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Pacific Lutheran College Bulletin V 1. v.

A - GUST 19:25

No. :.?

Fifth Annual Catalog for 1924 .. 1925

Announcements 1925 26 ..

Parkland, Wash.


Departments ", JUNIOR COLLEGE

Page 14

NORMAL DEPARTMENT

Page 24

HIGH SCHOOL

Page 37

MUSIC

Page 52


School

Calendar

FIRST SEMESTER 1925-26 Registration .................... Tuesday, Sept. 8 Formal Opening ........... .... \Vednesday, Sept. 9 Reformation Program

............. Sunday Nov.

2nd Quarter begins

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.......... Monday, Nov. 9

Thanksgiving Recess begins .. Wednesday, Nov.25,4 p.m. Friday, Dec. 18, 4 p.

Christmas Recess begins

m.

1926

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School be gin s ............ Monday, Jan. 4, 8:30

a. m.

Se mester Examinations begin ... ... .. Thursday, Jan. 2 I

SECOND SEMESTER Registration .................... Monday, }an. 25 Washington's Birthday ............ Monday, Feb. 22 Reunion ................. . ... . See Mooring Mast 4th Quarter begins ........ Tuesday, March 30 Easter Recess ..\Ved. 4 p.m.-Tues.8:30 a.m. Mar. 24-30 Alu mni Day ..................Saturday, May 22 Baccalaureate Service .............. Sunday, May 23 Final Examinations begin ........ \Vednesday, May, 26 Class Day .................... Thursday, May, 27

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Commencement Day ............... Friday, May 28


School

Calendar

FIRST SEMESTER 1924-25 Registration

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Tuesday, Sept. 9

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Friday, Oct. 17

Dedication Program .............. "

Reformation Program .............. Friday, Oct. 31 2nd Quarter began .......... Monday, Nov. 10 Thanksgiving ................. Thursday, Nov. 27 Christmas Recess began ...... Tuesday, Dec.23, 4 p. m. 1925 School began

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Semester Examinations began ...... Thursday, Jan. 22

SECOND SEMESTER Registration

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Washington's Bi r th day ............ Sunday, Feb. 22 Reunion ................... Fri.-Sun. Feb. 202 - 2 4th Quarter began ........ Monday, March 30 Easter Recess

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Wed. 4 p.m.-Tues. 8:30 a.m. Apr.8-14

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Baccalaureate Service ............. Sunday, May 24 Final Examinations began ...... Wednesday, May 27 Class Day .

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Commencement Day

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Thursday, May 28

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Friday, May 29


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Faculty

1924-5

ORDAL. Rev. O. ].. A B

.•

President

Bible

XAVIER. j. U . A 8.. Librarian .

Bible. History. Latin. Biology. Library Science

STUEN. O. J.. M. A. Mathematics. Physics. Norse. C erman

H AUGE. Ph. E

.•

M. A. Registrar

English. P sychology. Education

RINGSTAD. M

.•

B. S Coach .•

Chemistry. Mathematics. Mechanical Dra'DIing

TH ORSON. O. L.. A B . . Dean of Men English. V. S. History. Civics

HOLUM. M.. Ass·t. Treasurer Commercial Branches. Norse

KREIDLER. MRS. LORA B Art

.•

Dean of Wome n


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE FACULTY Continued LARSON. MISS NETTIE. Faculty Secretary

Typewriting. Shorthand. Spelling. English. PhjJsical Culture ASSISTANTS SVARE. REV. T. 0. A. 8.. Bible .

HAUGE. MRS. MARGRETHE JESSEN­ Voice. Hygiene. Chorus WADE. MRS. FLORENCE. A. B .. B. 0 French. Spanish

.•

LUND. MISS LILLIAN Piano LOEFFLER. MISS VANGIE Violin. Orchestra

NEW TEACHERS RAMSTAD. REV. A.. A. 8.. Dean of Men Bible. Norse, Science EDWARDS. JOSEPH, Dean of Music BLOOMQUIST. REV. E. C, A. 8.. 8. D .. M. A. Bible


BOARD OF TRUSTEES

REV. D. B. ROSS, Pres . .......... Tacoma, Wash. REV. O. E. HEIMDAHL, Sec. .. .. ..Fir, Wash. REV. A. RAMSTAD, V.Pres.&Treas...Seattle Wash. MR. ]. O. ANDERSON .......... Ballard, Wash. MR. B. L. KIRKEBO ... " ., " ... Tacoma, Wash. MR. P. T. LARSON ............ Parkland, Wash. REV. CEO. HENRIKSEN ........ Silverton, Ore. REV. L RASMUSSEN ........ Burlington, Wash. MR. H . E. ANDERSON .......... Tacoma, Wash. EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE OF THE BOARD MR. H. E. ANDERSON

REV. D. B. ROSS

MR. P. T. LARSON BOARD OF VISITORS

REV. A. LUNDE .............. Poulsbo, Wash. MRS. O. E. HEIMDAHL ............ Fir, Wash. MRS. H. H. HOLTE .......... W. Seattle. Wash. REV. CEO. LANE ............ Stanwood, Wash.


Faculty

Committees

Rev. O. }. Ordal. ex officio member of each committee RELIGIOUS ACTIVITY: M. Holum. ]. Xavier. Rev. T. O. Svare. Miss Lund LIBRARY: 1. Xavier. O. ]. Stuen. Ph. Hauge DISCIPLINE: O. L. Thorson. Mrs. L. Kreidler. M. Ringstad SOCIAL: Miss N. Larson. Mrs. L. Kreidler. O. L. Thorson Mu s I C : Mrs. Ph. Hauge. Miss L. Lund. Miss V. Loeffler ATHLETICS: M. Ringstad. O. ]. Stuen. Miss N. Larson PUBLICITY: Mrs. L. Kreidler. O. L. Thorson. M. Holum CATALOG. CURRICULUM AND SCHOLARSHIP: Ph. Hauge. ]. Xavier. O. Stuen SCHEDULE (Cames. Programs. etc.) : Ph. Hauge, M. Ringstad. Miss N. Larson STUDENT ORGANIzATION: Ph. Hauge. O. L. Thorson. Mrs. O. ]. Stuen EMPLOYMENT: O. ]. Stuen. Mrs. L. Kreidler

Ph.

Hauge.


Introductory Remarks CHRISTIAN EDUCATION \Ve believe that without public education there can be no great politica'l liberty. no great social achievement. no real manhood or won:anhood. because men become mentally stunted. But we also believe that a trw.e education must take into consideration the religious aspirations of man. or he will become morally stunted. "Education which is ;1Ot based on religion and character is not education." says Pres. Calvin Coolidge in "The Price of Freedom." \Vhere will the church get its teachers. missionaries and pastors? Were we to rely on our state institutions alone the church would soon be without leaders. One of our church scho()\s has alone furnished fifteen times as many pastors as the 12.000 high schools of the United States. We need our church schools. not only to educate for leadership. but for the common walks of life as well. We need devout. enlightened members in the pews as well as in the pulpits. For these reasons we build and maintain our church schools. These are needs no other institutions can meet. OUR AIM To reach as many as we can of our own church. and also to open our doors to those who may affiliate with other churches or with no church. To inculcate regular habits of life. To help each one to become a law unto himself. To serve as a stepping stone to a higher education whether in church or in state. 9


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE To educate the whole man. body. mind and soul. To measure up to the standard of the best in education. To train our students to make the best use of their time and opportunity. To educate for a life of service. To nourish and strengthen the faith of our fathers, firm belief in Christ and Christianity.

a

To help in supplying workers for our schools, our congregations and our missions.

HISTORICAL SKETCH The Pacific Lutheran Academy at Parkland. \Vash was established by members of the Norw. Ev. Luth. Synod It began its work in 1894 and continued of America. until 1918, the last year in conjunction with the Col­ lege at Everett. In its field it ranked as one of the best in the state. .•

The Columbia Lutheran College was built at EYerett. Wash., by members of the United Norw. Luth . Church of America. It opened its doors for pupils in 1909. and continued i ts work until the spring of 1919. From 191 1 it was under the direct management of the United Church. In 191 9 both schools were closed to pupils, and the consolidated school. The Pacific Lutheran College, which was to be located at Parkland, Wash . , began its preparation for taking up the work under the new auspices. During the summer of 1920 the main building was thoroughly re­ novated, and a chapel was built. On Oct. 4, 1920, regi,­ tration began, and the new school took up its work of ed­ ucation.

192 I The Junior College and Normal departments. were established. 10


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE LOCATION Parkland is a suburb of Tacoma. Its name 1lIdicates the nature of its scenery. To the west lie the broken, rugged, snow-capped Olympic IVIountains; to the east and south stretch the Cascade Mountains with their wooded foothills and the towering peaks. Here, serene and majestic, rises the sno·,...,y dome of Mt. Tacoma, the heavenward pointing, nourishing mother-a vision not to b� forgotten, never the same, always sublime, whether crowned by a storm cap of clouds, or roseate with the glow of morn­ ing, or still and milky white under the blaze of day, or tinted by the setting sun. \Vithin this frame lies Parkland, its prairies dotted with groves and clusters of trees, its nesting homes, and the Clover Creek winding like a band of silver below the hill on which the P. L. C. is located.

THE BUILDINGS The buildings are furnished with light and water from the city, but our O\'1n systems may be used whenever a n�cessity <Irises. THE MAIN BUILDING.-This is a massive five-story structure of brick. 1 90x8 2. It has been thoroughly re­ novated. In the basement are located the heating system. the kitchen, dining room, the biological laboratory, the boys' showers, the boys' hospital. The first floor cont<lins all the offices, the reception room, the library and study hall. the physical laboratory, guest rooms, two class rooms, two suites for teachers and a girls' reception room. On the second floor are four class rooms, the boys clubroom and students' rooms, and on the third floor thirty-seven students' roorns and the girls' hospital rooms. On the fourth floor, out from the main building, is the chemical laboratory. 11


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE THE GYMNASIUM. one of the best on the west coast. is a frame building on a concrete basement 1 00x50 feet. The main floor has a fine running track. a large stage, dressing rooms, a moving picture outfit and an open floor of 5Ox80 for games.

The basement when finished will contain a SWlmffiJng pool, 20x48, locker rooms, etc. THE CHAPEL was erected at a cost of about $7,000. It is a frame building, 40x60 feet, with a full concrete basement. The basement has an assembly room and a fully equipped kitchen. THE LIBRARY.-The school at present has a collec­ tion of over 7,000 books and pamphlets, besides a quan­ tity of unbound magazines. The library fee is used for improving this part of our school equipment, and yearly about 100 volumes are added thru this channel. Mr. P. ]. Larson has bequeathed $500 to the Norse D epartment of the college. The interest will be used each year for buying books. M rs. Bertha Bailey gave $10.00. The library occupies a large room on the first floor. LABORATORIES.-The Physical and Biological La­ boratories are fully equipped to meet the requirements, and every year new apparatus is added. The Chemical Laboratory occupies a fireproof room on the fourth floor. This laboratory is fully equipped to teach high school chemistry as well as first and secol!d year college chemistry. Accurate balances for quantitative work have been installed; electric power for hot plates, drying ovens, etc., also up-to-date laboratory desks with the nec�s­ sary apparatus and chemicals. Our other laboratories are rapidly beil!g perfected. 12


PACIFIC LUTHE.RAN COLLECE.

