Beyond the Bend Master Plan

Page 1

MASTER PLAN

TEMPLE, TX | July 7th, 2022 Resolution: 2022-0185-R


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Acknowledgments

A special thanks to those involved with the initiation, collaboration, and development of the Beyond the Bend Master Plan.

City Council

Timothy Davis, Mayor Judy Morales, Mayor Pro Tem Wendell Williams, Council Member Jessica Walker, Council Member Susan Long, Council Member

City Staff

Erin Smith, Assistant City Manager Brian Chandler, Planning and Development Director Mark Baker, Principal Planner Kelly Atkinson, Senior Neighborhood Planner Jason Deckman, Senior Transportation Planner Kevin Beavers, Director of Parks and Recreation Chuck Ramm, Assistant Director of Parks and Recreation

Property Owners

Cross Plains Development / Riley Scott Homes 302 Acres Leon River LP


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Table of Contents Background & Existing Conditions 4

Introduction

41

Sidewalk

5

Purpose

41

Greenway

5

Goals and Objectives

42

Types of Open Space

6

Inventory and Analysis

43

Linear Park

8

Opportunities & Constraints

44

Branding

45

Wayfinding Signage

Vision 12

Concept Plan

45

13

Residential

Implementation

14

Commercial

48

15

Open Space

16

Land Use Plan

16

Relational Use

21

Development Standards

22

Compatibility Standards

23

Human Scale Design

23

Alleys and Garages

24

Development Targets

25

Neighborhood Center

26

Neighborhood Center Plan

28

Streets Plan

30

Community Collector Entry

31

Community Collector

32

Neighborhood Collector

33

Local Street

34

Alley

35

Townhouse Fire Lane

36

Connector Drive

37

Blocks

38

Trails & Open Space Plan

40

Park Trail

40

Sidepath

Next Steps


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BEYOND THE BEND BACKGROUND & EXISTING CONDITIONS


Introduction The Beyond the Bend plan area is located in southwest Temple adjacent to the City’s Bend of the River plan area The property is currently undeveloped crop and pasture land. Similar to Bend of the River, it has river frontage along the Leon River and good access to Interstate 35.The development in the area, that is still within Temple’s city limits, is limited to two automotive dealership and one motorcycle dealerships.

As a whole this area represents an opportunity for development to occur in a portion of Temple that is relatively undeveloped. It has the ability to provide residents in the south and west of Temple with a nearby place for entertainment, recreation, and dining. Its location at the edge of the City provides an excellent opportunity to contribute to a physical gateway and sense of arrival into the Temple, similar to what is intended for the Bend of the River.

36

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LITTLE RIVER ACADEMY

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City of Temple

1.5 Miles

3 Miles

PROGRESS SET


Purpose

Goals and Objectives

The Beyond the Bend plan was initiated by the City of Temple for two specific reasons. The first was to protect the City’s vision for the Bend of the River plan area. The City is heavily invested in this site’s role as an important space for the advancing the quality of life offerings for the Temple community. This means developing the Bend of the River from a prime riverfront property into a unique park area that serves both as a hub for recreation, tourism, and economic development. With this understanding the City realizes that the adjacent development has the potential to further the quality of life goals for the Bend of the River plan area.

The plan is intended to meet the following goals and objectives that were derived from the input of the property owners, the development team, and the City’s long range planners.

The second reason, is to be responsive to the City‘s development community by working with them to create complete neighborhoods. The City of Temple realizes that is best to partner with land owners and developers to provide the certainty needed for future growth, especially when that growth is associated with a more complexed planned development. In doing so the City feels it can help the development community meet the desired goals for the Beyond the Bend plan area. Additionally, the proposed compact development for Beyond the Bend needs additional development guidelines to ensure an orderly and compatible phasing across the entire plan area.

Goal 1: Complement the Bend of the River plan area. Objective 1.1: Provide a connection street between the Bend of the River and Beyond the Bend plan areas. Objective 1.2: Utilize the Bend of the River parkland to support the more compact residential of the Beyond the Bend plan area Objective 1.3: Plan for additional point of ingress-egress other than I-35 that can serve Beyond the Bend as well as Bend of the River. Goal 2: Create a complete neighborhood that provides a live, work, play mantra. Objective 2.1: Make the development interconnected by creating walkable development standards Objective 2.2: Frame land uses along the I-35 frontage to allow for auto-oriented uses that also support the new residential. Objective 2.3: Support employment opportunities within the development by adding a workforce for housing stock and to support daytime commercial. Objective 2.4: Provide readily available open space for plan area residences. Goal 3: Protect a portion of the of the plan area to retain its natural aesthetic. Objective 3.1: Limit development impact on the 100 year floodplain Objective 3.2: Protect area along Pepper Creek, supporting infrastructure and vehicular access limited by natural features. Objective 3.3: Buffer Leon River with open space to protect riparian vegetation.

