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Pacific Lutheran Colleqe BULLETIN Vol. 1

June lS21

No. 3

First A l1nual

Catalog for

1920-1921

ďż˝

Announcen2ents for I92I - I922

Parkland, Wash


Calendar

School

1920-21 I Semester Registration .............................Monday, Oct., 4 Formal Opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tnesday, Oct. 5 Dedication Service .......................,Sunday. Oct. 17 Thanksgiving . . . . . . .. . . . ... . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Thursday, Nov. 25 2nd Quarter begins ..... " ............Monday, Dec. 6 Christmas Recess .begins . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . Thursday, Dec. 23

1921

Christmas Recess ends ...................Monday, Jan. 3 Semester Ex�minations begin .............Wednesday, Feb. 2 II Semester Registration . . . . . . . . . Reunion . . . . . . . . . . . . . 'Vashington's Birthday

.Monday, Feb. 7 Sat. and Sund., F e b. 19·20 . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuesday, Feb. 22 Easter Recess ............. , ..............Thursd.-Mond., March 24·28 . .

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4th Quarter be gin s . . . . . . . . . . � . . . . . . . . 'Monday, Apr. ] 1 Decoration Day ..........................Monday, May 30 Baccalaureate Servi. ce ....................Sunday. June 5 Final Examinations beg in ................Tuesday. June 7 Commencement ........... , ...,.,........Friday, June 10 Alumni Day ............ ,.' .. " ,.,., ......'Saturday, June 11

1921·22 I Semester Regi tl'ation ............ ,..... , ........ ,.'[Honday, Sept. 19 Formal O pe n ing ......... , ... ,............Tuesday, Sept. :]0 Dedication ProgTum ..... ,................Friday, Oct. 14 Reformation Program ..............., .... :Vlonduy, Oct. 31

2nd Quartel' begins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ...,.Monday, Nov. 21 Thanksgiving .......... ,' ................Thursday, No\'. 24 Christmas Recess begins .......... . .... " .Thursday, Dec l 22 Christmas Recess ends

1922

...................Monday, Jan. 2

Semester Examinations begin ., " .........Wednesday, Jan. IS " Semester Registration .............,... ,... , ...... ' Monday, Jan. 23 Reunion ........... , ....... ', ......... , ..Wednesday, Feb. 22 Washington's Birthday ,..................Wednesday, Feb. 22

4th Quarter begins ..............,....Monday. March 27 Easter Recess ................... " ...... ,Thursd.M - ond., Apr. 13·g Baccalaureate Service .. . . . . . . , . .\ . . " ....Sunday, May 21 Final Examinations begin .................Tuesday. May 23 Commencement ..........................Friday, May 26 Alumni Day ........................ , .....Saturday. May 27 ..


Faculty

1920 .. 1921

XAVIER, J. D., A. B. Luth. Col, Act. Pres. R e ligio n, History,

Latin,

Botany

LAR"SO.'r, LDDVIG, Asst. 'l'reas. C O m mer c ial Branches,

l' nmanship

Mathematics,

H...4.DGE, Ph. E. R., A. B. St. Olaf , Dean of Men English,

Psycho logo',

Geography

VELDEY, S. F., A. B. St. Olaf, Coach Fren ch, Physlcs, Math!"matic"s

receptress

ELLISON, MISS AI�PHA, English,

JESSEX, Shorthand,

History,

lVlI&S

Citizenship

MARGARETHE, Secretary

Typewriting,

Preparatory

Engli:sh,

Voice

NIELSE.'r, MISS LIZZIE 1fusic Depnrtrnent, Preparatory English

NEW TEACHERS FOR 1921 STDE.'r, O. J., r�r. A., D. of Wash. 1-t athenlC.ltics

Languages, Seience,

JORGEX6E),\ iX. S., �Vr. A., D. of Chicago H\sto�y, Language, Education

I

HOLDM, M.

Cornn1erciul Branche

Arithrnetic

,

Called for 1921 NAESS, REV. J. A. E., President Religion,

History

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

REV. O. HOLE X, Pres

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REV. O. E. HEIMDAHL, See

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. . .Tacoma, Wash. .

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Fir, Wash.

lIfR. .T. O. ANDERSON, T reas ......... Ballard, Wash. REV. :VI. A. CHRISTENSEN .. REV. O. GORNITZKA R}'-:;V. O. J. ORDAL 1fR.

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L. KIRKEBO .

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m. H. }IYRON . . . . .

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Portland, Ore.

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Tacoma, Wash.

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Tacoma, �Wash.

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. . . . . S attle, Wash.

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. Stanwood, Wash. .

TI'/E CCMMITTEE OF THE

RE . O. HOLE�

?lIR. D. L. KIRK�DO

EOARD

1 1K P. T. LARSEN

SCHOOL PHYSICIAN DR. EVA:-.l HY S LI X ...... 703-7 Jones

!vc.k, T;:>. 'oma


Christian Education Says R. \"1. Babson, "The need of the hour is not more factories or materials, not more railroads or steamships, not more armies and navies, but rather '!TIore education based on the plain teachings of Jesus Chri st." To this we fully subscribe. The Lutheran Church has always advo­ cated education-educaUon of all the people, but not an education of the mind and body alone.

\Ve want an education which includes the

heart also; a n education of the moral nature of man; a n education, If you pleas€, of the soul. '''Ie believ , e that without public education there can be n o great political liberty, no great social advancement, no real manhood or womanhood, because

men become mentally stunted.

But w e also

beli eve that a true education must take into consideration the religious aspirations of man, or he will become morally stunted. In our church schools the classes ar€ not as large as in most of our public institutions at the present time, and for this reason greater at­ tention can 'be given to the individual pupil.

The teacher does not

lose that personal touch with his pupils which i s so essential to good teaching and learning. Then again, whence i s the churCh to get is teachers and pastors? Were we to rely on our state institutions alone the church would soon be without leaders. But we need our church schools, not only for leadership, but for thp. common walks of life as well.

\Ve need devout, enlightened, alive

members as well in the pews as in the pulpits.

We do not hold that

"Ignorance is the mother or devotion," unless it be of an ignorant devotion., and such a devotion i s not a result of, nor has it anything to do with the b iblical attitude of "1 know." For these reasons we build and maintain our church schools.

These

are n-eeds no other institutions can meet.

OUR AIM To

reach as many as we can of our own c hurch, and also to open

our doors to those who may arfiliate with other churches or with no Church. To help the backward pupil and to spur on the more gifted. To do as much good as we can in teach ing and discipline to as many as possible. To giv,e the special student as much attention as the regular, and to guide each till he, by the growth of his intellectual and moral powers, shall have overcome the difficulties he has been laboring under. To inculcate regular 'habits of life. 4


To help each one to become a law unto himself. To serve

as a stepping stone to a higher

education whether

in

church or in state. To -educate the whole man and help our boys and girls to become men and women of character. To educate for a life of usefulness. To nourish and strengthen the faith of OUl' fathers, a firm belief ir. Christ and Christianity. To help in supplying workers for our schools. our congregations and our missions.

H I STORICAL SK E T C H

The

Pacific

Lutheran

Academy

at

Parkland,

lished by members of the Norw. E\,. Luth.

"'ash.,

was

estab足

Church of America.

It

began its work in 1894 and continued until 1918, the last year in con足 junction with the College at Everett.

In its field it ranked as one of

the best in the state.

The Columbia Lutheran College was built at Everett, Wash., by members of the United Norw. Luth. Church of America.

It opened its

doors for pupils in 1909, and continued its work till the spring of 1919. From 1911 it was under the direct management of the United Church.

COLUMBIA L"CTHERAN COLLEGE

5


In 1919 both schools "ere C osed to pupils, and the consolidated school,

The

Pacific

Lutheran

Coll ege,

which

was

to

be located at

Parkland. '�Tash., began its preparation for taldng up the work under the new C\U pices. inc"

the S Ulll mel' of 1920 the P. L. A. main build·

During

was thoroughly renovated.

1920, registration began,

and

and a chapel was built. the

new

school

On Oct.

4,

up its work of

tooIt

education. LOCAT I O N

arkland i s a suburb oE Tacoma.

Its name indicates

n ature of

the

its scenery.

To the we t lie the broken, I'ugged, snow-capJled Olympic

Mountains;

to the east and south stretch the Cascade �Iountains with

theil' wooded foothil ls and the towering peaks.

Here,

serene

and

y dome of 'lIn. Tacoma, the heavenward pol:1t·

majestiC, rises the sno

Sal11l�,

ing, noul'ishing mother-a vision not to be forgotten, never the always sublime, whether crowned

by

a storm cap of clouds,

01' rosea te

with the glow of morning, or still and milky white under tbe blaz e of day, or tinted by the setting sun. 'Within this frame lies Parkland, its prairies dotted with groves and clUsters of tl'ees, its

nesting homes, and th e Clov er Creek winding like

a band of silver below the hill on which the P. L. C. is located. THE BU ILDINGS This is a mass!ve five·story structure of brick,

The Main Bui !ding. 190xS2 feet. ment floor

In the base­

al'e located the heating syste m , the kitchen, dining room,

chemical guest

It was thoroughly renova ted last summer.

and

biological

contains all

laboratories,

the boys'

showers.

the offices, the reception room,

rooms, two class rooms and two

suites

The

the first

the reading room,

for teachers.

On the

second ,floor are four classl'ooms, the library and students' rooms, and on

the thi rd flool' thirty·seven studen ts' rooms and the boys' and girls'

hospital rooms.

It is furnished with city light and water, and has

own light and water system for an emergency.

Hs

The rooms are ligbt

and pleasant. When the fourth and fifth stories are finished the building will house

about

250

pu.pjls.

The Chapel was erected at a cast of about $7,000 last summer.

feet, with a fu ll concrete basement.

is a frame building, 40x60

basement has an assembly room aud a fully equlpllcd The Gymnasium,

one of

building on a concrete outfit

kitchen.

t 1e best on the west CO:lst, is a f ram e

b ..sement, lOOx50 feet.

fine rt:nning track, a large

It

The

The

l:tage, dressing rooms,

111ft'r. COOl' l�as a

n.

n1c",-i::.6' p!ctun:�

and an allen floor for games o[ 50xSO.

The b::tsement when fi:1:sbec will contain

a swimming poel,

20x4S,

locl{er l'eoms, etc.

THE U8R;'RY The

�(' h ool libr:1.ry

at pr-sent has a collecTion or

and pampJleL, besides a

some

j,000 books

qua It:ty of unbound m:lgazines. The largest (j


single additions to the library have been:

Rev

.

J. O. Hougen (about

.

400)' Rev. C. X. M. Carlsen (some 350), Prof. J. M. Clary (some 200), Prot A. O. Aaberg (about 130).

When the books from Columbia Col·

lege are added it will materially increase the library and enhance its value.

The library fee is used for improving and enlarging this part

of our school equipment. THE CAMPUS The Coliege campus comprises about eighteen acres, a fine ground for the pupils.

play·

There are the ·base ball diamond, tw . o tennis

courts and the croquet courts. OUR TEACHERS While the Pacific Lutheran College has superior advantages in the way of location and buildings, it realizes that these are not the most essential factors of a good school. College has therefore spared

no

The teachers mak e the school. The efforts to

secure teachers who are

graduates of institutions of repute, and who have had successful expe­ rience in school work.

They are loyal to the school, devoted to thei,

work, capable, enthusiastic, and helpfnl to our students. Several of the teachers reside in the dormitorY and come into daily contact with the stndents.

As companions and advisers 0[ the students they seek to

guide them to the highest ideals of Christian manhood and womall­ hood. For the coming year additional teachers 11a \'e been engaged, and the Board has exercised great care in the selection. OUR STUDENTS

OUI' students come from homes representing th e most varied occu­ pations and conditions of life.

