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Festival Introduction by Mary E. Davis ......................................2 Festival Calendar ..............................................................................5 Sponsors ..............................................................................................7 Partners................................................................................................9

April 27, 28 & 29: Program............................................................17 April 27, 28 & 29: Events & Program Notes ..............................18 May 3: Program ..............................................................................25 May 4 & 5: Program........................................................................27 May 4 & 5: Events & Program Notes ..........................................28 It is the mission of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra to provide musical experiences at the highest level of expression to enrich the community and satisfy the needs and preferences of our audiences. We will achieve this mission by working together to support an internationally recognized orchestra and by ensuring a viable long-term financial future; a fulfilling environment for our orchestra, staff, volunteers; and the unsurpassed satisfaction of our customers. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra performances are brought to the community in part by generous support from the Allegheny Regional Asset District and corporations, foundations and individuals throughout our community. The PSO receives additional funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and an award from the National Endowment for the Arts. Art Works.

May 6: Program ..............................................................................39 May 11 & 13: Program....................................................................41 May 11 & 13: Events & Program Notes ......................................42 May 12: Program ............................................................................49 Biographies (alphabetically) ............................................................52

Annual Fund Donors: Individuals..............................................71 Foundations & Public Agencies ..................................................79 Corporations .................................................................................. 80 Legacy of Excellence: Steinberg Society ....................................82 Legacy of Excellence: Sid Kaplan Tribute Program ................83

Radio station WQED-FM 89.3 and WQEJ-FM 89.7 is the official voice of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Tune in Sundays at 8 p.m. for “Pittsburgh Symphony Radio” concert broadcasts hosted by Jim Cunningham. TO ADVERTISE IN THE PROGRAM, CONTACT: Elaine Nucci at 412.471.6087, or email: nucci@culturaldistrict.org

Legacy of Excellence: Endowed Chairs ....................................83 Commitment to Excellence Campaign ..........................................84

Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Musicians ..............................6 Board of Trustees & Chairman’s Council ....................................8 Jack Heinz Society ..........................................................................10 New Leadership Board..................................................................10 Pittsburgh Symphony Association..............................................10 Friends of the PSO ..........................................................................10 Administrative Staff........................................................................12 Heinz Hall Information & FAQ ..................................................88

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ARIS IN the city crackled with life, much of it centered in the activity of the great Universal Exposition, which stretched along the banks of the Seine and up the Champs de Mars across the heart of the city. A centenary commemoration of the Revolution, this world’s fair lasted from April to November, anticipating the new century with unprecedented displays of innovative work in fields ranging from technology and sciences to art and architecture. The Eiffel Tower, constructed specially for the event, served as the main entrance archway, and other highlights included a massive gallery devoted to the latest machinery and a seemingly endless number of pavilions built to showcase the culture and contributions of civilizations around the globe – notably those that were colonial outposts of France. Music was an essential part of the celebration: popular waltzes wafted across the lawns, American marches were performed by military bands on the fairground, and Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov conducted concerts of contemporary Russian compositions alongside performances of the country’s folk music. French composers who frequented the Exposition absorbed these sounds, along with the spectacle of music and dance from Java, Vietnam, Africa and the Near East, and many emerged with new ideas about just how Paris could become the center of musical modernism. Claude Debussy was one leader of the charge. Already immersed in the progressive French literary scene by the time of the Exposition, he found further inspiration for a modern sound in the unconventional rhythms, non-western melodies, and innovative forms that characterized the music he heard at the Exposition. His musical “illustration” of French Symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé’s Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun, which had its premiere in 1894, brought these elements together in radical ways, challenging audiences with its whole-tone and modal melodies and fluid rhythms. Meant to evoke the antique world of Mallarmé’s “ecologue,” these unusual sounds led one critic to grouse “such pieces are amusing to write, but not at all to listen to.” A critical success in spite of such dismissals, Debussy’s Faun had an even greater later life in the repertoire of Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, whose 1913 production of the work – choreographed by Vaslav Nijinsky, who also danced the lead role – created a scandal because of its overt eroticism. In Ibéria, composed between 1905-1908 as one of three Images for orchestra, Debussy likewise featured non-tonal melodies and rhythms, this time to suggest his impressions of Spain. Though he spent only a single afternoon in that country, his knowledge of its music ran deep thanks to study of Spanish folksong and immersion in works by his friends

P

1889:

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Isaac Albéniz and Manuel de Falla, who were both living in Paris in the early years of the century. Falla’s Three-Cornered Hat, commissioned by Diaghilev and premiered by his Ballets Russes in 1919, is based on an old Spanish folktale; the composition draws heavily on Andalusian folk music for its material. Spain also had a powerful hold on the imagination of Maurice Ravel, whose Boléro evolved from dancer Ida Rubinstein’s request that the composer orchestrate selections from Albéniz’s Ibéria for her use. In the end, Ravel opted to write a new piece instead, basing his work on the 18th-century Spanish dance known as the bolero, in which slow rhythms and triple meter create a hypnotic and graceful effect. Boléro stands as Ravel’s most popular composition, but his Piano Concerto in G major follows close behind; completed in 1931, this work reflects Ravel’s deep interest in invigorating the traditional concerto format with the melodies and harmonies of contemporary American jazz. The same impulse animated George Gershwin’s classic orchestral portrait, An American in Paris, premiered in 1928, which in the composer’s words aims to evoke the French capital as seen through the eyes of an outsider as he “strolls about the city, listens to the various street noises, and absorbs the French atmosphere.” Honking horns and the sound of the blues bring a kind of realism to this modern tone poem, which inspired the classic 1951 film of the same name, with Gene Kelly in the starring role. Russian music found its representative in Igor Stravinsky, who arrived in Paris with Diaghilev in 1910 for performances of his ballet The Firebird. His next major work for the Ballets Russes, Pétrouchka, premiered the following year to great acclaim, and Stravinsky was launched in France. Based on a Russian version of the commedia dell’arte – the timeless Italian comedy featuring the stock characters Pulcinella, Harlequin and Colombine – Pétrouchka presented Parisian audiences with a familiar narrative, but matched this with strange new musical language that made Russian folk tunes a foundation for a challenging, non-tonal musical idiom. With sets and costumes by Alexandre Benois, choreography by Michel Fokine, and Nijinsky in the title role, the work mined the past to suggest the future. The Paris Festival showcases these global interests of composers working in France in the early part of the 20th century, and reveals the ways in which various musical influences encountered at the 1889 Exposition – American, Eastern, Spanish, Russian – continued to resonate in their works long after the fairground was dismantled. Like the Eiffel Tower, which was intended to last only for the months of the event but became a permanent symbol of the nation, the sounds of the world that were heard at the fair remained a potent force in the shaping of a new and vibrant modernism that we still recognize today as essentially and inherently French.

MARY E. DAVIS

PROFESSOR OF MUSICOLOGY, CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

pittsburghsymphony.org 3


The Arts Open Our Minds. Every performance reminds us that you are one of our community’s most valued natural resources.

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APRIL

WINE TASTING AT ELEMENTS CONTEMPORARY CUISINE

APRIL

PSO BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS PERFORMANCE: THE MAGIC OF PARIS AT HEINZ HALL includes pre-concert

27

27-29

lecture, film screening and post-concert performance

MAY

FREE! FILM SCREENING: LA PASSION BOLÉRO AT HARRIS THEATER

MAY

WINE TASTING AT ELEMENTS CONTEMPORARY CUISINE

MAY

PSO PERFORMANCE: DEBUSSY & RAVEL’S BOLERO AT HEINZ HALL includes pre-concert lecture, film screening, wine & free French food

3

4

4&5

tasting and post-concert performance

MAY

FREE! PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PERFORMANCE AT HEINZ HALL

MAY

RENOWNED ORGANIST PAUL JACOBS IN RECITAL AT HEINZ CHAPEL

MAY

WINE TASTING AT ELEMENTS CONTEMPORARY CUISINE

5

6 11

MAY

1 1 & 13

PSO BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS PERFORMANCE: AN AMERICAN IN PARIS AT HEINZ HALL includes pre-concert lecture, film screening and post-concert festival after-party on May 11 with live music, free refreshments and cash bar

MAY

12

THE ART AND MUSIC OF AVANT-GARDE PARIS AT CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART & CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL

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2011-2012 SEASON SECOND VIOLIN

Jennifer Ross j

G. CHRISTIAN LANTZSCH & DUQUESNE LIGHT COMPANY CHAIR

Louis Lev

d

THE MORRISON FAMILY CHAIR

MUSIC DIRECTOR

Manfred Honeck

ENDOWED BY THE VIRA I. HEINZ ENDOWMENT

PRINCIPAL POPS CONDUCTOR

Marvin Hamlisch

ENDOWED BY HENRY AND ELSIE HILLMAN

PRINCIPAL GUEST CONDUCTOR

Leonard Slatkin

VICTOR deSABATA GUEST CONDUCTOR CHAIR

Gianandrea Noseda

RESIDENT CONDUCTOR

Lawrence Loh

VIRGINIA KAUFMAN RESIDENT CONDUCTOR CHAIR

ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR

Thomas Hong FIRST VIOLIN

Noah Bendix-Balgley CONCERTMASTER RACHEL MELLON WALTON CONCERTMASTER CHAIR

Mark Huggins

ASSOCIATE CONCERTMASTER BEVERLYNN & STEVEN ELLIOTT CHAIR

Huei-Sheng Kao ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER

Hong-Guang Jia ASSISTANT CONCERTMASTER

Jeremy Black Ellen Chen-Livingston Irene Cheng Sarah Clendenning Alison Peters Fujito David Gillis

SELMA WIENER BERKMAN MEMORIAL CHAIR

Sylvia Kim Jennifer Orchard

RON & DOROTHY CHUTZ CHAIR

Susanne Park Christopher Wu

NANCY & JEFFERY LEININGER CHAIR

Shanshan Yao

THE ESTATE OF OLGA T. GAZALIE

Kristina Yoder

Dennis O’Boyle x Michael Davis 1 Carolyn Edwards Linda Fischer Lorien Benet Hart Claudia Mahave Laura Motchalov Peter Snitkovsky Albert Tan Yuko Uchiyama Rui-Tong Wang VIOLA

Randolph Kelly j CYNTHIA S. CALHOUN CHAIR

Tatjana Mead Chamis d Joen Vasquez x Marylène Gingras-Roy Penny Anderson Brill Cynthia Busch Erina Laraby-Goldwasser Paul Silver

MR. & MRS.WILLARD J.TILLOTSON, JR. CHAIR

Stephanie Tretick Meng Wang Andrew Wickesberg CELLO

Robert Lauver

Peter Guild Micah Howard

STEPHEN & KIMBERLY KEEN CHAIR

John Moore Aaron White

Adam Liu x

GEORGE & EILEEN DORMAN CHAIR

Mikhail Istomin Irvin Kauffman u Gail Czajkowski Michael Lipman JANE & RAE BURTON CHAIR

Louis Lowenstein Hampton Mallory

CARYL & IRVING HALPERN CHAIR

Lauren Scott Mallory

MR. & MRS. MARTIN G. MCGUINN CHAIR

J. Ryan Murphy OTPAAM FELLOW

1

Charlotta Klein Ross BASS

Jeffrey Turner j TOM & DONA HOTOPP CHAIR

Donald H. Evans, Jr. d Betsy Heston x Ronald Cantelm Jeffrey Grubbs

HARP

Gretchen Van Hoesen j VIRGINIA CAMPBELL CHAIR

FLUTE

Lorna McGhee j

JACKMAN PFOUTS FLUTE CHAIR

Damian Bursill-Hall h Jennifer Conner HILDA M.WILLIS FOUNDATION CHAIR

PICCOLO

Rhian Kenny j

MICHAEL & CAROL BLEIER CHAIR

Joseph Rounds TRUMPET

George Vosburgh j MARTHA BROOKS ROBINSON CHAIR

Charles Lirette h EDWARD D. LOUGHNEY CHAIR

Neal Berntsen Chad Winkler

SUSAN S. GREER MEMORIAL CHAIR

TROMBONE

Peter Sullivan j TOM & JAMEE TODD CHAIR

FRANK AND LOTI GAFFNEY CHAIR

OBOE

Rebecca Cherian h James Nova BASS TROMBONE

Cynthia Koledo DeAlmeida j

DR.WILLIAM LARIMER MELLON, JR. CHAIR

James Gorton h

MILDRED S. MYERS & WILLIAM C. FREDERICK CHAIR

Scott Bell

Murray Crewe j TUBA

Craig Knox j

MR. & MRS.WILLIAM E. RINEHART CHAIR

TIMPANI

Harold Smoliar

BARBARA WELDON PRINCIPAL TIMPANI CHAIR

ENGLISH HORN

j

JOHANNES & MONA L. COETZEE MEMORIAL CHAIR

CLARINET

E-FLAT CLARINET

Thomas Thompson BASS CLARINET

Richard Page j BASSOON

Nancy Goeres j

MR. & MRS.WILLIAM GENGE AND MR. & MRS. JAMES E. LEE CHAIR

David Sogg h Philip A. Pandolfi

CONTRABASSOON

James Rodgers j HORN

William Caballero j ANONYMOUS DONOR CHAIR

Stephen Kostyniak d Zachary Smith x

THOMAS H. & FRANCES M.WITMER CHAIR

SPECIAL THANKS TO THE PERRY & BEE JEE MORRISON STRING INSTRUMENT LOAN FUND

6 pittsburghsymphony.org

Ronald Schneider

REED SMITH CHAIR HONORING TOM TODD

Rusinek j Anne Martindale Williams j Michael MR. & MRS. AARON SILBERMAN CHAIR PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ASSOCIATION CHAIR Thomas Thompson h David Premo d Ron Samuels DONALD I. & JANET MORITZ AND EQUITABLE RESOURCES, INC. CHAIR

IRVING (BUDDY) WECHSLER CHAIR

Edward Stephan j Christopher Allen d JAMES W. & ERIN M. RIMMEL CHAIR

PERCUSSION

Andrew Reamer j ALBERT H. ECKERT CHAIR

Jeremy Branson d Christopher Allen

JAMES W. & ERIN M. RIMMEL CHAIR

FRETTED INSTRUMENTS

Irvin Kauffman j LIBRARIANS

Joann Ferrell Vosburgh j JEAN & SIGO FALK CHAIR

Lisa Gedris

STAGE TECHNICIANS

Ronald Esposito John Karapandi OPEN CHAIRS

WILLIAM & SARAH GALBRAITH FIRST VIOLIN CHAIR

MR. & MRS. BENJAMIN F. JONES III KEYBOARD CHAIR

j h d x u 1

PRINCIPAL CO-PRINCIPAL ASSOCIATE PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL ASSISTANT PRINCIPAL LAUREATE ONE YEAR POSITION


sponsors header

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra thanks the following Paris Festival sponsors: THE PARIS FESTIVAL IS MADE POSSIBLE, IN PART, BY

THE GAILLIOTS

THE JACK BUNCHER

FOUNDATION

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS TITLE SPONSOR

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

pittsburghsymphony.org 7


2011-2012 SEASON

Richard P.Simmons CHAIRMAN

Beverlynn Elliott VICE CHAIR

Richard J.Johnson VICE CHAIR

James A.Wilkinson PRESIDENT & CEO

Jeffery L.Leininger SECRETARY & TREASURER

Joan Apt Benno A.Bernt Constance Bernt Michael E.Bleier Diana Block Theodore N.Bobby Donald W.Borneman Larry T.Brockway Michael A.Bryson Bernita Buncher Rae R.Burton Ronald E.Chutz Charles C.Cohen Estelle F.Comay Basil M.Cox L.Van V.Dauler,Jr. David W.Christopher Mrs.Frank J.Gaffney Mrs.Henry J.Heinz,II Annabelle Clippinger CHAIR, NEW LEADERSHIP BOARD

Jared L.Cohon,Ph.D.

PRESIDENT, CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY

Diana Block

PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE

Ronald E. Chutz MODERN TRANSPORTATION

Kimberly Fleming HEFREN-TILLOTSON

Richard J. Harshman ATI

J. Brett Harvey CONSOL ENERGY, INC.

8 pittsburghsymphony.org

Larry T.Brockway

CORPORATE LEADERSHIP TEAM

Michael A.Bryson FINANCE COMMITTEE

Rae R.Burton AUDIT COMMITTEE

L.Van V.Dauler,Jr. PARTNERSHIP COMMITTEE

Donald W.Borneman INVESTMENT COMMITTEE

Roy G.Dorrance,III

Beverlynn Elliott

Deborah L.Rice

Thomas B.Hotopp

JACK HEINZ SOCIETY

MAJOR GIFTS COMMITTEE**, TOUR FUNDING TASK FORCE

EDUCATION AND COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT COMMITTEE

Barbara Jeremiah ARTISTIC COMMITTEE

Jeffery L.Leininger MAJOR GIFTS COMMITTEE**

Alicia McGinnis

MARKETING COMMITTEE

James W.Rimmel Thomas Todd

GOVERNANCE COMMITTEE

Helge H.Wehmeier

INTERNATIONAL ADVISORY TASK FORCE

Rachel Wymard DIVERSITY COMMITTEE

PATRON DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

**co-chair

HEINZ HALL COMMITTEE

Mildred S.Myers

Robert C.Denove William S.Dietrich* Roy G.Dorrance,III Albert H.Eckert Beverlynn Elliott Sigo Falk Terri Fitzpatrick Elizabeth H.Genter Ira H.Gordon Peter S.Greer Ira J.Gumberg Caryl A.Halpern John H.Hill  Thomas B.Hotopp Barbara Jeremiah Richard J.Johnson J.Craig Jordan

Robert W.Kampmeinert Clifford E.Kress Jeffery L.Leininger David McCormish Robert W.McCutcheon Alicia McGinnis Devin B.McGranahan BeeJee Morrison Mildred S.Myers Elliott Oshry John R.Price Richard E.Rauh Deborah L.Rice James W.Rimmel Frank Brooks Robinson,Sr. Steven T.Schlotterbeck David S.Shapira

Max W.Starks,IV James E.Steen Craig A.Tillotson Jane Treherne-Thomas Jon D.Walton Helge H.Wehmeier Michael J.White,M.D. James A.Wilkinson Thomas H.Witmer Rachel Wymard Robert Zinn

Mrs.Henry L.Hillman James E.Lee Edward D.Loughney*

Howard M.Love* Donald I.Moritz David M.Roderick

Richard P.Simmons Thomas Todd

Gregory G.Dell'Omo,Ph.D.

