Planet Weekly 473

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>>> N E W S | T H E C H A M B E R O F C O M M E R C E

NEWS

LEGACY PARK TO HOST POPULAR STORES Shoppes at Legacy Park Break Ground A groundbreaking for the Shoppes at Legacy Park was recently hosted by Alumni Development. Construction is officially underway and the project should be complete by Oct. 2015. Located on the former Cedar Crest neighborhood site, it will house World Market, Fresh Market, Dick's Sporting Goods, Pet Smart, DSW Shoes and more and will create about 500 jobs. Tuscaloosa Builder to Lead Home Builders Assoc of Alabama in 2015 Lynn Corder of Tuscaloosa has been appointed to serve as the 2015 President of the Home Builders Association of Alabama (HBAA), the fourth largest state Home Builders Association in the U.S. Corder, of The Builders Group of West Alabama, has been a member of the Home Builders Association of Tuscaloosa (HBAT) since 1990 and has served on its Board of

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Directors since 2000. He led the HBAT as its President in 2005. At the state level, he has chaired the Governmental Affairs and Regulatory Affairs Committees and the Land Developers Council and has been active in the Investment Property Owners Council. Corder has received numerous awards for his service to the home building industry, including the HBAT President's Award in 2002 and 2006, the Carolyn Guidroz Humanitarian of the Year Award in 2007, the HBAT Builder of the Year Award in 2008 and the HBAA's Hershel Trimm Builder of the Year Award in 2010. For more info about HBAA, visit www.hbaa.org or call 800.745.4222. Tuscaloosa Nonresidential Curbside Recycling Service Starts The City of Tuscaloosa will expand curbside recycling services to its nonresidential garbage customers beginning Dec. 1. This free, voluntary service is available to businesses, nonprofits, churches and government agencies with active City of Tuscaloosa water and garbage accounts. City nonresidential customers will now

be able to recycle the same plastics, metals and paper products accepted on residential routes and in drop-off trailers. Customers will receive a 96-gallon City recycling cart at no cost. Recycling will be collected on the same day as the garbage service. Customers must put plastics and metals inside a plastic or paper bag before placing the items in the recycling cart. Cardboard must be emptied, flattened and placed at the curb next to the recycling cart. If volume of recycling is higher than expected, a second cart can be requested at no cost. For more info, call Tuscaloosa 311 at 248.5311. Gentlemen's Grooming is Now Open We recently marked the opening of Gentlemen's Grooming. This is a barber shop for the man that enjoys a relaxing experience when getting a haircut. The space features a leather couch and chairs,

TVs on the wall, sports memorabilia and more. Haircuts are offered with a hot steam towel and warm lather neck shave. Address is 2104 Univ. Blvd. in Tuscaloosa (next to Black Warrior Outdoors). Get a Santa's Elves Collection Box Now in its 6th year, Santa's Elves is a charitable organization committed to providing gifts to children (K-5th grade) in our our area during the holiday season. Recipients are selected by guidance counselors in the city and county school systems based on need. Each year, Santa's Elves partners with a number of local businesses and organizations to collect new toy and monetary donations. This year, Santa's Elves will be working with the Chamber and distributing collection boxes for monetary donations. If your business would like to participate, please contact Donny Jones by email at donny@ tuscaloosachamber.com.

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inside

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>>> planetweeklyissue473

STORIES 4 THE MELODY GIRL // JUDAH MARTIN We interview Raelyn Nelson, Willie's granddaughter

HIGH TIDE SPORTS 23 A GREAT SEASON // Gary Harris

5 DAD'S TWEED COAT // JIM REED The good memories of my father

PUBLISHER L I N DA W. JOHN S ON MANAGING EDITOR BE R T PAUL S EN ASSISTANT EDITOR W I L L I AM BA R S HOP COVER DESIGN L AU R A L I N E B E R R Y EVENTS WILLIAM BARSHOP ROAD TRIP T R E Y B R OOK S PRODUCTION HERB NEU

IMAGES Creative Common License unless otherwise credited.

ADVERTISING 205.792.7 239 205.765- 8007

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS JEROME ADAMS WILLIAM BARSHOP CARA BRAKE TREY BROOKS A LY X C H A N D L E R JORDAN CISSELL GARY HARRIS C I N DY H U G G I N S JUDAH MARTIN JIM REED BRETT REID JON ROGERS VA N R O B E R T S STEPHEN SMITH

Planet Weekly P. O . B o x 2 3 1 5 Tuscaloosa, AL 35403 Phone: 205.792.7239 |

6 DICKENS DOWNTOWN // JEROME ADAMS The once-a-year street party everyone loves

7 BRAVING THE TRAIL // ALYX CHANDLER William Well's 2,180-mile trek on the Appalachian Trail

8 PROJECT BLESSINGS // WILLIAM BARSHOP Putting turkey on the table

9 CAVERN RECORDINGS // JORDAN CISSELL 24 rare songs see the light of day for the first time

13 REMEMBERING JACK BRUCE // TREY BROOKS We say goodbye to a legendary bass player

22 SEC FOOTBALL RECAP // STEPHEN SMITH A look at the contenders

205.765.8007

ENTERTAINMENT

Email: publisher@theplanetweek ly.com Please direct correspondence to: publisher@theplanetweekly.com The Planet Weekly is a proud member of The West Alabama Chamber of Commerce.

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Planet Weekly is published every other Thursday. No part of this publication including editorials may be reproduced, in whole or part, by any means, including electronic retrieval systems, without the Publisher’s prior expressed written consent. One copy of each issue of THE PLANET WEEKLY is free to each of our readers. Any reader who takes more than four copies without expressed permission of the publisher shall be deemed to have committed theft. The views and opinions of the authors of articles appearing in this publication may not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of the Publisher.

FEATURE 14 REMAKE MANIA // CARA BRAKE

RESTAURANT GUIDE / WINE & BEER

MOVIE REVIEW

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LOCAL EVENTS CALENDAR

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ROAD TRIP

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LOCAL MUSIC

20 PUZZLEMANIA 21 HOROSCOPE

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>>> M U S I C | JUDAH MARTIN

THE MELODY GIRL // MUSIC RUNS IN HER FAMILY

Photo: Raul Lieberwirth/flickr/cc

Painting: Kathy Hiers

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admired the work they did. “I just had a heart for moms who were in fear of what was going to happen to them and their baby,” she said. “My passion for that comes from my experiences with my children.” As time passed, though, Nelson could not let go of her drive to make music, and so she found other ways to channel the emotions of her experiences with motherhood. In her spare time, she found herself writing songs. As her kids began to grow, they soon began to share their mother’s passion for music. She decided to home school her children, using classical models of education to teach them music. “We like to write songs before bed,” she said. "I’m kind of a melody girl, melodies just pop into my head. Sometimes we kind of make songs up as we go along. I’ll sing something like ‘this is the good night song and everybody's going to sleep,’ and and they'll sing the other line.” To keep them thinking about music, Nelson bought her kids a drum set and As the granddaughter of a country encourages them to write songs. music legend, Raelyn Nelson certainly “With my two boys, any song about did not have to look far for inspiration in bodily functions is always a hit,” she said, her journey to become a musician. laughing. “We won’t go into that.” When she was just a little girl, Nelson A few years ago, Nelson met a music looked on shyly at the country music producer, Jonathan Bright, through a superstars who seemed to always be mutual friend and he invited her to record somewhere nearby whenever Grandpa in his studio. Eventually she recorded a Willie was around. full album independently. She and Bright “There were always lots of really handled the songwriting, marketing and talented people around [my grandfather],” publicity. Nelson said. “That was kind of normal It's a lot of work doing everything on to me. I was a kid so I always felt like I her own, Nelson said, but she enjoys the should get out of their way.” creative freedom. After hiding in her grandfather’s "Not having a label behind you is shadow for so many years, Nelson is all financially unstable but, at the same time, grown up now and she is finally stepping being independent gives me a lot of flexinto the spotlight with her own band, The ibility," she said. "That's important, espeRaelyn Nelson Band, and her own sound. cially in my situation since I have children Together, they released their first, selftitled album in March 2014 and were even who are really important." Now that her band has completed their recognized by Rolling Stone magazine for album, they are returning to the studio to their unique blend of country music and record more songs. Nelson said they plan garage band rock and roll after a perforto release the songs as singles instead of mance at Farm Aid in 2013, where her recording an album. grandfather had invited her to perform. To promote the album, the band has “I don't ask my grandpa to help or anyperformed gigs throughout the South, inthing,” Nelson said. “I'm proud of him. At cluding several Alabama shows with local first I was nervous because I didn't want acts like The Toney Boys. anyone to compare me to him, how do “You have an extremely new, unique you live up to that? I like to play because sound coming out of Nashville that's the it's fun. Raelyn Nelson Band,” said Glenn Toney, Interestingly enough, Nelson only lead singer of The Toney Boys. “Raelyn began her career in music around three Nelson is becoming a really big deal. I years ago. In fact, she’d almost taken a think it’s just a matter of time before she'll much different career route. find that song that’s going to be really big.” “Before I started pursuing music I The Raelyn Nelson Band is currently thought for a while that I wanted to be a promoting their album, available at raelynmidwife,” she said. “I did a lot of research nelson.com and all digital distributors. after I was pregnant with my twins. I was In the meantime, Nelson plans to conreally young and didn't know a lot so I read a lot of books on spiritual [subjects.]” tinue writing music. “I think we're all supposed to inspire Nelson now has three children, two each other,” Nelson said. “People inspire boys and one girl, who were all born preme everyday. We get inspiration from mature. In her research, she discovered people every minute. Every moment a place called The Farm where natural seems mundane at times but it's really births were performed near her home in not. Every connection you make, every Goodlettsville, Tennessee. Though she LEARN MORE person you listen to, it affects you.” never gave birth there personally, sheAT WWW.FUTUREFIRST.US

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>>> R E D C L AY D I A R Y | J I M R E E D

DAD'S TWEED COAT // WEARING YOUR MEMORIES

It 's just a tweed jacket that's old before its time, but I hate to let it go. I've been wearing it and wearing it and wearing it, and it feels as good as my skin, and besides, who needs a new tweed jacket when you've got one that feels this nice? I usually wear it all during the cooler months, most of the time with jeans and tennis shoes or khaki pants and tennis shoes. Sometimes I vary my wardrobe and wear something besides a black shirt—my usual apparel. Get the shirts at a priest boutique—one of those little stores selling religious stuff. I like 'em because they don't have buttons showing and because nobody else (but priests) wears them. So, you'll usually find me going to the post office and the drugstore and the office on a workday (everyday) wearing that old baggy tweed coat, the black or gray priest shirt, and those dirty old tennis shoes complete with clean underwear and an old leather belt and jeans or trousers of some kind. The closest I ever come to dressing up is to dredge out my previous-life dark suit, my current-life red bow tie and one of those priest shirts, along with the standard black shoes and socks that once were mired deeply in corporate intrigue, corporate sin. The tweed jacket belonged to my father. Since he died, I've taken him with me via the old jacket to such places as relatives' homes; Washington, DC; Radford, Virginia; Cuba, Alabama; Lookout Mountain,Tennessee; Atlanta, Georgia;

and home every day, to have him comfortably near the family as we go about our funny and furious business of living. The old tweed jacket was nice and new looking when I first put it on after the funeral, and I'll have to retire it to the closet after a time, since Daddy wouldn't have liked thinking his clothes ever looked shabby in public. The good memories of my father I can wear all the time, anyhow, so I'd best be about the business of weaning myself and remembering the times before I donned this nice old piece of cloth. The important stuff my father left me isn't shabby at all AVAILABLE ON AMAZON.COM

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

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>>> EXPLORING ALABAMA | JEROME ADAMS

DICKENS DOWNTOWN // A HISTORICAL WINTER WONDERLAND PHOTOS: Jerome Adams

A Clydesdale horse pulls a carriage past a snowy storefront, and a choir of strings plays Christmas carols in the distance. Tiny mittens almost drop a steaming cup of apple cider when a little boy with soot on his cheeks sees a red hat and coat turn the corner. Would you believe all this happened one December night in Northport, Ala.? An annual evening event called Dickens Downtown turns the streets of Northport into a time machine to a winter wonderland your family will never forget. Rresented by the Kentuck Arts Center and Downtown Northport Merchants, the fair will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. on Dec 2. The first Tuesday of the month has been set aside for 25 years for the celebration.

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The streets will be blocked off beginning about 4:30 so that the only traffic will be by foot, unless you count the horse-drawn carriage that will trot through the town. Parking areas will be on the perimeter, but won’t require a long walk. A tree lighting will set the Christmas mood along with old time crafts making and a delightful atmosphere of holiday music. A marching band dressed in kilts will play traditional songs on bagpipes, string choirs will perform all over town, and groups of carolers will make their rounds, inviting bystanders to join in. Vendors will offer hot cocoa and other wintry sweets. Many of the shops will be open and will have light refreshments such as apple cider and cookies hoping that not only will you have an enjoyable evening but maybe you will make some purchases, too. Down one street, snow will tumble out of a second-story window but don't try to eat it! It is really flakes of soap! It looks like the real thing, and presents a magical photo opportunity for children, maybe even to send out on a Christmas card. Father Christmas will be spreading cheer, and Queen Victoria come down from her throne to interact with her royal subjects. A Civil War reenactment band dressed in period costumes will play music to transport you to another era. Last year, a bluegrass band also performed near the Kentuck Arts Center, which will also be open for visitors. In the past, some have brought instruments and set up along a sidewalk busking and no one objected, especially when they came

Dickens era costumes. Individuals, couples and sometimes whole families will dress for the occasion! Since December is a winter month and usually cold, dress to be comfortable in an outdoor setting and wear comfortable walking shoes. Bring as many with you as you can to get into the Christmas spirit at this one-of-a-kind festival. Our state may not always be presented in the brightest light, but celebrations like Dickens Downtown show the kind of culture that Alabama offers to the world. Everyone is invited, there is no charge, a multitude of interesting things are going on at the same time, and the focus is on enjoyment and participation! Explore Alabama and see for yourself! December 2,Tuesday, 5-8 pm, downtown Northport. It's a street party that everyone can enjoy. A winter street party of food, fun and music.