A few come from wealthy homes, but

the majority are young men and women of moderate, or even slender means.

1fany of them have

to

support themselves while

attending

school, and practically all have been accustomed to hard work.

They

come to the school, bringing with them rugged energy and habits of economy and industry;

and while some of them are rough·hewn and

deficient in some of the graces of fine society, they have an intense desire to learn and improve themselYes, ann it is unnecessary to add that they invariably succeed. The past year eight nationalities and six church bodies were repre­ sented at our College.

EQUIPMENT Due to lack of funds our equipment is not yet wlmt \ye ho;)e soon to make it by the help of our friends.

Hel' e is a splendid field of work

for the Y. P. S:s. the Alumni Association and Student Societies. The Physical Laboratory bas a somewhat adeqmlte equilJ"!'uent but our other laboratories are as yet in their beginning. The school also has a moving pictUre machine and a balopticon. As to pi:mos, typewriters see under Music Department and nnd!'!r

Typewr:tin g. 7


Courses of Study Special efforts have been macie to arrang-e the various courses in their natural order.

branches of the

Pupils are therefore required

to select and follow some particular course of study, and will, as a rule, find it to their advantage to do so.

Only under special circum­

stances will a pupil be allowed to omit a study from the course which he hRs selected.

Beginners' E n g lish Course Hours" First SemesterReligion I . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . 2 English A .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spelling I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 5 Arithmetic I . . . . . . . . .. . . .. Penmanship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Second SemesterReligion I . . . . . English A . _ . _ . Spelling I _ _ . . . Arithmetic I . . . Penmanship . . .

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Hours

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2 5

5 5 3

'" Th-e "hours" means 2, 3 or 5 hours pel' week. This course is especially designed to meet the needs of foreigners, but young men and women, who, {rom want of opportunity, or from other causes, have been deprived of the adva.ntages of even an educa­ tion equal to that of the fifth or sixth gra,de, wiII also here find an ex­ cellent opportunity to make up what they have lost. Th-e main stress is put on the study of English;

and the greatest

care is taken that the pupil may learn to read WEll, spell correctly, speak and write the language with a fair amount of skill. write a good hand, and be thorough in arithmetic. The study of Bible History is taken up ill this year-not in a way

designed for children, but for persons of more mature age. No pupil bas evel- been refused admission because he wa,s too old From 14 to 40 has been the slosan, but even 50 is

or knew too little . not too old.

Those who are 3!bJe to do so will be permitted to take up wme s u b­ jects in the Preparatory Course also.

Preparatory Course First Semestereligio n 1 [ . . . Englisa B . IS-pelJing II .

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. . . . Political Geography . Citizenship . _ . . . . . . .

Arithmetic II

Secoud Seme�ter-

Hour Religion II . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 English B . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Spelling II . . . . . . . . . . ._ . . . . 'J " Arithmetic [I . . . . . . . . . . • . . 5 Political Geography ..... . . 5 Citizenship . . . . . . . . _ . . . . , 5

Hours . .

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2

5 3 5 5 5

The work in this ye;:\r corres;10nds, in a general v;ay. to that pur-

sued in th-e s ventll and eighth grades of our pub:ic schools. 8

hile


elementary

in

character,

it

is

planned

for

young

men

and

women,

rather than for children. For explanation o{ the subjects refer to "Subjects," beginning on page 16.

BUSIN ESS DEPART M E N T

Commercial Course Hours

First SemesterReligion II-VIII . ..

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2

English I-IV . . . . . . . . . . .. . . ;; Business English VIII..... 5 Spelling III .............. 3 Arithmetic IV and 5 Rapid Calculation . . ..... Bookkeeping .. . . . . .. . .. 10 Typewriting . .. . .. . . . . 10 Penmanshi[l . . .. ..... ..... 3 .

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Second Semester-

Hours

Religion II-VIII ..... ... .. English I-IV . ... . . .. ... . Commercial Law .... .. ... Spelling III .. . . ... .. .. Arithmetic IV and .

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2 5 5 3

Rapid Calculation . . ... .. 5 Bookkeeping .. . .. ..... .. 10 Typewriting .... .... . ... 10 Pennlanship ... .... .. . ... 3 .

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This course is designed to prepare young men and women for the active ,duties of the business world by givi n g them a practical know­ ledge of the laws, usages and practices of trade and commerce.

There

i s probably no other course of the same length a n d ,cost which even approaches a

business training course in its

value to young people.

The business world and the government are constantly calling for well trained men and women to fill positions.

A pupil who has a good elementa.ry knowledge of reading, spelling. grammar and a rithmetic can complete the course in nine months.

Que

who is deficient in one or more of these subjects will require longer time.

No one will be allowed to graduate who has not at least COlli­

pleted English I, and all below eighteen years of age should finish one year of Hi'g h School before taking up this course. What is taught. things:

A

good

The pupil is taught the following very important business

handwriting;

good

'business

English;

a

knowledg'e of punctuation; how to write a correct business letter that will command attention;

'how to use the typewriter; how to solve all

kinds of practical problems in arithmetic rapidly and accurately;

a

knowledge of business law; how to d'raw up contracts, deeds and ·bm;i· ness documents; a thorough knowledge of bookkeeping;

system, neat·

ness and order. It is the aim of the school to make the course so broad and tho�­ ough that the pupil who has

completed it

shall be able, readily, to

adapt himself to any ordinary system or sets of books, involving either single or double ent17 bookkeeping, as used in the business world.


S�enographic Course First Semester-

Second 'Semester-

Hours

eligion II-VIn . . . . . . . . . _ . English I-IV . . . . . .. . .. . . . _ Spelling III. . .. . . . . ... ....

2 5 3

Shorthand ................ Typewriting .. .. . . . . . . . . . . PenmanshiD .. . . . . . . . . .. . .

;:J

Hours

Religion II-VIII . . . . . English I-IV . . . . . .. . Spelli n g III . . . .� . . . . Shorthand . . . . ... . . . Typewriting Penmanship Office Work

3

. . . . . .

.. . . . . .. . . . ... . . ..

2 5

3 [) ;; 3

This course is designed [or those who wish to prepare for general office work.

The time required to complete this course is nine months.

but to do so successfully, the student must be able to write a good hand, spell well and have a good command of the English language. One who is deficient in any of these branches must spend sufficient time in, attaining the required standard of scholarship before taking up the study of shorthand. The minimum of English required for gradua­ tion from this course Is English I. The use of shorthand and typewriting is continually being extended, and at the present time more opportunities are offered to the compe­ tent stenographer than to any other profession. call for efficient workers in the field.

There is a constant

The modern business office is

not fully equipped without one or more stenographers.

The United

States' civil service commission is calling for more candidates to supply the shortage of eligibles who are

trained in both stenogra.phy

and

typewriting, for employment at Washington, D. C., and \'arious govern­ ment offices throughout the United States.

To the college student,

shorthand is of great value in making reports of addresses and lec­ tures, and to the lawyer, the lecturer, the clergyman and the teacher the art is a valuable assistant.

Asid e from its specific commercial

value, shorthand affords a splendid training in mental dlclpline and awakens push, energy and activity, Speed

Requirements:

To graduate from this course, the student

must have attained a speed in shorthand of 140 words a minute, an!l be able to transcribe his notes correctly on the typewriter at the rate at twenty-five words a minute.

10


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2 6 a 5 5 5

Religion VI ........ English IV ........ For. Lang. 11.. .... ·Moe1. H i story .... U. S. Hi story .... . Pbyslcs

.

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2 r, ij 5 3 5

r, 3

2 fi 3 5

.

.

Religi on VI ....... . English IV . . ..... r. Fo� Lan� II .. ... 6 MOd. History 5 Civics ___ 5 Ph y sics

'Rc·Jigion V .......... 2 English JTr For. Lang. ] 01"1 r r, l\1ed. lTist o rv .... !j ' PsYChology Algebra. II ..........

TIeJigion 1'V . .... English II ._ . ..._._ For. Lang. l(1r.l I Anc. Hislory Physio logy ________ Gcolnetry I _____.__

.. . .

'For. Lang. J Pt·nmanship

Religion In ...... Engligh 1. •..•.......•• Aritl1l11ctic III . . .A..lg-cbl'a 1 ._

5

TV

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r, 5

5

5

5 5

2 5 5 ;,

.

r, 5 5

2 fi

2 5 5 G 3 5 5

Religion VI ...... . 2 EngJi8h IV ... ..... 5 F01". Lang. 1L. ... . Mod. His tory .... fi Civics ______.___________ 5 PhysiCS _.________._____ 5 Latin II·IV ........ 5

.

'I1eligion V .... ..... . J-;ng-lish III ........ 11'01'. T... ang. 101'11 Mell. History .... Psychology .. __ .'._ Algebra II .... . .... Latin I-III ...... ..

FOllrth �ear

.

Hollg-ion VI Eng"lil"ll} IV Por. Lang. IT .... .. 1I1od. }] istory .. .. U. S. History..... . Physi c s . .. . ........... Latin TI-IV ........

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Religion IV ... .... English II ...... .... 1:'''0 ' 1". T.. ang. lorl! Anc. History ...... Physiology ........ Geometry I ..... Latin I or 1L......

Third �ear -----

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Re1igion V English HI For. Lang. IOl'lf Med. History .... rsycholOgy ... .. .. Geometry II .. ... Latin I- I ll ........

TIel1g-ion

English 11 For. Lang. IorII .j\ nco l-:fistory ...... Plly�iology 3 Geolnetry I _______ 5 Latin I or IL. ..... 5

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For. Lang. I ...... Penmanship . .. . .. :1 Latin I ........ ........ 5

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Religion III ..... 2 g ngli sh 1 . . . . .. _. .. Arithmetic Ill .. ;j Algobra I ............ ;,

Second �e3,r

Phys. GcogrHphy 5 Fol'. Lang. I ...... ;, 3 P<,lImanship 5 Latin I .......

Algebra I

. .

Religion III . ... 2 I'�Ilg"li:-ih I ......... . .. 5 ;\ritl1metic III . . 3

For explanation of stllcliefl Pofr. pages ] G-31

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fi G b 5

2

5 5 5 3 5

3 5 5

2

'Religion V .......... J�ng]jsh ITT . ... . .. 1"01'. Lang. IorI! lIIed. History .. . Psych ol ogy ..... ... Geometry II ......

.

En gli sh n .......... For. Lang. IurII Ane. Hi story ...... Physiology Geometry I .... ...

Religion IV ........

... .

Religion III English I ........... . Aritl1l11etic III .. Algebra I ... . .... Phy s . Geography For. Lang. I ... .. Pennlanshi

.

Solentific Course

III

.

.... ..

3

5

5 3 5 5 5

Religion VI .. . ..... English IV ... ..... For. Lang. 11.. .... Mod. History .... U. S. History...... PhysiCS .. .............. Zoology ..... ......... ..

..

'Religion V ........ .. �nglish lI1 . . .... For. Lang. lorn Psychology ........ Geometry II ...... Botany ...... ..... ..... Manual Training

Physiology ........ Geometry, I ........ General Science .. MechaniC. Draw.

G

2 5 r. 5 5 5 5

5 5 5

5 5

3 5 5 5

Religion IV .. .. .... 2 5 II Lang. lorIl 5

For.

English

Arithmetic Ill .. Aigebra I . Phys. Geography For. Lang. I ...... Pfnmanship ........ Drawing I ..........

Religion

l';nglish I ...... .....

2 fi 3 5

. .

5

2 r. r, 5 h [)

3 5 5 5

Religi on VI ....... . 2 IV .... .... r. :; For. Lang. 11... Mod. History . Civics .... --�-----.--- 5 Physics .. .... ....... 5 Zoology .. .............. 5 English

...

'Religion V .......... En gli sh III For. Lang. IorTI Algebra II . ..... Botany ____.. _ ...___ Manual TrainingPsychology ........