Joseph Rounds ORCHESTRA MEMBER,PSO

The Honorable Rich Fitzgerald

PRESIDENT,POINT PARK UNIVERSITY

PRESIDENT, PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ASSOCIATION

CHAIR,FRIENDS OF THE PSO

PRESIDENT,ROBERT MORRIS UNIVERSITY

Paul Hennigan,Ed.D. Harold Smoliar ORCHESTRA MEMBER,PSO

PUBLIC AFFAIRS COMMITTEE

Alexandra Kusic

distinguished emeritus *deceased

*deceased

CHIEF EXECUTIVE,ALLEGHENY COUNTY

Kathleen Maskalick

David Iwinski

Christopher Pike

David Shapira

THE HILLMAN COMPANY

EQT

CALGON CARBON

BLUE WATER GROWTH LLC

Eric Johnson

Gregory Jordan REED SMITH

Stephen Klemash ERNST & YOUNG

Morgan O'Brien PEOPLES NATURAL GAS CO.

KDKA / UPN PITTSBURGH

David L. Porges James Rohr PNC BANK

Arthur Rooney, II

PITTSBURGH STEELER SPORTS, INC.

John T. Ryan

MINE SAFETY APPLIANCES

GIANT EAGLE, INC.

John S. Stanik John Surma

US STEEL CORPORATION


partners header

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra thanks the following Paris Festival partners: PARIS FESTIVAL MEDIA PARTNERS

PARIS FESTIVAL MARKETING PARTNERS

Brasserie 33 Café Des Amis Jean-Marc Chatellier’s French Bakery La Gourmandine L'Occitane - Shadyside Paris 66 PARIS FESTIVAL AMBASSADOR COMMITTEE CO-CHAIRS

Jean-Dominque Le Garrec Honorary Consul of France

Barbara MacQuown Tucker President, Alliance Française

PARIS FESTIVAL AMBASSADOR COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Roger Adam Joe Barack Linda Blum Christine Bok Erin Bond David Bush Margaret Carlson Isabelle Chartier Jean-Pierre Collet Cynthia Cooley

Nicole Currivan Cecile DesandreNavarre Eileen Flynn Karen Fullmer Leah Gally Julia Gleason Melanie Linn Gutowski Maria Harrington Patricia Heinle

Dawn Hluhan Luis Ibarra Colleen Kalchthaler Janet Konig David Kremen Michal Lesnoski Rémy Maréchal Elisabeth Milton Weis Yevgeniya Monisova Bryan Mullins

Seth Pearlman Eileen Rosenberg Carol Rotruck Judith Shuster Mary Sommerfeld David Taylor Ann Toth Melanie Werner Victoria Woshner Edward J. Zwolak

Current as of April 20, 2012. Visit pittsburghsymphony.org/parispartners for the most current listing. pittsburghsymphony.org 9


2011-2012 SEASON CHAIRMAN

James W. Rimmel

MEMBERS

Todd Izzo Rodrick O. McMahon Gerald Lee Morosco Abby L. Morrison Gabriel Pellathy Victoria Rhoades-Carrero

Barbara A. Scheib William Scherlis James Slater John A.Thompson Rachel M.Wymard

UNIVERSITY RELATIONS CHAIR

MEMBERS

Andrew Swensen Rev. Debra Thompson

Bernie S. Annor Jensina Chutz Jeffrey J. Conn Gavin H. Geraci Robert F. Hoyt

CHAIRMAN

Daniel Pennell

Annabelle Clippinger

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES CHAIR

VICE CHAIRMAN

Lynn Broman

Elizabeth Etter

EDUCATION & OUTREACH CHAIR

SECRETARY

Ronald Smutny

Elizabeth Etter

TREASURER

Alexis Unkovic McKinley MEMBERSHIP CHAIR

Janice Jeletic

PRESIDENT

Alexandra Kusic

VICE PRESIDENT FINANCE

Margaret Bovbjerg

PRESIDENT ELECT

VICE PRESIDENT OF FUND DEVELOPMENT

EX-OFFICIO PRESIDENT

BOUTIQUE CHAIRS

Margaret Bovbjerg Linda Stengel

SECRETARY AND PARLIAMENTARIAN

Cheryl Redmond

NOMINATING CHAIR

Linda Stengel

VICE PRESIDENTS OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT

Doris Cope, M.D. Reshma Paranjpe, M.D. VICE PRESIDENT COMMUNICATIONS

Cissy Rebich NEWSLETTER

Peg Fitchwell-Hill VICE PRESIDENT EDUCATION

Gillian Cannell

MUSIC 101 CHAIR

Susie Prentiss

MIllie Ryan

Linda Stengel Michele Talarico

FINE INSTRUMENT FUND CHAIR

Chris Thompson

VICE PRESIDENTS MEMBERSHIP

Jennifer Martin Carolyn Maue

VICE PRESIDENT EVENTS

Francesca Peters

FALL ANNUAL MEETING/LUNCHEON CHAIRS

Fran Peters Alex Kusic

HOLIDAY LUNCHEON CHAIRS

Bernie S. Annor Cynthia DeAlmeida Antonia Franzinger Alice Gelormino Susan Johnson David Knapp Dawn Kosanovich James Malezi Bridget Meacham Lily Pietryka SPRING LUNCHEON CHAIRS

Jan Chadwick Susie Prentiss Patty Snodgrass

PSA NIGHT AT THE SYMPHONY CHAIRS

Doris Cope, M.D. Reshma Paranjpe, M.D.

ORCHESTRA APPRECIATION CHAIRS

Millie Ryan Frances Pickard Chris Thompson

AFFILIATES' DAY CHAIRS

Mary Ann Craig Cheryl Redmond

AFFILIATE LEADERSHIP COUNCIL SYMPHONY NORTH PRESIDENT

ClareMARKETING Hoke PARTNERS SYMPHONY EAST PRESIDENT

Robert Kemper

Frances Pickard Thea Stover Mary Lloyd Thompson

CO-CHAIRS

Kathy & David Maskalick FOUNDING CHAIRS

Connie & Benno Bernt 10 pittsburghsymphony.org

Linda Blum Cynthia & Bill Cooley Stephanie & Albert Firtko Millie Myers & Bill Frederick Andy & Sherry Klein Joan & Cliff Schoff

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT FRIENDS OF THE PSO MEMBERSHIP, CALL 724-935-0507

FOR INFORMATION ABOUT NLB MEMBERSHIP, CALL THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA AT 412.392.4865

HONORARY DIRECTORS

Joan Apt Grace M. Compton* Betty Flecker Caryl A. Halpern Drue Heinz Elsie Hillman Jane S. Oehmler* Sandra H. Pesavento Janet Shoop Kathy Kahn Stept Jane C.Vandermade Elizabeth B.Wiegand Joan A. Zapp *Deceased FOR INFORMATION ABOUT PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP,

PSA@PITTSBURGHSYMPHONY.ORG OR CALL 412-392-3303


2011-2012 SEASON

PRESIDENT & CEO

James A.Wilkinson

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT & COO

Michael E. Bielski

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF EDUCATION & STRATEGIC IMPLEMENTATION

Suzanne Perrino

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF FINANCE & CFO

Scott Michael

VICE PRESIDENT OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS

James R. Barthen

VICE PRESIDENT OF AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT & SALES

Yu-Ling Cheng

VICE PRESIDENT OF HEINZ HALL

Carl A. Mancuso

VICE PRESIDENT, DONOR RELATIONS

Mary Ellen Miller

SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT OF ARTISTIC PLANNING & AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT

Robert B. Moir

GENERAL MANAGER & VICE PRESIDENT OF ORCHESTRA OPERATIONS

Marcie Solomon

ASSOCIATE VICE PRESIDENT OF DONOR RELATIONS & DIRECTOR OF THE MAJOR CAMPAIGN

Jodi Weisfield

ADMINISTRATION

Dawn Sechrist

SECRETARY TO THE BOARD/FINANCE & MUSIC DIRECTOR ASSISTANT

Lisa G. Donnermeyer

MANAGING ASSISTANT TO THE PRESIDENT

ARTISTIC PLANNING & AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT

Yonca Karakilic

MANAGER OF ARTISTIC PLANNING, AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT & FESTIVALS

Erik Thogerson

MANAGER OF ARTISTIC PLANNING & AUDIENCE ENGAGEMENT

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT & SALES

Sally Denmead SALES MANAGER

Jim D. Deuchars

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SALES

Claire Ertl

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING

Trish Imbrogno

DONOR RELATIONS & MAJOR CAMPAIGN

Susan M. Jenny

INSTITUTIONAL ANNUAL FUND MANAGER

STAGE TECHNICAL DIRECTOR

Katie Andary

Jennifer Birnie

INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT COORDINATOR

Shannon Capellupo DIRECTOR OF SPECIAL EVENTS

Jan Fleisher

MAJOR GIFTS OFFICER

Lizz Helmsen

DIRECTOR OF CORPORATE & PARTNERSHIP SUPPORT

Lisa Herring

MANAGER OF SPECIAL EVENTS

Alfred O. Jacobsen SPONSORSHIP MANAGER

Kimberly Mauersberg MAJOR GIFTS OFFICER

Lori J. McCann

INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT MANAGER

Tracey Nath-Farrar MANAGER OF FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

Camilla Brent Pearce

DIRECTOR OF INDIVIDUAL SUPPORT

Brian Skwirut

DIRECTOR OF FOUNDATION & GOVERNMENT SUPPORT

Lauren Vermilion

MAJOR CAMPAIGN COORDINATOR

Jessica D.Wolfe DATA COORDINATOR

EDUCATION & COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Lisa Hoak

DIRECTOR OF EDUCATION PROGRAMS

Gloria Mou

MANAGER OF EDUCATION & COMMUNITY PROGRAMS

FINANCE, INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY & EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

T.C. Brown

ANNUITY DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR

Kevin DeLuca

Robbin Nelson MAINTENANCE

James E. Petri STAGE TECHNICIAN

Mary Sedigas

MAINTENANCE STAFF SUPERVISOR

William Weaver STAGE TECHNICIAN

Stacy Weber

CENTRAL SCHEDULING MANAGER

Eric Wiltfeuer ENGINEER

ORCHESTRA OPERATIONS

Ronald Esposito STAGE TECHNICIAN

Shelly Stannard Fuerte

DIRECTOR OF POPULAR PROGRAMMING

Kelvin Hill

ORCHESTRA PERSONNEL MANAGER

Rachel Joseph

MANAGER OF POPULAR PROGRAMMING

John Karapandi STAGE TECHNICIAN

Sonja Winkler

DIRECTOR OF ORCHESTRA OPERATIONS & TOURING

PATRON SERVICES

Shannon Kensky

PATRON SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Aleta King

DIRECTOR OF PATRON SERVICES

Victoria Maize

PATRON SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Jennifer McDonough

PATRON SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Andrew Seay

PATRON SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Cody Sweet

PATRON SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

PUBLIC AFFAIRS

CONTROLLER

DIRECTOR OF IMAGE

Sena Mills

Eric Quinlan

CASH MANAGEMENT ACCOUNTANT

Fidele Niyonzigira SYSTEMS ADMINISTRATOR

Chrissy Savinell MULTIMEDIA MANAGER

GROUP SALES

Elise Clark

GROUP SALES COORDINATOR

Erin Lynn

DIRECTOR OF GROUP SALES

HEINZ HALL

MARKETING MANAGER

ENGINEER

Kevin Berwick

Mark Cieslewicz CHIEF ENGINEER

Raymond Clover SOUND TECHNICIAN

Richard Crawford MAINTENANCE

12 pittsburghsymphony.org

Michael Karapandi

DIRECTOR OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF MARKETING & E-COMMERCE

Monica Meyer

BUILDING OPERATIONS MANAGER

Deborah Cavrak

Jessica Kaercher GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Tyler Kozar

GRAPHIC DESIGNER

Ramesh Santanam

DIRECTOR OF MEDIA RELATIONS

SUBSCRIBER & TICKETING SERVICES

Alison Altman

MANAGER OF SUBSCRIBER & TICKETING SERVICES

Stacy Corcoran

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF SUBSCRIBER & TICKETING SERVICES

Lori Cunningham

SUBSCRIBER & TICKETING SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE

Bill Van Ryn

SUBSCRIBER & TICKETING SERVICES REPRESENTATIVE


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Join Music Director Manfred Honeck and your PSO in a season of poignant, exhilarating and moving performances.

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Beethoven’s Symphony No. 7 Mozart’s Symphony No. 40

Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, “Ode to Joy”

Mussorgsky’s A Night on Bald Mountain

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program

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS | HEINZ HALL FRIDAY, APRIL 27 & SATURDAY, APRIL 28, 2012 AT 8:00 PM SUNDAY, APRIL 29, 2012 AT 2:30 PM

PRE-CONCERT Fri. & Sat., 6:45 pm & Sun., 1:15 pm

CONCERT PRELUDE ON STAGE: “A WINDOW INTO THE CITY OF LIGHT” WITH WQED’S JIM CUNNINGHAM

GIANANDREA NOSEDA,

CONDUCTOR

OTTORINO RESPIGHI

INTERMISSION

CINEMATHEQUE IN THE DOROTHY PORTER SIMMONS REGENCY ROOMS: EXCERPTS FROM PARIS THE LUMINOUS YEARS: TOWARDS THE MAKING OF THE MODERN

La Boutique Fantasque I. Overture II. Tarantella III. Mazurka IV. Danse cosaque V. Can Can VI. Valse lente VII. Nocturne VIII.Galop LOBBY EXHIBITS

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

“Ibéria,” No. 2 from Images

MANUEL DE FALLA

Suite No. 1 from The Three-Cornered Hat (Scenes and Dances)

MANUEL DE FALLA

Suite No. 2 from The Three-Cornered Hat (Three Dances)

I.

Par les rues et par les chemins (Through Streets and Lanes) II. Les parfums de la nuit (The Fragrances of the Night) III. Le matin d’un jour de fête (Morning of a Feast-Day)

I. II. III. IV.

Introduction — Afternoon Dance of the Miller’s Wife (Fandango) The Corregidor The Grapes

I. The Neighbor’s Dance II. The Miller’s Dance (Farruca) III. Final Dance

POST-CONCERT

L’AMOUR, LA VIE: DAPHNE SINGS PIAF IN THE GRAND LOBBY WITH VOCALIST DAPHNE ALDERSON ARTIST SIGNING WITH GIANANDREA NOSEDA

TITLE SPONSOR

PHOTOGRAPHY, AUDIO

Delta Air Lines is the Official Airline of the PSO &

VIDEO RECORDINGS OF THIS PERFORMANCE ARE STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

17


APRIL 27, 28 & 29, PRE & POST CONCERT EVENTS CONCERT PRELUDE: A Window into the City of Light with Jim Cunningham 6:45 pm (Friday & Saturday) and 1:15 pm (Sunday), on stage WQED-FM’s Jim Cunningham surveys the artistic life of Paris, La Ville-Lumière, in the early decades of the twentieth century and discusses the role of the city in galvanizing one of the greatest artistic revolutions of all time.

CINEMATHEQUE: Paris the Luminous Years: Toward the Making of the Modern (excerpts) Written, directed and produced by Perry Miller Adato, PBS Special, 2010 6:45 pm (Friday & Saturday) and 1:15 pm (Sunday), Dorothy Porter Simmons Regency Rooms In the early decades of the twentieth century, a storm of modernism swept through the art worlds of the West, uprooting centuries of tradition in the visual arts, music, literature, dance, theater and beyond. The epicenter of this storm was Paris, France. Paris The Luminous Years explores this unique moment in Paris from 1905 to 1930, decisive years for our contemporary culture, when an international group including Pablo Picasso, Henri Matisse, Marc Chagall, Igor Stravinsky, Ernest Hemingway, Jean Cocteau, Gertrude Stein, Vaslav Nijinsky and Aaron Copland, among numerous others, revolutionized the direction of the modern arts.

POST-CONCERT: L’Amour, La Vie: Daphne Sings Piaf Grand Lobby Daphne Alderson celebrates the life and times of Edith Piaf, one of the most mercurial artists of all time. Experience the poignant, passionate chansons in their original versions as toured by Piaf and her contemporaries following the PSO concert in the Grand Lobby. *DOORS OPEN ONE HOUR AND THIRTY MINUTES BEFORE ALL PARIS FESTIVAL PERFORMANCES AT HEINZ HALL. ALL PRE- AND POST-CONCERT EVENTS ARE FREE TO TICKETHOLDERS.