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>>> C H A L L E N G E | A L Y X C H A N D L E R

BRAVING THE APPALACHIAN TRAIL // GEORGIA TO MAINE meet his mileage for the day. “For some people, it's hiking the Appalachian Trail; for others, it's starting their own business, but this is what stirred the pot for William,” said John Miller, a former teacher and research project advisor for Wells, as well as the assistant director of the University of Alabama's New College. “It made sense for William to approach it this way.” Just like that obstacle, Wells went on to finish the hike in its entirety on July 23, 2014. After 142 days, approximately 2,180 miles and 3,000-foot drops, along with eight sightings of 300-pound bears, the daily burning of over 7,000 calories and after one whole year of intensive planning, Wells finished hiking the Appalachian Trail. “It forces you to challenge yourself. You get more confidence, and you learn a lot more about yourself, probably too much,” Wells laughed. “But you figure out what you want to focus on in life.” Since then, instead of attending the university's Outdoor Recreation Center trips like he did in college, he gets to lead a group of nature-hungry kids to follow his backpacking adventures through forests. He teaches eco-friendly and safe ways to improvise on the trail for survival. “Some people, they were living to work, instead of working to live. So, that's why they had to come out there,”

Outside of Vernon, N. J., a rickety, wooden suspension bridge opens its mouth to a dirt path that snakes up and down the vibrant, moss-green Pochuck Valley, leading directly toward the rocky Wawayanda Mountain. This is a part of the Appalachian Trail where rolling hills emerge between dense, undisturbed woods, allowing hikers to view the marked trailheads for only eerie, short distances ahead. Once hikers pass a cow patch, the dirt trail abruptly unfurls into steep slabs of stone that wind up the rocky mountain. Popularly dubbed the “stairway to heaven,” this particular path is warned to be an advanced, uneven hike for some people, but hiking “a few rolling hills” by himself posed nothing close to a threat for William Wells, a recent University of Alabama wildlife and land management graduate. For him, this was just a normal day for the Georgia to Maine “thru-hiker.” With loud headphones and no sign of human life for miles, the crisp air and fast pace had 22-year-old Wells' blood pumping and energized in a comfortably focused daze. After hiking for four months, this was exactly the kind of verdant June day he loved. Or at least, it was, until he turned and made immediate, gut-wrenching eye contact with a 300-pound black bear, standing motionless and very possibly hungry about 30 yards away. Seconds crawled by in beady-eyed silence. He knew escape was impossible. Panic dripped like sweat from his neck,

Wells explained. “Like this one guy from Germany, he started hiking alone. He just comes over from a whole new country without speaking any English. He has no connection, nothing. This was right before he was going to start a big career, and he struggled to communicate with us what he needed. We had to help him, but he was the one who had to figure out how to live.” Wells' mental determination to keep pace at an estimated 10 miles a day became easier and easier as he went along, especially as he found groups or even other lone hikers. Wells met people on the trail aged all the way from 8 to 67. Some of them spent their lives hiking back and forth, shuffling from shelter to shelter, rooted deep in the mountains. “When we got to the end, we didn't celebrate or anything, like a lot of people do. We just got to the sign that marked the end and stood there,” said Wells. “All I remember thinking is, 'Now what?' ” Wells' next adventure consists of a speed hike on the Pinhoi through Alabama and Georgia. After that, he plans to trek the Pacific Crest Trail from California to Washington in May. “See, people always tell themselves they don't have the time, or they're not in shape, or they'll say they don't have the money. But, seriously, do it. If you just go do it, then you'll fall in love with it.” and you won't ever want to stop,” Wells said.

and though his research claimed that black bears weren't known for charging, he also knew that he wouldn't stand a chance if it did. Out of instinct, Wells began backing up unsteadily over rocks, unable to rip his eyes from the “terrifying, yet beautiful,” bear. That tiny movement was all it took: The hefty, sharp-clawed creature suddenly charged full-force in his direction. The massive bear cut the distance between them in half with quick, heavy strides. It's generally suggested that hikers fight black bears, but Wells knew for a fact that there was absolutely no training that could have prepared him for what looked to be his last excruciating moments to live. “All I could think of was that quote by Jack Kerouac,” Wells said, recalling the incident with a bewildered smile. “'Pain or love or danger makes you real again.' Also, I was wondering if I would die.” With just as much nightmarish enthusiasm, the bear abruptly cut off to the side of Wells at the last few yards and pounded into the dark woods, leaving Wells shaking and in a new kind of silence. He could still smell the bear's musk breath near him. “At that point, I kind of finally realized, oddly enough, that I was out in the woods. I'd felt so comfortable out there by then. I actually felt more uncomfortable in towns. But after that, I said to myself, 'You're not the top dog here,' and the fear put me back in my place,” Wells said. When the bear didn't return, all there was left for him to do was continue. With shaking hands, he made it rock by rock to the blistering hot boulders at the top to

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>>> CO M M U N I T Y | W I L L I A M B A R S H O P

PROJECT BLESSINGS // PUTTING TURKEY ON THE TABLE AT CHUCK'S

A little girl in her Sunday best walks into Chuck’s Fish in Tuscaloosa, Ala. around 11 a.m. on Thanksgiving day, her purse held tight against her waist. She makes a beeline to the white, plastic bucket set discretely to the side, and drops in a handful of coins. With a proud smile she looks back at her parents, and

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they all sit down for a feast of turkey, potatoes and cranberries, all for the change in the girl’s purse. Others enjoy the feast for no charge at all. The free Thanksgiving meal has become an annual tradition at Chuck’s in partnership with Project Blessings, a Tuscaloosa charity that specializes in

home repair the other 364 days of the year. “We don’t ask for a penny,” said Kelley Reinhart, a Project Blessings board member. “We don’t take a bucket around. If you want to donate there’s little white buckets placed discretely around the restaurant where you can drop some money

or a check.” Charles Morgan, the owner, says he opens Chuck’s doors for a free meal because he wants people of all backgrounds to be able to enjoy the holiday under one roof. “There’s all kinds of shelters and Salvation Army places that do Thanksgiving

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Continued from previous page dinners, but we don’t want people down on their luck to be off to the side,” Morgan said. “We have a table of successful lawyers and one of developers, and we have a table of people who don’t have anything.” “Some people come in handicapaccessible vans with their caregivers, and some of those people need help to be able to enjoy the meal,” Reinhart said. “We serve people who don’t have the financial means to go to a really nice restaurant like Chuck’s and take their family, or take their mama.” Then there is this other group of people, who have been blessed with many material gifts, but they may be travelling or visiting here and staying in a hotel,” Reinhart said. “They are looking for a place to enjoy some fellowship along with turkey and dressing.” Athletic teams from the University of Alabama have even stopped by for lunch in past when the athletes could not travel home for the holiday because of practice schedules and competitions. “We’ve been very successful selling food for many, many years,” Morgan said. “To have one day a year where we give food away is not that big a deal.” The idea started with Annie Jones, a chef at Morgan’s restaurant in Destin, Fla. called Harbor Docks. After 20 years of success putting the meal on in Destin, where they have served 2,000 Thanksgiving lunches in one day, Jones came up to Tuscaloosa to train the kitchen staff and share her recipes. “We had people in Destin who said ‘we would’ve come but we thought it was only for homeless people,” Morgan said. “No, we want all kinds of people. We will seat everybody that’s hungry.” In terms of charity events, Morgan says the meal is a slam-dunk because he is already prepared to serve huge crowds. He just needs a little help to do it on all his servers’ day off. “This is what we day every day anyway,” Morgan said. “It’s not a stretch of any means. We sell lots of food. Giving some away on Thanksgiving day is nothing . . . The responses we have gotten are more rewarding than any excellent day of business.” The spark that started Project Blessings was a 12-year-old girl who made a wish to have a sleepover at her house. The founder of the organization, Marsha Sprayberry got the call from the Magic Moments organization in Birmingham, about a girl with cystic fibrosis in Northport, Ala. who was too embarrassed to have friends over because her bedroom was in such bad shape. Throughout the house, doors were off their hinges and termites had eaten through the walls. “You could see the floor through the bathtub,” Sprayberry said. “The whole house was in dire need of work.” Sprayberry knew that a one-room makeover would not make the girl’s situation any better, but Magic Moments could not allow her to use the allocated budget for anything outside the bedroom. Habitat for Humanity could only offer help building new homes. After countless phone calls for charities that Paul Hornsby couldn’t get the job done, Sprayberry

took it into her own hands. “I was able to look the woman in the eye and say ‘I know how it feels,’” Sprayberry said. “I went from having everything to being just about homeless . . . I know what it’s like to have the water cut off, and the gas cut off, and power cut off.” After losing her clothing business, Sprayberry had struggled to get back on her feet, and wanted to help this single mother do the same. She rallied her friends and family to get the job done. “We all worked really hard, and we finished that little girls bedroom, and we redid the whole house,” Sprayberry said. “It made such a difference in her life. She was missing school, and now she’s a straight-A student.” Five years later, Project Blessings has renovated 82 houses in the Tuscaloosa area. “These are people that are great mother and great fathers, it’s just hard for them to put food on the table let alone fix the roof or repaint,” Sprayberry said. “They just don’t have the extra money on hand.” Just a year after Project Blessings began operations, the owners of Chuck’s Fish reached out for help to put on their free Thanksgiving feast. “They were looking for a charity to partner with and I recommended Project Blessings because it’s Tuscaloosa homegrown,” Reinhart said. “And I thought that because Project Blessings serves people who are down on their luck and in need of assistance, that it would be just a natural partnership.” While the group is always looking for helping hands for repairing homes, and they rely on donations for all projects, they always have a solid base of volunteers ready to help on Thanksgiving. “We’re pretty filled up with volunteers this year,” Reinhart said. “People will drop in and want to help, and we try to tell them how much we appreciate that they would do that.” Chuck’s even had a famous face on the serving staff for last year’s feast; Bill Battle, the University of Alabama athletic director, and his wife, Mary both lent a hand. “They were serving, and the Battles just never sat down,” Reinhart said. “They were such a huge help.” Manning the kitchen at Chuck’s has become a regular Thanksgiving tradition for the Sprayberry family, who all take stations hosting, cooking and waiting tables. “It is really a magical time,” Sprayberry said. “It’s such a wonderful way to spend the holiday, and really I think it’s what Thanksgiving is all about.” For Morgan, every year has proven to him that there is more to business than just turning a profit. “In a world where there’s all these conflicting opinions . . . I think we can all agree that people who are hungry, and need a good meal, deserve it,” Morgan said. “We’re an affluent enough country where we can handle that.” One hundred percent of Project Blessings’ funding comes from personal donations, so contributions are always greatly appreciated.

>>> A L B U M R E V I E W | J O R DA N C I S S E L L

CAVERN SOUND // ECLECTIC RAMBLING, ROLLICKING CAVE RECORDINGS

These are 24 songs that have quite literally never seen the light of day. Back in the late 1960s, a fellow named Jerry Riegle stuck a recording studio down under the ground in an active limestone mine near Kansas City, Missouri, and called it Cavern Sound. James Brown recorded a few cuts there throughout 1972, as did Brewer & Shipley. But for the most part the subterranean studio served as a creative lair for long-forgotten folk and rock hopefuls, high school garage heroes with amps, aspirations and just enough scrounged-up lunch money to pay for a daylong session or two. On Local Customs: Cavern Sound, the fourth issue in the label’s Local Customs series, Numero Group has gathered up two dozen tracks recorded at Cavern Sound between 1967 and 1973, the majority of which have never before been released. And if that conjures visions of purging that old, steel filing cabinet in the office basement or digging up a soil-encrusted time capsule from the backyard, then so be it. Much like a seemingly bottomless document repository or a nostalgic box of knick-knacks, this record’s got a little bit of everything. Album-opener “Mustache in Your Face,” by Pretty, sounds like BachmanTurner Overdrive forgot to look over its shoulder before changing lanes and sideswiped the 13th Floor Elevators. Fuzz-tothe-max guitar slides around over the top of a big, propulsive drum cadence, and the track’s elastic groove is sporadically intruded upon by bursts of chirpy organ and primal screaming. The low-fidelity, multi-tracked harmonies on Fraight’s “One Girl” evoke the Beatles crowded around one microphone in a subway station bathroom. “Lovin’ You’s Blues,” by Jaded, is one of the record’s most arresting cuts. The song’s effect is at once meditative and creepy, with half-mumbled vocals delivering low-key poetry like incantations muttered through an opiate haze. Muted tribal

rhythms also filter through the mist, as the occasional explosive flute freakout whirls to the front of the mix before dissolving into reverberating shimmer. Larry Sands and the Sound Affair’s “You’ll Know the Words” comes across as a mellow, Doors-y lullaby, but listen a bit more closely and the lyrics hurl venom at a previously domineering love interest upon whom the tables have now been turned. The song, along with the album’s other Larry Sands tune, “If I Didn’t Want to See You Anymore,” also represents some of the first recorded output of Sneaky Pete Kleinow, who went on to play pedal steel guitar with the Flying Burrito Brothers, Joni Mitchell, the Rolling Stones and Fleetwood Mac, among many others. The singer on Tide’s “I Wish It Hadn’t Ended That Way” muses with elegiac nostalgia on a time “long ago when the deer ran wild, starlit nights were sweet and mild” and a “winding river ran fresh and clean” over a loose rumble of bass and acoustic guitar that crescendos to the electric, staccato attack of the titular chorus. Morningstar predicts Bikini Kill’s reckless, no-holds-barred attack on “Little by Little,” a three-minute vector of nervous energy, rudimentary riffing and explosive soloing. The collection’s final track is perhaps its best. In “Smoke My Pipe (The Sign Ain’t Right),” A.J. Rowe methodically spews a series of rambling vignettes in an instantly endearing, gravelly croak of a talk-sing, while subtle, trebly guitar jabs punctuate a circular rockabilly drumbeat and pulsing bass guitar run. As the song progresses, the cumulative effective of intermittent guitar stutters and vocal hiccups threaten to catapult the singer and his stories to the brink of collapse. Here is someone doing exactly what he wants to, exactly how he wants to do it, and the results are five weird and stimulating minutes of unfiltered idiosyncrasy. Fitting for a compilation devoted to unearthing the beatific in the bizarre.

