Educate Together Secondary Schools

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EDUCATE TOGETHER SECONDARY SCHOOL

4TH YEAR

Dublin School of Architecture


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4TH YEAR 2012-2013

Dublin School of Architecture

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Contact: Paul Kelly + Patrick Flynn 4th year Module Coordinators Head of School Orna Hanly Dublin School of Architecture Dublin Institute of Technology Bolton Street Dublin 1, Ireland Tel: +353 1 4023690 www.dublinschoolofarchitecture.com www.dit.ie/architecture/urban-design/ Typeface: Gil Sans + Helvetica Design: Paul Kelly Š Dublin School of Architecture Press. All rights reserved. All information presented in this publication is deemed to be the copyright of the creator or the Dublin School of Architecture, unless stated otherwise. Second Edition

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CONTENTS Introduction Design Matters Educate Together Sites Morgan Boland Laura Carroll Miriam Corcoran Declan Duffy Paul Egan James Hanlon Cian Hughes OisĂ­n Jacob Dean Murphy John Meehan Stephen Richardson Ciara Ryan Georgina Vernon Class List

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EDUCATE TOGETHER SECONDARY SCHOOL Peter Crowley Patrick Flynn Emma Geoghean Paul Kelly

Jim Roche

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Introduction The introduction of a three plus two structure in the school has meant the Fourth and Fifth year programmes have shared a number of lectures series in the Advance Design Studio under the theme of “Schools of Thought�. A wide range of educational typologies will be investigated across the two years. In Fourth Year we have elected to investigate a new model for secondary schools, seeking to challenge the existing pedagogical norms with new ways of thinking about how and why we educate ourselves. Educate Together are our client body setting a context and ambition for the school within the scope of the Department of Education and Science programme. For the purposes of the project three towns were selected, Athlone, Mullingar and Tullamore with two sites in each town. The students researched the towns in terms of their social, economic and environmental fabric for three weeks and were then assigned a site.

Patrick Flynn Paul Kelly

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RIAI + Department of Education and Science COLLOQUIUM ON POST PRIMARY SCHOOLS DESIGN MAKES A DIFFERENCE Long Term Value in the Design of Post Primary Schools December 13th, 2012 Background The fourth year architecture students worked this year with Educate Together as our client body setting a context and ambition for the school within the scope of the Department of Education and Science programme. It became apparent to us as students that the brief for the school needed to encompass issues beyond

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Circulation and Social Space is something that forms

than simply allowing the students to move from one room to the next. Herman Hertzberger describes how the space normally places for students to meet, socialise, swap stories and more importantly to learn. Thus one needs to think of these spaces as important learning spaces in their own right. Their design needs careful thought in terms of how they are lit, their scale, how they impact on the organisation of the school, how they can become places for congregation in small and large groups.

experience of a public building and as such represents what kind of society we would wish to live in the future. It needs to address additional issues such as how schools can be made Environmentally Socially and Economically sustainable. For the purposes of the project three towns were selected: Mullingar, Tullamore and Athlone with two sites in each town. We researched the towns in terms of their social, economic and environmental fabric for three weeks and were then assigned a site to explore the school brief for the remainder of the semester. The school brief impacts on the wider town fabric and each town was

4. Classroom layouts commodate the new Department of Education and Science reappropriate to the direction that second level education needs to move in the future. Richard Neutra in his studies of the class room explored the need for classrooms to be adaptable to the future needs of the student.

There are a number of projects we would like to show to highlight these issues which are usually not included in the brief for a secondary school. How the school can act as a resource for the community, the need to produce sustainable schools, the need to acknowledge the changing nature of the school curriculum and

5. Classroom spaces need to be less hierarchical in terms of how they are laid out in detail. In the new education model the teacher acts more as a mentor to the secondary school learners and as such needs to be placed in a supporting role in the classroom. This places the em-

provide adequate social space within the school. Conclusions

theorists Dewey & Freire and the consideration of the classroom ibility in terms of how they may be changed and combined into larger units and also in terms of the way learning occurs within the space.

