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UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH 14th A N NUAL

Electric Power Industry Conference

October 28, 2019 Energy GRID Institute at the Energy Innovation Center Pittsburgh, PA


A special thank you to our sponsors


14th ANNUAL UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH

Electric Power Industry Conference October 28, 2019 Energy GRID Institute at the Energy Innovation Center, Pittsburgh, PA

Brandon Grainger, PhD – Conference Chair Associate Director, Energy GRID Institute Associate Director, Electric Power Engineering Laboratory Assistant Professor Electrical & Computer Engineering Department Swanson School of Engineering, University of Pittsburgh

Dear Friends and Colleagues, Welcome to the 14th annual Electric Power Industry Conference (EPIC) at the University of Pittsburgh! On behalf of the conference committee, the Center for Energy and Energy GRID Institute, and the Swanson School of Engineering at Pitt, thank you for your participation and support. I hope you enjoy the conference, and I look forward to the exchange of innovative ideas, insights and networking opportunities that lie ahead. We can look forward to hearing from industry leaders like this year’s keynote, Eaton’s Craig Gob, and our technology spotlight speaker NETL’s Dr. Brian Anderson. Our breakout session speakers will bring a wealth of knowledge and decades of experience to the sessions that represent all corners of the electric power industry today, and our graduate students and faculty members have exciting research to share and discuss with you. Building a clean and intelligent grid of the future is one of our main focuses at the Energy GRID Institute, and we believe the place to do this is at the intersection of industry- and community-focused collaborative research. The GRID Institute facilitates the establishment of public-private partnerships and the acceleration of economic growth and technological leadership. The effect is both global and local, encouraging greater energy-related regional opportunities and job creation, and we empower Pitt’s Incubator, startup and commercialization activities to create new innovations. The Energy GRID Institute’s new Electric Power Technologies Laboratory is housed here in this state-of-theart facility, and we are thrilled to show you around the lab this afternoon. We’ll provide some light fare for you to enjoy while discovering the space and getting to know one another. Our collaborations are our most valued asset, and we hope that today you’ll have a chance to explore our unique facility and consider how we might be a partner to you. Finally, we’d like to thank our many corporate sponsors and exhibitors. Your contributions and participation are essential to the continued success of EPIC, and we look forward to our continued collaboration well into the future. Sincerely, Brandon

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Schedule Monday, October 28 8 – 9 a.m. – REGISTRATION AND NETWORKING Note: Breakfast will be set up in Innovation Hall GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCHER POSTER SESSION Posters will be available for viewing at distinct locations throughout the Energy Innovation Center. The time frame is set aside specifically for when the students will be at their posters to present, discuss, and answer questions prior to the start of the conference.

9 – 9:15 a.m. – WELCOME David Vorp, PhD – Swanson School of Engineering Associate Dean for Research and Acting Director, Energy GRID Institute

9:15 – 9:30 a.m. – OPENING REMARKS Brandon Grainger, PhD – Associate Director, Energy GRID Institute

9:30 – 10:30 a.m. – CONFERENCE KEYNOTE ADDRESS Covestro Bright Space Craig Gob – Eaton Senior Vice President and General Manager, Electrical Systems and Services Division

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

10:30 a.m. – Noon GRADUATE STUDENT RESEARCH SYMPOSIUM with POSTER SESSION Covestro Bright Space MODERATOR: Alvaro Cardoza – University of Pittsburgh RK Mellon Graduate Student Fellow and PhD Candidate Presentations from Pitt Electric Power Engineering PhD and M.S. students providing overview of the group’s research activities, and introducing elements of the GSR poster session.

Noon – 1:15 p.m. – LUNCH / EXHIBITS Roadway around Labs Exhibits with strolling lunch.

1:15 – 2 p.m. – TECHNOLOGY SPOTLIGHT Covestro Bright Space Brian Anderson, PhD – National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Director


2 – 4:30 p.m. – T ECHNICAL PROGRAM SESSIONS (CONCURRENT TRACKS)

Session 1

Session 2

Innovation Hall

Covestro Bright Space

Intelligent Grid Design through Power Electronics

Advanced Techniques for Grid Modernization

MODERATOR: Santino Graziani – University of Pittsburgh PhD Student, Electric Power Systems Laboratory, RK Mellon Graduate Student Fellow

MODERATOR: Aryana Nakhai – University of Pittsburgh MS Candidate, Electric Power Systems Laboratory IEEE Student Branch PES President

Speakers Michael Mazzola, PhD – University of North Carolina at Charlotte Duke Energy Distinguished Professor Director, Energy Production and Infrastructure Center (EPIC)

Speakers Joseph Petti – Dominion Energy Engineer II, System Protection

Neal Clements, PhD and Marc Aiello – Siemens Industry R&D Specialist Engineers Subhashish Bhattacharya, PhD – North Carolina State University Duke Energy Distinguished Professor NSF FREEDM Center Core Founder Shyam Ramamurthy, PhD – Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. Senior Engineer – Electric Distribution Division

Masoud Barati, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor, Swanson School of Engineering Elizabeth Cook – Duquesne Light Company Senior Manager, System Planning Amy Babay, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor, School of Computing and Information (SCI) Shailesh Vora, PhD – National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Manager, Fuel Cell Program

