Page 1

146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Mozambique

Real progress

Plan has been working in Mozambique for little over a year. But in that time, we’ve set up field operations in the southern area of Jangamo, where levels of poverty are a pressing issue and we can be of most help.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Mozambique are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

As well as having meetings with village heads, communities and children, we’ve established strong relationships with key government agencies such as the Ministry of Women and Social Action. We aim to take a leadership role in Mozambique’s civil society on issues ranging from birth registration to violence against children in schools. Plan’s work in Mozambique has only just begun, so in this Country Progress Report we take a look at two people – a child and a mother of three – whose lives we hope to improve through our work in their villages in the years to come.

148.5mm FRONT

• Encouraged children to participate at our meetings with communities, raising issues like physical punishment in the home and underage pregnancy

p Boys and girls with schoo l books and sta distributed by tionery Plan

• Distributed school materials like books and stationery to 6,457 children • Provided 11 schools with agricultural tools to cultivate vegetables to improve the pupils’ diets

• Showed Mozambiquan government officials work Plan is doing in Kenya to

Mozambique

broaden their knowledge of Plan’s work and development issues generally.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world.

p Community mem bers map out the village at a community development meeting

Mozambique country facts Population: 19.7 million

Life expectancy: 42 years

Capital: Maputo

Rural people using safe drinking water: 26%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 168th (of 177 countries)

So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Number of orphans: 1.5 million Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

MOZ

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Mozambique 01.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Country Progress Report 2007


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Mozambique

Real progress

Plan has been working in Mozambique for little over a year. But in that time, we’ve set up field operations in the southern area of Jangamo, where levels of poverty are a pressing issue and we can be of most help.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Mozambique are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

As well as having meetings with village heads, communities and children, we’ve established strong relationships with key government agencies such as the Ministry of Women and Social Action. We aim to take a leadership role in Mozambique’s civil society on issues ranging from birth registration to violence against children in schools. Plan’s work in Mozambique has only just begun, so in this Country Progress Report we take a look at two people – a child and a mother of three – whose lives we hope to improve through our work in their villages in the years to come.

148.5mm FRONT

• Encouraged children to participate at our meetings with communities, raising issues like physical punishment in the home and underage pregnancy

p Boys and girls with schoo l books and sta distributed by tionery Plan

• Distributed school materials like books and stationery to 6,457 children • Provided 11 schools with agricultural tools to cultivate vegetables to improve the pupils’ diets

• Showed Mozambiquan government officials work Plan is doing in Kenya to

Mozambique

broaden their knowledge of Plan’s work and development issues generally.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world.

p Community mem bers map out the village at a community development meeting

Mozambique country facts Population: 19.7 million

Life expectancy: 42 years

Capital: Maputo

Rural people using safe drinking water: 26%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 168th (of 177 countries)

So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Number of orphans: 1.5 million Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

MOZ

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Mozambique 01.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Country Progress Report 2007


148.5mm INSIDE

Two villages; two voices Life is difficult for Martine, a 12-year-old girl living in the little village of Magaissa in the district of Jangamo, southern Mozambique.

Martine’s mother is dead, and she is wholly responsible for taking care of her father and young brothers. Although Martine is able to go to school, her responsibilities to her family mean she has very little time to study, play or spend time with her friends. “I need to care for my father and my two young brothers,” she says. “I clean the house, cook, go to the farm and so on.” But Martine is a lively, hopeful girl. She’s in the fifth year of primary school, and in the little free time she gets, she likes to practise her hobby, dancing. Martine is part of a dancing group, and they perform at cultural events and special occasions. When she grows up, Martine says: “I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.” Martine was there when Plan held a series of meetings involving men, women and children in Magaissa to get to know the local people, introduce them to our way of working and ask for their views on the problems the

p A community development meeting held by Plan in rural Mozambique

community faces. It’s one of a series of meetings Plan has been holding in Mozambique to gauge how best we can support communities to improve their children’s health and education, create a better environment for everyone and boost standards of living.