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

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>>> WINE REVIEW | J O N R O G E R S

TWO SO-SO INEXPENSIVE WINES // BERINGER CAB & YELLOW TAIL MOSCATO Beringer Cabernet Sauvignon is from Napa, California, USA. For this review I tasted a 2012 “Founders Estate” Cabernet. Founders Estate is the line of wines that Beringer says combines quality with every day value. These wines are meant to be opened right away. Price paid for the Founders Estate Beringer Cabernet Sauvignon was $8.99. Per the bottle, Beringer is the Official Wine of the PGA Tour. Alcohol content of Beringer Cabernet Sauvignon 13.0%. Beringer Cabernet SauvignonIn appearance, Beringer Cabernet Sauvignon is dark plum in color. Very little light shines through. It has subtle legs when first poured. After a bit of air, it seemed to coat the inside of the glass better and produce more legs. On the nose, the wine produced cherry blossom florals. The aroma was light to medium in intensity. It’s a very clean smelling wine with little pronounced alcohol. The aroma wasn’t overly developed and wasn’t noticeable from afar. The wine’s taste included flavors of blackberry and vanilla. It’s a smooth drinking wine and is not dry at all. It reminded me of a blend in that there was some sweetness in the flavor. Although the bottle suggested flavors of oak and spice, I didn’t sense either one. Mouthfeel was silky, with a milky to creamy texture. I detected only minimal tannins. The wine’s finish was short to medium. Overall, this really wasn’t my kind of Cabernet. I tend to like more complexity and less sweetness. If this wine had been presented as a red wine blend, it would have been more in line with what I experienced. Having said that, this wine is definitely “non-controversial” and would be approachable for someone who doesn’t like a dry red. If you like a hint of smooth sweetness in a red wine, this may be to your liking. It’s a good wine if you are just getting into reds or if you are serving it as one of the wine choices for a dinner. Yellow Tail Moscato comes from Casella Wines in Australia.

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Casella Wines’ roots go all the way back to 1870 when they first started planting grapes in Italy. In the late 1950’s the family made the move to Australia. In the mid 1990’s the family built a new winery and is now up to their 6th. generation of family wine making. Their website has more on the Yellow Tail story. The “Yellow Tail” part of Yellow Tail Moscato comes from the golden tail color of the yellow footed rock wallaby, which is an animal similar to a kangaroo in Australia. Some time ago I reviewed the Yellow Tail Cabernet and was rather lukewarm on it. But, I always wanted to come back and check out other Yellow Tail wines. So, I chose the Moscato first, as it’s a very popular wine. I opened the twist top and poured. In the glass Yellow Tail Moscato is very light golden in color. I noted a small amount of effervescence both in the glass and in the bottle after I opened it. I would describe it as lots of tiny bubbles ringing around the surface of the wine. I really had to get my nose into the glass to smell the aroma. I mostly noticed pear and there was little to no whiff of alcohol. Alcohol content of Yellow Tail Moscato is 7.5% by volume per the bottle. The wine’s taste started tart with flavors of ripe green apple. Immediately following that were the sweeter tastes of pear and tropical fruits. Maybe a bit of tangerine, too. I was expecting the flavors to be more crisp, however I wasn’t tasting it chilled. It’s recommended that this wine be served chilled and I would agree with that. Finish of the Yellow Tail Moscato was long and the sweetness lingered all over the palate. Overall, I found the wine to be a very smooth drinking Moscato. There were no positive or negative surprises. It’s very approachable and is likely enjoyable to the masses. If you like a white wine that’s on the sweeter side, this would be perfect for you. This wine would go great on its own at Happy Hour or with a light salad. Also, with dessert. Definitely serve it chilled to get that “zingy and crisp” feeling the bottle suggests. Yellow Tail Moscato price paid was $6.99. More wine reviews by Jon Rogers at www. honestwinereviews.com

>>> RESTAURANTS |

W H E R E TO E AT I N T U S C A LO O SA

BREAKFAST / LUNCH

Brown Bag 9425 Jones Road | Northport // 333.0970 Its speciality, fried green tomatoes, joins barbecue plates and fish filets on an extended list of meats and vegetables. Tues 10:30 a.m. – 5:30 p.m. | Wed-Sat 10:30 a.m. - 7:30 p.m. City Cafe 408 Main Ave | Downtown Northport // 758.9171 Established in 1936. Big on food, low on price. Open for breakfast and lunch. Historic downtown Northport. Closed weekends. CountryPride Restaurant 3501 Buttermilk Rd // 554.0215 www.ta.travelcenters.com Breakfast 24 hours. Lunch and Dinner buffet. Cracker Barrel Old Country Store 4800 Doris Pate Dr | Exit 76 // 562.8282 www.crackerbarrel.com International House of Pancakes 724 Skyland Blvd // 366.1130 Jack's 1200 Hackberry Lane | Tuscaloosa // 345.1199 Maggie's Diner 1307 Ty Rogers Jr. Ave | Tuscaloosa // 366.0302 Mr. Bill's Family Restaurant 2715 McFarland Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 333.9312 Panera Bread 1800 McFarland Blvd *402 | Tuscaloosa // 366.8780 Quick Grill 1208 University Blvd | The Strip | Tuscaloosa // 342.0022

Epiphany Cafe 19 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 344.5583 “New American cuisine” with a strong emphasis on local produce, organic meats, and sustainable seafood. The menu is always changing and features include an extensive wine list, a large vibrant bar and martini lounge area, as well as patio seating. Reservations are available online at epiphanyfinedining.com or through open table. Hours: Mon–Sat 5 p.m. - until Evangeline’s 1653 McFarland Blvd. North // 752.0830 Located in the Tuscaloosa Galleria. 2004 West Alabama Tourism Award Winning Restaurant. American Eclectic Cuisine. Lunch: Mon–Fri 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Dinner: Tues–Sat 5 p.m. - until... Fall: Saturday Brunch. FIVE Bar 2324 6th Street. // 205.345.6089 A restaurant/bar based on simplicity. We offer 5 entrees, 5 red wines, 5 white wines, 5 import beers, 5 domestic, and 5 signature cocktails, to go along with our full liquor bar. Dinner: Sunday - Thursday 5-10; Friday and Saturday 5-12 Lunch: Friday and Saturday 11-3; Sunday Jazz Brunch: 10-3 five-bar.com; 205.345.6089 Kozy’s 3510 Loop Road E | near VA Medical Center // 556.4112 Eclectic menu, extensive wine list. Dinner at Kozy’s is a romantic experience complete with candlelight and a roaring fireplace. |killionrestaurants.com/kozys/ Twin 3700 6th St, Tuscaloosa in Tuscaloosa Country Club | 758-7528 | http://twinpowersactivate.com Certified USDA Prime Steaks; specialty Sushi and cocktails. Hours: 11 a.m. – 2 p.m.; 5 – 10 p.m.

JAPANESE

Rama Jama’s 1000 Bryant Dr // 750.0901 Closest restaurant to Bryant-Denny Stadium.

Benkei Japanese Steak House 1223 McFarland Blvd // 759-5300 Hours: Mon–Thurs 5 p.m. - 9 p.m. | Fri–Sat 5 p.m. - 10 p.m.

Sweet Home Food Bar 2218 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 764-9346 Mon.-Fri. 7 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sat. 8 a.m. – 4 p.m., Sun. 11 a.m. – 4 p.m.

Bento Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar 1306 University Blvd // 758.7426

The Waysider 1512 Greensboro Ave // 345.8239 Open for breakfast and lunch. Smoke free.

MEXICAN Chipotle Mexican Grill

1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 391.0140 www.chipotle.com Don Rafa's 2313 4th Street | Temerson Square // 345.9191 El Mariachi 3520 McFarland Blvd E |Tuscaloosa // 409-8585 El Rincon (2 locations) 1225 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 366.0855 1726 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 330.1274

Hokkaido Japanese Restaurant 607 15th Street Open Sunday through Thursday from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m., and Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. to 11 p.m. Ichiban Japanese Grill & Sushi 502 15th Street // 752.8844 Tokyo Japanese Steak & Sushi Bar 6521 Hwy 69 S | Hillcrest Center // 366.1177 Offers steak, seafood, tempura, teriyaki and sushi. Including cooking at your table, if you choose. Sun–Thurs 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Fri & Sat 5 p.m. - 11 p.m. Kobe Steak House 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 759-1400 Lunch: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Dinner: 4:30 p.m. - 10 p.m. Sat & Sun 11:30 a.m. - 11 p.m.

ITALIAN

Fernando's Mexican Grill 824 McFarland Blvd E | Northport // 205.331.4587

Avenue Pub 405 23rd Avenue

Iguana Grill 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 752.5895

Broadway Pizzeria 2880 Rice Mine Road Northeast Tuscaloosa, // 391.6969

Jalapeno’s Mexican Grill 2001 New Watermelon Rd | Northport // 342.3378

DePalma’s Italian Cafe 2300 University Blvd, Downtown // 759.1879 Menu ranges from sanwiches to finer pasta dishes and pizza. Varied beer and wine selection. Hours: Mon–Thurs 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. www.depalmascafe.com

LaGran Fiesta 9770 Hwy 69 S // 345.8871 Los Calientes Mexican Grill 3429 McFarland Blvd E // 553.1558 Los Tarascos (2 locations) 1759 Skyland Blvd // 553.8896 3380 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 330.0919 Margarita's Grill 1241 McFarland Blvd E // 343.0300 Moe’s Southwest Grill (2 locations) 2330 McFarland Blvd E // 342.1487 1130 University Blvd // 752.0234 moes.com Pepito’s (2 locations) 1203 University Blvd | The Strip // 391.9028 1301 McFarland Blvd NE // 391.4861 Taco Mama 2104 A University Blvd, Tuscaloosa 409.8173

FINE DINING

Chuck’s Fish 508 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 248.9370 Monday - Thursday 5-10 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 5-11 p.m. Steak, seafood, & sushi specialities. Daily specials: Monday $20 Bottles of Wine; Tuesday - Ladies Night 1/2 off Domestic Beer and House Wine, Select $5 Martinis, $2 off Select Sushi Rolls for Everyone; Uptown Wednesday - $6 Uptown Shrimp; Featured Cocktails and $20 Bottles of Wine. Cypress Inn 501 Rice Mine Rd // 345.6963 Fax: 345.6997 | www.cypressinnrestaurant.com 2003 Restaurant of Distinction. Beautiful riverfront location. Steaks, seafood and more with Southern flavor. Wine list, full bar. Specialities of the house include Shrimp Cypress Inn and Smoked Chicken with white barbecue sauce. Kid friendly. Closed Saturday lunch. Mike Spiller is featured the first Thursday of every month. Happy Hour- Mon-Fri from 4:30 p.m. - 6:30 p.m. featuring 1/2 price appetizers. $2 Domestic Draft Beers and $3 Well cocktails.

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Little Italy 1130 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 205.345.4343 Mellow Mushroom 2230 University Blvd // 758.0112 Pizzas, calzones, hoagies and more. Open daily for lunch and dinner. www.mellowmushroom.com Mr. G’s 908 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 339-8505 Olive Garden 2100 McFarland Blvd E // 750-0321 Open daily from 11 a.m. www.olivegarden.com

CASUAL DINING

Avenue Pub 405 23rd Avenue // Tuscaloosa The pub offers a different menu for brunch, lunch, and dinner. Feature foods include pineapple French toast, pork sliders, and a house burger which changes daily. The drink menu features specialty cocktails, local pints, bottled beer, and wine. Monday through Friday 11 a.m. – 11 p.m., Saturday Noon – 11 p.m., Sunday Noon p.m. – 9 p.m. Big Daddy’s Cafe 514 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 759.9925 The Blue Plate Restaurant (Was Northport Diner) 450 McFarland Blvd, Northport // 462-3626 Brumfield's Restaurant 4851 Rice Mine Road | Tuesday - Thursday: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday - Saturday: 11 a.m. - 10 p.m., and Sunday: 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Buddy’s Ribs & Steaks 2701 Bridge Ave | Northport // 339.4885 Buffalo Wild Wings 2710 McFarland Blvd // 523.0273 Mon–Wed 11 a.m. - midnight | Thurs–Sat 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Chicken Salad Chick The Shoppes at Midtown & Essex Square, Northport | Said to be the very best chicken salad that can be found anywhere.


>>> RESTAURANTS |

W H E R E T O E AT I N T U S C A L O O S A ( C O N T. )

www.chickensaladchick.com Chili’s 1030 Skyland Blvd | Near McFarland Mall // 750.8881 Fax: 758.7715 // www.chilis.com Dave’s Dogs 1701 McFarland Blvd E | University Mall // 722.2800 Five Guys Burgers & Fries 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 391.0575 www.fiveguys.com Glory Bound Gyro Company 2325 University Blvd // 349-0505 Glory Bound Gyro Company is a unique restaurant that focuses on great food and service in a funky, fun-filled atmosphere. Open Mon-Thu: 11am - 10pm | Fri - Sat: 11am-10pm | Sun: 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Hooligan’s 1915 University Blvd // 759.2424 From hamburgers to hummus. Open daily 10 a.m. - 11 p.m. Horny's 508 Red Drew Ave | Tuscaloosa // 345.6869 Mon 4 p.m. - 2 a.m. | Tues-Thurs 11 a.m. - 2 a.m. Fri 11 a.m. - 3 a.m. | Sat 4 p.m. - 2 a.m. New Orleans style atmosphere in the heart of Tuscaloosa on the strip. Horny's offerings include a full liquor bar, beer, and a variety of classic American food. Horny's Bar and Grill offers a limited late night menu from 1:30 a.m. - 2:30 a.m. Tacogi 500 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 342.3647 Logan's Roadhouse 1511 Skyland Blvd E // 349.3554 Madear’s 1735 Culver Road // 343.7773 Mon–Fri 6 a.m. - 5 p.m. | 2nd & 3rd Sunday 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. Mugshots Grill & Bar 511 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 391.0572 Great burgers & sandwiches. Unique setting, full service bar, veggie entrees, kid friendly, and open late www.mugshotsgrillandbar.com Newk’s Express Cafe 205 University Blvd. East // 758.2455 Fax: 758.2470 // www.newkscafe.com An express casual dining experience in a refreshing and stylish atmosphere. Serving fresh tossed salads, oven baked sandwiches, California style pizzas and homemade cakes from Newk’s open kitchen. Sun–Wed 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Thurs–Sat 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. O’Charley’s 3799 McFarland Blvd // 556.5143 Open daily for lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch www.ocharleys.com Panera Bread 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 366.8780 www.panerabread.com Piccadilly Cafeteria 1701 McFarland Blvd E | University Mall // 556.4960 www.piccadilly.com Quick Grill 1208 University Blvd | The Strip // 342.0022 www.bamaquickgrill.com Ruby Tuesday (2 locations) 6421 Interstate Drive | Cottondale // 633.3939 Just off I-20/59 at exit 77. Near Hampton Inn and Microtel Inn 311 Merchants Walk | Northport // 345.4540 www.rubytuesdays.com Ryan’s 4373 Courtney Dr // 366.1114 Near Marriott Courtyard and Fairfield Inn Sitar Indian Cuisine 500 15th St // 345-1419 Southland Restaurant 5388 Skyland Blvd E // 556.3070 Steaks, chops and home-cooked vegetables Mon–Fri 10:45 a.m. - 9 p.m.

