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THE

Pacific Lutheran Academy

and Busine'ss College

MAIN BUILDING

PARKLAND, WASHINGTON

1915 First Quarter

-

econd Quarter Third Quarter .Fourth Quarter

Begins September 21 Begins Novemher 22 Begins January 2,'; Begins March 30


N. J. HONG, A. B., Principal


Twenty-second Annual - of the-

Pacific Lutheran Academy and

Business College

1915

PARKLAND, WASHINGTON

"�IFIC ,.RINTERY S!'ATTLE, WN.


FACULTY, 1914-15 N. J. HONG , A. B., Prin ipaJ Enj,;lisJ,

1,11"

'o)'\\' Ki�n

Lite)'alllr ,

P.·>'eJ101,,;�y,

P,,, lrigoltl <'s

REV. B. HARSTAD .A ur:':.. d)Ul'J:)'

.T. U. X P

.

hurch

j ll�tory

rincipaJ

VIER, A. B., Ass stant

(:ell(\,'al

.�Ig ./1ru,

CUll fe.tision,

.

Ill/.tory,

Latin,

Greek,

Bible

J. BARDON, B. S. . A. B .

Al'it h n ll!ti a ,

Plty:;ical

Geogr

ph)"

A rnerican

LilertltunI

T. M. DROTNING, A. B. Eng-lislt,

Dil' (:101'

of

Band.

Orchestra,

ChurUIl S

O. J. S'rUEN, A. M.

:hI� tlJ e m a ti cM

Phy::dc:->, Gel'rtlan,

.T. . T'rineiT).l

LARY, A. B., 1....1.... B., M. Ace's

f'ulIllllercial

Depal'tlll nt,

Hookkt:;epin�,

('0111 1l1e:rc ial

I'

r.ivil GoYemment, U. S. HistoI'Y

INGA D. HONG Shol'thand, Typew!'iriTig', En.L;:ltsh Conlpu:-:itiofl

'l'j-H�ODOHA ALFSEN, B. Pi.i.lIIO,

Voict>,

:Hal'fIlon:v,

us! nC

l-li:-:tol'Y

.\fllxiC"

OLOF BULL Yiolin

. I \LlE HARSTAD, Preceptl'ess

ASSISTANTS .

TIS. O. J. STUEN

Rf'!1diJ1f.:".

Gf>(I�raphy,

MRS, J. U. XAVIEr:

Cornpositlon

E. B. ELLENGSON rchlt""ttlJ'aJ .Drawing

I :eudillg.

�pelJing-

;VlRS. GEO. S. .TOHNSON

GRACE O. GOORD Geometry,

ArithmetiC'

BOARD OF TRUSTEES REV. O . .T. 0

N. J, HONG . President

REV. H. A. S TUB

,

Secretary

.T. U .

DAI..., Vice Presidpnt

'A"'mR. Tl'pa�Ur r

B. L. KIRK -DO

BOARD OF VISITORS H}<W. L. C. FOS�

RMV'. A. O. WHITE

DR. .T. L. RYNNTNC


The Christian Academy Needed

ITH

W

the

presence

of

so

ex cellent

many

well

equippetl

publ ic grammar and high schools in a lmost every section

establish and maintain private academies.

of

This, however, is not the

The aca demy has at present, as it has h ad

ease.

and

our country, man y persons tleem i t altogether superfluous to

in

the p as t , a deflnitf'

and important mission. While it is true

that

ac a demy

today

private

is

done

scho ols, not all or it is so done.

uy

work formerly

much or the

done

grammar

by

the

and

high

There is a great deal of work

done

the

by

p ublic

the private academy which the public schools of the same grade,

owing to the nature of their or ganiz a t ion, are unable to do.

In a ny he

large.

the

system of public e ducation the clas s es must of necessity Not all stUdents can keep pace with the class.

pace set is altogether too

for others

fast,

stud ents the academy,

with i ts more

place.

quiek

Here ·both

the

and

the

are

�'or such the proller

elastic courses, is s low

For some

too slow.

accommodated

and

permitted to do t heir hest work.

IMMA T U R E ST U D ENTS During the period of ad ole s c en c e many young" people are not in ro bust

health and

public

schools

in

cannot l,eep addition

to

pace

the

with

many

them at hOllle. Such st ud ents will, as a

the

r efj ui r ements

social I'ule.

do

dllties

of

which

the

beset

excellent work a ud

develop greater c on centrati o n in the acatlemy, with its regu lar habits

or

study.

eating',

Slee[lin:J;, and recreation.

SP E C I A L ST U DEN TS

:\j;Jny

stlllip.nts, especially

Iho�E'

\','ho

difficulty with some particular branch; fo)'

or Latin,

In most or ollr p u blic schools

are immaturE', have specia l in�tance, algebra, geometry, either all 01' some of th ese

branches must be studied hy all students, and, as a re sult, many of those who are in c apable

of

mastering these drop out, a.nd, what is

WOl'se, learn to dislike school.

There is no reason, however, why such

students should be de[ll'ive(l of all the ollportunities of an education because they can n o t take Latin or algebr a with the rest. [lrivat e it

academy has

('an :lllow

need.

a d ecided advantage.

Here thf>

\Vith its elective

system

th e se stnrlents to sel ec t and pursue such branches as they

fn this

way the

school can.

by judicious

direction.

and

step

by step, cultiYatll in them the growth of intellectual and moral power,

allli

th u s finally lead them to master tile very difficulties br whieh ther

\'."(1l'e

at

first overcome.

ST E P P I N G STON E TO C OLL£ G E

a lso furnishes the very best intermediate step hf" tWE'en the gna rded and more 01' less d pendent hom e life of the stili! eut and his more in d e pend on t life at c ollege. Through the genth' llirec:t ion and ('ontrol of the academy 11(' dE'Yelops se lf co n t r ol and The academy

-


learns to be "a law

Through dany association with

IInl·o himself."

his fellows, in the dormitory, in the gymnasium, or on the cam us, He develops

he learns how to make his way among his fellowmen. and

school-spirit away

the

for

work

nnder

common

Being

good.

deciding

of

necessity

the

re­

a sense of

and

develops self-reliance

himself, he

questions for sponsibility.

to

continually

and

home

from

desire

a

If he is conceited or proud, selfish or snobbish, he has

these qualities taken out of him by his associates,

who value him

only for what he is, or what he can do, and not by the wealth or

A great many young people who have

social position of his family.

been

have

made utter failures at college, might in all probabilitty

fate had they, before plunging Into the greater

saved from such a

freedom of college life, received this intermediate training which a good academy can give.

CHA RACT E R B U I L D I NG It is quite generally recognized that the most important part of the teacher's work is that of character-building, and that any system of education which ignores or neglects this is at best worthless, no matter how many facts It may have succeeded in cramming into the minds of the young.

P U B L IC SCHO O LS I N A D EQUATE From the nature of the case, the moral instruction and training which

the

publk

schools

are

allowed

to

give

They can deal chiefly, and perhaps solely,

cannot

be

adequate.

with the intellectual

velopment of the pupil and with his outward

manners

de­

and actions.

They can impart what is narrowly called usefUl knowledge--that to say,

so much

knowledge as is

useflll

to a 'human

being

in

present life, during his passage from the cradle to the grave, and reference to it writing,

alone.

geography.

It

includes

history,

civil

knowledge

of arithmetic,

government,

a

This is the sum total of the instruction allowed

in

reading,

knowledge

material universe and some of its laws. and the like.

Is

this

of

Here it

the

ends.

to be given in the

public schools.

T H E CH R I ST I AN SCHOO L THE BEST But we believe and know that man is destined the grave, and that. there is a body of which bears closely upon that life.

knowledge

for a life beyond within

our rea(�h

This bein.!!; the case, it is the 1)alt

of common sense to make this knowledge, too, a part of the instruc­ tion we give our children. or college essays to do.

And this is just what the Christian academy

It. is not subje.ct to the same limitations as

the public schools in this matter. above in the building of character.

It con make use of the )'elps from It can appeal to the higllest mo­

tives, it can judge ('onduct by the highest standard, it can inculcate t.he loftiest principles, it can hold up for the imitation of its students the

highest ideal,

Christ.

the

most

perfect

character,

the

GOd-man,

Jesus

It can I�y down the only infallihle rille of faith and conduct,

the inspired word of God.


The Pacific Lutheran Academy 'l'he Pacific utheran Academy is an institution which humbly o ffe nl to serve tile public in harmony with the principles dis . cussed

in

It aims, by a thorough, systematic in­

the fore 'oing paragraphs.

struction on a Chr! tian foundation, to prepare yo for

f,ome

dea v()r

useful

work in life.

It

will

lUg

men and women

therefore be it . s constant

en­

to promote the highe st intellectual development of lt� students,

t o give th e m a sound religious instruction, and to sUTround them wit h such influences as best will fit tilem for their duties in life. In strllction in the fundamental truths of the Bible p ar t of alI courses offered by the schoo!.

an integral

forms

SCOP E OF T H E W O R K 1'he Pacific

any

first-dass

leaving

Lntlleran

Academy prepares its students for entering

college or school of science.

the grammar or

high school

do

But many students after

not wish to

go to

college.

HOI\"I)ver, tlley d ,sire advanced work in a new environment, and under competent

and

needs.

instrueto!"s. in The Pacific

those subjects which best meet their tastes Lutheran Academy

tun ity to do this very thing.

offers

them

the

oppor­

There are classes to suit all, the back­

wa!'(1 as well as tile advanced.

OHGAN I Z TiON

'rlle Pacillc Lutheran Academy is ('ontrolle,1 and operated by the Par i li c f.mlleI'an 'University ASEociation, :l co:'poration, organized in 189 0. nnd I' the laws of the State or \Vl\�l!ington. This corporation '

meets annually, on tlle second Wednesday ill December, to elect trus· tpes and to outline

ate ('(mtrol of the t.<'e!'<, compos ed of

re):(lilations,

and

llle

gellenl policy of tile institution.

affairs of the school

is

vested ill a

The immedi­

board

of trus­

five members, W110 elect teachers, adopt rules and

manage the financia l affairs of the institution.

B E A U TIF UL L O C A T I ON 'rile Pacific Lutheran Academ y is located at. Parkland, a beautiful

slllJllrb ancl

of

tlIe city of Tacoma, in

grandeur

ran ges and south

lie

scenery.

rugged

a

To

reo'ion remarkable for the beanty the west

are

Olympic :Mollntains,

foothills

and

broken

seen

the snow-c-Iar!

while to the east and

ranges of

the

Cascade

and towering far above the surrounding peaks rises the

m ajf sti c cone '

its

peaks of the

the

Mountains,

of

of Mount Tacoma, or Rainier, with its mantle of eternal

�now, a vision of unspea-kable beanty

th J'os y glow of mOmil1/i, in lia nt tints of the s et tin g sun,

and sublimity, whether seen

the full glare of noonday. or

ill

in

th e bril·

Within this magnificenl frame lie the be autif u l , park-like prairies. dott(�d with g!'oves and clusters of trees fit short and irregular inter· vals, and covered in spring :llld SUI11111()l'

oj'

almost every

hue and

color.

with

myria(ls or wild flo\\"f'!'S


AN IDEAL PLACE FOR STUDENTS

In health!uines8 Parkluou anli vicinitr can scare Iy be surpassed. Cf;'an, Situated midway betweell the C a�cade Range an the Pa itl blending uf tbe In riga ating 1lI untni breezes with the ur r air from the ocean . a.nd has a mild. equaj)le temperature through­ , ' ate r , good lJraioag , anti exc llf;'nt out the whole y ar. PUl'e air. pure \ oPJlOrtunlt ' for outdoor exercise at a 1 s a sons, make it an almost ideal

it enjoys the

of the than six utiJes t rom the hea of Tacoma, with which it has e, cel lent treet ear Hid telephone connectIon , and (rom which it r '{�eives water and light servic , it possesses practically all the a(l vanta�e8 of a arge city, Situa ted less

plaee

lor students.

lar

and growing city

()). none oj

witll r w

ils llrawbacics. THE MAIN BUILDING

The m ain buildill�, which originally wa� erectr,ti at a cost of $ LO!l,OOO, i� a massive flve- tory strudure, 190 feet lon g and 82 feet \ 'id e ,

It is supplied with modern COllveniences,

ha� a

water and elec­

tri c light. plant of it s own, and is designed to accommodate

2F.0

and

between

:lOO ::;tuden·ts. DORMITORIES

The main b u ildin g has been of

the"

is used as a

t.he you.ng men. t h ey

Whil e t e

nevertheless,

are,

The rooms

b1llldings,

a nd

intents

floor

The upper stOl').

space for games and

I.raek, built

arne roof,

l i l,e

spp r ti'

on

110 \

is a

It

fiuest gYIll­

of the

stJ'UCtUl'P,

t\l'o-story

whiclJ is ("ompletely finisbed, has a clear

e,e)'('ises of

dressing rooms.

ancl

purpos s,

GYMNASIUM

buildings on the Pacific ("oast.

the l:!ta�e

Onp

ligbt, airy, and comfortable,

are

TH E NEW

"Oxl00 feet.

two part:,

two dOl'mitorieR are under the

to all

1'lJe Pacific Lutheran Academy ha s naMium

01'[ into

partitioned

ladies' dormitory and the oth er is occup ied by

It

is

abont 50xSO feet, exclusivp of

also provided

according to the latest mo del s ,

1I0t cornpletply finished. i� dt'signe

to

with

a

running

The lower �tlJl'Y, wb ich

contnill

it i:!wimmill!!; pool.

is

slJOw­

e rs, dressing- 1'00ms, and other conveniences. OUR TEACHERS

Pacifi(' Lutheran Academy has superior ad vallt, ges ill

'Vhile the

thA way of locat.ion and bnihtings. it realil';tls m

sl

e, sential

factof'S

of

The Academy has

school.

ers who are

'aduates

,;uccel;sl'ul e x per i ence

that thesE' al'

not thE'

The t a ch ers make the therefore spared no efforts 0 secure teac!h­ a

good

sehoo1.

01' institutions of repute, and who have hall

in

ella 1

wo (' k .

They

nl'e

loyal

to tlw sc:bool,

devoted to th iJ' work, capaul , enthllsiastic, and hell1ful to our stud­

!'nts. daily

Sevel'al

of the telJehel's l'eside in the dormitMY and

contact with the stndents.

tll Uellts tlH'Y

manhood

anll

come into

As eOlllpa11ioll!'; and ad,is rs of the

eek to gl'ilh" them to

\\"01nal1hoor1. 6

the hii!,'lJest

i deal S

or

hristiHlI


I'

FAVORITE HAUNTS


FUL L Y ACCREDITED

The Pa,('itic Luthemll Academy is fully acer ve�!ty of

W " ashington, and its

graduates

dited

by

may e nter the

Unl­

the

University

without examination,

OUR C O M M UNITY

is

I'al'kh�nd

a town

of dlUrclles lind schoo ls

The larger nUll_he r

,

of its inhabitauH. have b>een attT,lCled by its eduea.t.\onaJ adva ntages. Most of its youn;; people are studious and industrious, and are, as a

rule, church memb e rs

.

The town ha�

no saloons ,

Illl\.ny of th e temptations with whic h students

and is free

are usually beset.

ever, it

is in the world, and not free from all temptations.

tastes

incline them to evil

who desire to obtain

'rile

nor can it undertake the

s tudents who are wayward, s hiftless

care of

Those whose

c-,ompany will flUd it or make it.

Academy does not aim to be a reformatory,

All studen t s

from

How­

OJ'

unwilling to

study.

an education w!ll be cordially wel­

comed and giv e n every possible oppor t unity

to a(\Yanee.

Youn g 0\'0-

pIe of bad m o rals are allowed to remain on ly until their character iR aseerta ined.

OUR STUDENTS Our

students

(,ome

from

homes

oecupatioflS and conditions of life. but

the

slende r

majority are young me n means.