“I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.”

148.5mm INSIDE

Education is the priority Like Martine, Sonia had a difficult childhood. Now a 48-year-old mother of three, she had to drop out of school as a girl to look after her blind father. Now, she says: “My first priority is to support one of my children to study up until secondary school.” Sonia works as a volunteer teacher, coaching adults in her home village of Guipombo, which, like Magaissa, is in the Jangamo district. Adult education receives strong support from the Mozambiquan Government, and is seen as a key way to increase the number of people who can read and write within Jangamo.

“Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community.” Yet Sonia knows only too well that much more could be done to improve levels of education in Guipombo. “One issue,” she says, “is improving the school’s infrastructure and putting in desks. The primary school of Guipombo was built with local materials and the children don’t have desks; they are using the coconut tree trunks to sit on.”

And Sonia’s concerns don’t stop at the education system. “What I would like to see is a health centre in Guipombo,” she says. “A week ago my eldest daughter’s feet swelled up so badly that she couldn’t walk. We had to take her to the hospital using a bicycle; it was a bad experience because we travelled six miles and she was in so much pain.”

A living from the land At the same time, Sonia talks of how important farming is to her life and the life of the village.

146.5mm INSIDE

Like Martine, Sonia has been attending the community development meetings arranged by Plan. Sonia emphasized that during Plan’s meetings, the communities always learn something, and as a result, they are popular events.

Sonia’s own ambitions for the community run high: “I would like to create a women’s group which will work on farming, sewing, needlework or another activities to improve the Guipombo community.”

“I have attended nearly all the meetings,” she says. “Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community. The interesting issue is that Plan doesn’t work only with children, but with families and communities as well. I agree with their approach because children don’t live on their own, but with their families and their communities.”

The challenges for Plan’s new programme in Mozambique are plain, but together, there’s plenty we can do to help Sonia, Martine and many thousands like them to improve life in their communities. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

She has a small farm close to her home. She works on this piece of land every day, and looks after livestock. “The farm is my life,” she says. “Here in Guipombo we can’t live without farming because that is where we get our food from. I have planted peanuts, cassava leaves, maize and I have various fruit trees. What I am also trying to do is raise livestock, but unfortunately I have only one pig.”

p Sonia preparing for one of

her adult education lessons


148.5mm INSIDE

Two villages; two voices Life is difficult for Martine, a 12-year-old girl living in the little village of Magaissa in the district of Jangamo, southern Mozambique.

Martine’s mother is dead, and she is wholly responsible for taking care of her father and young brothers. Although Martine is able to go to school, her responsibilities to her family mean she has very little time to study, play or spend time with her friends. “I need to care for my father and my two young brothers,” she says. “I clean the house, cook, go to the farm and so on.” But Martine is a lively, hopeful girl. She’s in the fifth year of primary school, and in the little free time she gets, she likes to practise her hobby, dancing. Martine is part of a dancing group, and they perform at cultural events and special occasions. When she grows up, Martine says: “I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.” Martine was there when Plan held a series of meetings involving men, women and children in Magaissa to get to know the local people, introduce them to our way of working and ask for their views on the problems the

p A community development meeting held by Plan in rural Mozambique

community faces. It’s one of a series of meetings Plan has been holding in Mozambique to gauge how best we can support communities to improve their children’s health and education, create a better environment for everyone and boost standards of living.

“I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.”

148.5mm INSIDE

Education is the priority Like Martine, Sonia had a difficult childhood. Now a 48-year-old mother of three, she had to drop out of school as a girl to look after her blind father. Now, she says: “My first priority is to support one of my children to study up until secondary school.” Sonia works as a volunteer teacher, coaching adults in her home village of Guipombo, which, like Magaissa, is in the Jangamo district. Adult education receives strong support from the Mozambiquan Government, and is seen as a key way to increase the number of people who can read and write within Jangamo.

“Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community.” Yet Sonia knows only too well that much more could be done to improve levels of education in Guipombo. “One issue,” she says, “is improving the school’s infrastructure and putting in desks. The primary school of Guipombo was built with local materials and the children don’t have desks; they are using the coconut tree trunks to sit on.”

And Sonia’s concerns don’t stop at the education system. “What I would like to see is a health centre in Guipombo,” she says. “A week ago my eldest daughter’s feet swelled up so badly that she couldn’t walk. We had to take her to the hospital using a bicycle; it was a bad experience because we travelled six miles and she was in so much pain.”

A living from the land At the same time, Sonia talks of how important farming is to her life and the life of the village.

146.5mm INSIDE

Like Martine, Sonia has been attending the community development meetings arranged by Plan. Sonia emphasized that during Plan’s meetings, the communities always learn something, and as a result, they are popular events.

Sonia’s own ambitions for the community run high: “I would like to create a women’s group which will work on farming, sewing, needlework or another activities to improve the Guipombo community.”

“I have attended nearly all the meetings,” she says. “Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community. The interesting issue is that Plan doesn’t work only with children, but with families and communities as well. I agree with their approach because children don’t live on their own, but with their families and their communities.”

The challenges for Plan’s new programme in Mozambique are plain, but together, there’s plenty we can do to help Sonia, Martine and many thousands like them to improve life in their communities. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

She has a small farm close to her home. She works on this piece of land every day, and looks after livestock. “The farm is my life,” she says. “Here in Guipombo we can’t live without farming because that is where we get our food from. I have planted peanuts, cassava leaves, maize and I have various fruit trees. What I am also trying to do is raise livestock, but unfortunately I have only one pig.”

p Sonia preparing for one of

her adult education lessons


148.5mm INSIDE

Two villages; two voices Life is difficult for Martine, a 12-year-old girl living in the little village of Magaissa in the district of Jangamo, southern Mozambique.

Martine’s mother is dead, and she is wholly responsible for taking care of her father and young brothers. Although Martine is able to go to school, her responsibilities to her family mean she has very little time to study, play or spend time with her friends. “I need to care for my father and my two young brothers,” she says. “I clean the house, cook, go to the farm and so on.” But Martine is a lively, hopeful girl. She’s in the fifth year of primary school, and in the little free time she gets, she likes to practise her hobby, dancing. Martine is part of a dancing group, and they perform at cultural events and special occasions. When she grows up, Martine says: “I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.” Martine was there when Plan held a series of meetings involving men, women and children in Magaissa to get to know the local people, introduce them to our way of working and ask for their views on the problems the

p A community development meeting held by Plan in rural Mozambique

community faces. It’s one of a series of meetings Plan has been holding in Mozambique to gauge how best we can support communities to improve their children’s health and education, create a better environment for everyone and boost standards of living.

“I would like to be a nurse so I can help sick people.”

148.5mm INSIDE

Education is the priority Like Martine, Sonia had a difficult childhood. Now a 48-year-old mother of three, she had to drop out of school as a girl to look after her blind father. Now, she says: “My first priority is to support one of my children to study up until secondary school.” Sonia works as a volunteer teacher, coaching adults in her home village of Guipombo, which, like Magaissa, is in the Jangamo district. Adult education receives strong support from the Mozambiquan Government, and is seen as a key way to increase the number of people who can read and write within Jangamo.

“Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community.” Yet Sonia knows only too well that much more could be done to improve levels of education in Guipombo. “One issue,” she says, “is improving the school’s infrastructure and putting in desks. The primary school of Guipombo was built with local materials and the children don’t have desks; they are using the coconut tree trunks to sit on.”

And Sonia’s concerns don’t stop at the education system. “What I would like to see is a health centre in Guipombo,” she says. “A week ago my eldest daughter’s feet swelled up so badly that she couldn’t walk. We had to take her to the hospital using a bicycle; it was a bad experience because we travelled six miles and she was in so much pain.”