Champs Sports Grille 320 Paul Bryant Drive | inside Four Points Sheraton Hotel // 752.3200 Breakfast and lunch buffets. Sunday brunch 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Hooter’s 5025 Oscar Baxter Dr | Next to Jameson Inn // 758.3035 Wings, clams, shrimp and of course the Hooters Girls www.hooters.com

Moe's BBQ 101 15th Street | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 752.3616 Mon-Sat 11 a.m. - 9 p.m. Bar open until 2 a.m., 3 a.m. on Fridays Mugshots Grill & Bar 511 Greensboro Ave // 391.0572 Great burgers. Full service bar. Open late. www.mugshotsgrillandbar.com Tuscaloosa Burger & Seafood Company 1014 7th Ave. | Tuscaloosa // 764.1976 Over 160 craft beers. Tue. - Thu 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fri - Sat 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Large selection of decadent desserts Wilhagan’s 2209 4th St | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 366.0913 Wings U 1800 McFarland Blvd East Suite 218 | Pick-up Tuscaloosa // 561.3984 Features the first coal-fired pizza oven in Alabama. Owned by former UA/Miami Dolphins great Bob Baumhower. Completely open concept! www.wingsu.com WingZone 1241 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 342.2473

BARBEQUE

Archibald & Woodrow's BBQ 4215 Greensboro Ave | Tuscaloosa // 331.4858 Mon-Sat 10:30 a.m. – 9 p.m. | Sun lunch Bama BBQ & Grill 3380 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 333.9816 Dickey's BBQ 9770 Alabama 69; Midtown; and 13544 Hwy 43 North at Rose Blvd. in Northport. Great Texas Barbecue. | 344.6500 Dreamland (2 locations) 5535 15th Ave | Tuscaloosa // 758.8135 101 Bridge Ave | Northport // 343.6677 The legend. On game day, get there early if you want to make kickoff. Seating is limited. Hours: Mon–Sat 10 a.m. - 9 p.m. | Sun 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. Hick’s BBQ 4400 Fayette Hwy // 339.3678 // Tues–Sat 10 a.m. - 8 p.m. Moe's Original BBQ 2101 University Blvd.. // 752.3616 Serving up an award-winning, all things Southern BBQ and Live music experience. Come dine-in or sit on the patio and enjoy some great Que, beers, whiskey, and live music on Thursday-Saturday. Roll Tide! Mon–Sat 11am - 10pm | Bar service Mon-Sat 2am and Fri -3am | Kitchen closes at 10pm Pottery Grill (2 locations) Highway 11 | Cottondale // 554.1815 3420 Alabama 69 | Northport // 333.5848 Menu: thepotterygrill.com Awesome barbecue. The Pottery Grill serves up everything from pork, chicken, ribs and sausage to burgers, hot dogs and salads. Take-out and catering available. Tee’s Ribs and Thangs 1702 10th Avenue // 366.9974 |11 a.m. - 10 p.m. daily

STEAKS

Logan’s Roadhouse 1511 Skyland Blvd | next to Sams // 349.3554 Steaks, ribs and spirits

T-Town Café 500 14th Street, Tuscaloosa | 759-5559 |www.ttowncafe.co Mon - Fri: 5 a.m. - 9 p.m., Sat: 5 a.m. - 3 p.m. Sun: 10:30 a.m. - 3 p.m.

Longhorn Steakhouse 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 345-8244 #412

Zoe’s Kitchen 312 Merchants Walk // 344.4450 A wonderful selection of Greek foods

SPORTS GRILL

Baumhower's Wings of Tuscaloosa 500 Harper Lee Drive | catering-Pick-up Tuscaloosa // 556.5858 | Always fresh and always fun. Owned by former UA/ Miami Dolphins great Bob Baumhower. Kid Friendly Buffalo Phil’s 1149 University Blvd | The Strip // 758.3318 Sports grille with TVs galore. Diverse beer and wine selection, full bar Billy's Sports Grill Historic Downtown Northport / 879.2238 Good food, beverages and family friendly Monday through Wednesday from 11 a.m.-9 p.m., Thursday through Saturday from 11 a.m.-10 p.m., and Sunday from 10:30 a.m. till 9 p.m. (Sunday Brunch 10:30am-3pm). Buffalo Wild Wings 2710 McFarland Blvd. East | Tuscaloosa // 523.0273 Sports grille with TVs galore. Diverse beer and wine selection, full bar

HOLIDAY BEERS // CLOWN SHOES PECAN PIE PORTER

Innisfree Irish Pub 1925 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 345.1199

The Southern Dining Room Grill (Behind Ryan's) 4251 Courtney Dr, Tuscaloosa 331-4043

Tuscaloosa Burger & Seafood Company 1014 7th Ave. | Tuscaloosa // 764.1976 Over 160 craft beers. Tue. - Thu 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fri - Sat 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Large selection of decadent desserts.

>>> BEER REVIEW | B R E T T R E I D

Nick's In the Sticks 4018 Culver Rd | Tuscaloosa // 758.9316 A long-time Tuscaloosa tradition. Good steaks at a reasonable price Try a Nicodemus if you have a designated driver. Outback Steakhouse 5001 Oscar Baxter Dr // 759.9000 Twin Restaurant 3700 6th Street |Tuscaloosa | 758-7528 A full service restaurant specializing in Sushi, Prime Steaks, made fresh daily pasta, and whiskey oriented cocktails. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m., 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. // Former Tuscaloosa Country Club

SEAFOOD

Chuck’s Fish 508 Greensboro Ave | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 248.9370 Monday - Thursday 5-10 p.m. and Friday - Saturday 5-11 p.m. Steak, seafood, & sushi specialities. Daily specials: Monday $20 Bottles of Wine; Tuesday - Ladies Night 1/2 off Domestic Beer and House Wine, Select $5 Martinis, $2 off Select Sushi Rolls for Everyone; Uptown Wednesday - $6 Uptown Shrimp; Featured Cocktails and $20 Bottles of Wine. Red Lobster 2620 McFarland Blvd // 553.8810 McFarland Plaza Shopping Center Tin Top Restaurant & Oyster Bar 4851 Rice Mine Rd NE #460 // 462.3399 McFarland Plaza Shopping Center & Temerson Square

Flavored beers can be a huge hit or a huge miss. When done properly, they can be magnificent, taking on flavors in the right spots and leaving out things that aren’t really noticeable. When done wrong, which is the more common occurrence, you give half-assed flavors that don’t really do anything for the name. A while back, I reviewed the Liquid Bliss Peanut Butter Porter from Terrapin, which is a beautiful execution of flavors pairing with the style, and also a while back I had a sickening take on something that was described as a Raspberry, Chocolate, and Pretzel ale, which tasted like none of these flavors. Being that it is the holiday season, I decided to go for holiday inspired beer. Pecan pie has been a staple in the south for as long as any of my family can remember, and I’ve always loved it so when I saw that Clown Shoes had a Pecan Pie Porter, I knew I needed to try it. Also, it is worth noting that I have tried Clown Shoes beer on several occasions and never been impressed; it’s just not good. No matter how much I read the label and no matter how much I wanted this to taste good, again in true Clown Shoes fashion, it failed me miserably. Here are my thoughts: The beer poured a nice, dark black with about one and a half to two finger widths of a khaki-colored head. The head settles slowly, but the retention was very small with some patches of light lacing. I let it settle for a moment before I began to sniff in hopes that I would be blown away by something magical. Turns out, this beer doesn’t have the slightest scent of pecan pie at all. I was heartbroken.

I just went out of my way to purchase a beer that is falsely labeled. Anyways, a lot of strong coffee notes with some nice malt scents, and possibly a little vanilla made its way through, all of which are not pecan pie; which is dumb. From the first sip, you really pick up on a lot of coffee and roasted barley. There were some chocolate flavors, but more specifically dark chocolate. Other people note that they tasted pecans and spices, but all I really tasted was just coffee and generic porter flavors. A lot of malt, coffee, and some faint chocolate flavors are this beer is really offering. On the label indicates that the beer is 25% aged in bourbon barrels, which, to me, didn’t add anything to this beer at all. There is no flavor gained or lost from the “bourbon barrel aging.” I guess this also has to do with the fact that I hate beers that are aged in bourbon barrels. It just doesn’t do anything for me, sorry. I wish there would have been a bigger level of sweetness from some brown sugar and classic pumpkin pie spices, although, more than anything, I would have enjoyed the taste of pecans somewhere in this beer that is labeled as a pecan pie beer. My mind was boggled, but I guess such is the game when you attempt to give redemption to a brand you’ve been let down by so many times before. The mouthfeel was the best aspect of this one. The carbonation level was dialed in perfectly for a porter. It warmed the stomach and settled well on the tongue without that horrible carbonation tingling. There was some sort of sour after taste mixed with the only vanilla I tasted through the whole beer.

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

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>>> R E S T A U R A N T R E V I E W | C I N D Y H U G G I N S

A BITE OF PERFECTION // BROTHERS EXPRESS PIZZA

The 2014 Bacon & Brewfest people’s choice winner for the Best Bacon Dish was Brothers Express Pizza Café. It wasn’t the “Carnivore” red pie, slathered in red sauce, topped with mozzarella, pepperoni, bacon, Italian sausage, and Italian meatballs that took the prize. Imagine the tastes and textures of creamy cold gelato with a rich caramel flavor followed by the comforting taste of salty, fatty bacon. Yes, it was the Caramel Bacon Gelato that took the win. Brothers Express Pizza Café is creating a name for itself and quickly. Owners Robbie Sickler and wife hosted a grand opening only 5 weeks ago. The vision for this restaurant is in its name. Sickler wants the focus to be on family and food. Not just any food, fresh and fast food. Their pies take a turn on a revolving deck inside a massive brick oven reaching 750 degrees in little time. The oven possesses world record holding technology having produced 200 pizzas in one hour. So, if you need a couple hundred pies made you know where to turn. This new pizzeria can be found in Midtown Village across from Az Well. The space is sleek and modern with plenty of family seating. The menu is well designed with a simple format making it easy to navigate. Offers include pizza pies, calzones, salads, bread sticks and gelato. Little Brother, Middle Brother, and Big Brother, is used to distinguish pizza sizes. The menu makes it easy for a whole family to eat together or choose individual options. When I reached the counter I was immediately greeted by a friendly employee and Mr. Sickler, who was diligently cooking while holding a polite conversation with me. The evening’s meal was carryout, so my order was promptly brought to

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me nice and hot. My eyes hit the colorful gelato and curiosity got the best of me. Along with my order I opted for two scoops to-go. The first scoop, cookies-n-cream with blood orange sorbet plopped on top. Random, yes but oh so good! During my conversation I was invited to browse the walls which displayed beautiful black and white family pictures. The lasting family memories were captured in the beautiful country of Italy. My drive home was accompanied by the intoxicating smell of melted mozzarella, spicy sausage, and hints of herbs. The aroma was escaping from two delicious calzones. My choice was the “Keep it Simple” calzone. What can I say? I’m a simple kind of girl. Garlic, pepperoni, ricotta, and Mozzarella filled a thin layer of crust topped with parmesan cheese and an herb blend. Like most calzones, the portion was generous. But, this handcrafted calzone was rather flat. The ingredients were evenly distributed promising a consistent savory bite. The ricotta cheese was a nice addition rendering a somewhat tangy, sweet taste. Marinara sauce sat lonely beside my plate. The well-seasoned crust complemented the ingredients so well didn’t crave the need for sauce. Though, my husband felt the portion of the sauce was a little stingy. His calzone, “Mighty Meaty”, was full of garlic, ricotta, Mozzarella, pepperoni, hand-pinched Italian sausage, and bacon engulfed in parmesan and herb covered crust. The crust was something special. It was soft but not undercooked or doughy. It allowed for the softest bites not taking away from the ingredients and adding a little more. Hungry yet? Brothers Express Pizza Café is serving up hot pies Monday – Saturday from 11:00 am to 9:00 pm and Sunday from 11:00 am to 6:00 pm. Let us know where you are eating! Tweet us @ ThePlanetWeekly. Cindy Huggins, RDN, LD is a registered dietitian nutritionist and local “foodie” Follow her on twitter @DietitianCindy for more foodie news.

>>> RESTAURANTS |

W H E R E TO E AT I N T U S C A LO O S A (CO N T.)

Tuscaloosa Burger & Seafood Company 1014 7th Ave. | Tuscaloosa // 764.1976 Over 160 craft beers. Tue. - Thu 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m.; Fri - Sat 10:30 a.m. to 11 p.m.; Sun 10:30 a.m. to 10 p.m. Large selection of decadent desserts. Wintzell’s Oyster House 1 Bridge Ave | Northport // 247.7772 Casual riverfront dining Sun–Thurs 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Fri–Sat 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.