PROGRESS SET

5


Inventory and Analysis As part of the development of this plan a thorough inventory and analysis process was conducted. This effort was important to understanding the site so that the plan would have a strong connection to the policy, environmental, and physical elements that will impact site build out. The following are just a few of those elements that were examined.

Future Land Use

The Future Land Use (FLU) Plan shows a strong commercial presence within the plan area surrounded by residential development in the form of neighborhoods or estate lots. FLU Designations Rural/Estate Residential & Neighborhood Services Corridor Mixed-Use Regional Commercial Parks & Open Space

Major Thoroughfare Plan

Outside of the I-35 access the MTP does not identify any other points of access to the site. The proposed extension of the Outer Loop is found just to the North of the plan area. Connecting to this corridor can provide a second means of access. MTP Designations Existing Major Arterial Minor Arterial Community Collector Neighborhood Collector Proposed Major Arterial Minor Arterial Community Collector Neighborhood Collector

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Topography

The plan area has some significant elevation change at the plan area boundary edges. The remainder of the site is more gradual changes in elevation.

Elevation 470’ to 474.9’ 475’ to 479.9’ 480’ to 481.9’ 482’ to 483.9’

484’ to 485.9’ 486’ to 487.9’ 488’ to 489.9’ 490’ or more

Floodplain

The adjacency to the Leon River necessitates the examination of floodplain. The site has a small amount of 100 year floodplain, but a large 500 year floodplain. This means that the site is largely developable with modest precautions needed to address flooding concerns

Flood Zones Floodway 100’ Year Floodplain 500’ Year Floodplain

Vegetation

The plan area is predominately pasture/cropland. The important riparian and more established wooded vegetation are found on the perimeter of the site. Other vegetation is associated with fence line and drainage corridor brush. Vegetation Types Riparian Wooded Fenceline Trees & Shrubs Drainage Corridor Trees & Shrubs Pasture/Cropland

PROGRESS SET

7


Opportunities & Constraints This exhibit highlights a number of considerations that were derived from the inventory and analysis process. The features compiled together begin to show that how the site may buildout by identifying development opportunities and showing areas were existing condition provide constraints on the future development.

Key Opportunities •

A regional trail along the perimeter of the of the plan area that capitalizes on the riparian vegetation A point of ingress-egress to the plan area, connection to the future outer loop major arterial Take advantage of I-35 frontage for commercial development Take advantage of nearby Bend of the River parkland and Leon River frontage for residential development

• • •

35 Existing Overhead Easement

Key Constraints •

Overhead utility transmission line impacts continuous development pattern Small pockets of drainage corridors and floodplain need to be accounted Leon River and Pepper Creek make connections to surrounding development costly Parcels adjacent to I-35 have deed restrictions that disallow residential housing

• • •

Existing R.O.W and Sewer Ease

Connection to Bend of the River

Existing Lift Station

Bend of the River Site

8

City of Temple

PROGRESS SET

With


.W. ement

Bend of the River Trail Connection Heavily vegetated area

Highway Interfacing Land Use

Cross Site Connection Connection to Future Outer Loop

Amentity Water Feature Park and Open Space Interfacing Land Use

Linar Park h Drainage Element

Constraints Riparian Vegetation Wooded Vegetation Easements 100 Year Flood Zone Steep Slopes

0’

PROGRESS SET

100’

200’

400’

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


BEYOND THE BEND VISION

PROGRESS SET

11


Concept Plan The goal of the Beyond the Bend Plan is a continuation of a unique development similar to that of the Bend of the River location. The project should complement Bend of the River through the use of similar guiding framework and strong connectivity. The abundance of open space and proximity to I-35 allows for compact residential, impactful commercial development, and prime office space. The presence of these land use types places more importance on a thoughtful integration of the pedestrian realm to maximize the overall harmony within the plan area.

Open Space Commercial

Work

Open Space

Shop & Eat

Bend of the River

Neighborhood Gathering Place

Live

Entertainment

Residential

12

City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Residential The residential areas of Beyond the Bend shall be composed of townhouses, neighborhood scaled multi-plexes, and urban apartments. These housing types allow residents to live an active and engaged lifestyle close to unique amenities ands services.

Character • • • •

Proximity Connected Complete Intensive

PROGRESS SET

13


Commercial A mix of retail, restaurant, grocery and office space make up the commercial element of Beyond the Bend. This area is largely autooriented, with the exception of intimate nodes of neighborhood based commercial.

Character • • • •

14

Convenient Complete Intentional Engaging

City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Open Space Open space within the plan area is comprised of natural areas, a linear park, parklets, and an amenity water feature. A central sidepath and a multi-use trail move users throughout the site and connects the various open spaces.