Many

of

them

representing

A few come

and

to

support

rough-hewn

of

eeonom y

and

a1ld deficient in

themselves

industry;

ancl

while

rugged ene['�)'

while sOllie of them

some of the graces of fine

arid that they invariably sue('ped.

a 1'('

society, they

have an intense desire to learn and to improve thell1�elve�, nnner'essary to

Yari",cl

accustomed to hard

They come to tile school, bringing; with them

habits

most

wealthy homes,

and women of moderate, or even have

attending school , and ]Jl"actieally all have been work.

the

from

and it is


College Preparatory Department T

HIS department offers thorough p r epa r a t ion for college, and prJ­ vldes a fairly complete course of practical education for those who cannot enter c ollege. as nearly

requiring,

Classical, the

i

It embraces three groups, or courses, the same

as possible,

fodern

Language, and

of

amount

The

work:

General Science.

the

These

COUl'ses correspond very closely to those offered by the high schools

01' the State, and aim to furnish the necessary jlreparation for enter­ Students who desire to prepare for enter­

ing the State UniYersity.

ing Luther College may tal,e the Classical COllrse with a few modi­ fications.

FULLY ACCREDITED Graduates fl'Om any of these courses may entcr the University 0( Washington witllout examination.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION Sixteen courses.

units

are

required

for

graduation

from

any

of

these

To complete a cOllrse in fOllr years, which is the uSlial time

required in tile state high schoOl, a student must earn four units a year.

To complete it in three years, he must earn a little more than

nve, and this a bright young student call do, withollt much tlifficulty. under the more favorable conditions for study alHl recitation olTered by the

Pacitlc Lllthel'an A('ademy.

WHO ARE ADMITTED Graduates of the public schOOls and graduates of private or rocllial

schools,

pa­

doing worl{ similar to that of the public schools, 01'

students who have

completed the

work of our English

will be admitted withollt examination.

Department

Students who are lacking the

necessary preparation may obtain it in our English Department. Students who have completed one or more branches in a high school,

no rm a I

standing,

school,

will receive

academy,

full

or

other

institution

credit therefor,

and

of

will be

rc('ognizerl

admitted

io

;lI!vanced standing on presenting ·the proper credentials.

TIME TO ENTER The best time to enter is a t the beginning of September 21. Jannary 25.

the

sl'hool

year,

The next best, is at the opening of the second semester.

Students will, however, be received nt any time, and will

be placed where they can do the most effective work. Brie f outlines of the

('ourses

in

this

department

are

OPPOSite page. For details rep;arrling the !lCop!' of I he work, spp pap;e 11.

II

given

on


I

r

Lang.

l

s

g'li h

'j-Forejgn

E Lal1g. -;-Poreign Lang.

Engl i sh

Physiology

S.

H iRtol'Y

['�eonorllics

LT.

r'hysics

Church

PhySics

S.

History

H i tof" Y Econ 0111 ics

U.

Physi(:s

.;. Foreign Lang. 'i-Fol'eig-n Lang', -;-}-i'oreign Lang.

10iViCS s

En gl ish

F;n gl i sh

English

)

'i"l�ither L;)tin,

Gel'nlan,

or

XOl'wegian.

and

l

H.ist.

1�:ng1ish

I

PhysiCS

during

the

fin�t

two

yean;,;,

u. S. History Church History Econ o n ic

Physics

ei"iC>;

ls

English

Geogr.

� s

Penmanship

.. F oreign Lang.

Phys.

Algebra

EngJish

SeconrJ SCIll!',!.er

i

Arith.

s

English

Iligher Algebra

Psychology

Adv.

En gl sh

Catechism

Ancient lUst.

G eome ry

Poli tical Geog.

t

l; n gli h

I

and

Latin

an d

Church Histol"Y

P hy I cs

Civics

i"Foreign Lang. Meth. of Teach. State :'1anual

Bn g l i h

s

Con!.

\ I'i til. •

AlIgsbllrg

Ad v.

Bigher Algebra Solid Geometry

P"ychology

Zoology

Hist.

Geog.

I'hysi.ology

Alleient

Geometry

fFol'eign Lang. D rawing

English

Ca teeiJism

Ancient

litel'attU'e

('h UrCh History Economics

History

U. Physi c

PhYBics

Ch'ies

S.

';'Foreign Lang.

s

Eng l ish

I

;-Fol'eign Lang.

"�ngli�h

Solid Geom.

Hist'y;\ugsblll'g Conf.

Psychology

1NlIeVal Hist'y Medieval

Augsbl1rg Cont '.

Psychnlog'y

:'ledieval Hist'y ;Vlecli e val Hist,y

Solid Geometry Hjgher .A Igelll'a Solid Geometry Higher Algebra Zoology

-:'Fot'eL�pl Lang. tFol'eig:n Lallg. 'i-Foreign

s

En gl i h

Engli�h

];nglif;h

Catechism

s

Phy i ology

Catechism

Ancient Hi st .

Geometry

Hist .

G eome try Ancient

Ge0111etry Geometry

-;"Fol'eign Lang. Poli tieal

English

English

tJi'orei�n Lang.

.A nei"n t Hist.

Lang.

History

English

Bible

E nglish

Penmanship

;'Foreign

Bible History

'

Lang .

Phys. Geogr.

Ph ys. Geog r.

, For eign

Algebra

l<�ngliHh

Fil's-t Sell)t·.'sff>l"

NORMAL

Algebra

English

Sec:onll Sf'llIeSI (IT

Penmanship

';' For'eign Lang. tForeign Lang.

Physiology

ni�t.

'Geometl'y

��a tin

j ngli sh

History

Geogr.

-i-Foreign Lang.

Phys.

Phys.

Geo!;'!'.

;"F'oreign Lang. Phys.

Geogr.

S(�lI1e'8ter

English

l'-"irst.

Al ge br a

�eme'tel'

English

f;"""n,1

A lgeb ra

\

GENEltAL SCIENCE

STUDY

+Foreign Lang.

;Eng-lish

Geogl·.

s

Al ge b ra

Engli h

Bible

Phys.

Latin

Algebra

E n gli Sh

Fjl'�t �('nlt',..,If'l'

Penlnanship

I

I

SeeoJlO] Sem""I,,]"

.-\.nciE-llt Tl�stor)' A ncien t

Geonlet!'y

Latin

English

\1i bl e T-Ii story

1'11ys. Geogl'.

Latin

A l gebra

English

Fjr�t Sellw:-:I PI"

Augsburg ConI.

,

!

MODERN LANGUAGE

OF

�ThoBe p1'E!p3'ting to enter Luther Col1ege wUI study Norwegian language German du I " in g )a�t two yeal's.

l"()1!!'! II

'J'IJirtl

�(\t';l1I11

First

---

V!'nt"

"CLASSICAL

COURSES


I

The Normal Department

N

spite o f the fact that our State supports several schools for the

special

training

of

teachers,

Academy

Pacific Lutheran

the

has

been called upon to p repare many young men a n d women, who are in

n o w engaged

]Jublic

the

of

sch oo ls

this

and

neighboring

states,

and so successful has been the work o f our graduates and students in this line, t h a t we have felt encouraged not only to continue the worlr in this depa rtment, but also to extend it from t i m e to tim e The

course

covers

period

a

of

four

years,

and

,

embraces

all

branches required for a First G r a d e Certificate in the State of Wash路 ington. For ontline of eOllrse see page 9. R EQ U I R E M E N T S To obtain a Th i rd Grade Certificate i n t h i s state, mnst

pass

a n examination

punctuation,

history

of

the

in

reading,

United

grammar,

States,

the applicant

penmanship

geograp h y ,

and

arith m e t i c ,

orthography, a n d Washington S t a t e M a n n a l . .A. pplicants

o r a Second G r a d e Certificate must h a v e credits i n t h e

s a m e s u b j e c t s a s f o r a Third Grade Certl11ca-te , and m u st a l s o take a n examination in music

.

To obtain a Icirst Grade Certificate, applicants m u s t have t a u gh t at least nine months, and must have credits in the same subjects as for a Second algebra,

Grade

and

Certificate,

and

also

in

physics,

English

l i terature,

physica l geography. G R A D U AT I O N

T o gTati uate

from

this

comse,

a s tu d e n t m u s t p a R S

a

state

ex路

amination i n al l the branches req nired for a Second G ra d e C e rtificate, an d also pass an examInation a t tbe Academy in a l l the other branplws required in the course. P A R O C H I A L SC H O O L T EAC H E R S Students w h o wisl] t o fit them selves

for

teaching t h e

Lutheran

paroehial or Sunday schools wlll be given s)lecial work in B i ble study, catechetics, the branches

and

Norw egian

gra m m a r

and

literature

equil'ed for a public school ('ert i tl c路ate.

10

in

a d d i t ion

to


The Normal and College Preparatory Branches B

C H R I ST I A N I T Y

ELIEVlNG we have

that the fear o f

the Lord is the beginnl.n,. o f Wisdom, sy stematic instruction in

made ample provision for a

the p ri nc ip les

of the weekly

studied four hours

Die tri ch ' s Explanation

Biblical history wlll be semester of the first year,

Christian reli gion . during the first

during

second year,

the second semester of th e

the Augsburg Confession during the first semester of the third year, and

Church history during

so

The work w l ll be

the

second

semester of

the fourth year.

a rl'lmged, however, that a student who desires

i t may study two or more o f the above branches during the one yea r. There

will also be

week during

classes for Bible study two hours a

the entire sch ool year.

H I STO RY U. S. H i story and careful study of the Efl'orts

States.

will

C i v i c.ll-Two semesters history

be

and

made

to

civil

will

be

government

familiarize

the

d evoted

of

student

the

to

a

United

thoroughly

with the chief events bearing on the development of the nation, and

especially to give him as stitutional h istory as his

General

clear

an insight into its p ol l tical a nd con足

development will

all

H istory-Nearly

onr

permit.

institutions

llnd

of

most

modes of action !lnd habits of thought have come down to us former g enerations.

No consciolls progress, no truly worthy

a

can therefore be achieved without the present bears to the past.

our from

refor.m

knowledge of the relations which

For this reason a kn ow ledge of gen足

eral history should forn! a part of th e ed ucational equip ment.

01' every

young person.

ENGLISH T h e work i n

English,

while i n the

main

fo llo w i n g I.he require揃

ments adopted by the Conference on Uniform Entrance Requirements, Is the

introduc足

tion of the study of English grammar du ring the first year.

will have

Anoth er

is

the

certain distinctive features.

special

atten t i on

given

to

One of these

orthography,

expression.

"

orthoe py,

and

vocal


F I RST Y E A R

Review o f G rammar.

Themes.

F o r T h o ro ug h Stud y in C l as&­ S ha kesp e are :

M a c b eth or Ha mlet.

F o r Read i ng in ClassS h akespeare : yan :

Dream , As You Like I t ; Bun­

Midsummer Night's

Pilgrim's Progress.

F o r O uts id e R cadi n gScott :

Ivanh oe ; Dick en s :

David Copperfield.

S ECON D Y E A R Rhetoric. Lockwood a n d Emerson.

Them es.

F o r T h o ro u g h Study in C l antilton :

l\: inor Poem s ;

or Selec tion s

from

Wordsworth,

eats.

a n d Sh elley. For Read i n g in QlaasColeridge :

The

Ancient

Mari ne r ;

La unfal ; Shakespeare :

Lowell :

The

Vision

of

Sir

R omeo and Juliet.

POI' O utside Read i n gSw ift :

Travels ;

G ulliver's

G eorge E l i o t :

Goldsm ith :

Silas Marne r ;

Coope r :

Vicar

of

Wakefi elu ;

The Spy.

T H I R D YEAR History o f English Literature.

Themes.

F o r T h o ro u g h Study in Cl assB n rk e :

Conciliation

w i th the Colon i e s ; o r M a caulay :

Speech on

the Copyright. F o r Re ad i n g i n Cla ssShakespeare :

King Leal';

Tennyson :

The Prin c e s s ; Elocution.

F o r Outside Read i n gMrs. G askell :

Cranford ; Blackmore :

Tales ; Ha l e :

Lorna Doon e : Poe : Selected

The Man ·Wlthont II Country. FO U RT H Y E A R

H i story o f American L i terature.

Themes.

Final

Orntion.

Senior

R e cit al. For T h o ro u g h Study i n C l alllMa caulay :

Essay

on

Joh n s o n ,

and

Selections

from

Addison's

De Coverly Papers. For Read i n g i n OlasaSll akespeare : Poems ;

R ichard

IT : B u rn s :

Poems ;

Brow ni n g :

S h o rter

Poe. Lo well, Lon gfellow. and 'V'h i ttier.

For Ou tside R e a d i ngHolm e s :

The Autocrat at th e Breakfast Table ;

O regon Trail ; Fra n kl i n

Parkh a m :

Antobiog'rap h y ; Irv i n g : IZ

The

Alhambra.


En g l ish

G ra m m ar.-This is a more teclmical courl'e in �ramruar The presentation will, B.

than that generally pursued in the grades. far as possible, b

inductive.

It w ill ta ke familiarity with English on

the part of the student for g ranted, and lead him to observe, compare. and classify grammatical facts for himself. and guide hiru to the right

inferences.

As a preparation for the study of literature and composi­

tion It is invaluable. O rt hog ra p h y

and

O rt h o e p y .-The

wo rk

in

orthography

consists

of a careful study of words, and a systematic drill in spelling, both oral and written. In

orthoepy

it

is

the

special

to

aim

make

the

,;t u d ell t

so

fa­

m i li a r with the diacritical marks of ·Webster or "Worcester that, with

in a moment

a dictionary i n hand, he can pronunciation

drilled

of

any

English

word.

assure

Besides

hilllself of the c orr e ct this

he

is

carefully

In the correct pronunciation of about fifteen hundred

words

t hat are often mispronounced. Elocution .-In this branch the obj ect is to teach the student prup­ erly to interpret and express the author's thought.

To d o this, mauy

things enter in, such a s emphasiS, infiection, enunciation, pauses, pos­ ture, and gestnre, all of which will, in t n r n . receive due atten t i o n . During the one sem ester that this subject is studied the student w ill be required to memorize and recite, before the class, selections

of prose and poetry, taken from the

standard English a n d American

classics, and before his graduation, to render a public recital of or

seven sele ctions, a p proved by the teacher in charge R h etoric.-According to

the judgment of those

six

of this work.

who

are conver­

sant with the facts, nothing in school i s usually so poorly taught as rhetoric.

Yet i t would be

practical

importance.

hard

The

to name a study that

aJb ility to express

orally,

equals it in

or in

writ ing,

exactly what he means, not only h e lps the student in acquiring knowl­ edge, but also multiplies indefinitely the value of it when acquired. The student who has this skill can thereby learn faster every otl l . r

branch

of study and

at the

same

time turn e v ery other branch to

greater account. While this subject will be studied formally only during one

year.

i t will, nevertheless, receive freqnent attention throughout the entire

course in connection with other branches

of study,

particularly that

of English litera t ure. M A T H EMAT I C S The aim will be :

(1)

T o lead the student to study m a themat i cs

s o a s to develop his reason and imagination and to become familiar

with the SUbject-matter and methods of mathematical furn i sh

him

with

a

certain

number

work.

of mathema·t ical faels

(2) and

To the

necessary skill a n d accuracy in handling them. A l gebra.-The required

work i n algebra covers one and

years and includei the following subject s : 13

a

haH

The fundamentals, factors ..


q u a n t i ty, literal and

kno"

olle 1

n et h o d s

of elim inatIon,

, equ atioDs wIth

b i no lJJ inal theol's

fracti on s, l'od i cal " exponents, til

numerical coeffi cients, the or d in a ry ratio

v Uiations,

i magi na ry

pro ortion,

and

a n d complex n u m bers. P la ne

s e m e s ters

Two

Geometry.