Christopher Lee – Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. Senior Power Controls Design Engineer Arash Khoshkbar-Sadigh, PhD – Penn State University Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering

4:30 – 6:30 p.m. – RECEPTION AND VIEWING OF THE ELECTRIC POWER TECHNOLOGIES LABORATORY Note: Beverages and a light dinner will be provided during this time RECEPTION AND EXHIBITS Raceway at the Energy Innovation Center throughout the day Exhibitors Pitt Entities (Online Learning, Center for Energy, Office of Technology Management), Sargent Electric, Duquesne Light Company, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Premier Automation, Eaton, Measurement Instruments, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Penn Power Systems and Northeast Energy Systems

6:30 p.m. – CONFERENCE ADJOURNS

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Speaker Biographies DAVID VORP, PhD Swanson School of Engineering Associate Dean for Research and Acting Director, Energy GRID Institute Dr. David Vorp is the Associate Dean for Research at the University of Pittsburgh Swanson School of Engineering and the William Kepler Whiteford Professor of Bioengineering, with secondary appointments in the Departments of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Surgery, and the Clinical & Translational Sciences Institute at the University of Pittsburgh. He also serves as a Director of the Center for Vascular Remodeling and Regeneration, the Co-Director of the Center for Medical Innovation, the Interim Director of the Peterson Institute for Nano-Science and Engineering, as well as the Director of the Vascular Bioengineering Laboratory. The research in Dr. Vorp’s lab focuses on the biomechanics, “mechanopathobiology,” regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering of tubular tissues and organs, predominantly the vasculature. He is currently studying the biomechanical progression of aortic aneurysms by modeling the mechanical forces that act on the degenerating vessel wall. He is developing a treatment strategy for abdominal aortic aneurysms by delivering adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells to the periadventitial side of the aneurysm to inhibit the matrix degradation commonly seen in the disease progression and promote its regeneration. Lastly, he is

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

designing a small diameter tissue engineered vascular graft to treat cardiovascular diseases. Here he utilizes adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells incorporated in a biodegradable polyurethane-based scaffold (produced by the Wagner Group) that undergoes substantial in vivo remodeling to develop a native-like blood vessel. Dr. Vorp has published more than 105 peer-reviewed research manuscripts and has been awarded over $7 million in research funding from the National Institutes of Health, American Heart Association, Whitaker Foundation, Pittsburgh Foundation, and other sources. He has several patents in the field of vascular bioengineering and is a co-founder of the start-up Neograft Technologies, Inc., a company that applies technology developed in Dr. Vorp’s laboratory relating to biodegradable support for arterial vein grafts. Dr. Vorp is the Chair of the Executive Committee of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, Bioengineering Division, President of the International Society for Applied Cardiovascular Biology, and the Secretary of the Executive Committee of the Biomedical Engineering Society. Dr. Vorp is also a member of several other prestigious organizations, such as the American Heart Association, American Society of Artificial Internal Organs, the Tissue Engineering & Regenerative Medicine International Society, and the Sigma Xi Scientific Research Society. His most recent honors include the 2013 Carnegie Science Award in the category of Life Sciences, and being elected to the World Council of Biomechanics for 12 years (2014-2026).


BRANDON GRAINGER, PhD Associate Director, Energy GRID Institute Dr. Brandon Grainger is currently an assistant professor and associate director of the Electric Power Engineering laboratory in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh (Pitt), Swanson School of Engineering. He is also the associate director of the Energy GRID Institute. He holds a PhD in electrical engineering with a specialization in power conversion. He also obtained his master’s degree in electrical engineering and bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering (with minor in electrical engineering) all from Pitt. He was also one of the first original R.K. Mellon graduate student fellows through the Center for Energy at Pitt. Dr. Grainger’s research interests are in electric power conversion, medium to high voltage power electronics (HVDC and STATCOM), general power electronic converter design (topology, controller design, magnetics), resonant converters and high power density

design, power semiconductor evaluation (SiC and GaN) and reliability assessment, military power systems, DC system design and protection, fault identification techniques, and power electronics for microgrid applications. Dr. Grainger has either worked or interned for ABB Corporate Research in Raleigh, NC; ANSYS Inc. in Southpointe, PA; Mitsubishi Electric in Warrendale, PA; Siemens Industry in New Kensington, PA; and has regularly volunteered at Eaton’s Power Systems Experience Center in Warrendale, PA designing electrical demonstrations. In his career thus far, he has contributed to 60+ articles in the general area of electric power engineering (emphasis on electric power conversion) and all of which have been published through the IEEE, ASEE or ASNE. Dr. Grainger is a member of the IEEE Power Electronics Society (PELS) and Industrial Electronics Society (IES) and is an annual reviewer of various power electronic conferences and transaction articles. Dr. Grainger is a Senior Member of the IEEE and served as the IEEE Pittsburgh PELS Chapter Chair for which the section has won numerous awards under his leadership.