H ere is a splendid field of work for the Y. P. S., the Alumni Association and Student Societies. THE CAMPUS The College campus comprises about eighteen acres, a fine play-ground for the pupils. There are the baseball diamond, two tenrns courts and the croquet courts, offering facilities for outdoor exercise. Of historical interest is the little Douglas fir south足 east of the building, planted on the first Good Roads' Day in the State of Washington. LEGACIES AN D GIFTS The College has received a number of gifts and be足 quests during the past year. We wish to express our appre足 ciation to the donors. It would be well if the many friends of the college would remember the school in making their wiU or by special gifts. Mr. and Mrs. George Knutzon, of Burlington, Wash., gave the school $1.000 in memory of their son Henry who a ttended the College 1921-22. A gift of $500 was left by Mrs. Bell Siverson of Eugene, Ore. A bequest of $500 was left by Mr. P. ]. Larson for the Norse Department. Dr. L. Hektoen has deeded lots 5-10,block 25, Arm足 our Addition to Tacoma, to the College. Mr. M. Arntson has donC'.ted a flag pole which was erected on the 14th of May, 1925. The graduating class of 1925 has presented four loving cups on which the names of two Senior boys and two Senior girls who have been of the greatest inspiration to the school, will be respectively engrav d . 13


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Junior College Department REQUIREMENTS FOR ADMISSION

To enter the College Department. graduation frOIO an accredited high school or its equiv a l ent will be required. GRADES Tbe scale of grades are the same as those of the university. A-96-IOO. B-86-95. C-76-85. 0-7075. E-failure.

AMOUNT OF \VORK The nonnal amoun t of work for each semester is fif­ teen to seventecfl credit hours exclusive of Bible. 64 semester hours. exclusive of Bible and physical training. are required to entitle one to a Junior College Certificate. COLLEGE CURRICULUM

FR£ HMAN YEAR SECOND SEMESTER Required Bible Engl is h II Electives Foreign Languages 3 or Science 3 or

FIRST SEMEST H Requir d Bible 2 3 English Electives Foreign Lancu:.r;es 3 or 4 3 or :; Science

Psycholog. .

3 4

4 Educational Psychology 3

4

athemati.::s

Economics

2

Mathematics .:} Economi<:s or Hist()ry 3 or 4

4

History 3 or 4 2 P-.rt 2 Library Instruction or

Art

2 •

14


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE SOPHOMORE YEAR SECOND SEMESTER

FIRST SEMESTER Required

Bible English Electives Foreign Languages 3 or Economics or History 3 or Education Science 3 or

Required Bible

2 3

Eng�sh Electives Foreign Languages 3 or 2 or Education Economics or History 3 or Science 3 or

4

4 4 5

2 3 4 3 4 5

OUTLINE OF SUBJECTS B I B LE

I, 2. CHURCH HISTORY

.

The Gospel and the Epistles teach us Christ­ ianity. the Acts show us the origin of the Christian Church, while the church history traces for us the growth of this church thru persecutions and contro­ ver5ies about doctrine. It shows us the rise and grawth of the papacy, its suppression of the freedom of conscience, the Reformation under Luther, the division of the church into different denominations, and how thru it all. in spite of the fallacies and frailties of man, God's hand has guided and sup­ ported his Church. SVARE 3, 4. THE AUGSBURG CONFESSION. Every Lutheran ought to know what the teach· ings of his church are, what he, as a Lutheran, con­ fesses. SVAR£ 15


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE 5, 6 . CHRISTIAN EVIDENCE. A brief survey of the evidence for Christianity as found in prophecy, history, excavations, scienct", etc . XAVIER ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 1

.

ECONOMICS. Three credits per semester.

This course is designed to acquaint the stu足 dent with the general principles of economics. Stress will be laid on our monetary system, taxation, land labor and capital, commerce, etc. 2.

INTRODUCTION To SOCIOLOGY. Three credits per semester. A general survey of sociolt)gy in the attempt

to give the students a knowledge of the principle, underlying social actions as forces. EDUCATION 3.

EDUCA TlONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Three credits per semester.

This course deals with the psychological pnn足 ciples involved in education. Consideration is given to the following problems: individual differences. COT足 relation of human capacities, heredity, rate and pro足 gress of learning, transfer of training. HAUGE 6.

PRINCIPLES OF EDUCATION. Three credits per semester.

The doctrine of formal discipline, edl1cational values, curriculum, agencies that educate, physio16


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

logical and psychological basis of teaching. etc.. are all taken up. HAUGr::

1 6.

HISTORY OF EDUCATION. Three credits per semester. The development of education from primitive systems to the present is studied. Barbaric. Oriental. Greek. Roman. Medieval and Modern education will be discussed. Not given 1925-26.

18.

CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE. Three credits per semester. A study of the physical and mental develop­ ment from infancy thru the adolescence period. Its relation to educational problems will be emphasized. HAUGE

ENGLISH HAUGE

'. 2. FRESHMAN COMPOSITION. Three credits per semester. A course in the principles and practice of com­ posllion. Consideration is given to description. nar­ ration. exposition and argumentation. Special con­ sideration is given to sentence and paragraph struct­ ure.

3.

NINETEENTH CENTURY POETRY. Three credits per semester. A study of the poems of representative writers.

4.

ARGUMENTATION. Three credits per semester. Study and application of argumentation.

17

the

principles

of


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE 5, 6 . ENGLISH SURVEY. Three credits per semester. A general survey of the history of English Literature. 8.

ORAL ExPRESSION. Two credits per semester. The aim of this course is to give practical train足 ing in the correct pronunciation. enunciation. voice. and stage presence. The voice as the teaching tool is always kept in mind. HANDICRAFT AND ART

1 . 2 . ART. Two credits per semester. This includes freehand drawing from nature. still life and figure. simple landscape composition, applied desigll. weaving and construction, stick printing, clay modeling, paper cutting, needle and raffia work, booklet making, stenciling, poster making, freehand perspective cardboard construction, modeling and decorating of ornaments, <,.nd the use of pencil. crayon, charcoal. water color. oil and enamel as mediums . MRS. KREIDLER

HISTORY XAVIER I.

GREEK. HISTORY. Four credits per semester. A course stressing the legacy of Greece in poli足 tical institutions. art. architecture, literature, phi loso足 hy and mythology. Not given 1925-26.


PACIFIC L UTHERAN COLLEGE 2.

ROMAN HISTORY. Four credits per semester.

Special stress is laid on tracing the ongIn and growth of institutions that we are familiar with in Medieval history. Not given 1925-26. 3, 4. CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION. Three credits per semester.

A brief discussion of the effect of environment on human progress; of early social relations and in­ stitutions and their effect on modern progress, and of the most important problems of today. It is an adaption of the course worked out dt Columbia College and the Columbia syllabus Will be extensively used. 5, 6. AMERICAN HISTORY. Three credits per semester.

The origin and development of the American Nation from colonial times to the present. Special emphasis placed on the cultural and spiritual factors that contributed to the American political and social tradition.

LIBRARY SCIENCE

XAVIER I.

LIBRARY h�STRUCTION. TIJ10 credits per semester. Elel!'entary course in preparing shelves, care of books, accessioning, care llse of catalog and reference works. tion and cataloging will c.lso be touched 19

books for of shelves, Classifica­ upon.


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE MA THEMA TICS STUEN. RINGSTAD 1.

HIGHER ALGEBRA. Three credits per semester. First a rapid review of elementary Algebra is given. Then higher quadratics. binominal theorem. literal and numerical coefficients. variation. ratio and proportion. imaginary and complex numbers are taken up for a thorough study. Time used. one semester. RINGSTAD

2.

SOLID GEOMETRY. Three credits per semester. The work in this branch covers one semester and includes the usual theorems and constructions contain­ ed in the best text books. including the relations of planes and lines in space; the properties and measure­ ments of prisms. pyramids. cylinders. cones and spheres. A large part of the time wil! be given to the solution of original exercises. and to constructions. RINGST.-\D

3.

TRIGONOMETRY. Four credits per semester. A course in plane trigonometry will be given for one semester. Circular measurements of angles. proofs of the principal formulas. the use of inver�e functions. solution of right and oblique triangles. sur­ veying. navigation. Prerequisite. Higher Algebra. STUEN

4.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA. Four credits per semester. Review of High Schoal Algebra. advanced work in functions and their graphs. theory of equa20


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE tions. Length of course, one semester. P rerequi sites Higher Algeb ra .

,

STUEN NORSE STUEN 1.

HOLVIK'S B EGINNING BOOK IN NORSE. Four credits per semester. Oral and written exercises.

2.

HOLVIK'S FIRST BOOK IN NORSE, CONT'D. Four credits per semester. Bjprnson s Farmernovels. '

3.

First semester.

Second semester.

HOLVIK'S SECOND BOOK IN NORSE. Four credits per semester.

Grammar and Composition. Not given 1 92 5-26. 4.

First semester.

IBSEN KONGSEMNERNE. F our credits per semester.

Selections from Kjelland, Lie and Bjprnson. Second semester. Not given J 92 5-26. 5.

B RAND AND PEER GYNT. Three credits per semester.

Outside reading in \Vergeland, Moe and others. First semester. 6.

\Velhaven,

MODERN NORSE WRITERS. Three credits per semester.

Outside readings Second semester.

and

reports.

Lec ture:;

.

Courses 1 and 2 for beginners. Courses 3 and 4 for those who have had one year of Norse or its equivalent. Courses 5 and 6 for advanced students. 21


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE PSYCHOLOGY HAUGE

J.

GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY.

Four credits per semester. This course will give a general introductory acquaintance with the subject. It will be of value to those who wish to gain an insight into the nature and workings of the mind. This course will include the study of the processes of attention, association, perception, memory, reasoning, instinct, etc. Experiments will be carried on in connection with the work. 3.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY.

Three credits per semester. This course deals with the psychological prin足 ciples involved in education. Consideration is given to the following problems: individual differences, cor足 relation of human capacities, heredity, rate and pro足 gress of learniilg, transfer of training.

SCIENCE RINGSTAD, XAVIER I. 2. CHEMISTRY. GENERAL INORGANIC CHEMISTRY.

Five credits per semester. The fundamental chemical lhe'J ries are discussed and the chemistry of the non-metallic elements. The course is open to students not having an accredited high school course in chemistry. Three lectures and two laboratory periods per week. RINGSTAD

22


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

3.

CHEMISTRY. ADVANCED QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five credits per semester.

Two lectures and three laboratory periods a week. one semester. Prerequisites. Chemistry I and 2. RINGSTAD

4.

CHEMISTRY. QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five credits per semester.

A brief course which deals with both gravI足 metric and volumetric methods. One semester. Pre足 requisites. Chemistry I and 2. RINGSTAD

5. 6. BIOLOGY. Three credits per semester.

An advanced course in biology, in which the relation of plants and animals to man, and the rules of health are especially stressed.

23


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Normal

l)epartment

The Normal Department is accredited by the State B oard of Education. The two year course leads to a Standard Elementary Certificate. This Certificate will be granted to only those students whose individual achieve足 ment is satisfactory. \Vork of the individual shall be re足 garded as satisfactory when two-thirds of the marks of the student are C or above.

NORMAL SCHOOL CURRICULUM FRESHMAN YEAR

First Semester

Second Semester

Hrs. 3 English Educational Psychology 3 2 Library Instruction Contemporary Civil3 ization 2 Hygiene I Penmanship 3 Electives Cr. Physic?.! Education

2 Oral Expression Psychology of Elementary '3 School Subjects Contemporary Civil3 ization 2 N u trition 3 Biology 4 Electives Cr. Physical Education

Hr;.