]")art of t h i s

d

devot

are

tll !):;

to

subj e d .

studying the th eo re m s of the

m p l oyed in

time w i l l be

uk, including tll e gencral p r oper ti e s o f plane rectil inear figu r e s ,

t xt b

m .asurements of a n g l es , s i m ilar puly ons, areas, a n d

the circle, and th

The r m ain de r of the t im e will be given

t h e m easn re o f tle circ l e.

to origI n a l d e m on _ tra l i on s of exercises, c o n s t ru c t i on of m od e l s , m e a s­ U !'! n g of l i n e s a n tI areas, numerical " c r ific tions or r es ul t s , and a c cu.­ work in gc om etr ica l c onstruction .

rate

Sol i d

Ge ornet ry.-The

a n d i ncludes the

usual

w o rl{

.t'leorem

in

branch c o v er s one semester c on stru ct! on s contained in ti l e

this

s an

best text books, i n d n d in g th e reI t i ollS o f p l a n e s ancl lines i n spa c e ;

n l! mcasurements of pl"isnlS, pyramids, <.:yl inders, cones

th e propert i e s

A l a rge part of th e t i m e will be given to t l1 e s olu t ion

I ! n d spheres,

or i gi n a l exe rcises, and to constructions.

01

H i g h e r A r i t h m ctic.-Tl1is is a n a d van c ed

� p e cial attention

cIa

will b e given to the dev lopment o f the prinCIples

m e ti c I op er atio n s . metric

sys t em ,

underlying arltl1-

Thorough mastery of the s u bject of fr a cti on s, the

mens u ra ti o n , pel' 'entage

and

its

var io u s

a pl111c ation s

will be insisted o n . SCI ENCES Ph ys i cs .-Tll e educational value of p h y s i c s , o r , i n fact a n y natural

science, does not consist in t h e s o- c a l l d di scovery of laws, n o r in the demon stration rather,

of

principles

m ea n s

by

but consi sts,

o f e xp eri m ent ;

in the exce l l e n t traini ng it gives in attention to details, and

in

o f a ccuracy in the observation of the smallest change s a s well as in t h e a b i l i ty to reason back f om a s t o f phenomena to the c u l t l"

gen e ral

ti on

law ,

and

in

t he

power

to

express

t h ou gh t

in

precise

lan­

The work W ill , therefore, consist of recitations, e x pe r I m e n t s , and the s olu ti o n of prob l e m s . A thorough m a s tery of Ile fundamc'\ ­

gua.

tal principles w i l l lJe in sisted on.

Ea('h student

is required to h a v e

a

Hat. . b ook in which to record t h e worle done by h i m in the laboratory. Zool c g y .-Th ls \\ orlc is desi�ned to a i d the student i n getting c l e ar

i d e a of the au im I kingdom as a

typica l in(l ivhlu nl:;. lJy

rnerms

of

the

"hole by t h e study

a

of a few

The :;tudy of strnc tu ra l and sy s t e mat i c zoology ' will b amply supp lemented and ilIus­

text-book

traterl by l abora tory work. stud: of inse cts, the

After devoting considerable t i m e to

studilll t s talce up the crawfish, th

th e

earthworm,

the clam, snail, snake, fish . fro"', bird and mammal. The st u den t will be required laboratory

e x p e r i m e n ts, which

to keep

must b e

a no te bo o k record of h i s as

a pa rt o f the

stud ie d

oue s e m e s t e ;' ,

submitted

examination. P h ysical

G e o g r a p h y .-This

s ubject 14

will

be


a n i! w i l l cove r t h e follo w i n g top i c s :

'rh e ealth as a

pl an e t , t h e at­

n, sphere, t h e o('ean, the lands, plains and plate a u s , volcanoes, rivel's,

deserts, and glaCiers, shore lines, and the d i s t ri b u tion of ·plants, ani­ mals, a n d man.

T h e study of the text-book will be supplemented b '

t h e study of reference books, l a b orat ory work, and field stu dy. P h y s i o l o g y .-The study of the text-book will b e accompa n i e d s i m ple

ch emical

nd

physical

p e t' i m e n t s,

e

physiological processes of the h u man body.

iIIust r ll t i n rr

the

by

v a rious

T h e work w ill include a

general survey of anatomy, the principles of digestion and absorp t i o n ,

t h e general functions of respiration, the skin. k i d n e y s , nervous s y s ­ t e m and t h e speci a l senses.

S p e c i a l efforts w i l l be made to t e a c h the

students to understand the relations of these facts to th e g r e a t l a w s of health a n d to apply them to daily Jiving.

Psych o l o gy.-This work �TilJ b e of an e l em e n ta ry character, and It will l e a d t h e learner to look into h is own mind, t o analyze h i s own m ental a els, and t o d is­ cover for h i m self the capabilities of t h e soul . 'Wh at am I ? "Vhat will deal with the plain facts of m i n d .

can 1 d o ?

How s h a l l 1 make the most of myself ?

Th ese are Q ues­

tions which obtrude themselyes on the yo u n g student. lead h i m t o find answers to these q uest i on s .

Psychology viii

A student Who c a n learn

algebra, phYSiology, and rh etor i c is ready for p ychology.

The study

of some o f the chief laws of m i nd during the h igh SC11001 age w i l l greatly aid the student in h i s subsequent work. T h e ory a nd

Art of T ea c h i n g .

-

The chier object of this wo rk is to

aid young men an d women who are bravely studying t o becom e edu­ cational artists.

Processes. illustrations, Hnd results are fre e l y gi ven .

" i t h these a i d s each s 11001

teac;her

left

is

m a n a gem e n t. for h i msel f in

to

work

Ol1t

the

prob l e m s

oj'

his own way.

F O R E I G N LA N G U AG E S Lat i n . Lat i n G ra m m ar a n d R ead e r

.-

T h l ee semesters will be devoted to '

thorough stndy of th e elements of Latin grammar. t.O

Jt \Viii he tll

ma ster t h e pronunciation, ineluding a c c e n t a n d quantity ;

ular declensions and

conju

etymolog-y

and

ations, the vocabularies, with

t h e reg­

special rules

0 1'

to

syntax ;

sim}lle translations from Latin to English, a n d from English

derivatives ;

simple

at­

tention

English

the

a

aim

to Latin. Caesar.-During

the

second

year four

hool.s

of

Caesar

will

be

read and translated. S o m e atten tion will also he p a i d to L a ti n prose c; o m pos lt io n, t o t h e stu d y of t h e l i fe a n d times or Caesar an d t h e. organization of the Roman army. C ice ro.�Six

of

Cicero's

o ra t io n s

will

be read a n d translated.

Special efforts will b e made to have the student render the Latin into pure,

idiomatic

English.

A considerable p a rt of th e time

will

be

devoted to Latin prose composition, b a s e d on Cicero's writings, and to the subject of Rom a n oratory, inst i t u t ions, and courts of l a w . 15


V i rg i l .-Four b o o k s

of Vi rgil's

Aen id

w i ll

stn d ie d.

b

Special

attention w i l l be paid to prosody, syntax, mythology, and the h i story and purpose i n v ol ved in the poem.

German G ra m m a r a nd

Read er.-The first n i n e weeks of tb is cour se w i l l

b e s p e n t i n re ading a bo11t 1 5 0 pages of e D s y G e rm n prose. ma inder

of the

year

G e rman grammar.

w ill

he

devoted

to

acquiring

An aceura-te knowl edge will

the

T h e re­

elements

be required :

of

of tlle

declensions of articles, adjectives, pronouns, and nouns ;

the conjuga·

tion of verbs, w i t h the principal parts of all strong verbs ;

the p r e p o s i­

tions and

the cases they gove rn ;

t h e uses of m odal auxiliar i es ;

elementary rules of syntax and word order.

Cons iderable time

the w i ll

he devoted to practi ce in pronunciation and to writing German from dicta tion.

Seve]'al

s i m ple

German

poems

will

be

commit ted

to

m emory. The fi r st semester of the second year's work in German w i ll be spent in reading and translating one or m ore easy <:lassies, as Sch.ill­ er's

William

Tell,

Storm 's

l m m e n spe, and

others.

DUring t h e second s e m ester a thorough review of the

grammar

w i l l be given in connection with simple original compo sitions and easy conversations

on

d i fferent topies.

be continued during the year.

The

reading o f some olassic

will

Special stress will be laid on the ac­

q u i s i tion by the student o f a vocabulary or several hnndred German words and phrases. The tf! ird year w i l l be devotprl to stu(lying somfl of the m aster­ piecfls

of G e rman

lit erature and

s i tion and conversation. as

a

to

more

work

a d vanced

in

compo­

As far as pos s i b l e , German will be e m ployed

mediLl m of instmction and

rflcitation

(l uring

the

e n t i re t h ree

years' course.

N o rweg i a n ,

T h e practical importan ce of t h i s stuLly c n n scar cely be overesti­ mated.

:\JJ in isters, teachers, and business lllen who arE' fam i l i a r with

the Norwegian or Dan i s h l angna ge will , for a l o ng time, be in demand in th i s section of the country. A s a large number of our stud ents possess a practical knowl edge of these languages, t h e aim of th e work in t. h i s class will be to teach them to speak and

write them with

accnracy, and to acqua i n t them

v.- i th th fl riches of t h e i r literature. MISCE L L ANEOUS

S i n g i n g .-Fi v e perior.s weekly th rollghout t.he e n t i re year will be devoted to singi ng.

S p e c i a l efforts w i l l lJe m a d e to teach t11fl st U den t s

t o read music a t sight. Pa f1l i a m enta ry L a w, -- On e period a week du ring the fi rst semester will be devoted to the stu d y of Lyon's Hules of Order. w il l

learn

by

actual

pra(·tice

how

to

or,!!il. n i ze

aurl

T h e student

condud

nwetings, S t ]Cf! as eaucm�es, school m e e t i n gs, convE'nt i on R , etc. 16

p ubl i c


The Business Department C O M M E R C I A L CO U R S E

Second

Fi rst Seme ster-

B ol ke e p ing Com tll e l c:ial

S e m ester­

Boo]tk eep i ng

GOIll I11 . rcla J A r i th m e ti c

Ar i t h m et ic

Gl 'am m ar

B u s i u ess

0\18111 58 Wri ting and

T yp ewnti n �

Re a d i. n g T y p e lVriting

COlfll1l rcial Law

II pid

Form Writ i n g

C a l c ulat i on

H is t o l'Y

U ' li l e

Le Ue r W riti n g

Eng] i s h ,

T J u s i ne Hs 'Vriti ng a n d S p el l ing

S pell i n g

Stlldy

Bible

or

S C O P E O F WO R K T h is

course i s desig ed to pl'(>pal'€ Y O U D o' m e n a n d you n g

for the aCI

(J u li e s

ive

laws, )),;a:,>es a n d pl'a't iues

j"nO w le d g e . o f the

is pl'o babl

There

b u � iness worl d by givLng

th

0

no other

'

e ell appr Hl ch e s a

t hem

\\'0 n en

a practical

tra d e and c o m m e r c e ,

of

eourse of t h e s a m e l e n gth and c os t which

business

b-ai n l n rr

course

in

vallie

its

to

young

people, H ELP a n d IIU l unfac t.llr i n g e 111 1 'loy­

D E M A N D FO R T R A ! N E D The

expansion

rapid

of

commercial

lIlPnts creates a s tr o ng demand 1'01' young people, well 1.ra inf'rl Ln bURi­

m et h o d s

n f.' S S

and neells.

T I M E.

A

has a

stndent \\'11 0

R E Q U I R ED

good e l e me nta l'j lmowl .(lge of

A stu d e nt who is d e fi c i e n t in

D1 o n1.h s _

nine

bru nche s w i ll req u i re

good

s t u d ent i s

b u s i ne s s

t e Jl( "! e s, aud

tll l:ght

the

handwriti n g- ;

how

to

tIcal

a rrau;;e

bow to use th e

of

arithm

busin ess

d oc u m ents :

h ow

to

them

i n to

tY1J w ri t e r ;

t cal problems

with

law ;

d ra w

a

ono

or

1 l 1 l) 1 'l'

of

t h e .: ('

i s TA U G H T [ol l o w ' n g

punctu ation, h o w to write a bus iness t i on ;

spel l­

l on gf' ], t.ime. W H AT

The

l'ea di ilg,

th i s COU I's e ill from s i x to

i n g , ul'itll 1 l 1 e l i c , a n d gT�lIn mar c a n c<lmpl ete

how

to

vel'Y

im port a n t. things ;

cou stnH't

",rannn " t l ' ,!l

parngr:J ph s :

know l e llge

l e tt e r t.hat w i ll e n m m u n ll

how t. o c om p u t e r apidit y

np

a

all

A Sl1n­ 01'

a tten­

ld u d s of p ra ,'­

and acc nraey : a k n o wled ge

contra c ts.

r1 ee,l s,

and

1111 si]1(' ''5

th oroll gh knowl erlp;e of boold{ c e p ; n g ; " ys t e m , neatness

a n d order.

It is the aim of tll e sehoo1 to make the course s o llro;\ d a ll f] thor­ that a student who has conl plet ed i t s h a l l ve able. I' n d il :c , t o

ollgh

flO p t single

It' to auy o r d i n n r) sy " t9m or s('1 of bo or donble e n t r y bookl, ep i TI g', as nserl in t h i'

hims

k s i nvol v i n g

eithf'l'

bus i n e s s worl d .

B U S I N E SS W � I T I N G In

penman s h i p t h e l'i �

l11 B t l e to rnen t

are

see

d

th e eno l' S

1. m ove ment

is

t a llp;ht,

df h i s o\\'n IHiting.

Yel o)wd ai t h e

same time, 17

By

and

Speer], (' o r r('et

the

j'n)'11l

stlldf'lIt I s awl 11l 0Yf'­

tra i l l i w ! ; , throngh


a

n' J! - g ral le d

I

tl SYR tema tk

to

h im in

any vocation

ill

a " e l'age pupil a ' uil'es a

tlle

conl'se,

or w r ting, which w i l l b

ne t, I-a pi d nnll leg ble st yle

( f great benefit

I iie.

BO O K K E E P I N G

A k now l ed ge of bookke e p i n g is genera l l y cone .ded to be

f c o n s i d­

r w h at the r occu pat i on s tl1UY )e. A"lde from the PI' eliea1 u t i l i l y of t h e sc ie nce, t a l s o affords m e n t a l di S ci pl i ne r t h e h i gh e s t o r d e r . I t i culca tes neatlJ e s s , aCCUI'B y, an d to a l l persons, no matt

erable valu

s y stem-a e q u i e ments which ar

es sen ti

I

to s u c e s s

in life.

I N DI V I DUAL PLAN The work i n bo ol,lteep in g is indiv idual perience

anied on a('conlin g to th e so-called

There are no class

plan.

having demonstrated the

po ssibility, of classing together :;tude n t tal

s ordin ar ily u n d e rstood, ex­

s,

difficulty, not Lo say, im­

xtreme

differing wid I y in age, m en­

ability, and pr par ation . ENT E R A N Y TI M E 'With the in

ivi dnal

p l an

p o s si b le for students to enter

i t is

at

any time, take u p su(:h w ork a s t h ey n e e d , a n d p rogr ss as rapiilly a s t h e i r abilities w ill al l ow .

I n t h i s way, t h e b r i g h t , energetic student,

with a good preparation, w ill not be retarded by h i s c t i ve

fellow-student ,

lJurried a l

and

slow,

the

ploddin g

lower and less

shldent

�ll

not

be

n g i n his attempt t o ke .j) pace with t h e brightel' or mor e

a e t i ve membf'l's of the c l a s s . G E N ER A L E X E RCISES While

the

bookkeeping, ci ses,

school

follow

it n ev erth el e

discus sions,

no

regular

class

system

of

teaching

general exer­ the indiv i d ual

Ii i m p a rts I11lJ('h inst r Ll ct i on in

xaminatiolls

and

dr il l s ,

wherein

student has am p l e o p p ortunity ot' compa rin g himself with others

and

o r profi t i n g b y their Sllccesses a n d t' a i l u res. A ll po I nt s not unde rstood by th e student "' HSSAn

A I1I1 f' x pl a i n pn

to

h i m , and

sidered finjshed u n t i l it ha A CT U A L

no

B U S I N E SS F R O M

t e m a t i c , as well a s r.ompl'ehensil'e. and,

st e p b y step,

Tn t h is way

S dler'

the

will be tboroug11ly

or til

work w ' l I h

dis­ p.nn­

been completely ma >;t ered.