Physi o l ogy Geometr,' I ........ Gen era l Science.. Mechanic. Draw.

nclig-ion IV ....... . 2 En gli sh II 1"or. Lang. lorII

.

.

For. Lang. I .... .. Penmanship .... 3 Drawing I ........ ;,

...

..

Religion III ...... English I ...... .... Arithmetic III . Algebra I .... . . ...

______ �----------------------------------------Hrs. hit Semester Hrs. 2d Semester Hrs.

______

.-=F�i�r�s�t_� �e�ar Hrs. 2d Semester

Cl3,!J8ical CO=811

� __ ________ ____________________________ __ � __ __________ __ 1st Se m ester 1 st Semester HI's. 2!l Semester TIl'S.

Eng lish and Modern Language Courses

AOADEMIO DEPARTMENT


ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT Gra,duates from the eighth grade of our parocllial schools and from the pubIic schools will be admitted to any of these courses without examination on presentation of credentials from the respective schools. Applicants who lack the neceSE,a.ry llreparation may obtain the same in our Prellaratory Course. The aim of the courses is to llrepare the PUllil for life, or for a continuation in our own College or Normal Dejliartments, the

State

College, our Universit}), or any of the Kormal Schools of the sUtte. The preparation is thorough, and our pupils will rank with any from OUI' High Schools.

Our former school ranked as one of the best in the

state at our University, and the P. L. C. is not going to lower the standard of scholarship.

COLLEGE DEPARTMENT This department constitutes the Junior College.

The reason fa!'

this department is chiefly that our own young people may be kept under the influence of our church education as long as possible, that they may be better grounded in the truths of the Christian doctrines, that their faith may be stronger and more mature before they come under the dissolving influences of our irreligious state institutions.

If

it is true, what a young man from our University said, "It is hard for a young man to retain hi:; Christian faith under the influence of these teaChers," it behooves the Christian Church to see to it that they may be spared this temptation in the more im]lressiVe years of their youth. Our church needs pastors;

our schools, teachers, and no

better

place for prejlaration for theSe callings can be found than at our own schools. Furthermore, our state schools are so crowded that they can not adequately accommodate all the students.

The teacher becomes more

or less only a lecturer; the illdividlWl supervision is to a great extent lacking.

This, no doubt, ]lartly explains th

in the first years of the State Colleges.

great number of failurf's

l\'or is this the fault of t�je

teachers, but a result of the lack of teachers and classrooms. "\Ve have ta'ken up with the Unh'ersity the matter of getting our Junior College accredited, so our graduates will not need to take an ex· amination to en tel' the Sophomore or the .Junior year as the case m,lY be. The requirements for entry are tile same as those of the of "\Vashington Cfr. credits, page 32.

1�

nivers:ty


Hrs.

Religion V I l I . . 2 E ngl i s h V . V I . . . . 5 For. Lan. I I I , I V 5 Ec'On'Omics 5

..

Rel i g i o n VII ..... . 2 English IV, V . . . . 5 5 For. Lang. I I I . 5 Trigon o m e t r:,' Chemistry

1 s t Semester

S e m es te r

.

.

Hrs.

'O

.

R e l i g i on V I n ... E n g l ish V, V I . . . . 5 For. Lan. ! J I, IV 5 E con m i c s .......... 5 A n a l y . Ge'Ometry 5

.

el i gion V I I Engli s h IV. v . . . 5 :For. Lang. III.. . . 5 H i s t . of E d u c . . . . . 5 Cll e m i st r y ... . ... . .. La t i n I l l -V . .. . . . Greek I . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

R

2d

Modern Language Course

2d Semester

Latin IV-VI Greek I I .......

.. . .

5

5

.

.

. .. . ..

.

R e l i g i o n YI I I .... 2 5 English VI For. Lan. I l l , I V 5 Economics .......... 5 Analy. Geometry 5 Latin IV-VI . .. 5 Greek II . . . . . . . . . . 5

",

Rel i gion VII . . . . . 2 Engli sll IV. V .... 5 5 For. Lang. I I I Hist. of iDduc . . .. 5 Ch emi rt r y . . . . . . . 5

Sophomore Year

. ..

R e l i g i o n V I I I .. .. 2 English V , V I . 5 For. Lan. I l l , IV 5 Econ'Omics .. . . .. . . . 5

C

.

Religion VTl .... . . 2 E n g l i sh IV, V .. . 5 For. Lang. I l l . . .. 5 'l' r i gonometry ... . 5 h em i s t ry . . . . . . . 6 5 Latin I I I -V 5 Greek I

Hrs.

FreBhman Tear 1 s t Semester

Hrs.

DEPARTMENT

Classical Course

COLLEGE

..

. .

.

R e l i g i 'On v n I . .. 2 Eng li sh V, VI . . . . 5 F'Or. Lan. II I , IV 5 ]':;conomics . . . . . ... 5

.

Hrs

Rel igion VII . . . . . 2 English IV, V . . . . 5 For. Lang. I l l . . .. 5 Tri g o n o m e t r y . . . . 5 Ch e m i s t r y . . . . . . . .

1st Semester

Se m e s t e r

R e l i g i 'O n V I II .... V. VI ... 5 F'Or. Lan. I l l , IV 5 Econonlics ____ . _ _ _ 5 Analy. Geometry

En gl i s h

For. Lang. I I I AgricuItu re Chemistry .....

5 ii ;:; 5

lirs.

En;;li sh I V. V...

R el i gio n V I r

2cJ

Scientific Course


N O R M A L DEPAR T M E N T

F i rst Y e a r Hours

Second S emeste r-

Hours

First Semester-

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2 5

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G 5 3 5 3

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3

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.... ....

2 5

R e l i gion VII . . ..... .. .... English IV or V . . English in Elementary

.. . ... , Normal Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 'Principles of Education . . . . Methods of Education . . . . . State Manual . . . . . . . Music . . . . . . . .

5 5 3 5 :3 2 2

Schools . . . . 'Chemistry . ..... Normai Art . . . . . . . . . . . History of Education . Methods of Education . AgrlcultuTe . IMusic . . .. . ..

Religion vn . . . . . . . . . English IV or V . . . . . . English in Elementary Schools . . . . . . Chemistry . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Religion VIII . . . . . . . . . E n glish V or VI . . . . . . Normal Art . . . . . . . . . . Methods of Education . Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

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EJrpression . . .. . . . .. . . Practice Teaching . . . . . Child Psychology . . . . . id . Hygiene and Fi rst

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2

Seco n d Year

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2 5 3 3 2 3

Religion VIII . . . . English V or VI .. .. Normal Art . . . Methods of Education . Music Expression . . . . .. . .. . .

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. . . Practice Teaching . . . . Tests and Mea s urements . School M an a g e m e n t . . . . .

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5 5

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2 5 3 3 2 3

3 3 3

Why nm a N o rm a l Department w i t h a l l t h e w e l l equ i p p e d Kormal

Schools we have ill "Vas h i n g t on ? The question i s partly ansv;ered lInder the College Department. But we may add that graduates and 1!tud£n ts o E tll e Normal Department o f our former school !lave been so succe ssful a s teachers, both in the p u b l i c schools and i n o u r [larochial Ichools, that w e have felt the work ought to be cor:ti nued.

Besides we req ' es ts from young men and women who w i s h to take u p teac hing as a v o c a ti o n u n d w h o say, "\Ve l"iIl come to your school, provi ded you have a Xonual Department."

a r e get ti n g

To enter this dO[J:J.;·tment, the a.ppliCllnt must lU1':8 graduated from Acac1n oic Departme::t or from some c c r e d : t e d i gh School of tile

our

tate.

efr.

credits,

p:lge

32.

Persons

::not register for this course.

14

under

s i xtee n

yea.rs

should


M U S I C D E P A RT M E N T

Plano

Viol i n

Voice

Fi rst Y e a r

Touch a n d Technique Sight Reading Ear Training Cord and Scale Constructlon Eleme ntary Hal'mony-l Easy Pieces Du e t s

Exercises Bowing, Elementary Scales . Elementary Theory, EI€men tary Easy Pieces

Breathing Voice Placing Sustained Notes Scales Exercises Simple Songs

Second Year

Touch and Technique Technique Scales Arpeggio s Bowing S€lections HarIDQny . . . . . . . . . 1 Sight Reading History of Music . . 1 Pieces

T h i rd Year

Touch and T€ch n!que Technique /Harmony . . . . . . . . . 1 Scal€s, Arpeggios History or Music . . 1 Bowing Ensemble Selections Duets Pi eces

1e.

Breatl1ing Voice Placing Articu l a tion Exercises Songs


Outline 0/ SubJ"e cts R E L I G I ON

"The

fear

of

t.he

Lord

is

the

.beginning of

wisdom,"

sang

the

psalmist ( Ps. 111, 10) , and the great Apostle Paul adds. "Godliness is profitable unto all things" (1 Tim. 4, 8 ) .

And s o religion, which i s to

teach us our dutIes toward God and our fellow men, and the mercy of God toward us, has been made a part of every course of our school. In

the Interpretation of the Bible th e teachings of the Lutheran

Church are adhered

to.

The aim is to strengthen the

faith,

Impart

knowledg.e o f Bib l e truths, and help tb e prospective parochial teacher t o impart thi s knowledge to others. Bible

I.

textbook.

The Vogt's B i;JJ le History will

H i story.

b e used! as t h e

Those who a r e n o t familiar with th e Bible will g a i n a gen­

eral knowledge of the Bible stories, and those who are familiar with them will gain a new ill s ig ht

,

a deeper understanding o f them.

Tho

stories will be illuminated by s i de ligh ts from h i s tory, from p h i lology, :from science and from daily experience.

I I.

Catec h i s m

and

E x p l a n at i o n .

th e Chri sti an faith are studied. (!uestion s '?

The

fundamental

doctrines

of

\Vhat does the Bible teach on the�'�

Its an wsers decides the ma tter.

Other books on Christia 11

�octrine will Ge used for parallel reading. I I I.

Gos p e l s and

Acts.

A Grief introduction

will Ge given to the

Gospels and the Acts arter which one of the Gospels, or the Acts. w i l l be taken up f o r m o r e detailed study.

In taking u p the study of the

Acts special e m p hasis is laid on the life of ·St. Paul. I V.

R o m a n s to R e v e l a t i o n .

After a Grie,f survey of these writings,

llome of the Epistles, or the ReYelation, will b e taken u p for fuller s tudy. V.

T h e O l d Testame nt.

A brief int roduction will be given to the

writings of the Old Testament.

Part of the year will be spent in study·

ing some of the ·psalms or some of the prophetic books. VI.

Thi

The O p e n B i b l e by Dr. O. :I;I. N o rl i e will b e used as a textbook.

book gives a masberly introduction to the Bible.

It i s a whole

li brary on the Bible brought within the compas s o[ about 700 pages. It i s conservative, scholarly, and written i n a language so simple that all can understand it. V I I.

The

A u g s b e rg

Confession.

what the teatchings o f his

Eyery Lutheran

church are.

ought to know

what he, as a Lutheran, con·

fesses, and the reasons ,for Luther's revolt against the Roman churcil.

16


And

it

will

not

hurt

anyone

else

to

become

acquainted

with

this

noble document. VII.

C h u rc h History.

The Gospels and the Epistles teach us Chris足

tianity, the Acts show us the origin of the Christian Church, while the church history traces for us the growth of this church thru persecu足 tions

and

controversies

about

doctrine.

It

shows

us

the

rise

and

growth o f the papacy, its ,suppression o f the freedom o f conscience, the Reformation under Luther, the division of the church into different denominations, and how thru i t ail, in spite o f the failacies and frailties o f man, God's hand has guided and supported his Church.