Character • • • •

Natural/ Riparian Engaged Passive Communal

PROGRESS SET

15


Land Use Plan

The land use plan is intended to guide the future build out of the plan area. Commercial and Residential areas are further broken down into subdistricts to better frame the desired characteristics of the built environment. There are three distinct types of commercial, with each having a different scale and desired building form. The residential area is broken down into three different types to frame the more compact development around the provision of different housing types.

1 Townhouse

35

2 Neighborhood Flex

6

3 Active Multi-family 4 Neighborhood Center 5 Retail/Office Flex 6 Supporting Commercial

Relational Use

Ultimately, this plan is built around the idea that the differences between the six individual development sub-districts work in harmony to achieve a more complete neighborhood. The increased unit count from the active multi-family provides a significant population base to drive the demand for goods and services of the commercial districts, while the other two residential district diversifying the housing choice to be more inclusive of people looking for alternatives to multi-family dwellings. The retail/office flex district contributes to both employment opportunities and a workforce population to provide daytime support for the dining and personal services found within the neighborhood center.

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City of Temple

Line Par

3

PROGRESS SET


5 Open Space

4

Amenity Water Feature

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ear rk

PROGRESS SET

0’

100’

200’

400’

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Townhouse

Neighborhood Flex

Defining Characteristics

Defining Characteristics

The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Walkable street environment ■ Building street edge ■ Street trees ■ Low maintenance yards ■ Rear access parking ■ Shared common space ■ Unique street sections to accommodate townhouses that front open space

The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Walkable street environment ■ Prominent street trees with small front lawns or planting beds ■ Porches and stoops ■ Variety of housing types ■ May include single-family and multi-family

The Townhouse land use provides opportunities to increase residential housing units near activity nodes, such as neighborhood centers or large open space areas. This unit type is ideal for people who don’t want yard maintenance and prefer living close to hubs of activity, while still desiring a single-family housing option. The streetscape plays an important role in providing the aesthetic softening of street edge. Residential alleys are important for access to garages and dedicated parking.

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City of Temple

The Neighborhood Flex land use is intended to provide a variety of housing choice and building scale. These residential properties should be more intentional with their design, where smaller lots result in more shared green space and improved walkablity. The variety in housing type is very much determined by the surrounding context. Housing units may be single-family attached or multiplex housing. This district essentially acts as a buffer and stepdown in use intensity between the Active Multi-family and the Townhouse districts.

PROGRESS SET


Active Multi-family

Neighborhood Center

Defining Characteristics

Defining Characteristics

The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Parking behind building ■ 3-5 stories in height ■ Buildings have short setbacks or build to lines ■ First floor may be raised for privacy/safety ■ Shared park space in a large linear park ■ Individual amenity spaces such as pools and yard game areas can be internal

The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Walkable street environment ■ Street trees ■ Outdoor merchandising and dining ■ Gathering spaces ■ Pedestrian scale signage and lighting

Multi-family housing opportunities are allowed within this district, these developments should take advantage of nearby by shopping, dining, open space, trails, and entertainment. Pedestrian connectivity is important to nearby commercial and internal development circulation routes and should be sure to connect to the street sidewalks. The high land use activity requires a more intentional approach to building.

PROGRESS SET

The Neighborhood Center is developed at a pedestrian scale with restaurants, retail, and professional services. Streets are intended to be veins of activity, complemented by a plaza or gathering space that provide entertainment and dining opportunities. Its close proximity to residential reduces the need for large parking lots.

19


Supporting Commercial

The supporting commercial provides an opportunity for the conventional big box retail and other autooriented businesses. The location adjacent to I-35 allows for significant vehicular traffic, as such businesses within the plan area will serve all of Temple and the larger region. Businesses should also take advantage of pedestrian connectivity to nearby residential. The high land use activity of the district may require some buffering to residential.

Defining Characteristics The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Large parking lots with shade trees and planting beds ■ Large footprint single-use structures ■ Vehicular scale signage ■ Outdoor seating requirement to allow for restaurant drive throughs

20

City of Temple

Retail/Office Flex

Retail/Office Flex is a unique area that encourage sindividual campus development for office, medical, retail, dining, and professional services. As a employment center, nearby commercial, residential, and open space land uses support this as a destination location for a centralized pace of business. While each of these developments may be internally focused campuses, they are connected physically to the greater plan area through the integral open space network and trail system. With large building setbacks, the street edges are defined by shade trees and ornamental plantings.

Defining Characteristics The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Large building setbacks ■ Activity clusters, such as a complex of buildings ■ Outdoor gathering sites, central greens ■ Peripheral parking ■ Abundant shade trees ■ Campus feel that enables a variety of employment and service focused uses.