T h e course i s b a s d o n Sadler's np,

PA r t

student

T H E STA R T

Budgets.

I t i s s i m pl e

Ea sy t ansactions are advan e s

and

fi r s t taken

to 01 01'e di ffi cult work.

t h l'ee-bndge t co n r se i s mastered,

gi\' ing the stud­ ent a complete view of t h e prineiplf'S employed i n the v a rious k i n d s uf b ol,keepin g. From first to las t the e r; U r " 6 i s one of at·t u al b u s i­ ness practice, and is mueh su p r i or to t h e "set m e t h o d " f t e ac h i n g this im p o r ta nt subj ct. In t h i s c o u r e the 'LlIdent i s const ant! observing tbe proper forms

and

u"es

B U S I N ESS A

gren

of

c m m el' c i a l

p'

er.

LAW

knowledge 0 (' t h e l a w govel' n i n g co m m e r c i a l transil C'tions i s 0 1' value t o e v ryoof', b u t espe c i a l l y t o the llll sin SR man, Our 18


course

aims

to

meree

that

he

gh' th e stud e n t s u c h ImowlE'dge of t h e laws of (�om­ may tra n sact hi b u s iness affairs in an i n t el l ige n t COlT c t w ri t in of legal d o c u m e n t s is a special feature.

manner.

r

COM M E R C I A L A R I T H M ET I C Nine

mouth s This

111' i t h metic.

is

th at

i s pre s u p posed

tbese

with

before

be

to

a

c

s tu d y

reful

is

commerc i a l

of

intentled for s t u d en t s princi "les of u rithmeti<-.

not

tbe s tu d e nt h as become t h o r ou gh l y

up st ud en t

takes

this class furnisl1 e s the

sa ving

devoted

a n a d va nced c l a � s a n d

truction in tb e m or e elementary

r e q U lrmg i

It

be

" ill

arith m

c o m me r c i a l

tic.

a c q u a i n t eli

T h e work

in

a thorough d l' il l in th e slHlIt a n d ti n l e ­

m et h o d s actua l l y used by business m e n . B U S I N ESS E N G L I S H

I t i s n o t the

aim

of this

grammatical faets, but pr in ci pl e s of grammar,

to

clas.s

fmable

in

and

the righ t u n ders ta n di ng and

t o t e ac h

the

the

stu d e n t

to

gr e a te st 1

number oj" the

.-t ster

l ea d illg

way fur n i sll the means town nl the eOITed use of the English lan g u a g e . i n t er e st i n g from begi nning to e n d , a n t! this

The w o r k i. s pl' <1c tical and fll m i � hes a n ex(' ell ent p r e p a ration

f o r t h e s t u d y o f lpttpr·wr i t i n g .

LETTER-W R I T I N G l a rge

the b l s i n e s s o f th e worlel i s ca r r i e d 0 1 1 medium of l e t ten; I t i s til eretore of !i;l'ea t j Jll p ort a n e e to every b usiness man to b e abl e to s a y j u s t w h a t h e l1l e a n s , anll to do it in a pleasing a n d effe c t i v e w a y . It i� tll e a i m of our w or l( in e ompositi ol1 a n d l e tter-w r i t i n g to a i d the stu d e n t in {Ievelopi n g th p p o w e r of expre �s l on , b o th i n speech a n d in wl'itin;,:,.

A

proportion

of

th

th r o u g h

.

SPE L L I N G

This con sists o f a careful s t n d y of \\ ords , aJ\{ i or d i r t n t i o ll p x p r · ds s. T h e s p e l l i n g , t h e proJ1 u n e htt i o n , th e m e ;l n ing. a n cj th e nse of a w o rd are taught at the same t i m e . -

R A P I D C A L C U L AT I O N S A

sh ort

column s

of

period fi gures

is

set

a ud

a p a rt each day for d r i l l s i n a rl d i n f!; 101l,� other arithme1 i e a l compn t a t i ons

perfo r m i n g

w i th speed and a c c u racy. THE

ST E N O G R A P H I C

F i rst Sem ester­

COURSE

S e c o n d S e m est el'­

S h orth and

Shorthand

G ra m m a r

(' om posi tion

1' ype wri ting

'!'ypewri t i n g

and Penma n s hip

Spelling

and

Letter

Writing

R pading

Bible History or B i b l e St u d y

S n p] J i ]) !S

Reading

Oftic'e Work

and

Penmanship

Form Writing SHORTHAN D The

tended

uses

{l lI l'illg

of

shortllflnd

thl-'

last

and

t yp e w ri t I n g

fi fteen 0 1 ' tw e n ty 19

have been °T e a t l y fi X , years. an 'l . a t t l i P pl'eSfnt


time, more opport unities for advance men t ar s tenograplJers

to any

than

OITered to competent The

profes Ion.

t.her

busin e ss

modern

offi ce ! not fully equipped w I th out one or more stenograph ers . Every court or ju sti ce has its offie! I report 1', and in the couvention, th e legisla t u re and otll r gath erin gs, the art of sh orth and

assembly, the is useful

In

and ne cessary.

civil service tll .re Is constantly in­

the

demlinu for c o m petent stenographers at a g o od salary_ To the college student, sh orth a nd is of lnestlll1able vallie in making reports of addresses and If'ct ure s and to the lawyer, the lec t urer, the creasing

,

clergyman,

null tlj e teacher, the

pers on, therefore, can po ssi bly

art is a

No y oun g

valuable as istant.

W l10 is desirous of s u ccess in

,y of thes

ti sl us,

y taking a thoro u g h conrse in short­

m ake any m istake

h and and typewriting. But

a id

from it s sp ecifi c c o m mercjal value as an art, the train­

ing r�cei ed in

a c ourse of th is kin d i s w

a cqui ri n g It, on account

J] worth the

of the mental d i scipline it

mOl ey sp en t in

. lronls, and th e

push, energy, and activity it a.wakens.

T H E G R EGG SYST E M We

teach the Gregg syst m of shOlth n u d, which, although

about twenty years old, has acqllJred by

a

large

nly

a w ide popul arity and i s used

num er of l'epres n tatIve scho ols

in

this

coun try

and

Canada. This system requires no s h a di n g, as the ch ar a cters may be wri t ten either light 01' h eavy. It is .v r ! tten on the same s lant as l ongha nd, thus secur I n g a uni orm movem ent of the haud. a tel's may be writ ten on un rl1le d paper, thus

writin g.

vowels and

The

natural order, thus

consonants

mak.ng the

follow

each

other

t i n g easy to read.

'\\

The char­

abolishing all position in

their

The characters

con si s t almost ex cl u ' ivel y of Cnfl'ef' and straight lines, angles beIng alm ost wholly Signs,

abs nt.

He inl"; ll u rely

phon etic

ha Ying very

and

f

\'

the system can be re adil y ada p t d to any lan guage. T I M E R EQ U I R E D T O L EA R N

The months.

time required To

be

able

to eomplete

to

pursue

til is

conrs e i s from

S il lj ects

the

writin g sn c c e s s i'ully, the student must be able to write one of these branch es must spend suUi i ent t he

requ ired

to

nine

a go od hand, to

A st udent who is deficiellt in an

spell well, and comp o e correct l y. partment to attain

si x

of shorthand and type­

standar d

time in the English De­

of scholarship before tak­

ing up the stmly of shorthand.

S P E E D P RACT I C E After th e

tnd ent has

in sho rth and 8ll b

has

become fam i l ial' wi th the characters used

I arned to write p h o n e tically any word that might

met w i th , he begi n s to take d lctutlon .

naturally slo

and simple, are contin

Th

and include b u si n e ss correspondence, literary l e c tures,

tes timony. se rm on s, etc .

se.

WIl ich at

ed throughout the entir elections,

r

first are course. POTts

on

Spe lal attention is g1ven to tlIe

i ndividual stu dent , th u s g .ining

op portunity

of

d'iscovcl'ing

peeull r d irnc1.1Jties a n d help in g h i m to overcome t h e m . 20

his


TYP E W R IT I N G

T Ylle , ' I'lting "cell])i!';!; a vel',) PI' mill( I t plae ill thi� c u llrSe, u l l (J i s , ill fact , a n inse a rable purt 0 ' i t. Stu den ts al'e re qu i re d to de ole from two to turee bour ' a day to sys tom a ti c practice on tile type­ write r, From th e \ ery b eginn i ng , s t u cl e n t s at!' laU g;l t t h e p l'n per Iin"erillg' of t h e ke ys , th e cleaning, oj ling, a n d arlj n , L i ng nl the m a c: i J i n 11 1f' lettel' . ]q;U doc1l m tI ts, m a n i T u ld l u g. »1' P f' 1' form and a l'r an g m ell t l n i m p o g l' piling, nd t11 1ik . •

D I CTAT I O N

As

tlle studpnt becom e.' m ure pro fi c ie nt, b u s il l P. " S lette r's are dIctated to ll i m i n sho rthand fo r tra n s(:l'i pti{Jll all the m ach il1 ('). Tll ! S pradice i s of great value to the si tl ll t�n t., l L gi es h i n l inu ey en d · e n ce !luu 'onfidence, It c o m p e b 11 m to th ink c l e ar ! )' fl.IlU , r'c\1 r' l t {� I,V, a.nd, above all, to corr ct his mi E>takes . a task u su al ly 1J ll\\l� I ('(J JU e , a u [1 s ,1 er rorme J b: stll ent" p 1': l (; t ic \t l C; a 1 ', �' it b () u t the overs Ight h p. i s t· u �h t t o s p e l l e o !' re cLly a n d tu l !llUll S i x m o nLhs o f such ]J ra ctic e w i J I (l o m o r e to lhe tra in the ave l'u&€ :;tuden t 1 11 s pel l i! ''''' u n f, g ru m ll1 :l1' a n d grne l':ll neat· 1]('88 thun t\\ 0 y e a r ' :study \ · itli o u l I t. SOOli

as

( )

'j'he c o u r se in t y p e w r i ti n � i n cl u d e s a carefld an d ex t o;'!cled d r i l l in tll e various kin lls of office p (,tiel'. (,Ol1l me l'('ial p, p r o; , 1 (",£";>1.1 d ocll­ TD8nt", b u s ine, s l e tter>', spec i fica t i ons , t. ab i l l a ti n g \\ ork, e t c , M O DE R N

E Q U I PM E NT

An am ple s u p p l y of L. C . Smith tYIIt·" ri te I' ." o f t l 1 8 l a t('�t ll1 0rl el is kl"]Jt 011 h a n d tOI' tlH : II>;" of stn Ilts. A e l l ;! 1 g�' or 3 . 0 {i pel' 9 1-'1]1I,'8 L <' r w i l l be made fu!' Lb H n se o f the m aCh i n e , T i l e " j , o nl Ilfl' a l s o au 8d !son e om m('l'oi �l l p l HlO co!':l'a TJ l l , a n t ! t\\ O Ed lflOll lll · m<'!o-:o; rfl p ils. w h i c h tll [� stl d e nt s are taugbt to oppra te. SP E E D R E Q U I R EM E NT S

t h i s CPllf'Se, a stUllent 11111S1 b ot \'(' a t t.a i ; l c'11 a in shor LiJ sIl d of 1 1 0 wor.] s a m in u t e }I n tl be ah1<:> to tran scrilJ(� h i s llotes co reetl y on the t.Y)1 � ' r i t er 11 1 I ll e ) " t.e or tl ,i rl.y · !i ve W ()l'I l � pf'r min ute, To

gra d u a t e

fl om

speed

OF F I C E WO R K

,Yhen a student h a s a eq u i r f' d a ('Ntai n stnnd:ud of pro {](' i n cy h t' is gj\,9.ll a place i n th e p r i n ('in 1'8 01' m a n ,uu' !" s offi ce as � l en() p; l' up!.Jer. The WOT' l� h e re is s i m i l a r to t h a t 1'0q ll i ,-e d i ll tl i p a v e r, � e b ll .� i [)('ss oIl1ce, A DV

N e E D C O U RSE I N S H O RT H A N D

T h i s COlll'se lias bpPll d e " gn f'd f !'Jr I h e bf'lll�flt o f g m (111 a l ' S a n d { h ers \\'1 1 0 !'pq u l re special tra Jn i ug' I' m ' j'esp()n� i IlJp po i t · ous . w hpl'(' h i gh spp.ed and great a c c ll r�.c y � re ]' q u i red , It w i l l i n cl lH.!e n t h o \'· oU f.,b review ill' th e pr; ll t'i ples , fl.nd ;1 Cfl f'(> rlll elri ll in l pg-a l forms, H r! · va] c,, {] phrasing, conrt l'epor t in�, t a b u i a l l ug, m i m (l,e:ra ph i[J !!;. spec ; flca· t i n ns. H llW;, and Hi e 1 1 k S1 ur! 'nts i n thi� ('O UI' e will b e l'eq l 1 i n� d to moh' \�prha l i rn r, port s (; r s P 1 ' m o n s , led.l rp ,' , n tl <1 rI'RSeg, et c ,


DO M E S T I C S C I E N C E

This

the

a study 0

appl

18

pra c tical from

beg i n n i n g

cation o f these p r i nc i p les to th da . twice

hours

a

desire

0

work.

made to covel' cost of m

P R ACTI C A L C O U R S E Thi s course aims

typic.al fo ods.

c ooking of

week. are devoted to Uti

$2. 0 per sem ster will L

otllers who

AN D A RT

to end. It embraces fun d amental p rinc iple>'! or foods u u d cook ery , and the

course

Two

A charge of

erial.

I N A R C H I T E CT U R E

to be o f assistance t o carp n t rs, mechanics or outn l n

a

working knowl edge

or d rawi n g s, bu t

who lack the time and meanll to p ursue a complete co ur se in arch i­ tee

ure

t a university or te c h ni("-al school.

Arch Itec tu ral

Drawl ng .-In th i s Gourse stu dents are gi

sive practice in making drawings as

residen c e s, bar ns,

store s,

wi th the necessary details tions of brid g e Strengt h of

public buildings,

apanment houses and

and speCifications.

Also plans and

sp cifi ca­

and trestle work, as well as concrete and .brick worl,.

of Materia ls.-C o n s i derable time is devoted to the

puting or the strength struction

en exten­

of all kinds of trame struc tu res, such

common

t mat rials. beams,

com­

The rules for the design and con­

braces,

ryi r'ders,

and

trusses

are

here

presented in such a simple manner that they can readily be under­ stood

by any

o rdinary person.

While

a knowledge

of

algebra

and

geometry are desirable in th i s work, they are not essential, a s mo t

of the computat ions can be made by m ans of arith m etic. The Steel Squ are.-Consi derabJ e attent ion i s given to inslructing and training the student in the many uses of the steel

ject of whIch the avera �e mel:h ll. ni

22

Is

square,

woefully ignorant.

a sub­


T

Ens

The English Department bas b. ee n called the l�nglish Department for want of a b e t t e r

Young m n and women, w h o , from wan t of opportunity. .

name.

or fa i l u r e to i m pro,'e it when off e r e d , or from other c a u s e 8, h a v e

been deprived of t h e advantages or an e d u cation, and t hu s seriously h a n d i ca p p e d i n the strugg l e fol' e x i s t ence or succes�, w i l l h e r e fin d ; I n e.

.e l l e n t opport u n i ty

to m ake u p mucll o f w h a t t h e y h a v e l o s t .

T h e work i n t h i s d e p a rt m e u t carre p on d s , in a general

way. to

that pursued in the seventh and e i gh t h grades of t h e p u b l i c schools.

While e l e m entary i n its na tur e , the i n s t l uction is not design ed children, but for young men and women.

for

T h e greatest ca re is taken

t b a t a sturlent may learn t o I'ead w e l l , to s pe l l correctly, to wr ite a good h a n d , a n d to be thoro u g h in a r it h m eti c,

S tuden t s

will

be

a dm i tted

t h is

to

COlll'se

Suitable classes w ill b e

provided f o r a i l ,

i gn or a nt a n d backward.