LANGUA GES E N G L I SH

First learn the language of your own country, then as many more as you can. The chief aims In teaching English are : To assist the students to acquire an accurate and ready command o f good English in speaking and in writing ; To stimulate and train the taste in reading; To familiarize him with the best literature ; To furnish a spiritual and e t h ical stimulus and give h i m the basis for a ju dgment of literary values ; To open the storehouse of the world's best thoughts.

A.

The

Special

B e g i n n e rs'

Class

E n g l ish :

for Foreigners :

The

school

foreign born men and women of all ages.

invites to

this course

Even those who hav e just

arrived from Europe and are unable to speak English will find suitable classes_

Special atten tion i s given to the s tudy of words, spelling,

reading, pronunciation and conversation.

B.

The

The Preparatory C l ass ( 7th and 8th grades) :

work in this department corresponds to that

pursued in

the

seven th and eighth grad-es of the public school and is especially for the ,b enefit of the young man or woman who has not had the oppor足 tunity to finish grade school, and who wish to prepare themselves to enter the academic classes.

This course

includes

reading,

spelling,

grammar, penmanship, arithmetic and Bibl e study. Stud ents o f any age will be admitted to this class without examina足 tion.

Engl ish

I.

Grammar.

Review of the element s .

Spelling-C hew's

text. Composition.

A

review

of

the

letter writing, word analYSis.

17

mechanics

of

writing,

narration,


Study in class-Dicken ' s A Christmas Carol, Sco t t's Ivanhoe, Low­ ell's Vision of Sir Launfal, Fr Outside Reading.

klin'

Snow Bound-J , G. Whittier;

y,

Autoblogra

The Spy-Cooper;

avid COPPe;'field-Dickens ;

The �ran Who \Va -Rudyard Kiplin g ;

T h e Wasted Day-Richard Harding Davi s ;

Chambered Nautilus-O,

W, Holmes ; The Gift of the Magi-O. Henry. Grammar,

Eng l is h I I .

R eview of the parts o f spee h .

Description

Composition,

and

Exposition-Debates-Themes-

Study of the Short S tory. Study in cIass-Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice, George Eliot's Silas Mamer, Francis Parkman's Oregon Trail. O u ts ide Reading.

The Other ':Vise Man-Henry Van Dyk e ;

The

Blue Bi rd-CVlaurice Maeterlinc;,: ; The Prince and the Pauper-Samuel L,

Clemens ;

Twice

Told Tales-Nathaniel Hawthorn e ;

Counsel

As­

s igned-Mary R. S. Andrews,

Composition,

English I I I.

The study a n d practice of writing Eng­

lish. lIis tory of English Literature,

A sy s t emat i c study o f the lives an:l

works o[ the important English writers. followin g : kin's

Shakespeare's

3esame and Li l i es .

E n g l i s h I V.

Grammar.

Hamlet,

A special study made of the

Milton's

Paradise

Lost and: Rus­

Outside reading required,

Detailed study of verbs with especial attention

to the forms and correct US e of irregular verbs,

Effort will be made

to esta blish a correct usage o f the English language C c mposition.

Themes, Argumentation, Final

Oration, Newspaper

reporting on local enterprises and happenings, School Paper, Study or a Periodical. H i story of American Literature.

A systematic study of the l ives and writings of our leading Ameri­ can authors.

Typical selections from theIr writings will b e studied in

connection with the b!ograph�' and criticism, such a s : Washingto n ' s

Farewell Address,

'Webster's

Bunker H i l l Oration,

Lincoln's Addresses, and others. Outside Reading.

The Gold Bug-Edgar Allan Poe ; Scarlet Letter

-Nathaniel Hawthorne ; Autocrat of the Breakfast Table-Oliver W. Holme s ;

Pilgrims

Progress-John

Raymond

S h ipman

Andrew s ;

Genius

for

Bunyan ;

Lincoln

Expression-Richard

th e

Watson

Perfect

Leader Gilder;

Tribute-�Iary

and

Lincoln

the

Romola - George

Elio t ; Nicholas Nickleby-Charles Dickens.

E n g l i s h V.

Composition, prinCiples and practice ; criticism.

tice of writing and the study of modern writers.

opment, plot, characters, b a ckgroun d , word building, deriyatlon. plementary reading and reports.

18

Prac­

The novel, Its devel· Sup­


Engl ish V I .

V.

T h e instruction i n general follows the lines of EnglisIl

Orthoepy.

Supplementary

based On the li terature read. bating.

and

other

exerc i s e s

reading.

Compositions

Elocution. that

tend

and

le tters

practice in reading a n d de­

to

encourage

freedom

of

ex­

pression.

E n g l i sh V I I .

Normal.

:Methods and problems in teaching English

in the grades form the main part of the work. grade readers.

Study a n d criticism of

ISelection of material suitable for the grades.

English V I I I .

B u s i ness E n g l ish.

A large proportion of the 'business

of t h e world is carried on thorugh the medium of letters.

It is there­

fore of great i m portance to every business man to b e able to say just what h e means, and to do it i n a pleasing and effective way.

It i s the

aim of our work in composition and letter-writing to aid the student in developing the power o f expression, both in speech and i n writing. This consist of a careful study of words, and of dictation

Spe l l i n g . exercises.

The spelling, the pronunciation, the meaning, and the u s e

of a word a r e taught a t the same time.

N O R W E G I AN Next

to English, Norwegian

ought

to

be

of

interest

to those

of

I t is the language of our parents, it is the l anguage

Norse p a rentage.

which still is, and has to be, used extensively in

our p'-1blic worhsip.

And Xorway has a literature tbat any country m ight be proud of.

In

parts of our country our native b orn American n ei ghbors are stu dying -orweg i a n . should we despise this r i c h inheritance of our fathers ?

I.

This

reading,

coures

writing,

begins

with

elementary

elementary

gramUlar.

worle,

such

The reading will

as

s p elling,

be of e a s y

selections snch as found i n o u r N oI'wegian readers f o r beginners.

II.

Platou's grammar, or one of the saUle grade, will b e n s e d. Com­

p o sitions will be required,

and sbort and easy stories, as Bjornson',;

Dond en oveller, read. ,Vhene\'er it i s

found neces sary, other classes will

b e organized,

w h e r e the h i s t o r y of the l i t e ra t u re oE Xorway will b e studied in COll­ n e ction with selections or books

by all the renowned writers

of the

country,

GERMAN

German has b e e n more o r less taboo since the war, an d i t will be some a gai n.

t.ln: e before it will become a regular course i n But

negl e c t ed,

our

schools

t h e language and its literature are too important to be E s pecially i n science Germany has for years s tood at t!]C

19


b ead.

B esides

it

was

not

the

German

languao-e,

0 1'

lit erature,

or

science, we fought in the 'World 'War, but Kaiserism.

1.

Elements

of German

grammar,

easy

readi n o- and

translatio'),

German will be used more or less in the classroom from the beginning. II.

More advanced grammar and composition is taken up, and in

connection with these s o m e of the easier masterpieces o f German lit­ e rature will be studied.

Sight reading and easy converastioll will re­

ceive consid erable attention. As the need arises m o r e advanced calsses will

e organized.

F R E N C H O R S PA N I S H Freneh has always held its own in our schools, more a s a language of culture and refinement.

Of late, however, it seems that Spanish is

running a clos e second and that Chiefly because of the growing im· portance of the comm ercial and political r e l ations with our neighbors to the south. The object sought will he to attain a d egree of practical fluency in speaking by means o f til e direct conversational method.

1.

The pupil will be taught

( 1 ) clear and dist inct pronunciation,

( 2 knowledge of the prinCil)les of grammar ess ential to the expression of ideas, ( 3 )

ability to read easy s e l ections and small news items in

n ewspapers, ( 4 ) II.

ability to speak .flu ently,

(5

simple l etter-writing.

T he aim is to coordinate t.he knowledge gained the first year

and enlarge i t b y means of a sys t ematic study of grammar, withont departing from the principles of the direct method.

Part of the time

will be devoted to the study o f two or three comedies.

LAT I N Is not Latin a rather us eless study and th e t i m e spent on, learning it more or less wasted ?

The answer will largely depend 0 11 the per­

sonal viewpoint of the one replying. When we remember that of the English language about fifty per cent is derived from the Latin, that language takes on a new import· ance.

Then the s tudy of the gra.mmar, the exactitude demanded i n

translating correctly, w i l l constitute a splendid drill in c a refulness eVlin tho the "transference" may be a moot.ed question. Says

J.

M.

Siddall,

editor

of Am erican

Magazine,

"If

a

perilon

wishes to have a good understanding of the En glish l anguage a know· l edge of 1,atin is essen tial.

The average high school gradua t e who bas

studied n o other language really und€rstand i t .

. .

.

tlian English curiously enough .

do�s

not

Words are -beautiful things with their

delicate differences o f shading.

Latin will aid you to discover their

beauty." I.

O n e of the standard textbooks for b eginners will b e lIsed. 20

Em-


the correct pronunciation of the words, on the

ph a sis w ill be put on

eSEentials o f grammar, o n the declensions and conjugations. tram

th e

Almost

questions a n d answers i n Latin will b e in tro­

easy

first

duced.

II.

Gra m m ar w i ll b e tak'en u p more in deta i l , and the pupil wi1I

study La tin compo s i tion b a s e d on Caesar's "De Bello Gal lico." Cae5ar's will be read

commentarie

(four books ) .

The Roman army a n d its

equipment, and the Roman camp will b e given special a tte ntion.

III.

Further

study

based on Cicero's

of

the

grammar

is

taken

up.

Comp o s i tion

speeches will be studied thruout the year.

Social

and political organizations among the Romans will b e studied. study o f the history of Roman literature will b e begun.

The

Six speeches

o f Cicero will b e read, or f i v e speeches with select letters amounting

i n s u b j e ct m a t t er to one speech. IV. or

Sight reading.

Prose composition continued.

Roman

literature.

Four

Books

A rapid survey o f the history

of Virgil's Aene i d are

read

selections from Ovid's Metamorphoses equal to about one book. prosody i s taken up. V.

Prose

and

Latin

Sight reading.

compositions.

Roman

antiquities.

Sight reading.

Se­

lections from L i v y and Horace.

VI.

Prose

composition.

SpeCial

authors

studied.

Tacitus'

Ger­

mania.

GREEK Th o G ree k h a s not given b y far t h e number' o f words t o our l a il­ guage that the Latin h a s , i t Is stilI an important factor i n science and in.ventions. And those w h o wish to become pastors, or even laymen who wish to gain a clearer understanding o f the New Testament, ought t o study Gr e ek.

I.

\Vlhite's

First

Greek

Book

is

used.

Special

stress

is

p ut on

learning the forms and being able to read with some fluency. II.

Goodwin's grammar and prose composition.

Xenophon's Ana­

basis, foul' bool's.

H I ST O R Y O u r forefathers l a i d the foundation, w e a r e b u i l ding on t h e super­ structnl' .

?llost of our ins titutions, our modes

of action, our

habits

of thought even. have come down to u s from former generations.

Xo

OTea t reform can be instituted that does not have its roots in former times ;

nothing a,b solutely new

individuals a part o f all time s and nations.

can well

our ancestors ;

be

introduced.

as a

people,

of

\Ve all

are

as

former

Herein lies one of the great lessons o f h i s tory a;].d

o n e of the chief sources of O U I' interest in h i story.

Pol itical s ions

into

Geograp hy. continents

The pupH learns, not only the natural divi­ and

oceans,

plains

and

plateous,

valleys

and

mount a i n s , but he b e c omes acquainted with th e resources, the centers

21


of trade, cit i es, boundary lines and political divi sions. m a n y of these things are made plain.

The

W h y England i s

a

why o f

country o f

trade and manufactures ; why Norway i s a land o f bold sailors, a n d i s n o w forging t o the front a s a land o f electrical power.