PROGRESS SET


Development Standards Below are some development standards that begin to relate to how the built form may take shape. These standards are ways to frame the massing of buildings and subdivision of lots. While this document is intend to be for planning purposes, this type of guidance would inform the next step phase of the establishing the regulatory environment for the plan area. Townhouse Area Width Depth Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage (impervious) Structure Height

Open Space

Open space is a variety of public land used for recreation, preservation of natural areas, and drainage facilities. These green spaces are important to the overall character of development, supporting the intense development proposed within the plan area. The open space framework is a network of green space that will host a trail system which unifies and supports the higher activity levels of the plan area. Open space is also a term that describes undeveloped areas that offer natural, leisure, or recreational functions.

Neighborhood Flex Width Depth Units per Acre Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage (impervious) Structure Height

Active Multi-family Units per Acre Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage (impervious) Structure Height

Neighborhood Center

Defining Characteristics The following are typical elements and features that are unifying to the district: ■ Natural areas and use of native plantings ■ Enhanced drainage facilities ■ Parks and recreation opportunities ■ Mix of pastoral, prairie, and post oak savanna landscapes

Area Width Depth Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage (impervious) Structure Height

Supporting Commercial Area Width Depth Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage Structure Height

Retail/Office Flex

PROGRESS SET

Area Width Depth Front Yard Setback Lot Coverage (impervious) Structure Height

Minimum 1,920’ 24’ 80’ 10’ 2 Stories

Maximum 4,000 sq. ft. 40' 100’ 15' 85% 4 Stories

Minimum 100’ 80’ 8 10’ 2 Stories

Maximum 160’ 120’ 20 15’ 75% 4 Stories

Minimum 20 5’ 3 Stories

Maximum 40 15’ 90% 5 Stories

Minimum 400 sq.ft. 40’ 100’ 5’ 15’

Maximum 15' 90% 45’

Minimum 1 acre 200’ 200’ 5’ 15’

Maximum 85% 5 Stories, 75’

Minimum 1 acre 200’ 200’ 5’ 15’

Maximum 85% 10 Stories, 150’

21


Compatibility Standards

30’

30’

Property Line

10’

As a means to provide flexibility for development in the plan areas the application of compatibility standards between the different land uses is desired. These compatibility standards identify a the introduction of screening and buffering elements that improve transition between districts when not separated by R.O.W. or greenway.

Proximity Slope

Open Space Buffer

Townhouse

Supporting Commercial

Neighborhood Flex Active Multi-family Neighborhood Center Retail/Office Flex Supporting Commercial

District Type

-

No

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Retail/Office Flex

No

-

No

Yes

Yes

Yes

Neighborhood Center

No

No

-

No

No

Yes

Active Multi-family

Yes

Yes

No

-

No

Yes

Neighborhood Flex

Yes

Yes

No

No

-

No

Townhouse

Yes

Yes

Yes

Yes

No

-

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City of Temple

30’ Building Height

This is accomplished with a compatibility matrix, which identifies the need for compatibility measures between sub-districts.

35 degree step back

Residential Property

New Building

A residential proximity slope is intended to soften the transition between multi-storied structures and those of shorter heights. The proximity slope shall start at adjacent property building setback where a 30’ height at that point, but the building is stepped back at a 35 degree slope.

PROGRESS SET


Human Scale Design

Alleys and Garages

Human scale design focuses on development that orients buildings and spaces to reflect a environment that is pleasing and inviting. This starts with making streets comfortable and walkable, and buildings that orient to the pedestrian as opposed to the automobile. If a significant majority of daily trips are initiated by leaving via the car/garage, its likely because the neighborhood is absence the interest or completeness that encourages walking.

The compact nature of the Bend of the River development in conjunction with abundant nearby open space changes the needs of the residential development. Properties within the development should focus on form, safety, and security. This limits the use of garage access that directly face public streets. Moving the garage and vehicular parking behind the building is a desired element for development within the plan area. The following are a list of compromises that would be acceptable for front facing garages:

Front yard engagement • Porches and other prominent entry features are important in activating the front yard, especially if the space is small. • Front yard activation results in stronger sense of community and the benefits of passive surveillance.

• No more than 50% of homes may have front faces garage with any townhouse or singlefamily attached units within a development • One side of street may have front facing garages but the other side should have on-street parking • Lots that are adjacent to open space or shared common space may be more desirable to back to the public street. • Lots with alley access parking may elect for carports instead of garages.

Alley garages enable higher function neighborhoods Building architecture • The residential structure should be a focal point of the lot. • Design elements should be integral to the building’s facade to add interest • A visible front door entry promotes the human scale of the structure. • Garages often overpower the building aesthetics making the building vehicular scale.