CHINESE

Buffet City 1747 Skyland Blvd E // 553.3308 All you can eat buffet. Open 7 days a week. Chang’s Chinese Restaurant 1825 McFarland Blvd N // 391.9131 China Fun 2600 University Blvd | Alberta City // 553.2435 China Garden Hwy 69 S | Hillcrest Center // 758.0148 Hot Wok Express 6751 Alabama 69, Tuscaloosa // 758.0148 Lee Palace 6521 Highway 69 S // 391.9990 Open daily 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Mr. Chen's Authentic Chinese Cooking & Oriental Market 514 14th St. | In the Oz Music shopping center // 343.6889 // Open Sun - Thu 11am - 9pm, Fri & Sat 11am - 9:30pm Pearl Garden 2719 Lurleen Wallace Blvd | Northport // 339.0880 Peking Chinese Restaurant 1816 McFarland | Northport // 333.0361 Open 7 days a week. Super lunch and dinner buffet. Hours: Sun–Thurs 11 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. Swen Chinese Restaurant 1130 University Blvd | The Strip // 391.9887 Trey Yuen 4200 McFarland Blvd E // 752.0088

ASIAN CUISINE

Fax: 752.6193 // www.jasonsdeli.com Located in the Meadowbrook Shopping Center. Jimmy John’s (3 locations) 1400 University Blvd | The Strip // 366.3699 1875 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 752.7714 815 Lurleen B. Wallace S | Tuscaloosa // 722.2268 Delivery 7 days a week. www.jimmyjohns.com Manna Grocery & Deli 2300 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 752.9955 McAlister’s Deli (2 locations) 101 15th St | Tuscaloosa // 758.0039 3021 Tyler Dr | Northport // 330.7940 Sandwiches, salads and spuds www.mcalistersdeli.com Momma Goldberg’s Deli 409 23rd Ave // 345.5501 www.mommagoldbergs.com Newk's 205 University Blvd E | Tuscaloosa // 758.2455 Schlotsky’s Deli 405 15th St. E // 759.1975 schlotskys.com Which Wich University Blvd.// Downtown Tuscaloosa // Mon – Sat 10:30 – 9 // Sunday 11 – 7 // Fun atmosphere,fresh ingredients, great sandwiches. 764.1673

COFFEE SHOP

Barnes & Noble 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Tuscaloosa 349.6366 Chloe's Cup 2117 University Blvd.| Tuscaloosa // 764.0218 Crimson Cafe International Coffee House & Gourmet Deli 1301 University Blvd | The Strip // 750.0203 Mon–Fri 7 a.m. - 11 p.m. | Sat & Sun 8 a.m. - 11 p.m. thecrimsoncafe.com Five Java Coffee, fresh juices, smoothies and treats from Mary's Cakes. Open Monday - Saturday at 7am; 9am on Sundays

Ruan Thai 1407 University Blvd // 391.9973 | ruanthaituscaloosa.com Exotic Thai cuisine. Offers vegetarian options, outdoor dining, and a full bar. Sushi on Thursdays. Lunch: Mon–Sat 11 a.m. -2 p.m. | Dinner: Mon–Thurs 5 p.m. - 10 p.m. Fri & Sat 5 p.m. -10pm | Sun 11 a.m. -3 p.m.

Heritage House 18 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 758.0042

Surin of Thailand 1402 University Blvd // 752.7970 Authentic Thai restaurant and sushi bar. Open daily. Lunch: 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. | Dinner: 5 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. www.surinofthailand.com

Starbucks (2 locations) 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 343.2468 1901 13th Ave East | inside Super Target // 462.1064 starbucks.com

PIZZA AND SUBS

A Taste Of Chicago 1700 Greensboro Avenue 205-342-DOGS Mon. - Thurs. 10 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Fri. - Sat. 10 a.m. - 10 p.m. 17th Street and Greensboro Avenue. Authentic Chicago style foods. Italian Beef Sandwiches, Chicago Rib Tips, and Chicago Style Pizza. California Underground 13552 Highway 43, Northport | 339.8660 Firehouse Subs 1130 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 248.0680 Hungry Howie’s (2 locations) 1105 Southview Ln | South Tuscaloosa // 345.6000 1844 McFarland Blvd | Northport // 333.2633 1211 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa | The Strip // 366.1500 4851 Rice Mine Rd | Northriver/Holt // 345.3737 Lenny’s Sub Shop 220 15th St // 752.7450 Fax: 752.7481 // www.lennys.com Little Caesars Pizza 1414 10th Ave // 366.2220 | 1www.littlecaesars.com Little Italy 1130 University Blvd. // 345.4354 Mellow Mushroom 2230 University Blvd | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 758.0112 Subs n' You 2427 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa // 205.758.0088 Roly Poly Sandwiches 2300 4th Street | Tuscaloosa // 366.1222 The Pita Pit 1207 University Blvd | The Strip // 345.9606 Hours: Mon–Sat 10:30 a.m. - 3 a.m. | Sun 11:30 a.m. - midnight Pizza 120 50115th St. East | 561.6853 Pizza Palace Buffet 6521 Alabama 69 | 752.5444 Tut’s Place 1306 University Blvd | The Strip // 759.1004

DELICATESSEN Honeybaked Ham Company 421 15th St. E // 345.5508 www.honeybaked.com

Krispy Kreme Doughnut 1400 McFarland Blvd // 758.6913 www.krispykreme.com

DESSERTS

Celebrations Bakery, Inc. 1832 McFarland Blvd N | Northport // 339.3221 Fax: 349.1945 Cold Stone Creamery 1130 University Blvd. | Tuscaloosa //343.1670 Specializes in customized ice cream Hours: Mon–Thurs 11 a.m. - 10 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. Sun 12 p.m. - 10 p.m. Dunkin' Donuts 2520 Stillman Blvd. |Tuscaloosa// 349.3400 McCorvey Dr. | Tuscaloosa // 348.4041 www.dunkindonuts.com Mary's Cakes & Pastries 412 22nd Avenue | behind Opus | Northport // 345.8610 www.maryscakesandpastries.com Mon–Fri 8 a.m. - 6 p.m. | Sat 8 a.m. - 3 p.m. Smoothie King (2 locations) 415 15th Street | Tuscaloosa // 349.1721 Fax: 349.1945 1403 University Blvd | Tuscaloosa // 462.3664 Sweet CeCe's Frozen yogurt Treats 2217 University Blvd. | Downtown Tuscaloosa // 561.6458 A fun and friendly make your own creation, yogurt experience! TCBY (3 Locations) 2304 Mcfarland Blbd | Meadowbrook Shopping Center // 349.4661 // 2 Mcfarland Blvd | Northport | Essex Shopping Center // 758.6855 // 1130 Univ. Blvd. | The Strip // 345.0804 Yogurt In Love Patriot Center 7402 Highway 69 South Phone Number: 764.9173 Fax Number: 764.9228 Monday-Thursday 11 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday & Saturday 11 a.m.-10 pm. Yogurt Lab 920 Paul W. Bryant Dr Ste 200 | Tuscaloosa // 347.9522 Yogurt Mountain 1800 McFarland Blvd E | Midtown Village // 342.1484 Mon–Thurs 11 a.m. - 11 p.m. | Fri & Sat 11 a.m. - midnight

TO HAVE YOUR RESTAURANT LISTED HERE PLEASE EMAIL PLANETEDITOR@YAHOO.COM

Jason’s Deli 2300 McFarland Blvd // 752.6192

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS


>>> M U S I C | T R E Y B R O O K S

REMEMBERING JACK BRUCE // HIS MUSIC WILL LIVE ON

The legendary bass player for one of the most important rock bands of all time passed away on October 25th this year. Cream was only around from 1966 until 1968, but their recordings from that period have proven over time to be immensely influential to scores of rock and blues musicians since then. was already an accomplished musician before he teamed up with Ginger Baker and Eric Clapton to form the world’s most famous power trio. He spent time with John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers and Manfred Mann, where he performed on the chart-topping hit “Pretty Flamingo”. But it was with Cream that he became the almost universally respected figure he is today. The name of the band came from the reputations of the three men as the “cream of the crop” of British blues musicians. While American blues music was waning in popularity in the United States during the 1960’s, British musicians were just discovering the music and creating a vibrant scene in the United Kingdom. After leaving the British Invasion band The Yardbirds, guitarist Eric Clapton was recruited by drummer Ginger Baker to form a new group. Clapton agreed, but only on the condition that his friend and former bandmate from the Bluesbreakers Jack Bruce also join. The arrangement was one built on shaky ground as Baker and Bruce were not the best of friends. In fact, when the two were bandmates in the Graham Bond Organisation, they fought so often that they actually began sabotaging each other’s instruments. Nevertheless, they put their differences aside to form Cream. Bruce played bass without ever seeing himself as just a part of the rhythm section of the band. As with “Sunshine of Your Love”, he crafted riffs that helped give Cream a much more thunderous sound than their contemporaries. Bruce was also gifted at improvisation, as can

be heard on the band’s cover of the blues standard “Spoonful”. He also acted as the band’s lead vocalist for most of their recordings. Clapton would take a greater role singing near the end of Cream’s run, but the two were also able to harmonize and add more atmosphere to their songs. Along with the Jimi Hendrix Experience, Cream set the standard in using volume in blues music. This was the beginning of hard rock, and with later groups such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath, also the origins of heavy metal. Ultimately, Bruce and Baker could not work together. The two could not put aside their rivalry, and went back to trying to upstage each other as much as possible. When Clapton failed to get Traffic vocalist Steve Winwood to join the band, Cream finally dissolved in 1968. They would reunite for one-off performances in 1993 and 2005, but never recorded or toured again as a band. After Cream disbanded, Jack Bruce would go on to create several solo albums that are still held in high regard by musicians to this day. His second album Things We Like included music that was more jazz-oriented, and played a role in the growing popularity of jazz-fusion music that would see commercial growth in the late 1970’s. He would also work with musicians who had been in groups such as The Rolling Stones, Beatles, Parliament-Funkadelic, Mountain and Living Colour. Jack Bruce’s personal life was one of extreme ups and downs. Throughout his career he had a major drug addiction that left him nearly broke by 1980. He also lost his son Jonas in 1997 to respiratory illness. Bruce’s liver disease, one that had plagued him for years, finally took his life this October. However, the music he made will live on. Cream remains one of the most influential bands in rock and roll, and Bruce is still regarded as one of rock’s greatest bass players. RIP Jack Bruce.

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS

BACKROAD ANTHEM NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

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>>> T H E F L A T S C R E E N | C A R A B R A K E

REMAKE MANIA // BE CAREFUL OF WHAT YOU REMAKE

What should a television network do when the ratings go down? Some come up with creative reality shows, or launch new animated series. Those usually hit the spot, but when now it seems as if the newest craze is to remake shows from different countries using American actors, but the same plots, and in some cases the same dialogue.

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The biggest market for remakes is British television shows-the familiar dialect makes it easier to pick up in America, and after removing the unfamiliar British slang that sounds strange on an American tongue, networks assume they have a hit on their hands. The most noteable example of this is the hit show “The Office”, which first aired

in England in 2001 and starred Ricky season continued, however, critics tore it Gervais as David Brent. In 2005, NBC apart, and the show was lost. Its backers picked it up, with actor Steve Carell as Mi- pulled out, and there were even accusachael Scott, the David Brent-esque boss tions of child pornography, as most of the of Dunder-Mifflin Paper Co. The office cast-as they were written-were under the is in a category known as “mockumenage of 18. “Skins” is an example of being tary”, where the camera man is, instead careful what you remake, as the decency of invisible, noticed by everyone and the laws in the UK are much less strict than show is filmed documentary style, with the are in the US, so what would be interviews and sometimes awkward camentertainment there is controversial and era angles. That plays into the comedy as inappropriate here. the characters give off the wall answers Now, FOX is jumping into the ring to questions, they interact with each again, this time with a remake of “Luther”, other in quirky ways, and get involved in the popular UK detective drama whose shenanigans. Both shows started with low three seasons in Great Britain have ratings, but soon the UK Office soared in soared so far. The outlook isn’t good, howratings and became one of the best Britever, since FOX isn’t airing the original, ish comedies. After two seasons, the US but remaking the series with American version picked up great ratings, but rode actors. In the wake of shows like Doctor low with the last two seasons, the last Who, Sherlock and Downton Abbey, why episode airing in 2013. won’t FOX just air the original? RegardHowever, not all shows that get picked less, “Luther” isn’t predicted to be a hit, up for an American audience are as but only time can tell if the show will win or welcome. A lesser known remake that lose to American audiences. flopped in translation was “Skins”. The UK series of the same name was a critical hit, and the ratings continued through all of it’s seven seasons. Characterized by it’s changing cast, sex, drugs, violence, and issues with mental illness and dysfuncThe 1981 production after opening despite wide audience acclaim. Today, tional families, “Skins”closed was a shortly dark look it'sthe among popular musicals in the U.S. into livesthe of amost group of teens in Bristol. When the US picked it up in 2011, the writers remade the first episode exactly, with American cast members. As the

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>>> M O V I E R E V I E W | V A N R O B E R T S

"DUMB AND DUMBER TO" // A RIOTOUS ✭✭✭✭ ASSAULT ON GOOD TASTE

Twenty years have elapsed since Bobby & Peter Farrelly made their cinematic debut as co-directors on “Dumb and Dumber” (1994) with Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels. Although it wasn’t nearly as sidesplitting as subsequent Farrelly fare, such as “Kingpin,” “There’s Something About Mary,” and “Me, Myself & Irene,” “Dumb and Dumber” acquainted audiences with the Farrellys’ politically-incorrect brand of lowest common denominator humor. Not surprisingly, the “Dumb and Dumber” slapstick sequel, “Dumb and Dumber To,” constitutes nothing short of an assault on good taste. The Farrellys conjured up a catalogue of rude, crude, and lewd jokes that made “Dumb and Dumber” a riotous outing as well as a smash box office hit, and the lunatic sequel serves up even more audacious antics. If you abhor raunchy humor, you should avoid at all costs this anthology of gross-out gags, some so lowbrow that discretion discourages me from describing them in depth. Reprising their roles as Lloyd Christmas and Harry Dunne, Carrey and Daniels wallow in a rib-tickling variety of pranks, concerning grotesque bodily functions, bared buttocks, and flatulence galore. Although the overall narrative concept isn’t as fresh as the original “Dumb and Dumber,” the farce is still clearly with Lloyd and Harry, and this impertinent comedy tops the original. If you thought Lloyd and Harry were morons in “Dumb and Dumber,” they are twice as obtuse in this sequel. Not only does “Dumber and Dumber To” imitate its predecessor’s jokes and pratfalls, but it also delivers even more material to laugh and/or cringe at than the original. One of my favorites is the peanut funnel gag. In my day, somebody persuaded you to stick a funnel in your britches, place a quarter on your forehead, and then drop George Washington into the funnel three times to demonstrate your genius. As you prepared for the third attempt, somebody would empty an icy Slush Puppy into the funnel and drench your drawers. Most sequels provide less-than-inspired links to their predecessors. Indeed, everybody knows Hollywood makes sequels primarily for the loot. Reportedly,