18 pittsburghsymphony.org


program notes

OTTORINO RESPIGHI

La Boutique Fantasque (1919) Ottorino Respighi had an abiding interest in the music of earlier times, and he demonstrated a particular fondness for his recent Italian predecessor Gioacchino Rossini, dead only a decade when Respighi was born in 1879. In 1919, for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes, Respighi arranged a ballet titled La ABOUT THE COMPOSER: Boutique Fantasque (“The Fantastic Toyshop”) from Born 9 July 1879 in Bologna; died the extensive miscellany of miniatures that Rossini 18 April 1936 in Rome concocted during his last years, a little-known body PREMIERE OF WORK: London, 5 June 1919 of work that is one of the most curious repertories in Alhambra Theater all of music. After dazzling Europe with no fewer Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes than 39 operas between 1808 and 1829, Rossini Leonid Massine, choreographer abruptly stopped composing at the hardly advanced THESE PERFORMANCES MARK THE PSO PREMIERE OF THE age of 37. Except for a little volume of vocal enterCOMPLETE BALLET ON A tainment pieces called Les Soirées Musicales jotted CLASSICAL SUBSCRIPTION down between about 1830 and 1835, he thereafter CONCERT retired completely from creative activity, traveling INSTRUMENTATION: extensively in Italy and France, and growing increaspiccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, two basingly alarmed about the deteriorating state of his soons, four horns, three trumpets, health. In 1855, he finally settled in Paris, and the three trombones, tuba, timpani, perfollowing summer was ordered by his French doccussion, celesta, harp and strings tors to seek relief at the baths in Wildbad, Kissingen APPROXIMATE DURATION: 43 minutes and Baden. The treatment succeeded, and he moved into a new apartment in central Paris in the autumn of 1856 with a renewed invigoration for life and work, though he maintained a strict daily regimen of walking, rest, dining and receiving visitors. The only variation in his schedule came on Saturday evenings, when he hosted one of the most popular salons in the city — invitations to his soirées samedi were among the most eagerly sought by artists and socialites from all over Europe. At his gathering of April 15, 1857, Rossini amazed the crowd by presenting to his devoted wife, Olympe, his first new composition in 22 years, a series of six different settings of a poem by Metastasio appropriately titled Musique Anodine (“Music to Soothe Pain”). From that date until he died 11 years later, Rossini again composed with real enjoyment, devising some 180 little pieces for solo piano and for various combinations of accompanied voices that he smilingly called his Péchés de Vieillesse — “Sins of My Old Age.” Though a tiny fraction of these musical transgressions are serious in tone (A Funeral Ode for Meyerbeer, A Deep Sleep, A Caress for My Wife), most are deliberately humorous or satirical or even grotesque in both title and content. There are, among many others, a whole series of pieces named for various desserts and hors-d’oeuvres, a tongue-in-cheek programmatic number about A Little Pleasure Trip in the Train (Rossini hated trains), a Little Castor Oil Waltz, An Abortive Polka and A Hygienic Prelude for Morning Use. These delicious morceaux were eagerly served to the guests at his Saturday soirées, but he refused to have them published, and after his death they were preserved in 13 manuscript volumes in the archive of his works in his PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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2011-2012 SEASON

native Pesaro. It was from the Pesaro collection that Respighi culled the material for La Boutique Fantasque. The ballet tells of a shop that trades in elaborate mechanical dolls in a Mediterranean resort town. Two vacationing families — one American, one Russian — are shown a variety of the shop’s amazing wares, each of which performs a characteristic dance (tarantella, cossack, mazurka, waltz, galop, etc.), but both families are taken with the same pair of can-can dancers, the shop owner’s favorite creations. It is agreed that each family will take one, and that they will return the next day to pick up their purchases. After the shop is shuttered that evening, the dolls lament the separation of the can-can dancers and hide them away. The Americans and Russians are furious that their dolls cannot be found when they return, and start to tear up the shop. The other dolls drive them off and bring the can-can dancers out of hiding, much to the delight of the shopkeeper, who not only gets to keep his prize toys but also the money of the departed customers.

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

“Ibéria,” No. 2 from Images (1905-1908) The year 1908 was a difficult one for Debussy — one of the succession of difficult years that comprised the last decade and a half of his life. The success of his only completed opera, Pelléas et Mélisande of 1902, had catapulted him into the public consciousness as an important musical personality, but the ABOUT THE COMPOSER: effect of that notoriety on Debussy was not as saluBorn 2 August 1862 in St. tary as might be expected. It meant that he could no Germain-en-Laye, near Paris; died 25 March 1918 in Paris longer play the reclusive bohemian, composing PREMIERE OF WORK: what he liked, when he liked. Fame increased the Paris, 20 February 1910 demand for both his music and his personal appearConcerts Colonne ances, and to fulfill the former, he undertook an Gabriel Pierné, conductor ambitious agreement with the publisher Jacques PSO PREMIERE: 4 November 1934 Durand that imposed heavy creative obligations on Syria Mosque him. Though Debussy frequently found Durand’s Antonio Modarelli, conductor demands difficult to meet, the works that he proINSTRUMENTATION: duced during the succeeding years were among the two piccolos, three flutes, two greatest to come from his pen — La Mer, Jeux, oboes, English horn, three clarinets, three bassoons, contrabassoon, four Images and most of the important piano composihorns, three trumpets, three tromtions. He satisfied the calls for his personal appearbones, tuba, timpani, percussion, ances with several strenuous European concert tours celesta, two harps and strings in which he conducted his own works, but in APPROXIMATE DURATION: 20 minutes January 1909 his plans for several engagements in England were cancelled because of the first signs of an illness that was diagnosed later in the year as cancer. Morphine and cocaine to ease the pain helped him to continue — after a fashion. Following a February concert in London, he wrote to Durand, “Arrived here Thursday, have been ill all the time. The concert today went off admirably. It only depended on me to secure an encore for L’Après-midi d’un faune [‘Afternoon of a Faun’], but I could hardly stand up — a very bad posture for conducting anything.” 20 pittsburghsymphony.org


program notes

That such a brilliant work as Ibéria could arise out of such difficult circumstances is a tribute to Debussy’s artistic spirit and creative diligence. Equally remarkable is how clearly he captured the atmosphere of the land across the Pyrénées, despite the fact that he had spent only a single afternoon in Spain during his entire life — to attend a bullfight in San Sebastian. Manuel de Falla, Spain’s great composer, wrote admiringly of Ibéria, “The entire piece down to the smallest detail makes one feel the character of Spain.” Ibéria, which Debussy included as the second of his three Images (though it is seldom performed with the other two, Gigues and Rondes de Printemps), is in three movements. The first, Par les rues et par le chemins (“Through Streets and Lanes”), establishes the Spanish inspiration of the work with a rhythm dominated by tambourine and castanets. The opening melody suggested to Falla “village songs heard in the bright, scintillating light.” A martial middle section dominated by the horns follows, and leads to the return of the opening melody. The second movement, evocatively titled Les parfums de la nuit (“The Fragrances of the Night”), is a dreamy nocturne, but one presented with detailed precision. This is music marked by a glorious instrumental palette, subtle rhythm, luscious harmony and sinuous melody that embodies the quintessential Impressionist style. The finale, Le matin d’un jour de fête (“Morning of a Feast-Day”), celebrates a festival day amid the sounds of strumming guitars (represented by pizzicato strings) and church bells. The movement represents, Debussy wrote, “the whole rising feeling, the awakening of people and of nature.”

MANUEL DE FALLA

Suites Nos. 1 and 2 from The Three-Cornered Hat (1917-1919) The dazzling Parisian success of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes that began in 1909 came to an abrupt halt when the Guns of August tore across Belgium and France to begin World War I in 1914. Diaghilev, Leonide Massine and some of the company took refuge in Switzerland and Spain, while Nijinsky and others fled to America. Diaghilev arranged a season in Spain for 1917, and, always on the prowl for new talent, he took the opportunity to look up a musician Stravinsky had met in Paris in 1910. Stravinsky described his Spanish colleague as “even smaller than myself, and as modest and withdrawn as an oyster... unpityingly religious, and the shyest man I have ever met.” His name was Manuel de Falla. Falla, a meticulous worker who composed slowly, had completed only a small number of works by 1917 — most notably Nights in the Gardens of Spain, the opera La Vida Breve (“The Brief Life”) and the ballet El Amor Brujo (“Lover, the Magician”) — and he was little known outside his homeland. When Diaghilev and Massine introduced themselves to him in Barcelona, he took them to see a one-act farce set in the early 19th century about the attempted seducPROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

ABOUT THE COMPOSER: Born 23 November 1876 in Cádiz, Spain; died 14 November 1946 in Alta Gracia, Argentina PREMIERE OF WORK: London, 22 July 1919 Alhambra Theater Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes Leonide Massine, choreographer

PSO PREMIERE OF SUITE NO. 1: 25 February 1972 Rafael Fruhbeck de Burgos, conductor

PSO PREMIERE OF SUITE NO. 2: 20 November 1932 Syria Mosque Antonio Modarelli, conductor

INSTRUMENTATION: two piccolos, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, harp, celesta, piano and strings APPROXIMATE DURATION: 26 minutes

pittsburghsymphony.org 21


2011-2012 SEASON

tion of a miller’s wife by the local governor for which he had provided the music, El corregidor y la molinera (“The Corregidor and the Miller’s Wife”). The script for this “pantomime” was by Gregorio Martinez Sierra, who based it on a short novel by Pedro de Alarcón published in 1874 as El sombrero de tres picos. Alarcón was said to have heard the story in turn from an old goatherd who hired himself out as an entertainer for local weddings and feasts. Of Falla’s score, Massine wrote that it “seemed to us very exciting, and its blend of violence and passion was similar to much of the music of the local folkdances. Both Diaghilev and I felt that the story and the music offered us the potentials of a full-length ballet.” Falla accepted Diaghilev’s proposal to revise and extend his score for production when the war was over, but gave the provision that he be allowed enough time to study Spanish folk music and dance styles to assure the correct atmosphere for the finished work. It was not until World War I ended that the production of The ThreeCornered Hat could be staged as part of the 1919 London season of the Ballets Russes. The Three-Cornered Hat concerns a village miller and his pretty wife. The Corregidor (mayor) is attracted to the miller’s wife, and makes his advances. She tells her husband to watch as she spurns the old man’s attempts at love. The Corregidor chases her, but becomes aware of the teasing intrigue between husband and wife, and departs. That evening the village festivities are interrupted by the local constabulary, who have come to arrest the miller on a charge trumped up by the Corregidor to get him out of the way. The Corregidor appears as the miller is led away, but falls into the millstream as he is pursuing the girl. She runs off in search of her husband while the Corregidor removes his sodden clothes, including his three-cornered hat — symbol of his office — hangs them on a chair outside the mill, and jumps into the absent girl’s bed to ward off a chill. Meanwhile, the miller has escaped and returned home. He sees the Corregidor’s discarded clothes and believes himself betrayed by his wife. Vowing to get even, he exchanges his garments for those of the official, scribbles on the wall “The wife of the Corregidor is also very pretty,” and runs off in search of his conquest. The Corregidor emerges to find only the miller’s clothes. He puts them on just in time for the police, hunting their escaped prisoner, to arrest him by mistake. The miller’s wife returns, followed by the miller, and the two are happily reconciled. Falla derived two orchestral suites from the complete score for The Three-Cornered Hat. They parallel the action of the ballet, but omit some of the connecting tissue. “The Introduction to the First Suite,” a fanfare for drums and brass, was added just before the London premiere so that the audience would have time to admire Picasso’s decor. “Afternoon” portrays the sultry midday heat through which passes the procession of the Corregidor (solo bassoon). “The Dance of the Miller’s Wife” accompanies the girl’s fiery fandango, observed by the Corregidor. “The Corregidor” comments briefly (again solo bassoon), and the miller’s wife replies with a few sweet strains before beginning the extended scene of “The Grapes.” “The Second Suite” comprises “The Neighbor’s Dance” (initiated by an ethereal melody high in the strings), “The Miller’s Dance” (prefaced by solo horn) and the energetic “Final Dance.”

22 pittsburghsymphony.org

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA


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program

PARIS FESTIVAL: THE CITY OF LIGHT | HARRIS THEATER THURSDAY, MAY 3, 2012 AT 6:00 PM

FILM SCREENING

OF

LA PASSION BOLÉRO

DIRECTED BY MICHEL FOLLIN, 2007 U.S. PREMIERE

Considered exasperating or captivating, hummed the world over in any number of arrangements, the most performed piece of classical music, Maurice Ravel’s BolĂŠro, is part of us — in our genes, as Jean Echenoz, the author of Ravel, puts it in this film. How did a work of such apparent simplicity become the biggest hit in the classical repertory? Perhaps one of the keys to its success can be found in the handful of pages that Claude LĂŠviStrauss devoted to BolĂŠro in his book, "The Naked Man." He explains the work’s universality in that he sees Ravel as a musician of a "message" that makes the listener “a negative creator, for whom the music emanating from the composer fills in the gaps." With the participation of Jean Echenoz, Marcel Marnat, Michel Sendrez, Kurt Masur and the Orchestre national de France, as well as Katia and Marielle Labèque.

ADVANCE REGISTRATION IS REQUIRED FOR THIS FREE EVENT. TO REGISTER, CALL 412.392.4900.

An intimate, European-scale setting in which to enjoy an artful blend of regionally inspired Contemporary American dishes with an emphasis on elegance and flavor.

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VIDEO RECORDINGS OF THIS PERFORMANCE ARE STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

25


program

PARIS FESTIVAL: THE CITY OF LIGHT | HEINZ HALL FRIDAY, MAY 4, 2012 AT 8:00 PM SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2012 AT 8:00 PM

PRE-CONCERT 6:45 pm

CONCERT PRELUDE ON STAGE: “A WINDOW INTO PARISIAN SALONS” WITH MARY E. DAVIS

CINEMATHEQUE IN THE DOROTHY PORTER SIMMONS REGENCY ROOMS: LA PASSION BOLÉRO

MANFRED HONECK,

FOOD & WINE TASTING EVENT IN THE GRAND LOBBY WITH COURTYARD WINERIES & LOCAL RESTAURANTS

CONDUCTOR

LISE DE LA SALLE, PIANO STEPHANIE LAURICELLA, MEZZO-SOPRANO JUAN JOSÉ DE LEÓN, TENOR MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH, BETSY BURLEIGH, ANDREW OSTROWSKI, LIGHTING DESIGNER

DIRECTOR

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

Prélude à “L’Après-midi d’un faune”

LILI BOULANGER

Psalm 130, “Du fond de l’abîme”

INTERMISSION

LOBBY EXHIBITS

MAURICE RAVEL

Concerto in G major for Piano and Orchestra

MAURICE RAVEL

Boléro

MS. LAURICELLA MR. DE LÉON MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH

I. II. III. MS.

POST-CONCERT

Allegramente Adagio assai Presto DE LA SALLE

FASCINATIN’ RHYTHM: GERSHWIN SONGS IN THE GRAND LOBBY, WITH MAUREEN & DAVE BUDWAY

ARTIST SIGNING WITH LISE DE LA SALLE

This weekend’s performances by Music Director Manfred Honeck are made possible, in part, through the generous Annual Fund support of the R.P. Simmons Family.

Delta Air Lines is the Official Airline of the PSO PHOTOGRAPHY, AUDIO

&

VIDEO RECORDINGS OF THIS PERFORMANCE ARE STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

27


2011-2012 SEASON

MAY 4 & 5, PRE & POST CONCERT EVENTS CONCERT PRELUDE: A Window into Parisian Salons with Mary E. Davis 6:45 pm, on stage The Parisian salon, a touchstone for French culture in the 18th and 19th centuries, continued to thrive in the 20th. Whether in the drawing room of a Right Bank mansion or the back room of a Left Bank bookstore, the city's artists and intellectuals – Debussy and Ravel among them – met to exchange ideas and make contacts with aristocratic patrons and influential members of the press. This talk explores the legacy of these interactions, which can be traced not only in artistic works and musical compositions, but also in institutions and initiatives ranging from Diaghilev's Ballets Russes to the American School at Fontainebleau.

CINEMATHEQUE: La Passion Boléro, Directed by Michel Follin, France, 2007 6:45 pm, Dorothy Porter Simmons Regency Rooms Considered exasperating or captivating, hummed the world over in any number of arrangements, the most performed piece of classical music, Maurice Ravel’s Boléro, is part of us — “in our genes,” as Jean Echenoz, the author of Ravel, puts it in this film. How did a work of such apparent simplicity become the biggest hit in the classical repertory? Perhaps one of the keys to its success can be found in the handful of pages that Claude Lévi-Strauss devoted to Boléro in his book, "The Naked Man." He explains the work’s universality in that he sees Ravel as a musician of a "message" that makes the listener "a negative creator, for whom the music emanating from the composer fills in the gaps." With the participation of Jean Echenoz, Marcel Marnat, Michel Sendrez, Kurt Masur and the Orchestre national de France, as well as Katia & Marielle Labèque.

POST-CONCERT: Fascinatin’ Rhythm: Gershwin Songs with the Budways Grand Lobby Stay after the concert to enjoy Gershwin classics in the Grand Lobby with Pittsburgh jazz legends Maureen and Dave Budway. Selections will include: S'Wonderful, I Got Rhythm, Our Love is Here to Stay, Fascinatin' Rhythm, and various songs about Paris...voilá! *DOORS OPEN ONE HOUR AND THIRTY MINUTES BEFORE ALL PARIS FESTIVAL PERFORMANCES AT HEINZ HALL. ALL PRE- AND POST-CONCERT EVENTS ARE FREE TO TICKETHOLDERS.

28 pittsburghsymphony.org


program notes

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

Prélude à “L’Après-midi d’un faune” (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun) (1892-1894) When the symbolist poet Stéphane Mallarmé completed his L’Après-midi d’un faune in 1876 after several years of writing and revising, he envisioned that it would be used as the basis for a theatrical producABOUT THE COMPOSER: tion. Claude Debussy was intrigued by this suggesBorn 22 August 1862 in St. tion, and he set about planning to provide music to Germain-en-Laye, near Paris; died 25 March 1918 in Paris a choreographic version that would be devised in PREMIERE OF WORK: consultation with Mallarmé, but completed only the Paris, 22 December 1894 scenario’s first portion, perhaps realizing, as had othSociété Nationale ers, that the poet’s misty symbolism and equivocal Gustave Doret, conductor language were not innately suited to the theater. PSO PREMIERE: 27 November 1908 Mallarmé’s poem is deliberately ambiguous in Carnegie Music Hall its sensuous, symbolist language; its purpose is as Emil Paur, conductor much to suggest a halcyon, dream-like mood as to INSTRUMENTATION: tell a story. Robert Lawrence described its slight plot, three flutes, two oboes, English as realized by Debussy, in his Victor Book of Ballets: horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two harps, antique cym“Exotically spotted, a satyr is taking his rest on the bals and strings top of a hillock. As he fondles a bunch of grapes, he APPROXIMATE DURATION: sees a group of nymphs passing on the plain below. 10 minutes He wants to join them, but when he approaches, they flee. Only one of them, attracted by the faun, returns timidly. But the nymph changes her mind and runs away. For a moment he gazes after her. Then, snatching a scarf she has dropped in her flight, the faun climbs his hillock and resumes his drowsy position, astride the scarf.” As the inherent eroticism of the plot suggests, the Debussy/Mallarmé faun is no Bambi-like creature, but rather a mythological half-man, half-beast with cloven hooves, horns, tail and furry coat, a being that walks upright and whose chief characteristic is its highly developed libido. Mallarmé’s poem is filled with the ambiguities symbolized by the faun: is this a man or a beast? is his love physical or fantasy? reality or dream? The delicate subtlety of the poem finds a perfect tonal equivalent in Debussy’s music.