I.

This study will take us back to the dim past,

A n c i e nt H istory.

the dawn of h i story.

\Ye see mighty nations rise and fall, we see

civilization moving from country to country. erian

and

the

other

nations

of

the

The annals of the Sum­

"Fertile

Cresent,"

of

mighty

Egypt, of God's chosen people, o f the beauty-loving Greek and t rr e stern Romans w ! I I p a s s 'before u s .

vVe see t h e ,beginnings of customs

and institutions, the spread of civilization, until the onslaughts of the barbarous Germanic t!'i'bes seem to overwhelm i t all i n a common ruin_ II.

The

M edieval

ra.nge them in

II.

H i story will gather t h e ,broken

fragments, ar­

mosaic of ever changing patterns, always disturbed

·by the tu"bulency of the age, changes are taking place, a t times only dimly seen thru the gloom o f the so-called Dark Ages, while the church of Rome spreads her pall over all o f Europ.e. But there i s a change in all things human,-the Renaissance, which w a s also an awakening from a troubled sleep of centuries was ushered in ;

fetters o f ignorance a n d superstition were broken, anu w e

find

tha t. the old civilization had not really perished, but had been recast i n n e w forJT; o . Ill.

T h e th ird period i s the M o d e r n H i story.

This i s t h e a g e o f

discoveries a n d i n ventions, o f reforms i n church and revolutions in states ; con sti tutions granted, republics fou n d e d ; the age of steam and

electricity, o f science ; the era when man t o his conquest o f e3.rth and s ea

a.j,ls that of the air.

But i t is an age also that again trembles i u

th e scales.

I V.

U n ited States H istory.

Revolution, altbo

a

brief

This course begins with the American

urvey of the earlier period i s reviewed tf)

give the student a s e tting for th e national development.

Effort wHI

b e made to familiarize the student thoroughly with the chief e v e n t s reI2.ti!1g to t h e nation.

l\'Iu c h time is s p e n t o n til e ll eriod after t h e re­

con � lrl1 c r i o n . emphas is being p l a c e d on the political and i ndustrial llroh l em F. that ba\"e a r I sen and have extended down to the Il res8nt

; � llle.

S p€cial a t t e n t i c n i s alw given to b i ogra!lhy.

Reference books

ar.d }l(?l'<:'odicals are used qLLite exten siye l :-.

P O L I T I C A L SC i E: N C E J.

C itize n s h ip.

b ecOlDe

T h i s i s a special study for foreigners who w ish to

.merican citizens.

The aim in

this s tu d y of the city, state

a n d nati c lD al government is to prepare the Ic>reign born s tudent, a s h;' as posf i b l e , to become

a

good and u s e ful American citizen.

damen tal s u pon which the actions o f our go\"ernment rests ;

dition

o ut of which our present government arose ;

both st<"te and national, a n d the

la.ws that have

studi e d 22

T b e fun­ the con­

the c o n s tltution 3. been enacted, are


n.

One

C i v i cs.

semester

is

civil all d political ins titutions.

devoted

to

a

careful

s tu d y

of our

Efforts will be made to give the p u p i l

a clear understanding of t h e constitutions of t h e n a t i o n and t h e

and of t h e charters of our city givernments.

state,

T h e three great branches

o f our government, their functions and their interdep endence ,,'il! reo cpive � p ecial attention.

TIL

This course i s designed to acquaint the studeat

Ec o n o m i cs.

with the background of our social and pOlitical life. of economy will b e treated.

Leading principles

Stress will b e laid on our monetary s ys­

tem, taxation, land, labor a n d capital, commerce, etc.,

and how they

effec't the social conditions of today,

M AT H E M AT I C S

J,

T h i s i s a beginnners'

A r i t h m e t i c.

A thorough drill i �

class.

given i n t h e f o u r ground rules, in simpl e fractions, weights and m e a s ­ llres. mensuration. I.

The work will b e more difficult than that

I nt e r m e d i ate C l a ss.

of �o. 1.

Involution a n d evolution, ratio a n d proportion, p e rcentage,

etc . . will receive more attention. III.

-Special attention will be given to the

Adva n c ed A ri t h m et i c.

d e v el'')lJment

of

the

principles

underlying

arithmetical

o p e rations.

T h o rough mastery of the subject of fractions, the metric s y s t e m , m e n­ suratioIl, percentage and its various applications will be i n s i s t e d on. IV.

C o m m e rc i a l

Kine months will

Arith metic.

c a reful study of commercial arithmetic.

be

devoted to

a

This is an advanced class and

is not intended for students requiring ins truction in the more elemen· tary principles of arithmetic. becomt

thoroughly

It i s presupposed that the student has

acquainted

mercial arithmetic.

The

with

work in

these before

this

class

he

takes

furnishes the

up

com­

student

a

thorough drill in the short a n d time-saving methods actually used by business men.

R a p i d C a l c u l at i o n .

A short period i s set apart each d a y for drills

In adding long columns of figures

and performing other arithmetical

computations with speed and accuracy.

V.

E l e m e ntary A l g e b ra.

fa.ttors,

fractions,

radicals,

O n e year i s spent on the fundamentals, exponents,

equations

with

one

unknown

q antity, the ordinary methods of elimination. VI,

H i g h e r A l g e b ra.

1s given.

First a rapid review of elementary Algebra

Then quadratics, binomial theor€m,

coefticients,

variation,

nllm0ers aTe taken u p for a thoro study. VII.

literal an d n u m b erical

ratio a n d proportion, imaginary a n d

P l a n e Geo met ry.

Time u s e d one

complex

semes ter.

Two semesters are deYoted to this 3ubjec. t .

Part of the time w i l l be employed in studying the theorems

o f t !I e t e x t

book, i n c l u d i n g the general properties of plane rectilinear figure3, the circle ;

the measurement o f angles, similar polygons, areas .

The study of geometry is important from an informatio!1al p o i n t of view.

It is generally recogni z e d that a genuine mastery of the subject

means real achieyemen t i n the solution o f original exercises.

23

Much


time

will

be given to original demonstrations of exercises and

solu­

tlOIl,;, o f p:roblems.

YHI.

So l i d Geometry.

The work in this ·branch covers one semes.

tcr and includes the usual theorems and constructions contained in the best text books. including the relations of planes and lines in space ; the properties and measurements of prisms, pyramids, cylinders, cones and spheres.

A large part of the time will be given to the solution of

original exercises, and to constructions.

IX. for

T r i g o nometry.

(tne

semester.

A course In plane trigonometry will be given,

C i rcular

measurements

of

angles,

proofs

of

the

principle formulas, the use of Inverse functions, solution of right and oblique triangles, surveying, navigation.

X.

Analytic

Geometry.

Rectilinear

and polar

tions of loci, properties of th e straight l i n e and

coordinates,

equa­

conic sections, etc ..

are studied thru one semester.

SCI ENCE

Our school offers a n introduction t o natural an d biological science,

and endeavors to lay a broad foundation for further study. instruction i s built o n Christian ance.

The

That thl

pri.nciples i s of the greatest import­

purely materialistic or evolutionary presentation may do

untold harm, and mere theory has no right to be represented as facts. The work will to a great extent consist of experiments and laboratory work.

1.

P h y s i c a l Geog ra p h y.

This subject will be studied one semester,

and will cover the following topi c s :

The earth as a planet, the atmos·

phere, the ocean, the lands. plains and plateaus, mountain s, volcanoes,

r iV W 8 . deserts and glaciers, shore lines, and the distribution o f plantA, 8 nimal s . an d man.

Th e study of the textbook w!ll be supplemented by

the �tnd:! of l',=r,,'· .. nce books, laboratory work, and field study.

II. simple

P h y s i o l ogy.

chemical

The study of the textbook will b e accompanied by

and

physical

experiments,

physiological processes of the human body.

Illust rati.ng

the

various

The work will include a

general survey of anatomy, the principles of digestion and absorption, the general functions o f respliration, the skin, kidneys, nervous system, a n d the special senses.

Special efforts will be made to teach the stn­

dents to understand the relations of these facts to the great laws of health and to apply them to daily living. III.

H y g iene.

A nontechnical, sane and simple dlscnssion of facts

that every pnpil should know in order to safeguard his health.

In con­

nection with the hygiene will b e given a course In first aid. IV.

Gene r a l

field of s ience. this line.

Science.

This subject

is fundamental to the entire

It furnishes the foundation for all subsequent work in

It provides instruction about principles and facts that all

should know.

It answers the natural curiosity of the young and' at the

same time furnishes a solid foundation of knowledge on which to 'build farther.

Unity Is kept thruou t ; i t is not the study of a series of unre­

lated subjects.

Laboratory work.

24


V.

The main facts of botany are studied.

Botany.

o f the time is spent on the morphology of plants. pointed

out.

Structure

and

phys iology

of

seed

A great part

Relationships are pJants

are

studied.

Ecology and economy of plants i s also treated. La,b oratory. Note books.

VI.

The farm Is the center of interest.

A g r i c u l t u re.

moisture,

heat,

pla.nting,

pruning,

insect

pests,

a re

Soil, fertility,

fully

discussed.

The pupil is taught th e reasons for the more important operations on the farm.

VII.

Phenomena are explain e d .

Zoology.

brates.

Laboratory,

Note ·books.

'Mos t of the time will be spent on insects and verte­

T h e less known groups are, however, also treated with care,

and among these animals the e a rthworm receives especial attention. Laboratory work.

VIII.

Note books. This subject i s treated in, an elementary w ay.

Psychology.

and deals with the plain facts oof the mind.

I t will b e of value to those

who wish to gain an insight Into the nature and workings of the mind. SpeCial emphasis will be placed upon th e phys iological aspect or m en­ tal reac tions.

The course will in clude the s t u d y o f the process of at­

tention, association, perception, memory, reasoning, instinct, etc.

Ex­

periments will be carried on in connection w i t h the work.

IX.

Child

Phyc h o l o gy.

This course deals especially w i th tenden­

cies of the child, its mental and physical development. child l i f e and o f t h e adule scen t ;

how t h e natural

Problems o f

tendencies at the

child can be corrected or guided, are studied.

X.

Phys ics. The course consists o f reCitations, lectures and labora­

tory work,

The chief aim is to present elementary p h y s ic s in such a

way as to stimUlate tbe pupil to do some original thinking about the laws and the whys of the physical world in which h 'e Jives, Modern life and

modern

wars have

wrought

many

changes,

The

most

s triking

changes, as the gas engine, the automobile and the airplane, will D e given fuller treatment.

XI.

C h e m i s t ry .

Text Milliken a n d Gale.

The preparation and

pl'o perties

o f the elements

are studied thoroughly, the compounds of these elements are next treat­ ed, and a discussion or certain topics is included. quaint the s tudent with the science and its

The aim is to ac­

application

to everyday

li fe, and to deyelop scie n tific habits of thought.

C O M MERCIAL BRA N C H E S

T h e commercial branches are those that bring t h e quickest ret u rn in

money for t h e time spent and the expenses incurred

them.

in

learning

This i s possibly the only reason why they are popular w i th a

great number of our young.

They are necessary for our well-b e i n g i n

mDre than one w a y , and it w o u l d not b e amiss if everyone h a d some i n s truction i n them,

1.

P e n nmansh i p _

A good handwriting lil(e

is its own recommendation.

a

pleasing appeara.nce

In penmanship the right movement is

taught, and the student is made to see tbe errors of his own writing. Speed, form and movement are developed at the same time.

25

B y cor·


rect training. through a well·graded and systematic course, the average p u p il s gains

full controll o f h is muscles, acquires a neat,

rapid and

legible Etyle of writing, which will be o f great benefit to him i n any vocation in l i fe.

IT.

B o o k k e e p i ng.