SOPHOMORE YEAR

Fi rst Semester

Second Semester

Hrs.

Hrs.

Educational Measurements 3 Practic.e Teaching 3 Technique of Teaching 2 Electives 9 Physical Education Cr.

3 Prin . of Education State Manual 2 3 Practice Teaching Technique of Teaching 2 Electives 7 Physical Education Cr. 24


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE Electives FRESHMAN YEAR Second Semester

First Semester '} ,-

Music Art Geography History

Music Art Children's Literature Geography History

2 3 3

2 "l ..

2 3 3

SoPHOMORE YEAR First Semester

Second Semester

1. 1\1usic 2 Art 2 Nature Study Science for Upper 3 Grades 3 Economics 3 or 4 Mathematics 5 Chemistry Foreign Language 3 or 4 3 English Literature

2 Music 2 Art Current Educational 2 Problems 3 S�ciology 3 or 4 Mathematics 5 Chemistry Foreign Language 3 or 4 English Literature 3

BIBLE I. 2, CHURCH HISTORY. The Gospel and the Epistles teach us Christ­ ianity. The Acts show us the origin of the Christian Church. while the church history traces for us the growth of this church thru persecutions and contro­ versies about doctrine. It shows us the rise and growth of the papacy. its suppression of the freedom of conscience. the Reformation under Luther. the division of the church into different denominations.

25


PAC IFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

and how thru it all. in spite of the fallacies and frailities of man. God's hand has guided and sup­ ported his Church. SVARf.

3, 4. THE AUGSBURG CONFESSION. Every Lutheran ought to know what the teach­ ings of his church are, what he, as a Lutheran. con­ fesses. SVAR£

5, 6. CHRISTIAN EVIDENCE. A brief survey of the evidence for Christianity as found in prophecy, history. excavations, science, etc. XAVIER

ECONOMICS AND SOCIOLOGY 1.

ECONOMICS. Three creJits per semester.

This course is designed to acquaint the stu­ dent with the general principles of economics. Stress will be laid on our monetary system. taxation, land labor and capital. commerce, etc. 2.

IN TRODUCTION To SoCIOLOGY. Three creJits per semester. A general survey of sociology in the attempt to 8ive the students a knowledge of the principles underlying social actions as forces. 26


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE EDU CA TION 3.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY. Three credi/� per �eme�ter.

4.

This course is given the second semester and deals with the psychological principles involved in Consideration is given to the following education. problems: individual differences, correlation of hu­ man capacities. heredity, rate and progress of learn­ ing, transfer of training. The psychology of special school subjects is also considered. PSYCHOLOGY OF ELEMENTARY SCHOOL SUB­ JECTS. Three credits per �emester.

A study of the results of Experimental Psychol­ ogy in the field of the common branches. for the purpose of furnishing a background for the formation of a method of teaching these subjects.

5.

EDUCATIONAL MEASUREMENTS. Three credits per semester

A course dealing with the methods of scientific measurement of children's general ability and class­ room achievement. the knowledge and skill necessary to apply scientific methods to the study and improve­ ments of teaching. Students will be given an oppor­ tunity of testing pupils, scoring papers and inter­ preting results. 6.

PRIN CIPLES OF EDUCATION. Three credits per semester. The doctrine of formal discipline, educational values. curriculum. agencies that educate, physiologi­ cal and psychological basis of teaching. etc.. are all taken up. 27


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

7. 8, TECHNIQUE OF TEACHING. Two credits per semester. This course is closely correlated with Practic� Teaching. Problems of method. management. te:st­ ing of achievement. and discipline are discussed. 9. 10. PRA CTIC E TEACHING. Three credits per semester. This course includes observation. particIpation. and responsible teaching under supervision. The pur­ pose of the course is to attain a peculiar skil\ in the method and technique of teaching. 12.

CURRENT EDUCATIONAL PROBLEMS. Two credits per semester. A disc ussio n of current educational problems based upon educational boob and magazines of the past year.

1 4.

STATE MANUAL. Two credits per semester. This course is planned to acquaint the studentl with the State Constitution and the school laws of Washington. The Washington Sta te Manual is use d as a text.

ENGLISH HAUGE

I. 2. FRESHMAN COMPOSITION. Three credits per semester. A course in the principles and practice of com­ position. Consideration is given to description. nar28

..


PACIFIC LUTHERAN C OLLEGE

ration. exposition and argumentation. Special con足 sideration is given to sentence and paragraph struct足 ure. 3.

NINETEENTH CENTURY POETRY. Three credits per semester. A study of the poems of representative writers.

4.

ARGUM ENTATION.

Three credits per semester. Study and application of the principles of ilrgumentation.

5. 6. E NGLISH SURVEY. Three credits per semester. A general survey of the history of English Literature.

8.

ORAL EXPRESSION.

Two credits per semester.

The aim of this course is to give practical train足 ing in the correct pronunciation. enunciation. voice. and stage presence. The voice as the teaching tool is always kept in mind. 10.

C HILDREN'S LITERATURE. Three credits per semester. This course aims to familiarize the student teacher with the literature for children in the lower grades. Story tdling included.

HANDICRAFT AND ART MRS. KREIDLER

1, 2. Our aim

IS

to develop a certain amount of

29


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE technical skill in handling of the ordinary problems of the grades. This includes freehand drawing from nature, still life and figure, simple landscape composition. applied design. weaving and construction, stick print­ ing. clay modeling, paper cutting, needle and raffia work. booklet making. stenciling. poster making, free­ hand perspective cardboard construction. modelling and decorating of ornaments. and the use of pencil. crayon. charcoal, water color. oil and enamel as mediums. H EALTH EDUCATION

1.

HYGIENE. Two credits per semeslcr.

In this course students will be made familiar with the body and how to keep it in health. 1lle study of this subject also aims to equip the student to make the school a center of influence in the movemenL for the conservation of health in the community. 2.

NUTRITION. Two credits per semester.

Thi5 course denls with the function and nutri-­ tive value of foods. H ISTORY

XAVIER 1.

GREEK HISTORY. Four credits per semester. A course stressing the legacy of Greece in poli-

30


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE tical institutions. art. architecture. literature. philoso足 phy and mythology. Not given 1 92 5-2 6. 2.

ROMAN HISTORY. Four credits per semester.

Special stress is laid on tracing the ongm and growth of institutions that we are familiar with in Medieval history. Not given 1 92 5-26. 3. 4. CONTEMPORARY CIVILIZATION. Three credils per semester.

A brief discussion of the effect of environment on human progress; of early social relations and in足 stitutions and their effect on modern progress, and of the most important problems of today. It is an adaption of the course worked out at Columbia College and the Columbia syllabus will be extensively used. 5, 6. AMERICAN H ISTORY. Three credits per semester.

The origin and development of the American Nation from colonial times to the present. Special emphasis placed on the cultural and spiritual factors that contributed to the American political and social tradition. LIBRARY SCIENCE XAVIER I.

LIBRARY INSTRUCTION. TJ損o credils per semesler.

Elementary course in preparing books for shelves. care of books. accessioning. care of shelves. use of catalogue and reference works. Classifica.足 tion and cata.logueing will also be touched upon. 31


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE MATHEMATICS STUEN. RINGSTAD

I.

HIGHER ALGEBRA. Three credits per semester. First a rapid review of elementary Algebra is given. Then higher quadratics. binominal theorem. literal and numerical coefficients. variation. ratio and proportion. imaginary and complex numbers are taken up for a thorough study. Time used. one se­ mester. RINGSTAD

2.

SOLID GEOMETRY. Three credits per semester. The work in this branch covers one semester and includes the usual theorems and constructions contain­ ed in the best text books. including the relations of planes and lines in space; the properties and measure­ ments of prisms. pyramids. cylinders. cones and spheres. A large part of the time will be given to the solution of original exercises. and to constructions. RINGSTAD

3.

TRIGONOMETRY. Four credits per semester. A course in plane trigonometry will be given for one semester. Circular measurements of angle�. proofs of the principal formulas. the use of inverse functions. solution of right and oblique triangles. sur­ veying. navigation. Prerequisite. Higher Algebra. STUE N

32


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLECE

4.

COLLEGE ALGEBRA. F our credits per semester.

Review of Higi. School Algebra. advanced work in functions and their graphs. theory of equa tions. Length of course. one semes t e r Prerequisites. Higher Algebra. STUEN

­

.

MU S I C I. 2. NORMAL MUSIc. Two credits per $emcster . i

s ng

.. study of the fundamentals of music. i ng. Music methods in the Grade .

Sight

NORSE STUEN

I.

HCLVIK'S BEGINNING BeaK IN NO!'SE. Four credits per semester.

Oral and written exercises.

2.

Fir:;t semester.

HOLVIK'S FIRST BOOK IN NORSE, C ONT'D. F011r credits per semester.

Bjprnson's F armernovels.

3.

Second semester.

HOLVIK'S SECOND BOOK IN NORSE. Four credits per semester.

Grammar and Composition. Not given 1925-26.

33

First semester.


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE

4.

IBSEN. KONGSEMNERNE. Four credits per semesler.

Selections from Kjelland. Lie and Bj yjrnso!!. Second semester. N ot given 1925-26. 5.

BRAND AND PEER GYNT. Threďż˝ credils per semesler.

Outside reading in Wergeland. Moe and others. First semester. 6.

Welhaven.

MODERN NORSE WRITERS. Three credits per semes ler.

Outside readings Second semester.

and

reports.

Courses 1 and 2 for beginners. Courses 3 and 4 for those who have had one year of Norse or its equivalent. Courses 5 and 6 for advanced students. P EN MAN SHIP

Penmanship is required of all normal students. The course is primarily one dealing with the method of teaching. A good style of writing must be acquired before work is completed. 1.

PALMER SYSTEM. One credit per semester. A study in method of teaching penmanship

III

the grades. Three periods per week. PSYCHOLOGY HAUGE

1.

GEN ERAL PSYCHOLOGY. Four credils per semesler.

This course will give a general introductory 34


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE acquaintance with the sub j e c t . It will be of value to those who wish to gain an insight into the nature and workings of the mind. This course will include the study of the processes of attention. association, perception, memory, reasoning, insti nc t Experiments will be carried on in connection etc. with the work. ,

3.

EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY.

Three credits per semester. This course is given the second semester and deals with the psychological principles involved in education. ConsiderE'.tion is given to the following problems : individual differences, correlation of hu足 man capacities, heredity, r"te and progress of learn足 ing, transfer of training. The psychology o f special school subjects is also considered.

4.

PSYC HOLOGY J ECTS.

OF

E LEMENTARY

C HOOL

SUB足

Three credits per semester A study of the results of Experimental Psychol足 ogy in the field of the common branches, for the purpose of furnishing a background for the formation of a method of teaching these subjects. SCIENCE RINGSTAD, XAVIER

1 . 2. C H EMISTRY, GENERAL INORGANIC CH EMISTRY. Five credits per semester. The fundamental chemical theories are discussed and the chemistry of the non-metallic elements. The

35


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE course i s open to students not havin g an accredited high school course in chemistry. Thr ee l ectures and two laboratory periods p er week. RINGSTAD 3.

CHEMISTRY. ADVANCED QUALITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five credits per semester. Two lectures and three laboratory p eriods a week. one semester. Prerequisites. Chemi stry 1 and 2 . RINGSTAD

4.