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

pittsburghsymphony.org 29


2011-2012 SEASON

LILI BOULANGER

Psalm 130, “Du fond de l’abîme” (“Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord”) (1914-1917) “Though Lili Boulanger died in 1918 at the age of 24,” wrote musicologist David Noakes, “hers was a creative life of more than mere promise; it was a life, at least, of partial fulfillment.” The name of ABOUT THE COMPOSER: Boulanger was indelibly inscribed into the annals of Born 21 August 1893 in Paris; died music by Nadia Boulanger, the 20th-century’s most 15 March 1918 in Mézy-parMeulan influential teacher and mentor of composers. PREMIERE OF WORK: Despite her seismic impact on modern music, Nadia Paris, 1921 never considered herself a composer (“not bad, but Henri Büsser, conductor useless” is how she dismissed her original works), THESE PERFORMANCES MARK and firmly held that the family’s creative talent had THE PSO PREMIERE been inherited by her younger sister, Lili. And conINSTRUMENTATION: siderable talent there was to inherit. The girls’ paterpiccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, bass nal grandfather, Frédéric, taught cello at the Paris clarinet, two bassoons, contrabasConservatoire; his wife was the well-known soprano soon, four horns, three trumpets, Marie-Julie Boulanger. The couple’s son, Ernest, four trombones, tuba, timpani, percussion, celesta, organ, two harps won the Prix de Rome in 1835, became a successful and strings opera composer in Paris and teacher of singing at the APPROXIMATE DURATION: Conservatoire, and was awarded the Légion 26 minutes d’Honneur in 1870. In 1877, he married Raïssa Mychetsky, one of his most talented students, when he was 60 and she 19. Among the family’s friends and regular visitors were Charles Gounod, Gabriel Fauré, Jules Massenet and Camille Saint-Saëns. It was into this privileged musical environment that Nadia was born in 1887; Marie-Juliette Olga (Lili) came along six years later. Lili’s musical talent was evident from her earliest years. She could reliably carry a tune by two, and three years later began tagging along with Nadia to sit in on her older sister’s classes at the Conservatoire. Lili studied harp, piano, cello and violin with some of the city’s best teachers during the following years, but steady bouts of ill health, precipitated by a near-fatal attack of pneumonia when she was three, precluded the physical exertions necessary to master any of those instruments. She turned instead to composition, and began serious study of that discipline in 1909 with Georges Caussade and Paul Vidal. Three years later, she was formally admitted to the Conservatoire, but illness prevented her from participating in the Prix de Rome competitions that year. A stay at a sanitarium on the English Channel restored her health sufficiently enough for her to win the Prix in 1913 with her cantata Faust et Hélène, the first woman to earn that coveted honor. That same year, she also received the Prix Lepaulle and the Prix Yvonne de Gouy d’Arsy. Her arrival at the Villa Medici in Rome was delayed by illness until March 1914, and even then, weakened by the trip and the activity of the preceding year, she was confined to her room for nearly a month and could not resume work until late in the spring. Lili was granted special permission for a visit home in July, and she had to remain in France when World War I broke out the following month. She organized an extensive 30 pittsburghsymphony.org


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program of letter-writing, communication and support among the Conservatoire students who had been mobilized and their families and friends during the following year, and did not return to Rome until early 1916. There she set to work on an operatic version of Maeterlinck’s La Princesse Maleine, with whose lonely heroine she identified. She worked on this and other projects as much as she could, but her health was in steady decline during the ensuing months. In February 1917, she went to convalesce at Arcachon, on the Atlantic coast near Bordeaux, but she did not improve and was taken to Paris in July for emergency surgery. The procedure brought only little and temporary relief. She next went to the family summer home at Gargenville for several months, and returned to Paris in December, but soon had to leave for Mézy-par-Meulan, west of the city, when the capital was subjected to heavy German bombardment early in 1918. She died in Mézy on March 15. Despite her early death and the debilitating state of her health, Lili Boulanger completed a substantial number of compositions in which she demonstrated a highly developed creative personality imbued with the pastel Impressionism characteristic of turn-ofthe-20th-century France: 18 works for chorus, many accompanied by orchestra (notably settings of three Psalms); two cantatas; some 20 songs; a half-dozen orchestral scores, including a Poème symphonique; and pieces for organ, piano, violin and flute. The opera La Princesse Maleine remained unfinished at her death. In a review of a performance of her music in 1921, Louis Vuillemin wrote, “Lili Boulanger brought to music a keen and prodigiously human sensibility, served in its expression by the full range of natural gifts, from grace, color, charm and subtlety to winged lyricism and obvious power, easy and profound. Such virtues, so rarely brought together for the benefit of one single creative temperament, are to be found in her works.” Given the fragility of Lili Boulanger’s health and the constant awareness of her mortality that it entailed, it is not surprising that several of her works were inspired by sacred texts, the most important of which are her settings of Psalm 124 (1910-1916), Psalm 24 (1916) and Psalm 130 (1914-1917). (Two other Psalm-based works — Psalm 131/137 and Psalm 1/119 — are lost; a third — Psalm 126 — was never completed. On her deathbed, Lili dictated her final composition, a setting of Pie Jesu Domine [“Merciful Lord Jesus”] from the Requiem Mass to Nadia.) The most ambitious of the Psalm settings, Psalm 130 (“Du fond de l’abîme je t’invoque, Iahvé” — “Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord”), was begun in 1914, soon after she took up her residency in Rome, but her health and the outbreak of World War I delayed its completion until the summer of 1917 at the family home at Gargenville; it was premiered in Paris in 1921 under the direction of Henri Büsser, a friend of Debussy and Massenet and himself a Prix de Rome winner. Psalm 130 expresses the human aspiration for redemption, progressing from the soul’s most profound supplication — “Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord” — to the hope of deliverance — “There is forgiveness with the Lord” — sentiments mirrored with great subtlety, feeling and power in Boulanger’s setting. The work opens in the orchestra’s most somber regions, with a chant-like motive in the tuba emerging from the ominous, subterranean background. Double basses and contrabassoon respond with a rising broken chord of unsettled tonality that is expanded into a wide-ranging, chromatically inflected theme when it ascends into the violins. A broad call from the trumpet sounds an urgent note. These four musical elements — chant phrase, broken arpeggio, chromatic theme, trumpet call — provide the material for the opening section, as PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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the chorus grows from its almost numbed entry (“Out of the depths”) to an impassioned plea “(Lord, Lord, I have cried unto thee”). The solo mezzo-soprano continues the prayer (“If thou, Lord, shouldest mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand?”) and is echoed by the chorus as the work mounts to a passage of fierce intensity. Suddenly, the tension is relaxed — the rhythm steadies, luminous arpeggios radiate from the harps, a smooth, even-paced phrase arches through the winds, and the soloist offers the Psalmist’s words of hope: “But there is forgiveness with thee.” The chorus takes up this promise as well, both in whole and in part (including a few lines for tenor solo), but Boulanger, dying at age 24 when she was finishing this composition, was not able to allow optimism to stand unalloyed, so her Psalm 130 recalls the words and the music of the opening to bring the work to an uneasy close.

CHORUS Du fond de l’abîme je t’invoque, Iahvé; Adonaï, écoute ma prière! Ah! Que tes oreilles soient attentives aux accents de ma prière.

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord. Lord, hear my voice! Ah! Let thine ears be attentive to the voice of my supplications.

Iahvé, du fond de l’abîme je t’invoque, Iahvé, je crie vers toi; Iahvé, Adonaï, écoute ma prière/ma voix! Que tes oreilles soient attentives aux accents de ma prière. Iahvé, Adonaï, je t’invoque, Adonaï.

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord. I have cried unto thee; Lord, Lord, hear my voice. Let thine ears be attentive to the voice of my supplications. Lord, Lord, I have cried unto thee.

Du fond de l’abîme je crie vers toi, Adonaï; Écoute ma priére! Je crie vers toi, Iahvé/Adonaï;

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, O Lord. Hear my voice! Lord, I have cried unto thee.

Que tes oreilles soiont attentives aux accents de ma prière, Iahvé, Adonaï.

Let thine ears be attentive to the voice of my supplications, Lord!

Si tu prends garde aux péchés qui donc pourra tenir, Iahvé?

If thou, Lord, shouldest mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand?

Du fond de l’abime je crie verts toi, etc.

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, etc.

MEZZO-SOPRANO Si tu prends garde aux péchés, Adonaï, qui donc pourra tenir, Adonaï, Iahvé?

If thou, Lord, shouldest mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand?

CHORUS Iahvé, Adonaï. Si tu prends garde aux péchés qui donc pourra tenir?

Lord, Lord. If thou, Lord, shouldest mark iniquities, O Lord, who shall stand?

MEZZO-SOPRANO Mais a clémence est en toi, afin qu’on te révère. Mon âme espère en Iahvé. J’espère, je compte sur sa parole, plus que les guetteurs

But there is forgiveness with thee, that thou mayest be feared. I wait for the Lord, my soul doth wait, and in his word do I hope, more than they that

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de la nuit n’aspirent au matin. Mon âme espère en Adonaï plus que les guetteurs de la nuit n’aspirent au matin. Adonaï! La clémence est en Iahvé, afin qu’on le révère.

watch for the morning. My soul waiteth for the Lord more than they that watch for the morning. There is forgiveness with the Lord, that he may be feared.

CHORUS Mon âme espère en Iahvé, j’espère en Iahvé, j’espère en ta parole, j’espère en ta clémence. Je t’invoque, Iahvé, Adonaï, écoute ma prière!

My soul waiteth for the Lord, I wait for thee, I wait for the Lord, and in thy word do I hope. I hope in thy forgiveness. I have cried unto thee, O Lord, hear my voice.

FOUR SOPRANOS Israël espère en Iahvé.

Let Israel hope in the Lord:

MEZZO-SOPRANO & TENOR Car en Iahvé est la miséricorde et l’abondance de la délivrance.

for with the Lord there is mercy, and with him is plenteous redemption.

FOUR SOPRANOS & MEZZO-SOPRANO C’est lui qui délivrera Israël de toutes ses iniquités. Israël espère en la clémence de Iahvé.

And he shall redeem Israel from all its iniquities. Let Israel hope in the forgiveness of the Lord.

EIGHT CHORISTERS Israël espère en Iahvé. En Iahvé est la clémence.

Let Israel hope in the Lord. With the Lord there is mercy.

CHORUS Du fond de l’abîme je t’invoque, je crie vers toi. Car en Iahvé est la miséricorde et l’abondance de la délivrance. C’est lui qui délivrera Israël de toutes ses iniquités. Ah, Iahvé, Adonaï! je t’invoque, je crie vers toi.

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, I have cried unto thee. For with the Lord there is mercy, and with him is plenteous redemption. And he shall redeem Israel from all its iniquities. Ah, Lord, I have cried unto thee, I have cried unto thee.

EIGHT CHORISTERS Israël espère en Iahvé.

Let Israel hope in the Lord.

CHORUS Du fond de l’abîme j’espère en toi, je t’invoque, Iahvé, Adonaï. Écoute ma prière, Iahvé, Adonaï.

Out of the depths have I cried unto thee, I have cried unto thee, O Lord. Lord, Lord, hear my voice.

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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MAURICE RAVEL

Concerto in G major for Piano and Orchestra (1929-1931) Ravel’s tour of the United States in 1928 was such a success that he began to plan for a second one as soon as he returned to France. With a view toward having a vehicle for himself as a pianist on the return visit, he started work on a concerto in 1929, perhaps ABOUT THE COMPOSER: encouraged by the good fortune that Stravinsky had Born 7 March 1875 in Ciboure, enjoyed concertizing with his Concerto for Piano Basses-Pyrénées, France; died 28 December 1937 in Paris and Winds and Piano Capriccio earlier in the PREMIERE OF WORK: decade. However, many other projects pressed Paris, 14 January 1932 upon him, not the least of which was a commission Lamoureaux Orchestra from the pianist Paul Wittgenstein, who had lost his Maurice Ravel, conductor Marguerite Long, soloist right arm in the First World War, to compose a piano PSO PREMIERE: concerto for left hand alone, and the Concerto in G 14 January 1945 was not completed until 1931. Leonard Bernstein, The sparkling first movement of the Concerto in conductor & piano G opens with a bright melody in the piccolo that INSTRUMENTATION: may derive from an old folk dance of the Basque piccolo, flute, oboe, English horn, E-flat clarinet, B-flat clarinet, two region of southern France, where Ravel was born. bassoons, two horns, trumpet, There are several themes in this exposition: the livetrombone, timpani, percussion, ly opening group is balanced by another set that is harp and strings more nostalgic and bluesy in character. The developAPPROXIMATE DURATION: 22 minutes ment section is an elaboration of the lively opening themes, ending with a brief cadenza in octaves as a link to the recapitulation. The lively themes are passed over quickly, but the nostalgic melodies are treated at some length. The jaunty vivacity of the beginning returns for a dazzling coda. When Ravel first showed the manuscript of the Adagio to Marguerite Long, the soloist at the premiere, she commented on the music’s effortless grace. The composer sighed, and told her that he had struggled to write the movement “bar by bar,” that it had cost him more anxiety than any of his other scores. The movement begins with a longbreathed melody for solo piano over a rocking accompaniment. The central section does not differ from the opening as much in melody as it does in texture — a gradual thickening occurs as the music proceeds. The texture then becomes again translucent, and the opening melody is heard on its return in the plaintive tones of the English horn. The finale is a showpiece for soloist and orchestra that evokes the energetic world of jazz. Trombone slides, muted trumpet interjections, shrieking exclamations from the woodwinds abound. The episodes of the form tumble continuously one after another on their way to the abrupt conclusion of the work.

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MAURICE RAVEL Boléro (1928)

PREMIERE OF WORK: Paris, 20 November 1928 Paris Opéra Walter Straram, conductor

Ravel originated what he once called his “danse lasPSO PREMIERE: cive” at the suggestion of Ida Rubinstein, the famed 11 November 1937 ballerina who also inspired works from Debussy, Syria Mosque Carlos Chavez, conductor Honegger and Stravinsky. Rubinstein’s balletic interpretation of Boléro, set in a rustic Spanish tavern, INSTRUMENTATION: piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, portrayed a voluptuous dancer whose stomps and oboe d’amore (alto oboe), English whirls atop a table incite the men in the bar to horn, E-flat clarinet, two B-flat clarmounting fervor. With growing intensity, they join in inets, bass clarinet, three saxophones, two bassoons, contrabasher dance until, in a brilliant coup de théâtre, knives soon, four horns, four trumpets, are drawn and violence flares on stage at the three trombones, tuba, timpani, moment near the end where the music modulates, percussion, celesta, harp and strings breathtakingly, from the key of C to the key of E. So APPROXIMATE DURATION: viscerally stirring was the combination of the power16 minutes ful music and the ballerina’s suggestive dancing at the premiere that a near-riot ensued between audience and performers, and Miss Rubinstein narrowly escaped injury. The usually reserved Pitts Sanborn reported that the American premiere, conducted by Arturo Toscanini at Carnegie Hall on November 14, 1929, had a similar effect on its hearers: “If it had been the custom to repeat a number at a symphonic concert, Boléro would surely have been encored, even at the risk of mass wreckage of the nerves.” Of the musical nature of this magnificent study in hypnotic rhythm and orchestral sonority, Ravel wrote in 1931 to the critic M.D. Calvocoressi, “I am particularly desirous that there should be no misunderstanding about this work. It constitutes an experiment in a very special and limited direction, and should not be suspected of aiming at achieving anything different from or anything more than it actually does achieve. Before its first performance, I issued a warning to the effect that what I had written was a piece lasting about 17 minutes and consisting wholly of ‘orchestral tissue without music’ — of one long, very gradual crescendo. There are no contrasts, there is practically no invention except the plan and the manner of execution. The themes are altogether impersonal ... folktunes of the usual Spanish-Arabian kind, and (whatever may have been said to the contrary) the orchestral writing is simple and straightforward throughout, without the slightest attempt at virtuosity.... I have carried out exactly what I intended, and it is for listeners to take it or leave it.”

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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MOZART

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6 WORLD PREMIERE MINI-OPERAS

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program

PARIS FESTIVAL: THE CITY OF LIGHT | HEINZ CHAPEL SUNDAY, MAY 6, 2012 AT 3:00 PM

PAUL JACOBS PAUL JACOBS,

IN RECITAL

ORGAN

MAURICE DURUFLÉ (1870-1937)

LOUIS VIERNE (1870-1937)

OLIVIER MESSIAEN (1908-1992)

Suite, Opus 5 Prélude Sicilienne Toccata

“Berceuse” from 24 Pieces in Free Style, Opus 32 “Final” from Symphony No. 1, Opus 14 “Le Dieu caché” from Livre du Saint-Sacrement “Dieu parmi nous” from La Nativité du Seigneur

NADIA BOULANGER (1887-1979)

Trois Pièces

JEANNE DEMESSIEUX (1921-1968)

Transcendental Études, Opus 5

Prélude Petit Canon Improvisation Pointes Accords alternés Octaves

Program will be performed without intermission. Notes on the program will be announced from stage.

PHOTOGRAPHY, AUDIO

&

VIDEO RECORDINGS OF THIS PERFORMANCE ARE STRICTLY PROHIBITED.

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program

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS | HEINZ HALL FRIDAY, MAY 11, 2012 AT 8:00 PM SUNDAY, MAY 13, 2012 AT 2:30 PM

PRE-CONCERT Friday, 6:45 pm & Sunday, 1:15 pm

MANFRED HONECK,

CONCERT PRELUDE ON STAGE: “A WINDOW INTO THE EXOTIC” WITH MARY E. DAVIS

CINEMATHEQUE IN THE DOROTHY PORTER SIMMONS REGENCY ROOMS: CHARLIE CHAPLIN SILENT SHORTS WITH LIVE ACCOMPANIMENT

CONDUCTOR

ANNE MARTINDALE WILLIAMS, CELLO ATTACK THEATRE PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA LAWRENCE LOH, MUSIC DIRECTOR Pétrouchka (1947 revision) I. The Shrovetide Fair II. Petrouchka's Cell III. The Moor's Cell IV. The Fair (towards evening)

IGOR STRAVINSKY

INTERMISSION

LOBBY EXHIBITS

ARTHUR HONEGGER

Concerto for Cello and Orchestra

GEORGE GERSHWIN

An American in Paris

OFFICIAL AIRLINE

(In one movement) MS. WILLIAMS

INTERMISSION

LOBBY EXHIBITS

La Création du Monde

DARIUS MILHAUD

POST-CONCERT Friday only

(performed without Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra) ATTACK THEATRE PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

AFTER-PARTY IN THE GRAND LOBBY: “PITTSBURGH/PARIS: THE ROARING TWENTIES” WITH THE BOILERMAKER JAZZ BAND

This weekend’s performances by Music Director Manfred Honeck are made possible, in part, through the generous Annual Fund support of the R.P. Simmons Family. This weekend’s performances by cello soloist Anne Martindale Williams, are made possible, in part, through the generous Annual Fund support of Jamee and Tom Todd. TITLE SPONSOR

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41


MAY 11 & 13, PRE & POST CONCERT EVENTS CONCERT PRELUDE: A Window into the Exotic with Mary E. Davis 6:45 pm (Friday) and 1:15 pm (Sunday), on stage In early 20th century Paris, attraction to all things exotic ran high. For artists, the imperative to create work that was both profoundly expressive and perceptibly modern fueled interest in unfamiliar cultures–from pagan Russia to contemporary Manhattan – which in turn could serve as the source for new methods, approaches, and materials. This talk explores the radical and diverse outcomes of these engagements with the exotic, examining in particular their links to contemporary style, fashion, and technology.