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Conference Keynote Address – Monday Morning CRAIG GOB

BRIAN ANDERSON, PhD

Eaton Senior Vice President and General Manager, Electrical Systems and Services Division

National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Director

Craig Gob is the senior vice president and general manager, Electrical Engineering Services and Systems Division, Electrical Systems and Services Group, Electrical Sector, for Eaton. Gob is responsible for leading, managing and setting the strategic direction for the Electrical Engineering Services and Systems Division’s engineering and technical functions. Prior to his current role, Gob served as the vice president, U.S. Sales, North American Sales, Electrical Sector. He joined Eaton in 1995 serving in roles of increasing responsibility for the Electrical Sector including general manager, Australia New Zealand Division, Asia-Pacific; and sales director, Southwest Zone, North American Sales. Prior to Eaton, Gob worked for Westinghouse Electric in the Energy Systems business. Gob holds a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. Eaton is a power management company with 2018 sales of $21.6 billion. We provide energy-efficient solutions that help our customers effectively manage electrical, hydraulic and mechanical power more efficiently, safely and sustainably. Eaton is dedicated to improving the quality of life and the environment through the use of power management technologies and services. Eaton employs 99,000 people worldwide, and sells products to customers in more than 175 countries. For more information, visit Eaton.com.

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Technology Spotlight – Monday Afternoon

University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

Brian J. Anderson, PhD is director of the Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory where he manages delivery and execution of fossil energy research programs. He earned his bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from West Virginia University and his master’s and doctorate degrees in chemical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is recipient of the Honor Achievement Award from DOE for his work on a team that responded to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill and the 2012 Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers.


Graduate Student Research Symposium with Poster Session

Moderator ALVARO CARDOZA was born in Pittsburgh,

summer of 2016 with research evaluating the benefits of directly integrating energy storage into DC-DC converters to suppress unstable photovoltaic transients. In the summer of 2018, he interned at General Electric’s Power Conversion group in Cranberry, PA performing simulation and experimental testing of both motor diagnostic algorithms and grid-scale capacitor bank equipment. Alvaro’s research interests include renewable energy integration, microgrids, and power electronics. His dissertation focus explores the use of multiinput, multi-output power electronic interfaces within a distribution network to dynamically control the flow of electricity and improve the

availability of local generation. Mr. Cardoza is an RK Mellon Fellow graduate student researcher, the President of the Electrical and Computer Engineering (ECE) Graduate Student Association, a graduate student representative on the ECE Graduate Committee, the former President of the Engineering Graduate Student Organization, the former Graduate Ambassador and Regional Graduate Representative for the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers, a fellow of the NSF-funded Pitt-STRIVE, and a member of the Engineering Diversity Graduate Students Association. He is also a student member of the IEEE Power and Energy Society as well as the IEEE Power Electronics Society.

SANTINO GRAZIANI is a PhD student

THIBAUT HARZIG graduated with a

advised by Dr. Grainger at the University of Pittsburgh. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a master’s degree in electrical engineering in the fall of 2018. His thesis topic was a new power electronic converter topology for DC-DC power conversion. He is continuing this topic in the area of design optimization for his PhD dissertation. Santino spends his summer semester with Eaton at the Power Systems Experience Center where he has developed and built numerous power system demonstrations for training and educational purposes.

master of Science from Pittsburgh University and a Master in Electrical, Electronics and Communications Engineering from the National Institute of Applied Sciences of Lyon (France) in 2018. He is currently a PhD candidate working in the Electric Power System Lab (EPSL), as a research assistant at the University of Pittsburgh under the supervision of Dr. Brandon Grainger. In 2016, he did a five-months internship at CERN located on the FrenchSwiss where he worked on the optimization of [4-6-8 kA; 8V] DC-DC power converters used to supply superconductive magnets in the

LHC (Large Hadron Collider). In 2019, he did a two-months internship at General Electric Power Conversion in Cranberry Township (PA) where he designed a control scheme for a DC to AC converter test bench. His research interests are the field of power electronics and control strategies of power converters. He is currently working on the upgrade of current controlled inverter sequence model to improve the single-phase DQ measurement involved in grid stability analysis.

Pennsylvania. Currently, he is pursuing his PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh with a concentration in electrical power engineering. He received his B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in the spring of 2012 and his M.S. in electrical engineering in the

PhD Students

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

MOHAMMED HATATAH received the BS degree in electrical engineering from King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia, in 2006, MBA degree from King Abdulaziz University, Saudi Arabia, in 2010, and the MS degree in power system from Pennsylvania State University, USA, in 2015. He is currently working toward the PhD degree in power


electronics at University of Pittsburgh, USA. His thesis topic is on solid state transformer and their control. In 2005, he did a six months internship at Saudi Aramco, Saudi Arabia, where he worked on distribution equipment design. From 2006 to 2011, he was an Electrical Planning Engineer at Saudi Electricity Company, Saudi Arabia, where he worked on the regional planning (110kV). Mr. Hatatah is a student member of IEEE PELS and PES. His research interests include renewable energy, smart transformer, and control strategies of power converter. He is advised by Dr. Grainger.