CHEMISTRY, QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS. Five credits per semester. A brief course which deals with both gravi足 metric and volumetric methods. On e semester . Pre足 r equisites. Chemistry 1 and 2. R INGSTAD

6.

BIOLOGY. Three credits per semester. An advanced course in biology. in which the relation of plants and animals to man, and the rules of health are especially stressed.

7. 8. GEOGRAPHY METHODS. Three credits per semester. An intensive study of geography as a founda足 tion for the teashing of the subject in the intermediate and grammar gr ades. Emphasis will be placed on or ganization of material for the grades together with method. 9.

NATURE STUDY. Two credits per semester. A study of forces, things, and conditions which will function for the t eacher as material for nature study. 36


PAC IFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE

H igh

School

D epartment

ADMISSION Graduates from the eighth grade of our parochial schools and from the public schools will be admitted to any of these courses without examination on presentation of credentials from the respective schools. This department is fully accredited by the University of \Vashington and by the State. AMOUNT OF WORK Students are required to take four units a year. GRADES The scale of grades are the same as those of the university. A-96- 100. B-86-9 5. C-76-8 5 . D-707 5 . E-failure. CREDITS AND UNITS For graduation from the courses of the H igh School 1 6 units are demanded besides those for Bible. All students are required to take Bible Study. One unit is five 45 minute periods a week for 36 weeks. COURSES The High School courses given are : English. Modern Language, Classical. Scientific and Commercial. For explanation of the subjects refer to "Subjects." beginning on page 40. 37


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE H IGH SCHOOL CURRICULUMS ENGLISH

AND

MODERN

LANGUAG E · E n g l ish Modern

5 5 5 5 3 10 �O :3

L a n g ua g e

G e n eral Science A l g e b ra

Commereial

C L ASS I C A L

Arithmetic

Bookkeeping

Art Penmanship

Language

G e n era l

H istory

Law

Business

and

5 10

Language

Algebra Solid Geometry Botany Physics A rt Latin I, I I

5 5 ij 5 7 7 10 5

E n g l ish Lat i n I, I I Modern Language Algebra Solid Geom etry Botany Physics Art

5 5 ;} 5 7 7 10

}Iusic

Music

5 5 5 7 5 10

U. S. H i story a n d C i v i c s E n g l ish Language

Physics Latin Hr, IV

A rt

Language

Music

E n g l i sh

M od e r n

5 5 5 5 :I ]0 11) 3

5 5 5 G e n e ral H i story 5 G e o m etry Botany 7 Business Law and Sales· manship li Art 10 E n g l ish M od e r n

Music Modern

Science

Penmanship :Mu s i c

Sales·

manship Art

G e n e ral

Art

5 5 5 5 7

G e o m etry Botany

Language

A l g e b ra C ommercial Arithmetic Bookkeeping

}fusic E n g l ish M o dern

E n g l ish M od e r n

U. S . H i story a n d C i v i c s Lat i n I I I , I V Physics English l\fodern Languag

Art

Music

5 5 7 5 1U

Music

• English Course requires four years of English a n d two o f any 1I1odern Language. while l\Io(lern Language Course re­ (I uires four o f Modern Language and three of Engl ish. 1 . The subjects In Black are requi red ; the others a l'e elec­ tive. 2. All are required to take Bible study. 3. If only one u n i t in Science i s taken, Physics is pre­ ferred, b u t a course in one of the biological sciences w i l l be accepted unless otherwise indicated i n the course taken.

38


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

H IGH SCHOOL CURRICULUMS CO M M E R C I A L

SC I E N T I F I C

5 5 M o d e r n L a n g uage 5 G e n e ral S c i e n c e 5 A l g e b ra :) Commercial Arithmetic 1 ,) Bookkeeping 10 Art

E n g l i sh

E n g l i sh

Com m e rc i a l Penmanship

Boo k keep i n g Modern Language

General Science A lgebra Art

'J "

Pen m a n s h i p

5 5 5 5

Engl ish La n g uage

General H i story G e o m e t ry

E n g l is h Co m m erc i a l

Business Law

and

Sales-

manship Art

Music

10

5 7

Modern Language

;)

Algebra Solid G e om etry

5

Botany Physics Art Latin I. ] I

Music S. H istory and C i v i cs

Physics English

Modern Lan�uage

Latin III. IV Art l\I u s i c

10

Law and

5 5 10

Salesmanship

5

Geometry General History

"

Modern Language t�

Art Music

Botany

Engl ish

Geography

Boo k k e e p i n g Com m e rc i a l

Botany

u.

!j 3 3 10 5 5

Music

Music M od e rn

Arithmet i c

E n g l ish Typewriti n g or Adv.

5 7 7 10 5

Boo k k e e p i n g Modern Language Algebra

10 5

Solid Geometry

n 7 10 5

Botany A rt Latin I, I I Music

u.

5 7 ;, 5 5 10

5

S. H i story and Civics

Typew r i t i n g or Adv.

;:;

5

Boo k k e e p i n g English

10

Modern Language

(j ;; 11)

Latin Art

M u s ic

Ill. IV

iJ

4 . Not l e s s t h a n t.wo u n i t s for the s t u d y o f a modern l " n ­ J:" u a g e w i l l h e accepted t o w a r d grad u a t i o n . o . Electi ves f o r a n y year m a y b e fi l l e d not only f r o m e lec ­ tives sp e c i a l l y i n d icated for each yea r i n each course, b u t f r o m �ubjects prescriiJed for a n y o t h e r course f o r t h a t or -p r viOl1� year. h . Five ( il ) . Seven ( 7 ) . Ten ( 1 0 ) . placed after a !<ubject i n t1 i c a t " � t h e n u m b e r of periods a subject m u s t be taken a week to g a i n full cred i t .

39


PACI F I C LUTHERAN COLLEGE

O U TLINE OF S UBJEC TS B I B LE ORDAL, XAVIER, SVARE "The fear of the Lord is the beginning of wisdom," sang the Psalmist ( Ps. 1 I I , 1 0 ) , and the gi"ea t Apostle Paul adds, "Godliness is profitable unto all things" ( I Tim. 4, 8 ) , and Christ said, "Seek ye first the kingdom of God" ( Matt. 6 , 3 3 ) . And so religion, which is to teach us our duties toward God and our fellow men, and the mercy of God toward us, has been made a part of every course of our school. In the interpretation of the Bible the teachings of the Lutheran Church are adhered to. The aim is to strengthen the faith, impart knowledge of Bible truths, and help the prospective Sunday school teacher or parochial teacher to im足 part this knowledge to others. It prepares for lead ership in Young People's Societies. Luther League. etc.

1 . 2 . FUNDAMENTALS OF CHRISTIANITY. The fundamental doctrines of the Christian faith are studied. What does the Bible teach on these questions ? Its answers decide the matter. The Old and New Testaments are referred to on each subject. Other books on Christian doctrine will be used for parallel reading. 3.

An introduction to all the books of the Old Testament,

4.

An introduction to the boo ks of the N ew Testament.

5. 6 . A study of the great characters of the Bible. 40


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

COMMERCIAL BRANCHES HOLUM. MIss LARsoN 1 , 2 . PENMANSHIP. By correct training. through a well-graded and systematic course. the average pupil gains full con­ trol of his muscles. acquires a neat. rapid and legible style of writing. The Palmer method is used.

HOLUM 3, 4 . BOOKKEEPING. The work is carried on according to the so­ called individual plan. This makes it possible for students to enter at any time, take up such work as they need. and progress as rapidly as their abilities will allow.

HOLUM

S, 6 . TYPEWRITING. The touch system is taught, by which the great­ est speed is obtained. F rom the beginning the stu­ dent is taught the proper fingering of the keys, the care and adjusting of the machine ; the proper form and arrangement of letters. legal documents, mani­ folding, etc. A great deal of time is devoted to transcnptIon from shorthand so that the pupil may have ample practice in doing this before he enters the office. The course includes careful and ex­ tended drill in various kinds of business letters, specifications, tabulating work, stencil cutting for mimeographing, etc. MISS LARsoN 7, 8 . SHORTHAND. The use of shorthand and typewntmg is con­ tinually being extended', and at the present time more

41


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE opportunities are offered to the competent stenogra­ pher than to any other profession. There I S a COI1The stant call for efficient workers in the field. modern business office is not fully equipped with­ out one or more stenographers. The United State; civil service commission is calling for more candidates to supply the shortage of eligibles who are trained in both stenography and typewriting. for employment at Washington. D. C.. and various government offices throughout the United States. To the col­ lege student. shorthand is of great value in making reports of addresses and lectures. and to the lawyer. the lecturer. the clergyman and the teacher the art is a valuable assistant. Aside from its specific com­ mercial value. shorthand affords a splendid training in mental discipline and awakens push. energy and activity. The Gregg System o f shorthand is now being taught in most of the leading schools of this country and in Canada. It can be learned in from one-third to one-half the time req uired by the old systems. It requires n o shading. and i s written o n the same slewt as longhand. Vowels and consonants are joined and follow each other in their natural order. thus contributing to easy. continuous. effortless writing. It is easy to read. and. being purely phonetic. can be adapted to any language. The latest edition of the text books. "Gregg Shorthand." "The Gregg Stud­ ies" and the "Gregg Writer" are used. When the student has acquired a certain stand­ ard of efficiency. he is required to be ready at any time to do stenographic work in the office of the president or other officials of the schoo!. for the purpose of becoming acquainted with general office work. Not given 1925-26. M I SS LARSON

42


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

9.

ADVANCED COURSE IN SHORTHAND This course is designed for those who wish to gradaate and those who require special training for responsible positions where high speed and technical accuracy are required. It will include a thorough re足 view of the principles and careful drill in legal forms. advanced phrasing. court reporting, tabulating, mimeo足 graphing. specifications. filing and the like. Students in this course will be required to make verbatim reports of sermons, lectures. addresses. etc. Not given 1 92 526. MISS LARSON SPEED REQUIREMENTS To graduate from the short course. the student must have attained a speed in shorthand of I 00 words a minute. and be able to transcribe his notes correctly on the typewriter at the rate of twenty-five words a minute. To graduate from the High School Busine5s Course will require a speed of J 49 words a minute.

1 0.

COMMERCIAL LAw. This course aims to gIve the student such knowledge of the laws of commerce that he may transact !.is business affairs in an intelligent manner. Correct writing of legal documents is a special feature. HOLUM

I I.

SALESMANSHI P .

This course is specially designed for students of the commercial branches. Its aim is to show that all people, whether in business or not, are selling

43


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE either merchandise or service. and that "the study of the science of salesmanship is of supreme importance to both cl asses." HOLUM 1 2.

COMMERCIAL GEOGRAPHY. The pUipose of this course is to show the re­ lation of men to their physical surroundings. methods of transportation. and products and resources (If leading nations. HOLUM

1 3.

SPELLING. This consists of a careful study o f words. and of dictation exercises. The spelling. the pronuncia­ tion. the meaning. and the use of a word are taught at the same time. MISS LARSON ENGLISH HAUGE. THORSON The High School English Course is based upon the

state requirements as outlined in the course of study in Eng­ lish for use in the Secondary Sch00ls of Washington. 1 . 2 . ENGLISH.