Jim Carrey found himself between places on the road when he caught the original “Dumb and Dumber” again on television. So enamored was Carrey with the memory of the first film that he convinced Bobby and Peter Farrelly and Jeff Daniels to reunite for the belated sequel. The link between the two movies is so absurd that you cannot help but burst your bladder laughing. Essentially, “Dumb and Dumber To” adopts the same road trip narrative. This time around our harebrained heroes aren’t involved in a kidnapping. Instead, Harry has been taking care of poor Lloyd who has been a patient in the Baldy View Mental Hospital for the past twenty years. Lloyd succumbed to depression because he couldn’t win over the girl of his dreams, Mary Swanson, in the original “Dumb and Dumber.” As it turns out, Lloyd faked his own depression, and Harry has been diligently changing Lloyd’s shorts and cleaning his buttocks for two decades. Indeed, Lloyd has made Harry the butt of his own joke. Lloyd stops faking his mental illness one day after Harry informs him that he must undergo a kidney transplant. Incredibly, when Lloyd comes clean, Harry isn’t insulted by Lloyd’s deception. Later, Harry learns that he may have been a father when he dated an old girlfriend, Fraida Felcher (a plump Kathleen Turner of “Serial Mom”), back in his high school days. Fraida hands them a letter with her daughter’s address. She put Penny (Rachel Melvin of “Zombeavers”), up for adoption years ago. Fraida loans them a hearse to search for Penny, and these knuckleheads read the wrong address and wind up back where they started from at Frieda’s house. Eventually, they manage to find Penny, who has been raised by a brilliant scientist, Dr. Barnard Pinchelow (Stephen Tom of “Android Cop”), and his late wife. Dr. Pinchelow’s first wife has since died, and he has remarried. Pinchelow’s second wife, Adele (Laurie Holden of “The Walking Dead”), plans to steal a package worth billions that he has entrusted to Penny to take to a science convention in El Paso, Texas, where she will deliver a speech about her father’s legacy. Mean-

while, Adele is trying secretly to poison Pinchelow, with the help of Travis (Robert Riggle of “21 Jump Street”) their sinister grounds-keeper. Penny, who is just as incompetent as our heroes, not only forgets her father’s package but also her cell phone. Adele sends Lloyd and Harry after Penny to give her the mysterious package with Travis accompanying them. As you can see, “Dumb and Dumber To” packs a lot of plot for a sophomoric comedy, and you have to connect quite a few dots in its complicated timeline. The crowning glory of “Dumb and Dumber To” is the pathetic idiocy of its protagonists. The elastic-faced Carrey and the equally befuddled Daniels get away with a lot in this PG-13 epic. Like the original “Dumb and Dumber,” Carrey and Daniels perform the same silly shenanigans without one upstaging the other. Basically, they qualify as ‘The Two Stooges.’ Carrey still wears his coiffure clipped like Moe Howard of the original “Three Stooges,” as if a barber had put a bowl on his noggin and trimmed his

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locks around the edge. Meanwhile, Daniels ruffles his hair and makes funny faces like Larry Fine, another “Three Stooges” alumnus. Not surprisingly, the Farrellys are lifelong “Three Stooges” fans, but their last film, a cinematic homage to “The Three Stooges,” didn’t live up to the insanity of the originals. Nevertheless, “Dumb and Dumber To” ranks as their funniest farce since “The Heartbreak Kid” (2007) with Ben Stiller. Their hopeless buffoonery will prompt you want to take another look at the original. Don’t waste your time on the atrocious prequel “Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd.” Despite its pervasive toilet humor, “Dumb and Dumber To” will make connoisseurs of crappy comedy flush with joy at its irreverent antics.

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

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>>> EVENTS CALENDAR |

THE SOUTHEAST'S LARGEST

NOTE: All events listed here have phone numbers in the 205 area code unless otherwise indicated.

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27 HAPPY THANKSGIVING! The Planet Weekly wishes you a safe and happy holiday.

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29

WHEN MOMMY LOVES BAMA AND DADDY LOVES AUBURN // BOOK SIGNING WHEN: 1 – 4 p.m. COST: $12.95 WHERE: SUPe Store Quad Tent near Denny Chimes PHONE: 323.692.1700 LINK: debhiett.com DESCRIPTION: Hollywood actress/author (and former UA student) Deb Hiett will be signing copies of this illustrated humorous book, which follows a young brother and sister growing up in "house divided" and navigating the delicate dance that is the Iron Bowl. Meet the author and watch the game on the University of Alabama campus.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 1

HODGES METEORITE ANNIVERSARY WHEN: 10 a.m. – 4:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 427 6th Ave PHONE: 348.7550 LINK: facebook.com/ALMNH DESCRIPTION: Special exhibit featuring historic artifacts from the natural history collections at the Alabama Museum of Natural History documenting the November 30, 1954 meteorite event that made history. Special case on display from Now through December 1, so get a good look before the exhibit is gone.

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3 MUSIC VIDEO SCREENING WHEN: 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 1305 Greensboro Ave PHONE: 348.67100 LINK: thenineteenthcenturycity.blogspot. com DESCRIPTION: The results of their the University Alabama “Nineteenth Century City” course will be presented in a 12-minute documentary music video whose “world premiere” will occur at the Jemison Mansion in downtown Tuscaloosa. Also take part in the food reception and the student photography exhibition and explore the history of the mansion.

BROWN BAG LECTURE SERIES WHEN: 12 – 1 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 715 Campus Drive PHONE: 348.6063 LINK: ferguson.ua.edu DESCRIPTION: Every month, the Feminism Spoken Here Brown Bag Lecture Series will host a guest speaker or information session highlighting the accomplishments of women in academia and beyond. Bring a lunch, and join us as we delve deeper and celebrate these accomplishments! Meets at the 360 Forum of the Ferguson Center.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4 KENTUCK ART NIGHT WHEN: 5 – 8 p.m.

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COST: Free WHERE: 503 Main Ave, Northport PHONE: 758.1257 LINK: kentuck.org DESCRIPTION: As on the first Thursday of every month, Kentuck opens its doors to visitors for a night of art, music, food and fun. Enjoy a live band, food from the cob oven, and the wonderful art of resident Kentuck artists. SEASONAL PHOTOGRAPHY WHEN: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. COST: $65 WHERE: 2200 Rock Quarry Dr PHONE: 562.3230 LINK: tcpara.org DESCRIPTION: This class is designed for those who have gotten their first digital camera, or for those who have had one for a while but never felt comfortable shooting in any mode other than the full auto-point and shoot. Students should bring their camera and its manual. The instructor is certified by the Birmingham School of Photography and has three years of experience teaching workshops. BRINGING OUT THE BEST IN OTHERS: SEMINAR WHEN: 9 – 10:30 a.m. COST: Free WHERE: 801 University Blvd PHONE: 348.9700 LINK: uahr.skillport.com DESCRIPTION: In this very interactive and energizing session at the Rose Administration we will focus on creating and maintaining a motivated work environment. A combination of principles and methods, including group interaction and individual reflection will be used.

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5

FIRST FRIDAY WHEN: 5 – 9 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: Downtown Tuscaloosa DESCRIPTION: First Friday takes place on the first Friday of the month from 5-9 pm in Downtown Tuscaloosa and is free to the public. Local galleries, businesses and restaurants are open as an event for the community. LITTLE WOMEN WHEN: 7:30 p.m. COST: $12 – 17 WHERE: 9500 Old Greensboro Rd PHONE: 391.2277 LINK: theatretusc.com DESCRIPTION: Based on the beloved novel by Louisa May Alcott, Little Women interweaves the lives of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March. Their mother strives to provide her daughters with a happy childhood despite the absence of their beloved father, who is away fighting in the Civil War. This cleverly written story of a family’s enduring love is a perfect show for the holiday season. Showing at BeanBrown Theatre through Dec 14.

>>> PET PLANET | K E L S E Y C A M E R O N

YOU'LL LOVE LUCY // MAGGIE IS WONDERFUL Lucy wants to be your #1. This is one of the most unique looking dogs we have had! Lucy is an almost 2 year old female German Shepherd mix. Her coat has the black and tan coloring like a German Shepherd but also has brindle markings, possibly like a Tennessee mountain cur. Lucy’s body is more like a cur but her head and ears are more like a German Shepherd. Lucy is a big dog, weighing 51 pounds. She was pulled from our local animal shelter, where she had been returned after being adopted out for about a year and a half by the shelter. Her owners said they didn’t want her anymore. So sad! She had been down there for a month and was getting very antsy, so we had to get her out! Lucy is a very sweet, social dog. She has a lot of energy, so she will need an active owner. She would be great with someone who wants a running, walking or hiking partner. Lucy would not do well in an apartment, and she will require a fenced in yard. She would probably be a good play partner for another dog. Lucy should be fine with children 12 and up, just not younger due to her size. We have started on her crate training. She is up to date on her vet care, spayed, heartworm negative and is micro chipped. She is on heartworm and flea/tick prevention. Lucy is a smart dog that will make a wonderful addition to any home, and we want to make sure this time it is forever! If you are interested in giving Lucy the forever home she wants and deserves, visit the Humane Society of West Alabama at humanesocietyofwa.org or call us at 554-0011. This beautiful lady is Maggie, an adult female Calico with gorgeous coloring! She is a young adult who is around 3 to 4 years old. Maggie is a friendly little lady! She would be a wonderful companion cat. She is low-energy, gentle and eager to be petted and loved. Maggie would do well with kids who can handle her gently. She would socialize well with another friendly, gentle cat or two, but we aren't sure how Maggie would like a dog. We would recommend a trial adoption if there is a dog in the home. Visit our cat adoption center or contact us to meet Maggie! Maggie is negative for FIV and FeLK, current on vaccinations and spayed. If you are interested in giving Maggie the forever home she wants and deserves visit the Humane Society of West Alabama at humanesocietyofwa.org or call us at 554-0011.

If you ever decide to adopt a dog, check out your local shelter. Buying dogs from pet stores or online increases the demand for the cruel puppy mills that often supply them. If you already have a dog, please remember to get it spayed or neutered. It's the best way you can help prevent dog overpopulation.

HILARITAS WHEN: 7:30 p.m. COST: $5 – 15 WHERE: 810 2nd Ave

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS


>>> EVENTS CALENDAR | PHONE: 348.7111 LINK: music.ua.edu DESCRIPTION: A must-see tradition since 1969, this holiday concert is a oneof-a-kind University of Alabama experience. Presented by the school of music, the Alabama Jazz Ensemble and the University Singers, the spirit of Christmas is perfectly captured in this annual concert of holiday songs. HOLIDAY DANCE WHEN: 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. COST: $5 – $7 WHERE: 427 6th Ave PHONE: 394.1494 LINK: ctbd.org DESCRIPTION: Get into the holiday spirit at the Alabama Museum of Natural History with a night of dancing sponsored by the Crimson Tide Ballroom Dancers. Semi-formal attire, though black-tie and holiday attire are more than welcome.

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6

CANDYLAND BREAKFAST WITH SANTA WHEN: 8 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. COST: $12 – 15 WHERE: 2213 University Blvd PHONE: 349.4235 LINK: chomonline.org DESCRIPTION: Bring a camera for pictures with Santa and Mrs. Claus, enjoy the holiday music and stick around for arts and crafts. Reservations are available for three breakfast times.

T

The Tuscaloosa County Preservation Society Presents its Annual Holiday Open House.

he Tuscaloosa County Preservation Society kicks-off the holiday season on Sunday, December 7, from 2 – 5 p.m. The Battle-Friedman House, the Old Tavern, the Murphy African American Museum, The Capitol School, and the Jemison-Van de Graaff Mansion will all be open to the public with refreshments and lively entertainment. Come enjoy the historic houses bedecked for the holidays in period decorations by the Greensboro Garden Club. Local caterers will provide goodies at each location and we are excited to partner with Bama Hillel for a third year who will provide tasty Hanukkah treats. The Tuscaloosa Belles will also be at each location dressed for the holidays and ready to welcome visitors. As a special delight, Father Christmas will be at the Old Tavern to visit with area children. ADMISSION IS FREE For additional information, please call 758.2238 or visit us online at HistoricTuscaloosa.org.

The Tuscaloosa Public Library will help you get in the holiday spirit as it hosts its fourth annual Holiday Open House on Sunday, December 7, 2014 from 2-5:30 p.m. The open house will have children’s crafts, movies, treats, book signings from local authors, and a “Holiday Postcard” photo booth. All activities are free and family friendly. For additional information, contact the Tuscaloosa Public Library at 345.5820.

CHRISTMAS EXTRAVAGANZA WHEN: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 2010 T.Y. Rogers Jr. Ave PHONE: 534.0014 LINK: weepingmarybaptistchurch.com DESCRIPTION: Join Charming Kreations & Get Kerri'd Away for a morning of shopping at the Weeping Mary Baptist Church Center. Complete your Christmas shopping early AND spread some holiday cheer. As always, there will be fun, great buys, and door prizes! Tables for this event are only $30. Shoppers please bring canned goods to donate to Temporary Emergency Services of Tuscaloosa County.

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7

5TH STREET VINTAGE MARKET WHEN: 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 4150 5th St PHONE: 345.4763 LINK: 5thstreetvintagemarket.com DESCRIPTION: Curated by This Ol' Thing Vintage, Grace Aberdean Habitat Alchemy and DJ Tom Kat Kitten, 5th Street Vintage Market brings a one of a kind shopping experience to the area. We will feature dozens of dealers from the region who specialize in vintage goods, handmade items and vinyl records. Concessions available on site. HISTORIC OPEN HOUSE WHEN: 2 – 5 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 1010 Greensboro Ave PHONE: 758.2238 LINK: historictuscaloosa.com DESCRIPTION: Visit the historic sites of Tuscaloosa from the Battle Friedman house

THE SOUTHEAST'S LARGEST to the Jemison Van de Graaff Mansion, with entertainment provided by the Tuscaloosa County Preservation Society. Entertainment will include the T-Town Strummers, Tuscaloosa's Barbershop Quartet, Victorian Carolers, Students at the Capitol School Christmas Music (piano, violins, handbells and more). Father Christmas will even be at the Old Tavern at the Northeast corner of Capitol Park. Full list of locations and events is available online.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 8

WEST ALABAMA CHRISTMAS PARADE WHEN: 6 – 8:30 COST: Free WHERE: 15th Street to University Blvd. PHONE: 562.3220 LINK: tcpara.org DESCRIPTION: The 39th Annual Christmas Parade and Tree Lighting Ceremony —the largest parade of its kind in West Alabama—features Grand Marshals, floats, decorated vehicles, marching groups, marching bands, and Santa Claus. The tree-lighting ceremony will be held at 5:15 p.m. at the County Courthouse steps.