CINEMATHEQUE: Charlie Chaplin – Silent Shorts with live accompaniment 6:45 pm (Friday) and 1:15 pm (Sunday), Dorothy Porter Simmons Regency Rooms In 1916, the Mutual Film Corporation paid Chaplin US$670,000 to produce a dozen two-reel comedies. He was given near complete artistic control, and produced 12 films over an 18-month period that rank among the most influential comedy films in the history of cinema. One A.M. (1916) A drunken gentleman as he arrives home early one morning and tries to get upstairs into bed. The Rink (1916) Charlie is an inept waiter who prepares the bill of Mr. Stout (Eric Campbell) by examining the soup, spaghetti, melon stains and other remnants on the sloppy eater’s shirt front, tie and ear. Featuring Susanne Ortner-Roberts, clarinet, and Tom Roberts, piano, in a new original score composed for the project by Tom Roberts.

AFTER-PARTY: Pittsburgh/Paris: The Roaring Twenties Friday only, Grand Lobby American jazz was all the rage in the post-war Paris of the 1920s. Wrapping up an evening of jazz-inspired works, this after-party transforms the Grand Lobby into a night-club with complimentary light refreshments and specialty drinks at cash bar. Swing into the night with Boilermaker Jazz Band and special guests! *DOORS OPEN ONE HOUR AND THIRTY MINUTES BEFORE ALL PARIS FESTIVAL PERFORMANCES AT HEINZ HALL. ALL PRE- AND POST-CONCERT EVENTS ARE FREE TO TICKETHOLDERS.

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IGOR STRAVINSKY

Pétrouchka (1911, revised in 1947) Stravinsky burst meteor-like onto the musical firmament in 1910 with the brilliant triumph of his first major score for the Ballet Russes, The Firebird. Immediately, Sergei Diaghilev, the enterprising impresario of the troupe, sought to capitalize on this success by commissioning Stravinsky to write a secABOUT THE COMPOSER: ond score as soon as possible. Stravinsky was Born 17 June 1882 in already prepared with an idea that had come to him Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg; died 6 April 1971 in New York even before finishing The Firebird. “I saw in imagiCity nation a solemn pagan rite,” he recalled in his PREMIERE OF WORK: Autobiography of 1936. “Sage elders, seated in a cirParis, 13 June 1911 cle, watched a young girl dance herself to death. Théâtre du Châtelet Ballet Russes They were sacrificing her to propitiate the god of Pierre Monteux, conductor spring. Such was the theme of Le Sacre du PSO PREMIERE OF THE Printemps.” Diaghilev was as excited about this 1947 REVISION: vision as was Stravinsky, and he sent the composer 11 March 1966 Syria Mosque off to write the score with all possible haste. Ronald Ondrejka, conductor Stravinsky continued the story in his Autobiography: INSTRUMENTATION: “Before tackling The Rite of Spring, which would be piccolo, three flutes, two oboes, a long and difficult task, I wanted to refresh myself English horn, three clarinets, bass by composing an orchestral piece in which the clarinet, two bassoons, contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, piano would play the most important part — a sort three trombones, tuba, timpani, of Konzertstück. In composing the music, I had a dispercussion, harp, piano, celesta and tinct picture of a puppet, suddenly endowed with strings. life.... Having finished this piece, I struggled for APPROXIMATE DURATION: 34 minutes hours to find a title which would express in a word the character of my music and, consequently, the personality of this creature. One day I leaped for joy, I had indeed found my title — Pétrouchka, the immortal and unhappy hero of every fair in all countries. Soon afterwards, Diaghilev came to visit me. He was much astonished when, instead of the sketches of the Sacre, I played him the piece I had just composed and which later became the second scene of Pétrouchka. He was so pleased with it that he would not leave it alone, and began persuading me to develop the theme of the puppet’s sufferings and make it into a whole ballet.” Though his progress on the score was interrupted by a serious bout of “nicotine poisoning,” Stravinsky finished the work in time for the scheduled premiere on June 13, 1911. The production was a triumph, though it appeared that at the last minute it might be scuttled by a costumer who refused to let things proceed until he was paid. The till being temporarily empty, Diaghilev went to the box of the redoubtable Misia Sert, the Polish pianist, salon hostess and arts patron, to ask for her help. She was, as always, ready with assistance, but the curtain was delayed half an hour while her driver was sent to retrieve the necessary funds. When the performance finally began, the music of Stravinsky and the dancing of Nijinsky captivated the audience. The illustrious thespian Sarah Bernhardt was so moved by the depth and subtlety of Nijinsky’s portrayal of the PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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2011-2012 SEASON

love-sick puppet that she said, with no little envy, “I am afraid, I am afraid — because I have just seen the greatest actor in the world.” Tableau I. St. Petersburg, the Shrove-Tide Fair. Crowds of people stroll about, entertained by a hurdy-gurdy man and dancers. The Showman opens the curtains of his little theater to reveal three puppets — Pétrouchka, the Ballerina and the Blackamoor. He charms them into life with his flute, and they begin to dance among the public. Tableau II. Pétrouchka’s Cell. Pétrouchka suffers greatly from his awareness of his grotesque appearance. He tries to console himself by falling in love with the Ballerina. She visits him in his cell, but she is frightened by his uncouth antics, and flees. Tableau III. The Blackamoor’s Cell. The Blackamoor and the Ballerina meet in his tent. Their love scene is interrupted by the arrival of Pétrouchka, furiously jealous. The Blackamoor throws him out. Tableau IV. The Fair. The festive scene of Tableau I resumes with the appearance of a group of wet-nurses, a performing bear, Gypsies, a band of coachmen and several masqueraders. At the theater, Pétrouchka rushes out from behind the curtain, pursued by the Blackamoor, who strikes his rival down with his sword. Pétrouchka dies. The Showman assures the bystanders that Pétrouchka is only a puppet, but he is startled to see Pétrouchka’s jeering ghost appear on the roof of the little theater.

ARTHUR HONEGGER

Concerto for Cello and Orchestra Arthur Honegger was born in Le Havre, France of Swiss parents and maintained a strong allegiance to (and the citizenship of) Switzerland throughout his life. He studied for two years at the Zurich Conservatory before transferring to the Paris Conservatoire, where his teachers included ABOUT THE COMPOSER: Gédalge, Widor and d’Indy. Honegger’s first imporBorn 10 March 1892 in Le Havre; tant work, a violin sonata, appeared in 1918, at died 27 November 1955 in Paris about the time that he was arbitrarily inducted by a PREMIERE OF WORK: Boston, 17 February 1930 French journalist into the group of composers Boston Symphony Orchestra known as “The French Six,” whose other members Sergei Koussevitzky, conductor included Poulenc, Milhaud and three lesser-known Maurice Maréchal, soloist figures. Though respectful of these musicians, and THESE PERFORMANCES MARK THE PSO PREMIERE supportive of the vibrant musical activity they brought to Paris, Honegger’s sympathies were as INSTRUMENTATION: woodwinds in pairs plus bass clarheavily weighted toward the traditions of Germany inet, two horns, two trumpets, tuba, as to those of France, and he drifted away from “Les timpani, percussion and strings Six” in the 1920s. Of his artistic philosophy, he APPROXIMATE DURATION: wrote, “I attach great importance to musical architec18 minutes ture, which I should never want to see sacrificed for reasons of literary or pictorial order. My model is Bach…. I do not seek, as do certain anti-Impressionists, the return to harmonic simplicity. I find, on the contrary, that we should use the harmonic materials created by the school which preceded us, but in a different way — as the base of lines and rhythms.” His oratorio King David (1921) and the “Symphonic Movement” Pacific 231 (1923), 44 pittsburghsymphony.org


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which suggests the speed and power of a locomotive, brought him international prominence, and he toured widely in Europe and the Americas for the last three decades of his life as lecturer, conductor and pianist. His large output comprises 30 stage works, including operas, oratorios, ballets and vaudevilles, a vast quantity of incidental music and film scores, five symphonies, many independent orchestral compositions, scores for chorus and orchestra, chamber music and songs. Of Honegger’s musical style, the critic Henry Prunières wrote, “In him ... the best qualities of French and German schools meet and blend. Simple melodies, with natural inflections, develop one from another. Each instrument in his chamber music, and each group of instruments in his orchestral scores, seems to have its individual life, and speaks its own language.” Maurice Maréchal (1892-1964) was among France’s leading cellists during the years between the two world wars, a prize-winning graduate and later faculty member of the Paris Conservatoire, principal cellist of the Lamoureux Orchestra, friend of Maurice Ravel (whom he advised on technical aspects of the Sonata for Violin and Cello and premiered with Hélène Jourdan-Morhange in 1922), André Caplet, and other prominent composers, and internationally acclaimed soloists. It was for Maréchal that Honegger composed his Cello Concerto in 1929 — Maréchal himself wrote the cadenza and gave the work’s premiere with Sergei Koussevitzky and the Boston Symphony Orchestra on February 17, 1930. Maréchal retained the Concerto in his repertory and recorded it with the composer conducting the Paris Conservatoire Orchestra in October 1943. Geoffrey K. Spratt of Ireland’s Cork University wrote in his 1987 study of Honegger of the Cello Concerto’s “deft combination of lighthearted joie de vivre with a graceful and intimate lyricism, divertissement with expressive restraint, non-intellectuality with a clear-cut and powerful structuring and traditional aspects of development, and elements of jazz with a touch of irony.” The Concerto opens with a luminous chord progression that billows peacefully from the orchestra to provide a cushion for the soloist’s ruminative introductory phrases. The first movement’s formal main theme borrows the syncopations and swing style of American jazz and popular music — Honegger, an admirer of George Gershwin’s songs and Rhapsody in Blue and Concerto in F, met the American composer when he visited Paris in the mid-1920s — and it is abruptly countered by a contrasting strain more aggressive in rhythm and angular in contour. Both ideas are treated in the development section before the music quiets to begin the recapitulation with the return of the main theme. The aggressive second theme is excised from the recapitulation so that the movement closes with a return of the halcyon introductory chords, strewn this time with delicate ribbons of scales by the soloist, and a brief reminiscence of the swing theme. The Lento is based on a plaintive melody of constricted range, short repeating figures and muffled-drums accompaniment that suggests a dirge. The center of the movement is occupied by a brief cadenza for the soloist that becomes more agitated and provokes the orchestra to join in a dramatic outburst. The woodwinds then set up a precise ostinato pattern above which the soloist recalls the plaintive opening melody to round out the movement’s three-part form. The finale takes as its principal subject a strongly rhythmic melody with a muscular, contrapuntal accompaniment; a broad, lyrical second theme arising from the cello’s low register provides formal and expressive contrast. The compact development section is mainly concerned with the first theme. The recapitulation ingeniously layers both subjects, beginning with the tuba’s growling, flutter-tongue version of the second theme combined with an imitative treatment of the main theme. The coda rounds out the PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA

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work’s formal cycle with a recall of the halcyon chords and the swing theme from the first movement before closing with a final iteration of the finale’s principal subject.

GEORGE GERSHWIN An American in Paris

In 1928, George Gershwin was not only the toast of Broadway, but of all America, Britain and many spots in Europe, as well: he had produced a string of successful shows (Rosalie and Funny Face were both running on Broadway that spring), composed two of the most popular concert pieces in recent memory ABOUT THE COMPOSER: (Rhapsody in Blue and the Piano Concerto in F), and Born 26 September 1898 in was leading a life that would have made the most Brooklyn, New York; died 12 July 1937 in Hollywood, California glamorous socialite jealous. The pace-setting PREMIERE OF WORK: Rhapsody in Blue of 1924 had shown a way to New York, 13 December 1928 bridge the worlds of jazz and serious music, a direcNew York Symphony tion Gershwin followed further in the exuberant yet Walter Damrosch, conductor haunting Concerto in v F the following year. He was PSO PREMIERE: 19 November 1933 eager to move further into the concert world, and Syria Mosque during a side trip in March 1926 to Paris from Antonio Modarelli, conductor London, where he was preparing the English preINSTRUMENTATION: miere of Lady Be Good, he hit upon an idea, a piccolo, three flutes, two oboes, “walking theme” he called it, that seemed to capture English horn, two clarinets, bass clarinet, three saxophones, two basthe impression of an American visitor to the city “as soons, four horns, three trumpets, he strolls about, listens to the various street noises, three trombones, tuba, timpani, and absorbs the French atmosphere.” He worried percussion, celesta and strings that “this melody is so complete in itself, I don’t APPROXIMATE DURATION: 17 minutes know where to go next,” but the purchase of four Parisian taxi horns on the Avenue de la Grande Armée inspired a second theme for the piece. Late in 1927, a commission for a new orchestral composition from Walter Damrosch, music director of the New York Symphony and conductor of the sensational premiere of the Concerto in F, caused Gershwin to gather up his Parisian sketches, and by January 1928, he was at work on the score: An American in Paris. From March to June, Gershwin was in Europe, renewing acquaintances in London, hobnobbing with Milhaud, Prokofiev, Poulenc, Ibert, Ravel and Boulanger in Paris (Ravel turned down Gershwin’s request for some composition lessons, telling him that anybody making as much money as he did hardly needed instruction), meeting Berg, Lehár and Kálmán in Vienna, and working on An American in Paris as time allowed. He returned to New York in late June to discover that the New York Symphony had announced the premiere for the upcoming season. The two-piano sketch was finished by August 1, and the orchestration completed only a month before the premiere, on December 13, 1928. An American in Paris, though met with a mixed critical reception, proved a great success with the public, and it quickly became clear that Gershwin had scored yet another hit. 46 pittsburghsymphony.org

PROGRAM NOTES BY DR. RICHARD E. RODDA


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PARIS FESTIVAL: THE CITY OF LIGHT | CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART & CARNEGIE MUSIC HALL SATURDAY, MAY 12, 2012 | DISCUSSION & PERFORMANCE AT 6:30 PM RECEPTION & GALLERIES OPEN AT 7:30 PM

THE ART & MUSIC

OF

AVANT-GARDE PARIS

A COLLABORATIVE PROGRAM OF CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART AND THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA PANELISTS:

MANFRED HONECK, MUSIC DIRECTOR, PSO NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY, CONCERTMASTER, PSO LINDA BENEDICT-JONES, CURATOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY, CMA AMANDA T. ZEHNDER, ASSOCIATE CURATOR OF FINE ARTS, CMA MODERATOR:

MARY E. DAVIS,

PROFESSOR OF MUSICOLOGY, CASE WESTERN RESERVE UNIVERSITY

Danse sacrée et danse profane (Dances for Harp and Strings)

CLAUDE DEBUSSY

GRETCHEN VAN HOESEN, HARP NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY, VIOLIN SHANSHAN YAO, VIOLIN MENG WANG, VIOLA DAVID PREMO, CELLO AARON WHITE, BASS

FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCE, ENJOY AN HORS D’OEUVRES RECEPTION AND EXHIBITION PREVIEW. GALLERIES REMAIN OPEN UNTIL 9:30 PM.

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In November 2006, the R.P. Simmons Family made a transformational $29.5 million lead gift to launch the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra's Commitment to Excellence Campaign.

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2011-2012 SEASON

DAPHNE ALDERSON

Daphne Alderson‘s diverse, eclectic career as lyric contralto includes opera, oratorio, chamber music and cabaret throughout the United States, Canada and Italy. The Pittsburgh Post-Gazette calls her, “An artist of dignified passion,” (Handel’s Messiah) and an artist of “Beautifully rendered love songs.” This past year, Alderson debuted with Microscopic Opera as Agnes in Tobias Picker’s Fantastic Mr. Fox, preceded by her performance as Mère Jeanne in Pittsburgh Opera’s critically acclaimed production of Poulenc’s Dialogues of the Carmelites. In a career that began in opera, she broke ground, writing original material and launching a cabaret/concert touring career. Several shows were commissioned specifically for her in collaborations with Heinz Chapel and The Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall. Both “An American in Paris, World War II” and “Songs That Oscar Taught Me” toured extensively through the Mid-Atlantic States. Her most recent show celebrates the world of Judy Garland and Edith Piaf. Her roles include Purcell’s Sorceress, Puccini’s La Zia Principessa, Rossini’s L’Italiana, Hansel, and Desiree in A Little Night Music with companies that include Central City Opera, Opera North, Wheeling Symphony, Chatham Baroque and Opera Theatre of Pittsburgh. Recent projects include appearances at the Whittaker Center in Harrisburg, Bricolage Theatre, IonSound Project, chamber music with members of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and tours in Central and South America with guitarist, John Marcinizyn. She is an Associate Professor of Voice at Seton Hill University.