RUI HU is a PhD student at University of Pittsburgh, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. Rui’s research interests include microgrid control, power system optimization, power electronics and renewable energy. He received his B.S in power system engineering

from Sichuan University, China in 2012. and M.S in electrical engineering from Michigan Technological University in 2015, respectively. His master research investigated the use of droop control in realizing battery energy balancing in a microgrid. His current research explores the use of game theory and reinforcement learning in the energy management procedure of the renewable powered microgrids. Rui is a student member of the IEEE Power & Energy Society.

ZACHARY T. SMITH received the B.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 2014. He is a member of the IEEE Power and Energy Society (PES) and the IEEE Power Electronics Society (PELS). Zachary worked from 2014 to 2017 in Eaton’s Leadership Development Program for Application Engineers. He has product engineering experience with MV/LV AC substations, motor control centers, and drives. His current research interests include multi-port power conversion devices for MVDC applications.

ALEKHYA VELAGAPUDI is a doctoral researcher at the School of computing and information, being advised by Dr. David Warren Tipper. She has completed her Bachelors in Electronics and Communication Engineering from J. N. T. U in India. After that she pursued her Masters in Information and Telecommunications systems from Ohio University located at Athens in Ohio. This is where her research started on using data for decision making in US telecommunication networks. Her core PhD research is on leveraging technology for achieving sustainability in smart cities. Being an interdisciplinary doctoral researcher, she is using her knowledge in telecommunications to research in developing methods that can bring through sustainable development in USA. Presently, she is also a part of Energy Innovation Center research group and is focusing on telecommunications, economic, and social aspects that relate to the researches being performed. Her main aim in doing such interdisciplinary research is to develop the methods and policies for the cities to support a smooth and sustainable transition into the smart era.

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MS Students ERICK BITTENBENDER is a second year

THOMAS COOK received a B.S. in

JENNA DELOZIER received her B.S. in

M.S. student advised by Dr. Greg Reed. He received his B.S. in Electrical Engineering with a concentration in Electric Power at the University of Pittsburgh in the spring of 2018. In the past, he has worked at GE Power Conversion on projects pertaining to the design, control, and testing of thyristorbased drive systems. His current research interests are in critical asset identification in power systems and technical aspects of policy and economic decision-making.

Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 2017. He is a graduate student researcher in the Electric Power Systems Lab (EPSL) and the NSF Center for Space, High-performance, and Resilient Computing (SHREC) at the University of Pittsburgh. His research interests include widebandgap semiconductors, power electronics for space applications, and power systems for CubeSats.

2018 from the University of Pittsburgh in Electrical Engineering with a concentration in Electric Power. During her undergraduate studies, she was a co-op student at BMW Manufacturing in Spartanburg, SC working in automation and control. This previous summer, Jenna was an engineering intern at Duquesne Light, working in substations and distribution. Jenna is currently pursuing her M.S. under Dr. Gregory Reed. Her research interests lie in Electric Vehicle Integration and Distribution Systems.

GRANT CRUSE was born in Johnstown, RYAN BRODY is a second year M.S. student at the University of Pittsburgh advised by Dr. Brandon Grainger. His research interests include power electronics and control systems, especially related to renewable energy and electric vehicles. He graduated Summa Cum Laude from the University of Pittsburgh in April 2018, with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering, a concentration in Electric Power, and a minor in Computer Science. While an undergraduate student, he interned in Pittsburgh at CurtissWright EMD, where he analyzed different electrical systems under the supervision of their electrical engineering team, and Bombardier Transportation, where he assisted with repair orders.

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Pennsylvania and is a graduate of the University of Pittsburgh at Johnstown, where he received a bachelor’s of science in electrical engineering technology. During his undergraduate studies, he completed two internships with H. F. Lenz Company, where he took part in the electrical design of several projects including data centers, the Statue of Liberty, and several buildings in Pittsburgh. He is currently working with Dr. Kwasinski on research topics related to the responses and restorations of power systems during hurricanes.

University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

ADAM EMES completed his B.S. in electrical engineering, with a concentration in electric power engineering, from the University of Pittsburgh in 2018. In his time as an undergraduate, he completed three co-op rotations at Curtiss-Wright EMD, and worked part time as an undergraduate student researcher. From his co-op position, he gained experience with electric machine design and testing. In his undergraduate research, he contributed to projects that utilized signal processing in fault classification and load detection applications. He is currently a second year M.S. student at the University of Pittsburgh, working as a graduate student


researcher under Dr. Brandon Grainger. His research interests are focused on applications of quasi-z-source inverters in renewable energy and microgrid systems. In his time as an M.S. student, he has coauthored two papers, and has also completed a summer internship at Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. In that role, he performed transients analysis on a variety of power systems, bench-marked the control performance of STATCOMs and SVCs, and developed a power dispatch schedule for a battery energy storage system.

JOHN KIEFFER received his B.S. in Physics and Mathematics from Centre College in 2014. Following completion of his B.S. he worked for Wilderness Trace Solar, Inc. in Danville, KY where he designed and helped implement gridtied, off-grid, and hybrid solar energy systems for residential and commercial customers ranging up to 300 kW in size. John is currently a second-year M.S. student at the University of Pittsburgh where he is advised by Dr. Gregory Reed with whom he co-led a sustainable engineering study abroad trip to Scandinavia for undergraduate students this past May. His research interests include the optimal control and dispatch of distributed energy resources.

