ce in the p rofession of N u rs i n g . Graduates of the department h ave a fou n d ation for adva nced study w h i ch q u a l ifies for positions of leaders h i p . 1 0 1 . H I STORY O F N U RS I N G

Two hours

A course designed to h e l p the young student in n u rsing unde rsta n d the h i storical background o f n ursing trad itions a nd present-day Mrs. Morken phi losophy.

201 .

I N TRODUCT ION TO N U RSING

T h ree hours

A course which i n c l udes the i n troduction to the profession of n u rsing t h rough a study of eth i cs and adj ustments, of el ementary drug therapy and of accuracy in drug a d m i n i stration, and of the basic p d n cip les of patient care, and of med ical and nurs i n g ter m i n ology. Mrs. Morken

97


N U RS I N G EDUCATION

203 . P R I N C I P LES A N D PRACnCE OF ELEMENTARY N U RS I NG Four hou rs A course desig ned to give the student knowledge and ski l l in the fundamental n u rsing care of patients, to deve'I'op habits of observa足 tion, man u a l dexterity and accuracy. Experience with patients in the clinica l situation serves a s a laboratory field with a m i n i m u m of 70 hours of ward experience in the qua rter. Staff

205. ADVANCED N U RSING ARTS

Three hours

A contin uation of the basic principles of patient care with a n in tro足 duction to the team method of assi g n ment. Staff

2 1 1 . ELEMENTARY MATERI A MEDICA

Two hou rs

This course is designed to give the student n u rse a working knowledge of drugs a n d thei r sou rces, a nd their therapeutic value in the treatment Staff and prevention of disease.

Two hours

2 1 5 . MATERIA MED ICA A contirlUation of N u rsing 2 1 1 .

2 2 1 . INTRODUCT I ON TO MEDICAL SO I ENCE

Staff

One hou r

A study of the methods used in d i a gnosis a n d treatment o f di sease, i nterpretation of I;aboratory findings, and additional term inology. Staff

223. P R I N c(' PLES OF MEDICI NE, SURGERY AND N U RSING CARE Th ree hours This course dea l s with the causes of d isease, methods of di ag nosis, and treatment and n u rsing care of those conditions req u i ring treat足 ment by medicinal therapy as we l 'l as those responding to operative therapy. The recogn ition of symptoms and com p l i cations and pre足 ventive meas u res are emphasized. Staff

224. MED ICAL N U RS I N G EXP E R I ENCE

T h ree hours

This cou rse is correlated with the classes in Medical N u rsing in order that the student may lear n to give the specific and persona l ized care req ui red, plus the a b i l ity to execute the specia l tech niques util ized in med ica l co nditions. O i nics and conferences weekly. Experience n i n e Staff weeks.

226. SURGI CAL N U RSING EXPERI ENCE

Three hours

This course is co rrelated with the c l asses in Surgica l N u rsing in order that the nu rse may learn to give the specific and individual ized care required plus an, a b i l ity to execute the speci a l techniq ues util ized i n surgica l conditions. C l i nics and conferences wee k l y. Experience nine weeks. Staff

3 1 0 . PRINCI PLES AND PRACT ICE OF D I ET TH ERAPY

Th ree ho urs

A study of the basic d i etary principles and therapeutics, consideration of the dietary needs of the i l l patient as we l l as his individ u a l needs with the opportunity to learn th rough special ized experience, the tec h n i q ue of p l a n n i n g , preparing and serv i n g special foods for specific type patients. Experience i n Dietary Therapy is for four weeks. Staff 98


N U RS I N G EDUCATION

320. P R I N C I P LES AND PRACTI C E OF O P E RAT I V E AS EPT I C TEC H N I Q U ES

Fou r hours

A study of the underlying principles of aseptic techniques, with exper足 ience i n executing procedu res invol ving these tec h n i ques, and in assisting the surgeon in hi s work. Experience eight weeks. Staff

324. ADVANCED MED ICAL N U RS I N G EXPER I E NCE A continuation of N u rs i n g 224.

Experience s i x weeks.

Two hours Staff

3 2 5 . P R I N C I PLES OF M E D I C I NE, S U RGERY A N D N U RS I N G A N D H EALTH SERV I C E I N T H E FAM I LY Fou r hours A continuation of N u rs i n g 2 2 3 with additional emphasis on the fam i l y a n d n u rsing care in the home. A n introduction to p u b l i c hea lth and community problems and the adjustment of the i n d i v i d u a l a n d fam i l y to these problems is stress ed . Conferences wee k l y with c l i n i c obser足 Staff vatio n .

326. ADVANCED S U R G I CA L N U RS I NG EX P E R I E N C E A conti n uation of Nursing 226.

Experience six weeks.

Two hours Staff

327. P R I N C I PLES OF M E D I CAL AND S U RG I CA L S P EC I A LT I ES Fo u r hours A study of the diseases of the nervous system, the genitourina ry system, conditions of the eye, ear, nose a n d throat, com m u n icable diseases, and of the diseased conditions of the skin, w i th n u rs i n g care Staff i n volved i n each case.

3 3 0 . P R I N C I PLES O F T U B E RCU LOSIS N U RS I NG A N D TUBERCULOSIS N U RS I N G EX P E R I E NCE

Th ree hours

A course with s i x weeks cl i n ical experience designed to teach the student the use of speci a l therapies, rehabi l i tation, prevention and control, and p u b l i c health and soci a l aspects of tubercu losis as a com足 mun ica b l e disease. Ward c l i nics, n u rsing conferences and n u rs i n g projects are i n c l u ded i n t h e theory and experience p l a n ned for the student. Taught through affi l i ation with the U n iversity of Was h i ngton at F i r l a n d San atori um, Seattle, Washington.

3 3 1 . P R I N C I P LES OF MATERN ITY N U RSING

Th ree Hours

This course is designed to help the student n u rse acq u i re the essenti al knowledge and to develop the understa n d i n gs wh ich will e n a b l e her to give inteli, igent n u rsing care and hea lth supervision to matern ity Staff patients.

3 3 2 . MAT E R N ITY N U RS I N G EX P E R I E NCE

Fou r hours

The student partici pates under supervision i n a l l th ree areas of service: labor and del ivery, post partum, and newborn. Correlation of theory and practice i n the management of pregnancy is accompl ished, incl ud足 i n g field trips to pre-natal d i n i c. Experience 1 2 weeks. Staff

3 4 1 . P R I N C I PLES OF P E D IATR I CS

Th ree hours

Stud y of the growth and devel'opment i n the normal c h i l d as it relates to the care of the sick c h i l d . Staff

99


P H I LOSOPHY

342. PEDIAT R I C NURS I N G EXPERIENCE

Four hours

P ractica'i app l .ication of the principles taught in N u rsing 34 1 . ience 1 2 weeks.

35 1 . P R I NCI PL ES OF PSYCH IATRIC N U RSING

Exper足

Three hours

Cou rse ta ken at Oregon State Hosp ita l through affi l i ation. A co urse given to assist the student to u ndersta nd the role of the n u rse in the treatment, care, and reha b i l itation of patients with menta l i l l ness.

352. PSYCH IATRIC N U RSI NG EXP E R I E NCE

Fou r hours

Practi ca l a p p l icati on of the princi ples taught in N u rsing 3 5 1 . ience 1 2 weeks.

4 0 1 . PROFESSIONAL ADJUSTMENTS A N D SU RVEY OF THE F I ELD

Exper揃

T h ree hours

A course designed to acq u a i n t the stud ent with techniques of problem solving i n the p ractice of profession a l n u rs ing; to fam i l i a rize her with Mrs. Morken p rofes s i o n a l respo n s i b i l i ties and opportunities.

402. SEMINAR

Two hours

403. P R I N CI PLES OF WARD RELATI,ONSH I PS

Two hours

Designed to i ntroduce the student n u rse to the vast field of research in n u rS i n g; to h e l p her eva lu ate her funda mental concept of the soci a l studies i n rel ation t o h e r p rofessi o n a l f i e l d , a n d t o b roaden her u n der足 sta n d i n g of her professi o n a l opport u n i ties th rough resea rch . Mrs. Morken and Staff

A course designed especia l l y to acquaint the senior student n u rse with some of the prob lems and techniques i nvo lved i n m a nagement of the tota l patient care with speci a l emphasis on teamwork a n d se lf-ev a l u足 ation. Staff

420. P R I NC I P LES A N D PRACT ICE OF ORTHOPEDIC N U RS I N G Th ree hours A course to h e l p the student u nderstand the needs of patients with m usculo-ske letal i n j u ries and diseases, and the prevention, cor rection, and reha b i l itation i n vo l ved. Experience of s i x weeks is co rrelated with theo ry i n a segregated service. C l i n ics a n d conferences weekly. Staff

428. ADVANCED CLI N ICAL EX P E R I E NCE

Two hours

During her l a st q u a rter in the c l i n i cal a rea the student is given the opportun i ty to have additio n a l experience i n the field where she has her g reatest need with additio n a l opportu n i ty to practice the techn ique of team man agement. Staff

P H I LOSOPHY Mr. Pf l u eger, Mr. Kuethe Major: 24 cred it hou rs, inc l uding Phi losophy 201 , 22 1 , 3 0 1 , 302. (Pol itical Science 3 1 1 , Socio logy 4 1 2, a nd H i story 333, 334, 337, 338 are reco mmended as s u pporting co u rses.) Minor: 1 5 credit hours. 1 00


PHI LOSOPHY

Course 2 0 1 i s to be rega rded as an i n trod uction to all phi losophy offeri ngs. Course 2 0 1 , or 3 0 1 -302, o r 3 1 2 s a ti sfies the phi losophy req u i rements for the Bachelor of Arts degree. Courses 2 0 1 , 3 1 2 , a n d 352 a re reco m mended for re l i g i on ma iors a n d for pre-se m i n a ry students not m a i ori n g in p h i l osophy. 20 1 .

Three hours

I NTRODUCT I O N TO P H I LOSOP HY

-rhe scope and mea n i n g of p h i losophy, discussion of funda mental p roblems, such as mind and m a tter, know ledge, cause and purpose. Mr. Pflueger, Mr. Kuethe Lectures, rea d i ngs, reports.

2 2 1 . LOG IC See Speech 2 2 1 .

3 0 1 , 3 0 2 . H I STORY OF P H I LOSOPHY

Three hours per sem ester

The first semester w i l l cover Greek, Roman and medieval p h i losophy; the second semester, modern p h i losophy from Descartes to the present. Mr. Kuethe

3 1 2 . ETH I CS

Three hours

A s u m m a ry of genera l, indi vidua l, and soc i a l ethics. Natural and divine sanction for acts of choice. Careful eva l u ation of the theories of ethical values. Mr. Pfl ueger

3 5 2 . P H I LOSO P HY OF R E L I G I O N

Two hours

The evidence for bel ief in God; the discussion between science and rel i g i o n . Val uable for science maiors. Open to iuni ors and sen iors w i th o u t prereq u i s i te. Offered 1 9 5 8 -59 and a l ternate yea rs. Mr. Kuethe

4 1 4 . AESTH ETICS

Three hours

Theories and princip les of aesthetic va l ue.

Two hours

4 2 1 . K I E R KEGAARD

An introduction to the existen t i a l approac h . Prereq u i s i te: Phi losophy 20 1 , 3 0 1 , 302 . Offered 1 9 57-5 8 and a l ternate years.

Two hours

426. AMER ICAN P H I LOSOP HY

Lea d i n g scho o l s of tho u g h t in America. Prerequisite: Phi losophy 20 1 , 30 1 , 302 . Offered 1 9 57-5 8 and a l te rn a te years.

43 1 . GE RMAN

IDEALISM

Two hours

A more detailed study of Ka nt thro u g h Hegel. Prereq u i s i te: Phi losophy 2 0 1 , 30 1 , 3 0 2 . Offered 1 9 5 8-59 and a l ternate years. Mr. Kuethe

4 3 6 . P RAGMAT ISM AND R EALISM

Two hours

The revo l t against subiective idea l i s m . Prereq u i s ite: P h i losophy 20 1 , Mr. Kuethe 30 1 , 3 0 2 . Offered 1 9 5 8-59 and a l tern ate years.

4 4 2 . ADVANCED lOGIC

Three hours

See Speech 442.

497, 498.

I N DEPEN DENT STUDY 101

Two hours per semester


PHYSICAL EDUCATION A N D HEALTH

PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND H EALTH Mr. Harshman, Mr. Salzman, Mrs. Young, Miss Moe Ma jor for Liberal Arts students: 26 credit hours including the fol lowing courses: Men-Prerequ isite: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62 . Physical Ed ucation 2 1 0, 292, 3 1 2, 322, 34 1 , 342, 345, 346, 363, 450, 497. Women-Prereq u isite: Biology 1 6 1 , 1 62. Physical Education 2 1 0, 290, 292, 3 1 2, 322, 333, 34 1 , 342, 345, 346, 450, 497. Mi nor for Liberal Arts students: 1 5 credit ho urs includ i ng the fol lowi ng courses: Men-Physical Education 2 1 0, 292, 3 1 2 , 341 , 345, 363. Women-Physical Ed ucation 2 1 0, 292, 3 1 2, 333, 34 1 , 345. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Ed ucatio n d egree who are p l a n n i ng to concentrate in the field of Physical Education should fol low the course outl i n e as listed in the section on Req u i rements for Degrees.

Health Education Either semester. Three hours

2 1 0. HEALTH ESSENT IALS

A general course in perso n a l a nd com mun ity health.

Mrs. Young

Two hours

292. F I RST A I D The Off i c i a l Red Cross Standard Course i n Fi rst Aid.

Mrs. Young

Three hours

322. K I N ES I O LOGY

A n a lysis of body movements in relation to physica l education activi足 ties and posture. Prereq u i site: Bio logy 1 6 1 , 1 6 2 . Mr. Harsh m a n

465. SCHOOL H EALTH ED UCAT I O N P ROGRAM

Two hours

I ncl udes schoolroom construction, l ig hting, heating, san itation, venti足 lation, selection a n d location of equipment, com m u n icable diseases and med ical inspection. Mr. Sa lzman

Physica l Education 1 0 1 , 1 02, 1 03 , 1 04. ACT I V I T I ES (Women)

One hour per semester

Reg u l a r fresh m a n a n d sophomore activity classes. week.

Two periods per Miss Moe

1 05, 1 06, 205, 206. ADAPTED ACT I V I T I ES (Women) One hour per semester Activities to meet the needs of i n divid u a l students who a re not able to p a rticipate i n the reg u l a r activities cl asses. Two periods per week. Mrs. Young

1 02


PHYSICAL EDUCATION A N D HEALTH

1 07, 1 08, 1 09, 1 1 0. ACT I V I T I ES (Men)

One hour per semester

20 1 . GOLF (Me n and Women)

One hour per semester

Req ui red fres hman and sophomore activity cl asses. Two periods per Mr. Salzman wee k .