A living from the land At the same time, Sonia talks of how important farming is to her life and the life of the village.

146.5mm INSIDE

Like Martine, Sonia has been attending the community development meetings arranged by Plan. Sonia emphasized that during Plan’s meetings, the communities always learn something, and as a result, they are popular events.

Sonia’s own ambitions for the community run high: “I would like to create a women’s group which will work on farming, sewing, needlework or another activities to improve the Guipombo community.”

“I have attended nearly all the meetings,” she says. “Plan shows that it’s possible to do good things to help a community. The interesting issue is that Plan doesn’t work only with children, but with families and communities as well. I agree with their approach because children don’t live on their own, but with their families and their communities.”

The challenges for Plan’s new programme in Mozambique are plain, but together, there’s plenty we can do to help Sonia, Martine and many thousands like them to improve life in their communities. Some names have been changed for child protection and privacy reasons

She has a small farm close to her home. She works on this piece of land every day, and looks after livestock. “The farm is my life,” she says. “Here in Guipombo we can’t live without farming because that is where we get our food from. I have planted peanuts, cassava leaves, maize and I have various fruit trees. What I am also trying to do is raise livestock, but unfortunately I have only one pig.”

p Sonia preparing for one of

her adult education lessons


146.5mm FLAP

148.5mm BACK

Challenge and change in Mozambique

Real progress

Plan has been working in Mozambique for little over a year. But in that time, we’ve set up field operations in the southern area of Jangamo, where levels of poverty are a pressing issue and we can be of most help.

With the support of Plan, children and adults in Mozambique are working together to develop their communities and claim their right to a better future. And real progress is being made. Among other successes, last year we:

As well as having meetings with village heads, communities and children, we’ve established strong relationships with key government agencies such as the Ministry of Women and Social Action. We aim to take a leadership role in Mozambique’s civil society on issues ranging from birth registration to violence against children in schools. Plan’s work in Mozambique has only just begun, so in this Country Progress Report we take a look at two people – a child and a mother of three – whose lives we hope to improve through our work in their villages in the years to come.

148.5mm FRONT

• Encouraged children to participate at our meetings with communities, raising issues like physical punishment in the home and underage pregnancy

p Boys and girls with schoo l books and sta distributed by tionery Plan

• Distributed school materials like books and stationery to 6,457 children • Provided 11 schools with agricultural tools to cultivate vegetables to improve the pupils’ diets

• Showed Mozambiquan government officials work Plan is doing in Kenya to

Mozambique

broaden their knowledge of Plan’s work and development issues generally.

For Plan, success almost always comes from a joint effort combining the hard work and determination of communities, children, volunteers, staff, and partner organisations. But the ongoing support of our sponsors is a vital ingredient, too. It’s their generosity and commitment that allows us to continue to help children in 49 of the poorest countries in the world.

p Community mem bers map out the village at a community development meeting

Mozambique country facts Population: 19.7 million

Life expectancy: 42 years

Capital: Maputo

Rural people using safe drinking water: 26%

UN Human Development Index ranking: 168th (of 177 countries)

So on behalf of the children and communities we work with, thank you to all our sponsors!

(Sources: the UN, the Foreign & Commonwealth Office, UNICEF)

Number of orphans: 1.5 million Plan UK Registered Charity No: 276035

MOZ

Any enquiries please contact: Nick Burton. e: nick@bright-uk.com m: 07884 367567. d: 020 7620 8150 Size (Prod)

Colours(Prod)

Admagic No: Bright No: Client name: File name: Date: Size: Studio proof: Art (A/D)

0407 100647 PLAN 0407_Mozambique 01.11.07 210x443.5mm FOLD TO A5 Client proof: 3 4 Copy (C/W)

Content (Acc.)

Country Progress Report 2007


Plan Mozambique Annual Program Report 2007  

A summary report on Plan International programs in Mozambique for the year ending 30 June 2007

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