ARYANA NAKHAI graduated Cum Laude from the University of Pittsburgh in December 2018, with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and a concentration in Electric Power. As part of her undergraduate degree, she completed 3 co-op rotations at BMW Manufacturing. She is currently pursuing an M.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh under the advisory of Dr. Gregory Reed. While holding an intern role at Eaton, she is also President and founder of a new IEEE Power & Energy Society student branch chapter at Pitt and holds a position on the Student Innovation Board for a DOE Consortium program known as FEEDER.

CHRISTIAN PERENYI is a second year M.S student at the University of Pittsburgh. He is a French exchange student in his final year of engineering at INSA de Lyon (France) in the ECE department. During his undergrad he had the opportunity to realize a first internship in UK (Telford) in Schneider Electric. Christian

also did a five month internship in Colombia (Bogota) at Enel; an Italian multinational manufacturer and distributor of electricity and gas. He was part of the technical support in thermal generation for Colombia & Brazil. His research concerns the frequency response of inverters inside a Power Grid. He is currently a research full time assistant under Dr. Brandon Grainger’s supervision.

COREY WEIMANN received a B.S. in Electrical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh in 2018. He is a graduate student in the Electric Power Systems Laboratory. His research focus is DC arc flash, particularly experimental results, under his advisors Dr. Robert Kerestes, and Dr. Brandon Grainger. His research goals are to determine when DC arc flash events are possible and at what minimum system parameters they start occurring at typical industrial installations. He is partnering with a company that does high power testing and is willing to perform arc flash tests.

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Monday, October 28, 2019 2 – 4:30 p.m.

Session 1 Innovation Hall

Intelligent Grid Design through Power Electronics MODERATOR: Santino Graziani – University of Pittsburgh PhD Student, Electric Power Systems Laboratory RK Mellon Graduate Student Fellow Santino Graziani is a PhD student advised by Dr. Grainger at the University of Pittsburgh. He graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a master’s degree in electrical engineering in the fall of 2018. His thesis topic was a new power electronic converter topology for DCDC power conversion. He is continuing this topic in the area of design optimization for his PhD dissertation. Santino spends his summer semester with Eaton at the Power Systems Experience Center where he has developed and built numerous power system demonstrations for training and educational purposes.

SPEAKERS Michael Mazzola, PhD University of North Carolina at Charlotte Duke Energy Distinguished Professor Director, Energy Production and Infrastructure Center (EPIC) A Conversation about Grid Modernization and Resilience in North Carolina Abstract In this presentation, two trends driving new realities on the electric grid in North Carolina are described that in many ways reflect the larger change occurring on the North American electric grid. The first trend is the closing of central generation assets, especially coal-fired stations, and the resulting changes to grid power flows. The second trend is the emerging field of microgrids and their deployment in communities that may not have enjoyed the same high reliability that most electricity customers enjoy. The presentation finishes with some recommendations for staying ahead of these trends and countering with responses that bolster grid resiliency. Biography Dr. Michael S. Mazzola received his PhD from Old Dominion University in 1990. In July of 2017 he was appointed executive director of the Energy Production and Infrastructure Center (EPIC) at UNC Charlotte and the Duke Energy Distinguished Chair in Power Engineering Systems. Prior

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering


to these appointments he was a professor of electrical and computer engineering at Mississippi State University and the Jack Hatcher Chair for Engineering Entrepreneurship. From 2005-2007 he was the chief technology officer of SemiSouth Laboratories, a company he co-founded. In 2009 he was named an associate director for advanced vehicle systems at the MSU Center for Advanced Vehicular Systems (CAVS). He has been awarded 14 patents.

Neal Clements, PhD and Marc Aiello – Siemens Industry R&D Specialist Engineers Advances in Motor Drive Technology at Siemens, New Kensington: High Powered AC Drives Abstract M2C Development In 1994, Pete Hammond of Robicon introduced a new concept in Medium Voltage Drive technology based on what would be called Cascaded H Bridge (CCH). Siemens would later introduce this as the GH180 product family. This technology would ultimately be copied worldwide as the most widely used and accepted MV Drive topology.

The presentation will discuss the various protection functions and how they were modified to better perform in the variable frequency environment. The fault detection capability of a Perfect Harmony drive with the advanced motor protection functions will be compared with an open neutral differential protection (6 current sensor) approach. Biography Neal D. Clements, PhD, is a graduate of the University of Toledo (BS), the University of Cincinnati (MS), and the University of Wisconsin (MS and PhD). He has 35 years of experience designing power electronic equipment for commercial, industrial and military applications and is an adjunct professor at the University of Pittsburgh in addition to his position as Siemens LDA PLM-R&D Principal Engineer. Marc F. Aiello has 43 years of experience in the field of Power Electronics and Electro-Optical System Design. He earned his BS and MS degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Pittsburgh and has authored multiple patents. Currently, he is the Siemens LDA PLM-R&D Principal Engineer.