Our studies led us to a number of conclusions about the school brief: 1. The need to explore overlap between the world of the school and the wider community. Both in terms of functions –i.e. parts of the building should be accessible to the public outside school hours and that the school could be less defensive and more permeable. Jan Gehl discussed this in his book The Life Between Buildings where he suggests that the spaces which are normally exclusively used for the schools could in fact service the wider community- spaces such as canteens could in fact become public cafes when not in use by the school – thus he argues integrating the school into the community.

6. Sustainability needs to be at the heart of the school design. Schools should lead by example in terms of how they are considered in layout, in energy use and in materials used. In other European countries such as Finland - who nearly twenty year ago faced a similar issue with a growing young population coming through the education system - they reasoned that since at the time the country was in a poor position economically all school buildings should be built to the highest standard with quality materials as they could not afford expensive maintenance in the future.

2. Following on from this point brings us to the consideration of external space as part of the learning experience. How this space gets used forms as much an important function as the layout of the building itself. The response to site determines much of how the school is perceived in the community. No two schools can be the same in this approach.

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Educate Together

An Educate Together second-level school will provide an education that will enable all students to develop the knowledge, skills and values necessary for their lives and careers in the 21st century. Our schools are committed to the values laid down in Educate denominational, co-educational and run democratically. This means that all members of the school community, whatever their social, cultural or belief background, work together in an atmosphere of dignity and respect. Students follow an ethical curriculum, which includes learning about different religions and belief systems. Our ethos provides a strong moral, ethical and spiritual framework for the whole school community, and informs all policies and practices in the daily life of the school. Ann Ryan - Educate Together

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Site A Mullingar Site B Mullingar

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Site C Tullamore Site D Tullamore

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Site E Athlone Site F Athlone

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Morgan Boland Site C Tullamore

Figureground Plan Showing Nodal Points

Figureground Plan Showing

My approach to designing the school grew out of my interpretation of the Reggio Emilia school system in northern Italy. This inspired me to think of how my school would act and allowed me to then interpret the site. The site is in Tullamore and situated off the canal and a tributary of the canal which leads to the canal harbour which exists to the South

Points

The school is envisaged as being a greater part of the community, forming links with the two existing schools and the proposed art and technology school creating a campus like interaction along the canal. The school design is based around the concept of allowing a hierarchy of separate entrances, group and external spaces. The school is organised to better integrate its use by the community and how external spaces relate to the students within. The school reacts to a vertical drop of 1.5m on the site which is exploited to order the hierarchy of use between guests, students and staff.

Sun

er admission each day. The classrooms are organised on the East and Southern axis to better naturally heat and light the classrooms. Additionally the workshops and labs form the western faรงade in an effort to minimize any excessive heat gains. The classrooms frame a central courtyard and the GP space which is a vertical link through to the open library above and the special tuition rooms.

NORTH

Outdoor Space

Outdoor Space + Courtyard

Outdoor Space + Courtyard

Music

Art

Canteen

Workshops

Sports

Workshops

Art

Music

Classrooms Admin

Science GP Space

Community/Life

Canteen

Canteen

GP Space Science

Admin

Classrooms

Sports

Science

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GP Space Sports

Workshops

Art

Music

Classrooms

Admin

SITE PLAN - 1:500 ELEVATION S - 1:200

SOUTH

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Morgan Boland Site C Tullamore

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Laura Carroll Site C Tullamore

in an informal sequence, allowing the subjects to overlap and the students to collaborate easily, the open nature of this layout allows the students not to be distracted by the external world.

classrooms, each of which can open up to form larger teaching spaces, to encourage group interaction and learning. The double height general purpose space creates a social strip courtyards, which introduce external social and learning spaces. The design employs economical materials: concrete blocks and plywood. However in using these standard materials in unconventional ways they can be transformed into something with a richer -

in use. The blackened plywood walls that divide the spaces house storage, lockers and seating areas. These occupied walls which line the corridors provide social spaces and areas for contemplation white blockwork structure, a muted pallet allows the students to provide colour to the school.

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Laura Carroll Site C Tullamore

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Laura Carroll Site C Tullamore

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Laura Carroll Site C Tullamore

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Miriam Corcoran Site A Mullingar

Mullingar Existing

Mullingar Proposed

As an urban strategy the school was utilized as a tool to heal the poor urban quality of Dominick Place, Mullingar by rebuilding the street. The conceptual driving force was the celebration of the banal. The repetitious exposed structure of the school may teach students the value of subtlety in design as opposed to novelty. Group discussion and self-learning are given equal importance to teacher led learning. This pedagogical reaction informed the design of the school resulting in a labyrinth of indoor and outdoor learning spaces as opposed to corridor space. A life exists within the structural zone providing smaller spaces for individual learning.