Opti o n a l activity class for Sophomores. C l ubs a re furn ished for class work. Students furn ish their own b a l l s . Students not own i n g golf Miss Moe, Mr揃. Salzman c l u b s may rent c l u b s for field wo rk.

202. BA DMI NTON AND TEN N IS (Men and Women) One hour per semester Optional activity class for Sophomores. Students f u r n i s h their own b a l l s a n d s h u ttlecocks. Racquets are provided for cl ass work, b u t students m u st furn i s h racquets for fie l d work. Miss Moe, Mr. Salzman

203 . ARCH ERY (Men and Women)

Option a l activity class for Sophomores.

One hour per semester Al l eq u i pment fu rnished. Mrs. You ng

One hou r

264. BOY SCOUT LEADERS H I P

Two hours

270. FOOTBALL

Mr. Harshman

2 7 1 . BASKETBALL

Two hou rs

M r. H a rs h man

272. TRACK

Two hours Mr. Sa lzman

Two hours

273. BAS EBALL

Mr. H a rs h m a n

274. METHODS IN TEAC H I NG TUMBLING (Men)

Two hours

290. METHODS I N TEAC H I NG I N D I V I D UAL SPORTS (Women) Two hours

Tech n i ques and methods used in teach ing te nnis, golf, archery, bad足 Miss Moe mi nton, and tu m b l i n g .

3 1 2 . PHYS I CAL ED UCATION I N T H E ELEME NTARY SCHOOL Two hou rs Progressive series of ga mes and ath letic activities for the el ementary g rades. Requi red for men who plan to teach in the elementa ry schoo l . M rs. You ng

333. METHODS I N TEAC H I NG TEAM SPO RTS (Women) Two hou rs

Techn iques a n d methods used in teach i n g soccer, basketba l l , vo l l ey足 b a l l a n d softba l l . Miss Moe

336. ATHLETIC TRAI N I NG

Two hou rs

34 1 . METHODS IN FOLK GAMES

Two hours

A course designed to aid the phys ica l educator and coach in the p re足 vention a n d treatment of athletic i n j u r ies. iEspeci a .l l y v a l uable to the coach i n the field. Mr. H a rs h m a n

Study of the methods and mater i a l s used in fo l k dancing. 1 03

Mrs. Young


PHYSICS

342. PROBLEMS I N TEACH I NG RH YTHM ICS Prereq u i s ite: P . E . 34 1 .

345. P R I N C I P LES OF PHYSICAL EDUCAT ION

Two hours Mrs. Young

Two hours

The p l ace of health and physical education in the school prog ram, a i ms, o bjectives, content of the program, a n d modern trends. Mr. Salzman

346. SCHOOL AND COMMUN ITY RECREAT ION

Two hours

A course of instruction for those i n tending to t a ke fu l l or pa rt-time positions i n the field of recreation. The course covers program p l a n 颅 n i n g in recrea tion. Organ ization and administration in com m u n ity recreation, i ncluding a study of the relation of public school a n d Mr. Sa lzman com m u n ity recreation.

363. METHODS AND MATERIALS IN TEAC H I N G SPORTS (Men) Two hou rs A study of methods a nd tech n i ques in teaching ga mes and sports, Mr. Salzman exc l u sive of major sports.

450. THE SCH OOL PHYSICAL EDUCAT ION PROGRAM

Two hou rs

I nc l udes problems of organ ization and ad ministration. Mr. Harshman

S473. H ISTORY OF PHYS I CAL EDUCAT ION S493. P ROB LEMS I N PHYSICAL ED UCATION

Two hours Three hou rs

lim ited to those who have 'had teachi n g experience.

497, 498. MAJ OR CO NFERENCE

Two hours

Prerequisite: Physical Education 363 (Men); or 290, 333 and 34 1 Staff (Women).

PHYSICS Mr. Jordahl Physics dea路ls with the fundamenta l p ri nciples which explain natural p henomena. Therefore, a study of Physics is basic to all adva nced work i n n atural science. Pre-engineers a nd pre-med ical students, as wel l as chemistry a nd mathematics ma jors a re req uired to h ave at least a yea r of co l l ege physics. The general physics co u rse, Physics 2 6 1 , 262, is designed to meet adeq u ately the requ i rements in these fields. A major in physics shall consist of at least 24 cred it hou rs, and a minor sha l l consist of at least 1 5 credit hours. As su pporting subjects fo r a ma jor, one year of col l ege chemistry and Mathematics 25 1 , 252 are required. Candidates for the Bachelor of Arts in Education deg ree who are pl'a n ni' ng to concentrate in the field of P hysics, shou 'l d fol low the course outl i n e as l isted i n the section on Req u i rements for Degrees. 1 04


POLITICAL SCIENCE

26 1 , 262. GEN ERAL PHYSICS

Five hours per semester

A course des igned to g ive a firm foundation in physical princip les and their a p p l ication in the sol ution of problems. First semester: mechan­ ics, heat, and sound; second semester: electricity, magnetism, and l i ght. Four lectu re recitations a n d one two-hour l a b oratory period per week. Prerequ isite: Mathematics 1 0 1 or e q u i v a l ent. Mr. Jord a h l

Three hours

3 1 1 . MODERN PHYSICS

A course cove ring the importa n t developments in the field of physics s i nce 1 8 9 5 . Topics incl uded are the iso'lation of the el ectron a n d the meas uremen t of its c h a rge, isotopes and mass spectro g r a p h studies, radioactivity, s i m p l e theory of ato m ic structure, X-rays, and n u clear d i s i n tegratio n . Lect u res and o u tside reading. Prereq uisite: one year Mr. Jord a h l of co l lege physics.

3 1 5 . HEAT

Three hours

3 1 6. LIGHT

Three hours

An i n termediate course dea l i n g with calorimetry, temperature meas­ u rement, methods of heat transfer, th erma l properties of substa nces, and a n i ntroduct.ion to thermo dynamics. Two lecture and one th ree­ hour laboratory period per week. Prereq ui s ite: Physics 26 1 , 262, Mathem atics 25 1 . Offered 1 95 7-5 8 .

General princip les of geometrical a n d physica l optics a n d study of optica l' i n stru ments. Two l ecture-recitations a n d one three-hour l ab­ oratory per week. Prereq u i s i te: Phys ics 2 6 1 , 262, Mathematics 2 5 1 . Offered 1 9 57-5 8 .

342. MECHAN ICS

Fou r hours

A cou rse in engi neering mech anics dea l i n g with statics, dynamics, and k i n etics. Prerequisite: Phys ics 26 1 , 262, Mathematics 25 ' . M r . Jorda h l

4 5 1 . ELECTR IC ITY AND MAGN ETISM

Fou r hou rs

The funda menta l phenomena and laws of magnetism, electrostatics, steady c u rrents, electro 'lysis, electromagnetism and a l te rnating cur­ rents. Th ree lectures and one three- h o u r l a boratory period per week. Prerequisite: P h ysics 2 6 1 , 262, Mathematics 25 1 . Mr. Jord a h l

4 5 6 . ELECTRON ICS

Fou r hours

A study of the cha racte ristics of vacuum tubes and their use i n rect ifiers, a m p l ifiers and other electron ic devices. Lectu res a n d l a bora­ tory work. Prereq u isite: P hysics 45 1 . Offered 1 9 5 8-59 . Mr. Jord a h l

497, 498. II N DEPEN DENT STU D Y One or two hours per semester

Prereq u l' s ite: consent of department head.

POLITICAL SCI E NCE Sta m po 'l is, Mr. Farmer

Mr.

The study of pol itica l science trai ns the student in the exercise of his rights and d uties as a citizen by giving him a better under­ sta nding of our democratic political processes a n d of confl icti ng pol itica l systems. 1 05


POLITICAL SCIENCE

A m a jor in Po li tical Science s h a l l co nsist of a minimum of 24 cred it hou rs i nclud ing Pol itka l Science 1 0 1 or 30 1 . A m i nor in Pol itica l Science sh a l l co nsist of a m i n i m u m of 1 5 cred it hours i ncluding Pol itical Science 1 0 1 or 30 1 . A combined major i n Pol itica l Science and Hi story requi res a m i n i m u m of th irty hours, at least twelve hours in a department and twelve or more hours i n upper d ivision courses. The fo l l owi ng courses a re req u i red : Pol itical Science 1 0 1 or 30 1 or 25 1 and' 252; History 1 03, 1 04, 203, 204. 1 0 1 . I NTROD UCT ION TO POLIT ICAL SCIENCE

Th ree hours

This course dea ls with the scope and method and the vocabu l a ry of po l i tical science, po l itica l behavior, and governmental orga nization. It is a l so designed to i n troduce the student to problems of pol itica l theory and to fa m i l i ari ze h i m with the comparative method of studying pol itica l in stitutions. Mr. Farmer

25 1 . AMERICAN NATI O NAL GOVER NMENT

Three hours

A study of the American natio n a l government includ ing the federal constitution and the distribution of govern menta l powers. Survey of structure and procedure of nation a l gove rnme n t with speci al attention Mr. Farmer to practical operation and contemporary refo rms.

252. AMER ICAN STATE GOVERNMENT

Three hours

A comparative study of state government i n the U n 'ited States with specia l attention to the Pacific Northwest a rea. M r. Farmer

282. COMPARATIVE GOV ERNMENT

Th ree hours

Comparison of contemporary governments as to pol itical philosophy, constitutional basis and gove rnmental structure and procedure. Mr. Sta m po l is

30 1 . P R ,I NCI PLES OF POLITICAL SCIENCE

Th ree hou rs

An introductory course i n political science designed to meet the needs of jun iors and seniors. Not open to freshmen, sophomores or to a n yone who has received credit for Pol itical Science 1 0 1 . Mr. Farmer

3 1 1 . R ECENT POLITICAL THOUGHT

Three hou rs

A critical examination of the major po l itica l phi losophies of the modern world. Socialistic doctrines, Co m m u n ism, Fascism, A n a rchy, Democracy. Contemporary problems. Mr. Sta mpolis

322. R ECENT LABOR L EGISLAT ION

Two Hours

See Economics and Business Ad m i n istration 3 2 2 .

33 1 . I NTER NATI ONAL PROBLEMS

Three hours

I n ternational coo peration, problems of defense; hemispheric solid路 arity and power pol itics, geo-po l i tics and internationa l economics. Mr. Stampolis

35 1 . AMER ICAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT

Three hours

A comparative study of local government, u rban and rura l, in the U n ited States with speci a l attention to the Pacific No rthwest area. Mr. Farmer 1 06


PSYCHOLOGY

Th ree hours

360. POPULATI O N TRE N DS See Sociology 360.

3 6 1 . AMER I CAN PO LITICAL PART I ES

Th ree hours

432. COMPARATIVE POLIT ICAL SYSTEMS

Th ree hou rs

P a rty history and organ izations; n o m i n ations and elections; campa igns and conventions; electo ra l prob lems and adminis tratio n ; bossism in local po l itics; pressure g roups; platfo rms. Offered Fa l,1 1 9 58 and Mr. Farmer a l,ternate yea rs.

Co mpa rison of the o rg a n ization and operation of the m a jor types of conte m porary pol itical systems. Mr. Sta m po l i s

434. GOVERNMENT A N D BUSI N ESS

Two hours

A study of the relation s h i p of government a nd busi ness in the United States with speci a l attention to governmental reg u 'l ation of business. Mr. Sta mpolis

457. P U B L I C ADM I N ISTRAT I O N

Three hours

The a rt and science of man agement a p p l i ed to the affairs of state; natu re of h u m a n behavior in organ izations; admin istrative law and quasi-j udici a l practices; civi l service; budget a nd fiscal contro l; cen足 tral ization; coo rd ination, integration in a d m i n i strative a reas. Pre足 req u i site: Pol itica l Science 2 5 1 .

4 7 1 . ENGLISH CONST I TUTIONAL H ISTORY

T h ree Ihours

See H istory 4 7 1 .

474. AMER I CAN CO NSTI,TUTIONAL H I STORY

Th ree hours

See History 474.

497, 498. I N D EPEND ENT R EA D I NG A N D RESEARCH O n e to two hou rs

Staff

PSYCHO LOGY Mr. So l berg, Mr. Ekl und, Miss Nelson The stu dy of psychology is designed to h e l p students to under足 sta nd themsel ves and others better, and to give them greater insight i nto the natu re of perso n a l and socia l p roblems. I t is especiaUy recommended to students who p l a n to enter fields rel ated di rectly or i n d irectly to g u i d a nce and person nel work, soc i a 'i work, teach i ng, the m i nistry, p a rish work, medicine and n u rs i ng, busi ness admin足 istration, etc. Students desi ring to obta in a major in psychology must have the approva l of the department for the courses to be taken. Major: 24 cred it hou rs, i ncl u d i ng Psychology 1 0 1 , 2 0 1 , 301 (or 305 and 42 1 ) , a n d 490. Mi nor: 1 5 credit hours, inc l u d i ng Psychology 1 0 1 , 301 (or 305 and 4 2 1 ), and 3 2 l . Psychology 1 0 1 is a prereq u i site to a l l other courses i n the department. 1 07


PSYCHOlOGY

1 0 1 . GEN ERAL PSYC HOLOGY

Either semester. T h ree hours

A general course in psychology emphas izing the principles and basic facts w h ich a re essential to an unde rsta n d i n g of h u m a n behavior. The main prob lems di scussed are the physical basis for behavior, motivation, hab its, I'ea r n i n g , remembering, th i n ki n g , emotion, i n tel­ l igence, perso n a l ity and character. Mr. Sol berg, Mr. E k l u n d , Miss Nelson, Mr. Bertness

2 0 1 . APP L I E D PSYCHOLOGY

Three hours

A study of the appl ications of the principles of psychology to practical perso n a l prob lems, aptitudes and vocati ons, industrial re l ations, ad­ verti sing and se l l i n g, menta l hea l th and therapy, d e l i n q uency, crim­ i n a l ity, l aw and court procedures, correction and co unseling. Miss Daven port

30 1 . H UMA N D EV ELOPMENT

T h ree h o u rs

3 0 5 . C H I L D PSYCHOLOGY

Th ree h o u rs

See EducaHon 30 1 .

A study of the development and behavior of children. Psychology 1 0 1 .