ATTACK THEATRE

Under the artistic direction of Peter Kope and Michele de la Reza, Attack Theatre has toured extensively throughout the U.S., Europe and Asia, choreographing and performing works for the Avignon Festival (France), Indonesia Arts Festival, Monaco Danses Forum, Spoleto Festival USA, the 7th Next Wave Dance Festival (Japan) and the Broadway production of Squonk. Attack Theatre seamlessly blends dance, multi-media, and live music, creating “wickedly entertaining stage productions” (Pittsburgh City Paper). Known for their interdisciplinary collaborations, Peter and Michele have worked with Pittsburgh Opera and Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra since 1998 choreographing more than two-dozen operas and symphonies. Attack Theatre has collaborated with The 52 pittsburghsymphony.org


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Andy Warhol Museum, The Carnegie Museum of Art, Quantum Theatre, August Wilson Center, among others, and has produced more than 150 original works worldwide. Attack Theatre is the recipient of three PA Council on the Arts fellowships, the Harry Schwalb Excellence in the Arts Award, Hardie Arts Educator of the Year Award, named one of “25 to Watch” (Dance Magazine), named “Best Dance Company in Pittsburgh” (Pittsburgh City Paper ‘06 – ‘11) and named Pittsburgh’s Top 50 Cultural Powerbrokers (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ’02 – ’06). Peter and Michele are acclaimed master teachers in schools and universities, and are faculty members at Carnegie Mellon University where Attack Theatre is Dance Company in Residence for the School of Music. Peter and Michele were founding company members of NYC based PerksDanceMusicTheatre, lead dancers with Dance Alloy, and Peter performed with Jacob Pillow’s Men Dancers: The Ted Shawn Legacy and the Dayton Contemporary Dance Company. For more information visit attacktheatre.com.

NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY

Noah Bendix-Balgley has thrilled and moved audiences around the world with his violin performances. In May 2011, he won 1st prize at the Vibrarte International Music Competition in Paris, France. A Laureate of the 2009 Queen Elisabeth Competition in Brussels, Noah also won 3rd prize and a special prize for creativity at the 2008 Long-Thibaud International Competition in Paris. He was awarded first prize and a special prize for best Bach interpretation at the 14th International Violin Competition “Andrea Postacchini” in Fermo, Italy. Bendix-Balgley has appeared as a soloist with the Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France (Théâtre du Châtelet, Paris), the Orchestre National de Belgique (Palais des Beaux-Arts, Brussels), the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra, Orchestre Royal de Chambre de Wallonie (Belgium), the Orchestra Filarmonica Marchigiana (Italy), the Orchester Jakobsplatz Munich, and the Asheville Symphony (USA). He performed the premiere of a rediscovered Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Viola and Orchestra by Carl Stamitz at the German Viola Congress in Muenster, Germany. In March 2011, he performed recitals at the Jewish Music Festival in the San Francisco Bay Area featuring little known works by Achron and other members of the St. Petersburg School. Noah has performed in Austria, Germany, France, Belgium, Italy, Iceland, China, Switzerland, Great Britain, Canada and the U.S. Bendix-Balgley is a passionate and experienced chamber musician. In 2011, he performed on North American tour with the Miro String Quartet. From 2008 to 2011, Noah was the 1st violinist of the Munich-based Athlos String Quartet, which won a special prize at the 2009 Felix MendelssohnBartholdy Competition in Berlin, and performed throughout Europe. In 2008, Noah was invited to participate in Chamber Music Connects the World in Kronberg, Germany, where he worked and performed with Gidon Kremer, Yuri Bashmet, Gary Hoffman and Lynn Harrell. He has collaborated with artists such as Ana Chumachenco, Wen-Sinn Yang, Hariolf Schlichtig, and percussionist Colin Currie. Noah has performed at number festivals in Europe and North America, including the Verbier Festival, the Sarasota Festival, and Centre d’Arts Orford. Bendix-Balgley earned his postgraduate Meisterklasse diploma for violin in 2008 from Hochschule für Musik und Theater Munich, where he studied with Professor Christoph Poppen and Professor Ana Chumachenco. In 2006, he received a bachelor of music degree with highest distinction from the Indiana University Jacobs School of Music, where he was a student of Professor Mauricio Fuks and also a Wells Scholar. He has performed in masterclasses for Gidon Kremer, Ida Haendel, Zakhar Bron, Joseph Silverstein, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg, Pamela Frank and Itzhak Perlman. pittsburghsymphony.org 53


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Born in Asheville, North Carolina in 1984, Bendix-Balgley began playing violin at age four. At age nine, he played for Lord Yehudi Menuhin in Switzerland. From 1995 to 1997, he studied violin with Anne Crowden while attending The Crowden School in Berkeley, California. There he performed the premiere of Recitative and Freilekhs, a piece for violin and chamber orchestra written for him by Arkadi Serper. Bendix-Balgley was also featured as a soloist on the 1997 Crowden School tour of England and Scotland. In his spare time, Bendix-Balgley enjoys playing klezmer music. He has played with worldrenowned klezmer groups such as Brave Old World, and has taught klezmer violin at workshops in Europe and in the United States. Noah plays on a Lorenzo Ventapane violin, made in Naples in the early 19th century. Noah Bendix-Balgley’s first recital CD, A Musical Tour of the early 20th Century (Anima Records) was recorded in Switzerland in May 2011 and is now available.

LINDA BENEDICT-JONES

Linda Benedict-Jones has been Curator of Photography at Carnegie Museum of Art since 2008, when the Department of Photography was formed. Prior to this she served for 10 years as Executive Director of Silver Eye Center for Photography, a small non-profit arts organization on Pittsburgh’s historic Carson Street. She has also been Curator of Education at The Frick Art & Historical Center (1997–1999) and Curator of The Polaroid Collection in Cambridge, Massachusetts before moving to Pittsburgh in 1993. She authored the principal essays and biographies for Pittsburgh Revealed: Photographs Since 1850. Benedict-Jones received a master of science in Visual Studies degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a Bachelor of Science from the University of Wisconsin at LaCrosse. She most recently curated Picturing the City: Downtown Pittsburgh, 2007–2010. In addition to working at the museum, she teaches courses in the history of photography at Carnegie Mellon University.

BOILERMAKER JAZZ BAND

Boilermaker Jazz Band is an ecstatically fun band performing authentic hot jazz and swing. The group has a wide repertoire that can make an audience swing to a classic jazz standard, get sentimental over an old-time ballad, boogie to a hot jump tune, or get low-down with a gritty blues. Leading the Boilermaker Jazz Band on clarinet and vocals is Paul Cosentino, a full time bandleader/performer who founded the band in 1988 at Carnegie Mellon University. Cosentino plays an antique Albert system clarinet giving him a wonderfully distinctive sound. The band also features fabulous female singer Jennie Luvv who will thrill you with her smooth and sultry vocal stylings. From bar room ballads and not-so-standard standards to hot and bubblin’ swing, Luvv’s performances add a touch of sophistication to the Boilermaker ensemble. The band has performed at major festivals, concert halls, ballrooms, colleges and clubs throughout the world, including Lincoln Center in New York City, The Edinburgh International Festival in Scotland, and the Smithsonian Institute in Washington, D.C.

DAVID BUDWAY

Max Jazz Recording Artist, David Budway is one of the most versatile pianists on the New York music scene 54 pittsburghsymphony.org


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today. Deeply rooted in many styles, his masterful command for Modern Jazz vocabulary has propelled him into the midst of present day jazz pioneers. He has recorded and performed with Branford Marsalis, Michael Brecker, Stanley Turrentine, Hubert Laws and Jeff “Tain” Watts. Performing and recording credits include Jimmy Heath, Jon Faddis, Louie Belson, Mark Murphy, Marlena Shaw, Ravi Coltrane, Joe Pass, Randy Brecker, Wynton Marsalis and George Benson. Performances include Carnegie Hall, Town Hall, Merkin Hall, The Village Vanguard, Blue Note, Cotton Club, The Jazz Standard, Zinc Bar and Smalls. Budway’s forthcoming release on Max Jazz, A New Kiss, features Branford Marsalis, Jeff “Tain” Watts, Eric Revos, Ron Affif, Marcus Strickland and Joe Barbato. As a classical piano artist, Budway has given countless recitals including guest appearances with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Detroit Symphony Orchestra ( with Hubert Laws ), the Steinway Society and the Pittsburgh Concert Society.

MAUREEN BUDWAY

JIM CUNNINGHAM

WQED MULTIMEDIA

Maureen Budway was born and raised in Pittsburgh. Her career as a jazz singer started with her brother, jazz pianist David Budway, at a jazz club called the Balcony. She went on to receive a bachelor’s degree in jazz performance from Duquesne University where she studied both classical and jazz voice. She holds a master of fine arts degree from Carnegie Mellon University. She is a winner of the Pittsburgh Concert Society. Her performances include the role of “Cozy Cool” in the Duke Ellington jazz opera Beggar’s Holiday with Opera Theater of Pittsburgh. Budway has performed on numerous occasions with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra; sang a Billy Strayhorn tribute in the jazz ballet Indigo in Motion with the Pittsburgh Ballet Theater; performed with jazz drummer and downbeat pole winner Jeff “Tain” Watts at the Frick Mansion; with renowned jazz drummer Louis Bellson in the Duke Ellington Jazz Mass; Hidden Valley Jazz Festival with jazz flutist Hubert Laws; with New York musicians Ron Afif, Eric Revis, E.J. Strickland, Jonathan Kreisberg and Freddie Bryant. She is a member of the 21st Century Swing Band, and their brand new CD Pittsburgh Jazz Legacy. Other recordings include Maureen Budway and the Freddie Bryant Trio, The Mass of Hope by Joe Negri, Latinventions by Salsamba, and Jazz…the Budway. Budway is a member of the voice faculty at Duquesne University. WQED-FM's Artistic Director Jim Cunningham hosts the WQED-FM Morning Show weekday mornings from 611 a.m., and the nationally syndicated Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra broadcasts, which air at 8 p.m. on Sundays and are heard on more than 150 Public Radio stations. A native of Warren, Pa., Cunningham served as station manager of WQED-FM for 15 years, leading the team that established WQEJ Johnstown. He also began 24-hour classical broadcasts, expanded live broadcasts in annual series from Carnegie Mellon, Duquesne University, Chautauqua New York, Heinz Hall and Heinz Chapel, and initiated new programs, including Symphony Weekend with Mariss Jansons, national distribution of concerts from the River City Brass Band and numerous holiday specials. He began writing for Pittsburgh Magazine in 1989 and served as the Classical Music Editor, contributing a monthly column for 15 years. He has produced, hosted more than 30 features for WQEDpittsburghsymphony.org 55


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LISE DE LA SALLE

PHOTO CREDIT: LYNN GOLDSMITH

TV's nightly OnQ Magazine, and twice produced feature programs with Andre Rieu in Rieu's hometown of Maastricht, the Netherlands. He has traveled as a correspondent with the PSO on 20 world tours to Europe, Japan, South America, Australia and the Orient. Some of his most memorable radio broadcasts were sent live from the Vatican, Great Wall in China, Moscow, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Kuala Lumpur, Sao Paulo, Buenos Aires, Montevideo, Sydney, BBC Proms in London, and the Salzburg Music Festival in Austria, where he produced the first international live digital broadcast. During his career, Cunningham has interviewed some of the biggest names in music and the arts, including Itzhak Perlman, Isaac Stern, Ravi Shankar, Benny Goodman, Wynton Marsalis, Yehudi Menuhin, Leonard Bernstein, Andre Previn, Lorin Maazel, Mstislav Rostropovich, filmmaker Gordon Parks, Graham Chapman of Monty Python, Salman Rushdie, Robert Redford, and Fred Rogers. Cunningham has won numerous awards, including several Golden Quills from the Press Club of Western Pennsylvania, Air Award from March of Dimes, Gabriel Award from U.S. Catholic Broadcasters, Opera Theater of Pittsburgh's Millie Award, and the Paul Ross Award for Education and Community Engagement from the PSO.

In just a few years, through her international concert appearances and her award-winning Naïve recordings, 22 year-old Lise de la Salle has established a presence as one of today’s most exciting young artists and a musician of uncommon sensibility and maturity. Her playing inspired a Washington Post critic to write, “For much of the concert, the audience had to remember to breathe...the exhilaration didn’t let up for a second until her hands came off the keyboard.” A native of France, now living in Paris, Ms. de la Salle first came to international attention in 2005, at the age of 16, with a Bach/Liszt recording that was selected as “Recording of the Month” by Gramophone Magazine. She was similarly recognized in 2008 for her Naive recording of first concertos of Liszt, Prokofiev and Shostakovich – a remarkable feat for someone only 20 years old. This season brings the release of Ms. de la Salle’s fifth CD - a Chopin disc including a live recording of the Piano Concerto 2, opus 2 with Fabio Luisi conducting the Staatskapelle Dresden as well as the Four Ballades. In this country, she has played with the Boston Symphony, Chicago Symphony at the Ravinia Festival, San Francisco Symphony, twice with the Los Angeles Philharmonic and she will make her second appearance with the Minnesota Orchestra in the Gershwin Concerto in F this season. During the past few seasons, de la Salle’s North American appearances included recitals in New York, Montreal, San Francisco, Vancouver, Quebec, St. Paul, at the Gilmore International Keyboard Festival, Duke University and in Miami, among others. In April 2006, de la Salle made her Lincoln Center debut, performing Liszt’s Concerto No. 1 with the Orchestra of St. Luke’s conducted by Keith Lockhart. She has also been heard in Berlin, London and Paris and made concerto appearances in Lisbon, Copenhagen, St. Petersburg and Lyon. Lise de la Salle’s 2010-2011 season opened with a performance of Rachmaninov Paganini variations with the Tonhalle Orchester Zürich and Simon Gaudenz. Additional orchestral highlights include Beethoven 3 with Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos and the Dresdner Philharmoniker; a return to the Minnesota Orchestra under the baton of Osmo Vanska, who engaged her for three consecutive seasons; debut performances with Colorado Symphony and Peter Oundjian and the Quebec Symphony with Yoav Talmi. She closes the season performing Mozart’s Jeunehomme with Lorin Maazel and the London Philharmonia. Recitals in Vienna’s Konzerthaus, the Paris Theatre des Champs Elysée, Hamburg’s Ladiszhalle, Chicago’s Mandel Hall, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art and at the Ansbach Bach Week, among others, will feature works by Bach, Liszt, Chopin, and 56 pittsburghsymphony.org


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Schumann. As a Young Concert Artists alumna, she will join the organization’s 50th anniversary musical marathon celebration at Symphony Space. Lise de la Salle’s 2009-2010 season included her debut with the Boston Symphony led by Fabio Luisi; her first subscription concerts with the Los Angeles Philharmonic with James Conlon, with whom she also appeared to enthusiastic audiences at the Aspen and Ravinia Festivals; as well as her debut in the fabled Musikverein with the Vienna Symphony. In this and recent seasons, de la Salle’s appearances included recitals in Paris, London (Wigmore Hall), Lucerne Festival Piano Series, Stuttgart, Copenhagen, Luxemburg, Salzburg and the Verbier Festival. Other engagements included the Philharmonia Orchestra in London, the Dresden Staatskapelle, the Stuttgart Radio Orchestra and the Munich Philharmonic Orchestra. She records exclusively for the Naïve label. De la Salle was also the subject of a multi-page feature in Vanity Fair Germany where they said, “An extremely personal beauty emanated from the pieces that she played. Lise de la Salle articulated all the voices with wonderful clarity and variety of expression.” De la Salle won the 2003 European Young Concert Artists Auditions in Paris and the 2004 Young Concert Artists International Auditions in New York. The organization presented her in her New York and Washington, D.C. debuts in October 2004. In 2000, Ms. de la Salle won first prize and the Bärenreiter Award at the Ettlingen International Competition in Germany. She has won first prize in many French piano competitions, including the Steinway, Sucy, Vulaines and Radio-France Competitions. In 2003, she won the “Groupe Banque Populaire Natexis” Prize, for which she received a three-year scholarship. Born in Cherbourg, France in 1988, de la Salle was surrounded by music from her earliest childhood. She began studying the piano at age four and gave her first concert at nine in a live broadcast on Radio-France. At 13, she made her concerto debut with Beethoven’s Piano Concerto No. 2 in Avignon, and her Paris recital debut at the Louvre before going on tour with the Orchestre National d’Ile de France playing Haydn’s Concerto in D major. After receiving special permission to enter the Paris Conservatoire Supérieur de Musique studying with Pierre Réach, at the age of 11, de la Salle graduated in 2001 and subsequently enrolled in the postgraduate cycle with Bruno Rigutto. She has worked closely with Pascal Nemirovski since 1997 and also studied with Genevieve Joy-Dutilleux.

MARY E. DAVIS

Professor of Musicology at Case Western Reserve University since 2009, Mary E. Davis specializes in crossdisciplinary studies of music, fashion and culture. Her most recent book, Ballets Russes Style: Diaghilev’s Dancers and Paris Fashion, published in 2010 by London-based Reaktion Books, has been acclaimed as “a well amalgamated combination of history, art history, ballet history, and fashion history” and earned praise in sources ranging from The New York Times and The Independent, to specialized academic journals. Her earlier books include Erik Satie, published in the Critical Lives series at Reaktion Books in 2008 and heralded as “a lucid, elegantly written biography and a distinguished addition to the general literature on the composer,” and the monograph Classic Chic: Music, Fashion, and Modernism, published in 2006 by the University of California Press. Classic Chic, issued in paperback in 2008, was short-listed for the Costume Society of America’s Millia Davenport Publication Award and has been cited by a variety of publications across disciplines as a significant contribution to understandings of cultural history. Other work in this area includes the essay “Refashioning the Fashion Plate: Poiret in Context” which appeared in Poiret, the catalogue issued in conjunction with the 2007 exhibit dedicated to Paul Poiret at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the essay “Chanel, Stravinsky, and Musical Chic,” pittsburghsymphony.org 57


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published in the journal Fashion Theory. A frequent lecturer on these topics, Davis has recently been invited to speak about her work at institutions including The Parsons School of Art and Design, The New School, Boston University, Harvard University and The Cleveland Museum of Art and at meetings of the American Musicological Society and the Society for American Music.