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Miriam Corcoran Site A Mullingar

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Miriam Corcoran Site A Mullingar

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Miriam Corcoran Site A Mullingar

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Declan Duffy Site D Tullamore

1 - Existing

Sprawled public car park adjacent to large scale derelict commercial warehouses

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2 - Defining the edge

Three seperate blocks are placed and orientated towards each of the site entrances, like gatehouses creating a strong edge to the site. Parking moved towards northern part of site.

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3 - Public And Private

The tree blocks are set back to prov neighbouring buildings and to crea squares for entrance. Proposed Inte

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Declan Duffy Site D Tullamore Legend 1 general classroom 2 interlinked classroom 3 group room 4 music/drama 5 guidance suite 6 religion 7 maths 8 social studies 9 multimedia lab 35

10 science lab 11 demonstartion room 12 arts and craft 13 home econonmics 14 busines studies 15 graphics 16 wood work 17 metal work 18 library/study 19 pastoral office

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20 principal office 21 deputys office 22 general office 23 meeting room 24 staff room 25 general storage 26 GP room 27 cloaks 28 toilets 29 PE hall

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30 equipment store 31 tutors control room 32 changing suites 33 cleaner storage 34 playing courts 35 car parking 36 Yard/storage

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vide a buffer zone between ate three small landscaped ernal private courtyard.

5 - Green Extension

4 - Cloister

The three blocks are bound together by a light single story structure, creating an inward looking enviroment and providing a roof deck for access at first floor level.

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The car park is covered with an intensive green roof to provide for playing pitches. The Roofscape becomes extension of urban green space

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Declan Duffy Site D Tullamore

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Declan Duffy Site D Tullamore

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Paul Egan Site A Mullingar

The approach taken with this project explored the relationship between education and the architecture that enables it. The curiosity that is present in learning was explored in the built form. This resulted in an ordered architecture that is pushed and pulled to create learning spaces outside of the formal classroom. These are illuminated in unique ways and views of these are concealed then revealed. This language also shows itself in the relation to the site. Other aspects including daylight and ventilation.

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Paul Egan Site A Mullingar

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Paul Egan Site A Mullingar

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Paul Egan Site A Mullingar

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James Hanlon Site E Athlone

Ground Floor Plan The scheme is primarily informed with reference to site context, a riverside site boasting a screen belt of mature broad leaf trees offering punctuation to the expansive vista of the Shannon while also providing shelter from prevailing winds blowing in over the river thereby creating a comfortable micro climate contiguous to the proposed building. The building aims to assimilate itself as closely as possible to the existing context rather than clear the context to provide just another suburban school.

The design takes the form of timber clad functional cubic forms sitting under a canopy of lightweight tree-like structure. The cubic forms contain the necessary and regimented programme of a school whereas the irregular spaces between provide for a fun and unique multi- purpose environment where the students are within it.

This approach allows the school to have a sense of place and an individual identity, a school should be about experience and memories as much as about learning.

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James Hanlon Site E Athlone

First Floor Plan

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James Hanlon Site E Athlone

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James Hanlon Site E Athlone

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Cian Hughes Site D Tullamore

The initial concept was to challenge the current education system and encourages group work and informal learning. The idea of transformation, where the physical transformation made by students, the transformative effect a school has on a community and the idea of transformation between internal and external spaces was investigated; to provide a transparency to the building. The school building sets up a relationship with the adjacent A2 arts centre but also creates a new square, just off the main shopping street, to be used by the students at lunch and then by the community at the weekend. The library, canteen and wood/metalwork workshops have been integrated the into the community so that they may be used by local residents during out of school hours.