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9

BRUNCH AND BINGO WHEN: 11 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. COST: $4 WHERE: 2200 Rock Quarry Dr PHONE: 562.3230 LINK: tcpara.org DESCRIPTION: Come and join us for a fun and a delicious brunch at the Phelps Center for an affordable price. Afterwards, those purchasing brunch can play bingo for free. This event is designed especially for seniors as a joint effort between PARA and North River Village Assisted & Independent Living. HATHA YOGA WHEN: 6 – 7:10 p.m. COST: $9 WHERE: 2200 Rock Quarry Dr PHONE: 562.3230 LINK: tcpara.org DESCRIPTION: Learn relaxation techniques while increase your strength and flexibility. New classes begin every month. Bring your yoga mat any Tuesday or Thursday and join us for some calming exercise.

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11

CONTEMPORARY ART TREASURE TROVE WHEN: 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. COST: Free WHERE: 700 Capstone Dr PHONE: 348.1891 LINK: art.ua.edu DESCRIPTION: UA’s last exhibit of the fall semester, Contemporary Treasures: Selections from the Permanent Collection, features more than 30 pieces belonging to the gallery collection. Artworks selected for this exhibit span five decades and were created primarily by American artists. Come take in the fine works collected in the Sarah Moody Gallery of Art at Garland Hall. The last day to visit is Dec 12. PUBLICIZE YOUR EVENT. CONTACT

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>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS

NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

17


>>> ROAD TRIP | S O U T H E A S T E R N CO N C E R T S A N D E V E N T S

CASTING CROWNS // BIRMINGHAM // NOVEMBER 28

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 27

NASHVILLE All Them Witches, 3rd and Lindsley Bar and Grill

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28

NASHVILLE Clint Black, Ryman Auditorium The Colourist, Mercy Lounge/Cannery Ballroom

BIRMINGHAM High Fidelity, Stillwater Pub

MONDAY, DECEMBER 1

BIRMINGHAM Casting Crowns, Boutwell Auditorium Kill The Noise, WorkPlay Theatre Brad Shirley, Tin Roof Chad Fisher, Bottletree Café Rollin’ in the Hay, Innisfree Pop Rocks, Iron Horse Café Husky Burnette, The Nick

NEW ORLEANS Melissa Etheridge, Saenger Theatre

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2

BIRMINGHAM Sara Evans, The Alabama Theatre

HUNTSVILLE Kozmic Mama, Lee Ann’s w/ CSB

MONTGOMERY Steven Curtis Chapman, Montgomery Performing Arts Center

ATLANTA Blackberry Smoke, Tabernacle NASHVILLE Trombone Shorty and Orleans Avenue, Marathon Music Works Radney Foster, 3rd and Lindsley Bar and Grill NEW ORLEANS Lalah Hathaway, Saenger Theatre Wool & Madonna, Circle Bar

BIRMINGHAM Augustana, WorkPlay Theatre The Matte Gray Band, Tin Roof

ATLANTA Ralphie May, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center Kindred the Family Soul, Center Stage Shawn Mullins, Variety Playhouse

NEW ORLEANS Kevin Gates, Howlin’ Wolf

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30

ATLANTA Yanni, Fabulous Fox Theatre

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3

HUNTSVILLE Roxy Roca, Humphrey’s ATLANTA Dave Koz, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center Black Veil Brides, Tabernacle

HUNTSVILLE Jonathan Laird, The Stem and Stein Tony Perdue and the Devastators, Humphrey’s

NASHVILLE The Dirty Guv’nahs, Mercy Lounge/Cannery Ballroom Will Hoge, Marathon Music Works Scott Collier, Tootsies Orchid Lounge

NEW ORLEANS Kat Dahlia, House of Blues Africa Umoja, Mahalia Jackson Theater

BIRMINGHAM Tab Benoit, Zydeco

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29

JOHN OLIVER // ATLANTA //

ROXY ROCA // HUNTSVILLE // DECEMBER 3

NASHVILLE Amy Gant and Vince Gill, Ryman Auditorium Bone Thungs-N-Harmony, Marathon Music Works Howie Day, 3rd and Lindsley Bar and Grill

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4

BIRMINGHAM Direct Hit, The Nick The Whiskey Dix, Tin Roof The Sunpilots, The Nick

DECEMBER 4

NASHVILLE Michael W. Smith, Schermerhorn Symphony Center NEW ORLEANS Hunter Hayes, UNO Lakefront Arena

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5

BIRMINGHAM Judah & the Lion, WorkPlay Theatre Pigeons Playing Ping Pong w/ Festival Expressions, Zydeco Jackson Mohr, Tin Roof

HUNTSVILLE Lee Greenwood, Von Braun Concert Hall ATLANTA Hoodie Allen, Tabernacle NASHVILLE Brantley Gilbert, Bridgestone Arena R Kelly, Nashville Municipal Auditorium Bush, Nashville War Memorial Auditorium The Manhattan Transfer, Schermerhorn Symphony Center NEW ORLEANS Joel Osteen, New Orleans Arena Hannibal Buress, The Civic Theater Johnnyswim, House of Blues Dustin Lynch, The District

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6

ELLE VARNER // NEW

ORLEANS // DECEMBER 11

NASHVILLE Joe Hertler, Mercy Lounge/Cannery Ballroom Dave Barnes, Schermerhorn Symphony Center

MONDAY, DECEMBER 8

ATLANTA Diana Krall, Symphony Hall Atlanta NASHVILLE The Black Keys, Bridgestone Arena NEW ORLEANS Alt-J, The Civic Theater

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9

MONTGOMERY Koffin Kats, Double Branch NEW ORLEANS Issues, House of Blues

NASHVILLE Blue Sky Riders, 3rd and Lindsley Bar and Grill

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 10

MONTGOMERY The Train Wrecks, War Eagle Supper Club

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11

MONTGOMERY New Rain, Montgomery Performing Arts Center

BIRMINGHAM Rodney Crowell, WorkPlay Theatre

ATLANTA Eric Church, The Arena at Gwinnett Center

ATLANTA Weezer, Tabernacle GWAR, The Masquerade Anthony Hamilton, Fabulous Fox Theatre Hunter Hayes, The Arena at Gwinnett Center Chris D’Elia, Center Stage Skinny Puppy, The Buckhead Theatre

NEW ORLEANS Elle Varner, House of Blues

NASHVILLE Jimmy Wayne, Country Music Hall of Fame

HUNTSVILLE Alyssa Jacey, The Stem and Stein MONTGOMERY Third Day, Montgomery Performing Arts Center ATLANTA John Oliver, Cobb Energy Performing Arts Center Common and Jay Electronica, Tabernacle

NEW ORLEANS Usher, New Orleans Arena

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 7

MONTGOMERY Ronnie Milsap, Montgomery Performing Arts Center

>>> R OA D T R I P D I R E C T O RY Travel the South's best venues. Visit their website for ticket info and more. Acoustic Café 2758 County Hwy 9 205.647.3237

Fox Theatre 660 Peachtree St NE 404.881.2100

Amphitheater at the Wharf 23101 Canal Rd 251.224.1020

The Hangout 251.948.3030 thehangout1.com

Bridgestone Arena 501 Broadway 615.770.2000

Marathon Music Works 1402 Clinton St 615.891.1781

Centennial Olympic Park 265 Park Ave W NW 404.223.4412

Minglewood Hall 1555 Madison Ave 901.312.6058

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

Montgomery Performing Arts Center 201 Tallapoosa St 334.481.5100 The Nick 2514 10th Ave S 205.252.3831 Sloss Furnaces 20 32nd St N 205.324.1911 Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre 2200 Encore Pkwy

>>> VISIT US ON THE WEB @ THEPLANETWEEKLY.COM

404.733.5010 Von Braun Center 700 Monroe St SW 256.551.2345 WorkPlay 500 23rd St S 205.380.4082 Zydeco 2001 15th Ave S 205.933.1032

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>>> LOCAL MUSIC | WHO'S PL AYING AROUND TOWN

CBDB // JUPITER

RYDIN DURTY //CRIMSON BAR //

// NOVEMBER 28

NOVEMBER 28

WEDNESDAY NOVEMBER 26

Nothin' Special / DJi ProtoJ, Rhythm & Brews

VELCRO PYGMIES // RHYTHM & BREWS // NOVEMBER 29

CHARLIE ARGO // COPPERTOP // DECEMBER 11

Badstick, Coppertop Mother Pandora (one-time reunion of this cult band), Crimson Bar

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6

THURSDAY NOVEMBER 27

Soul Tide, Coppertop

J-KO, Coppertop Sean Rivers, Rhythm & Brews

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 9

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 28

Plato Jones, Coppertop

Ryding Durty, Crimson Bar Mojo Trio, Rhythm & Brews CBDB, Jupiter The Devines, Coppertop

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 11

Charlie Argo, Coppertop

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 29

Velcro Pygmies, Rhythm & Brews Iron Bowl // food / drink specials, Crimson Bar

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 30

RiverBand / Fundraiser for Children's Hospital, Crimson Bar

TUESDAY, DECEMBER 2

Plato Jones, Coppertop

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 3

CBDB, Coppertop

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 4

Kenny & Battito, Coppertop Beitthemeans, Green Bar

HAVE YOUR LOCAL MUSIC EVENT LISTED FREE IN PLANET WEEKLY. JUST EMAIL

FRIDAY, DECEMBER 5

PLANETEDITOR@YAHOO.COM

>>> L O C A L B A R S 4th & 23rd //

Buffalo Wild Wings // 523-0273

Houndstooth // 752-8444

Mugshots // 391-0572

1831 // 331-4632

Capones // 248-0255

Downtown Pub // 750-0008

Innisfree // 345-1199

Rhythm & Brews // 750-2992

Alcove // 469-9110

Carpe Vino // 366-8444

Gallettes // 758-2010

Jackie's Lounge // 758-9179

Rounders // 345-4848

Bear Trap // 345-2766

Catch 22 // 344-9347

Gnemis Top Shelf Tavern // 343-0020

The Jupiter // 248-6611

Big Al's // 759-9180

Copper Top // 343-6867

Grey Lady // 469-9521

The Legacy // 345-4848

The Booth // 764-0557

Crimson Bar // 764-0185

Harry's Bar // 331-4151

Mellow Mushroom // 758-0112

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS

NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

19


>>> PUZZLEMANIA | C R O S S W O R D P U Z Z L E

Across 1. Not too much 5. Medicinal tuber 10. Make sport of 14. Stereo precursor 15. Western Samoan island 16. Black, to Calpurnia 17. Surgeon's symbol of yore 19. Gifts at Honolulu International Airport 20. Tool used in mountain climbing 21. Bic's writing end 23. Moves aimlessly, with "about" 26. Goes "nyah-nyah" 27. Some recording studios 32. Stallone nickname 33. Skater Harding 34. Rulers 38. Melodic subject 40. Dame Rebecca and others 42. Its cap. is Quito 43. 1953 John Wayne oater 45. Fat-cat transit 47. Where Mindy's TV friend came from 48. Johnny Cash classic written by Shel Silverstein 51. Start of a Juliet lament 54. Glacial snow 55. Li'l Abner's love 58. Poetic feet 62. ___ Mujeres (neighbor of Cancun) 63. Home for the birds 66. Humorist Silverstein 67. Tolerate 68. Inca fortunes 69. Cheer competitor 70. Benevolent Chinese spirit 71. Peak in ancient Palestine Down 1. Prefix with dextrous 2. "Flew in from Miami Beach ___" (opening lyric to "Back in the U.S.S.R.") 3. Memorandum opener

20

NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

4. Venezuela neighbor 5. Big ____, Calif. 6. "Killer" piece of software 7. Campus bus route, maybe 8. She, in St. Lo 9. Bandleader Tito 10. Window dressing 11. Didn't go out for dinner 12. Form request 13. Vanderbilt Cup seats 18. Methodical 22. Driving test directive 24. Boat on the Indian Ocean 25. With logic 27. Book after Nehemiah: Abbr. 28. Queen of the Nile, for short 29. "Rock of Ages," e.g. 30. Bygone Lanvin fragrance 31. Member of the Dynamic Duo 35. Sgts. and cpls. 36. Hindu spiritual leader 37. Eastern beverage 39. Water, jocularly 41. Not all 44. Follow, as orders 46. Insecticide 49. Notes from big brass 50. Church helper 51. Pindar or Shelley 52. Medieval rabbinical writer 53. Fixed a squeak 56. Good for what ___ you 57. He, to Rocco 59. Sir Thomas 60. Dunce 61. Word with facto or jure 64. Abbr. in a help wanted ad indicating a fair hirer 65. Control, in a way SOLUTION FOR PUZZLEMANIA CROSSWORD ON PAGE 21

>>> PUZZLEMANIA| S U D U K O

It's easy to play Sudoku! Simply fill every column, row and 3x3 box so they contain every number between 1 and 9. The game is easy to play but difficult to master! Solution Page 21

WRITERS WANTED

For Information, please email PlanetEditor@ yahoo.com

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS


>>> HOROSCOPES |

W E E K LY O V E R V I E W Home and family matters can be a source of joy and happiness right now, particularly as some good news may be about to come your way. In addition, you may be very excited about the potential for creating wealth. The current alignment entices you to explore schemes and ideas with a view toward becoming financially secure. Aided and abetted by Mars in practical Capricorn, this combination of planning and inspiration can go a long way toward helping you fulfill your dream. Relationships of all kinds take center stage, in a positive way, as they bring out the best in you and encourage you to have faith in yourself. Friends, family, and loved ones seem eager to help you in any way they can. Plus, with Thanksgiving looming you'll be in your element with a fun-packed schedule that keeps getting better and better. But it isn't a good idea to mix business and pleasure. Keep the two separate for now so as not to muddle agendas.