Freshman

Ward's "Sentence and Theme" and Greever and Jone�'s "Century Handbook of Writing" are used as a basis for the grammar and composition work. A thorough training in the minimum essentiais in these branches is gIven through practical exercises 44


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE Each semester class study is made of and drilIs. �everal sel ections from prose and poetic literature. In a ddition to this the pupils are required to read and make reports on approved books. THORSON Sophomore

3, 4 . ENGLISH.

The second year English work is a continua­ tion, in a more general way, of the work begun in the first year. The more advanced lessons i n the freshman text are studied, and a special emphasis is placed on theme writing. W ar�' s "Theme Build­ ing" and the "Century Handbook of Writing" The stress on the mech3nics of English are used. is always of concern. Various of the so-called English classics are studied in class. in a manner slightly 'TJore painstaking than that followed in the first year course. Outside reading of works by standard authars is required. THORSO:--l 5 , 6 . ENGLISH

Junior

Literature selections for class study are made from the more difficult of the classics. Outside reading is required. In English 6. argum entation is stressed. and the pupils are required to prepare and participate in formal debates. HAUG S 7. 8 . ENGLISH

Senior

A thorough study of the History of American Literature is made during these se esters. A more detailed consideration of the fives and writings of the 45


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE most significant of American literary figures is made. rather than the superficial treatment afforded by a cyclopedic course. Book reports and theme dis­ cussions constitute an essential portion of the course. Some study may be devoted to the fundaments of expression and interpretive reading. A practical us� of English. tolerably free from mechanical deficienc),. is expected of the pupils during this year. THO RSON

FOREIGN LANGUA GES FRENCH MRS. WADE

I. 2. The pupil will be taught clear and distinct pronunciation. knowledge of the principles of gram­ mar essential to the expression of ideas. ability to read easy selections and small news items in new�­ papers. simple letter-writing. Not given 1 92 5 -2 6. 3. 4 .

The aim is to coordinate the knowledge gained the first year and enlarge it by means of a systematic study of grammar. without departing from the princi­ ples of the direct method. Part of the time will be devoted to the study of two or three comedie3. Not given 1 92 5-2 6.

46


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE GERMAN STUEN

1. 2 .

3, 4 .

Elements o f German grammar, easy reading and translation. German will be used more or less in the classroom from the beginning. More advanced grammar and compos Ilion is taken up, and in connection with these some of the easier masterpieces of German literature will be studied. Sight reading and easy convers-ation will re­ ceive considerable attention. Not given 1 92 5 -26. As the need arises more advanced c lasses will be organized. LATIN

� '.

XAVIER

I. 2. One of the standard textbooks for beginners will be used. Emphasis will be put on the correct pronunciation of the words, on the essentials of gram­ mar, on the declensions and conjugations. Almost from the first easy q uestions and answers in Latin will be introduced. Not given 1 9 25-26.

3, 4. Grammar will be taken up more in detail. and the pupil will study Latin composition based on Caesar's "De Bello Gallico." Caesar's commentaries will be read ( four books ) . The Roman army and its equipment. and the Roman camp will be given special attention.

47


PACI FIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE NORSE STU E N . HOLUM

1 . 2 . NORSE. This course begins with elementary work. such as spelling. reading, writing, elementary grammar. The reading will be of easy selections such as found in our Norwegian readers for beginners. HOLUM 3 , 4 . NORSE. A standard grammar will be used. Compos i足 tions will be required, and short and easy storie., as Bjornson's Bondenoveller, read. STUEN

SPAN IS H

I, 2 . Regular drill in elementary grammar is em足 phasized'. Short stories, poems, dialogues and plays are chosen because of their special appeal to Ameri足 can students. 3, 4 . The study of the grammar is finished. The class work will be conducted in Spanish as far as possible. A carefully graded series of short selec足 tions from classic writers is prescribed together with original composition.

48


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE HANDICRAFT AND ART

MRS. KREIDLER The aim of work in the art department is : To assist in developing an appreciation of the beautiful wherever it may be found ; to stress the practical side of the art of to足 day. teaching this thru the use of different industrial mate足 rials. and to bring the art class into a close relationship with the other departments and activities

0

f the school.

The teaching of art is vastly more important than the teaching of drawing. HIGH SCHOOL ART. F our years' work.

This department offers a comprehensive course in art ( following closely the courses given in the high schools of the state) including : history of art. freehand. perspective and constructive drawing. sketching from life. composition and designing ; bas足 ketry. decorative and poster work in oil. water color and pastel. HI STORY AND POLITICAL SC IENCE XAVI ER. THORSON I . 2 . GEN ERAL H ISTORY.

This course will take up the history of all na足 tions from the early ages to the present time. Le3s emphasis is put on wars and dynasties. more on the general advancement. XAVI E R 49


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

3.

UN ITED STATES HISTORY. This course begins with the American Revolu足 tion. altho a brief survey of the earlier period is reviewed to give the student a setting for the national development. Effort will be made to familiarize the student thoroughly with the chief events relating to the nation. Much time is spent on the period after the reconstruction. emphasis being placed on the political and industrial problems that have arisen and have extended down to the present time. Special attention is also given to biography. Reference books and periodicals are used quite extensively. THORSON

4.

CIVICS. One semester is devoted to a careful study of Efforts will be our civil and political institutions. made to give the student a clear understanding of the constitution of our city governments. The three great branches of our government. their functions and interdependence will receive special attention. THORSON MATHEMATICS STUEN. RINGSTAD, HOLUM

1 , 2 . COMMERCIAL ARITHMETIC AND RAPID CALCULA足 TION. Nine months will be devoted to a careful study of commercial arithmetic. This is an advanced class and is not intended for students requiring instruction in the more elementary principles of arithmetic. It is presupposed that the student has become thoroughly

50

..


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE

acquainted with these before he takes up commercial arithmetic. The work in this class furnishes the stu足 dent a thorough drill in the short and time-saving methods actually used by business men. HOLUM

3. 4

.

ELEMENTARY ALGEBRA.

One year is spent on the fundamentals. factors. fractions. radicals. exponents. equations with one un足 known quantity. the ordinary methods of elimination. RI NGSTAD

S . 6 . PLANE GEOMETRY.

Two semesters are devoted to this subject. Part of the time will be employed in studying the theorems of the text book. including the general properties of plane rectangluar figures, the circle ; measurement of angles. similar polygons. areas. Much time will be given to original demonstrations of exercises and solu足 tions of problems . RI NGSTAD 7.

HIGHER ALGEBRA.

First a rapid review of elementary Algebra is given. Then higher quadratics. binominal theorem. literal and numerical coefficients. variation. ratio and proportion. imaginary and complex numbers are taken up for a thorough study. Time used. one semester. 8.

SOLID GEOMETRY.

The work in this branch covers one semester and includes the usual thorems and constructions con足 tained in the best text books. including the relations 51


PACIFIC LUT H ERAN COLLEGE of planes and lines in space ; the properties and measurements of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres. A large part of the time will be given to the solution of original exercises, and to construc足 tions.

MUSIC

I.

MRS. HAUGE, MISS LU ND, MISS LOEFFLER PIANO. A. Rudiments of music, studies in melody, and the underlying principles of touch and technique. N a tional Graded Course, Gurlitt's Album for the Young, Concone, Pieces. Loeschorn. Lynes, Bertini and others. Selections from modern composers. B. Major and minor scales. Broken chords and arpeggios. Samuel-Finger Exercises. Hanan. Studies by Loeschorn. Burlitt. BurgmulIer, etc.

e. Major and minor scales in odaves. thirds. 5ixths and tenths, arpeggios. Cramer Studies. Czerny Velocity Studies. Bach Inventions. Dunern 3Y E.tudes. Heller Studies, etc. Pieces suitable for grade. MISS LU I D 2.

HARMONY. No person who desires to become accomplished in music should neglect to study harmony, which has aptl y been called the grammar of music. In the study of this branch. ear training receives special attenti;)n. Much time is devoted to original work and the construction of major and minor scales, i!1tervals, triads, chords of seventh, and inversion3, J : tered ch:.rdst modulations. suspension. organ poinr.

52


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE passing notes, etc. Some time will also be devoted to the study of analysis and form. 3.

HISTORY OF MUSIc. Students find music doubly interesting if they acquire some knowledge of the life of the great com­ posers. In the study of the history of music, attention is paid to the development of music from the earliest times to the present, the birth of the opera, the rise of Romanticism and its influence on music. the de­ velopment of the modern opera. etc. Special atten­ tion wi ll be given to the life and activities of each of the following composers : B ach. Handel. Haydn, Mozart. Bethoven. Mendelssohn. B rahms. \Vagner. and Grieg.

4.

VOICE CULTURE. Voice training has its starting point. its founda­ tion. in beautiful tone. This training not only culti­ vates the voice but builds up and develops a wonder­ ful physique. It is our aim to instil and further in the student a love for only the best literature of vocal music.

PREPARATORY WORK. Breathing exercises. voice placing, sustained notes and scales. Voice exercises by Concone. Mar­ chesi and Lutgen. S imple songs.

ADVANCED COU RCE.

Breathing, voice placing. exercises in articula­ tion and interpretation. Advanced studies by Con­ cone, Marchesi, Vaccai and Lutgen. Songs by modern composers as well as , Schumann, Shubert, CauDad. etc . , also solos from standard operas and oratorios.

MRS. HAUGE. 53


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

5.

VIOLIN.

This is one of the finest tone instruments. and is deservedly becoming more and more popular. I. Exercises-Aiquoni : elementary bowing. scales and theory : easy pieces. II. Technique 2nd year. scales. bowing-Sevci k : elementary ensemble. class. sight reading. pieces. III. Technique 3rd year. scales and arpeggios. bow足 ing-Sevcik : ensemble. class. duets. etc. ; pieces. MIss LOEFFLER PHYSICAL EDUCATION RINGSTAD. MISS LARSON

The aim of this course is to develop the body and keep the individual in good health by suitable exercises. Emphasis is placed on correct posture. All are required to give some time to physical educa足 tion. but those incapacitated because of physical de足 fects may satisfy the requirements with hygiene. A splendid opportunity is offered for students to take part in various athletic activities such as basket ball. volley ball. baseball. indoor baseball. tennis and croquet. SCIENCE XAVIER. STUE N . RI NGSTAD

1 . 2 . GENERAL ScIENCE. This subject is fundamental to the entire field of science. It furnishes the foundation for all sub足 sequent work in this line. It provides instruction about principles and facts that all should know. and it furnishes a solid foundation of knowledge on which

54


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE to build further. Unity is kept thruout ; it is not the study of a series of unrelated subjects. Labora­ tory work. RI NGSTAD 3, 4 . BIOLOGY. After a general introduction. plants and animals will be studied with special reference to their eco­ nomic value. Hygiene and sanitation will be em­ phasized in the treatment of the human biology. Not given 1 92 5 -26. XAVIER 5 , 6 . BOTANY. Elementary Botany. This is a general intro­ ductory course. While it deals with the structure. development and life activity of plants. it also treats of their classification and economic importance. Laboratory work and note books. 7. 8 . ZOOLOGY. Most of the time will be spent on insects and vertebrates. The less known groups are. however. also treated with care. and among these animals the LabOiatory earthworm receives especial attention. work. N ate books. 9. 1 0. PHYSICS. This course consists of recitations. lectures and laboratory work. The chief aim is to present ele­ mentary physics in such a way as to stimulate the pupil to do some original thinking about the laws and the whys of the world in which he lives. Modern life and modern wars have wrought many changes. The most striking changes. as the gas engine. the automobile. the airplane. and the wireless. will be given fulier treatment. STUEN 55


PAC IFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

S hort Business Courses COURSE I This course is designed to prepare young men and women for active duties of the business world by giving them a practical knowledge of the laws, usages and practices of trade and commerce.