Ten years later, in 2003, Rainer Marquardt of Siemens and the University of Munich would introduce a bridge-based version of modular cells for High-Voltage DC applications, which would be called Modular Multilevel Converter (M2C). Siemens would later introduce this for Large Drive Applications as the GH150 product family. This technology is just beginning to penetrate the Large Drives arena.

Subhashish Bhattacharya, PhD – North Carolina State University Duke Energy Distinguished Professor NSF FREEDM Center Core Founder

With the emergence of upstream natural gas production, GH150 is gaining much interest due to its unique features over traditional voltage source bridge and multi-level topologies for high power applications.

High Power, Medium Voltage Power Converters and Applications – Opportunities and Challenges Offered by HV SiC Power Devices

With the expected boom in electro-mechanical renewable energy within the next 10-20 years, such as wind and tidal, many consider M2C to be well aligned as a key component for bulk energy harvesting and control of power to the AC and upcoming DC grid of the future.

Abstract The opportunities for HV SiC devices for MV and high power converters and utility applications and the challenges to apply HV SiC devices successfully will be presented in-depth for SiC 1200V to 1700V MOSFETs, and SiC 10 kV - 15 kV MOSFETs, JBS diodes, and 15 kV SiC IGBTs. The potential and challenges of the SiC 10-15 kV devices to enable MV power conversion systems, including MV motor drives, FACTS and MVDC grids will be explored with demonstrated application examples of SST, MV SiC power converters for grid tied solar applications, MV motor drives, and MV DC grids. Magnetics for High Power Converters with the latest advances in magnetic material qualification and characterization will be discussed.

Advanced Motor Protection Development Motor drives are often employed with an output motor protection relay. The protection relay provides various protection functions in accordance with IEEE std C37.2. Updated software functions have been developed and added to the drive to provide equivalent protection. The new protection functions have been adapted to operate in the variable frequency environment of the Siemens Perfect Harmony motor drive. The isolated output of the drive affects the strategy for protection as well as the variable operating frequency.

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Biography Subhashish Bhattacharya received his PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2003. He worked in the FACTS (Flexible AC Transmission Systems) and Power Quality group at Westinghouse R&D Center in Pittsburgh, which later became part of Siemens Power Transmission & Distribution, from 1998 to 2005. He joined the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at North Carolina State University (NCSU) in August 2005, where he is the Duke Energy Distinguished Professor and a founding faculty member of NSF ERC FREEDM Systems Center, Advanced Transportation Energy Center [ATEC] and the US DOE initiative on WBG based Manufacturing Innovation Institute – PowerAmerica – at NCSU. A part of his PhD research on active power filters was commercialized by York Corporation Inc. [now part of Johnson Controls] for air-conditioner chiller products. His research interests are Solid-State Transformers, Integration of renewable energy resources, MV power converters enabled by HV SiC devices, FACTS, Utility applications of power electronics and power quality issues; DC Microgrids, high-frequency magnetics, active filters, and application of new power semiconductor devices such as SiC for converter topologies. His research is funded by several industries, NSF, DoE, ARPA-E, US Navy, ONR. He has over 500 publications and 5 patents with several pending patent applications.

Shyam Ramamurthy, PhD Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. Senior Engineer – Electric Distribution Division Christopher Lee Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. Senior Power Controls Design Engineer Multi-Megawatt Power Converters for Grid Applications and Power Quality Support: State of the Art and Future Abstract As renewable energy installations continue to become a greater portion of the generation mix on the distribution power system, Multi-MW Power Converters and their features play an increasingly critical role in the areas of power generation, storage, grid support, power quality and interactions among installations. This presentation includes an overview of topologies and features of state-of-the-art grid connected converters. Some system modeling and application considerations and recent application examples in power quality support roles are presented. The need for new converter features, model features and the state of the technology developments in this area is also discussed.

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

Biography Shyam Ramamurthy, PhD, is Principal Engineer (Power Electronics). He earned his M.Tech at IIT in Mumbai, India, and his PhD in electrical engineering at the University of Arkansas, Fayetteville. He has 20 years of experience in the development of electric power products, including 15 years in power converters and controllers for converters and their various applications. Past Employers include CG Transformers (High Voltage Transformer Design and Testing), Baldor Electric (Low Voltage Power Converters Design) and General Electric (Low and Medium Voltage Power Converters Design). Christopher Lee is Senior Power Controls Design Engineer. He earned his M.S.E.C.E at Georgia Tech in Atlanta, GA, and his B.S.E.E. at the University of Pittsburgh. He has 10 years of industry experience, while participating in multiple power converter design teams for medium and low voltage inverters for FACTS, industrial, renewable energy and naval applications with a focus in hardware design, analysis, and verification. Previous positions include Lead Research and Development Engineer at GE Power Conversion, Pittsburgh, PA and Research and Development Engineer at Converteam, Pittsburgh, PA. His primary technical focus and specialties are in medium-voltage power electronics design, research and development, and validation of medium voltage power converters.