A g e i s n o h i n d ra n ce.

w ithout

exa m i nati o n .

t.hose w h o a r e m o s t

even

No s t u d e n t h a s e v e r

b e e n r e fu s ed admi ssion be c a u se h e w a·s t o o ol d , 0 1' knew t o o l i t t l e. To

a cr o m m o rr a te

these

t i m e , the school y e a r ll a s each.

T ll e

who

can

a t l end

but

a

few \ ' e e k s a t a

b en d i v i d ed i n t o fonr ter m s , oj' Ilille w e e k s

c o s t 0 1' t u i t i on , board,

. 5 0.00 p e r t erm of n i n e w e el{ s .

light, a n d w a s h ing i s

room,

only

T h i s b l'illgS it w i t h in tlle r e a ch of al l .

TI M E TO ENT E R 'I'll e b e st

Sep t e m b e r 2 1.

to en t er

timp

is

a t th e

beginni n g

o j'

1 11 8

sell ool

year,

T h e n e x t best t i m e i s a t the b e g i n n i n g- of o n e of tll P

tprms, N o v e m b e r 2 2 , J a n u a ry 25 or March 30. S P E C I A L C L A S S FOR F O R E I G N E R S A n othpr i p a t n re

for foreie;ners.

o i tlJ e �n ?;l i s h D e p a r t nJ Pllt i s t h e s p e c i a l eonl'sP

The �wu

emy re('oives into I l l i s spec: i a l c o u r s e t'ol' P i g n

A s t l l d e n t at t h e a g e o J' fOllrtpen i s

b o r n m en a n d women of all ages. not too young, nor i s o n e

o f ferty too o l d .

T h e olle w h o h a s j llSt ar­

r i ved from Euwpe, anrr who i s unable t o spe k a single word o r Eng­ li s h will here find suitable classe s ; a nd he w h o h a s aeq nil'ed some know l e d ge

of

the

wil l

l anguage

also

get

A s p e c i a l course in t h e h i s t o r y a n d ei\'iJ S tate s has been arranged for the

th e

instruction

govern mpn t

he

needs.

o f t h e U n i tprr

benefit of t h i s class of stu d e n t s .

'\' h i s work, besides p re p a rin g· th e stu dent for American c i t izensh i p , will Jlrovide exr' e l l ent t r a in i n g ill tlle use of the E n g l i sh lang-ua '-e.

Studen t s who a r e n n able to

n l e r at tl;e h e gi n n i n i!," of t h e s e h o o l

y e a r , may enter at th e h g i n n i n g of t h e second term, Jovember 2 2 , when

new

arithmetic

classes

will

be

organ ized

a n d pe n ma n sh i p .

in

I·e a d i n g.

spelling, gra m m a r ,

T h e s e c l a s s e s w i l l b e con t i n u ed t h r o u g-h ·

ont the th i r d t erIn . At th e b . i n ni T I <:!; " I' the 1'0 1 1 l't11 term , s t n d pn t � i n tll e s pe c i al classes w i l l t a k e u p the regular w o r k i n c i v i l govp rn m en t , rea d i llg, l e t t e r - w r i t i ng . a n rr a g r i ( 'u 1 t u r e , w i t h

HI t h e lJ e ;': ' n n : n g of t11 e yeul'. 23

t 1 1 e cla s "ps thil t R l a rtE'ri


T

HE

The Music Department Pacific Lutheran Aca demy recognizes the great importance

o f m usic as a means of culture and refinement, and ai m s to fur­ nish high-grade instruction at a very moderate price.

b e e n arra nged o n t h e attached

volved before

progressive plan.

thorough

a

to

pa-s sing

of

mastery

I n com­

school, the work i n music h a s

mon with all the oth er courses of the

Great i mportance i s therefore

the

f undamental

principles

in­

a D to more advanced work.

S P E C I A L A D V A N TAG E S The

musical education received in a school has many advantages

over that gained through private instruction.

The musical atmosphere

of the school, and the stimulus resulting from the close and frequent contact with others engaged i n similar work, cannot but exert a power­ ful i nfluen c e for good upon the student.

1<' urthermore, the close per­

sonal supervision of the teachers during practice pe ri ods ,

the regular

term recitals, the musical library, and many opportunities for public performances and i n a school

conc erted

playing, make

it possible

for a student

of m usic to make far greater progress Ul an would be pos­

sible under a p r ivate teacher.

A R I G H T STA R T

A great deal has been accomplished o f late years i n the stu dy of the arm. wrist, knuckles and fingers, involving many new motions and combinations for controlling touch and technique. tion

to

these

i m portant

details

Proper atten­

at the outset w!JJ save the stUdent

much mi sdirected effort and needless disappointment l ater on. In addition school

of music,

to the above mentioned the rates o f tuition

are

advantages, afforded by less

than

our

one-half of what

would be charged by similar talent for private lessons. Special normal classes

will be arranged far those Who d e s ire to

fit themselves for teaching mus ic.

F U N DA M E N TA L M U S I C T R A I N I The

first year o f piano

study

is

G FOR BEG I N NE RS

often

spent i n

profitable practice. which d iscourages the student. b e a delight,

unthinking,

un­

M : usic study should

and if the student does not find it so, there is something

wrong. How to avoid the drudgery of the beginning i s th e problem which confronts those who are interested in music study. Class ins truction in Fundamental Music Training solves this prob­ lem, saves the student much worry, and places him or her in a posi­ tion more fully to understand and appreciate music, and to practice thou hUully.

A student who has first learned to play it

find it a simple matter t o

24

think

a scale,

will


BOYS' AND AI\D

G I R LS' BASKET BALL TEAMS

I N T E R I O R O f GYMNASIUM


CI .ASSES

I N F U N D A M ENTAL

MUSIC

TRA I N I N G


C L A SS I N ST R U CT I ON

IN

PIANO

is an inc e ntive to Each student, ll ow e '", receives p erso nal aU ntlon. Th e class has two lessons eek for eighteen �· eeks. '1'11e s tu de n t ar e not re­ quired to practice at ho m e dllring the first few week s. They practice, but on ly in the PI' en 'e of the te ch e r, to pr vent them p ractici ng Beginner s are tau"ht i n c lasse s, as class-stud y

w ork.

til e

At

ml st ak es .

loarned how

the

of

end

first

to p ractic e thinJdu O'ly,

t wo 01' three w eel .s they have aUlI aTe t b 811 Te q liretl to practice

dally on th e pi ano.

CLASS I N S T R U C T I O N I N K E Y·B O A R D H A R M ON Y

the

By

ou t of

as i s usual

Th is lion and

l{ey board

mentary tOl'Y,

i n the study 01'

lJarrnony i s

m

n t the

nractlcal worldng

of study

c our se

the

o nly on paper,

l1arnl Ouy. is

d o e s D o t inte rfere

student

gjV'es III hi

term

llar11lonic prin c iples a t the in. lr u m en t i n s tead of

designed to suppl e men t priv, te ins tnw­ III any way with the re g u l a r lessons. t

necessary broadening' knowl e d g e or th eory, ele­ trai n i n g, analys is , s i 'ht reading, n d 11US! al b i m p a rte d in the time allotted to a private

h;!,rmony, C'ur tll a t

calmot

lesson. Instru ction

in

nough

oard lJarmnn:r \v i l l .gis t e r for a nh e-we

' e),-

wh o a d v anc e d to

pi ano students

r

be given free o f chaf!�e i(} . li s' term,

and

who

are I'

r

pro l1 t by it.

W H AT B E G I N N E RS L EA R N IN

E I G H T E EN W E E K S

T o read c (}rrectly at s igh t in nellJe [m d 1)' S S . T cal c ulate all kind of time. 'ro To

p lay all play all

majur and minor scales. major , m i n o r, d i m i n i s h e d , a ugm en te d

and

7th cll Ords.

T

play a l l iIl te vali:i llnd th eI r iUY6I's ion;,; . T o p i y all ca d e ) o s. Th ey are req u i l'e tl to hav(' a v o c a bnJary of and to Imow the st ori e s of t Ile composers. The

wrIst

a re

m a d e 1 00 8 " , tb

thirty

hm1fls sh alled ,

m u s i cal te rms.

and the PI'

per

ll n �er acti on g i ve n . Special a tten tio n is giv en

m us i C!a l stu dy most n ece�s a l' y

J

'CI

U. ,\\1 th i s

to ear tra i n in g , w h i ch is a to m u s i c a l d evelopment, b u t

hra nch

01

ort n ' t I eg'

knowledge is gained without seriollsly tax i n g the s t u d ent,

th i s sy . tem. e v e ryth i n g is simpl i fi e d :J.nd e on densed. The clmrg ' f a !' class II'S on s in Fu n da mental M usic Tra i n I n g for Be g i n n ers will be 50 (. n t s per wee k for e n ch pup il. i ll be gi v e n each we k Two i.tty-minute l essons

because. by

CO U R S E I N P I A N O

1.

P rim a ry

G rad e -

ud ments

of music, stn dles in melody. and

t h e u de rl yi n e; p rl l l c l p l s of lauch an t e . cJ m l q 1l8. Na ti ]Jal G TLll.\l'd Cou fse , , u rl i t t's , Ibllm for the Yo u ng', Conr on e. PIeces. Loescb rl , '5


SOll f l\ inas hy C'l m e n t i llnd u t i l l'l .

Kob ler, S i u dies. modern

2

S tu d i e s

ecker, Dus

'

rade--�la.jor a d m i nor se les in oct ves, thIrds,

n eed tenths,

au d

sixt h s

Ba c h '

arpegg i o s .

lnventloll

;

claves.

ongs

by Hayd - n and M oz 1'1 .

Sonatas

?I son,

Stnd i e s :

'ramer

l el 1 delf:so!J n ' s

� I o m e nts M usicales ;

b l'l't ' s Wal tze s �nd 'eher,

fa.

Ney In, M' son, Grieg, P rel and ot h ers.

ieel's b) A.dv

ehUmall n ' S Alb 1 m

Kullak, and

J en sen s Son""s and D a

H l'(,l,c n chol'ds

H t1 11eJ' . K u h l a u . R h e. n­

1 01"11, Czarny.

by Loe

e c:k, Dlaballl, Sonatiuas.

fOl' the YUllll �.

ta :

rad e-Maj or a n rl minor sc·al ps .

In termed iate

and arpeggios.

�.

from

Scle r·t!oll.

o w po ers.

1Jy

Stilu-

al des('l' nen.

thuman n ' s Pieces

Kullak, Oc­ 'ords ;

\Vltll out

MacDowel l ,

G r ieg,

ade.

H rmol1Y and H i st o r y of M u s i c . 4. taves,

'fe ell

's

C ra m e r

Ha�h, Studies.

G radua ti ng

Oc­

'ullag ;

Cle­

Beethoven's and

M o-

M azurk a s and Prel u des. e l e c ti on s f!'Olll Liszt,

ft. Bra h m s .

rieg, R

H a r m o n y a1 d History

5.

arpe;:;gios,

S t u dies,

O ctave

ehubert's I m prompt u s ;

Novelties.

eho in. Weber.

s( ' al e s ,

0la 8s-Ve l o c i t y

o c h eJ es , Studi e s .

h o p ' n ' " 'Va lues. N o ' t ll rn es,

sonatas,

S h u m nn's

and Parna8 suID .

m e ntI, G ra d u ' 7.url s

C ert i fi cate

and

r M us i c .

C l ass-Ve l o c i t y

st·ales. Arpeggios. Ol'ta ve s ;

C h o­

p in, Stndies ; B e h ' s PI 'eludes a n d F ug ue s : Beet h ov e n . S on atas ; Con­ e rt o s f1' m U umm el, G r l eg. d en d e l s s o lt n , HeHh oven : p.lections from I lUll del, Seh u m a n n , Oho in, Liszt. R u h i n s t c ; u , �·eber. Bra h m s . Hall', and others. A d v a nced

l e gs on s

in

Harm uny,

S ei e n ce or

[nsic

and

l\ l us i c ll I

A n al ysis .

COU RSE I N O RG A N First G rade-"\VaJter Langdon's O l'!!:u n , volu n ta ries,

11

mn

tu n e s . al d fugues.

Boo

I ancl IT. w i t. h NIRY

Se) m i d t' s Tech n i q u e.

eron d G ra tl e·- l e n d el � s o )m s Songs with o n t 'W ('(Is. vol n ll t al'ies '

a n d fugu e s .

VOICE A s y g t e m a t i c: course i n voice tl'a i n i ng, including lJrpath i n g . breath rontrol. voice plar:lng, i n terpretati on and execntion. P r e par atory C o u r s e .-B r a t h i n g and voice p lacing p-xercjses, S L l S­ sea Ie work, vocal i zes

t a i n d t on es ancl

from

C on c o n e :

Abr's Si llgin�

Tutor.

Adva nced C o u rse-.- \7oiC'e p l a c i n g. '. c a l e s . f;1J ' t il. ' 1N1 11 Ot!'S and !'x­ prci�"'::l in arti culation. s t u d i e s from r Oll e-one , Va e-a i . :Vl al'C;h�si ; . i m ­ ]lIe songs. Voi ce

Concon e' s

pla c i n g

Fifty

exel't:ises

LeHso n s ,

c o n t i lJ ll e d .

ongs

fr

m

M arro's H an d e l ,

\ rt o f

ocal i z H t i o n ,

Scbumann,

Schubert.

ha,lw! k ane1 olhers. A d vanced stuel i es a n d a nd o ra tori os.

expr(' i�e�, s o l o s

f,'om

the s t a nd o r tl or'era�


H A R MONY

No

come a cc o m p l is he d 1n music sh oul d neglect to study b armony, w h io h h a s apt ly been called the grammar or m u sic. In the stll(ly f this brarlch ear training r aeiv s specht! a t ten r on. Much time Is dey ted to original work and the ann truc­ lion o f major and min or seal s, interv[l.ts, tri ad s, cho}"cls of tlle se eu tll , and i nv e l· �ions . alt re d chol'ds, modulations, snsp en sion, organ point. p e rson who desires

pa sIng n o les, etc.

a nalysis

S ome

to b

t i ute

d evote d to t h e

w i ll also be

tndy

of

and form.

H I ST O R Y OF M U S I C

m u sic d,ou bly interestiuD' it they acquire some

Students find

edge of th In

history of music, a t tent ion is paid to the de­

of

mu

Ie from

the o pe ra,

t l1 e

r ise of Romanticism

d evelop ment

of

knowl­

great compo ers .

the study of th

vclo pm nt

of

life of tll

the earliest time s to the pr

m od e rn

tile

opera,

an etc.

s en t, the birth

it i n fluence on mu sic, the

Spe cial attention

will

be

glYc m to the l ife and a c t i v i t i e s o f each of the following composers : Bach, H an del, Hayden, Mozalt, Beethove n, Mendelssohn, B l'ah ms, Wagll T, and

rieg.

VIOLI N in h arge of Prof. OJof Bull, an arti s t o f more th a n ordinary ablllty and lV e l l lmown a l l over t h e Pacific oru;t. He ree iv ed Il is m u s ical education u n d er not e d European teach­

The wo r k in

vi ol i n has been

ers, a m o n g others th e

In

p rod u ct.ioll pi

as

of

pure

w il l b e stu

For t h e more studies

famous Wienawski.

the e lementa ry

or

instructioll

tone,

correct

much

em ph a S is

b w ing,

etc.

is

placed

on

the

el mentary

Suitable

ied. advanced students, u se

i s m a e of

Sevde, Kreu tzer ,

Schr-adlecK,

Kay er,

plece s b y Pagan ini, Jacoby , S i tt

the

Fiorillo,

standard

Ro be, a n d

and oth ers.