There is probably no other course

of the same length and cost which even approaches a busi足 ness training course in its value to young people.

The busi足

ness world and the government are constantly calling for well trained men and women to fill positions. A pupil who has a good elementary knowledge of reading, spelling, grammar and arithmetic can complete the course in nine months.

One who is deficient in one or more

of these subjects will require longer time. For explanation of studies e fr. page 40. Second Semester

First Semester B ible English I Spelling Commercial Arithmetic and Rapid Calcul ation Bookkeeping Penmanship Commercial Law

Bible English 2 Commercial Arithmetic and Rapid Calculation Bo:>kkeeping Typewriting Penmanship Commercial Geography

2

5 5

5 10 3 5

56

2 5 5 10 10 3 5


PAC I FIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE

COURSE I I This course i s designed for those who wish to prepare for general office work.

The time required to complete

this course is nine months. but to do so successfully. the student must be able to write a good hand. spell well and have a good command of the English langu<\ge.

One who

is deficient in any of these branches must spend sufficient time in attaining the required standard of scholarship before taking up the study of shorthand.

The minimum of Engli5h

required for graduation from this course is English 1 and 2 .

First Semester B ible English 1 Spelling Shorthand Typewriting Penmamhip

Second Ser::.ester 2

B ible English 2 Shorthand Typewriting Penmanship Office \Vork

:J

5 :;

10

3

57

2 5 5 10 3 5


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Begi nners' English Course Winter Term ( Nov. 9, 1 92 5-Mar. 26, 1 92 6 ) By Week $ 1 5 , Month $ 5 5 , Quarter, $ 1 1 0, Term $200 The Beginners' English is for the benefit of the young

men or women who have not had the opportunity of study足 ing the English language, and who wish to prepare them足 selves to enter the high school classes. Special emphasis is put on the study of words, spellin!!. reading, pronunciation and conversation. Course B

Course A Bible Beginners English Spelling Arithmetic Penmanship Reading ,

2 5 5 5 3 5

Bible Beginners English Spelling Arithmetic Penmanship Reading .

58

2 5 5 5 3 5


PACI FIC LUT H ERAN COLLEGE

Student

Organizations RELIGIOUS

THE .P. L. C. MISSION SOCI ETY is an organization composed of young men and women who feel the need of devoting an evening a week to prayer and Scripture study. Interest is chiefly centered on mission work . LITERARY THE TH ESPIAN-A literary dramatic club. formed by the union of the former D ramatic Club and the Alpha Omicron. THE DEBATING CLUB-To be fully alive every school must have its contests-contests of muscle and conte5ts of mind. One gains proficiency in any line only by exerci,e in that line of work. Up-to-date questions are studied and discussed and by constant application proficiency will be attained. tho the beginning be ever so modest. The best debaters form the Interscholastic Debating Team. SIGVALD QUALE CONTEST-Each year a contest will be held in the Norse Department for the Sigvald Quale silver medal and such other prizes as may be offered. Last year the Sons of Norway gave $ 1 00 for prizes. of which $ 5 0 were used 1 924-2 5 . and $50 will be used 1 92 5 -26.

IS

MUSICAL The College provides the opportunity. and every pupil heartily invited to join our musical organizations.

I. THE MUSICAL UNION-This is an organization of all the students under the guidance of members of the faculty. II. THE CHORUS. an organization open to all students. 59


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE III. TH E ORCH ESTRA, an organization open to all students. ATHLETIC THE ATHLETIC CLUB has charge of all athleti.: activities among the students. The athletic coach is the mentor of the club. The major sports include baseball, basket ball and tennis. To participate in extramural games, or games with other teams, an average of C will be required of the players in three fourths of the work. OTHER TH E STUDENT BODY is an organization of all the students. Its express purpose is to educate the boys and girls to become a law unto themselves, to settle all minor cases of discipline, and look after the general behavior of the pupils. THE P. L. C. ALUMNI AsSOCIATION-During the Reunion meeting the 1 9th and 20th of Feb., 1 92 1 , the Alumni Associations of the Columbia Lutheran College and the Pacific Lutheran Academy disolved and reorganized as the P. L. C. A. A. Life membership has been placed at $ 5 . The main aim at present is to get an endowment fund started. Full information about former pupils of C. L. C. and P. L. A. is desired. We shall be thankful for any information as to present addresses and occupations. Address Miss Nettie Larson, Parkland Wash. , correspond足 ing secretary. REUN ION-The school has held regular reunions of former pupils, teachers and members of the board of trustee,. Washington's birthday is generally the day chosen. N ext year the Alumni will have charge of the affair. 60

0


PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE

General

I n formation

T I M E To E N T E R AND REGISTRATION The best time is naturally at the beginning of the school year ; next. at the beginning of the second semester. Pupils ,��Il. however. be received at any time. and will be placed where they can do the most effective work. A fee of $2.00 will be charged for late registration, and $ 1 .00 for each change of registration a fter the first day. No change in registration can be made after the tenth week. No student will be permitted to drop any class with­ out special permission from his teacher and the registrar. A student's registration is not complete before he has made settlement with the treasurer, and until such settle­ ment is made 'he will not be considered a member of any class. ROOM AND BOARD The P. L. C. is a boarding school. Board �;11 be furnished at $90.00 per semester. Pleasant. well lighted and heated rooms are furnished with tables, beds and mattresses at a rental of $30.00 per semester. Day students pay a room rent of $4.50 per semester. nish.

\Vhatever else is needed or wanted, the pupi ls fur­ See below for suggested lists.

The dining room service will not open before the day pre ious to the opening of the term .

61


PAC I FIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE SUGGESTED BOYS

T run k 3 3 I

4 2

3 ,

3 3 I 6

B lankets ( sing l e bed size) Sheets Pillow Slips Pillow Bath and Face Towels \Vash Cloths N apkins and Ring Bath Robe Suits of Underwear Suits of Pajamas Pair Slippers Pair Socks

'

LIST

6 Pocket H a ndkerchiefs J Pair Gymnasiu m Shoes 2 Pair Shoes I

H airbrush

I Comb I ,

1 I I J

Toothbrush Soap Dish Clothes B rush Lďż˝,undry Bag Sh:Je Polish Cutfit Pair Gymnasium Shirt and T run ks (may be gotten at s:hool if desired)

Suggested. but not necessary : One p air curtains (size of windows. 3 ft. 4in, by 6ft. 6in. ) . One pair drapes for wardrobe (size 4x6 ft. ) . One rug. One mirror. SUGGESTED G IRLS ' LIST

3 3

I

4 3 J I

, , ,

Trunk Blankets Sheets 2 , Pi l low Slips Pillow 3 Bath and Face Towels 3 6 Napkins and Ring B ath Robe 6 Pair Gymnasium Shoes , Pair Bedroom Slippers , Pair Black Gym. Bloomers I , Hairbrush 62

Comb Toothbrush \f..1ash Cloths Laundry Bag N ight Gowns Suits of Underwear Pairs of St o ckings Pocket Handkerchiefs Pair Heavy Walking Shoes Clothes Brush Shoe Shine Outfit Soap Dish


PAC IFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Desirable. but not necessary : Curtains. size of window ( 3 ft. 4in. by 6ft. 6in. ) . Drapes for wardrobe (size 4x6 ft. ) . Rug T able Cover. LAUNDRY

The school has a modern. well equipped laundry. The charges are about three fourths of what the laundries A deposit of $5 .00 must be made when in town charge. entering school. BOOKS A N D STATIONERY

The school has its own bookstore where the necessary supplies may be bought at regular prices for cash only. ExPENSES

Bills must be paid i n advance on entering school. or a satisfactory arrangement made with the Treasurer before one will be considered a member of a class. The expenses for the semester are as follows : Tuition for normal number of credit hours . . $40.00 In case two or more members of one family are in attendance at the same time. a discount of 2 5 per cent. on the total sum of the tuition will be granted. A College or Normal student who takes more than 1 7 credit hours a semester will pay $2.50 extra for each semester credit hour ; a high school student will be charged the same amount beyond 2 5 credit hours.

The charge per semester for one period per week in music instruction is $2 7.00. Piano rent one hour per day is $5.00 ; two hours per day $9.00. Typewriters may be rented at $5 .00 a semester. 63


PACI FIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE GEN ERAL FEES Gymnasium Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $ 1 .00 Library Fee . . . . . . . J . 50 Student Privilege Fee 5 .00 .

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The Student Privilege Fee entitles the student to free admission to all games and programs given by the student societies of the school, and to a year's subscription to the College Paper.

SPECIAL FEES Each student is charged an Indemnity Fee of $ 5 .00 which will be refunded, provided there are no charges for damage or any unpaid bills. The following Laboratory Fees must be paid per semester by students taking the re�pectiYe subjects : Chemistry Physics Biulogy, Botany, Zoology o r P5ychology Art, General Science . . . . .

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$ 5 . 00

2.50 2.50 1 .00

Students graduating from the High School Depart­ ment will be charged a Diploma Fee of $2.50, from the College or Normal Courses, $5 . 00.

RECORDS AND TRANSCRIPTS A record of attendance, recitation, deportment, etc . , is kept, and a copy i s sent at the end of each quarter to parents and guardians. Each student will be furnished a transcript of recold free of charge, but $ 1 .00 will be charged per copy for additional transcripts. No transcript will be given until all bills are paid or a satisfactory arrangement has been made with the Treasurer.

64


PACI FIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE TUTCRI NG Students who need extra tutoring will be charged for each hour. \Vhen two students take the same work together. the charge will be 75 cents e�ch.

$ ' .0

ExTRA EXAMINATIONS A fee of $ 1 .00 will be charged for all extra exam­ inations ( except those due to sickness ) . including those for the ren:ova I of conditions. E xtra examinations for credit will cost $2 . 5 0 . RULES A N D DISCIPLI N E

Only su ::h rules have been adopted a s h,lve been fo' nd necessary for the promotion of the hight'st interests of tht> 5tudents. The school. on admitting students. does so with the express understanding that they will cheerfully comply with the rules and regulations of the school in every re pe el, and deport themselves as befits Christian ladies an d featlemen.

any

The College spe::ifically reserves the right to dismiss student. without making definite ch<'.rges. whenever in

its judgment the general welfare seems

to

demand such

action. \Vritten excuse. approved by the principal. dean or preceptress. must be presented to the teacher at the first recitation following an absence. All students are required to be present at the daily devotional exercises held in the chapel and to attend divine services on Sunday either of our church. or if not Lutherans. of their respective denominations in Tacoma. All students are required to keep their rooms clean and tidy. and to abstain from the use of tobacco in any

65


PAC IFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE form within or about the buildings. The occupants of a room will be held responsible for its condition. Day students are expected to observe the evening study hour' at home. and are not permitted to frequent the dormitory after 7 : p. m. The school maintains the right to exercise supervision over day students outside of study hours. All boarding students are required to be in the dormi­ tory after 7 :00 p. m unless granted special leave of absence. .•

Students are expected to employ their time to the be3t possible c:.dvantage and to avoid. as far as possible. every­ thing whi::: h has a tendency to interfere with legitimate school work. T e participation in dancing or card playing. whether i the school building or out of it. visiting gambling houses or other places of questionable nature. and the use of intoxicatin liquors. are strictly forbidden. A student who neglects his work. who wilfully dis­ obeys the rules which are laid down for the government of the schoo!. or whose conduct is improper. or whose influence is pernicious. is not wanted. and will not be retained in the institution. and. if expelled. forfeits the tuition and room rent paid. Continued failure to do good work. after a fair trial. will be considered reasonable ground for dismissal.