Arash Khoshkbar-Sadigh, PhD ­– Penn State University Assistant Professor, Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering Dual Flying Capacitor Multilevel Inverter Abstract Nowadays, multilevel inverters are considered as the most cost-effective solutions and the state-of-the art power conversion systems in the medium-voltage and high-power applications. These converters are particularly designed to be employed in energy and power conversion areas requiring high efficiency at higher switching frequencies, high power demand, and augmented power quality. First, general advantages of multilevel inverter in comparison with twolevel inverter will be discussed. Afterwards, some of the challenges in existing active neutral point clamp (ANPC) inverter will be addressed. Then, a new configuration of flying capacitor-based multilevel inverter, called dual flying capacitor (DFC) multilevel inverter, will be presented


to alleviate existing challenges in conventional ANPC inverter. The main advantages of the proposed inverter are natural soft switching of line frequency switches, elimination of the transient voltage imbalance between switches connected in series, and better loss distribution between switches. Simulation results and experimental verification of the five-level DFC-ANPC inverter will be presented to validate the performance of the converter as well as the applied modulation technique. Biography Arash Khoshkbar Sadigh (S’09 – M’15) received the BS and MS degrees (both with first Hons.) in electrical engineering from the University of Tabriz, Tabriz, Iran, in 2007 and 2009, respectively, and the PhD degree in electrical engineering from the University of California Irvine, in 2014. He was with Aran Nagsh Ara Consultant Engineering Company, Tabriz, from 2007 to 2010, where he was involved in the design of power transmission and distribution lines. During summer 2012 and 2013, he was an Intern with the RTDS Advanced Technology Laboratory, Southern

California Edison. From 2015 to 2018, he was with Extron Electronics as senior power electronics design engineer. In 2018, he joined Electrical Engineering department of Penn State University as Assistant Professor. He is the author or coauthor of more than 80 journal and conference papers and one book chapter, and he holds one patent. His research interests include power electronics circuits, multilevel inverters and their applications in power system, power quality and flexible ac transmission system devices. Dr. Khoshkbar Sadigh was selected by the University of Tabriz as the Distinguished Student in 2006. In 2007, he joined the Iran’s National Elites Foundation as he ranked second in the National Entrance Exam for graduate study in electrical engineering with a major in power engineering. He was a recipient of an Outstanding Presentation Award from the IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition (APEC) in 2013.

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Session 2 Covestro Bright Space

Advanced Techniques for Grid Modernization MODERATOR: Aryana Nakhai – University of Pittsburgh MS Candidate, Electric Power Systems Laboratory IEEE Student Branch PES President Aryana Nakhai graduated Cum Laude from the University of Pittsburgh in December 2018, with a B.S. in Electrical Engineering and a concentration in Electric Power. As part of her undergraduate degree, she completed 3 co-op rotations at BMW Manufacturing. She is currently pursuing an M.S. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh under the advisory of Dr. Gregory Reed. While holding an intern role at Eaton, she is also President and founder of a new IEEE Power & Energy Society student branch chapter at Pitt and holds a position on the Student Innovation Board for a DOE Consortium program known as FEEDER.

SPEAKERS Joseph Petti – Dominion Energy Engineer II, System Protection Dominion Energy’s Usage of RTDS HIL Technology to Strengthen their Grid Abstract Dominion Energy’s grid is constantly changing with the high penetration of solar, and soon to be wind, in the state of Virginia. Dominion responds by hardening its grid with new technology and protection schemes.

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

In order to assure performance for their customers, Dominion must constantly test these new technologies and ideas. RTDS HIL technology gives Dominion Engineers a software platform to construct its grid and generate real world secondary values to test their protection relays. This talk will detail multiple experiments conducted by Dominion engineers that have allowed technology to be put into practice on their grid. Biography Joseph Petti graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a BS and MS in electrical engineering. He attended many EPIC conferences as a student, presenting in the student poster session many of you attended today. He now works at Dominion Energy in the Distribution System Protection Engineering group. His work entails analyzing distribution networks, and the changes caused by DERs, to ensure proper protection of the grid.

Masoud Barati, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor, Swanson School of Engineering A Suite of Joint Real-time Fault Localization and Optimal Remote Fault Indicator Placement in Power Distribution – Feeders through Deep Convolutional Neural Networks Abstract Different classical fault types, fast re-closures, confused faults like high impedance faults, and unreachable feeders (ungrounded cables) in distribution grids, as well as complicated transient states after a fault event, make real-time fault location in distribution feeder challenging.


The state-of-the-art fault localization techniques rely on simplistic assumptions, such as static loads, or require much higher sampling rates or total measurement availability with more focus on the bulk power system. This talk proposes a distribution faulted feeder localization method based on a Deep Convolutional Neural Network (ConvNet) classifier using node voltages. Unlike prior data-driven methods, the proposed classifier is based on features with physical interpretations that improve the robustness of the fault location performance. The efficiency of our ConvNet based localization tool is demonstrably superior to other conventional classifiers in the literature. To further improve the fault location performance, a joint Remote Fault Indicator (RFI) placement strategy is proposed and validated against other methods. A significant aspect of our methodology is that under very low observability, the algorithm is still able to localize the faulted line to a small neighborhood with high probability. The performance of our scheme is validated through simulations of faults of various types in the IEEE Distribution Test Feeders 37-bus Feeder and 123- bus Feeder under varying uncertain conditions, system observability, and measurement attribute. Biography Dr. Masoud Barati is Assistant Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Pittsburgh. Prof. Barati received his PhD degree in Electrical Engineering from Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, in 2013. Prior to joining Pitt, he was Assistant Professor at University of Houston and Louisiana State University. He is an IEEE senior member. His research interests include developing optimization and mathematical model and algorithms for smart grid and microgrids, power distribution management, deep learning applications, wide area monitoring and resiliency quantification and rapid recovery assessment in power system.