It's Beginning to Look A Lot Like Christmas! Good Reading—Great for Stocking Stuffers!

The cosmos is encouraging you to go all out to improve your health and fitness level. A focus on your lifestyle sector suggests you might be inspired by the example of others who beat the odds to lose excess pounds or overcome personal difficulties to heal themselves and be an example to the world. Whatever your issue, the current alignment gives you the faith you need to try. In addition, it's a good time to clear the air regarding a relationship issue.

With warm and fuzzy planets filling your romance sector, you can have a lot of fun this week. Though you'll have responsibilities to attend to, your mind could be on other things - or perhaps on one particular person whose company you really enjoy. This alignment can bring out your inner entrepreneur, giving you creative ideas that you can turn into business opportunities. You might be on a dedicated health kick, too, and eager to discipline yourself to look and feel really good. With the holidays drawing closer, you'll be in your element as your extended family shows up at your door. A focus on your home zone suggests you might be getting some unexpected yet very welcome visitors, some of whom might be staying a while. Mars in Capricorn spotlights your organizing ability and encourages you to draw up plans and begin the preparations. None of this seems like work more like the best fun ever! Things are about to get exciting! This looks like a delightful week in which you'll be doing a lot of socializing. The focus on your communication zone is bright and breezy, encouraging you to reach out to those you haven't seen in a while. It's also a great opportunity to showcase your skills and abilities and get your business message out to the world. Social media can be instrumental in paving the way to success. You may be busy at home this week, but family and friends will pitch in. As Mars continues to stir up your communication sector, you'll be eager to get certain matters off your chest. This week's blend of energies hints that you'll also be something of a strategist, especially if you're hoping to persuade someone to back a plan of yours. Be careful, though, as a misunderstanding could backfire on you. You'll be feeling generous and eager to splurge on yourself and others. Don't forget to put some money to aside to help shore up your savings. You are truly in your element and ready to take the world by storm this week. A bright and very sociable focus on your sign suggests you'll be personally involved in launching plans, sharing ideas, and organizing get-togethers and other events as the excitement builds around Thanksgiving. When it comes to finances, this is an excellent time to plan ahead. You're naturally generous by nature, but you may be quite frugal when it comes to purchasing life's little luxuries for yourself. On the one hand, you'll be busy organizing and getting things together. At the same time, a very marked focus on your spiritual sector encourages you to relax and recharge daily. Use this opportunity to remember the year and how much you've accomplished. If you feel you've made mistakes, this is your chance to reflect on how you might have done things better. You also have a chance to prioritize your goals, enabling you to zero in on those that inspire you most. This is a fabulous time to expand your social horizons, move in new circles, and generally mix and mingle with people who both inspire and entertain. The coming week can be excellent for enhancing romantic opportunities, especially if you're looking for love. However, as both Saturn and Mercury link with Neptune, it pays to be careful, as all that glitters isn't necessarily gold. Later, Mercury edges into Sagittarius, making this the perfect time to network in order to enhance business interests.

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PUZZLE SOLUTIONS

With lucky Jupiter in your work sector and a fabulous lineup in your career zone, things seem to be going your way this week. The cosmos encourages you to take a leap of faith, especially if you've been considering trying for a new job or expanding your business along other lines. It helps to get practical advice from those who have experience in what you're hoping to achieve. They may be able to save you time and money and help you succeed more quickly. Although you'll be busy with career and financial matters, your heart may be aligned with more carefree pursuits. Thoughts of travel, love adventures, new beginnings, and sunny vacations could encourage you to research your options. Meanwhile, Mercury's move into Sagittarius may set you thinking about study and the benefits of adding to your skill set. Finally, a Quarter Moon in Pisces brings intuitive guidance your way. You'll need to act on it to find out just how advantageous it might be.

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NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

21


>>> STEPHEN'S REPORT | S T E P H E N S M I T H

SEC FOOTBALL: WEEK 12 RECAP // THE PICTURE'S GETTING CLEARER

Photos: UA Athletic Photography

More tears for the Magnolia State as mighty number one fell. The Southeastern Conference title game picture is getting clearer each week. Week 12 brought us stunning upsets, embarrassing losses, three schools fighting for bowl eligibility and one Tiger program that emerged a winner.

couldn’t establish a run game. Wildcats receiver Javess Blue did catch six passes for 131 yards, but it wasn’t enough. Justin Coleman and Brian Randolph each collected an interception for Tennessee. The Volunteers are 5-5 and remain with an opportunity to be bowl eligible. Final Score: Tennessee 50—Kentucky 16

#17 LSU vs. Arkansas Summary: The streak is over! Arkansas’s head coach Bret Bielema finally got over the hump. Arkansas got a well-deserved SEC win over LSU. Alex Collins and Jonathan Williams set a tone early. Both backs each had a touchdown. Brandon Allen managed the game well. He made smart decisions and guided Arkansas to a 58.8 percent (10 of 17) rating on third down. Allen went 16/27 passing for 168 yards. Arkansas’s defensive line negated LSU’s run game. The Tigers averaged 1.1 yards per carry! LSU totaled 36 yards rushing on 32 attempts. Anthony Jennings tossed for 87 yards. Arkansas outgained LSU 264-123. The Razorbacks are 5-5 and have a chance at a bowl game. Final Score: Arkansas 17—LSU 0

SEC Matchups: Week 12 #9 Auburn vs. #15 Georgia Summary: A three-loss team won’t have a spot in the College Football Playoff. Auburn’s chances took a hit against Texas A&M, but completely ended against Georgia. Todd Gurley and Nick Chubb ran over the Tigers defense. Chubb averaged 7.6 yards per carry. He registered 144 yards and two touchdowns on 19 carries. Gurley was triumphant in his return. He recorded 138 rushing yards and a touchdown on 29 carries. Hutson Mason was relaxed. He went 10/19 passing for 123 yards and a touchdown. Nick Marshall had a rough outing Saturday. He completed 47.8 percent of his passes (11/23) for 112 yards and an interception. Auburn’s running back Cameron Artis-Payne was its lone bright spot, totaling 86 yards and a touchdown. The Tigers had three turnovers, and collected 292 yards offen-

22

NOVEMBER 27 + DECEMBER 11

sively. Georgia remains in control of its destiny in the SEC East, if it wins out and Missouri loses. Final Score: Georgia 34—Auburn 7 Kentucky vs. Tennessee Summary: Both programs are trending forward, but Tennessee’s bowl chances look better than Kentucky’s. Tennessee’s head coach Butch Jones and the Volunteers achieved its second conference win. Sophomore Joshua Dobbs has emerged as Tennessee’s future at quarterback. He threw for 297 yards and totaled four touchdowns (one rushing). Jalen Hurd pounded Kentucky for 118 yards and a score. Von Pearson recorded two touchdown catches, but Jason Croom led Tennessee’s receiving corps with 87 yards. Placekicker Aaron Medley put in a solid performance, connecting on three of four field goal attempts. Patrick Towles struggled Saturday. He went 13/25 passing for 168 yards and an interception. Kentucky

Florida vs. South Carolina Summary: South Carolina’s head coach Steve Spurrier finds a way to win. Florida led 17-10 for much of the game, until late in the fourth quarter. The Gamecocks blocked a Kyle Christy punt in the fourth quarter. Dylan Thompson guided South Carolina into Florida’s territory. With 12 seconds remaining, Spurrier called an option play. Thompson pitched the ball to Mike Davis. Davis didn’t secure it cleanly and fumbled the ball into the endzone. A battle occured for the ball, but Davis recovered. Gators’ placekicker Austin Hardin nailed 35-yard field goal in overtime. South Carolina responded with a 4-yard touchdown run from Thompson. Thompson had 206 passing yards, but Davis and Brandon Wilds were the stars. Both back had one touchdown apiece. Florida’s quarterback Treon Harris played his heart out. He collected 111 rushing yards and a touchdown pass. The Gators converted 3 of 14 third downs and suffered 10 penalties. This very well could be the end of Will Muschamp in Gainesville, Fla. Final Score: South Carolina 23—Florida 20 (OT)

Jimmie Hunt and Bud Sasser led Missouri’s receiving corps. Hunt had five catches for 85 yards. Sasser registered six catches for 83 yards. Texas A&M’s quarterback Kyle Allen was on fire again. He threw for 237 yards, three touchdowns and an interception. Josh Reynolds had five catches for 125 yards and two touchdowns. Missouri outgained Texas A&M 587-341. The Tigers converted 13 of 21 (61.9 percent) third downs. Final Score: Missouri 34—Texas A&M 27 #1 Mississippi State vs. #5 Alabama Summary: This game lived up to its hype. Bryant-Denny Stadium was loud all game long. Alabama’s defense set a tone early. Senior linebacker Trey DePriest scored Alabama’s first points with a safety. Heisman frontrunner Dak Prescott took a beating. Alabama’s defensive line consistently affected him. Mississippi State’s running back Josh Robinson totaled 37 rushing yards. Prescott threw for 290 yards and two touchdowns, but his three interceptions all came at critical moments. Senior quarterback Blake Sims continues his underdog story for Alabama. He tossed for 211 yards and a touchdown, yet his mobility was pivotal in the fourth quarter. Sims converted two third downs with his legs. He engineered a 15-play, 76-yard drive that culminated in a 7-yard touchdown run from T.J. Yeldon. The drive gave Alabama a two possession lead, 25-13, and took a little over six minutes off the clock. Amari Cooper’s Heisman campaign is still alive. He caught eight passes for 88 yards and a touchdown. Cooper has totaled at least eight receptions and 80+ yards in nine of 10 games for Alabama. Freshman punter JK Scott was huge once again. He averaged 45.6 yards per punt. 71.5 percent of Scott’s kicks (5 of 7) pinned Mississippi State’s inside its own 20-yard line. Alabama held the Bulldogs to 138 rushing yards. Final Score: Alabama 25—Mississippi State 20

Missouri vs. #24 Texas A&M Summary: Missouri remains ahead of Georgia in its quest for an SEC East crown. Maty Mauk played a lot better Saturday. He attempted 40 passes, but completed 23 of them for 252 yards, one touchdown and an interception. Russell Hansbrough and Marcus Murphy are a deadly duo. Hansbrough averaged 10.0 yards per carry. He totaled 199 yards rushing and two touchdowns. Murphy put in 88 yards on 20 carries. Darius White caught Mauk’s lone touchdown pass, but

>>> PLANETWEEKLY • TUSCALOOSA'S SOURCE FOR ENTERTAINMENT, MUSIC, SPORTS & THE ARTS


>>> H I G H T I D E | GARY HARRIS / WVUA SPORTS DIRECTOR

A GREAT SEASON FOR BAMA FOOTBALL // AND A LOOK AT EDDIE LACY AND GREEN BAY

Photos: UA Athletic Photography

His impressive run started on Oct. 26, when he ran 24 times for 172 yards and a touchdown in a 44-23 victory over the Green Bay Packers. Four days later, he had 100 yards and two TDs on 30 carries in a 28-10 win against the Carolina Panthers. Following that game, Ingram carried 27 times for 120 yards in a 27-24 overtime loss to the San Francisco 49ers. Ingram's production slipped some against Cincinnati as he carried 23 times for just 67 yards. Still, Ingram has been terrific as the team's go to back and hopefully head coach Sean Payton will continue to give him opportunities even with the return of Robinson and Thomas.

Regardless of how it turns out, 2014 has been a terrific season for the Alabama Crimson Tide football team. Nothing has come easy for this team, but it has fought and persevered and has an opportunity to do something special. This year's squad is in position to win the SEC and National Championships and unlike some of the past championship teams coached by Nick Saban, this is not a dominant group. Alabama went into the season without a proven quarterback. Blake Sims has stepped up and been a playmaker for the offense and also served as a quiet leader. There have been injuries and inconsistent play. Following a 23-17 loss at Ole Miss in early October, there were many that were ready to count this Alabama team out. As we know now, that was a big mistake. EDDIE LACY IS A BEAST

Former Alabama running back Eddie Lacy is a beast and a major reason that the Green Bay Packers are as hot as any team in the National Football League. Sunday's effort against Minnesota was not only was his best of 2014, it might have been the most impressive of his career. Lacy pounded his way to a seasonhigh 125 rushing yards on 25 carries, including a game-sealing 27 yards on five attempts to drain the final 3:23 off the clock in the Packers' hard-fought 24-21 victory over Minnesota at TCF Bank Stadium in Minneapolis. Lacy scored two touchdowns in the game and was consistent all day against the Vikings. hE finished with an even 5.0yard average, and most impressively, he did that with a long run of just 16 yards. Smart and patient are the words his offensive linemen use often to describe him, and we got to see that on Sunday. For the season, Lacy has rushed 154 times for 672 yards and 6 touchdowns. He has also had 29 receptions for 335 yards and 3 touchdowns. Lacy made the Pro Bowl last season as a rookie and he looks to be on track to make it there this season as well.

CAMERON SIGNS WITH ALABAMA Congratulations are in order for Hale Co. H.S. pitcher Kyle Cameron who recently signed with the University of Alabama. The 6-foot-6, righthanded pitcher hit the high 80's on the radar gun this past summer and should be throwing in the low

90's by next spring. Kyle's head coach at Hale Co. is his dad Jeff. Coach Cameron told WVUA-TV that it's been Kyle's dream to play baseball for the Crimson Tide. The dream has become a reality. Way to go, Kyle! BASKETBALL OFF TO A GOOD START

I know it's early but the Alabama men's basketball team is off to a good start and the team is playing exciting basketball. Bama scored 80 or more points in its first three games, and is playing a full court style of basketball. I'm not ready to label this squad as an NCAA tournament team, but there is no doubt the potential is there.

INGRAM HAS ALSO BEEN IMPRESSIVE Lacy's former teammate at Alabama, Mark Ingram has finally been given the opportunity in new Orleans he has patiently waited for. The Saints have been hit hard by the injury bug at the running back position and Ingram has taken advantage. When Khiry Robinson and Pierre Thomas went down, Ingram stepped in and carried the load. Robinson and Thomas are set to return to the lineup though and it will be interesting to see if Ingram's carries are once again limited.

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