A knowledge

o f bookkeeping is

generally con­

ceded to b e or considerabl e value to all persons, no matter what their occupation may be.

Aside from the practical utility o f the sCience, it

also affords mental discipline of the highest order.

It inculca.tes neat·

n e ss, accuracy, and system-acquirements which are e s sential t o suc­ c e s s in l i fe.

Th e work is carried on according to the so-called individual plan. This makes it possible for pupils to enter a t any time, take u p such v. orl, as they need, a n d progress as rapidly a s their abilities will allow. In t h i s ,Y a y , the bright, energetic pupil, with a good preparation, will not b e retarded b y h i s slower and less active fellow'studen t , and the slo '\',-, plodding p u p il will not be hurried along in his attempt to keep pace w i th the brighter a n d more active members o f the class. ut, while the school follows no regular class system o f teachin .... bookkeeping. it nevertheless imparts much instruction in general exer· cises,

discussions,

examinations

and

drills,

wherein

the

individual

pupil h a s ample opportunity for comparing himself with others and profiting by their successes and failures. All points not nnderstood by the pupil will be thoroughly d iscussed and eXlllained to h i m , and no part o f t h e work will b e considered fin­ i s h e d U:1 t i l it has .b een completely mastered.

From first to last, tlle

c o u r s e is one of actual business practice, and the p u p i l is constantly obsery;ng the p rop I' forms and uoes of commercial papers.

Typew r i t i n g.

III.

Typewriting i s of course necessary for those who

wish to become steuographers. the gre a test speed i s

The touch system is taught, by which

obtained.

From the

beginning the

student i s

taught th e proper fingering o f the keys, the care a n d adjusting o f the mach ine ; the prop;er form and arrangement of letters, legal documents, m a n I fo l ding. etc. s ortlland so

A great deal o f tim e is, devoted to transcription from

that

the pupil may have ampl e practice in

b e fore he enters the office.

doing thi;;

T h e course includes careful a n d extended

drill in the varions kinds o f offiC e practice, commercial papers, legal documents,

business

letters,

spe cifications,

tabulating work,

stencil

cutting for mimeographing, etc. E q tl' pmen t :

An ample supply of L. C. Smith and Und'erwood type­

writers of t h e latest model is kept on hand for the use of the p u p il s. The Echoo l also has a rotary Edison mimeograllh which the student i s t aUg:l t t o use.

S h o rthand.

IV.

The

Gr.egg

System

of

shorthand

is

now

being

t:tucrht i n most o f the leading schools i n this coun.try and in Canada. It Ca!l 1) s y s te

learned from one·third t o one-half the time required by the old ,, ;

i t requires nO shading, - an d i s written on the same slant a s

long·h a n d .

Vowels and consonants are j o i n e d and follow e a c h o t h e r in

t h e i r J a ural order, thus contributing to easy, w ri t i n g.

continuous,

effortless

H i 3 easy to read, and, being pur,ely phonetic, can be adapted

to any language.

T h � l a te s t edition of the text-book " G r p gg S hoi't·

26


hand" i. u s e d , a l �

" The Gregg 'Writer," a monthly magazine devot::d

to shorUl u n d . t y p ew rit i n g and commercial education. When the student has acquired a certain standard of efficiency,

he

is required to be ready at any time to do stenographic work in the offic03 of the president or other o fficials of the school, for the purpose

of becom i n g acquainted with general o ffice work. Y.

Advanced C o u rse

i Sho rthand.

This course has been designed

f o r the henefit of graduates an d those who require

special training

for responsibl e positions where high speed and technical accuracy are rerillired.

It will include a thorough review

of the principles and :\

careful drill in legal forms, advanced phrasing, court reporting, tabu­ lati::g, mimeo grap.hin"', speci fications, filing and the like.

Students ill

this course will be required to make verbatim reports of sermons, lec­ tu res, addresses, etc.

YI.

Law.

Co m m e rc i a l

A kno wledge of the laws governing com­

mercial transactions is of great value to ever y o n e , but especially to the busine�s man.

Our course aims to give the student such knowledge of

the laws of commerce that he may transact his business affairs i n an inteiligent manner.

Correct writing o f legal documents is a special

feature.

E D U CATIO N

The aim of e ducation s hould be to construct such a 'I"orid in the consdou s n e s s

of

the individual as

will furnish

h:m wi t h motives to

live an enlightened, kindly, hel p fu l and noble social life.

1.

The theories of education, the di ffered

H i sto ry o f Ed ucation.

systEms, and th e deyelopment of education fr0111 primitive systems t.Ll the present, are studied. Barbal'ic, Oriental, Greek, Roman, Medieval and IVlodern education will each be discussed. II.

P r i nc i p l e s

of

Education.

The

doctrine

of

formal discipline.

educatlO);al values, curriulum, agencies tilat educate, physiolog;cal and

pschyological basis of teaching, etc., are all taken up.

IlL

M et h o d s o f E d u cation.

T ll€ teacher atte m p ts to a d o p t Instruc­

tion to tl, e p r e sent needs, to stimulate interest, eliminate waste due to either de ficient methods o f learning or teaching,

Practical problems

are discu s s e d , the most approved methods pointed out.

IV.

O t s e l'vati o n .

Fi rst c b s ervations in classes of our own school,

later visits to other schools.

V.

Express i o n .

Reports and discussions of data gat hered.

Thi" dass is not o n l y a means to secure free and

n a tural expression on the side of the one 'I'o'ho is to become a teacher, but also points out the best ways of developing this ability in the pup il. VI.

Tests il n d M easl� r (! m e nts.

:Nleasuring and weighing t h e child­

ren to find o u t i; they are up to standard physically.

But it is esp ecially

a course in the study and ap plication of mental test3 for I tellig-ence ancl mental anaiysis; training in applying the£e tests, and methods of

mea � urillg the H,sults-a practical exp]anation of ref.ults.

VII. state

State M a r. u z l .

A s tudy o f manual and the school code of our

The {unctions c f

O U I'

state government

and leading

h i s f o ry in c o n n e c ti o n with our state are a l s o dis cu ss ed. 27

facts

f


YIII.

Sch o o l

and

Classroo m

Among th e questio a s

M a n a g e m ent.

di�cl1ssed wllI be : routine, dally program, attendance, order a n d disci­ pline, a t tention, incentives, organization. administration, the teachers' rE'lalions to fellow teachers, to principals and to supervisors.

IX.

P ract i c e

Teac h i ng.

The

::;killerl teach ers,-Principles and

student Methods

will

obs erve

have b e e n

the

work

studied

of

before.

He i s then placed in charge where conditions will be as nearly as possi­ ble thp same as those h e will meet with i n the public school. For Child· Psychology se e S c i ence IX, page 25 ; page 30 ;

for Normal MU5ic,

for K ormal Art, page 31.

M U S I C A N D ART

R u s k i n said, "The beautiful is as usefUl a s the useful."

vV e need

beauty in our lives as well as the more directly useful thin gs ; i f for no other purpose than to relieve us from a rather drab existence. The Pacific Lutheran Academy recognizes t h e great importanc e uf music as a means or culture and refinement, and aims to furnish high­ grade instruction at a very moderate price.

I n common with all the

other courses or the sch'Ool, the work in music has been arranged on the progressive plan.

Great

importance

is

therefore attached

to

a

thorough mastery of the fun damental principles involved before passing OIl to more advanced work. A great deal has been accomplished of late years in the study of the arm, wrist. knuckles and fingers, involving many new motions and com­ binations for controlling

touch

and

technique.

Proper attention

to

these importat details at the outset wiII save the student much mis­ directed effort and needless disappointment later on. In

addition to

the above

mentioned advantages, afforded

by our

sch'Ool of m u s i c , the rates of tuition are less than one-half of what would be charged by s i milar talent for private lessons.

F U N DA M E N T A L M U SI C T R A I N I N G F O R B E G I N N E R S

The first year of piano study is often spent ill unthinking. unprofit­ able practice. which dIscourages the student.

Music study s hould be a

delight. and if the student does not find it so, there is s o mething wrong. How to avoid the drudgery of the beginning is the problem which confronts those who are in terested in music study. Class i n s truction i n Fundamental Music Training solves this prob· lem, saves the student much worry. and places h i m or her ill a pOSition more fully to understand and appreciate music, and to practice thought­ fu l l y.

A s t udent who has first learned to th i n k a scale, wll! find it a

simple matter to p l a y it.

C L ASS I N ST R U CT I O N I N P I A N O

Beginners are taught i n classes, a s class-study i s a n incentive to

28


work.

Each stu dent, however, receives personal attention.

has two lessons a week for eighteen weeks.

The class

The stu dents are not reo

quired to practice at home during the first few weeks.

They prac tic<',

but only i n the llresence of the teacher, to prevent them practicing m i s·

At the end of the first two or three weeks they have learned

takes.

bow to practice thinkingly, and are then required to practice daily on the piano.

C L ASS I N STR U CT I O N I N K E Y·B O A R D H A R M O N Y

By the term keyboard harmony is meant t h e practical working o u t o f harmonic principles a t the instrument instead of o n l y o n pa per, as i s u s u a l i n t h e s t u d y of harmony. This course o f study is designed to supplement private i n struction and does not interfer e i n any w a y with the regular lessons.

It gives the

student

elementary

the

necessary

broadening

knowledge

of theory,

harmony, ear training, analysis, s ight reading. and musical history, that cannot b e imparted in the time allotted to a private lesson. Instruction in keY·board harmony wiII be given free of charge to piano students who register for a nine-weeks' term, and who are far enough advanced to profit by it.

PIANOS

Th e school has a new Hallet and Davis piano, a n d other pianos for practice. P i a n o I.

Rudiments of music. studies in melody, and the underlying

principles of touch and technique_

N ational Graded Course, Gurlitt's

Album for the Young, Concon·e, Pieces. others.

Loeschorn, Lynes, Bertini a n d

Selections from modern composers.

P i a n o I I.

Major and minor scales.

Broken chords and arpeggios.

Saumeli-Finger Exercises, Hanan, Studies by Loeschorn, Gurlitt, Bur· gmuller, etc. Plano

I I I.

Major and minor scales i n octaves, thirds, sixths and

tenths, arpeggios.

C ramer Studies, Czerny Velocity Studies. Bach In·

ventions, Dunernay Etudes,

Heller

Studies,

etc.

Pieces

suitable

[or

grade.

H A R M ONY

N o person

who desires to become accomplished in music should

neglect to study harmony, which has a p tl y been called the grammar o f music. tion.

In the study of this branch e a r tra.ining receives special atten· Much time i s devoted to original work and the construction o f

major a n d minor scales, intervals, triads, chords o f the seventh, a n d inversions, altered chords, modulations, suspension, organ point, pass· ing notes. etc.

Some tim e will also be devoted to the study o f analysis

and form. 29


H I ST O r-: '(

O F M U SIC

Students find m u s i c doubly i n tere s ting if they il.cquire some k aowl­ edge of the life of the great composers.

In the stud,y of the history of music. a t ten t i on Is pa i d to the de\'elop­ ment of music from t h e earliest times to the present, the birth of the opera, the rise o f Roma nticism and its influence on mnsic, the develo p­ ment of the modern opera, etc.

Special attention w i ll be given to t h e

! l f e a n d activities o f each of t h e fol lo w i n g composers : Haydn , Mozart, Beetho\'en, :\Iendelssohn , Brahms,

Bach, Handel,

\'Vagner, and Grieg.

N O RMAL M U S I C I AND I I The s p ecial ai m of

hi

cours

i s to giv e

p ro s r e c �i v e teachers the

ability to teach singing i n the p a b lic SChools.

V O I C E C U LT U R E A conrse i n voice not oniy developes the voice a n d tea c h e s proper singing, but bnilds ntl and s tr e n gth e n s a

d e l i cat e physique as well. T h i s

c o u r s e includes proper b r e a th i n g exercises, b r e a t h control, v o i c e p l d C ­ ing, interpretation a n d execution.