Prerequisite:

T h ree ho urs

320. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY

A study of the psychological foundations of group l ife. A n a l ysis of soci a l behavior. Effect of the individual on the group and of the g roup o n the i nd ividua ll• Custom, fashion, war, public opinion, etc., i n the lig ht of psychologica l princi p les. Prerequisite: Sociology 1 0 1 . Miss Nelson

3 2 1 . T H E PSYCHO LOGY O F ADJ USTMENT

Th ree h ours

The course dea ls primarily with the methods used by normal people i n their adj ustment to the ord i n a ry and the serious difficulties of everyday life. The folTowing topics are analyzed: motivation and drives, normal adj ustment patterns, adj ustment by defense mechan­ isms, by negativism, by fear and regression, by a i l ments. Perso n a l ity, psychoa n ll l ysis, and techniq ues of mental hygiene are d iscussed. Mr. Solberg

3 5 3 . PSYCHOLOG ICAL TEST I N G

Two ho urs

A survey of the field of standard ized tests . Tests in the a reas of i nte l l igence, aptitude, i n terest, and perso n a l ity are considered. The proper use, the l i mitatio ns, and the i nterpretation of these tests are emphaSized . Mr. Bertness

370. P R I NC I PLES OF G U I DANCE

Two h o u rs

405. ADOLESC ENT PSYC HOLOGY

Two hours

See Education 370.

An advanced course dea l i ng w i th physical development, mental traits, social characteristics and i nterests of adolescents. Adjustments in home, school a nd com m u n i ty . Prereq u i sites: Psychology 1 0 1 , 30 1 or 3 0 5 .

42 1 . ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY

Th ree h o u rs

The appl ication of psychologica l facts and princip les to the problems of maladjusted persona l ities. Symptoms, causes, remedi a l proced­ Mr. Solberg ures for abnorma l states. 1 08


RELIGION 4 2 2 . ME NTAL H EALTH FOR TEAC H E RS

Two hours

See Education 422.

Th ree hours

44 1 . STAT IST I CAL METH ODS

Use and i n terpretation o f elementary statistical tec h n i q ues; g ra ph i c represen tation; measures o f central tendency; s i mp l e correlation a n a ly足 s i s , and s a m p l i n g theory Mr. E k l u n d

45 1 .

I N D I V I DUAL M E NTAL TEST I N G

Two hours

An i n tensive study of the Stanford-Binet and the Wechsler-Bellevue i n te l l i gence sca les. Enro l l ment l i mited. Prereq u i s i te: consent of the Mr. Landon instructor.

472 . OCCU PAT I O N A L I N FO RMAT I O N S e e Education 472. 473.

I NTROD UCTION TO COUNSEL I N G

Two h o u rs

Two hou rs

A course designed to acq u a i n t the student with the various theories and techn iq ues of co unsel ing. The course is meant to be an i ntro足 duction to the field and no actual co unseling w i l l be done; however, there w i ll' be opportunity for s i m u l a ted i n tervi ews and some ro le playin g i n connection with the development of the theories and the Mr. Solberg tech niques.

Two hours

477. F I E LD WO R K

Mr. Solberg

490. H ISTORY OF PSYC H O LOGY

Three hours

H i storical background of modern theory and method. Special emphasis on the development of the various schoo l s o f psychology. Prerequisite: n i ne hours in psychology or consent of the i nstructor.

4 9 2 . S EM I NAR I N PSYC H O LOGY

Two hours

Designed for department majors and others i n terested in special fields of psychology. Prereq u isite: consent of in structor.

497, 498.

I N D E P E N D E N T ST U DY

One or two hours per semester

507. PSYCHOLOGY OF LEAR N I NG See Education 507.

Three hours

RELIGION M r . Pfl ueger, Mr. Kuethe, Mr. Roe, Mr. Vig ness, M i s s Wickstrom Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege offers a cu rricu l u m desig ned to i ntro足 d uce the student to the prim ary sou rces of the Ch risti a n rel igion, its B i ble , the hi story and teachi ngs of Ch risti a nity through the cen足 tu ries a n d their appl icati o n to the problems of tod ay. In addition to the bas ic cou rses req u i red d u r i ng the fi rst two years of the student in residence, upper d i vision courses furnish i nformation and i n itial i n s i g hts for those who contempl ate devot i ng their l i ves to the speci a l 1 09


RELIGION

ca l l i ngs of pastor, m i ss i o n a ry, deaconess, parish worker, soci a l worker o r the more genera l activities i n a n y C h risti a n congregati o n . A wel l-i ntegrated p rogram i n a n y speci a l f i e l d shou l d be p l a n ned with facu l ty members of the department. Students a re encouraged to seek advice as early i n their col l ege course as poss i b le. Ma j or: 24 hou rs; m i nor: 1 5 hours. Req u i red for g radu ation: Cou rses 1 0 1 , 1 1 2 , 20 1 , 202. 1 0 1 . L I F E OF C H R IST

Either semester. Two hours

The study of the l i fe of Christ, with the fo u r Gospe l s as textbook, suppl emented by interpretative Ilectures and discussions. Mr. Roe, Mr. Vigness

1 1 2 . H I STORY OF T H E C H R ISTIAN C H U RCH Either semester. Two hou rs The growth of the Ch ristian C h u rch traced through persecutions a nd controversies; the rise of the papacy; the Reformation under Luther. Mr. Vigness

2 0 1 . THE B I B LE-OLD TESTAMENT

Two hou rs

A study of the d ivine-human encounter portrayed in the Old Testa足 ment. Sy l l abus. Mr. Pflueger, Mr. Kuethe

202. THE B I BLE-NEW TESTAMENT

Two hours

A study of the d i v i n e- h u ma n encounter portrayed in the New Testa足 ment. Syl l a bus. Mr. Pflueger, M r . Kuethe

2 1 1 . RELIGION AND H EALTH

Two hours

A course aiming to acquaint the student with the basic teachin.gs of the Ch ristian faith, with emphasis on their relevance to health a nd o n t h e Ch ristian ro le o f t h e n u rse i n t h e care o f the sick.

Two hours

2 2 2 . PARISH WORK

A study of the place of the parish worker i n the church, her prob足 !Iems, and particu lar phases of her work. Various field work oppor足 tun ities are provided such as Sunday School visitation, hospital and sh ut-in visitation, s u rvey work, prepa ring church bu Heti n s . May be taken for upper div ision credit u pon consent of i n structor. Miss Wickstrom

2 2 5 . C H R IST IAN EDUCATION OF C H I LDREN

Three hours

A study of the cha racteristics, prob lems, a n d needs of c h i l d ren and the developing of the educational program for the pre-school and e lementary age g roup in the ch u rch. Emphasis upon a i ms, methods, materials. Practice in story-te l l i n g . May be taken for upper d ivision credit u po n consent of instructor. Miss Wickstrom

2 27. C H R IST IAN EDUCATION OF YOUTH

Two hours

The nature and needs of youth as appl ied to C h ristian education for the pu rpose of deve loping a n adequate program. A study of methods for promoting, leading, and teaching both i n the Su nday School and Luther League. May be taken for upper d ivision credit upon consent Miss Wickstrom of i n structor. 110


SCI ENCE. (GENERAL)

3 0 1 . B I BLE TRUTHS

Two hours

Bible study methods as a means of discoveri ng doct r i n a l truths. A consistently Bib l ica l eva l uation is sought. The student seeks to dis足 cover principal B i b l ic a l i n s ights with which to i l l u m i n a te fundamental questions of l i fe. Offered 1 9 57-5 8 and a l tern ate years.

3 1 1 . THE C H U RC H TODAY

Two hours

The c h a l leng e to re l i g ion of trends and problems in the twentieth century. The program of the Church to meet these problems. Offered 1 956-57 and a l ternate years. Mr. Kuethe

33 1 . COMPARATIVE RELIGION

Two hours

The living re l igions of the wor l d : Judais m, Islam, Budd hi sm, Taoism, Hindu ism, Confucian ism, compared with Christian ity.

341 . AMERICAN CH URC H ES

Two hou rs

352. P H I LOSO P H Y OF RELIGION

Two hours

362 . MISS IONS

Two hours

The beg i n nings and doctrines of denomin ations and sects in America.

See Phi losophY 352.

History of foreign missions. Problems and programs in various fields of service. Qua l ifications and preparation of m issionary candidates.

Two hours

4 1 0. T H E PROPHETS A study of Old Testa ment prophetic l iterature. a lternate years.

Offered 1 9 57-58 and

Th ree hours

424. T H E REFORMATION See History 424.

497, 498. I N mV IDUAL STU DY

One or two hours per semester

Permission of the department is req u i red.

SCI ENCE (GENERAL) Mr. Ostenson, Mr. R u n n i ng A ma jor i n genera l science may be obta i ned by taking two year's work in either biology, chemistry or phys ics a nd one year i n each of two other sciences. 1 2 1 . I NTRODUCTIO N TO B I OLOGICAL SCI ENCE

Four hours

A survey course i n c l u d i n g a brief study of the plant kingdom and of the an i m a l kingdo m . Three lectures and one laboratory period per week. Mr. Ostenson

1 22. I NTRODUCT I O N TO P H YS ICAL SC I E NCES

Fou r hours

A su rvey of the funda mental principles in chemistry, phYSiCS, astron足 omy, c l i matology, and geology. Lectu res a n d lab oratory work. Mr. 'R u n n i n g 11 1


SOC IOLOGY

S 1 36 . D ESC R I PT IVE ASTRON OMY

Two hours

A descriptive course. Topics covered incl ude t h e moo n, t h e s o l a r system, coord i n ate systems for locating ste U a r objects, cha racteristics of stars.

S25 1 . E N V I RONMENTAL STU D I ES

Two hours

A study of objects, forces, a n d conditions t h a t will function for the elementary and i n termediate grade teacher as material for n ature study.

SOCIOLOGY Mr. K norr, Miss N el so n Sociology stu d i es t h e development, org a nization a nd behavior of h u m a n groups. Its general p u rpose is to exp 'l a i n u n iformities a n d processes of h u m a n soci a l behavior a n d the nature and re'l ations of institutions; to sti m u l ate a critical a nd constructive attitude toward programs of reform, a n d to furnish a sound basis of i nformation for i ntel l igent citizens h i p . M a j o r : 24 cred it hou rs, i nc l ud i ng Sociology 1 0 1 , 2 0 2 , 255, 43 1 a n d either 320 or 4 1 2 . Mi nor: 1 5 cred it hours, i nc l u d i n g Sociology 1 0 1 , 202, a nd 255 or 4 3 1 . Sociology 1 0 1 is the p rereq u isite for a l l other courses i n the department. 1 0 1 . I N TRODUCTION TO SOC IOLOGY Either semester. T hree hours An i n q u i ry i n to the b a s i c princip les f o r u n dersta nd i n g soci a l re lation­ s h ips. This cou rse is designed to acq u a int the student with the funda­ menta l' l aws gover n i n g h u m a n re lations. Prob lems of soci a l structure, soci a 'i processes and soci a l motives w i l l be considered. Mr. Knorr, Miss Nelson

202. CONTEMPORARY SOC IAL P ROB LEMS

T hree hours

Pro b 'l ems of d e l i nq uency, suicide, crime, popu l atio n , u nemployment, p u b l ic re l i ef, poverty, public welfa re, menta l deficiency, fa m i l y dis­ organization, and the l i ke. Miss Nelson

T hree hours

2 5 5 . H UMAN ECOLOGY

Factors a nd forces wh ich determine the distribution of people a nd i n stitution s . M i s s Nelso n

3 0 1 . SOC IAL LEGISLATI O N

Two hours

H istorica l and critica � a n a l ysis of soc i a l l eg i s l ation i n Europe and America, with specia emphasis upon soci a l l eg i s l' ation i n the United States and in the State of Wash i n gto n .

S308. J UVEN I LE DELI N Q U E N CY

T h ree hours

3 1 1 . TH E CH URCH TODAY

Two hours

See Rel igion 3 1 1 . 1 12


SOCIOLOGY

Two h o u rs

3 1 5 . P U B L I C OP I N ION

An a n a l ysis of public opinion and propaganda from the po i n t of view of modern soci a l. science.

T h ree h o u rs

3 1 6. U R BAN SOC I O LOGY

Organ ization and activity of urban groups, w i t h special reference to Miss Nelson socia l , economic a n d other instituti o n a l problems.

Three h o u rs

320. SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY See Psychology 320.

Three hours

3 2 1 . LABOR P R O B L EMS See EBA 3 2 1 .

3 2 2 . R ECENT LABOR LEGI SLATION

Two ho u rs

See EBA 322.

Two hours

3 3 2 . MOD E R N MARR IAGE

A practical i n q u i ry into the fo rces i n f l uencing modern courts h i p and marri age, with emphasis on human experience rather than statistica l presen tations. Mr. Knorr

Three hours

34 1 . RACE R ELAT IONS

A study of inter-racia l contacts and confl icts, with emphasis on Ameri足 can raci a l problems. Mr. Knorr

356. R U R A L SOC IOLOGY

Three hours

T h e rural l ife movement with spec i a l reference to group organ iza足 tion, rural soci a l organizations and i n d ications of change. Miss Nelson

Th ree h o u rs

360. P O P U LAT ION T R E N DS

The consideration of major q u a ntitative a n d q u a l itative problems of popul ation in contemporary society.

406 . C R I M I N O LOGY

Three hours

T h e nature of the soc i a l pro b l em of crime, the cri m i n a l law and its a d m i n i stration, and the pen a l treatment of the cri m i n a l . Mr. Knorr

407. E D U CATI O NAL SOC I O LOGY A systematic view of sign ificant sociological appl i ca b l e to education po l icies a n d practices.

4 1 2 . H ISTORY OF SOCIAL THOUGHT

Two hours data

and

principles

Four hours

An eval uation of the forces causing social change, with some hi storical background for present day soci a l thought and trends. Mr. Knorr

42 1 . P E RSO N N E L MANAGEMENT See EBA 42 1 .

1 13

Three hours


SPAN ISH

Three hours

422. COLLECTIVE BARGA I N I N G See EBA 4 2 2 .

Three hours

43 1 . THE FAMI LY

The c ha n g i n g home; the study of the fa m i l y and fam i l i a l customs; fa m i l y i n teraction and o rgan ization; ana lysis and treatment of family Mr. Knorr d i sorgan ization.

Three hou rs

435. H ELD OF SOC IAL WO RK

A survey cou rse of the princip les and p ractices in the total field of social work, with a comprehensive picture of availa ble services a n d future needs. Mr. Knorr

Two hou rs

437, 438. F I ELD WO RK

A research pro ject in the chosen field of the student's i n terest. It may consist of a study of some s pecific socia l problem, a study of a social institution o r su pervised field work with some loca l agency. Weekly cons u l tation with instr uctor and a semester report. Mr. Knorr

44 1 . STAT ISTICAL METHODS

Th ree hours

See Psycho logy 44 1 .

445. SOC IAL CONTROL

Three hours

Ana lysis of the tech n i q u e a n d process by which soci al changes in individual and co l l ective action are affected .

450. CONTEMPORARY SOCIAL I NSTITUTIONS

Three hours

The origins and developments of major American soci al in stitutions and re l a ted institution a l patterns.

497, 498. I N D E P E N D ENT STUDY

One to three hours

Open to students majoring in soci ology. Permission of the department is required.