PROGRESS SET

Garages that face streets should restrict driveway parking 23


Development Targets

Open Space

The development targets provide a way to further understand the plan area in terms of build-out, both from a residential, commercial, and open space standpoint. This is helpful in defining the development potential of the plan area for both builders and the City of Temple’s leadership. These development targets should not be viewed as a hard and fast cap or minimum threshold, but as a barometer for expectations for the full plan area.

Natural Area Linear Park Trail Corridor Amenity Water Feature Total

Area Acres 23.3 13.7 13.4 50.3

Residential Active Multi-Family Neighborhood Flex Townhouse Total

­

Commercial Supporting Commercial Neighborhood Center Retail/Office Flex Total

City of Temple

Area Acres

Low FAR

20.2 10.5 15.7 46.4

.20 .5 .35

Unit Per Acre 42 25 16

Total Units 978 342 214 1,534

24

Area Acres 28.0 1.0 2.8 3.7 35.5

Low Leasable Area 176,000 228,500 239,500 644,000

High FAR .35 1.0 1.0

High Leasable Area 308,000 683,500 457,000 1,448,522

PROGRESS SET


Neighborhood Center

The neighborhood center provides a social and economic hub for Beyond the Bend. The walkable scale development is intended to create an activity node that lends its-self to the day to day entertainment found in retail and dining opportunities. Corresponding outdoor seating and dining areas would complement the internal common space reinforcing the public space. The areas is served both on-street and off-street parking. The adjacent amenity water feature provides nearby open space that can be used for hosting larger gatherings or events.

PROGRESS SET

LIve-Work

Housing units with flexible ground floor space that accommodate a variety of non-residential uses. The first floor has a taller height and engages the street frontage with a shop frontage. The residential portion of the building will have a separate entrance that provides a distinctly secondary access point.

25


Neighborhood Center Plan

I-35 Frontage Access

Transmission Line

Neighborhood Center Plaza Parking Lot

To Bend of the River

Toh

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Parking Lot

Neighborhood Center

To Outer Loop

Amenity Water Feature

PROGRESS SET

27


Streets Plan

The plan area needs to focus on the realities of its outward connections and inward navigation. As such it important to establish a street hierarchy for the plan area so that development can occur in an orderly and continuous manner. This street network was developed with the provision of facilities for vehicular, pedestrian, and bicycle connectivity. The ability to meld these different user groups within the street will enable the more compact development that is encouraged by the different districts.

1 Community Collector

35

7

2 Neighborhood Collector 3 Linear Park Street 4 Local 5 Alley 6 Trail Corridor Local

2

7 Commercial Locals/Driveways Walkable Neighborhoods Throughout Central Texas new neighbors are being developed with a more compact residential fabric that is connected walkable destinations. This ultimately allows for a different type of living, where residents have the choice to reduce the number of end of day vehicle trips. Evening and weekends activities are located in activity hubs, either dining and retail nodes or destination open space. Ultimately the streets, open space, housing, and commercial activity works together to create meaningful experiences and true sense of place. Additionally, when Cities invests into a offstreet trail systems, they should maximize this investment. This occurs when multiple destination and attractions are found along these trail corridors.

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


4 1

5

6

3

0’

PROGRESS SET

100’

200’

400’

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Community Collector Entry The Community Collector provides an important arrival sequence into the plan area. This route will ultimately provide the main access to the Beyond the Bend. This street has exceptional landscape, as to promote a unique sense of place. With placement being adjacent to commercial use, the adjoining business should have no more than one bay of parking before a building. Buildings that front this street would be acceptable.

5'-0" Sidewalk

8'-0" Landscape Buffer

12'-0" Travel Lane

11'-0" Travel Lane

12'-0" Median

11'-0" Travel Lane

12'-0" Travel Lane

8'-0" Landscape Buffer

5'-0" Sidewalk

84' Proposed R.O.W.

Key Characteristics:

■ High level of landscape treatment ■ Accommodates large entry and exit traffic to the for the entire plan area ■ Median helps create interest, controls traffic flow, and unifies the plan area ■ Parking is not likely appropriate along this street because of high traffic levels

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Community Collector The Community Collector provides important access through and within to the plan area. This proposed street also provides a second means of access to the plan area and in turn the Bend of the River site. This street focuses on incoming and outgoing traffic to the plan area as well as being context sensitive to interface with and support the adjacent development. On-street parking is provided to help alleviate parking needs for nearby commercial and residential uses.

8'-0" Sidepath

9'-0" Landscape Buffer

8'-0" Parallel Parking

12'-0" Travel Lane

10'-0" Median

12'-0" Travel Lane

8'-0" Parallel Parking

12'-0" Landscape Buffer

5'-0" Sidewalk

84' Proposed R.O.W.