M u sic Tu i t l o n.-Piano, Harmony. V oice. Singl

l e s s o n s (private instruction )

__________________

--$ 1 .6 0

r, 18 weeks, one Jesson p e r we k (private) 16.00 Per semester, 1 8 weeks (clasB in s t ruc t I o n ) two l es sons per ,. eelt 9 .00 Violin, per lesson 1.00 P r semest

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

________________________ ____________

P i a n o R entOne hour d a i l y per month Two hours daily, per month T hr ee h ours daily, per mOnnL ,

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ______________

-$ 1.00 1 .50 2.00

______ ____ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _______ ._

Tuition as wel l a

_ _ _ _ _ _ ___________ ________

rent of instrument,

?

must be paid in advance.


A

Musical Organizations

LL

the stud nts' m u s i cal organi�a tions a re Ilnder tbe sllpel'V i Ri on

ot the Padfic

atheran Academy lfusical Union, organized d ur­ T h e officers,

n i "" t h e fa l l of 1 9 1 3 . m u sic

direetor,

I

stud n ts .

al'

'f h i s

over t u e Band, C horus, Orch stra. C l u b.

with the ex('eption o t the

organi,; tion

Boys' G l ee

has and

Club

j u r i :;;cl iction Glee

Girl s '

taste f(;r the best music, to teach the

I ts a i m is t o c u ltivate

students h o I\' t o perform O i l band a n d orchestra instrllments, and to A fee of $1.00 in r ading notes and I n part singing. per year enti tles t h e s t u d n t to n emb I' h i p in the un ion and a free T h is also enti tles t h e pass to the concerts held u nd e r its a u s p i ce s . instruct t h em

In­

s tud en t t o membership i n any 0 1 ' al l t h e m usieal orga nizations. struetion is given with o ut extra cost.

T H E C O N C E R T BA N D Du ring

the

past y a r t hi s organization numbered thirty, and we

materially to increase the m e m bership n e x t year. l\I 015t of the ' instrLllllents are furni shed by the )1 usical U n i on and may be re nt e d

b o pe

f o r the sm all s u m o f $2.00 per year.

Prospe(:tive students, who play

band and o r ehestra instrum ents, a r e reqnested to bring them a l ong. During the past year the :1 s e t 0)' l o w

l\lu sic a l U nion has furn i s h e d the Band w i t h

p i tch instrul1l

nts.

B EG I N N E RS' BA N D To

a ecommodate

stu d e n ts

who h a v e

knowlt'dge,

mus ical

no

beginners' band is organized at t h e opening of school .

a

H ere the very

fundamentals of band m n sic,. such as scales and very easy selec t ions, are fl rst studied. promot ed

The studies are l!l'ogressive and the students a r e

according to

progressed sulfi c i e n t l y

Dand.

their ability.

As soon

they are given

as

suitable

the members have

parts

in

the

Concert

T H E O R C H E ST R A

An orch e st r a of s i xteen pi e c es \\' s m a i n tain e d l a s t a s w e l l as Ule band, furn ;shed m u s i cal

year.

This,

numbers f o r t h e l iterary �o­

ciet ies and othel' progra ms, besides assisting at func·tions Ollt of tow n . THE C H O R U S

During the p a � t year a mixed c h orus o f nearly fifty voices ren­ dered

selections

fro111

Tn

L a co m e ,

Costa,

(, o m posers.

\Vai(nor,

and

othor

l eacl i ng

C O N C E R TS

February_

dUl'ing th e

alumni

re u n i o n

week.

the

a n n ua l

con­

cert i s given.

T h is ('on s i s t s o f select i o n s by all the llIusical o rga n i z a ­ tions of the sehool. T h e proceed s !,"O i n to the tl'easur�' of t h e M u sical nion.

Dnrmg

the

p a st

two

c-Ollcerts and social doillgS,

ing new instruments, enlarging

e x penses

in

general.

Open

yea rs

a b ou t

$ 8 110

W�lS r88 1 ized

Th i s slim has been lIsed to

from

a r d s p u rchas­

the m u s i cal l i h rary, a n ci for r u n n i n g­

a i r concerts

and

a feature o f the b a nd during the spring term.

picnic

excursions

are

During the first week

i n ?Iay, 1915, the Ban d , Orc:heRtra and Boys' G lee C l u b made a con­ cert tour of tlle Pu�et Sound c i t i e s . 28


Y

OUNG

General Information men and young women

work

re qu i re d

and

scbool w ill bi> admitted to

No

w h o are willing and able to do the

t o ob y the rules and regulation s of the . n y c ourse, upon pay1ng the regula r

tuilion a n d oilIer reQuired foes. e ffort will b e s par ed to secure

clus ification

possible, and

for e ach s t u d ent the very best

to Illace hi m where h e can

do the

most

efrecthre work.

T i m e to E nte r.-The best

' m e to enter i s at the beginning of the

f U'st semester, when new o la ss e s are o rga nil!:ed . calved

at

any time,

however,

anll g neTally

S tu d ents will be reo classes adapted

ffnd

to

theIr needs.

Ex p e n ses for

Boa rd i n g Stu d e nts.-The charges for room, boaTri,

amI tui tio n in the Academy Dormilories are as follows : On e week

9 weeks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

$

7.00

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

50.00

67.00

eeks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

18 .veeks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

5.00

S G wee k s

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ __ _

180.00

12

ThIs

includes

instruction

all

b an ch e s

offered

O

by

the

school,

It also in clu d e s room, good board, and the wash ing,

except music.

eacb we l{, of the following a r t i c l es

of clothin g :

ne sheet, one pil­

lowcase, two p a ir s of soel, s or s t ock ing s, one s n i t underwear, and two t

wei::;.

All th ese charges are

ayab l e in

advance.

Ex pen es f o r Day S t ude nts-

O n e week

_ _ _ __ ___ __ ___ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _____ _____ _ _ __ _ _ ____ __

$ 2.00

9 weeks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ._ _ ._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

16.00

1 2 we l{s

______________________ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

20.00

1 8 w ee k s

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

28.00

36 " eeks

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

4 5.00

A s t u dent who leaves school before h i s time expires will b e given a due bill.

This due bill may be u ed either by the student himself

or by a broth er

o r sist

r.

In no case

shorter time than two w ee k s .

ďż˝'ill

due b i l l be issue(l [or a

11 ch a rg e s are payable in advance.

M us i c T u i t i o n .-P i a n o, H armon y , Voice. instructIon)

Sln",le lesson s

( p rivate

P r semester,

8 weeks, one lesson per week ( prlvate)

____________________

$

__

1.50

15. 0U

Per s em e ste r , 18 weeks ( class instru c t i o n ) two l es sons per week

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Vi o l i n, p e r lesson

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

9.0 0 1.00

P l a n o Rent.-

Que hour d a ily. per

m onth _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ $

T;vo hours daily. per month . T1uee

ours daily, per month

Tuition as well as rent of

1.00

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 .60

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

2.00

._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

i ns tr um e nt. must be pa i d in advance. 29


R oom6.- T he

rooms

h e a l d lly stea rn , I lgl1tPu by el

are

f n nlished w i th ch a h's, tn l)) es, bedsteads, mattress

and

Stud eut' furn ish

J"(l be�.

a ll Y article oi l u xury

th e i r own

towt>l s ,

s

wal"d·

rug, � Jl d

bedcl oth es, Ooor

l<;ach room 11 s

[Lat rn n )' be d , s i r e d .

c lri" ity

and

oc·

t lVO

t'u pa n t s.

A l l s t ml e n t s Dut res i de n ts of Pa1"i( l a n d are requi re d to room

in t h e

board

a nd

nonll i lory, nn l !",;" e x p r e s s l y e:>teU!!ed by t.he

A ca d emy

p re!l lde n t . Bo oks .-Th e n ecessary

M ed i cal

$2 .00 p e r

ble

price s .

p h y s i c i a n 's

A t t e nti o n ,-A

'

L i b ra ry F e.- A li b rary

is ch'U'g"e u .

G E N E RA L

S1Iell

rules

h ave

R EG U LA T I O N S

b en adopted as ha ve been

sary fur the Pl'ou:wtion of the Il ig i l ."t 8( ,11001. o n a d m i tt i n g s t n d ntR. d o e s "0 that

y will r:!l e er-fu l l y

th

the s c h o o l

Cbristian All study

in

and

of

i nlYl"e8t

tbe

\'. i tll

with the

comply

res pect,

every

The nece sary medi ·

f the student.

eXllen�e

of 50 c e n t s pel' S mester is ch arged .

fee

.1-\ 11 i nde m n J t.- tee of $ :{.OO

ing

of

h i s stay at scbool .

ille a n d n u rsing is rll ni s h ed at t h e

of

$1.0 p r semest r, or Th is e n ti tl e s the studem

fee

i s required of each :ll udent,

year,

t o m e d i cal a t t e n d a n c e d u ri n l!;

Illy

an d s ta t i o n r y m a y be bought. a t

textbr.oks

t i l e Aca de my bo()k�tore a t rea ' O il

to

fo u nd neces· understand·

express ,md

ril l e .

deport

The

the student s.

t h em sel v

re gll l a r iolls

S 2R

befits

ladies a n d g e n tl em e n .

stud

are

Ilts

1

he

\York

s t l lily or he

a l lowed t o dro p a

to suh m i t

rel } llil'ed

ue rol'e hp g : nnillg

to t h e

of t it

tprm,

p r i n cipal a

and

,ourse

no s t u den t w i l l

a h s e n t ("rom h i s classes witll O u t

0 1" lie

sp c i u l

per m i ssion, All

a h s pnces a n d

i lTegnl arities l ll ll,.,t be

ported

r

at

t h e orfi ce

at

on ce,

ilre rPfJ u i ed to be p r e s en t at the d a i l y d e v o t i on I ex· in til e "hape!. Ulld are expeeterl to a l t nd div\ Ie ser vice�

A l l studen ts ereis s held on Sunday.

S t u o pnts a r e A x p ected

to

employ

tn e i r' t i llle to tbe b e st poss ible

acl va nt age, a n d to a v o i d , as f a r a s possible. d e n cy

to

int

d an ci n g or

are

of

a qll .stion�ble

s trictly fOTbidden.

t h e se t h i n g s w il l b

A

sl udent who n e glects h i s

w ill 11 0t

t u i t ion a n d

very th ing

work.

The

tha t h as a

ten·

partici pation

in

be retained mom

naU ITE', ancl the A ll)

udent

use

fOll 1 1 d

of in tOX icating gl.l i l l y

ot

d o i n :-­

promptly d i s m i s s e d .

w h ich are l a i d d o w n fo r and

l e g i t i m a te s c h o o l

("a rr1 playi ng. t il e v i s i t i n g o f sa l o o n s , gam b l i n g b ou se s . o r

other p l a c (' s liquors,

l'fp.l'e wllh

the

w o rk,

w iHul ly di sobey s

wbo

g o v ernm e n t o r

in til(; i nsti tntion,

rent pa i ll . 30

t h e school. i

and

I f'

expel l pu ,

th e rul e s

n o t w a n ted ,

forfeits th e


AT H L E T I C S Tbe control o f ath l eti cs i s

vested

in a

board o [ five,

compo e d o f

two mem bers o f the faculty, t he presIdent an d the supervisor o r ath· letics,

t hr e e student members, one

ud

dent of the Athletic

of w hi ch shall

A s soc ia t io n aull two ele c te d ,

b e th e presi·

semi-aunuall.

by

the

A th l et i c Association.

with

the

arranging schedule s for practice

d

This

and

board

co-op f'at es

ot h er

s tlld en t

organiz at i ons

in

cou est games, gr an ti n g letters

honoTs, dire ting expenditures, and passing

up

n

lile

e l i gi b il i ty

of

p lay er s to parti(;ipate in c o nte s t games.

An at hl et i c fee of $ 3 .00 per year,

q l a Tt e r

,

p ai d

is

to

or

the treasu rer

e m e s ter or $ 1 .0 0 PCI' s chool by eaeh student on

2.00 p e r the

This e ntitl es the stUdent to mem

entering.

o rganiz ation s, the use

of

,

er s h i p in all the ath l e t i c

all th e appar a tus , and free a d m i s s ion

to

all

g a m e s a nd a th l e t i c exhibitions.

m ember8 1l i p in n con t e s t i n g team, a s t ud e n t m u s t l e �s t ha n one s(, lll e:' te l ', m u s t cany n o t l e s s t h a n twenty h(]urs of worle P ' I' week. and m u � t m a intain a n averll!\f' o f at least 80 per cen t. in h is cl a s s work. T h e ll Ulll es of the cand i d at ,S 1'01 nwmb ersh ! p ill o o n te s t i n g t eam s Jll llst be reported tv t h e pri n c i p a l at least t w o weeks befo re the fi rs t ( ' oul e t ' IUl e . Any chI nge i n t l l e tell n l mu st be reported i m l e diat I . ' . To become a "an(iidate for h t lf l Ol'fl l'Y l e U 1 ' 5 01' nIlDJ b�'s , i l student must com ply ·jth o n e of the fo llow i ng- con di t i o n s : To

be

l i gible to

have registered ('or not

1 . I l ll m u st have a t . TI d e d tll� A c a tl� m y n ot l e s s than thirty-six I'\e);s, !Dllst l l a"c e a l'lled n o t ] t.l.J S n I \': p ty h o u r s o f w ork pel' week. and ha l e m aint.a ined an a v erll g e of not les," th u n 80 pel' cent. in h i s class wo r k . or 2. }j (-J m Ilst b \' i::ist reu fOl' a fill l sell DO] 'ear, earr), not less t h a n twe-nty h o urs or \\' o l'!. pel' v: ele , a n rl m ai l l r a lll an , V E'rage of lit J !'aJlt SO per c at. i n h i s class work. The n a 111P " or t h e can d i c1 a tps for J e t i ers m l l , t be r pOJ'tt'fl t o the ',\

."

pri n c i j H'l1

at

le ast foUl' \" eek s b e l Ore th R EC O R D S

A n�conl of

of

wh l c.h

.

is

n <l 0 1' t b e s ( h ool yea r.

N D R E P O R TS

of att e n d a nc e, recitation anrl de portm e ' t is ]( e 1 ) t , a s en t

to

parents or gu ardians w h o reqll est

it

li t the

copy eml

Exa n ! ll a t i on s a r e heJ el at the (;Iose ot' 7 5 p e r nent. m n st lw attai n!.'tl in e a ch separate study u r s ae d to e n ti tl e tl1 e stu dent to p u s s . A stutlen Who has p as s e d . sati . fac tory e,' rn i nation ill aJl branch e s preB<'ribed in any c o n rse o f s t l 1 (ly will rece ive a i )1 ma. A rl i t 1 1om' f e ot $ 2 . 5 0 is ch a r ge d . each

o:1[:h

senwster, or o ftener.

sen�este)'.

A fina.l gTa d e

of at l east

SPEN D I NG

0 1 EY

n o t to allow th , 1 1' rhiltlren too nIueh p o e k e t mOil r . Student w ho have a t o o li b e ra l a l low ance o r t11 i s , a n d s t i l l more 1 11 (J � t' 1'1 1 0 re allowed l o I' o n t l'aet !1 0I J t � , a r e a1lTJ(l;;t Pa r e n t s are e a rn estly u r ::; e d

31


. t i re to fail in st u lly :l nll in to

U , e h' cllllrlren

su bm i t

at the end of eacb

n

II I

ODl ill ct.

urents ure al1 v l 3 �d to I'PQ tl i e

Iteml ze

C ounl

an

and, If i ll !1 Ott IJt

J ' theIr

.

xpcll d itun'!;

to corredpo n d w i th we

,

pr inc i pHI in regard to expel sea.

H OW TO R E A C H P A R K LA N D

l'al'klEUH1 i8 pan :J \ a y

til

I'ille

car.

to

blo.'k

the

ror IJng._agf·, a n d tbe 8l'hoo] w i l l s e lo

dell'v ere d .

1t that !l a m e is proper] .. II stu!lell tll

Pa r k l ' 1(1, a n d w a l k one

to

hee'll.

ere lea e

A ca tl� my .

On arriving In Tn . Olll a la k e

oaRt.

ocenn porL on t. h e Pa c i li '

aIl d

r the l a l'ge ]'ail ro'ld ct'n j (>l's

ulJllrb of T}u ' ('l tl a. one

a

"

to

w l l O d esi re

m e t at t h e train

boat

or

s h o n l ll

y s in arlyan Ce of th eir arrivn l .