JUAN JOSÉ DE LEÓN

MANFRED HONECK

PHOTO CREDIT: FELIX BROEDE

Juan José de León is a first-year resident artist at Pittsburgh Opera. In the 2011-2012 season, he appears as Gastone/La traviata, Spoletta/Tosca and Nadir/The Pearl Fishers Student Matinee. His performance experience includes Benvolio/Romeo et Juliette at The Dallas Opera, El Remendado/Carmen and Jimmy O’Keefe/Later the Same Evening at Glimmerglass Festival; Don Ramiro/La cenerentola at Seagle Music Colony; Tamino/The Magic Flute and Rinuccio/Gianni Schicchi at University of North Texas, among others. De León was a National Semi-Finalist at the Metropolitan National Council Auditions, an Audience Favorite at Opera Birmingham Vocal Competition, one of the winners in The Dallas Opera Guild Competition, and received an Encouragement Award from the Dallas Opera Guild Vocal Competition. He has participated in singer training programs at Glimmerglass Festival and Seagle Music Colony, and holds a master’s degree in music from Southern Methodist University as well as a bachelor’s degree in music from the University of North Texas. Manfred Honeck was born in Austria and studied music at the Academy of Music in Vienna. An accomplished violinist and violist, he spent more than ten years as a member of the Vienna Philharmonic and the Vienna State Opera Orchestra. It is this experience that has heavily influenced his conducting and has helped give it a distinctive stamp. Manfred Honeck was appointed the ninth music director of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in January 2007 and began his tenure at the start of the 2008-2009 season. In February 2012, Honeck agreed to extend his contract through the 2019-2020 Season. Following their successful European Tour in 2010 and the European Festival Tour 2011 with appearances at the major music festivals, such as BBC Proms, Lucerne, Grafenegg, Rheingau, Schleswig-Holstein or Musikfest Berlin, Manfred Honeck and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will return to Europe in October/November 2012. Manfred Honeck’s successful work in Pittsburgh is captured on CD by the Japanese label Exton. So far, Mahler’s Symphonies Nos. 1, 3 and 4, Tchaikovsky’s Symphony No. 5 and Richard Strauss’ Ein Heldenleben have been released to critical acclaim. From 2007 to 2011, Manfred Honeck was music director of the Staatsoper Stuttgart where he conducted premieres including Berlioz’s Les Troyens, Mozart’s Idomeneo, Verdi’s Aida, Richard Strauss’ Rosenkavalier, Poulenc’s Dialogues des Carmélites and Wagner’s Lohengrin and Parsifal as well as numerous symphonic concerts. His operatic guest appearances include Semperoper Dresden, Komische Oper Berlin, Théâtre de la Monnaie in Brussels, Royal Opera of Copenhagen, the White Nights Festival in St. Petersburg, the Salzburg Festival and the Verbier Festival. Honeck commenced his conducting career as assistant to Claudio Abbado at the Gustav Mahler 58 pittsburghsymphony.org


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Youth Orchestra in Vienna. Subsequently, he was engaged by the Zurich Opera House from 19911996, where he was awarded the prestigious European Conductor’s Award in 1993. In 1996, Honeck began a three-year stint as one of three main conductors of the MDR Symphony Orchestra Leipzig, and in 1997, he served as music director at the Norwegian National Opera in Oslo for a year. A highly successful tour of Europe with the Oslo Philharmonic marked the beginning of a close collaboration with this orchestra, which consequently appointed him principal guest conductor, a post he held from 1998-2004. From 2000 to 2006, Maestro Honeck was Music Director of the Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra and served as principal guest conductor of the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra from 2008 to 2011. As a guest conductor, Manfred Honeck has worked with such major European orchestras as the Deutsches Symphonie-Orchester Berlin, Gewandhausorchester Leipzig, Bavarian Radio Symphony Orchestra, Sächsische Staatskapelle Dresden, Royal Concertgebouw Orchestra, London Philharmonic Orchestra, Orchestre Philharmonique de Radio France and the Vienna Philharmonic, and in the U.S. with the Chicago Symphony Orchestra, Los Angeles Philharmonic, National Symphony Orchestra Washington and Boston Symphony Orchestra. Guest engagements of the season 2011-2012 will see him return to his earlier places of activity in Stockholm, Oslo, Prague and Stuttgart and he will also conduct other prestigious orchestras including Staatskapelle Dresden, Bamberg Symphony, Orchestre de Paris, Israel Philharmonic Orchestra and Chicago Symphony. He will moreover appear at the Beijing Music Festival and return to Verbier. In 2010, Manfred Honeck earned an honorary doctorate from St. Vincent College in Latrobe, Pennsylvania. Apart from his numerous tasks as conductor, he has been artistic director of the “International Concerts Wolfegg” in Germany for more than 15 years.

PAUL JACOBS

PHOTO CREDIT: CHRISTINA WILTON

Paul Jacobs made musical history at the age of 23 when, on the 250th anniversary of the death of J.S. Bach, in 2000, he played the composer’s complete organ music in an 18-hour non-stop marathon in Pittsburgh. Today, Jacobs, hailed for his solid musicianship, prodigious technique and vivid interpretive imagination in performances throughout the United States, Europe, South America, Asia and Australia, is widely acknowledged for reinvigorating the American organ scene with a fresh performance style and “an unbridled joy of music-making” (Baltimore Sun). In 2003, Jacobs was invited to join the faculty of The Juilliard School, and the following year, he was named chairman of the organ department, one of the youngest faculty appointments in Juilliard’s history. Known for his “charismatic showmanship and unflagging exuberance” (Wall Street Journal), Jacobs possesses a vast repertoire spanning from the 16th century through contemporary times, including several works written for him by Samuel Adler and Christopher Theofanidis, among others. He has performed the complete organ works of Olivier Messiaen in a series of nine-hour marathons in Atlanta, Los Angeles, Minneapolis, San Francisco, Seattle, Washington, D.C., Chicago, where the Chicago Tribune called him “one of the most supremely gifted young organists of his generation,” and in New York, where The New York Times praised his “supple technique and vivid interpretive imagination.” Jacobs opened his 2009-2010 season with a performance in New York City of J.S. Bach’s Six Trio Sonatas for Organ. In other highlights, he will be presented once again by the San Francisco Symphony and the Pacific Symphony, and will return to Philadelphia for a recital at the Kimmel Center. When Jacobs played in Anchorage, Alaska in November, he performed in every one of America’s 50 states. Last season, Jacobs gave the modern-day premiere in Philadelphia of an unpublished prelude pittsburghsymphony.org 59


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and fugue by Samuel Barber, was presented by the San Francisco Symphony both in concert and in recital as part of their celebrations of the 25th anniversary of the orchestra’s Ruffatti organ, and recorded the Messiaen masterwork, Livre du Saint Sacrement, which is scheduled for release by Naxos in September 2010. In addition, his concert in our nation’s capital last fall was named as one of the best performances of 2008 by the Washington Post, and the previous season, New York Magazine named him as the best organist of 2007. Paul Jacobs is sought after to perform in concert halls, universities and churches across the country to dedicate their new and newly renovated organs. He is also in demand as a judge at international organ competitions, and in November 2009 he represented the U.S. at the First International Organ Braudo-Competition, in St. Petersburg, Russia, where he also made his performance debut. Paul Jacobs began studying the piano at the age of six and the organ at age 13. At 15, he was appointed head organist of a parish of 3,500 families in his hometown of Washington, Pennsylvania. Jacobs studied at The Curtis Institute of Music, where he double-majored in organ with John Weaver and harpsichord with Lionel Party. At Yale University, where Mr. Jacobs subsequently studied organ with Thomas Murray, he received a master of music degree and artist diploma and was awarded several honors, including Yale School of Music’s Distinguished Alumni Award. Jacobs captured first prize in numerous competitions, including the 1998 Albert Schweitzer National Organ Competition and was the first organist ever to be honored with the Harvard Musical Association’s Arthur W. Foote Award. Among his other honors, Jacobs was named the recipient of Juilliard’s 2007 William Schuman Scholar’s Chair. In addition to concert appearances and teaching, Jacobs has been a featured performer at national and regional conventions of the American Guild of Organists and performs frequently at festivals throughout the United States and abroad. He has appeared on American Public Media’s “Pipedreams,” “Performance Today,” and “Saint Paul Sunday,” Bavarian Radio, Brazilian Arts Television, ABC-TV’s “World News Tonight,” Australian Broadcasting Corporation, NPR’s “Morning Edition,” CBC Radio, and was recently featured on Robert Schuller’s “Hour of Power” from the Crystal Cathedral.

STEPHANIE LAURICELLA

Stephanie Lauricella is a second-year resident artist with Pittsburgh Opera. In the 2011-2012 season, she appears as Flora/La traviata and Hansel/Hansel & Gretel. She also appears as a guest artist in Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9 with Erie Philharmonic. In the 2010-2011 season she performed as Rosina/The Barber of Seville Student Matinee, the title role in Rinaldo and Sister Mathilde/Dialogues of the Carmelites. Lauricella spent summer 2010 at The Santa Fe Opera as an apprentice artist, covering Kate Pinkerton/Madama Butterfly, Second Lady/The Magic Flute, and Estrella in the world premiere of Life is a Dream. Lauricella’s other roles include Mrs. Segstrom/A Little Night Music, Angelina/La cenerentola, Lola/Cavalleria Rusticana, and Hansel/Hansel and Gretel. She has also performed in scene studies as Meg Page/Falstaff, Rosina/The Barber of Seville, and Romeo/I Capuleti e i Montecchi. Lauricella is a past studio and apprentice artist at Sarasota Opera and at Central City Opera, where she was awarded the McGlone Award. She recently won the 2011 Fritz and Lavinia Jensen Foundation Encouragement Award, MONC Great Lakes Region second place in 2011, and William Matheus Sullivan Award winner in 2010. She also studied in Italy at the Opera Theater and Music Festival of Lucca. Lauricella holds a master’s of music in vocal performance from Manhattan School of Music and is currently studying with Barbara Honn in New York City. 60 pittsburghsymphony.org


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LAWRENCE LOH

Resident Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Music Director of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic and Music Director of the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Loh is one of the most exciting young talents on the classical music scene today. He was brought to national attention in February 2004 when he substituted last minute for an ailing Charles Dutoit with the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Conducting Stravinsky’s Petrouchka and Berlioz’s Symphonie Fantastique, Loh received enthusiastic acclaim from orchestra players, audience members and critics, alike. Since his appointment as Music Director of the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic in 2005, the orchestra has flourished artistically, defining its reputation as one of the finest regional orchestras in the country. His leadership has attracted such artists as André Watts, Anne Akiko Meyers, Jon Nakamatsu, Zuill Bailey and Sharon Isbin. A champion of early childhood exposure to music, Loh created a family concert series that is dedicated to the youngest of audiences. He is very active in the region as an arts leader and music advocate, and is constantly in demand as a guest speaker and clinician. As Resident Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Lawrence Loh works closely with Music Director Manfred Honeck and conducts a wide range of concerts including classical, educational and pops. He is active in the PSO’s Community Engagement and Partnership Concerts, extending the PSO’s reach into other communities. Recent notable concerts with the Pittsburgh Symphony include performances of Dvorak’s 7th Symphony, Mendelssohn’s 4th Symphony and Beethoven’s 7th Symphony on a concert featuring violinist Sarah Chang. He made his debut on the main classical series conducting Handel’s Messiah in December 2008. As the conductor of the enormously popular Fiddlesticks Family Series “Bringing Music to the Lives of Children,” Lawrence Loh plays the part of host and conductor. In addition to his duties on the podium, he is an audience favorite in the PSO’s Concert Preludes lecture series, edits radio broadcasts, and makes many public appearances. His association with the PSO began as Assistant Conductor in 2005-2006. He was promoted to Associate Conductor in 2006-2007 and to Resident Conductor in 2007-2008. Lawrence Loh’s recent guest conducting engagements include his debut with the Seoul Philharmonic and a return engagement with the Dallas Symphony. Other recent guest conducting appearances include the Malaysian Philharmonic, the Detroit Symphony and the San Angelo Symphony. He has conducted the symphony orchestras of Portland, Cedar Rapids, Colorado Springs, East Texas, Fort Collins, Fort Worth, Lubbock, Plano, Shreveport, Sioux City, Spokane and Tallahassee among others. He has also led Korea’s Daejeon Philharmonic Orchestra, the Binghamton Philharmonic, the Yale Philharmonia, Omaha Area Youth Orchestra, Ottawa’s National Arts Centre Orchestra and the Dallas Chamber Orchestra. His summer appearances include the festivals of Bravo Vail Valley, Breckenridge, Las Vegas and Hot Springs, the Kinhaven Music Academy, the Performing Arts Institute (PA) and the Carnegie Mellon Summer Strings Camp. Lawrence Loh held the positions of assistant and associate conductor of the Dallas Symphony from 2001-2005. He led the Dallas Symphony in a variety of classical and educational programs throughout each season including classical subscription. Highlights include impassioned performances of Brahms’ Requiem, Rachmaninoff’s Symphonic Dances and Brahms’ 2nd Symphony. Prior to his Dallas appointment, Lawrence Loh was appointed by Music Director Marin Alsop to be associate conductor of the Colorado Symphony Orchestra. From 1998-2001, he conducted more than 50 concerts annually, including classical subscription, pops, education, family and outreach programs. While in Denver, he was also music director of the Denver Young Artists Orchestra, the premiere youth orchestra in the Colorado Rocky Mountain Region. Additionally, Mr. Loh served pittsburghsymphony.org 61


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as the interim director of orchestras and head of the Orchestral Conducting Program at Denver University’s Lamont School of Music in 2000-2001. In May 1998, Lawrence Loh received his artist diploma in Orchestral Conducting from Yale University, also earning the Eleazar de Carvalho Prize, given to the most outstanding conductor in the Yale graduating class. During his years at Yale, he was chosen to be the assistant conductor of the Norwalk Symphony Orchestra and apprentice conductor of the Hot Springs Music Festival. He received further training at the world-renowned Aspen Music Festival and School and has additional degrees from Indiana University and the University of Rochester. A dedicated teacher, Loh held the position of associate instructor in music theory at Indiana University and, later, that of teaching assistant at Yale University in Advanced Hearing, Conducting and Orchestration. He was also the guest curator at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science for “What Makes Music?” an interactive exhibit, offering the opportunity to explore the science of music and sound, as well as the role of music in culture. Lawrence Loh was born in southern California of Korean parentage and raised in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. He and his wife Jennifer have a son, Charlie, and a daughter, Hilary.

MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH

As Pittsburgh’s oldest continuing performing arts organization at 103 years young, The Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh is passionate about choral music. By singing choral music at the highest level, the Choir combines the clarity of words with the mystical power of music so that the deepest and most universal of human expressions are magnified through a community of voices. As the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s “chorus of choice,” the Mendelssohn Choir has performed under the baton of some of the world’s foremost conductors including Lorin Maazel, Mariss Jansons, Rafael Frühbeck de Burgos, Michael Tilson Thomas, Claudio Abbado, Mstislav Rostropovich, Leonard Slatkin, Charles Dutoit, André Previn, Sir Neville Marriner, Yan Pascal Tortelier, Helmuth Rilling, Ingo Metzmacher, Richard Hickox, Zdenek Mácal and Manfred Honeck. Performances of the Choir with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra are heard locally over WQED-FM (89.3) and distributed nationally by PRI. Under the direction of Betsy Burleigh, the Choir has become known for its mastery of the great choral classics. Most recently under her direction, the Mendelssohn Choir has performed Bach’s majestic Mass in B Minor and the Brahms Requiem to sold-out audiences at East Liberty Presbyterian Church and Dr. Burleigh led the chorus in a critically acclaimed performance of Rachmaninoff’s a cappella masterwork, the Vespers, at St. Paul’s Cathedral. The Choir has numerous commissions and premieres to its credit, including works by Ned Rorem, Nancy Galbraith and Derek Bermel. A leader and collaborator in the regional arts community, the Mendelssohn's artistic partners have included the Pittsburgh Opera, the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, the River City Brass Band, the Children's Festival Chorus, the Duquesne University Tamburitzans and, most recently, the Senator John Heinz History Center as guest performers for the opening gala for the Vatican Splendor exhibit. The Mendelssohn Choir continues to garner critical accolades as it shares the joy of choral music with the more than 50,000 individuals who hear the Mendelssohn in performance each year. The more than 120 singers who comprise the Mendelssohn share a remarkable commitment to the art of making great choral music and collectively contribute more than 35,000 volunteer hours each year. Through its recordings and commissions of new choral works, the Mendelssohn Choir seeks to advance the choral art. The Choir’s most recent recording released in fall 2011 is Mahler’s Symphony 62 pittsburghsymphony.org


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No. 3 with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and the Children’s Festival Chorus of Pittsburgh with Manfred Honeck conducting. As part of its commitment to educating the next generation of choral musicians, approximately 50 high school singers participate in the Junior Mendelssohn Program. This year marks the 25th Anniversary of the Junior Mendelssohn which will be celebrated with a Junior Jubilee and Reunion. Junior Mendelssohn alumni are to be found in concert halls and on opera stages throughout the world. The Junior Mendelssohn achieved national acclaim earlier this year when it was honored nationally with a 2011 American Prize for best vocal performance by a high school chorus. The Mendelssohn Choir is a Steinway Artist.

BETSY BURLEIGH, Music Director of the Mendelssohn Choir of Pittsburgh since 2006, was named artistic director of the Providence Singers (Rhode Island) in 2011 and has served as Music Director of Chorus pro Musica (Boston, MA) since 2009. She has led the Mendelssohn in their own concert productions (most recently Brahms’ Requiem, Bach’s B Minor Mass, Rachmaninoff’s Vespers) in addition to preparing the choir to sing with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. In 2009, she took the Mendelssohn Chamber Singers, a select sub-chorus of 32, to sing an invited performance at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. As guest conductor, Burleigh has led the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Akron Symphony, the Canton Symphony, and will appear with the Rhode Island Philharmonic in the 2011-12 season. Theater engagements have included music direction at Opera Cleveland and the Cleveland Public Theater. Also active as a clinician and festival conductor, she most recently led Cincinnati’s October Festival Choir in Haydn’s Theresienmesse. Burleigh’s performances have been critically acclaimed; her 2010 Chorus pro Musica rendition of Orff’s Carmina burana was praised as being both “nuanced” and “hair-raising.” She won the 2000 Northern Ohio Live Achievement Award for best classical/opera performance and conducted the Cleveland Orchestra Chorus on an Emmy award-winning concert for the 9/11 Red Cross Disaster Relief Fund. She has prepared choruses for Manfred Honeck, Rafael Frubeck de Burgos, Jan Pascal Tortelier, Leonard Slatkin, Sir Andrew Davis, Christoph von Dohnanyi, Anton Coppola, Jane Glover, Jahja Ling, Nicholas McGegan, John Nelson, Yuri Temirkanov and Franz Welser-Möst, among others. Burleigh served as assistant director of choruses for The Cleveland Orchestra from 1998 until 2009, and as chorus master for Cleveland Opera from 2002-2006. From 1994-2010 she was coordinator of choral and vocal music at Cleveland State University, where she achieved the rank of Full Professor. Her career began in Boston, where she was music director of The Master Singers, the Longy Chamber Singers, the Cambridge Madrigal Singers, and held teaching positions at Tufts University, Clark University and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Burleigh earned a doctor of music degree at Indiana University, a master’s degree at the New England Conservatory of Music, and a bachelor of music education degree from Indiana University. She is an enthusiastic grower (and consumer) of heirloom tomatoes. Betsy Burleigh last prepared the Mendelssohn Choir for a performance with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in February 2011.