I.

Breathing exerCises, voice placing, sustained

Preparatory wo rk.

notes, and scales.

II.

Vocal exercises by C o n co n e and

lat i on, exercises by Concone, Vaccai and Marchesi. voice

placing

exercises .

ex e l'ci s e s

;\IIarcl1esi.

B r eathing-, voice p l aC i n g, exercises i n artic l l­

Advanced course.

containned,

Marchesi,

S i mple songs.

advanced

s tudies

All and

. Songs by S c humann, Chadwick and o thErs ; solos from s t a n·

dard operas and oratorios.

VIOLIN This

is

one

of

the

finest

tone

becoming more and more popular.

and ' s d·eservedly w i ll be given by compe­

i n strumeats,

I n s truction

tent teacher.

1.

Exereises-Aiquoni ; elementary b ow ing, scales and theory ; easy

p i e ce s . n.

Technique 2 n d y e a r, scales, bowing-S e YC i k ; el eme nt ary ens em­

ble class, sight reading, pie'Ce s. III.

Technique 3rd year. scales and arp eggi os . b o w i n g- S e v c i k ; e n­

semble, class, duets, ·etc. ; pieces.

ART Dra w i n g

I.

art o f form s.

Fre e h a n d

Draw i n g .

Drawing is t e foundaUon

Geometric solids ; drawing from nature , frem c a s t s

coal ;

of Rll

A thoro;lgh drill is � yen ia the elements D E dra wi ll i'.

drawing from mEm on',

grouping, of c ompositio n.

ia

crayo n

from imagination ; sketch in g.

- at e r color. 20

and

c

ar­

S tu d;: of


D rawi n g

11.

Prop erly speaking t h i s does not

M ec h a n i ca .1 D ra w i n g .

belong u n der art, but i s placed here for want of a better place.

The

pupil first l e arns how to handle his tools, while instruction i s given !n the elements of the study.

\Vorking drawings, lettering, perspective,

projection and later special lines of drafting, are taken u p. M a n u al Tra i n i n g.

This course i3 to mak e the pupil acquainted w i t.!

the ordinary tools needed around a house, give h i m ability to handle them with skill, to plan and make simple pieces of furnlture, give him

an idea of the squar e a n d i t s manifold u s e s , etc. No r m a l Art I .

The art taught in the elementary grades.

This will

include paper folding, cutting, construction ; weavi ng, knotting ; model· ling ;

simple

designs and patterns ;

object

drawing,

nature

drawing,

color work.

II.

This is a continuation of Xo mal Art 1.

Designing, harmony o f

colors, charcoal a n d crayon work; stencil cutting, block printi n g ; pyro· graphy, work in leather and metal ;

basketry and work with raffia;

blackboard illustrating.

GY M �� A ST I C S Physical Educati o n .

The a i m of this course is to develop the body

and keep the individual i n good health by suitable exercises. is placed on correct posture.

Emphasis

All are required to give some time V'

gymnastics, but those incapacitated b e c ause of physical defects may satisfy the requirements with hygiene.

:; L


General In/ormation R E Q U I R E M E N T S F O R A D M I SS I O N N o examination i s demanded for entering th e Begi n n i n g English the Preparatory classes.

apd

But for entering the Aca d em i c department

one must show c€rtificate o f graduation frOln the e ighth grade o f the ImbUc schools or from the same grade o f private or p a r ochial schools. Those who h a v e attended high schools, normal school, or academias

of recognized standing, will receiv€ full credit for the work done

\On

presenting the proper credentials. To enter the College o r Normal Department, graduation accredited high school or its equivalent w i l l b e required.

from an

All others

must take examinations.

TI M E TO E N T E R T h e b e s t time i s natura lly a t t h e beginning o f t h e school year, next at the beginning o f the second s e m e s t e r . ceived at any time,

and

P u p i l s w i l l , however, b e re­

will be placed w h e r e

they

can do the m o s t

effective work.

G R A D ES A N D C R E D I T S T h e scale o f grades are t h e same a s those o f the university. 100,

B = 8 6- 9 5 ,

C = 76-S5,

A=96-

D = 7 0 · 7 5 , E = fa i l u re .

F o r gra dua t i o n from t h e courses o f the A c a d e m y 1 5 c r e d i t s a r e d e­ manded b e s i d e s those for reli g io n ; these m u s t be 80 or

M od e r n

and from next year two thirds of

above to entitl e one to a d i p lo ma.

L a n g ua g e

Scientific C o u rse

C o u rse

English

. . . ... . . . . . . . . . .. . U. S. H istory a n d Ci vics . . .

Algebra .. . . ... . . . . . . . . . . . Geometry . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

English

. . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . '. S. History a n d Civics . ..

3 1 1 1 1

Ge n. H i s tory . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Physical Geography . . . . . . % :Modern Language . . . . . . . . 2 Electives ( Exclusive of Religion) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3 1

Algebra . . . . . . . .. . . . .. . . ..

J%

Geometry . . . . . . .. . . . . ... . Physics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. P h y sical Geogr a p h y . . . . . .

1% 1

D o tany or Zoolog? . . . .

.

. . .

Electives ( Exclu s ive of Religion ) . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .

% 1 5%

4% 15

15

T h e English Course differs from Mod. Language" i n :laving English 4.

no M ::; dern Lan u a ge

demanded,

Electives 5 %.

Clas:;ical same as

Mod. Languages, but demands 2 credits in l�atin inst a d o f i n 3-Iodern Language. Religion i s required o f all s t u den t s .

3 ')


T 1-1 I, O F F 1 CE

.


T UE

G I R r�S' PARLOR

'rHI';

K 1 TCHE N


..

One credit equals five u n i ts, a n d one u n i t is mad� up or one 4 5minute period a w oo k

f o r 36 weeks. R O O M A N D B OA R D

The P. L. C. i s a boarding school.

Pleasan t, w�ll lighted and heated.

rooms are furnished with tables, chairs, beds and mattresses.

What­

ev-er else i s n ee d e d or wanted the pupils furnish. The b oard furnished b y the school i s good, w h olesome and well prepared. BOO K S A N D STAT I O N E RY The school has i t s own bookstore where the necessary supplies ma:r

b-e bought at regular prices. S U M M A RY OF E X P E N S E S Year Tui tion

.

Room, B o a r d and Laundry* .

.

Semester

Quarter

Month

$ 75.00

4 0 .0 0

$ 25.00

15.00

. . . . . 300.00

1 6 0.00

85.00

40.00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

M u s i c T ui ti on, 2 honrs per week . .

80.00

45.00

2 5 . 00

1 5.00

Music Tuition, 2 hour per week . . .

40.00

22.50

12.50

8.0!} 3.00

Mu s i c Tuition (class ) , 2 hours per week

.. ..

20.00

10.00

5.00

25.00

I S.00

10.00

5.00

P ia n o Rent, 2 h o urs per day . . . . . .

18.00

1 2.00

8.00

4 .0Q

. .

.

. .

.

.

.

. .

.

..

Piano Rent. 3 hours per day . . . . . .

.

.

. .

Piano rent. 1 h o u r per day . . . . . . .

10.00

7.00

4.00

2.00

Ty pewri ter Rent, 3 h ou rs per da y .

10.00

7.00

4.00

2.00

Day Student's Room R-e nt . . . . . . . .

FeesI n d em n i ty

1.00

...... .... ... ....... ..

G.OO

5 . 00

5.00

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

2 .0 0

1.00

1.00

1.00

Medical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.00

2.00

1.00

1.00

Athletic" *

3.00

2.00

1 . 00

1.00

3.00

2.00

1.00

1.00

Library

.

. . . . . .. . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .

Musical Union*'" Di ploma

. .

.

.

.

. .

. . . . . . .

. .

.

. .

. . .

.

.

. .

.. .

.

.

. .

.

.

.

.

.

.

..

.

5.00

2.50

.

Laboratory FeesPhysics or Chemistry . .

.

. . . .

5.00

3.00

2.00

1.01)

Botany or Zoology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

3.00

2.00

1.00

1.00

2.00

1.00

1.00

1.00

. .

General ,Sc i ence , Physical Geography or Physiology . . . . . . . .

.

·The free wash each week includes : one sheet, one pillow case, two pairs of socks or stockings, one suit of underwear, tw

towels a n d four

handkerchiefs. "The A th l e ti c an d Musical fees e nt i t le the s tu d e nt to free admis­ sion at

a ll the games and programs given by those societies at the

Scbool.

The above rates are for casb In advance for t.he term i ndi ca t ed , and p aymen t must b e made b e fore the pupil is enrolled

33

in 11i

classes.


R U L E S A N D D I SC I P L I N E Only such rules have been adopted as have been found necessary for the promotion of the highest Interests of the students.

The school,

o n admitting students, does so with the express understanding that they w i l l cheerfully comply with the rules and regulations of the school In every respect, and deport themselves as it befits Christian ladies and gentlemen. All stUdents are required to submit to the principal a course of study before beginning the work of the term, and no student wlll be allowed to drop a study or be absent from his classes without special p.ermission. Written excuses, approved by the principal, dean or preceptress, must b e presented to th e teacher at the first r.ecitation following all absence. All students are required to be present at the daily devotional exer­ cIses held in the chapel, and are expected to attend divine services on Sunday either of our church, or i f not Lutherans, of their respective d.enominations in Tacoma. All students ar.e required to l,eep their rooms clean and tidy. and to abstain from the use of tobacco in any form within or about the build­ ing.

The occupant of a room will be held respon,sible for its condHion.

Day students are expected to observe the evening study hours a t home, a n d are not permitted t o frequent the dormitory after 7 : 0 0 p. m . The school maintains the right t o exercise supervision over d a y stu­ dents outside of study hours. All boarding students are required to be in the dormitory after 7 : 00

p. m., unless granted special leave of absence. Students are .expected to employ their time to the best possible ad­ vantage, and to avoId, as far as possible, everything which has a ten­ dency to i nterfere with legitimate school work.

The participation in

dancing or card playing, whether in the school building or out of it, visiting gambling houses or other places of a questionable nature, and the use of intoxicating liquors, are strictly forbidden. A student who neglects 'his work, who w ilfully disobeys the rules which are laid down for the government of the school, or whos.e con­ duct is improper, or whos.e influence is pernicious, is not wanted, and will not be retained i n the institution, and, if expell.ed, forfeits the tuition and room rent paid.

'Con tinued failure to do good work, after a

fair tJial. will be considered reasonable groun d for dismissal. In addition to observing the general rules given above, all student.s will b e required to observe the special regulations announced from time t o time.

E M P L OY M E N T W e are often asked i f a pupil can work his way thru s-chool. great number of our pupils pay their own way.

A

They may have a llttle

saved up to begin with, and each summer they are hard, at w ork to earn enough to continue.

There i s also some employment to be had at

34


the school for a number of pupils.

Correspondence from pupils who

lleed work to help pay for their schooling is Invited. M E D I C A L ATT E N T I O N

The paym�mt of the medical fee entitles the pupll to medical attend­ ance by the school physician.

The necessary medicine, nursing and, as

may become inevitable, room In a city hospital Is fUrnished at the /lX­ pense of the pupil. R E C O R D S A N D R E PO R TS

A record of attendance, reCitation, deportment, etc., Is kept, and a copy Is sent to parents and guardians

who request It, at the end of

each semester, or oftener. SP E N D I N G M O N EY

W-e do not wish to encourage extravagant spending, and parents are urged not to allow their children too much .pocket money.

It Is never

conduciv e to good school work, and free spenders are generally poor s tUdents. V I S I TORS

V!sltors are always welcome, and the parent s and other relatives are Invited to visit the school to become acquainted with the work and environment of the pupils. BAGG A G E

W e have a transfer company at Parkland that will bring the dtU­ dents' ·baggage at special prices.