.i n form we pri ncl)Jlll a Fe

TELEPHON E 1' h p telephone nllmber of nse

of rloullt

01'

diffi cul ty, c a l l

lhe Academy

ii:!

l O G J 2.

l a d l all

In

t h i s number.

11

S E L F S U PPO R T I N G ST U D E N T S uestion is otten astted :

The

the Pllcifc

Can

a . ' udent work

T h a t d epend ., i:'rgel y upon l h e stUtlt!llt. h al t or II a l arg

s udent'

earn

From

P!ll' [ of

a con siderable

w a y tl l r ugh

one -th i nl

'L'he Pac'

' l.ut lH'ra n

st ll deu ls.

The princ i a1

student . and as.'ll

s.

A y o ung

$71>. 00 to �] O O. O(l ('an s � f' e l y mal e a �la rt.

A rnrj emy

is

111el

e_

to aLtract s e l f-s u p ort i n g

anX IOUll

tJle Academ

01

to one­

thei r eX !J\:: llSPS, and

nnmber llre a b s ol nt l' l y i1 e jwn tl cnt u pon themse!>

pe rson wh o has saved r o m

�u ('ll

111

,utbel'an Acaden , y ?

tnvi I . _

corr s , lOudenc

fm

priv i l e{! e t o

he w i l ] consirj er it

a s s i ·t t b e m in e 'ery po ll i bl e wa y. DAILY ROUT I N E

011 tll

fi v e sci Dol Ll a y � of thl. v.cck tlle st u de n t

Ail( and brea : i'lIs1

at seven.

Tl e sch oul

w

rise at h a l f p a s t

l'k b gI n s a t ,, ' ght

IH1

o n t i n l les u n ti ! len, at ;\ h cll U n e the e n U re school a sel1l b J e ' in the iape]

is

a

lo r devotional

sliort

re c ess ,

t.i n u e s u n W one

e, (lr,'ise s .

I m m ed iately

ufter whieh t h e

a l f past

h ool

r ] l o w \ l l g tlie e tIl ere

w' or k is

the s('h o'lJ worle is

5';tlldent · ar

ar ise. !Inch

en('ourllge a !l

l.l

s

At h ai r past The

111'.

f o r t' cr .atlo n, a nll

t,) take p a rt in \'8 l'i o u s forms of phy!; irul

hall.

Sll Pll r il' Rervf!d at s i x .

basket bal l .

At R

yen tt.

tennis, . tnd en t"

1' 1 1 ('1'6 th e)7 a l e (lxpe('\ d 10 stur1y u n t i l tif t' l ights

d, and con­

� U Il)

gai n rE'su m etl , t\nt] con ti n oe ' u n t i l r

tWfl n -foul' and six i s set a pa r t especiall

time

l"

t w e J e, wben d i nn e r is s rvell.

are turned oJ'f,

[ l' n .

crofjl1et. r

At

and

pall' to Ii

t

1 he

e-x ­

1ll

p,

air r o o m s .

4 1 1 a l tl'r a ft er l <'f1

a n u !Ill relll' .

On Sn tur d ars anll h o l i d a ys b J'ea kts l' t 1s seT\'l'( at h :u r pu"t se ' n . Stll d en l s a r day II

l'tly

arnest!:v uJ'g:ed to ttf'lld (livine el'v!C'Ps on the Lord's On Satu rd r y no r gular cl a ss wo rk i s d on e , The day is lIsell tor rP.l'reat i o n an d

h 3 t i n�, w rit ing' <,o m ]J f)� i t i

par tly for d O ing- sp<'clal work, , .I e l l a IJ:Ulfl Ill-H e t i e 8 11 0 t 1 1 t' i ii, ... .

11�,

,

tiE'­


CHORUS J\ND CO�CERT B A N D


GLEE CLUB

AND

ORCHESTRA


.L Y C E U M Th i s is the oldest lit erary society of the school. membership a n d I s doing excellent work.

It h a s

a strong

Public programs are reno

dered twice a month. D E B AT I N G &,O C I ET I E S

these are usually organized a t the beginning of They afford an excellent opportunity for practice in

Two or more o f the s c h ool year. public

spealdng.

M ee t ings are held Friday evenings. T H E M I S S I O N SOC I E TY

The aim of this society is to promote among i ts members and in the school at large a n interest in Christian m i ssions.

During

the past

six years the society has contributed money to various missions. C O M M U N I CATI O N S All communications

concerning the scllool should b e addressed to N. J. HONG, Principal, Pa rkland, Wash.

33


DIRECTORY OF GRADUATES NORMAL COURSE ( ne e Ettie K ra a b el )

1 8 9 8-Mrs. Viggo .Jurgensen

M. Tem ick, Missionary

1 9 0 0-Anna

1 9 0 2-Clara A. l�ossen, Teacher 1903-Mrs. H .

� e yers ( nee

1 905-11arie Olson 1 9 0 5- lrs .

larion Afdem )

W i l bur, WasIl.

Chi kongshan,

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

___________

China

Parklan d , Wash.

Spana way, Wash.

_

Genessee, Idoaho

_____________________________ _____

.J. T. Davis ( nee Tom ie Hal vorson) . Lauridsen, N llrse

H J 0 5-Karen

______

____________

Prosser, 'Vash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ �_ _ _ _ _ _

1 905-Lauritz Rasmussen, C l e rgyman 1 9 06-Nellie M!ay Tegl a n d , Teacher 19 06-Jda Aaberg, Stenographef-

_ _ _ _ ___

___ ____________

Astoria, Ore.

Burlington, 'Vash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

__________ __________

Yelm, Wash.

Parkland, Wash.

1906-:1I1rs. Oscar vVenberg ( Marie Louise Anderson) _ Stanwood, 'Vlash. 1D08-Mrs. Olaf B o rge 1 908-01ive

( n e e Si grid Greibrok)

Christensen,

IvI i s s i o n ary

1908-Edith .Johnson, S t udent

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ ___________

1 910-Moses O . Herber, Plumbing _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _-

1 9I3-01ga Hong, StudenL

& Hearing

--

-

----

--

Tacoma, WasIl.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

19 13-Lena O. Kittelson, StudenL

-

-

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________

Pal'kland, 'Vash.

__ _______

- - - -- - -

________

-

China

Parkl a n d , WasIl.

_ _ _ _ _ _ ________ ________

1 9 0 9-1sabel Storaaslie, Teacher

R . Knutson

Lawrence, Wash.

C h i k ongshan,

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 0 8-Louise D. Harstad, Nurse

1 9 1 1-Marie

________

_____________

Tacoma, \Va s h .

--

Tacoma, Wash.

Bellingham, Wash. Bellingh a m , Wash.

P R E PA R A T O R Y C O U R S E 1 8 9 8-Mrs. Anderson

( n e e Am a n d a Swan)

_________

Bellingham, ,va s h .

.J. Orelal ( n e e Anna C. L e q u e ) 1 90 1-lIL rs. O . .J. Toft ( nee .Johanna Ander son)

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

1902-�rs. Louis Nyhus ( nee :Vlar), SI,jervem)

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 8 9 9-lVT r s . O .

__ _________

1 9 0 1-Henry Skjervem , TeacheL

Tacoma, ·Was h. Seattle, Wash.

Parldand, \Vasll.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

TIoy, \Vasll.

CO M M E R C I A L C O U R S E 1899-Nellie

I. P . Lee

1 899-Sena Olson, Stenographer

_______________________

1 0 0 0-0scar A. 1' inge lstad. Teacher 1 9 0 0-C. A . Anderson

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ ________ _____ ____

1900-August Buschmann,

lVIannfacn treI'-

1 9 0 1-Gilbert Anderson, FarmeL 1 901-G. \V. Brown , Contractor 1 9 0 1-G.

______________

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Seattle, ·Wasll.

Ellingson, N. Dalr.

_______________

�r. Magelssen, Fal'mer

____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

-- _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

1 9 03-Christine Harstad, Bookkeeper

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 0 3-Theod ore TIes (Deceased)

Parkland, Wash.

Petersburg, Alaska

__ __________________

34

Astoria, Ore.

Seattle, Wash.

Stanw ood . Wash.

________ ________

1 903-1\-Iarie C_ .Toll anson, Dookkee1)ef

Seattle, Wnsh.

Klndred, N. Dak.

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1902-lVIrs. H. F. Kempe ( n e e N e l l i e Bra!:\re) (IDeceasec1 )

Oakland, Cal.

Aberdeen, 'Vash.

1902-Arnie Hanson, Public Account a n L

1903-E. E. Huseby

Seattle, -Wash.

______ __________ _ _ _ _

1 9 0 2-Huelolph E. Hamry, B o o k kee p er

1902-T.

lmperial, Cal.

Decorah, I o w a

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

H. Haukelie, Contractor

1902-0I1ver R i n d a l

Mt. Vernon, Wash.

____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Al'lington, 'Vash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _

PortIand, Ore.


1!)03-K. T. K u u t s o n ,

Fa rme r

<

S il v a n a , \Va sll .

_________________________

N el o n, B o okkeeper 1903-Harold H. P e d erson, 1 erchanL l ll 0 3-. 1rs. 0. A. T ing e l s t ad (nee Alfi e l d 1 9 04-A. M. Anders on , FarmeL 1004-0scar V. Aaberg 1!J 04--.J. C. Lund, ne�t:lurant Keeper 1903-

mil

_______________________

______________

Tvete)

Sea t tl e , WasIl.

Los Angeles, Cal. De c orall , Iowa

________

___________________

Brownsville, \Vash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Tacom a, ·Wasll.

__________________

19 04-F. C. iVIoehring.

_____________________________

1904-Ella O lson, Boolc](eeper

______________________

19 05-Ge ol'ge Harstad, TeacheL 190 5-L e wi s ]\l oe, B o ok e eper

1905-Alfred 1.

S mi th , Fruitgrower

1 9 05-Carlo S. Loven, So l ic i tor

________________

B�ngi neer J<-; state

1 olstad, Real

1 9 0 6-1. J. E ri ckson ,

B ookkee p e r

. Po r t Townsend, \Va sll.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

DealeL

_ _ _ _ _ _ _

shcrotl ( ne e Blanche

B e lln er )

e l\Jargrete 'f. Forde, LawyeL

1907-11,rs. A . J . D e m e r s (n

1907-J ol1n Schau

Bentson,

190 7-OIe Linvog, Stu d c u L

Seattle, ·W a s h .

Larson

1 9 0 5-P_ B. Jaco bson

Sil yertoll, Ore.

Seattle,

Sea ttle , Wash. S ilverton, O re .

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ __ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

__________________

Silverton, Ore.

Balla r d , WasIl.

.. Eyerett, ·Wash.

Park la n d , WasIl.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _._ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 0 8-J. H. Smith, T e a c h e L

__ ______ _ _ _ _ _ __ ___________

1 9 0 5-Alexan d e r Ostrom, Bool,kee p e r

M ahl b e rg ,

Stenographer

Portland, O re .

Ro sl y n , S. Dak.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ ___

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 0 8-Bernard J. Berg, Far me L

_________ ________________

___________________

1910-Hans Staurust

F a i r fi e l d , \Va s h .

______________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. _ _ _ _ _

Barlow, Ore.

Bellingham. \Va s h .

_ _ _ _ _ __________________

1 9 09-0 s c a r A. Larson, Bo o k lw e pe r

Astoria, Ore.

Olympia. Wash.

1 9 09-John Hogberg, Contractor

1 1l09-EUw. a. Bl o o m , FarmeL 1 n 0 9 -E d w i n T i n gelsta d , StudenL

WasIl.

S e attle, \Va sh.

_ _ ____________

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

iI'T olden, B ookk eepe r

Cal.

C h lyton, \Va s h .

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ ______

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

Oaklan d ,

Seattle, \Vasll.

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ __________

1 9 0 8-C . Herman Johnson, Boo]t];eep e L

1 905-Lars

Tac o m a, Wa ' sh.

Tacoma, \Va s h .

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Farmer

Hatl eherg,

.r.

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 908-l\L T . Tingelstad, Farmer

HI08-Clara

Knudson)

Wnsh. W a sIl .

T a c oma, Wash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ________ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

1 !HJ 8-Julius Alberg, Bookkeeper

190 8-Melvin A.

______

_ _ _ _ _ _ __

_______________________

lerchanL

1 9 08-0tto W i de n, Bool,keeper

190 5-l\i. O.

Seattle,

P ou lsbo,

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

1 9 0 7-Even B e rg, Bo ok k ee pe r

G.

Seattle, \Vasll .

___ __________________

1 9 0 7-.Tol1n N e l s o n , B o o k k e e p e L

1 9 0 7-Cl1al'les

Edmon toll, Alberta

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 07-1\lrs. C . D. Milhoane ( n e e Maude Benner) Hl07-Mathias H.

Tacoma, \Va s ll .

Port Townsen d , \Vasll.

_______ ________ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 906-M arius M e sford, Bookkeeper 1907-;\1rs. Dean

Parkland, Wash.

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

190 G-P. H. Ongstad, BookkeepcL

1inn.

Kenne·wick, \Va sh.

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

______________

Wi lm ar,

El lens b nrg, \Vasll.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1905-Ployd S ath er , B o oltk eeper _ .

1906-John H.

Sta n w oo d , Wash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

1 905-Edwin An d e r son , Farme L

1905-01af Bendixon, C i v il

Snoho mi s h, ·Wa sh.

Decorah, I o w a

Petersburg, Alaska

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 1 1--Jollll V. H i l l s , Bookhf>epeL

_ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 l 1-L. C. T h y n f> s s , B o () l;I(ceper

_ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Alherni, B.

C.

Bel'keley. Cal.


1911-E. B. Houke, Bookl{eeper 1 9 1 1-Ole Torget

_________________________

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 1 1-A. H . Foss, Bookkeeper

________ ________________

Flasher, N. D.

_____________________

Seattle, Wash.

1911-Carl L. Hansen, Bookkeeper 1 9 1 1-Gustav O . Haagensen 1912-Henry Husby 1 9 1 2-Lou i s .Roen

( Deceased)

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_________ _______________________

19 12-Henrik Nilsen

__________ ________ __

1 9 1 2-Conrad Gaal'd, StudenL 1913-Edmund H. Hanson,

StudenL

1913-Elias Nelson, MerchanL

_________________

Parkland, Wash. Parkland, W.Rsh.

____________________

SiI vana. Wash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1914-Edw. O. Hougan, StudenL 19H-Ivan Mesford

_____________________

Cl'abtree, Ore.

Port Ludlow, Wash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 14-Arthur Wardal

_______________________________

1914-Jacob Jacobson, Bool,keeper

Rainier, Ore.

l\'Iilton, Wash.

Pal'kland, Wash.

________________________________

______ _____ __________________

Astoria, Ore.

Seattle, Wash.

_____________

________ ______ ______________________

1 9 14-Arndt Anderson 1914-S. T. Syse

Chehalis, Wash.

Arlington, Wash.

_______________________

1 9 1 3-Lasse Knutson, Bookkeeper 1 9H-Syver Sa tel'

Waterford, Cal.

Parkland, Wash.

_ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 1 2-Jolm Kulsley

Eureka, Cal.

Point No POint, Wash.

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 912-0rdin H i im, Bookkeeper 1 91 2-Lew i s Ness

Junction City, Ore.

________________

_____________________________

__________________________

1912-Harold Johnson

Tacoma, wash.

__________________

1911-Milton C. Hoff, Lumber Dealer 1911-Wm. Hjertaas, Bookkeeper

Astoria, Ore.

Seattle, Wash.

________________

Custer, Wash.

G a rrison,

Mont.

Junction City, Ore.