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Cian Hughes Site D Tullamore

educate together 2nd level education cian hughes

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ground floor plan 1:200 1. classroom 2. interlinked classrooms 3. demonstration room 4. toilets 5. guidance suite 6. science 7. group room 8. social studies 9. caretaker and first aid 10. fitness suite 11. female changing 12. male changing 13. cleaning store 14. store 15. gym 16. metalwork and woodwork 17. canteen 18. library

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Cian Hughes Site D Tullamore

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Cian Hughes Site D Tullamore

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OisĂ­n Jacob Site B Mullingar

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OisĂ­n Jacob Site B Mullingar

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OisĂ­n Jacob Site B Mullingar

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OisĂ­n Jacob Site B Mullingar

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Dean Murphy Site F Athlone The concept for this school design is based around the Maria Montessori educational pedagogy. The philosophy is based around group learning where the teacher becomes secondary within the class and effectively acts as a mediator. Each class facilitates this method by placing students primarily in group scenarios and the teacher based in a neutral part of the class. Meeting spaces and group areas are provided in most classes with the majority consisting of double height space to place their hierarchy within the learning environment provided. In the more public spaces of the school a number of various conditions have been provided for students to congregate based on their individual preferences. These range from large scale areas such as the general purpose hall to individual study zones which inhabit various niches around the school. The same philosophy has been applied externally with a number external spaces have been designed to have ample sunlight and views of the passing River Shannon. In terms of materiality the school will consist of board marked concrete and corten steel cladding in some locations externally. These materials provide the durability needed for this building use while still providing the necessary aesthetics to blend in sufproject the walls internally will be left blank in order for them to facilitate students work. Overall the building acts as a blank canvas offering the inhabitants the opportunity to personalise the space.

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Dean Murphy Site F Athlone

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Dean Murphy Site F Athlone

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Dean Murphy Site F Athlone

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John Meehan Site E Athlone

The main driving force behind my scheme has been the site. Being surrounded by mature trees on the banks of the Shannon presented many inherent advantages, trying to be sensitive to both the site and the program was of paramount concern. commodation linked by a continuous circulation route. This idea still remains but the form has morphed in order to wrap itself private outdoor spaces. The main circulation route was envisaged as being more than just a route to class, but as a social zone and even auxiliary learning space. Along the route there are a number of nodes with corridors radiating out from them in order to promote a sense of heart and inclusion. Establishing an identity for the school was a driving factor behind the materiality. The main portions of the south, east and west facing facades are made up of timber vertical louvres that are individually controlled by each room. This control over the classroom lighting would lead to an ever changing facade arrangement over the course of the day or year. This would provide a visual interest for both the public and students, making an architectural statement over what might otherwise be an ill considered shading device.

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John Meehan Site E Athlone

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John Meehan Site E Athlone

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John Meehan Site E Athlone

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Stephen Richardson Site A Mullingar

SITE PLAN 100m 10m

50m

Learning occurs as much if not more in social interaction than in formal learning through out school.

for exhibiting students work and group presentations to small seating and locker zones between circulation and learning. These small zones also act as a buffer between the circulation route and the learning zones.

The series of courtyard and outdoor spaces provide additional learning spaces. Each has its own character from river side learning in the science labs to the service yard of the woodwork and engineering spaces. These spaces will be used to exhibit students work and projects. This provides all students with a -

The materials selected reinforce the reading of these spaces. The circulation zone use a brick column and timber beam tectonic. The learning spaces exist between brick walls running perpendicular to the circulation within which the classes inhabit.

The creation of large and small social spaces within the circulation zones of the school provide many zones for group learning, interaction and social gatherings outside of the formal learning spaces. These spaces vary in size form the tiered demo space

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classrooms, however these enclosing walls can be removed for a free open plan. The classroom are orientated in a SW or SE direction to take advantage of passive solar gains and provide a bright learning environment.

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Stephen Richardson Site A Mullingar

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Stephen Richardson Site A Mullingar

Social Spaces Large Spaces Small Spaces

20m 2m

10m

SCIENCE

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SCIENCE GARDEN

CLAS RO M CLASSROOM WCWC

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COMPUTERART

CHANGING

WOODS

ADMIN FITNES SUITE

PE HALL

TEACHING DECK

ADMI N FOREST OF COLUMNS

ADMIN CLASSROOM DEMO GP SPACE SPACE

COURTYARD

TRADES SERVICE YARD

COURTYARD

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Stephen Richardson Site A Mullingar

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Ciara Ryan Site D Tullamore

This scheme aims to achieve comfort and individuality by purposefully breaking away from the typical institutional environment that is found in many Irish schools today. My main focus has surrounded the theme of materiality and landscape.

unique movement through the two ends of the school. With light often scarce in Ireland I felt it is important to maximise the opportunity of light. The screens are south facing to all classrooms and are on a double axis rolling system which allows the students to interact and make the faรงade their own.