So leave your baggage In Tacoma.,

bring us your check, and the baggage will be brought out as soon and as cheaply as possible. HOW TO R E A C H P A R K LAN D

Parkland i s a suburb of Tacoma, on e of the large ports and railroad centers on the Puget Sound.

On arriving at Tacoma take Spanaway or

Parkland car on Pacirtc avenue. fro-n the station.

At Parkland the College Is one block

The cars generally run a:bout every ·half hour. STU D E N T O RG A N I ZAT I O N S

The P. L . C . M i ssion Society I s an organization composed o f young

men and women who [eel the need of devoting an evening a week to prayer and IScripture study.

In terest has chiefly centered In mission

work, and much over $ 1 00.00 has this year ·b een sent to different mis­ sion fields and to help those In need. The Dramatic C l ub.

This club was organized for the purpose of

giving to Its members training that wlll enable them to s.peak effec­ thely before the pubHc, read impressIvely; expression.

It Is to teach the art of

Several plays are studied and produced during the school

year. The A l p h a O micron.

This is a literary society.

35

It is strictly mod-


ern

in its m e thods.

youn g men society

It rpllresents all p � a s e s of work of in tere s t t () a C I d women. It is t o train i t s m e ;u hcrs for lead€rs hip. Th ..

s ta n ds

f(lr t h e h ighest ideals o f scholarship, friendship, and the ins t i tutio n of wh i c h i t forms an important part. Let us pull toge t h er, i s the meaning o f the nam e , and "the Sedarmoc," rue loyalty to

the school p a p e r issued b y the SOCiety, titands fol' the same idea.

The D e b a t i n g C l u b.

T o be fully alive every school must have its

ontest. ,-contests of muscle and contests of m i n d.

One gains profi·

dency i n any line only b y e x ercis e i n that line o E work.

Up·to.date

Iluestions are studied and discussed and by constant application profi. iency will be attained, tho the beginning be ever so modest.

M U S I C A L O R G A N I Z AT I O N S "Love i s the spirit o f life, and Music the life o f th e spirit."-Coleridge Music is everywhere.

Nature i s full of harmo n y ;

it is one grand

melodY,-the voice o f man, the w h i s pering wi nd , the laughing brook, the throbbing ocean.

God has endowed us w i t h the gift of music, and

has -made it so universal that it is an expression of our every feeling.

We all p{)ssess that wonderful talent for music.

It Is

the most

�eautiful talent our Maker could endow us with, and i t was intended to

be developed..

The

majority

of us

do

not realize that

the

musical

talent is indeed within us until W€ tI'Y,-but there are s o many o f u s who never have the opportunity. The College provides the opportunity for everyone, and every pupil

is heartily i n v ited and earnestly encouraged to join our musical organ­ lzations. Two very successful concerts have been given during the year these organizations.

by

The first was given during the Reunion, o n Feb.

%0, the second May 29.

1.

T h e M u sical U n i o n .

an d has

T h i s is an organization of all the students

t h·e general control or the musical organizations among the

ltudents under the guidance of members of the faculty. II.

T h e C h o rus.

Th:is is an organization of boys and girls.

Tho the

:a.ttendan c e was sma�l l h i s year the chorus h a d a membership of thirty· five. HI.

T h e Boys' G l ee C l u b consisted this year of twelve.

IV.

The Gi rls' G : ee C l u b wi t h a membership o r twenty.

V.

The O r c h e stra has done good work and counted some very gootl

l)layers among its members.

There

were nine who belonged to t h i s

rganization. b u t we hope t o at least double t h i s number next year.

VI.

T h e Band.

There were not enough playel's to take u p this l i n e

f m u s i c and organize a b a n d .

\Ve h a v e some g o o d instruments, h o w ­

ever, and h o p e next y e a r to start t h e w o r k .aarly.

The At h l et i c C l u b has charge o f all athletic activities among thp­ !Jtudents.

The athletic coach is the mentor o r the clu,b. 36


The former is an organization

T h e Stu d e n t Body a n d t h e Co u n c i l s.

of all the students. gIrls to become

a

Its express purpose is to educate the boys ana

la w unto themselves, to settle all minor cases o f

discipline, and lo o k after the general behavior o f the pupils. T h e C o u nci l s are similar bodies that have to do w i th the boys, or

the girls, onl y.

They treat cases that do not concern the student >b ody

in general, but have to do with the boys or the girls respectively. Th e P. L. C. A l u m n i Assoc i at i o n .

During t h e Runion meeting the

19th and 20th of Feb., 1921, the Alumni Associations of the Columbia Lutheran College and the Pacific Lutheran Academy dissolved and reo organized as the P. L. C. A. A. Reunion.

The school aims to have a reunion of former pupils, teach路

ers and members of the board of trustees each year. held Feb. 19 chosen.

and

20.

Washington's

birthday

is

This year it was

generally

the

day

Look for announcements later.

For further information write to The Registrar, or to the Secretary, P . L. C . , Parkland, Wash.

37


Students G R A D U AT E S C l ass o f 1 921

President

. . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. .

l\J iss Marie Smaby

Secretary·Treasurer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Miss Sol veig Rynning Class Motto :

"Know thy work a n d do it."

Class Colors :

Pink and Pale Blue.

Class Flower.

Pink Rosebud.

M E M BERS E n g l ish Cou rse-Quam, Emmelin e ;

'Wathne, Thomas.

L a n g u a g e Cou rse-Rynning. Solv eig ; Smaby, Marie. C o m m e r c i a l C o u rse-Hauke, Olga ; Johnson, Julia. Ste n o g r a p h i c Glasso Agnes ; Roe, Olga C. ; ,Starks, Goldie. M o dern

-

,

1 920·1 921 E n ro l l ment Adskim, :\Iartin J. Almaas, Oscar Anderson, Arngrim Anderson, Arthur Anderson, John I. Anderson, Paul Anderson, Reinhold Anderson, Thorsten Benson, Amanda Benson, Bertrum Boe, B a rbara Breum, Helmer O. Coltom, Arthur Cooper, George E. Crosby, Eik, Amelia Eik, Hubert Eikanger, �Iagnus Fadness, Sonva Finsvik, Arne Glasso, Agnes Haaland, Olive Hansen, Bert Hauke, Olga Holdal, Gertrude H olm, Ole O . Holte, Herman J. Jensen, MUl'l L. Jessen. Margrethe W. Imislund, Floyd Johanson, ,\Verner John'son, Julia Jorgenso n. Edgar M. B e rt Krangne s

Kridler, Burton Kveven, Erik Lange, Leo Langlow, Monroe Lee, Lars Lero, Bertha Malmberg, Torsten Merculieff, Paul Nelson, BirgeI' N ielsen, Lizzie S. Larson, Christian Odegaard, Asbjorn Olsen, Alfred Oness, Peter Oyen, Arnt Quam, Emmeline Rasmussen. Johanna Rian. Johan Roal kvam, Tom Roe, Olga C. Rynning, Solveig Samuelson, Alfred Sin land, Inez S. Skarbo, Frieda Skare, B irgeI' Smaby, Marie Solem, Ingeborg Solheim, Oliver Sorenson, Ole Starks, Goldie Swanson, l\L.tt Thompson , llbert Veldey, Selmer F. 'Vathne, Thomas

38


I n dex Page Academic Department . . . . 1 1 , 1 2 Admit.tance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 , 12 Agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Ai m . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Algebra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 "Alpha Omicron" . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 Alumni . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 7 Arithmetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Art . . " . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28, 30 Normal . . . . . . .- . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 Athletic Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 Augsburg C o n f e :, s i o n . . . . . . . 1 6 aggag'e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 Band . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Beginners' English . . . . . . . . 8, 1 7 BIble History . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8, 1 6 Bible Study . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 � Board . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 � Bookkeeping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 6 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 3 Botany . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . . . 2 5 B i l i i d ings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 B u � il1ess Departmen t . . . . . . . . . 9 Calendar . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Campus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Catechism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 Chapel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Chemis try . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Chorus . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 6 ChTistian Education . . . . . . . . . . 1 Church History . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7 Civics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Citizenship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 College Department . . . . . . 12, 1 3 Columbia Lutheran College . . . . 5 Commercial Branches . . . . . . . . 2 5 Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7 Concerts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Courses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Credits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . : . . . . . . 32 Debating C l u b . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Diploma Fee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Discipline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 4 Dramatic Club . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Drawing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Mechanical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 Economics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 3 Education, Christian . . . . . , . . , . 4 Department of . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7 Employment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 English . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 7 Enter, time to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Equipment . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Examinations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 2 Executive BoaTd . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Page Expenses . . . Expression . . Faculty . . . . . Fees . . . . . . . . First Aid, s e e French . . . . . . Geography . . Geometry . . . German . . . . . G l e e C l u'b s . . Grades . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . ... . . . . . . . . . Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . 33 . . . . . . . 27 . . . . . . . .3 . . . . . . . 33 . . . . . . . 24 . . . . . . . 20 . . . . . . . 21 . . . . . . . 23

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 . . . . .

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Graduates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Graduation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Greek . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1 Gymnasium . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Gymna.stics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 Harmony . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 9 H i s torical Sketch . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 H i story De,mrtmen t . . . . . . . . . . 22 of E d uc ati o n . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 7 of Music . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :3 0 Hygiene . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 I n formation. General . . . . . . . . . 3 2 Laboratories . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Language Department . . . . . . . 1 7 Latin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 0 Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Literary Society . . . . . . . , . . . . . 3 5 Location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Laundry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Manual Training . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 Mathematics : . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Mechanical Drawing . . . . . . . . . 31 Medical Attention . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 Mission Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Modern Languages . . . . . . . . 17·20 Money for Spending . . . . . . . . . . 35 Music Department . . . . . . . . 1 5 . �R Musical Organizations . . . . . . . 36 Musical UnIon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Normal Course . . . . . . . . . . . 14, 27 Normal Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 ::V[usic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 Norwegian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 9 O b s ervation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 O pen Bibl e . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 Orchestra . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 O rganization, Students' . . . . . . 3 5 Pacific Lutheran Academy . . . . . 5 Parkland . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 How t o Reach . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Penmanship . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 Physical Education . . . . . . . . . . 3 1 Geography . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 ' PhYSician . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 3 5


I ndex - Continued Page

Page

Physiology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Ph ysics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Piano Course . . . . . . . . . ' " . 28 , 29

Spe lli ng . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Spending Money . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Stat e Manual . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27

Pianos . . . . . . . . . . . . Political Geogra phy

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29 31

S c ience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 ct i c e Teac h i n g . . . . . . . . . . . 3 8

Pr Preparatory Course . . . . . . . . 9, 16 Psychology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Child . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 5 Reeords . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Religion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rent, Pianos, Typtewrit rs . . . . 33 Reports

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :3;}

Reunion Rooms

Rules . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . S c i en c e D ep artment . . . . • . . . . Sc h ool and Classroom :Vlanagement . . . . . . . . . . . . Shorthancl . . . . . . . . . . . . . . " . . �ocieties

' S ta.tionery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . 3 3.

Stenogra]J h i c Course . . . . . . 10, 2 tl Subjects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 6 Students

. . . . . . . . . . . . , . . . . . . . .7

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :3 7 Councils . . , . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 7 Names . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 Organizations . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Teachers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3, 7 Teaching, Practice . . . . . . . . . . . 2 8 T e s t s and �Ieasurements . . . . . 2 7 Body

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Trigonometry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 Trustees . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

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34

Tuition

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24

Typewriters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Typewriting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 26 Violin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 5 , � O Visitors . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 5 Volee . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15, 30

. 28

. 26 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . :3 6

panish . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20

Zoology

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1920-1921Catalog of Pacific Lutheran College