STE N O G R A P H I C C O U R S E 1912---'M rs. O . A. 'l'ingelstad (nee Alfield Tvete) 1 904-Bertha Erickson 1 9 04-Ludvig Larson

Decorah, Iowa

________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

________________________________

1905-Anna Molden (Deceased)

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

1 90 5-Alfred I. SmIth, Fruitgrower 1905-Nils Jeldness, MerchanL

____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___

______________

1 907-Mrs. Dean Ashcroft (nee Blanche Benner) 1 9 0 7-l\Ilrs. C. D. Milhoane (nee Maude Benner) 1 907-Mrs. Hugh Sales (nee Louise Brottem) 1907-Mrs. Chambers

(nee Alice Merifield)

1 9 07-Karl F. Frederickson, Bookkeeper

_ _____

Tacoma, Wash.

_______

Tacoma, Wash.

________

}fl 08-Al exander Ostrom, Bool(keeper 1 9 0 8-Gena Brudvig

Parkland, Wash. SeattJe, Wash.

____________

_ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

19 0 8-Bertha Harstad, Stenographer

Astoria, Ore.

South Bend, "Wash.

1907-Mrs. A. J. Demers (nee V l largrete '1'. Knudson) 1908-P. C. Lee, MerchanL

Parkland, Wash.

Kennewick, Wash.

_________________________

1905-Clare R. Knudson, Bookkeeper

SeattJe, Wash.

Tacoma, Wash.

__

BelJ ingham, Wash.

___________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

Astoria, Ore.

Parldand, Wash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1908-H. L. Dahl, Farmer

_____________________________

1 9 09-H. P. Hansen, Farm e r 1909-E. G . Bloom, FarmeL

3&

Barlow, Ore.

Neptune, M inn.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ __ _ _

1909-Mrs. Strong ( nee Mary W. Sales)

Quincy, Ore.

Ethridge, Mont.

S il verton, Ore.

Fairfield, Wash.

_ _____________

Tacoma, Wash.


1909-Emma H . Wallin, Stenographer 1909-C. A. Wallin, Stenograph el'

191 0-J!]lI a Tv ete, Stenographer -- - - - - - - - - 1910-Ida "\Vaal e

,Tacoma, Wash.

( nee Minnie Hong)

Tacoma, Wash.

19 11-Jennle Foss, Stenographer 1911-Helmer Halvorson

____________________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ ___

Stenographer

191 1-A. H . Foss, Bookkeeper

Tacoma, Wash.

BelIingham, Wasil.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _. _

L. Oss, Bookkeeper - - -

Montbourne, Wasil.

_ __ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

Parkland, Wash.

__________________

_______ ________________

1 9l4-Julia Nederlee -

_______

Empire, Wash.

- - - - - - - - - -Bryant, Wash.

ďż˝ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ Bryant,

M. Ose, Stenographer

Wash.

Tacoma, \Vasl!.

_____ _____________

1 n 4-Alma Arnet

Minn.

Winchester, \Vash.

1913-Alpha Pederson, Stenographer 19l4-Ellen Nederlee

Wilmar,

Tacoma, Wash.

Tacoma, Wasil.

__________________

____________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

191 3-Myrtle Olson, StudenL

SeatJtle, Wash.

Poulsbo, Wash.

_ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

191 3-Cora H off, Stenographer 1 9 1 3-Alma Nelson

W):Jlford, N. Dak.

________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _

L. Hogberg, Contractor

191 1-Laura Ellefson,

Tacoma, Wash.

____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_ ___________________

1911-Clara M. Madsen, Stenographer

1914--- ' Dorothy

Seattle, Wash.

Los Angeles, Cal.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ___ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1911-Ina Cooper, StenographeL

1911---Clara

__

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____________

19 10-1 ¡ rs. D. Storvik

1911-John

Minot, N. Dak .

_ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

19l0-Mrs. H . A . Hendrickson ( n ee Margot Sende) 1910-Inga Waale

Minot, N. Dak.

___ __ _ _ __ ________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_______________________________ _______

Tatino, B . C.

CO L L E G E P R E P A R AT O R Y C O U R S E 1902-Ingebret Dorrnm, Teacher 191 0-Ciara

_____ _____________

Christensen, Teacher

Fergus Falls, M : inn.

___________________

Parkland, Wash.

19 10-Mathias H. Forde, Lawyer

_____ __________________

1nO-Aletta Gre ibrok, Teacher

_ _ _ _ _____ _____________

1902-0scar A . ringelstad, Teacher 1903-John C. Goplerud, Farmer 190 3-Lars Jensen

(Deceased )

1903-Ludvig Larson

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ ____

_ _ _ _____ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1905-Alfred Halvorson, StudenL

_________________

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1907-Iver A. Opstad, Teacher

______________________

______________

1908-Gynther S toraasli, Miss ionary 1909-Aanon Greibrok, StudenL

_________________

Shanghai, China

___ _____________

_____

191 1-Conrad Gaard, StudenL 1911-Alfonso Lee, StudenL

St. Paul, Minn.

Tacoma, \Vash.

Stanwood, Wash.

- - - - - - - - - - - - - -Decorah, Iowa

_ _ ____________________

Albert Lea, :Mlnn.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1911-H. A. Hendricksen, Solicitor

__________________

Silvana, Wash.

Los Angeles, Cal.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _____

Parkland, Wash.

___________________________

19 11-l\1'artln Olson, Teacher

_______ ________ _______

37

Reineck, Iowa

Sedro-Woolley, W,ash.

________________________

1911-Walter J. Maakestad, StudenL 191I-J oseph Husby

Willmar, Minn.

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

190 9-Alfred E. 'Vedeberg. MerchanL

1911-01iver H a rstad, Teacher

Silv erton, Ore.

J!]thridge, Moni.

____ ____________________

190 8-Frank W. Peterson, Teacher

1910-Martin Leque, Farmer

Decorah, Iowa

Silverton, Ore.

Mlnneapolis, Minn.

________________________

1905-George Harstad, Teacher

Seattle, Wash.

Parkland, Wash.

Seattle, Wash.

Bellingham, 'Vash.


1. 12-Ida Fjeld e, T acher

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 9 1Z-Agnes 1 9 1 " - fils

M . Legue, StudenL

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __

----- - - - - ---- Decorah, Iowa

1 9 1 2-11enry Torvauger, Cle rlL

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _

1 9 1 2-Joseph A aberg, Stl dent

___________ _____________

1 91 3-Elizabeth Larsen,

Stud nL

nL

1 9 13-Sophie Larsen, Stud

1 9 1 4---

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

-L B ardon , Stll(] enL

o r Ul a

ydia Greibrok, Teacll Pl'

1914-G l'acc

aard

_

_ _____

1 9-14-Thc allder Harstad

adisoll. Wash. lash.

'Bi ckleton, Was h .

e ll in gha m, \Vash.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

_

De<!orah, Iowa

Blcldeton,

_

_ _• __ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

1 14-Ell wal'd J. A rn t zen , StudenL 1 914-

Pt.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _ _ _ _ _ _

914-1 ariha R. llowem, Teache r

...Dss!an, low

arkiand, wash.

h r istensen, St ud enL - - - - - - - - - -- -

8 i l enon, are.

__ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _

__ __ __ _ _ ____ _ __ _ _ _ _

Seattle, Wash.

Par - l an d, ''V ash.

- - - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - - - P arkla nd,

ash.

Pal'kland,

Wasb.

_ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ _ __ _

GRADUATING CLASS, 1915 CO L L E G E

A n d erson ,

P R E P A R A T O RY

Se re na

Harstad, COM M E RCI A L

SE

Ness,

Everott, Jean

li ong, Andrew

Uanson, Karsten

S T E N OG R A P H I C

Anderson, A. K.

Arthur

COURSE

Ba sse, Ell ward

u d ol p h

O nsta d ,

COU

Ingyalc1

COURSE

Tvete, N i na

lson, Inga

Erdah l , Breitha

Hanson, Gertrud

Storaasli, S igne G.

Dani

A ngell, Henry

Mabel

Ison,

Iverson. Mabel

STUDENTS, 1 914-191,5 AUsen,

Bardon, C d .

Joel

Anderson,

K

,\ n d e rso n , F. rnest Anderson, G nst r

11

Christensen, GeI'trude

Bardon, Jennie

M.

erson, J . A.

nllnrson. J. 1.

Bal'seth.

h ristensen, Hans

l a r ti n

Coltom, l�m m y

H a s se, Ed ward

Dahl , M a r tin

HEn c1L"on. Karl

Da ielson. J u n e

n

n80n,

Eva

Danielson, Lucy

A nderson , Knute

Jlerg-, Hans

D:l11 i elson.

A I1 Ll o rso n,

Dl oom , . l abel

Dein ing, Chas.

Dloom, O l i v e r �!rel\(l . n . Pet a

Drost, L. P.

liron <1t.

e t ro

Elstad, Arnold E.

Dro wn,

O s m ann

'aem i

Anderson . Osc:11' L.

Anderson, Serena An[lerson. Victol' n. A n tral ! . } cnry Art!: ttl.

John

_ 1 abel

Elken, Carl

A.

:J.!11 ]1tell, ''Vm.

'8u ge, RobeT't F.rdahl, Britha

.'\ m t zen. 1\ el ford

('arlson, Clifford N

Eric ,s on,

All s :11und, A s trid

C'. �P(;

Erickson, "Frank

8art o n , BUl'tlon DnJ'(\nn. G u n h i l d

C'h ri s tflJ; s p n , C l a ra

E r i c k s o n , Leonard

C h -:, l s ' r.: l!�(m , ChI'.

l<;ri cl; son,

on,

Carl

36

!fred

Ole


E rlan d son. A ugust

J h nson , Albin

Even�on, Sigurd M.

Johnson, Arvid

Pet

John son, Louise

PetII I'SOn, Leonhard

Poutz, RIc b a rd

verett, Jean

eterson , Hang

Fadness, Anna

Johnson, Amanda M.

!,' adn s s, lre ne

Kallane!, 1\1

Flel dlJer g , J ohn

Kal s th , Thore

Hattie

1'8011,

Preste g a ar d , H an s

tho

Price, Do r o t hy

Foss, C lara

Knudsen,

eorge

Foss. Halfdan

Kvelland ,

Andrew

Foss, O l e

Kvern, Rosin

Fossen, Clara A.

Larson, John

Roe, Godtrred

Fre de rickson, Freu

Larson, Louie

Ronnei, Or e

Larson, Lillian

Rovelsta d , Cora

Fribr oclt . John P. Oarness,

i

a ri on

G l'e i brok. Ragnhild

Rern es s, Jacob R i nd al, O scar Rod f;et , Peter

Rynning . Emma

Larson, lIt a u d arson, Valborg

H y n n i ng, Karen

G re i brok. L y d ia

Lee,

[,'red

San d v ig, Martin

G rimst a d, -Iarold

Lee,

Osoar

Sat1ler, B anna

Oulhuugen, T heo d o re

Lervik, Torris

Sath 1',

Gabrielson, Gunnar

Lilleboe, Amelia

Ol oman, .John

LineJllUrdt, Johannes

Bat ra, A ndrew Slwl'Eeth, P.

Hans

} T uleen, A n dre w

Lofgren, Ella

Shu dshi t, Arne

hannus, Mike

M'adsen, Johannes

Skarstrom,

Halvorson, Elmer H.

?l T c:Farl an d , Lettie

Hanson, Edmund

11 elgard, Ohristian

Hanson, Eimar

:!I l oe, A n d re w

Ha n son , H. A.

N e l s o n , . 1a.rtin O .

Skillman, Ma,y

R n so ll , Gertrude

Nelson, Nettie

Skjervem, Gustav

Hanson, Harold

Ne ss, Arthur

Skorgen, Bernhard

Han so n , Karsten

Nelson, lIlartin

S o l l i,

Harstad,

N ilsen, Nordal

Sol h e i m , Cl a us H.

dolph

L.

kattebol, Ln rs Skattelbol,

lc;a

k i l lr.la.ll , C. P.

". E.

Ha rstad, Berth a

Nilsen, Peter

80lwold. Gertrude

Harstad, C h r i s t i n e

Norgore, Hilmar

Sonju, Howard

Harstad, Jngvald

Nor�oTe. Martin

S t a rkso n , Stark

H a rsta d , Lydia

O l so n , G ertrude

StensrUd,

Ran g , Andrew

O l son, Inga

Storaasli, Amanda

E d w ar d

Hauke, Paul

Olson, Johan P.

S toraasli,

He ndricks, Chas.

Olson, l\lagp-ie

Storaasli, Elsie

larence

H olland, J. H.

Olson, Myrtle

St oraasli, G ilbert

IIolte,

O n s tad, Rudolnh

Stora 3 �li, Gustav

Hong, Harold

O p h au g , 1\1 arlin

Sto1'aasli, Isabel

I-Tong, Tomine

Opdahl, H a rold

S to raasl i, Hjalmar

Houge. L. C .

O s a, Lorentz

St o ra 8 sli, Ol ga

Haugan, K O.

Qscnrson, Axel G.

St(1raasl! , T h e a

Iv

Storaa ti l i . S i g-Il

Gena

r on ,

And rew

Iverson, M a bel

Ostby, Bert o 'el'by, Agnes a u l se n . SOphll S H .

Iverson, Philip

Pede

Jensen, A nl!;nst

PNlprSE'D, J uhy

.Jens<>n, Norman L.

T'etl'l'SOI1,

.Tespel'se 1 , P ter

r .tAr

Iverson. InoTal ]

Ren, A x e l

F.

nto n

n , Flrn Q�t

S t "a n a . An ton SUll d t, S i!,;fred

<;"anSOIl, A. S Wll l son, 11th Swa n s n, Sam � c.·P . r. 0 bert

J.


Elyse, S. T.

Tvete, Nina

Wilcoxson, Frank

Tindeland, Kn ut

Vevelstad, Carl

,Vinge,

Tollefsen, Carl

" '::tale, Inga

'Volden, l\'1arion

Torgerson, Louis

W'iI. en. Andrew

路Wordal. Arthur

Hugo

Ton'e, Olav

PIANO STUDENTS Anderson, J. I.

Garness, Marion

Peterson, H attie

Anderson, Serena

G reibrok, Lydia

Peterson, Ruby

IA.. n derson, Thorwald

Harstad, Adolph

Price, Dorothy

Arntzen, Melford

Harstad, Bertha

Rovelstad, Cora

Ausplund, Astrid

Harstad, Lydia

Rynning, Emma

Bardon, Gunhild

Holte, Gena

Skattebol, Olga

Bardon, Jennie

Iverson, Mabel

Skillman, May

Bensoll, Eva

Larson, Maud

Skillman, Paul

Brenden, Petra

Larson, Valborg

Sol void, Gertrude

Cam pbell, Wm.

Lofgren,

Christensen, Clara

McFarland, Lettie

Storaasl ie, ElSie Storaaslie. Isabel

l!:lla

Storaaslle,

Amanda

Coltom, Emmy

Olson, Gertrude

'Danielson, June

Olson, Inga

Storaaslle, Olga

Everett, Jean

Olson, Maggie

Storaaslie, Signe

Fadness, Irene

Olson, M : yrtle

Storaaslie, Thea

Foss, Clara.

Ostby, Bert

Tvete, Nina

Fossen ,

Overby, Agnes

Waale, Iuga

Clara

VOICE STUDENTS Anderson, J. A.

.J oh nson, Amanda

VIOLIN STUDENTS Bardon, B.

Olson, Jnga

Rynnlng, Emma

Erdahl, Bertha

R!ndal, Oscar

,Vlnge, Hugo

Ka) s e t h , Thore

40


THE

Pacific Lutheran Academy - AN D -

. BUSINESS C O LLEGE

w i th

those of first-class h i gh-sc hools.

year it had an enrollment of 212

D u r i n g the past

s1udents.

COURSES : Classical, Modern Language, Gen eral Science, C ommercial, ographic,

English, Sten足

Music,

Science and C ou rs e

Normal,

in

Domestic

Art,

Practical

A r c h i t e c t u re,

Special course s for foreigners

It is open to all, or church for

regardless

of

ar,-e,

nationality.

conne<.'i:ions. further

information

read

this

hooklet,

or

addr('s-Cj-

N

.

.T. HONG, Principal, Park l and

,

\Vash.


1914-1915 Catalog of Pacific Lutheran Academy and Business College