5 1 0. GRADUATE S EM I NAR

One to three hours

Permission of the department is required.

SPAN ISH 1 0 1 , 1 02 . E L EMENTARY SPAN ISH

Fou r hours per semester

Pronunciation; funda mentals of g ramma r ; ora l a n d reading of easy texts; outside re ading.

203, 204. I NTERMEDIATE SPANISH

written

work;

Th ree hours per semester

Review of g ram mar; exercises in composition; rea d i n g of S p a nish足 American a uthors; outside reading. 1 14


SPEECH

SPEECH Mr. Karl, Mr. E l berson, Mr. Ericson, Mr. Nord h o l m T h e Department of Speech embraces three sections: P u bl i c Address, D r a m a , R a d i o . A m a j o r i n t h e department req u i res courses i n a l l sections with emphasis in the part i c u l a r secti o n accord i ng to the student's electio n . Speech d e l i very tech n i q u es, contents o f speeches, as wel l as pl atform proficiency, a re the poi nts of m a i n concentration the fi rst two years. Speech m a jor: 24 cred it hours. Req u i red courses: Speech 1 0 1 , 250, and 9 hours chosen from 1 04, 222, 256, 270, or 308. A l l students m a jo r i n g i n the field w i l l participate i n s o m e ph ase o f d ra matics a n d forensics. Speech m i nor: 1 5 credit hours. Req ui red courses: Speech 1 0 1 , 250, a n d 9 h o u rs chosen from 1 04, 222, 256, 270, 308, 352, 353, or 356. Drama m a jor: 2 7 cred it hours. Req u i red courses: Speech 250, 256 and Eng l i s h 233 and 1 5 h o u rs from the fo l l o w i n g : Speech 350, 352, 3 5 3 , 356, E n g l ish 357, 358, 383, 3 84 or 442 . Selection of courses with approval of the m a jor ad viser, dependent on stude nt's i nter­ est in tech nical or perfo rming d r a m a . Drama m i no r : 1 5 credit hours. Req u i red courses: Speech 1 0 1 , 250, 256, a n d E n g l i s h 233 a n d 3 h o u rs o r m o re from the fo l l o w i ng : Speech 35 0, 352, 3 5 3 , 3 5 6, English 357, 3 5 8 , 3 8 3 , 384, 442. Candid ates for the Bachelor of A rts i n Edu cation deg ree who are p l a n n i ng to concentrate i n the field of Speec h, s h o u l d fo l l ow the co u rse o u t l i n e as l i sted in the section o n Req u i rem ents for Degrees.

1 0 1 . F U N DAMENTALS O F SPEECH

Either semeste r . Three hou rs

Foundation course dea l i ng with basic e l ements of the speech situa­ tions, including the v i s i b l e and a ud i b l e approaches. Some concentra­ tion on content. Extensive platform work. Mr. Ka rl, Mr. Ericson, Mr. Nord h o l m

1 04. F U N DAMENTALS O F SPEECH STRUCTU R E Either semester. Th ree h o u rs Tech niq ue, composition and d e l ivery of speeches for various occasions. Group and individual projects. Major portion i s pl atform wor k . Pre­ Mr. E l berso n, Mr. Ericson requisite: Speech 1 0 1 .

1 06 . B US I N ESS AND P ROFESSIONAL SPE ECH

Two

hours

P l atform techniq ues, voice adj ustment, speech constructi on . Applica­ tion made to practica .l speech situations for profes sions and businesses Mr. Ericson represented in the cl ass. Platform work predominates.

206. PARL IAMENTARY LAW

Two h o u rs

Study of Pa rlia mentary Law based upon Robert's Ru les of O rder. Practical work dominates. Designed p r i m a r i l y to aid those who do or will belong to organizations. Mr. Ka r l

1 15


SPEEC H

2 2 2 . LOGI C

Three hours

The study of the theory and practical app l ication of deductive logic. Not open to freshmen. Mr. Ericson

250. I NTERPRETAT IVE READ I NG

Three hou rs

256. F U N DAMENTALS OF ACT I N G

Three hours

An introduction to the a rt of i n terpretative reading . Emphasis given to developing logical and emot io n a l responsiveness to l i terature. Mr. Elberson

Tr a i n i n g of the actor with emphas i s upon movement, emotio n a l reca l ,l, and responding to i m a g i n a ry sti m u l i . !lecture and perfo rmance.

2 70 .

Three hou rs

RAD I O S P EA K I NG

Microphone tech n i q u e and styles of delivery for radio prog rams. Extensive use of reco rding eq u i pment. Prereq u i site: Speech 1 0 1 . Mr. E l berson

2 80 . FORENSICS

Two hours

Two credits gi ven upon co mpletion of two years of participation in intercol legi ate fore n s ic activities. May be a p p l ied toward m i nor or m a I o r .

308. EXTEMPORE SPEA K I N G

Th ree hours

350. ADVANCED I NTERPRETAT I V E R EAD I NG

Th ree hou rs

352. STAGE SCENE RY A N D COST UME

Th ree hours

353. STAGE LIGHTING A N D MAKE UP

Three hours

356. PLAY D I RECT I O N

Th ree hours

370 . RAD I O PRODUCT I O N

Three hours

P l atform work predomin ates. Speci a l emphasis gi ven to the study of gather i n g m a teria l , methods of prepara ti o n , a nd del ivery. Prere­ qu isite: Speech 1 0 1 and 1 0 4. Mr. Karl

Spec i a l projects a n d class exercises d i rected toward prog ram p l a n n i n g . Deve lo pment of s k i l l a n d com m u n i cativeness i n read i n g a l o u d . Devel­ opment of the art of making l iterature l i ve. Prereq u i s i te: Speech 2 5 0. Mr. Karl

The design and execution of scenery a nd costumes for stage prod u c­ tions, incl uding the tra i n i n g of stage perso n n e l . Open to speech majors and m i nors or by permission of the depa rtment.

Theory and practice of stage l i g h t i n g and m a ke u p . Open to speech majo rs a nd m i nors or by permissio n of the department. Mr. Nord h o l m

Princip les of p l a y d i rection, theory, exercises and production of com­ p l ete one-act p l a y . For speech ma jors and mi nors or by permission of the department. Mr. Elberson

D i rection and production of radio programs with extensive use of rad io equipment. 'lectu re a n d worksho p. For speech ma jors o r m i nors or by permission of the depa rtment.

422. ADVANC ED lOG I C

Three hours

A review of the deductive forms and processes, a n d a study of induc­ tive reaso n i n g . Prerequis ite: Speech 2 2 2 . 1 16


SPEECH

Th ree hours

430. SPEECH PATHOLOGY

A study of s peech difficulties, with emphasis on identification a n d cause. L i m ited t o s peech maj ors or t o other persons b y permission of the depa rtment. Given altern ate years.

434. V O I C E SC I ENCE

Th ree hours

The physiologica l , a natomica l, and hea r i n g . Prerequisite: Speech 4 3 0 .

440 h . SPEEC H

physical

I N T H E SECON DARY S C H O O L

basis

of

s peech

Two

and

hours

Cu rricu l u m constructio n , speech p h i losophy for the teacher. Co-curric­ u l a r activity. Ad m i n i s t ration of drama, radio and foren sic activities.

4 4 2 . S P E EC H FO R THE CI.ASSROOM TEAC H E R

Two hours

A s u rvey of speech problems and o p po rt u n i ties w hich confront �'he Staff teacher in the d assroo m.

S46 1 . C H I L DR EN'S TH EATR E WORKSHOP

Fo u r hours

fhe ch i l d ren's workshop w i l l consist of 5 weeks of i n tensive work i n C h i l d ren's Theatre. A co m p lete three-act p l ay, or equiva lent, w i l l be prod uced in that t i m e . The students w i l l be i nvo l ved in d i rection, stage m a n agement, l i ghti ng, a n d all other phases of production .

First term, five h o u rs S462. SUMMER D RAMA WORKS H O P The s u mmer dra m a workshop w i l l consist of fi ve weeks of intensive work i n dram a . Acting, stage m a n agement, l i g hting i n struction, and a l l other p h a ses of productio n .

480.

FO RENSICS

Two hours

Participation for two years i n senior d i v ision of i n ter-collegiate for­ ensics. May be a p p l ied toward m a j or. Mr. Karl

4 9 7 . S P E C I .A. L STU D I ES IN S P E ECH

One hour

I n dividual projects a n d s peci a l outside activities under the supervision of the department. Entra nce u po n a p p roval of the department.

49 8 . S P EC I A L STU D I ES IN SP EECH

Two hours

I n divi d u a l projects and spec i a l outside activities under the s u pervision of the depa rtment. Entrance u pon a p prova l of the depa rtment. Mr. Karl

499. SPECIAL STU D I ES I N S P E E C H

Three hours

I n dividual projects and spec i a l outsid� activities under the s u pervision of the department. Entra n ce u pon a p p roval of the department. Mr. Karl

527. R ES EA R C H I N SP EECH

One hour

I n divid u a l projects and spec i a l .:lutside activities under the s u pervision of the depa rtment. Entra nce u pon a p pro v a l of the department.

528.

RESEA R C H I N S P E ECH

Two hours

I nd i vidua l projects and spec i a l outside activities under the s u pervision of the department. Entrance upon a p p roval of the department.

Th ree hours

529 . R ESEARCH I N S P E ECH

I n dividual projects a nd s peci a l outside activities un der the su pervision of the department. Entrance upon approval of the department.

1 17


THE REGISTE R

BOARD OF TRUSTEES REPRESENTING THE PAC I F I C DISTRICT OF EVANGE LICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH Term

Expires

1 957

Rev. A. O. Wigd a h l , 2 4 3 4 N. LaFa yette, Bremerton, Washi ngton Term Expires 1 956

Rev. O. K. Davidson , c/ o Josephine Home, Stanwood, Washington Dr. H. L. Foss, 308 Medical Arts B u i ld i n g , Seattle, Washington Mr. Einer K n utzen, Burli ngton, Wash i n gton Term bpire. 1 959

Mr. E a r l E. 'Eckstrom, 6222 Fi rst Street N. W . , Seattle, Washi ngton Mrs. Carl H a l vorson, 224 ,I ron Mounta i n B l vd . , Oswego, Oregon Mrs. M i l ton W. Nesse, 1 5 09 Twenty-fourth Street, Everett, Wash i n gton REPRESENTING THE

INTERMOUNTAIN AND SPOKANE CIRCU ITS OF THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIST R I CT OF THE EVANGE L I CAL LUTHERAN CHURCH Term Expires 1 959

Mr. E. A. Morke n , Genessee, Idaho REPRESENTING T H E CALIFORNIA DISTRICT OF T H E EVANGELICAL Term E xpi res

LUTHERAN

CHURCH

1957

Dr. Gay lord Fa lde, 4 2 70 West Sixth Street, Los Ange les 5 , Ca lifornia REPRESENTING THE NORTHWESTERN D I ST R I CT OF THE AMERI CAN LUTHERAN CHURCH Term E xpires

1 957

Mr. H a rold Widsteen, 32 1 5 South Cherry Street, Port Ange les, Wash i ngton Term Expire.

1 956

Rev . F. J . Molter, 1 03 Fa i rv iew St., Ephrata, Washi ngton REPRESE N T I N G THE CALIFORNIA D ISTR ICT OF THE AMERI CAN LUTHERAN CHURCH Term Expires 1 956

Rev. W . H. Hel l m a n , 2005 San Ma rino Ave., San Marino, Cal iforn ia REPRESENT'ING THE COLUMBIA CONFERENCE OF THE AUGUSTANA LUTHERAN CHURCH Term Expires

1 957

Dr. Kenneth Erickson, Treasurer, 7 1 37 S.W. 5 2 n d Ave., Portland 1 9, Oregon Dr. S . L . Swenson, Advisory Member, 1 2 52 1 Fremont Avenue, Seattle 33, Washi ngton REPRESENTING THE

CALIFORNIA CONFERENCE O F Term Expires

THE

AUGUSTANA

LUTHERAN

1 958

Rev. P h i l i p E l l m a n , 1 744 U n iversity Ave., Berkeley, Cal iforn i a 118

CHURCH


BOARD OF TRUSTEES, C H U R CH OFFIC IALS REPRESENTING THE

PAC I F I C LUTHERAN COLLEGE ALUMNI Term Expires

ASSOCIATION

1 958

Mr. M a rv i n Tommervik, 820 South 1 20th Street, Tacoma 44, Washi ngton Term Exp ires 1 959

M r . Eldon Ky l l o, 807 South 1 1 8th Street, Tacoma 4 4 , Wash ington

EXECUTIVE COMM ITTEE OF THE BOA R D R EV. F. .I. MOLTER, Vice-Chai rman

D R . H. L . FOSS, C h a i rm a n

REV. O. K . DAVIDSON, Secretary

DR. K E N N ETH E R ICKSON, Treasurer

REV. R. A. DAEH L l N and D R . S. C. S I EFKES, Advisory

C H U RCH OFFI C I A LS

General Dr. F. A. Schiotz, President, 422 S. 5th Street, M i n neapo l i s 1 5 , M i n nesota D r. J. A. Aasgard, President Emeritus, Cokato, M i n nesota Dr. S. C. Eastvo ld, First Vice President, Pacific Lutheran College, Tacoma 44, Washington Dr. L. M. Stavig, Seco nd Vice President, Augustana College, Sioux Fa l l s, South Da kota Rev. O. H. Hove, Secreta ry, 4 2 2 S. 5th Street, M i n nea polis 1 5, M i n nesota Mr. N. H. Nelson, Treasurer, 4 2 2 S. 5th Street, M i n neapo l i s 1 5, M i n nesota Rev. H. O. Sh u rson, Treasurer Emeritus, 3 74 8 Portland Ave . , Mi nneapolis, Min nesota

Pacific District Dr. H. L. Foss, President, 3 0 8 Medical Arts Bldg., Seattle, Washi ngton Mr. Vern H a roldson, Lay Member, 1 005 W. 1 32 n d St., Seattle 77, Wash i n gton