Key Characteristics:

■ Locate parallel parking on collector to increase parking capacity and serve increased volume of visitors during district events ■ One travel lane with parallel parking on each side of the road balances traffic flow and parking demands ■ Median helps create interest and unifies the plan area while providing pedestrian refuges ■ Landscape buffer helps create a comfortable pedestrian environment and contribute to an calming street environment

PROGRESS SET

31


Neighborhood Collector The Neighborhood Collector street type carries moderate traffic volumes and connects the residential areas to the community collector or I-35. These streets provides ample space for pedestrians. On-street parking is encouraged adjacent to residential uses.

Key Characteristics:

■ Sizable landscape buffer performing street treas

to

allow

high

■ Locate parallel parking along both sides of the street in residential settings ■ Sidewalk width of 5’ allows for the higher pedestrian traffic levels, they should be located on both sides of the street

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Local Street The Local street type focuses services adjacent properties with parking and walkways. Traffic calming is important to create a more pedestrian oriented setting. These streets are used in lower traffic volume areas and are not always continuous but connect into the plan areas collectors.

4'-0" Sidewalk

7'-0" Parallel Parking

12'-0" Travel Lane

12'-0" Travel Lane

7'-0" Parallel Parking

4'-0" Sidewalk

54' Proposed R.O.W.

Key Characteristics:

■ Interrupt consecutive number of parking stalls with planting beds and street trees.

townhouse

■ Narrow width of sidewalks for more intimate pedestrian setting

multifamily apartment

■ Allow non-designated parallel parking on each side of street ■ Increase of traffic calming through the narrowing of overall street paving width

PROGRESS SET

33


Trail Corridor Local The Trail Corridor Local is intended to enable a narrow street where development is only located along one side of the corridor. This street is only allowed if there is no driveways that front the road. Effectively one side of the road is absent development, reducing the vehicular demand on the street.

4'-0" 8'-0" Sidewalk Parallel Parking

24’ Min. Fire Lane Travel Lane

Park Trail Corridor

40' Proposed R.O.W.

Key Characteristics:

■ Narrow R.O.W. to accommodate tight spaces ■ Optional onstreet parallel parking ■ Sidewalk should be include on all sides that are adjacent to housing ■ Natural area or a trail corridor (this is not to be confused with a sidepath) should be present on one-side

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Connector Drive The connector drive serves the purpose of providing access within a shopping center or office park. These facilities are to be privately owned and maintained. The key difference between them and other drive aisles, is the presence of landscape buffer and sidewalk that contributes to improved pedestrian access.

6'-0" 4'-0" Sidewalk Planting Buffer

24'-0" Fire Lane/ Circulation Drive

6'-0" 4'-0" Planting Sidewalk Buffer

44' Minimum Width

Key Characteristics:

■ Narrow minimum width to avoid needing a local street R.O.W. ■ Sidewalk should be buffered by landscape from drive lane ■ Parking located on outside edge highly encouraged to provide safe pedestrian corridors within a larger parking environment ■ Utilties should not be present to ensure long term sucess shade trees

PROGRESS SET

35


Alley Alleys are an important supporting infrastructure for attached single-family and small lot apartment homes. These facilities support the more compact development by allowing the public right-of-way to maintain a safe and comfortable pedestrian environment. With limited front-access garages the building can maintain a high level of humanscale design.

15'-0" One-way Access Road 20’- 0” Two-way Access or Fire lane

20' Minimum Width

Key Characteristics:

■ Alley provide rear access to attached housing types ■ Alley’s are important for enabling reduced front-yard setbacks ■ Alley’s that provide fire lane access need 20’ of paving width

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET


Blocks Establishing block parameters can ensure that the subsequent development will meet the plan areas desired walkablility goals. These block lengths should respond to context of land uses. Residential areas are more compact and connected, while commercial blocks are typically larger and deeper.

Streets Make Blocks and Blocks Make Neighborhoods

Block Length By LU Area Sub-district (Maximum)

Block Depth

(Maximum)

Block Perimeter**

Townhouse

300’

220’*

1,200’

Neighborhood Flex

400’

300’

1,400’

Active Multifamily

400’

400’

1,800’

Neighborhood Center

400’

400’

1,800’

Supporting Commercial

600’

600’

2,600

Retail/Office Flex

600’

600’

2,600’

(Maximum)

Meeting higher connectivity demands does not have to always require additional roads and public r.o.w. dedication. The use of block extenders like the commercial drive or greenways can allow the block length or depth to double, provided those facility’s design criteria are met. The end result is the focus on local access and pedestrians connections, while allowing for development flexibility.