Elizabeth Cook – Duquesne Light Company Senior Manager, System Planning Embed Public and Private Clouds into Machine Learning Algorithms for Reconstructing Grid-Edge Topologies for Renewable Integration Abstract While bringing benefits, ongoing deployment of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) causes significant opportunities to the electric utility industry, especially in the distribution grid. This calls for closer monitoring to be able to operate, plan, and maintain the distribution grid, where an accurate and real-time topology identification is the basis. Past methods are either based on maps or ideal assumption of

an isolated sub network. To solve these problems and other issues on limited measurements and un-scalable algorithms, this presentation proposes hierarchical solutions to combine theoretic analysis, practical challenges, and Geographical Information System (GIS) information to resolve topology reconstruction problems. Preliminary results show highly accurate reconstruction accuracy and fast speed, opening the door for monitoring and control in the secondary distribution grids. Biograhy Elizabeth Cook received her BS degree in electrical engineering from University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA; her MS in electrical engineering from Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS; and is currently a doctoral student in electrical and computer engineering at the University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA. After finishing her BS in 2004, she joined Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc., (MEPPI) as a Power System Studies Engineer for 12 years. In 2016, Elizabeth joined Duquesne Light as the Senior Manager of Transmission and Distribution Planning. She manages and leads the efforts of the transmission planning, distribution planning, and distribution energy resources (DER) interconnection team.

Amy Babay, PhD – University of Pittsburgh Assistant Professor, School of Computing and Information (SCI) Spire: Intrusion-Tolerant SCADA for the Power Grid Abstract As SCADA systems move to use IP networks to take advantage of their cost benefits and implement smart-grid capabilities, the traditional assumptions that these systems are air-gapped and inaccessible to outside attackers no longer hold. While modern fault-tolerant SCADA architectures provide sufficient resilience to overcome benign failures, they are not adequate to cope with the hostile environments that SCADA systems are now being exposed to. To address this problem, we introduce Spire, the first SCADA system for the power grid that is resilient to both system-level compromises, in which an attacker gains control of part of the system, and sophisticated network-level attacks and compromises. In this talk, I will describe our experience developing the Spire system and the intrusion-tolerance techniques that it uses to maintain correct operation and guaranteed performance even while subject to a successful attack. I will also describe lessons learned from two deployment experiences with the system: a red team experiment conducted at Pacific Northwest National Lab in 2017, and a test deployment with the Hawaiian Electric Company in 2018.

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Biography Dr. Amy Babay is an assistant professor in the School of Computing and Information at the University of Pittsburgh. Her research interests are in distributed systems and networking, with a focus on building dependable critical infrastructure systems. Dr. Babay received her PhD (2018) and MSE (2014) in Computer Science and her BA (2012) in Cognitive Science, all from Johns Hopkins University.

Shailesh Vora, PhD – National Energy Technology Laboratory Technology Manager, Fuel Cell Program Overview of U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program Abstract The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Fossil Energy (FE), through the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is leading the R&D of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) technology. The mission of the SOFC program is to enable the generation of efficient, low-cost electricity through natural gas-fueled distributed generation (DG) systems in the near-term and coal or natural gas-fueled utility-scale systems with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) in the long-term. The program supports R&D that addresses the technical and economic barriers to commercial viability, and the development of prototype SOFC power systems that validate those solutions. The program is a unique balance of strategically oriented research and development activities spanning fundamental research to prototype testing. The accomplishments of these activities, along with the status of an on-going 200 kWe grid connected prototype system test in Pittsburgh will be presented. Biograohy Shailesh D. Vora is Technology Manager for the Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program at the National Energy Technology Laboratory. He provides programmatic and technology leadership for DOE’s Office of Fossil Energy’s Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Program. He has also served as Technology Manager for Carbon Capture, Advanced Combustion Systems, and Rare Earth Elements programs. He received his MS (1985) and PhD (1990) in Materials Science and Engineering from the University of Florida, and an MBA (1997) from the University of Pittsburgh.

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University of Pittsburgh | Swanson School of Engineering

RECEPTION AND EXHIBITS Raceway at the Energy Innovation Center throughout the Day Exhibitors Pitt Entities (Online Learning, Center for Energy, Office of Technology Management), Sargent Electric, Duquesne Light Company, Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Premier Automation, Eaton, Measurement Instruments, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Penn Power Systems and Northeast Energy Systems


Notes


Notes


Thank you for attending the Electric Power Industry Conference


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Electric Power Industry Conference

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Profile for PITT | SWANSON School of Engineering

2019 Electric Power Industry Conference Program  

2019 Electric Power Industry Conference Program