Board of Christian Education Dr. Morris Wee, C h a i rman, 1 0 04 Sherman Ave . , Madison, Wisconsin Rev. Edward W. Nervig, Vice-C h a i r m a n , 3 1 4 S. Jay St. , Aberdeen, South Dakota Dr. A. J. To lo, Secreta ry, Dows, Iowa Mr. Peter Anderson, 606 1 0th St. 5., Moorhead, Min nesota Rev. O. G. Birkeland, Whiteh a l l , Wisconsin M r . Wa lter I . Bra ndt, 59-88th St., Brooklyn 9, New York Rev. Arne Christianson, 2 1 0 4 N . E. H a n cock St., Portland 1 2, Oregon Rev. J. T. Dah le, 706 U n i versity Dr., Saskatoon, Sas k . , Canada Dr. Leonard Haas, Wisconsin State Col lege, Eau C l a i re, Wisconsin Rev. Arndt L. Ha lvorson, 1 2 0 1 E. River Rd., M i n neapo l i s 1 4 , M i n nesota Rev. Harold B. K i l d a h l , J r . , 5 1 5 Walders St., M i n ot, North Da kota Mr. Theodore L. Nyd a h l , 220 Viola St., Man kato, M i n nesota Mr. Leonard Ramberg, 42 1 5 2 2 n d Ave. 5., Mi n neapo l is 7, M i n nesota Rev. J. T. Sto lee, 2 3 2 4 3rd Ave. W., Hibbing, M i n nesota Rev. Erling H. Wold, 6226 More l la , North Hol lywood, Cal iforn ia Ex Officio:

Dr. Fred rik A. Schiotz, 4 2 2 s. 5th St., M i n neapolis 1 5 , M i n nesota

Dr. Sidney A. Rand, Executive Di rector, Department of Christian Education, 422 S. 5th St., M i n neapol is 1 5 , Minn esota 1 19


A D M I IN JSTRAT I V E A N D OFFICE PERSO N N EL

ADM I N I STRATIVE AND OT H ER O FFICERS President

S. C. EASTVOlD

Dean of the Col l ege

P H I LI P E . HAUGE

Busi ness Manager

S. C. EASTVOLD P H I L I P E. HA UGE

Reg istrar

LESLIE O. EKLU N D

Dean of Men

MARGARET D . W I C KSTROM

Dean of Women

A N N A MAR IN IN I ELSEN

D i r ector of Teacher Education

F RA N K HAM I LTON HALEY

Acting Librarian

ROY E. OlSON

D irecto r of Public Rel ations

MA RVEL K. HARSHMAN

D irector of Ath l etics

KA'RL E . W E I SS

D irecto r of Music

G U N NAR J . MALM I N

D i rector of Choral Music

ELI N E KRAABEl MORKEN

D i rector of N u rsing

W I LLIAM l . STR U N K

Chairman, Stu dent Health Service

FLORENCE A. QUAST

D i rector of Foods

OFFIC E P E RSONN El. A N D STAFF Secretary to the Pres ident (First Semester) (Seco nd Semester)

JOAN N E POENCET BERTON NANCY LEE R I CHARDSON H ELEN J ETER ELLINGSO N

Secretary to the Dean ' Assista n t to the Registrar

L 1 N KA K. J O H NSON

Secretary to the D i rector of Public Relations

JOYCE R I GG DEASY

Secretary to the Faculty

BARBARA R I X POTRATZ

Cle rk, Registra r's Office

J A N I CE A N NE TTE SIN D ERSON

Receptionist

MAMI E K. RAMSTAD

Bookkeeper

A N N A MELLI NG ENGE

Assistant to the Book keeper

ELEANOR CARLSON PETERSON

Co l lege N u rse

PEGGY FA RVER M I LES

P l a n t Man ager

KEN N ETH J. A. JACOBS

Manager of the Bookstore

CARL G. FAULK

Library C l e r k Housemothers

CAROl EDITH GETCHMAN CLARA F. NELSO N , H El'EN N I C HOlSON, FREDA ROUZE, C H R I ST I N E MALM I N

Housefather

C . K. MALM I N

Resident Physician

DONALD L . NOTHSTE I N , M . D . 1 20


FACU LTY

FACU LTY 1 956-57 SETH CLAR ENCE EASTVOLD President Graduate, Jewe l l lutheran Co l l ege, 1 9 1 3 ; A. B., St. Olaf Co l lege, 1 9 1 6 ; Cando Theo l . , Luther Sem i n a ry, 1 920; B. D . 1 924, S. T. M. 1 9 26, Th . D . 1 9 3 1 , Augusta n a T h eo logical Se m i n a ry. A t Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 94 3 . •

ELV I N MA RTI N AKRE Associate P rofessor of H istory B. A., Conco rdia Co l lege, 1 9 28; g raduate work, North D a kota State Co l lege, summer 1 9 30; Concord i a Co nservatory of Mus ic, sum mers 1 9 30, 1 9 3 1 ; Un iversity of Min nesota, summers 11 935, 1 9 3 6 ; M. A . , Un iversity of Was h i n gto n , 1 9 4 1 ; graduate wo rk, ibid, 1 9 43-44, s u m­ mer 1 9 47 a n d 1 947-4 8 ; Un ivers ity of Oslo, 1 9 5 4 ; Oxford University, summer 1 9 5 5 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege since 1 9 3 7 . H E RBERT MElV I N AXFORD Assista n t P rofessor of Economics a n d Busi ness Admin istration B. Co m., University of Man itoba, 1 9 4 1 ; M . Com ., Un iversity of Mani­ toba, 1 9 47; g radu ate wo rk, U n ivers i ty of Wiscon s i n , 1 9 47- 1 9 5 1 . At Pacific Lu1'heran Co l 'l ege si nce 1 9 54. E lS I E MA R I E BERGE I n structor i n Econom ics a n d Business Admin istration B . A., Concordia Co l l ege, 1 9 44; Katharine G i bbs Schoo l , New York, 1 9 44-45; Colvmbia U n i versity, summer 1 9 50. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege from 1 9 48- 1 9 5 2 and f i rst semester, 1 9 56-57. GRACE ELEA NOR BLOMQUIST Associate Professor of Eng l i s h B. A., Concordia Co l lege, 1 9 34; M . A . , Syracuse Un iversity, 1 9 39; g radu ate work, Un iversity of Min nesota, summer 1 948; Goethe Uni­ versity, summer 1 95 5 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 9 39. VERNON C . CARLSON Associate Professor of Education a n d Eng l ish B. A., Wittenberg Co l l ege, 1 92 8; Ph. D . , Johns Hopkins Un ivers ity, 1 9 47. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege s i nce 1 9 5 5 . ELNORA EMI LY C H ESTERMAN I n structor in Eng l is h B. A . , Un iversity of Cororado, 1 9 27; M . A . , Un iversity o f Was h i ngton, 1 9 5 5 . At Pacific Lutheran College since J a n uary, 1 95 5 . ElLEN KAROLYN CHR ISTENSEN I n structor in Music B. A . in Mus ic, Un iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 95 3 ; M . A. in M u sic, Uni­ versity of Was h i n g ton, 1 9 55 <\t Pacific tutheran Co l lege si nce 1 9 55. .

.

OSCAR KIRK D I ZMANG Assista nt Professor of Economics and Business Admin istration B. S., Kansas State Col lege, 1 9 27; M. A., 'Un iversity of Ch icago, 1 9 29; g raduate work, Un iversity of Ch icago, sum mers 1 9 30-34 and 1 9 4 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Col l ege si nce 1 95 5 . 121


FACULTY LESLIE OLIVER E KLUND Dean of Men a n d Ass istant Professor of Psychology B. S., U n iversity of Nebraska, 1 94 2 ; M . A., U n iversity of Nebraske, 1 944. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 946. STAN LEY DENTON ELBERSON I n structor i n Speech B. A., Pacific Lutheran Co l lege, 1 95 1 ; B. Ed., Pacific Lutheran Col lege, 1 9 53; g raduate work, Stanford U n iversity, summer 1 953; U n iversity of Uta h , 1 954, 1 95 5 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege si nce 1 95 3 . JON M E Y E R E R I CSON I n structor i n Speech B. A. i n Ed . , Pacific Lutheran Co l lege, 1 95 2 ; M. A., Stanford U n iver足 sity, 1 9 5 3 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 954. DONALD RAYMOND FARME R Assistant Professor o f Po l itical Science B. E. in Ed., University of Min nesota, 1 943; Ph . D . , Un iversity of M i n nesota, 1 95 4 ; graduate work, U n iversity of Min nesota, 1 95 5 ; foreign study sem i n a r y e a r i n Europe, 1 948-49. A t Pacific Lutheran Co l lege si nce 1 95 5 . CARL GUSTAV FAULK Manager of the Bookstore. I nstructor in Economics and Business Ad m i n istration B. S., Co l l ege of Puget So und, 1 9 36; g raduate work, Col lege of Puget Sound, 1 9 36-1 937, 1 940-1 94 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege si nce 1 95 4 . LEE FORD Associate Professor of Biology B . A., Witten berg Co l lege, 1 947; M. S., U n i versity of M i n n esota, 1 949; Ph. D., Iowa State Co l lege, 1 95 2 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 95 6 . R . BYARD FR ITTS Assistant Professor of Music B . M., Wittenberg Col lege, 1 94 8 ; M. Mus., Eastman School of Music, U n iversity of Rochester, 1 949; grad uate work, U n iversity of Washing足 ton , s u m me r 1 95 1 ; Eastman School of Music, 1 955-5 6 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 949. JOHN EDWARD GAI N ES I nstructor in I ndustri a l Arts B. A., U n iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 9 39; Petro leu m Engi neering Degree, Colorado School of Mines, 1 947. At Pacific Lutheran Co 'l l eg e si nce 1 9 56. GORDON OLIVER GILBERTSON Assistant Professor of Music B. A., Concordia Col l ege, 1 937; M. M., Northwestern U niversity, 1 9 42. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 95 4 . ARNOlD JASPER HAGEN Assistant Professor of Education B. A., Concordia Co l l ege, 1 9 3 1 ; M. Ed., U n iversity of Montana, 1 94 1 ; D . Ed . , U n iversity of Oregon, 1 95 5 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 95 5 . 1 22


FACULTY FRAN K HAMI LTON HALEY Acting Librarian B. A . , W i l l amette U n iversity, 1 935; B. D . , D rew U n iversity, 1 945, g rad­ uate work there 1 9 46, 1 94 8 ; graduate work, University of Zu rich, 1 9 47; Un iversity of Cambr idge, 1 947; A B . L.S., U n iversity of Wash­ ington, 1 950. At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege since 1 95 1 . MARVEL KEITH HARSHMAN Coach of Footba l l , Bas ketba l l , and Baseba l l and Assistant Professor of Physica l Education B. A., Pacific Luthera n Col lege, 1 942; g radu ate work, Un iversity of Wash i n gton, 1 946, and summe rs 1 948, 1 949. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 9 45. P H I L I P ENOCH HAUGE Dean of the Co l l ege, Reg istrar B. A., St. Olaf Col lege, 1 920; M . A , Un i.versity of Washington, 1 92 4 ; graduate work, Un iversity o f Ch icago, summ er 1 9 33; P h . D . , University of Was hin gton, 1 9 4 2 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege s i n ce 1 920. LU C I LL E MAR GU ERITE JOH NSON Assistant Professor of English B. A, Concordia Co l l ege, 1 940; M . A , Was hington State College, 1 943; graduate work, MacPha i l School of Music and Drama, 1 94 4 ; U n iversity of Colorado, 1 945; U niversity o f Washi ngton, 1 947, 1 95 5 ; Un iversity of Oslo, 1 94 8 . A t Pacific Lutheran Co l lege since 1 9 5 3 . OLAF MELVI N JORDAHL Professor of Physics, Mathematics A. B . , Luther College, 1 92 5 ; M . S., U n iversity of Pittsburgh, 1 9 2 7; Ph. D., U n iversity of Wisco nsin, 1 93 3 . At Pacific tutheran Col lege s i nce 1 940. T H EODORE OSCAR HENRY KARL Professor of Speech B . A., Gustavus Ado l ph us, 1 934; M . A, Gustavus Ad olphus, 1 9 36; g rad uate work, U n iversity of Southern C a l ifo rnia, summer 1 95 1 ; Stan­ ford U n iversity, s ummers 1 9 52, 1 9 5 3 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege 1 940-1 942 and since 1 94 8 . LARS EVERETT K I TTLESON I nstructor in Art B. S. in Art Educ., M i lwaukee State Teachers Col lege, 1 9 50; M. S . i n Appl ied Arts, Un iversity o f Wiscons i n , 1 9 5 1 ; M . F . A . in Painting, Uni­ versity of Southern Cal iforn ia, 1 95 5 . At Pacific Lutheran College s i nce 1 95 6 . RA YMOND A KLOPSCH Assistant Professor of Eng lish B. S., I l l inois I nstitute of Technology, 1 9 49; M . A, University of I l l i nois, 1 950; g raduate work, U n iversity of I l l ino is, 1 950- 1 95 3 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l eg e s ince 1 95 3 . E R I C H CARL KNORR Professor of Sociology Graduate, St. Paul Luther Co l lege, 1 9 2 1 ; Cando Theo l . , St. P a u l Luther Sem i n a ry, 1 924; B. A., Washington State Co l l ege, 1 9 29; M. A , Wash­ ingto n State Co l lege, 1 930; Ph. D., U n iversity of Was hington, 1 946. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 94 9 . 123