PROGRESS SET

Local

Collector/Arterial Perimeter

Local

*Block depth can be an average of lot length on curved streets **Block perimeter should be used for on blocks that deviate from rectangular shape

Connect to Extend Blocks

Length

Depth

LU Area

Block Length

Block Extension LU Area

Connector Drive

Greenway

Townhouse

No

Yes

Neighborhood Flex

No

Yes

Active Multifamily

No

Yes

Neighborhood Center

No

Yes

Supporting Commercial

Yes

No

Retail/Office Flex

Yes

Yes

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Trails & Open Space Plan

The role of trails and open space within the Beyond the Bend plan area help unify and support the compact nature of the development. With the trails, open space, and park land of the plan area, as well as that of Bend of the River, this degree of open space specifically enables the higher intensity residential. Much of the plan area’s open space is tied up in non-developable land in natural areas which are not able to support intense recreation. The adjoining parks in the Beyond the Bend act as the community park spaces that enable more active recreation pursuits.

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Trails

1 Park Trail 2 Sidepath 3 Greenways Open Space

4 Natural Area 5 Linear Park 6 Amenity Water Feature 7 Parklets

2 5

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1

4

6 7

3

0’

PROGRESS SET

100’

200’

400’

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Park Trail Trails in the plan area are off-street shared-use pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Ultimately the Trail will be part of a regional network that not only connects the plan area to adjacent development, but also to the larger Temple area.

Programing of Facility Paving

10' minimum width, 12’ is encouraged in high trafficked areas

R.O.W.

20’ minimum

Landscape Buffer

5’ turf either side, turf and shade trees acceptable planting

Clear zone

2' buffer free of boulders, furnishings, and trees

Furnishings

Seating should be found at intervals of no less than 1 bench per every 1/4 mile. Trash can should be located at entry points

5'-0" Landscape Buffer

10'-0" Paving

5'-0" Landscape Buffer

Sidepath Sidepaths are shared-use pedestrian and bicycle facilities located within the street right-of-way. The placement of sidepaths within the right-of-way may be impacted by utilities and other supporting infrastructure. The 8’ width of the sidepath is acceptable as it parallels the Park Trail.

Programing of Facility Paving

8' minimum width,

R.O.W.

Within Street R.O.W.

Landscape Buffer

8’ turf and shade trees acceptable planting

Clear zone

2' buffer free of boulders, furnishings, and trees

Furnishings

Furnishing should respond to needs of adjacent land uses

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City of Temple

8'-0" Planting Strip

8'-0" Paving

PROGRESS SET


Sidewalk Sidewalks provide on-street connectivity within the development. Sidewalks are a critical component, as the variety of land uses and compact nature of the plan areas should promote the increased reliance on walking to access services, shopping, and dinging.

Programing of Facility Paving

4’ width on residential locals, 5’ width on collectors and commercial streets

R.O.W.

Within Street R.O.W.

Landscape Buffer

8’ turf and shade trees acceptable planting

Clear zone

2' buffer free of boulders, furnishings, and trees

Furnishings

No furnishing needed, in commercial context furnishing maybe provided by adjacent business

8'-0" Landscape Buffer

4'-0" Paving

Greenway The greenway is a connectivity alternative to a street. It allows for longer blocks without sacrificing the commitment to a walkable built environment. Additionally, they provide an alternative corridor for buildings to orient to where the front facade would face the greenway as opposed to an adjoining street.

Programing of Facility Paving

One 8’ multi-use path or two 4’

R.O.W.

30’ minimum

Landscape Buffer

0’ for 4’ sidewalk, 5’ min on outside for 8’ multi-use path, landscape can be turf, planting, ornamental or shade trees.

Clear zone

2' buffer free of boulders, furnishings, and trees

Furnishings

Seating may be added and trash cans are encouraged

PROGRESS SET

4'-0" Sidewalk

22'-0" Center Green

4'-0" Sidewalk

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Types of Open Space Open space and parks are a fundamental component to the success of a development focused on a live, work, and play ethos. These spaces provide opportunities for exercise, entertainment, an outlet for youthful exuberance, and neighborly fellowship. Open spaces acan be broken down further into different categories. Each one of the categories is distinct in its role, which are described in further detail in the following sub-sections.

Linear Park

The linear park is a common space element that is intended to support the multifamily. The linear park is to provide recreation and lesiure space within a compact environment. Its location should be central to the plan’s population. Adjacent properties should front the linear park providing passive surveillance to help keep space safe. The linear park also provides a connection between the Park Trail and the sidepath of the nearby community collector. Including programing that promotes the park land as a larger gathering space for neighborhood events and seasonable festivals would be appropriate.

Amenity Water Feature

Amentity Water Feature areas are ponds, stormwater detention and/or retention facilities that are developed in a manner to provide opportunities for active and passive recreation. This space takes vital and often unsightly stormwater infrastructure and adds purposeful design and programming to make a valued and attractive contribution to the development. The added elements typically include maintained play lawns, walking trails, wet pond, riparian habitat, overlooks, seating, and complimentary water features.