In addition 1-0 observing the general rules given abov?. all students will be required to observe the special regula­ tions announced from time to time. EMPLOYM ENT We axe often asked if a pupil can work his way thru school. A great number of our pupils pay their own way. They may have a little saved up to begin with. and eacn summer they are hard at work to earn enough to continue. 66


PAC IFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE There is also some employment to be had at the school for a number of pupils. Correspondence from pupils who need work to help pay for their schooling is invited. M EDICAL ATTENTION The payment of a medical fee of $ 1 . 5 0 per semester entitles the pupil to medical attendance by physician.

the school

Hospital rooms are equipped at the school.

1l1e necessary medicine. nursing and. as may become in­ evitable. room in a city hospital. is furnished at the expense of the pupil. The school urges parents to have all necessary dental work done during vacation periods. SPENDING MONEY \Ve do not wish to encourage extra va gent spending. and parents are urged not to allow their children too much pocket money. It is never conducive to good school work. and free spenders are generally poor students. UNI FORM DRESS FOR GIRLS The idea of uniform dress for girls in boarding schools is becoming more and more popular in schools of the better sort. and our school suggests the following : Sailor or Peter Thompson style of navy blue serg�. Variety may be had during the fall and spring terms by wearing white middies with regulation blue skirt. or all white made in same style for warm weather. Dresses made o f gingham or other wash goods for Saturdays ; a little party frock for evening wear. and a suitable dress or suit for Sundays. 67


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE VISITORS Visitors are always welcome. and the parents and other relatives are invited to visit the school to become ac足 quainted with the work and environment of the students. BAGGAGE \Ve have a transfer company at Parkland that willi bring the students' baggage at special prices. So leave your baggage in Tacoma. bring your check. and the baggage will be brought out as soon and as cheaply as possible.

How To REACH PARKLAND Parkland is a suburb of Tacoma. one of the large ports and railroad centers on the Puget Sound. On arriving at Tacoma take Spanaway or Parkland car on Pacific avenue. At Parkland the College is one block from the station. The cars generally run about every half hour. For further information write to The President or The Registrar. P. L. c.. Parkland. ;Vash.

68


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Graduates 1 92 1 Glassoe, Agn.es, B.

Hauke, O ' g a. J.,

"

Telephone Opera·tor, Parkland.Wn.

,

B. ( M rs. J. Hennessey)

' "

. Astorla, Ore.

Johnoon, Julia P.,

B . ( Mrs. Sorens<ln ) . . . . Poulsbo, 'Vasil.

Quam, Emmeline,

H . . . . . Teacher, Sedro Woolley, Wash.

Roe, Olga C.,

B. ( }Irs. Hutchins) . . . . . . Parkland, Wash. H . . . . . . . . . Teacher, Tacoma, Wash.

Rynning, Schelg K.,

H . . . Stud. U. o r Wash., Ocean Falls B. C.

Sma by, Marie H . ,

Starks, Goldie,

B. ( M rs. Moore ) . . . . . . . . . . Ev e r e tt, Wash .

Wathne, Thomas,

Tacoma, Wash.

H.

1' 922 Anderson, ArthUr,

Aurora, Ore.

B.

Anderson, Thorsten,

B.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Aurora, Ore.

I3. ( Mrs. L. McI ntosh) . . . . . . Seattle, Wash. Fadnes�, Son va. B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C lerk, Parkland, Wash.

Doe, Barbara,

Holdal, Gertrude, Holte, H erman, Jensen, Murl,

B. ( Mrs. C. Adams) . . . . Seattle, Wash. H.

Knutzen, Harold,

.

. .

H. . . .

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.

.

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.

. . .

Stud. St. Olaf, Everett, Wadh.

. .

. . Stud. St. Olaf, Wilmot, S. D.

B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Everson, 'Vash.

Knutzen, Henry, B . . . . . . . . . Deceased, Burlington, Was h. Lero, Bertha,

H . . . . . . . . . Stud. P. L. C., Parkland, Wash.

Ordal, }Iarie,

H. .

Samuelson, Alfred, Skarbo, Frieda,

. .

..

.

.

.

Stud. P. L. C., Parkland, Wash.

H . . . . . StUd. P. L. C., Parkland, WaSh.

H. ( M rs. E. Leuchenot) . . Tacoma, WaJh.

Thomp50n, Albert,

B . . . . . . . . . Salesman, Parkland, Wash.

Wedeberg, Sivert,

H . . . Stud. U. or Wa sh . , Tacoma, Wash.

B-Shorter Business Course. H-High School Course. C-J u n ior College Course.

The home address id given In each case.

69


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE GRA D UA TES Continued

1 923 Boettcher, Mrs. Nita, BuH, 'fabel,

Cooper, George,

H. . .

Cronquist, Oscar, Eik, Amelia,

B.

H.

Kre idler, Burton, Lee, Alyce,

Wash.

of Wash., Parkland, Wash.

Stud. State College, San Jose. Cal.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Richard,

Lane, Irwin,

U.

B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spa naway,

Erholm, Thelma, Jacobsen,

H . . . . . . . . . . . Teacher, Alder,

B. . . . . . . Stud.

. . . . H.

Wash.

Tofino, B . C.

Bookkeeper, Bellingham, '''ash.

. . . .. . . . . . . .

H . . . . . . . Stud. P.

Santa Barbara,

L.

Cal.

C., Parkland, Wash.

C . . . . . . . . . . . Stud. Luth. C., Stanwood, Wash. H.

Lero, Bertha, Oyen, Arnt,

( M rs .

S.

Clark)

.

. . . . . . Bellingham, Was h .

C . . . . . . . . . . . S t u d . C. P. S. Parkl and, Wa sh . B. . . . . . . . . . . . . Stud. P.

L.

C. Poulsbo, Wash.

1 924 H.

Anderson, Alfred,

.

Cam bas, Hope,

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.

S t ud. P. L. C., Tacoma.

. . .

Wash.

H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook. Wash.

Anderson, Katherine,

H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petersburg, Alaska

Ebbeson, Oswald, Fadness, Ruth,

B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

l\Iatsqui, B. C.

H. . . . . . . . . Stud. P. L. C., Parkland. Wash.

Goplerud, Lulu,

C.

. . . . . . Stud. Bellingham Normal. Silverton, Ore.

Greenwood, George,

H . . . . . Clerk, Tacoma Music Store. Tacoma, 'Na s h .

Ranson , Helga,

B. . . . . . . . .

Stenographer, Seattle, '''a s h .

W.

Wa �h.

Knutzen, Ralph,

H . . . . . S tud.

Kreidler, Myron,

H . . . . . . . Stud. P. L. C., Parkl a n d , Wash.

Langlow, Monroe,

H.

.

.

. . . .

. .

. .

S . C . . Burlington,

Stud. State College Santa Barbara. C a \ .

Neslon , BirgeI', Olson, Conrad, O rdal, Marie,

B. . . . . . . . . Stud. P. L. C., Poulsbo, Wasil. B. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . C.

. . . . . . . .

Samuelson, Al fred,

Tacoma.

Wasil.

Stud. C. P. S., Parkland. ·Wa s h .

C . . . . . Stud. C. P. S . , Parkla n d.

70

Wasil .


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE GRA D UA TES Continued

1 92 5 B. . .

Angvik, Esther, Beck, Alvar,

H.

Beck, Edwin,

H.

BUli, Ruth E.,

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H.

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2333

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. . Rapelje, Mont.

L.,

Tacoma, Wash.

2333 So. L.,

Tacoma, Wash.

SO.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Parkland,

Wash.

Carlson, Lyman,

H. .

.

. . 1407 No. Prospect, T<l�oma, Wash

Cooper, George,

C. .

.

. .

Day, Lillian Am ore tte,

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.

. . . 1 15 So.

.

C. . . .

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. .

. .

G.,

Tacoma, WasIl.

Lincoln Ave.

&

A,

Tacoma, Wash. G1asso, Sidney,

H.

Helmdahl, Erna,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C.

Heimdahl, Palma,

H.

Hjermstad, Signe, Iverson, Mabel,

H.

H. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

C.

La.nglow, Palma,

.

.

.

Mt.

. . .

.

523

. . . . . . .

H.

Was h .

. . .

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.

. . .

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.

Parkland, Wash.

. .

W. Sola St. Santa. Barbara, Cal.

.

.

.

.

. . . . . East Stanwood, Was;l .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ort ing , Wash.

H.

Stella,

.

. . . .

H.

H. . . .

Sydow, Esther,

H.

B-S h orter

.

. . .

.

.

.

.

. . . .

. . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . .

. . . . . . .

. . . . 515 So.

. . . .

. .

27 St.,

Busi n es s Cou r s e .

C-.Junior College Course.

addr-es s

is given i n

71

each

Silverton, Ore.

Parkland,

H-High School Course. The home

V ern on ,

Fernd<lle, Wash.

H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo, Wash.

Svinth, Luetta,

..

Waah.

Chinook, Wash.

H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo, Wadlt.

Riveness, Ruth, Samuelson,

H.

C.

O'Farrell, Edna., Oyen, Arnt,

Chinook,

H . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burlington, Wash.

Kreidler, Burton, Matson, Ruth,

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Knutzen, A rthur,

Nelson, Birger,

Fir, Wash.

C . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fir, Wash.

Hjermstad, lVlartha,

Kiel, Henry, H .

Parkland, \Vasl1.

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case.

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Wash.

Roy, Wasb.

Tacoma, WaJh •


PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

Enrollment 1 924- I 92S

Aalmo. Christ . . . . . . . . . . Stanwood Adamson. Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gregaria Allison. Ad:lbelle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Anderson. Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Angvik. Esther . ... . . Rapelje. Mont. Annis. Margaret . . . . .. . . . Parklan.l Arthur. E d Tacoma 'Baardson. Alf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Westminster. Canada Beck. Alvar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Beck. Ed . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Berger. Sigurd . . . Parkland. Alberta. Canadd Bergman. Alice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland Ore. Birklund. Constance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKennd Blomhoff. Franz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacom .. Borseth. Edgar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fir Botten .. Einar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , Silvana Brudvik. Arthur . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Buli. Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Carlson. Lyman . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Cedarquist. Herbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Christiansen. Christ . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Petersburg. Alaskil Coltum. Carl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parklan.:l Cooper. George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Cowden. Elizabelh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Dahl. AnelJe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Dahl. Irene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Dahl. Iver . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland. Ore. Dahlberg. Eleanor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enumclaw Dale. Anga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland .

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE ENROLLMENT Continued

Day. Amorette . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Eide. Nina . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stanwood Eidem. Carl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Des Moine� Ekrom. Knut Seattle Eliasen. Emil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Ellingson. Arnold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ellingson. Carl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ellingson. Edwin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ellingson. Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ellingson. Lawrence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Ellingson. Lloyd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ellingson. Olga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Erickson. Hugo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Espeness. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Fadness. Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Flott. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland French. Walter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Santa Barbara. Calif. G:udlin. Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook Glasso. Joseph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Glasso, Sidney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ,Parkland Haga, Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Handegard. Lillian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacorn,\ Hanson. Birger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Hanson. Egil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Hanson. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Juneau. Alaska Hanson. Knut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Haugen, Erling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Heggen. Mattias . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Heggen. Meyer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Heirndahl, Erna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fir Heimdahl. Palma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fir Hemming. George . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland. Ore. ¡ Henriksen, Dora . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland. Ore. Henriksen. Henrik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Astoria. Ore: .