FACULTY ANNE ELISE KNUDSON A�sociate P rofessor of E n g l ish B . A., Aug ustana Col l'ege, 1 9 28; M. A., State Col lege of Washingto n , 1 9 36; U n i versity o f Wa s h i ngton, s u m m e r 1 9 3 8 ; State Col lege of Wa s h i ngto n , s u m mers 1 9 40, 1 9 4 1 ; U n iversity of C a l ifo r n i a , s u m mer 1 946; U n iversity of Lon d o n , s u m mers 1 949, 1 9 5 5 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l il ege since 1 9 4 6 . J O H N GEORGE K U ETHE Associate P rofessor of Rel igion, P h i loso p h y A . B., Capital U n iversity, 1 9 40; B . D . , Capita l Un iversity, 1 9 4 3 ; S. T. M., Union Theo logical Sem i n a ry, 1 9 47; g ra d u a te work, U n ion Theolo­ gical Sem i n a ry, 1 94 3 - 1 944; graduate work, Columbia U n i versity, s u m­ mer 1 946; g radu ate work, Union Theo logical S e m i n a ry, 1 94 6- 1 9 4 7, s u m me r 1 94 7 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 95 4 . OTTILI E ELISE LITTLE Professor of Germ a n , French Western- I l l inois State Teachers Col lege, 2 year d i p l o ma, 1 9 1 6; A . B . , U n iversity o f I l l i nois, 1 9 2 3 ; M . A . , U n i versity o f Wash i n gton, 1 9 26; g radu ate work, U n iversity of Chicago, s u m mers 1 9 1 7, 1 9 1 8 ; P h . D . , H a n seatic U n iversity, H a m b u rg, Germany, 1 9 3 7 . At Pacific Luthera n Cd l ege, 1 9 4 6 to 1 9 5 1 , a n d si nce 1 95 2 . EUGENE ALFRED MA I ER Assistant P rofessor of Mathematics B . A., U n iversity of Oreg o n , 1 9 50; M . A., U n iversity of O rego n , 1 9 5 1 ; P h . D . , Un iversity of Oregon, 1 95 4 ; graduate work, Pri nceton U n i ­ versity, 1 9 5 1 -5 2 . At Pacific Luthera n Col lege s i nce 1 9 5 5 . GUNNAR JOHANNES MAlMIN Di recto r of Chora l Music and Professor of Music B . A., Luther Co l lege, 1 9 2 3 ; study a broad, 1 92 3-24; B . M., St. O l a f Col lege, 1 925; graduate w o r k , U n iversity of M i nnesota, summer 1 9 25; Northwestern U n iversity, first semester, 1 9 27; M . Mus., U n iversity of M ic h i g a n , 1 9 40. At Pacific lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 9 3 7 . R UTH V I R G I N I A MOE I n structor of P hysical Education B . A., Pacific lutheran Col lege, 1 9 5 3 ; s u m mer study at Col lege of P u get Sou n d , 1 9 54; g radu ate work, U n iversity of Wa sh ington, sum­ mer 1 95 6 . At Pacific lutheran Col lege s i n ce 1 9 5 5 . I N E Z E . MOORE I n structor i n Economics a n d Business Admin istration B. A., U n i versity of North Dakota , 1 9 1 5 ; g raduate work, U n iversity of C a l iforn i a , s u m mer 1 9 2 3 ; Un iversity of Was h i n gton 1 9 3 2 , 1 94 6 . At Pacific lutheran Col lege s i n ce J a n ua ry, 1 9 57. ELINE KRAABEL MOR KEN Di rector of Nursing and Assistant Professor of Nursing B . A . , St. O l af C o l lege, 1 92 8 ; R . N . Emanuel Hospital School of Nurs i n g , 1 9 3 1 ; graduate work, U n iversity of Chicago, 1 9 37; Gonzaga U n iver­ sity, 1 94 3 ; U n iversity of Wash i n gto n , 1 94 7 ; Eau C l a i re State Teachers Co l lege, 1 9 4 9 . At Pacific lutheran Co l l ege s i nce 1 9 5 3 . ANN CAROlYN NELSON Ass istant P rofessor of Sociology, Psychology B . A., Un iversity of Wyo m i n g , 1 9 50; M . A., U n iversity of Wyo m i n g , 1 9 5 2 ; g raduate w o r k , U n iversity o f Oregon, 1 95 3 - 1 9 5 4 . A t Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege s i nce 1 95 4 .

1 24


FACULTY M I tTON LUT H E R N ESV I G Assista n t Professor o f Eng lish B. A., St. O l a f Coi tege, 1 9 37; Cando Theo l . , Luther Theological Semin足 a ry, 1 942; M . A., U n iversity of M i nnesota, 1 947. At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege, 1 947-5 1 a n d si nce 1 95 3 . FRED E R I C K LAURENCE N EWN HAM Associate Professor of Music Graduate, Royal Academy of Mus ic, London, 1 9 2 5 ; Teacher's Trai n i n g Certificate, U n ivers ity o f Lo ndon, 1 925; Associate, Royal Col lege of Mus ic, London, 1 9 28; Licentiate, Royal Academy of Mu sic, Lo ndon, 1 9 2 9 ; Associa.e, Roya l Academy of Music, Lo ndon, 1 9 34; g raduate work, McGi l l University, 1 94 3-44. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege since 1 950. ANNA MARN N I ELSEN Di rector of Teacher Educaiion and Professor of Education B. A., Iowa State Teachers Col lege, 1 92 9 ; M. A., Co ll umbia University, 1 9 3 5 ; g radu ate work, Un iversity of Was hingto n , su mmers 1 937, 1 9 38, 1 9 3 9 . At Pacific Luthera n Col l ege since 1 9 39. MAGNUS NODTVEDT P rofessor of H istory B. A., St. O l a f Col lege, 1 9 1 7; A. M . , Columbia U n iversity, 1 920; Th. B., Luther Theo logical Sem i n a ry, 1 92 5 ; Th. M . , Princeton Theological Sem i nary, 1 92 8 ; Ph. D., U n iversity of Chicago, 1 95 0 . At Pacific Luthera n Co,t lege s ince 1 947. ERIC NORDHOLM I n structor of Speech B. F. A., Art I n stitute of C h i cago, 1 95 1 ; Va l pa raiso U n iversity, summe r 1 947; I nd i a n a U n i versity, 1 95 2 - 5 3 . At Pacific Luthera n Co l l ege since 1 95 5 . DONALD L O U NOTHST E I N Assistant Professor of Biology B. A., Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege, 1 950; M . D., U n iversity of Was hi ngton, Med ical Schoo l , 1 9 5 4 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege si nce 1 9 56. ROB ERT CARL OLSEN Professor of Chemistry B. S., Michigan State Co l l ege, 1 9 3 1 ; Ph. D . , 1 9 36. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 947. ROY E DW I N OLSON Di rector of Public Relations Jewe l l Lutheran Co l l ege, 1 9 20; E I,l sworth Co l lege, su mmer 1 9 2 1 ; Cando Theol., Luther Theological Sem i n a ry, 1 9 2 9 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege since 1 9 5 1 . BURTON THOMAS OSTENSON Professor of Biol'ogy B. A . , Luther Co l l ege, 1 9 3 2 ; M. S., U n iversity of Michi gan, 1 9 34; P h . D . , U n i versity o f Michigan, 1 947. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege si nce 1 947. 1 25


FACU LTY A R N E K E N N ETH PEDERSON I n structor in Education B . A., Pacific Lutheran Col lege, 1 9 49; B . E., Pacific Lutheran Col lege, 1 9 5 3 ; M. A., Pacific Lutheran Col lege, 1 9 5 5 . At Pacific Luthera n Col lege s i nce 1 9 56. J ESSE P H I L I P PflUEGER P rofessor of Rel igion, P h i 'losophy B. A., Capital Un iversity, 1 9 07; B. S., Capita l University, 1 9 1 0 ; Cando Theo l . , Capital Un iversity, 1 9 1 0 ; g raduate of Tropica l Medicine Course, T u l a n e Un iversity, 1 9 1 4; graduate work, Leipsic U n iversity, 1 9 1 5; U ni足 versity of Wash ington, Slimmer, 1 9 3 1 ; D . D., Capital University, 1 9 42; L H. D., St. Olaf Col lege, 1 95 6 . At Pacific Lutheran College si nce 1 9 30. FLORENCE A. QUAST D i rector of Foods and Assistant Professor of Home Economics B. S . , U n iversity of Wa shington, 1 9 1 9 ; M. S., U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 9 3 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 9 5 5 . AN DERS WI LLIAM RAMSTAD Professor of Chemistry B . A., St. Olaf Co l l ege, 1 9 1 4 ; Cando T h ee l . , Luther Theo logical Semin足 a ry, 1 9 1 8 ; M . S., U n i versity of Was h i n gton, 1 936; special work, Uni足 versity of Was h i n gton, summer 1 940. At Pacific Lutheran College s i n ce 1 92 5 . H E R BERT ROBERT RANSON Professor of Eng l is h B. A., University o f Kansas, 1 924; M. A., U n iversity o f Kansas, 1 926; P h . D., Un iversity of Was hi ngton, 1 9 36. At Pacific Luthera n Co ,r lege s i n ce 1 9 40. KELMER N ElSON ROE Associate Professor of Religion, Greek B . A., Luther Col lege, 1 9 25; B . Th., Luther Theological Sem i n a ry , 1 9 2 8 ; M. Th., P rinceton Theotogical Semin ary, 1 929. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 9 47. GEORGE ROSKOS Associate Professor of Art B. S. Art Ed., Youngstown College, 1 949; M . A., Iowa Un iversity, 1 95 0 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l eg e since 1 9 50. J U N ET E. ,RUN BECK Assistant Professor of Education Graduate, Pacific Lutheran College, No rma l Department, 1 9 35; B . A., Co l l ege of Puget Sound, 1 9 5 1 ; g radu ate work, Stanford Un iversity, sum mers of 1 9 54, 1 95 5 , 1 956. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 9 5 3 . JOSEF EM I L R U N N I N G Assistant Professor of Mathematics B. A., St. O l af Col l ege, 1 9 1 6; M . A., U n iversity of Minnesota, 1 9 4 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l eg e si nce 1 94 8 . H . M A R K SALZMAN Assistant Professor of Physical Education and Coach of Track B. A., Carthage Co l lege, 1 9 47; graduate work, Bow l i n g Green State Teachers University, 1 94 3-44; Northern I l l i nois State Teachers Col lege, 1 9 47; George W i l l iams Co l /ege, 1 94 8 ; M. A., U n iversity of Iowa, 1 9 5 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 95 1 . 1 26


FACULTY WALT ER CHARLES SCHNACK ENB ERG Associate Professor of History, Politica l Science B. A, St. Olaf Col lege, 1 9 39; M. A, Gonzaga University, 1 9 47; P h . D . , Was h ington State Col lege, 1 9 50. A t Pacific Lutheran Co'liege 1 942-44 and si nce 1 9 52. T H EODORE CAROL SJ ODI N G Director o f Secondary Education a n d Professor o f Education B. A, Un iversity of Saskatchewan, 1 9 33 ; M. A, Un iversity of Minne足 sota, 1 944; P h . D . , Un iversity of Minnesota, 1 9 5 1 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege si nce 1 9 5 1 . KRISTEN B. SOLBERG Associate Professor of Psychology, Education B. A, Augustana College, 1 9 42; Ed . M., U n iversity of South Da kota, 1 9 50; Ed . D., Un iversity of Wyoming, 1 9 5 3 . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege si nce 1 9 5 3 . ANTHONY STAMPOLIS Professor of Politica l Science and istration

Economics and

Busi ness

Ad min足

A. B., Uni versity of Mich igan, 1 9 42; M. PA, Harvard Un iversity, 1 9 44; Ph. D., H a rvard University, 1 950. At Pacific Lutheran College si nce 1 9 53. WI LLIAM LEONARD STRU N K Professor o f Bio logy B. A, Un iversity of Min nesota, 1 9 2 3 ; M. S., U n i versity of Minnesota, 1 9 25; D. Sc., University of Michigan, 1 9 3 1 ; special work, Oxford Un iversity, 1 9 43. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege since 1 94 8 . TRYGVE O. SVARE Assistant Professor of Lati n and Norwegian B . A., Concord i a Co l l ege, 1 9 1 7; Cando Theo l . , Luther Theo1logical Seminary, 1 9 2 1 ; M. A, Un iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 947; g raduate work, Un iversity of Washington, 1 948-49. At Pacific Lutheran College 1 949 to January 1 , 1 9 5 7 . KARL ERWI N WEISS D i rector of I nstrumenta l Music and Professor of Music B. M., Eastman School of Music, 1 9 2 7; piano, Josef Pembauer, Munich, Germany, 1 929-30. At Pacific lutheran Co l lege since 1 94 1 . MARGARET D. WICKSTROM Dean of Women and Assistant Professor of Rel igion A B., Aug ustana Co l l ege, 1 9 37, grad uate work there summer 1 9 37; Un iversity of Wiscon s i n , sum mer 1 9 39; lutheran Bible I n stitute, 1 948; M. R. E., The Biblical Se min a ry of New York, 1 9 5 1 . At Pacific lutheran College si nce 1 9 5 1 . R H ODA HO KENSTAD YOUNG Assistant Professor of Physical Education Graduate, Pacific lutheran Col lege, 1 9 3 5 ; B. A, Un iversity of Wash足 ington, 1 9 3 7; M. S., U n iversity of Wash ington, 1 9 56. At Pacific luth足 eran College, 1 9 38-42, and s i nce Apri l , 1 9 4 3 . 1 27


FACU LTY

ASSI STANTS, ASSOCIATES AND LECT U RERS H E N RY J. BERTNESS B. A., Augsburg Col l ege, 1 947; M. A , Un iversity of M i nnesota, 1 94 8 ; P h . D., U n iversity o f M i n n esota, 1 9 5 5 . Assistant i n Psychology. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege si nce 1 95 6 . TRYGVE I . B L i X B. A , Vv'ash i ngton State Col lege, 1 9 35; M. A , Washington State Col­ lege, 1' 94 4 . Ass istant in Educati on. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege, sum­ mer 1 9 56. EVELYN BUCKLEY B. A , 1 9 44; M. Ed., U n iversity of Was h i ngton , 1 9 5 5 . Ed ucati on. A t Pacific Lutheran College, summer 1 9 56.

Assista nt i n

BEVERLY F. DAVENPORT B. /" . , Un iversity of Cal ifornia at Los Ange les, 1 9 4 5 ; P h . D., U n iversity of Southern Cal ifornia, 1 9 5 2 . Assista n t in Psychology. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege fa l l semester, 1 9 5 6 . L O R E M. DORMER A B., A. M., inclusive, U n iversity of Tue b i ngen, Ge rmany, 1 94 6- 1 9 5 3 ; graduate sem i n a rs toward P h . D . , U n iversity of Tuebingen, 1 9 541 9 5 5 . Assistant i n Ger man. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 9 5 6 . MORRIS EVERETT FO RD B. A, Co l l ege of Puget Sound, �1 932; g raduate work, Col lege of Puget Sound, 1 9 3 3-34, 1 93 7-39. Ass ista n t i n Education. At Pacific Lutheran Col l ege, su m m e rs 1 946, 1 947, 1 94 8 , 1 94 9 and 1 9 5 6 . L I LLIAN K I N G G I BSON B. A , U n iversity of I owa, 1 924; M . A , U n iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 9 2 8 ; graduate work, U n i versity of Southern Cal ifornia, 1 9 3 1 ; U n i ver­ s i ty of Washi n g ton, 1 9 34; Un iversity of Oregon, 1 9 3 5 ; Col lege of Puget Sound 1 94 9 , 1 9 5 5 . Ass ista n t in Education . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege spring semester 1 9 5 7 . HAROLD F . GRAY B. A, Pacific Lutheran Col lege, 1 944; B . Ed . , Col lege of Puget Sound, 1 9 46; graduate work, Un iversity of Wa s h i ng ton, summer 1 9 47; M. A., Col lege of Puget Sound, 1 9 5 0 . Assistant i n Educa tion. At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege, summers 1 95 1 , 1 95 2 , 1 954, 1 9 5 5 , 1 9 5 6 . B ENJAM I N G . HANSON B . S . in Law, L. L . B . , U n ivers i ty of Washi ngton , 1 9 5 3 . Assista n t in Economics and Business Ad m i n istra tion . At Pacific lutheran Col lege s i nce 1 956. DORIS H U BN E R B . A . , Col lege of Puget Sound; g radu ate work, Co l l ege of Puget Sound. Assista nt i n Education. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege, s u m m ers 1 9 5 2 , 1 956. MARGARET A KEBLBEK B. A . , Western Was hi ngton College of Education, 1 94 8 ; M . A , Central Wash ington College of Education, 1 9 5 6 . Assistan t in Educa tion. At Pacific lutheran C o l l ege s ince 1 95 6 . H A R O L D J . LE RAAS A B . , luther Col lege, 1 9 30; M. S . , U n iversity of Michigan, 1 9 3 2 ; P h . D . , Un iversity o f M i c h i g a n , 1 9 3 5 ; D . D . S . , U n i versity o f M i c h i g a n , 1 9 46. A t Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege, 1 9 35-42, and 1 955-56, and lec­ tu rer in B i o logy si nce J a n u a ry, 1 9 47. 1 28