Natural Areas

Natural areas are contributing open space that provide passive recreation opportunities and preserve environmentally sensitive areas. These areas often include riparian vegetation that is important habitat along river and stream corridors. Natural areas a great backdrop for multi-use trails as they are typically uninterrupted corridors allowing for extend distances of safe travel for its users. Many natural areas a unaccessible for the average person to use on a routine basis, so there inclusion as park space should be limited.

Parklets and Greens

Parklets and Greens provide compact leisure and recreation opportunities within the open space systems. They are located adjacent to streets, walkways, or are shared spaces adjacent to building frontages. They can be stand alone spaces or part of a greater open space asset. Both of these spaces are privately owned and maintained as a semi-public for the developments residents or business’s patrons.

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City of Temple

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Linear Park

The proposed linear park is intented to serve the direct needs for park space to the nearby higher density residential. This would be public space that will meet daily needs while providing a unifying space for the development. Additionally, it would provide an important corridor for connecting to regional trail that found along the Leon River corridor.

PROGRESS SET

High Performing Space

High performing open space require more resources to construct and maintain then traditional park land. As such they may offset higher requirements of parkland dedication and provide opportunities for public-private maintenance/ operations agreements to serve high levels of programing for the nearby development.

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Branding While the built environment is ultimately important to establishing a unique sense of place, the concept of branding can assist with increasing the exposure and identity. They City’s of Temples future plans for the Bend of the River are very much the inspiration for organizing and coordinating the adjacent Beyond the Bend neighborhood development.

The Leon River

The Neighborhood’s name and identify can often com from the environmental context of the site. This approach was used use in the development of the logo where “Beyond”, builds off the Bend of the River. The backgound blue field with the arrow signifies the Leon River as a unification element between two areas. The green “The Bend” represents the conservation values of the projects development group.

Bend of the River 44

City of Temple

Conservation

PROGRESS SET


Wayfinding

Signage

Wayfinding signage may be at both pedestrian and vehicular scale. Secondary signage is necessary to help orient visitors to the sub-areas and specific park and community amenities. Directional signage helps increase certainty for visitors and improve awareness of where vistors are located within the plan area.

Singage can so much more than the simple conveyance of a company name. It can add artistic expression and help unify developments. The consideration additional sign guidance should be considered for the Beyond the Bend plan area.

BEND OF THE RIVER

NEIGHBORHOOD CENTER

PA R K T R A I L

B E Y O N D L I N E A R PA R K

Mural Sign

Shingle/Hanging Sign Including logo elements within wayfinding continues with the plan area’s brand further while the directional benefits ease navigation efforts and reinforce the sense of place. These elements can be as simple as adding the a representative logo or color scheming from the plan area’s brand.

PROGRESS SET

Pole Sign 45


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BEYOND THE BEND IMPLEMENTATION

PROGRESS SET

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Next Steps The following is a set of high level recommendations or next steps in the implementation of the Beyond the Bend Plan.

Update Long Range Plans

The plan for Beyond the Bend, as well as Bend of the River, is dependent upon the support from the long range planning guides such as the Future Land Use Plan, the Major Thoroughfare Plan, and Parks Master Plan/Trails Master Plan. Land use, street, and trail decisions within the plan area should inform the updates of these long range planning resources to ensure consistency in implementation. The complexity and scope of the Beyond the Bend may mean that full realization of the plan will take years, if not a decade. Updating these plan help insulate the plan from changes in property owners, city staff, and site developers.

Capital Improvement Plan

The degree and scope of the City’s investment into the Beyond the Bend is yet to be known. However, the City will undoubtedly have some role in implementation. It is important for the City to identify the projects within the plan area that are most impactful to meeting the City’s objectives. The City should identify those projects and set the parameters for their role and degree of involvement. This may best be done in conjuction with projects identified for the Bend of the River plan area.

Regulatory Support

The plan promotes development patterns that are different than that which is found in the City’s current UDC. The desired compactness and variety of residential housing types are important to the Beyond the Bend’s success. As such it important to create the regulatory guidance that supports the intended built form. This guidance will include land uses, lot sizes, site development standards, block dimensions, and other elements for consideration. It is recommended that a City initiated Planned Development be undertaken for this plan area.

Public/Private Partnership

This development encourages an expanded use of public private partnerships in maintaining high performing spaces. The more compact nature of the residential area will result in more demand on the public spaces within Beyond the Bend. The degree to which expanded use can be met will likely require a level of maintenance and oversight that is not quite possible by the City alone. As such, it is recommended that City proactively frame relationships it desires to have with any public park land within Beyond the Bend and it private maintenance as part of a unified development.

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City of Temple

PROGRESS SET