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PACI FIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE ENROLLMENT Continued

Hersey, Jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Hjermstad, Martha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook Hjermstad, Signe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook Huntington, Beatrice . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Huglem, John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Iverson, Mabel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mt. Vernon Iverson, Iver Seattle Jacobsen. M agnus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Jacobsen. Mary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eatonville Jacobson. Alfred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bothel J angaard. Hans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . T acom;l Jensen. Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Everett Johnson. Joe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McMillan Johnson. Karl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Kid. Henry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ferndale Kjaerstad. Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Knutsen. Reidar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Knutzen, Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burlington Krangness. Bert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mt. Vernon Kreidler. Burton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Kreidler. Lyell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Kreidler. Myron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Langlow. Palma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Santa Bar'bara. Calif. Larson. Berner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Larson. Nettie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Lee. LIlian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook Lee. OUo . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mt. Vernon Lehmann. Dorothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Lero, Bertha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Lind. Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Lund, Lillian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Fargo. N . D. Lundeen. Teddy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Eatonville Mageli. Hilmen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland M ageli. Olga . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland .

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE ENROLLMENT Continued Martinson. Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . McKenna Matheson. Melvin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Des Moines Matson. Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . East Stanwood Malmberg. Einar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Moen. Martin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stanwood Nelson. Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Gig Harbor Nelson. Berger . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo Nelson. Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Nelson. Helen . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Portland. Ore. Nelson. Lenore . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chinook Nelson. Norman . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Westminster. B. C. Ness. Fred . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Port Blakely Norby. Arvid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma N ordstrom. Magnus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo Noringset. Harold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Nyhaug. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Volin. S. D. Nyman. Wilbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Nysater. Olav Seattle O'F arrell. Edna . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Orting Odlund. Sig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ketchikan. Alasb Olson. Albert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Raymond Olson. Bertha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Olson. Garvik . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ordal. Dorothy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ordal. Marie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Ordal. Olaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Osbakken. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Oyen. Arnt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo Paulson. Thelma . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Pellett. Claude . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacomil Peterson. Gust . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Peterson. Thoralf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Quam. Nels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Everett Rockness. Morris . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma .

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PAC I F I C LUTHERAN COLLEGE ENROLLMENT Continued

Riveness. Ruth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Silverton. Ore. Rod. Bertha . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Rod. Clara . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " Parkland Ronstad. Conrad . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Rorvik. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Rynning. Solveig . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Samuelson. Stella . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Sanderson. Rudolph . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Sannerud. Harry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bend. Ore. Servold. Olaf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PoulsLo Seubert. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Spanaway Sognefest. Peder . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Stave. Ingval Seattle Ste�erson. Edmund . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Anacortes Stuen. John . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Sundset. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Svare. T. O. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Svinth. Luetta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Roy Sydow. Esther . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Thomas. Gladys . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Santa Barbara. Calif. Thorson. Orrin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ottawa. III. Tietjen. Herbert . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . San Francisco. Calif. Tilrem. Torlaug . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Tveter. Elmer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tacoma Tynes. Peter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Ulvang. Andrew . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Poulsbo Viland. Charles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Parkland Vogel. M arcus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Seattle Wersen. Arthur . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Burlington Woge. Frithjol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Everet-t Wold. Knut . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . West Seattle .

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PACIFIC LUTHERAN COLLEGE

I N D EX Accreditation , . . . . . 2 4 , � 7 Admi s s ion

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A im ,

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Our

Algebra

1 4 , :,7

. . . . . . . . . . . . .

Al gebra, College

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.

!J ii1

20, :\3

Algebra , Higher 2 0 , 32,

51

Alumni

ti O

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

American Hist o ry . 19, 3 1 Arithmetic

. . . . . . . . . . .

50

A r t . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 8 , 2 9 , ·19 Athletic Club . . . . . • . . A t hletics . . . . . . . . . . . . .

1:0 �4 Augsburg Confession . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, � 6 Baggage . . . . . . . . . . . . . ti 8 Beginners' English Course . . . . . . . . . . . . . �8 B i bl e Stu dy . . . . . . . . . . 4 0 B iogra p h i es ( Dible Study ) . • • • . . • • . . • • • -l{) B i ology . . . . . . . . 2 :3 , 36, :1 :) Board . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . Gl 7 Boa.rd, Executive Board of Trustees . . . . Board of Visitors . . . . Bool{e eping . . . . . . . . . . Books . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . B o tan y . _ . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bu i l d i ngs . . . . . . . . . 1 1 ,

7 7 41 ·3 3 ;,}S J2 B u s iness Course, S hOI·t ,,6 Ca le nda r , School . . . . 3, 4 Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 ChalJel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 C h a rges, Ex tra . . . . . . 6:3 Chem istry . . . . 22, 3 5 . 36 Adolesand Childhood cence . . . . . . 17 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . i)!) Christian Education . . 9 Ch risti an EYidence 1 6 , 6 2 Church H i story . . . 15, 2 5

C i v ics

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. r; o . . 14 C ol umbia Lutheran College . . . . . . . . . J 0 Commercial Bran ches 4 1 Committees , Faculty . S Contemporary C i y ilization . . . . . . . . . . 19, : n Course, Beginners' English . . . . . . . . . . ;is Courses, High Sc h ool 3 7 Cour,�e Normal . . . . . . 2·i Coul'se, Short Business ;j l) Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 7 CurriculuDlS . . H , 2 'i, 3 8 Debating C l u b . . . . . . . !i9 Department, Col le ge . . 1 4 Department, High School . . . . . . . . . . . . , :3 7 Department. N or ma l . :H Diplom3. Fees . . . . . . . . :3 1 Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . I' ') Dr�tmatic Club . . . . . . . . :)n Dress. School . . . . . . . . 67 Economics . . . . . . . 16, jtj Education, Christian . . 9 Education, H istory or . 17 Education, Principles of . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7 , 27 Education, Subjects 16, �7 IEducation al Measurement . . , . . . . . . . 1 6 , 27 Educational Psychology . . . . . 16, 22, 27, 35 Employ ment . . . . . . . . . 60 English . . . . . . . . 1 7 , 28, 44 Enrollment of Stude nts 72 Enter, Time to . . . . . . . 61 Entrance Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . 14, :l7 Examinations, E x tra . . 6r; .

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College Department

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PACIFIC LUTH ERAN COLLEGE IND EX Executive B oa rd . . . . .

7

Expenses

. . . . . . . . . . . .

E x penses,

Beginners' Eng·

lish

. . . . . . . . 58 G3 I)

Extra C h a r ges . . . . . . . Faculty . . . . . . . . . . 5, . Facult C o m m ittees . . F e e s , General . . . . . . . . Fee s , S p ecial

S

fi4 . . . . . . . . 61

Foreig n Languages .

h

63

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Hi

46 Fundamentals o f Christi'anity . . . . . . . . 4 0 G-eneral S c ie n c e . . . . . . 5·1 Geogra p h y , Com me rci a l 44 Geo gra p h y, M et h o d s . . :� o Geometry . . . . . . 20, 32, 5 ] German . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 7 Gifts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 Grades . . . . . . . . . . 14, :n raduates . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Graduation . . . . . . . 14. '17 : Gyrnn:lsium . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 (jymnasties . . . . . . . . . . 54 Handicraft . . . . 18, 29. 4ll H arm on y . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 H e a l t h E d u c a tion . . . . :30 High School Departmen t . . . . . . . . . . . . ' " 37 Historical Sketch . . . . J \) History . . . . 1 8 , 1 9 , 30, 4 !'l History of Education . 1 7 History o f Music . . . . . . 5 3 H y g i e n e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :�O In for ma t i o n , General . G 1 Tntroductory Remarks . �I Laboratories . . . . . . 1 2 , L 3 Languages, Foreign . . 4 6 Fren

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Latin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . fJaundry . . . . . . . . . " . . . a "r1 C o m m erc ial . . . . . Lega cies a n d G i f t s . . . .

,17 1)8 -! �1 t :3

Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Library, Science . . Literary Societies

1 9, 31 :; 9

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Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 Man u a l . State . . . . . . . . 2 S Mathematics, . . 2 0 , 32, 5 0 Measurements, E d u ca t i on al . . . . . . . . . . 27 Medical Attention . . . . 1.7 Mission Society . . . . . . ;,9 Money, Spending , . . . 67 Music . . . . . . . . . . , . 33, 52 Music. Tuition . . . . . . 63 M u s i ca l O rg an i z ati on s . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59, 6 0 Nature S t u d y . . . . . . . . . :l6 :-rormal Department . . . 24 Norse . . . . . . . . 2 1 , 33, 48 Nutrition . . . . . . . . . . . . :10

Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . �O Organizations, Stu d ent ,,9 Pac i fi c Luth. Academy 10 Parkland . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1

Parkland, How t o Reach 6 8 Penm a n s h i p . . . . . . 34, 4 1 Physica l Education . . ,, 4 PhysiC i a n , School . . . . 67 Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5ii

Piano . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :;2

Piano, Rental . . . . . . . . 6 3 Political S c i e n c e 19, 3 1 , ,19 P ri n c i p l e s of Ed uca ti o n . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 , 27 P ro b lem s, Current Educational . . . . . . 28 Psychology . . . . . . 22, 34

Psyc hology, Educational . . . . . . . 1 6, 27. :l5 Psychology o f E l e m . Sc11. SubjeCts . ;!7, � i) R ecords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64 Registration . . . . . . . . . . 6 1


PAC I FIC LUT £RAN COLLEGE I LVD EX Religion . . . . . . 15, 25, 4 0 Ren t, Pianos, Typewriters

Reports R e u nion Rooms

............ ( Transcr i p t s ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . 2 )! . '.. 2 Organizations 59

S t a te Manual

S t u clents, Enrollment

03 6·1

S t u dents,

60

S t udents.

Supplies

61,

Teachers

. . . . . . . . .

5,

Teaching,

Practice

Teaching,

Technique of

T h espian,

The

'3 1

Ruled, Gene:'al . . . . . . . 65 S a les man s h i p . . . . . . . , � 3 School Dress . . . . , . . . 67 Science . . . . . . . 22, 35, 5 -1 Shorthand . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1 Sigvald Quale Contest �9 Societies, Student . . . . ;;9 Soci ology . . . . . . . . . 1 6 . 2 6 Spanish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 8 S p el l i ng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Spending money . . . . . . 67 S�ationery . . . . . . . . . . . . 03:3 Ste:lOgraphy . . . . . . . . . . 1 � Subjects. Outlines of . . . . . " . . . " 15, 26. 40

Trigonometry

.

.

. .......... . . . .

Violin

Visitors

6

28 28 59

. . . . . . . . . . 20, 3 2

Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuition . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tutoring . . . . . . . . . . . . Ty pewriters, Rent . . T y pewriting . . . . . . . . . United States History

Units

62

. . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. ............ Visitors, Board of . . . . Voice Culture . . . . . . . . Work, Amount o f . . 1 4 , Zoology . . . . . . . . . . . . .

7

!i3 65 63 ,n 50 ;;7 54

liS 7 53 37

55



1924-1925 Catalog of Pacific Lutheran College