FACULTY PERRY LONDON B. A., Yes hi va Col lege, 1 9 5 2 ; M. A., Teachers Col lege, Columbia U n i v ersity, 1 9 5 3 ; P h . D . , Teachers Col l ege, Columbia U n iversity, 1 9 5 6 . Assistant in Psych ology. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege, spring semester 1 957. COR N E L I US K . MALM I N B. A . , St. Olaf Col lege, 1 9 1 5; Cando Theo l . , Red Wing Theologica l Se m i n a ry , 1 9 1 7. I n structor in Norweg i a n . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 9 5 6 . MELV I N S EV E R I N MONSON B. S., I l l in ois State Norma l Un iversity, 1 9 28; M . A., No rthwestern U n ivers ity, 1 9 34; Ed. D . , Colorado State Co l l ege of Education, 1 9 44. Lecturer in Educati o n . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege 1 949- 1 9 5 1 and sum­ mers 1 95 4 , 1 9 5 6 . BERTRUM O. MYH R E B. A., Pacific Lutheran Co'l lege, 1 9 4 5 ; B . S . , U n i versity of Wa s h i n g ton, 1 9 4 1 ; M . Ed., Co l l ege of Puget Sound, 1 9 5 2 . Assistant i n EducaNon. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege, summer 1 9 5 6 . CLIF FORD ORI N OLSON B. A., Luther Col lege, 1 9 27; Summer Coach i n g Schoo l , Bem i d j i , M i n­ nesota, 1 9 29; State Co l l ege of Washington , summer 1 9 30; Un iversity of Was h i n gton, 1 9 3 1 ; Luther Co l lege Coaching Schoo l , Decorah, Iowa, 1 9 3 3 . At PacHic Lutheran C o l l e ge, 1 9 29-46, and associate in Public Relations si nce 1 9 48. ANNE E. ORLUCK B. A., Un iversity of Was h i ngton, 1 9 5 2 ; M . A., Un iversity of Washi ng­ to n , 1 9 5 4 . Assista nt in Education . At Pacific Lutheran Col lege, sum­ mer 1 95 6 . IIRMA L. PAI N E B . A . , Western Washington Co l lege of Education, 1 9 46; M . E . , Western Was hi ngton Co l l ege of Ed ucati o n , 1 9 5 3 . Assistant in Education. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege si nce 1 9 5 2 . ERMA COFFMAN BLETHEN PARKER B. A., Col lege of Puget Sound, 1 9 2 7; M . A., Ohio State University, 1 9 29; gradua te wo rk (part-time), New York School of Soci a l Work, Co l u mbia U n i versity, 1 9 30- 1 940. Assistant in Education. At Pacific Luthera n Col l ege, 1 9 54 - 1 9 5 5 and su mmer 1 9 5 6 . H E L E N POLLA R D B. A . , Eastern Wa shin gton Col lege of Education; B. Ed., U n iversity of Washingto n . Assista nt in Educat io n . At Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege sum­ mers 1 9 5 5 , 1 9 5 6 . R I CHARD ROSENTHAL B . A., Centenary Col lege, 1 9 49; '8 . H. L. and M . H . L., Hebrew U n i on Co l l ege. Assistant i n Hebrew. At Pacific Lutheran Co l lege s i nce 1 9 56. H E N RY S I EGL Graduate, Curtis I nstitute of Music, P h i l adelphia; studied under Mme. Lea Lu boshutz, Dr. Artur Rodzinski, Louis B a i l ly, Mme. Renee Longy and E m i l My l n arsky; Concert Master, Seattle Symphony Orchestra; Assistant in V i o l i n at Pacific Lutheran Co l lege since 1 9 5 6 . DOROfHY THORDARSON B. S., Oregon State Col lege of Education; B . A., U niversity of Oregon; g raduate work, Un iversity of Cal iforn i a . Assista n t in Education. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege, s ummer 1 9 56. KATH ERYN E. WHITE B. A . , Western Washi n gton Co l l e ge of Education, 1 942; M . A., Teachers Col lege, Co l u m b i a Un iversity. Assistant in Education. At Pacific Luth­ eran Co l l ege, summ er 1 9 56. 1 29


FACU LTY

C LINICAL DIVISION ASSOCl' ATE FACU LTY-EMAN U E L HOSP ITA L EST H E R A. JACOBSON Assista n t i n N u rsing Education R . N., Fai rview Hospita ll School of N u rsing; B. A., Luther Co l l ege, 1 943; extens ion work, U n iversity of Minnesota, 1 943-1 950. LE'TOI L E KRON McFADDEN Assistant in N u rs·ing Education R . N., B. Sc. i n N. Ed., Col lege of Holy N a mes, 1 943; M. N., U n i versity of Was h i n gton, 1 95 3 . H A LVOR GEORGE RANDOLPH Assistant i n Rel igion A. B., Upsa l a Co l l ege, 1 9 1 3; C. T. Augustana Sem i n a ry, 1 9 1 8; g rad­ u a te work, Bibl ical Sem i n a ry, summer 1 92 5 ; Wesley Memori a l Hos­ pita l, 1 945; I nstitute of Pastoral Care, Boston, summer 1 948. ONALEE FROST Assistant in N u rs ing Arts R. N . Emanuel Hospita l School of N u rsing, 1 949; B. S., U n i versity of Oregon, 1 95 5 . DOROTHEA C. HAR D I N Assistant i n N u rs i n g Education R . N., Fort Wayne Lutheran Hospital School of N u rs i n g ; B. S., U n iver­ s i ty of Mich igan, 1 943; g raduate work, University of Oregon, 1 948. LO R E N E K N UTSON Assista n t I nstructor in Operating Room R. N . , Emanuel Hospita l , 1 956. DOROT H Y MO I RA MANSELL Assista n t in Nursing Education R . N., St. J a mes Hospital School of N u rs ing; B. Col lege, 1 94 6 .

E.

i n N. Ed., St. Mary

DOROTHEA MEAG H E R Assistant Therapeutic Dietitian B. S., Wash i ngton State Col lege, 1 949. L I LA MUSTOLA I nstructor in Operati n g Room R. N . , E m a n u e l Hospital School of N ursing, 1 946; additio n a l work, U n i versity of Oregon . I RMA ROSE N EU B ERT Assista n t i n Nursing Education R. N., E m a n u e l Hospital School of Nursing; add itio n a l work, U n i­ versity of Oregon, 1 950. A N N ETTE C H I LDRETH N EWMAN Assistan t in N u rsing Arts R. N . , B . S., Lewis and C l a r k Co l lege, 1 955; graduate work, U n i versity of Oregon. 1 30


FACULTY J U N E H O lSTROM PERRITT I Assistant i n Matern i ty N u rsin g R. N . Emanuel Hospital School of N u rsing, 1 95 2 ; B. S., Cascade Col颅 lege, 1 9 54; graduate work, Un iversity of Oregon. BERNICE PETERSON Assistant i n N u rs i n g Education R. N . , Swed ish Covena nt Hos p i ta l , Chicago; col lege work, U n iversity of Oregon. DOROTHY D. RADEMACHER Assistant in N u rs ing Education R. N . , Emanuel Hos pita l School of N u rsing; B. S., Whitworth Col lege, 1 9 50. CAT H E R I N E NESS ROSENBERG Assistant in N u rsing Education R. N., B. S., Lewis and C l a r k Col lege, 1 9 5 5 . A N N E M. ZARA Assistant in Nurs路i ng Education R. N., Un iversity of Iowa College of N u rs i n g .

EMERITUS P ET E R J EREMIAH BARDON B. S., V a l p a ra i so Co l l ege, 1 8 92; B. A . , U n iversity of Wa shington, 1 9 1 1 ; M . A., U n i versity of Was h i n gton, 1 9 2 7; graduate wo rk, U n iversity of Washi ngton, su mmers 1 9 30, 1 9 3 1 , 1 9 3 2 , 1 9 33, 1 9 34, 1 9 35. At Pacific Lutheran Academy, 1 9 1 2-1 7; at Pacific Lutheran Co l l ege sin ce 1 9 2 9 (Emeritus 1 9 38).

LORA B RADFORD KREI DLER Col lege work, Carleton Co l l ege, 1 890-9 1 ; Un iversity of Min nesota, 1 89 1 -92; art work, Min nea po l i s School of Art, 1 8 95-98; Col lege of Puget Sound, su mmer 1 9 2 4; U n iversity of Wa s h i ngton, su mmers 1 929, 1 9 30. At Pacific Lutheran Col lege since 1 92 1 , part time since 1 940 (Emeritus 1 943).

GEO R EN EAU Ph. B. Un iversity of Chicago, 1 900; Ph. M., U n iversity of Ch icago, 1 9 1 0 ; gr adu ate wo rk, Un iversity of Ch icago, part time 1 9 1 1 - 1 3 , and part time, Un iversity of Pennsylvania, 1 9 1 3 ; Ll. B., LaSa l l e Un iversity, 1 944. Professor of Sociology, Pacific lutheran College 1 9 3 3 -1 952 (Emeritus 1 952).

JOHN ULR I K XAV I E R A. B., Luther CoHege, 1 8 9 3 ; Cando Theo l . , luther Semina ry, 1 898; gr aduate work, Un iversity of M i nnesota, 1 8 98-99; M . A., Un iversity of Washi n gton, 1 92 9 . D. O., Pacific lutheran Col lege, 1 953. At Pacific Lutheran Academy, 1 902-07, 1 9 0 8- 1 6; at Pacific Lutheran Colleg e s i nce 1 9 20 (Emeritus 1 942). 131


FACULTY COMMmEES, ALUM N I ASSOCI ATION

FACULTY COMMITTEES 1 956- 1 957 The first named member of each com m ittee is chairman. The President and the Dean a re ex-officio members of a l l com mittees. COMM I TT E E ON COMM ITTEES: AT H L ETICS: K a r l , Ericson, H a rshman, Salzman) CATALOG:

Nesvig,

Roy Olson,

Schnacken berg

(advisory,

L. Johnson, Jorda h l , Blomquist

D I SCI PLI N E :

Sol berg, Axford, Nelson

EDUCAT IONAL POL I C I ES: EMPLOYMENT: H EALTH:

Knorr, Fritts, R. Olsen

Stru nk, Ca r l' son, Akre, Hagen, Knudson

E k l u n d , Nesvig, Wickstrom (advisory, K. Jacobs)

Stru n k, Nothste i n , You n g

LI BRARY: Stampolis, Klopsch, Maier, G. M a l m i n , Runbeck (advisory, H a ley) PLACEMENT:

N ie lsen, Axford, Ra mstad

P U B L I C I TY AND P U B L I C R E LATIONS: Newn h a m

Roy Olson, Nesvig, Weiss, Elberson,

R EL I G I O US ACT I V I T I ES: Pflueger, Knorr, Kuethe, N odtvedt, Ramstad, Roe, Svare (advisory, Lutnes) SCHEDULE OF ACT I V I T I ES:

Wickstrom, Nordh o l m , G i l be rtson

SCHOLARS H I P AND C U R R I CU L UM: Nodtvedt, Little, Morken, Sioding, Osten足 son, Kuethe, Roskos SOC IAL: Ch ristensen, Berge, Quast, Chesterman, Gai nes, Kittleson (advisory, Ne lson, Rouze, Nicholson, Mrs. Ma l m i n , C . K. Ma l m i n) STUDENT ACT I V I l I ES : (advisory, Lutnes)

Sa lzman,

STUDENT P U B L I CATIONS:

E k lund,

Farmer,

Roe,

Moe,

Wickstrom

Nesvig, R a nson, Kittleson, Running, Dizmang

ALUMN I R E PRESE NTATIVE: Nesvig FACU LTY SECRETARY:

Knudson

PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE ALUMNI ASSOC IATION 1 956-57 Pres ident

RONALD DOUGLASS

Vice-President

CLI FFORD KORSMO

Secretary

E N I D BLAKE WEBBER DELBERT SCHAFER

Treasurer Executive Secretary

MRS. A. W. RAMSTAD 1 32


STATISTICAL SUMMARY

STATI STICAL SUMMARY

En rol l me nt 1 956-57

Grad ua.tes Seniors J u n io rs

Men

Women

74

76

1 50

1 17

1 31

248

1 64

1 02

266

1 81

1 52

333

21 1

244

455

4

4

4

8

_____________ ____________________________ �___

______________________________________________

� ____________ � ________________________________

Sophomores Fres h m en

________________________________________

___ .... ________ �______________________________

Tota l

Spec i a l s M u s i c l essons o n l y Au d i tors

_ _ _ _�___________________ __________________

Other speci a l s Exte ns ion

_______ �__________________ _

TOTAL REG U LAR SCHOOL YEAR Summer Session Enro l l m ent, 1 9 56

10

40

50

___

.762

754

1516

1 55

289

444

91 7

1 043

1 960

60

1 37

1 97

857

906

1 763

________

__ ___� __ __ ____�_ ________ _ _ _____ ___ ___ _____

Students Cou nted Twice N ET TO TAL

2

___________________________________

_____________________________________________

TOTAL

4

_______________________

_______________�________________ ___

1 33


STATISTICAL SUMMARY

G EOGRA P H I CA L D I STR I BUTION 1 9 56-5 7 Men Wash ingto n Ca l ifornia Oregon Montana Id aho Al aska Minnesota North Da kota Hawaii Utah Wisconsi n Co lor ado I l l inois Ohio Alabama Arizona Iowa Kansas Maryland Michigan Pennsylvania South Da kota Texas Vi rg i n i a Wyoming Canada I raq Korea Ch i na

___________________________ .. _ _ _ _ _

__ . _ _ __ _

_

_ _ _ _____ _ _ __ _

______ _ _ _ ____

_________ _ _ _ _

_

_______ ______ __ _ __________ ___ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ __

____ _ _ _ __ _ __ _______ _ _ _ _ _______ _ _ _ __ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _________________________

______ _ ____________ . . ___ _____

_____

_ _ _ _ _____________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _______ ______

____

_____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________________

669 61 50 15 15 9 7 4 1 1 1

___________________ _____________ ___________ _

_ _ _ _ __ __ ___ _______

____

_ _____ _

_

Women 682 76 84 17 12 5 6 4 5 2 2 2

1 351 1 37 1 34 32 27 14 13 8 6 3 3 2 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1