The idea is to allow each classroom to have its own personal outdoor space that is proportionate to its indoor working setting. The intention is to break down the four walls of a classroom which we previously felt bound to. I believe outdoor learning is extremely

angle to gain maximum solar heat for an array of photovoltaic panels that line the roof. Below is a green roof which absorbs the rainwater and provides insulation.

fresh air and overall awareness of the environment. The classroom furniture is designed to change the way we teach where group leaning is encouraged.

The building stretches across the site inhabiting the whole space. This spreading out of the building allows for a greater experience of movement through a central circulatory spine that latches onto a series of gardens and in addition contains a number of general purpose areas at cross over junctions. The PE hall is designed to open onto a square which connects to an Arts Centre and recreational canal. This facility is designed to be equally as important to the community as it is for the students and staff.

To avoid the traditional material of block concrete, pink and instead used patterned screens to express not only a weightlessness within the building but also to allow for an interesting display of light and pattern within the space which results in a

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Ciara Ryan Site D Tullamore

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Ciara Ryan Site D Tullamore

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Ciara Ryan Site D Tullamore

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Georgina Vernon Site F Athlone

Changing The Educational Landscape

accommodate each form individually, or both forms together through a shared social space. This social space, when not in use by either form room would become a corridor break-out area, where casual and informal learning would emerge, through communication and interaction. The elimination of the traditional arrangement of tables facing a blackboard and replacement with a group based organisation of the classroom furniture also features in the design of these classrooms.

search into school design and the Educate Together schooling system, I established that the reoccurring theme regarding a modern method of teaching and learning would be a new, unconventional and inventive learning space.

The form neighbourhoods together generate the townscape of the school, also composed of humanities and sciences districts, gardens, public institutions such as the library, gym and general purpose space, where the corridors act as streets between such, with irregular and indented moments along the journey for students to pause and interact with each other, their teachers, and their surroundings. From this micro-city concept, the idea of each room being its own house within the greater envelope of the school took shape, which informed and inspired decisions throughout the design process including structure and materiality.

My approach to the design was to create an integrated and involved learning experience for both student and teacher. I conthemselves could change their own environment and organize themselves and their space as they desired. This would promote sensory and physical activation and encourage using the body as a tool to understand or create something, and learn by doing, making, and engaging with space. A simple solution evolved by housing year groups in their own classroom neighbourhoods, which could be manipulated to

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Georgina Vernon Site F Athlone

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Georgina Vernon Site F Athlone

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Georgina Vernon Site F Athlone

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Notes

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Notes

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4TH YEAR Timothy Bergin Morgan Boland Kate Buck David Burke Fiona Canavan Laura Carroll Aisling Cleary Miriam Corcoran Mark Davy Sophie Dempsey Michael Drury Declan Duffy Paul Egan Caren Finnegan Jennifer Fisher Josephine Flahive James Hanlon John Hanrahan Cian Hughes Oisin Jacob David Keegan Nadine Kelly Anna Keogh David Lally Louis Lancon Niall Lennon Sophie Mc Cauley Aidan Mc Donnell Karen Mc Gillion David Mc Gowan Sinead Mc Loughlin Robert Mannion Pierre Marc Alba Martell John Meehan Ciaran Molumby Dean Murphy Matthew Murphy Daniel Nash Hugh Neary Louison Newlove Alison Noone Liam O Reilly Shane Phelan Mark Poland Egel Pruckte Stephen Richardson Ciara Ryan Natalie Scanlon Conor Sheehan Alan Sherlock James Slater Colum Smith Philip Tennyson Kenneth Tuite Georgina Vernon Cliodhna Walsh Cillian Wright Anne Young

GUEST CRITICS Ralph Gingham Jeffrey Bolhuis Brenda Carroll Shannon Chance Donal Colfer

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