3

7 5 5 1

906

1 763

2 1

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

---------------- ---------

________

_ _ _ _ _

_____ ___

____ _ __ ___ ____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

__ __ _ ___ _ __ _ ._ __ _

_

_ ____ _ _

_ _ _ __ __ _____ _ _ _ __ _____ __ _ ______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

___ ___ _ _ ___ _ _________ ____ __ ______ ____

___

___ _ _____ _____ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ___ _

__

____ __ _ _ _

__ _ _ ____ _ _ _ __

_________ _

TOTAL

_ _ _ ____ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ ____ ___ _ _ __ __

1 34

1 1 4 5 4 1 857

Tota l

1


STATISTICAL SUMMARY

REL I G I OUS AFFI LIATI ONS 1 9 56-57 LUTH E RANS Eva nge I i ca I America n Aug usta na U n ited Missouri Free Wiscons i n Danish Norwegi a n Finnish U ncl assified

Men

47

1 1 15

565

577

1 1 42

40 37 38 35 10

73 60 44 19 25 13 6 11 8 3 3 2 2 4

9 65 . 292

1 1 4 43 329

1 13 97 82 54 35 24 19 17 12 7 7 7 5 5 3 3 3 2 1 1 1 1 1 13 1 08 62 1

857

906

1 763

_ _ _ __________ _ _ __ _ _ _

_ __ _ _ __ _ ___ __ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ __ _

_ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________ ___ _

_ . . _ _ _ . _ _ _ __ __ ___ __ ________ __ _______ _

_ _ _ _

4 3

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____ ___ _ _

___ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ ____ ___ . _ _ _ _ _

TOTAL

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__ _

__

Tota l 629 1 84 1 24 62 53 14 5 4 4 1 62

305 91 58 24 26 7

__ _ _____ __ ___ _ __ __ _ _____ ___ _.

__ _ _ _ _ ____ _____________ _ _ _ _ ___

_____ ____ ___ _ _

Women

_ _ _ _ _ _

324 93 66 38 27 7 5

OTH ER DE NOMI NATIONS Methodist Pres byteria n Ba ptist Cathol ic Ep i scopa I ian Ch risti a n Pentecosta I Congreg ational Covenant Eva ngel ica I Latter Day Sai nts Nazarene Christi a n Science U n ita ri a n B reth ren Jewish Seventh Day Adventist Armen i a n Orthodox B uddh i st C h u rch of God Di sci pies of Ch rist Greek Orthodox Qua ker Independent Churches U ncl assified TOTAL

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ ___ _ _ _______ . _

________________________________ . __ . . _ _

_ _ _ ___________________ _______ _________

____________________________

_ _ _ _ ___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

_ _ ___________

_ _____ ___ ______ ____ . . ___

_ .__ _ _.________ ___ _ _ __

___ . _ _ . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________

_

. _ _ _ ___ ______ _ __ __ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

___________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______________ . _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

______ _______________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________________

__ ___ _ ________ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________________

1 1

13 6 4 4 4 5 3 1 3 1 1 2

1

___________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______________

l' l'

___________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ . __________ _

____________________ ______

______ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___________________

__________________

_____ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ ___

__ _ ___ ________ __ _ _ __________ __ __

GRAND TOTAt

_______________________________

1 35

2 2


1 9 56 GRADUATES

GRADUATES 1 956 Bachelor of Arts Ron a l d Leo Abberger And rew Va lentine Ambueh l

Petra O ne l l a Lee W i l l i a m Hen ry Ludwig, J r

Wi l l iam Floyd Anderson Richard Eugene Barnwe l ,1 Myrna Vyrene Berg Ti mothy Wade B l a n ey M i l dred I rene B rammer Stephen Loth a i re Brandt J . Arnold Bricker

Robert A. Lu ndgren Arth u r M . McGee Raymond P a u l Magn uson Carl Warren Meyers J e a n n e Lorra ine Mi ksch Norita Dawn M i l l er

Dona1d Arth u r Bru n n e r J a m e s Kenneth Charlston Howard Ch ristian son J a mes R. C l i fton J a m es Wi l l i a m C o l berg Wa yne Bruce D a h l M a ry A l ice Drexel Edith Lorra i n e Dutton Lawrence Carl Eggan J a l mer M . E l d a l Robert E l m o F l e m i n g Stuart Henry G i l breath Don a l d Wayne Gray Al lan Roy Gubrud Gifford Warren H a l l Constance M a r i e Ha nson Rolph Sigurd H a n son R ichard P h i l Heins John Thomas Housholder, Jr. Gordon E J II sworth H uesby Sta n ley Wi l l ia m H u lsman Dean Warren H u rst Lorra i n e I n ez Olson H u rst Delvin Dwayne H u tton P a u l Norman Jord a n J e a n E l izabeth Ken d a U Sharon L y l l i s Kinzer Ruth E l a i n e K lopsch Adrian Ralph Knutzen Donald John Kra ntz

S a l i m E l ias Mitri Don a l d Morris Don a l d Gene Mortenson Stewart Malcolm Morton Audrey Leo n a M u h r Beatrice A l berta M u l ford Ruth Sy lvia Myrwang H . Richard Nicho lson Tore K j e l l N ie l sen Myrna Kay Pfa n n e kuchen Nodtvedt P h i l i p Akerson Nordquist Robert Bruce O l a fson E l wood Neal Rieke Robert A. Romnes H. Duane Romo Daniel Corlett Rose Le l a n d 'R . Roseb e rg M a r j orie Helen Salzman David M . Scherer Wa l ter Dean Schwindt M a rtin John Simmons Josep h i n e Anne Stewart Maudie E l a i n e Straub C l a rence Gordon Strom M a r l ene Joyce Stu h l m i l ler Armand Thomas Swind l a n d Carol J e a n U r H e M i l d red A n n V a n Buren June Adel Wigd a h l D a v i d C l ifford Wold

1 36


1 9 56 GRADUATES

Bachelor of Arts in Ed ucation Marga ret Ursula Ambuehl Betty Ann Anderson Wa lter Ba l l Ramon leRoy Barnes Oberta Jean Bartels Evelyn Syverson Berg Joanne Lee Poencet Berton Ma ry louise Biery Roberta Jean Birkeda h l Phy l l i s R a e Brandt Barba ra A l ice Breuer R icha rd louis Brown Terrance R. Brown Delores Amber Beck Carstensen Jean Marie Ch ristianson Edna Megard Coffe l t J e a n Marilyn Cogburn Betty Jean Condray Fra n tzel Ma rga ret Corman Clela D a l rym p l e C a r o l J e a n Ed l u n d Jean-Ma rie Fow"er Fe nand er Ward F . Fol som, J r. Mark lee Freed Shi rley Belle Freeman Wa lter Je rome G a l usha, J r. louis George Geisert Ja net A r lyne Geldaker Virginia Adele Grahn Ida Joe Gronke Joan Bongsto Gubru d Kathryn A n n G u l h a ugen D i a n e lee Hagen Barbara luanne Hedl'und Ruth Mirian Heino Nancy Jean H e l l a n d E l len Pea r l Henry Henry .R . Hergert Jack lamar Hoover

Marlene Ch ristine Hovland Ba rbara Ann Howard Glenn Edgar H u l l Constance Ann H ustad Eva Ma rie J acobson Sta n ley Arvin Jacobson Howard Wesley Jeanblanc Roxie Joan King Henry W. K ramer, J r . J i mmie l e e leathers Dorothy T . McCleary Reg i n a M . McFadden Barbara Ann Macdon a l d Ol iver C. Mag n u son Sha ron lyn n Morgan Thelma Constance Nygaard Cia rene Viola Osterli O l son Cassie B. Pierce Beverly Jean Pine Joyce E l a i n e Puffert John Robert Reay Joseph Rich a rd Reitz E l iza beth Ann Reule Ruth M. Rickert Mary Foster R i ppy R u th Alvhild Romtvedt lorra i l'] e J. Rowe Ruth Ba rba ra Sather Myrna lavonne Shelver Mary Nash Skrivan ich Barbara Sue Slagle Jera l d Kenneth S l attum Marlys Ann Solterbeck Georgia Stay Eleanor Ann Stephens Donna E l len Swanson E u n ice lenore Swenson Garda Berg Weist loris Ade l l Zel l me r

Bachelor of Science in N u rsing Adon n a Malene Bonda h l Norma Jea n n e Bo rgford laurella Frances Frazier Kath ryn Marie J e rstad Mari lyn Rose Krug Oretha Katherine Marion

Ca rolyn Ann P ri tchard Vel m a Ha rmon Sackman Mary Kathryn Simonsen Sandra Neldine Standal Joan Beard Stout Sigrid Annette Tol lefson 1 37


1 95 6 GRADUATES

Bachelor of Science in Medica l Tech nology Jeannette Jessie Walter

Bachelor of Education Helen Joan Hauge Terry Keith Mclean

David John Thorp

Ma ster of Arts Daniel F. Grefthen Arne Kenneth Pederson

Oscar Elmer Peterson Arne Strand

1 38


I N D EX Page

Page

Academic Ad m i n istration 20 7 Accreditation Activities, Co l lege 11 Athletic 1 2, 1 3 Col'lege Publ ications_________ 1 5 Depa rtmenta l 13 Genera l 11 Honorary 12 Literary 13 Musica l 14 1 4, 1 5 ReHgious Adm i n i stration 1 1 8, 1 2 0 Ad m i ssions 20 Ad vanced Sta nding 21 Fresh m a n Sta nding 21 Speci a l Students 2 1 , 22 24, 2 5 Advisers 1 32 A'i u m n i Associ ation American Lutheran Chu rch 8, 1 1 8 1 2, 1 3 Ath l etics Attenda nce 25 Aud i tors 22 Aug usta n a Lutheran Church_8, 1 1 8 Bachelor of Arts 30 Bachelor of Arts i n Education 31 Bachelor o f Education 43 Bachelor o f Science i n Medica l Technolog y 46 Bachelor of Science i n N u rsing Education 47 Band 1 4, 96 Board a n d Room 53 Board i n g Club 19 Boa rd of Education 1 1 8, 1 1 9 Book Store 19 Calendar 4 Ca lendar, Sch oo L 5 C a m pus 8 Ca reers, P ro g ra ms for 48 Engi neering 48 Law 49 Medicine a nd Dentistry 49 Pa rish Education 49 Soci a l Work 50 Theology 50 16 Chapel Chape l-Music-Speech Building 9 Choi r a nd Chorus 1 4, 9 6 Christi a n ity 1 09 Church Officials 1 19 Cl assifications of Students 27 Classroom B u i l d i n g 9 Co l lege, The 6 Co l lege B u i ld i ngs 8, 9, 1 0 Co l l ege Costs 51

Co l iege life 11 Co l lege Motto 2 Col'lege Reservations 54 Co l lege U n io n B u i l d i n g 9 Columbia Conference 8, 1 1 8 Cong regatio n , Pacific Lutheran Co l lege 14 Cost, Summa ry 53 Counse l i n g Program 23 Courses o f I n struction 58 Art 59 Bio logy 61 Che m istry 64 Economics & Busi ness 65 Education 71 E n g Ii s h 79 French 83 Genera I E n g ineering 83 Geog raphy 83 Geology 84 German 84 Greek 85 Hea Ith 85 Hebrew 85 History 85 Home Economics 89 I ndustrial Education 89 Jou rn a Ii sm 91 Latin 91 Mathematics 91 Music . 93 Norweg ian 97 Nursi n g Education 97 Ph i losophy 1 00 Physical Education 1 02 Physics 1 04 Political Science 1 05 Psychology 1 07 Religion 1 09 Science 111 Sociology 112 Spa n ish 1 14 Speech 1 15 Debate 13 Degrees, Requ i rements fOL 29 Depository for Students 54 Dormitories 10 Dramatics 1 2, 1 3 E I igi b i I i ty 27 Emanuel Hospita l 1 30 Endowment F un d 8 Entra nce Req u i rements 21 Evangel ical Lutheran Chu rch 8, 1 1 9 Even ing Cl asses 28 Executive Co mmittee 1 19

________

_

___ _______

_______ _ _ _ _

____ _ _ _

_____________

___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ __ ____ _ _ _

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_

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

__

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______

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__________

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__ __ _

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1 39

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________________

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_

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_________

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_______________________

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_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

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_____________________________

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__________________________________

______ __________________ ______

__________________

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _

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_ _ _ __________________

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__________________________

_________

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____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __________________

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_____________________

_ __ ________________ _ _ _ _ _

________________

______________________

__________________


I N DEX

Evergreen Conference Faculty Faculty Comm ittees Fees Class and laboratory. Genera I Music Special Forensics Freshman Standing Genera I Certificate Genera l Reg u l ations Geog raphical Distribution Grade Points_._ Grad i n g . . Graduate Courses Grad u ates, 1 9 56 Graduation Req u i rements. Graduation Honors Gu idance Personnel Gymnasi u m Health Service, Student Historica I Sketch_. Honors Housing I nfi rma ry I nsu ra nce I ntersynod ica l Advisory Committee language RequiremenL library loan Funds . . location of Col lege Main B u i l d i n g Majors and Minors_._ Mark ing System Master of Arts Degree Medical Technology Course Mooring Mast Music Preparatory N u rs i n g Education Objectives o f t h e Col lege Office Personnel & Staff Orchestra

Page

Page

27 121 1 32 51 52 51 52 51 13 21 43 11 1 34 26 25 . 44 _. 1 36 29 27 24 9 18 6 27 15 18 54

Owners h i p . . B Pacific lutheran 8 Co l lege Associ ation Pacific lutheran Co l lege Student Congregation 14 Parish Worker's Course 49 Payments and Ad justments 54 Physical Examin ation 18 Physician and N u rse 1B Piano . _52, 9 3 P i pe Organ 52, 93 Placement Se rv ice 19 Program Options 33 Provision a l General Certificate 31 Publ icity 1 32 Reg i st r a r, Th e 1 20 Registration 22 Rel igious Affi l iations 1 35 R e q u i rements, Entrance 21 Residence H a l l s 1 0, 1 7 Residence Req u i rements 1 6, 1 7 Saga . 15 Scholars h i p Requirements 25, 2 6 Scho I a rs h i ps 55 Science H a I I 9 Science laboratory Fees 52 Specia I Students 21 Standard General Certificate_. . 3 1 Statistical Summary 1 33 Student loan F u nds 56 Student Organ izations 11 Student P u b l ications 15 Student Teach i n g 75 Summer Session. 28 Table of Contents 3 Teacher Education._. 31 Fifth Year Regu lations 43 Testing Service._ . 23 Trustees 1 18 Tuition 51 Voice 52, 94 Withdrawal from Cou rses_. 26

________________

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1 40

___

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________._


.IOHI..aIl·IO:r C.OIlPAMT

� P R I NTIR"

TACOMA



1957-1958 Catalog