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MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH OFFICERS

Cynthia L. Roth PRESIDENT

Marian Block, M.D. VICE PRESIDENT

Mary G. Bachorski TREASURER

Terri S. Blanchette SECRETARY

DIRECTORS

Carey Andrew-Jaja, M.D. Philip E. Beard Douglas A. Clark Sarah Eldridge Nancy W. Grover Nancy M. Klimcheck Steven Kohler Susan Kukic Victoria Bechtold Kush Robert B. Moir Scott O’Neal MaryBeth Salama, M.D. Christine Thompson Vance W.Torbert III DIRECTORS EMERITUS

Jeanne C. Ashe Constance J. Bernt § Bette Evans Cordelia Jacobs Arthur J. Kerr, Jr. Paul R. Malmberg

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF

Mary Ann Lapinski EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR

MaryColleen Seip CHORUS MANAGER

Emily Stewart

COMMUNICATIONS MANAGER

Ronia Holmes

MARKETING CONSULTANT

David Nutt

MARKETING MANAGER

Elizabeth Thogerson

JUNIOR MENDELSSOHN JUBILEE COORDINATOR

Esther Berreth BOOKKEEPER

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ARTISTIC STAFF

Betsy Burleigh MUSIC DIRECTOR

Robert Page

MUSIC DIRECTOR EMERITUS

Susan Medley

DIRECTOR, JR. MENDELSSOHN

Maria Sensi Sellner ASSISTANT CONDUCTOR

Benjamin Filippone CONDUCTING ASSISTANT

Walter Morales ACCOMPANIST

Karen Roethlisberger ACCOMPANIST

CHORUS MEMBERS

Salvatore A. Amelio Brian Anderson Regina Anesin Earle L. Ashbridge Chuck Beard † Susan M. Beresik Robert Bildstein David Bodette Roland L. Bowen † Elizabeth Atwood Burnette Christopher Chovan Sarah College Michael Conway Ted Cooper Karen B. Crenshaw Barbara Crigler Amelia D’Arcy † Beth Damesimo D. Kenneth Davies Karen DeVries Bethann DiLione † Jolanta Doherty † Mark Doncic †† Mary B. Doohan Stephen Patrick Dragan Kyle Duff Lynn Streator Dunbar Christine L. Elek Linda Evans Wiltrud Fassbinder Benjamin Filippone † Brian J. Filtz Lynnea Rose Fiorentino Jordan R. Fischbach Marietta FischesserMetze †

Victoria Fisher Alexander Flurie Zanna Fredland †† Mark Gilbert Chris Girardi Deanna Golden †† David Gordon Mary Kay Gottermeyer Kimberly Sparks Graham Marcus Graham Margaret L. Groninger Theresa Vosko Haas Samuel P. Harbison III Marie Hattman Beth Rackley Hesselson Adam Hill † Deena L. Hower Michael J. Jackson Mary Jane Jacques Ed Jaicks Jeff Jezerc Holly Johnson Allison Johnston Marsha L. Keefer †† Ryan Keeling † Brett M. Kenna Bruce E. Klimcheck † Nancy M. Klimcheck † Andrew S. Knox Ryan Kok †† Joseph G. Kraus Nathan Leard Kwan II Lee M. Denice Leonard Kathy Linger † Liana D. Alksnitis Lloyd Jennifer Loh Stephanie Lowden Jonathan MacDonald † Kate Manukyan L. Glenn Matteson Susan A. Medley John Milnthorp Karl Naden Euthumn W. Napier Christopher Neff Scott M. O’Neal † Andrey Nemzer †† Susan Oerkvitz Timothy M. Ore Michael Painter Edward F. Peduzzi Jr.

Michael S. Pettersen John Phillips Cynthia Gail Pratt † Holly Reed Frank Rogel Justin M. Ross Gail Elizabeth Roup MaryBeth Salama Janet L. Sarbaugh Marcia M. Seeley MaryColleen Seip Maria Sensi Sellner Stephen Schall † Candice Shaughnessy † Matthew Soroka Emily Stewart Crystal J. Stryker †† Cody Sweet Elizabeth Thogerson Chris Thompson Marissa Ulmer Bill Vandivier Valerie S.Vernon † Sarah Webster Vodrey Mariana Sonntag Whitmer Katy Shackleton Williams† David Wilson David L.Wright Larry W.Wright Laura Connor Zajdel Benjamin Zaksek Alexander Zaretsky Joan Zolko § CHAIRMAN EMERITA

† PROFESSIONAL CORE

†† PROFESSIONAL CORE ALTERNATE THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR OF PITTSBURGH IS A STEINWAY ARTIST


biographies

GIANANDREA NOSEDA

Gianandrea Noseda is considered among the most sought-after conductors of our time serving as music director of the Teatro Regio Torino, chief guest conductor of the Israel Philharmonic, Victor De Sabata Guest Conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and Laureate Conductor of the BBC Philharmonic in Manchester. Since 2001, he has been artistic director of the Stresa Festival, one of the legendary Italian Music festivals. Noseda became the first foreign principal guest conductor at the Mariinsky Theatre in 1997 and has been the principal guest conductor of the Rotterdam Philharmonic and of the Orchestra Sinfonica Nazionale della RAI. Noseda holds the honour of “Cavaliere Ufficiale al Merito della Repubblica Italiana.” Born in Milan, Noseda regularly conducts many of the leading orchestras including the Chicago Symphony, New York Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra in the U.S., the London Symphony Orchestra, Swedish Radio Symphony Orchestra, Oslo Philharmonic, DSO Berlin, Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, Orchestre National de France, Orchestre de Paris in Europe and the NHK Symphony Orchestra in Japan. His magnificent interpretation of the Britten’s War Requiem with the London Symphony Orchestra and Chorus in London and New York in fall 2011, received unanimous acclaim from the critics in London and New York. Alex Ross of The New Yorker and Antony Tommasini of The New York Times both selected the performance at the Avery Fisher Hall as one of the most significant musical events of 2011. As Music Director of the Teatro Regio Torino, Noseda has conducted many opera productions including Salome directed by Robert Carsen, Massenet’s Thaïs (available on Arthaus DVD), La traviata directed by Laurent Pelly, Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov directed by Andrei Konchalovsky (Opus Arte DVD), Fidelio and Tosca. In summer 2010, he led the Teatro Regio forces in their first-ever residency in Japan and China; in May 2011, he toured them in Spain and brought them back to the Théâtre des Champs Elysées in Paris, where they have an annual performance and where they presented a critically acclaimed concert performance of Tosca in January 2012. Noseda’s privileged relationship with the Metropolitan Opera began in 2002 with Prokofiev’s War and Peace and has continued to this day with La forza del destino (2006), Un ballo in maschera (2007) and with new productions of Il trovatore (2009) and La traviata (2010). In June 2011, he conducted Lucia di Lammermoor on the Met’s Japan tour and returns to conduct Macbeth in March and April 2012. Noseda’s intense collaboration with the BBC Philharmonic continues with studio recordings, subscription concerts at the Bridgewater Hall and the annual appearance at the Proms in London. His live performances of Beethoven’s complete symphonies from Manchester with the BBC Philharmonic in 2005 were up to that point some of the most successful classical music streaming events in history with more than 1.4 million downloads as part of BBC Radio 3’s The Beethoven Experience. An exclusive Chandos artist since 2002, Noseda’s discography includes Prokofiev, Karlowitz, Dvorak, Smetana, Shostakovich, Liszt’s Symphonic works, Rachmaninoff (the operas and the symphonies) Mahler and Bartok. He is championing both known and lesser-known Italian composers of the 20th century through an extensive survey of their music, which includes works by Respighi, Dallapiccola, Wolf-Ferrari (Diapason d’or in France) and Casella. He has also recorded for Deutsche Grammophon conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra in Anna Netrebko’s debut album and the Teatro Regio Torino Orchestra for a Mozart album featuring Ildebrando D’Arcangelo. Noseda is very involved with the next generation of musicians through his tireless work with youth orchestras such as the Orchestra of the Royal College of Music in London, the National Youth Orchestra of United Kingdom and the Orchestra Giovanile Italiana. After the success of their 2010 tour, he will tour with the European Union Youth Orchestra again in August 2012. pittsburghsymphony.org 65


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ANDREW DAVID OSTROWSKI

Andrew David Ostrowski is quite excited about this project. Recent designs include Coppelia for Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre, Tosca for Pittsburgh Opera, The Monster in the Hall and Tigers Be Still for City Theatre, and In the next room or The Vibrator Play for PICT. Locally, Ostrowski has designed for Pittsburgh Public Theater, City Theater, Pittsburgh Civic Light Opera, Pittsburgh Opera, PICT, Quantum Theatre, PNME, THE REP, The Conservatory Company at the Pittsburgh Playhouse, as well as others. National credits include, “The Jimmy Awards,” Spoleto Festival USA, Theater of the Stars in Atlanta, Dallas Summer Musicals, Merrimack Rep., The Asolo, The George Street Playhouse, The Arden, Virginia Stage, Madison Opera, North Shore Music Theatre and others. International credits include Born Yesterday in Vasteras Sweden, a tour all over Ireland with Faith Healer, Lyon, France with a dance company, Porgy and Bess which was a western European tour over five years as the lighting director. Honors include a Kennedy Center National Merit Award and the 2010 Frankel award for his contributions to the arts in Western Pennsylvania. Ostrowski would like to thank his family and friends for their ongoing support.

PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

Founded in 1945, the Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra (PYSO) is one of the oldest youth orchestra programs in the country, providing educational opportunities and the finest orchestral training for young musicians in the Pittsburgh metropolitan area. It is an independent youth orchestra in all governing, administrative and financial matters although it has enjoyed a mutually beneficial working relationship with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra since 1962. Entry into the Orchestra is by way of highly competitive annual auditions and it rehearses each week from September until May at its home, Heinz Hall. It currently comprises approximately 95 musicians, ages 12-21, drawing from 36 schools, colleges and universities in the tri-state area. The Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra was one of a small number of youth orchestras chosen through competitive auditions to attend the American Symphony Orchestra League’s National Youth Orchestra Festivals in 1998 and 2002. PYSO has also participated in international music festivals in Canada, Scotland and Switzerland, frequently winning first place awards for outstanding performances. PYSO completed a very successful European Concert Tour in June 2005, culminating in a performance at the world-renowned Gewandhaus in Leipzig, Germany. PYSO also had the distinction of being not only the first youth orchestra ever, but the first American orchestra ever to perform at the prestigious Smetanova Festival in Litomysl, Czech Republic. In June 2008, PYSO undertook a two-week concert tour of China, performing in Beijing, Shanghai, Hangzhou and Hong Kong. Most recently, PYSO traveled to Italy to perform four concerts in the Tuscany region under the direction of Music Director Lawrence Loh, as part of the Festival Orchestre Giovanili, or Florence Youth Orchestra Festival.

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GRETCHEN VAN HOESEN

Gretchen Van Hoesen has been principal harpist of the Pittsburgh Symphony since 1977. She presently holds the Virginia Campbell endowed principal harp chair of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and has appeared as soloist with the orchestra on numerous occasions, both on the subscription series and on tour. Van Hoesen gave the New York premiere of the Alberto Ginastera Harp Concerto in 1976 and the Pittsburgh premiere in 1978. She has appeared as soloist with conductors André Previn, Lorin Maazel, James Conlon, Zdnek Macal, Sergiu Comissiona and Pinchas Zukerman and has collaborated with flutists James Galway, Bernard Goldberg, Jean-Pierre Rampal and Emmanuel Pahud. Additional appearances with the Pittsburgh Symphony have included performances of the Handel Concerto in B flat, Danses Sacré et Profane by Debussy, Concierto Serenata by Joaquin Rodrigo, Rhapsody by Peggy Stuart Coolidge, Noels for Harp by Marcel Tournier and the Concerto for Harp by Rheinhold Gliere. Ms. Van Hoesen and her husband, PSO Co-Principal Oboe James Gorton, presented the Pittsburgh premiere of Witold Lutoslawski’s Double Concerto for Oboe, Harp and Chamber Orchestra on the Pittsburgh Symphony subscription series. She gave the United States premiere of Suite Concertante for solo harp and orchestra by Manuel Moreno-Buendia in San Antonio, Texas. In March 2008, she presented the world premiere of Sir André Previn’s Concerto for Harp on the Pittsburgh Symphony subscription series. Concert Piece, Op. 65 for Oboe/English horn, Two Harps, and Orchestra by Eugene Goossens will close the orchestra’s subscription season in June 2012. Van Hoesen has also performed as soloist with the Rochester Philharmonic Orchestra, the National Orchestral Association, the Greenwich Philharmonia, the Sun Valley Summer Symphony, the Lake Placid Sinfonietta and the Westmoreland Symphony. She has concertized in the metropolitan New York area at Carnegie Recital Hall, Alice Tully Hall and the Brooklyn Museum, and has presented concertos at the Academy of Music in Philadelphia and the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. Van Hoesen was winner of the 1978 Passamaneck Competition. Gretchen Van Hoesen was selected to perform in Tokyo and Osaka, Japan, in the Super World Orchestra 2000, an orchestra made up of key musicians from around the globe. She has been a featured soloist at American Harp Society National Conferences in Boston, Pittsburgh, San Antonio, Denton, Washington, D.C. and Fredonia. Van Hoesen has served as a judge for National Competitions of the American Harp Society and has been past president of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Harp Society. Gretchen Van Hoesen graduated from the Juilliard School of Music earning both B.M. and M.M. degrees in harp as a scholarship student of Marcel Grandjany and Susann McDonald. She is also a graduate of the Eastman School of Music Preparatory Department with highest honors in piano and harp, where she was a student of Eileen Malone. She further studied with Gloria Agostini. Her recordings include Lullabies and Night Songs on the Caedmon label, Pavanes, Pastorales, and Serenades for Oboe and Harp, and Concertos for Harp, CD’s on the Boston Records label, and Breath of Heaven, A Christmas Collection with Soprano Sarah Botkin and a work by Bernard Andres with Judith LeClair, principal bassoonist with the NY Philharmonic. Van Hoesen is a faculty member at Carnegie Mellon and Duquesne universities and combines teaching with private students at her home in Pittsburgh. She has given master classes at Duquesne University, the Eastman School of Music, The Curtis Institute of Music, Manhattan School of Music, the University of Illinois, the Aspen Music Festival, the National University of the Arts in Seoul, Korea, and has been an artist-lecturer on numerous series in Pittsburgh as well as throughout the country. She was a faculty member of the Aspen Music Festival and School from 2001-2006. She is a past president of the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Harp Society. Her students have won numerous national awards and prizes. pittsburghsymphony.org 67


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DAVID PREMO

Cellist David Premo joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in 1992, was promoted to fourth chair, a nonrotating position in 1994, and subsequent to a national audition in 1999, he was offered the position of assistant principal. Following another round of national auditions, Premo was awarded the position of associate principal in 2001. Additionally, Premo has been Artist-Lecturer at Carnegie Mellon University since 1994, providing private cello instruction, coaching chamber music groups and teaching an orchestra repertoire class. Premo came to Pittsburgh from Washington, D.C., where he served as Associate Principal of the Kennedy Center Opera House Orchestra from 1980 until 1991. During his tenure in Washington, Premo performed chamber music at the Phillips Collection, the Corcorcan Gallery and the Library of Congress, and served on numerous occasions as principal cellist with the American Chamber Orchestra, the National Gallery Orchestra and the Wolf Trap Festival Orchestra, among others. Premo performed as a member of the National Symphony Orchestra, both at the Kennedy Center and on several United States and European tours. Premo has become a frequently requested chamber musician and soloist, appearing on Shadyside and Rodef Shalom chamber music series and, in 1993, performing the Elgar Cello Concerto with the Edgewood Symphony. In 1995, Premo and Christopher Wu (violinist with the PSO and winner of the 1994 Passamaneck Award) won the Pittsburgh Concert Society Competition. In 1996 Mr. Premo won the prestigious Passamaneck Award entitling him to a solo recital which he gave in Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Hall in April 1997. David Premo studied cello in his native Chicago with Margaret Evans of the Chicago Symphony, later with Robert Newkirk at Catholic University, and most recently with Janos Starker at Indiana University. His cello was made in approximately 1860 by Jean Baptiste Vuillaume.

THE ORTNER-ROBERTS DUO

Tom Roberts is one of the leading exponents of early jazz piano in the world today. He has performed on “The Tonight Show” and “A Prairie Home Companion” with Leon Redbone.Tom arranged and performed the music for the soundtrack of Martin Scorsese’s film The Aviator. He has also arranged music for the syndicated PRI show “Riverwalk Jazz, Live from the Landing with the Jim Cullum Jazz Band,” and for Wynton Marsalis and The Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. He was the featured pianist at the International Stride Piano Summit in Zurich, Switzerland 2001 and 2009. Roberts has been featured multiple times with Dick Hyman at the prestigious Jazz In July series at New York’s 92nd St. Y and has performed twice at New York’s Carnegie Hall. Besides his pianistic artistry, Roberts is a versatile music historian and has contributed articles for the magazine Piano Today, and is a frequent guest at National Public Radio. German clarinetist Susanne Ortner-Roberts is internationally acclaimed both as a soloist and as a member of the German Klezmer Quartet “Sing Your Soul.” The German newspaper Augsburger Allgemeine states that she is “a musician par excellence, capable of moving you deeply.” Following an invitation by the University of Pittsburgh 2006, she has been accompanying Pittsburgh area Holocaust Survivors at schools and universities creating the musical framework for their stories. She is the subject of the recent book Living the Dream – Für die Musik nach Amerika written by German Television journalist Helge Fuhst.

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MENG WANG

Violist Meng Wang has established himself as a soloist, an avid chamber musician and a prominent orchestral musician. Born in Sheng-Yang, China, he began his violin studies at the age of five with Ze Jin, the concertmaster of Liaoning Symphony Orchestra. At age 12, he was accepted by Central Conservatory in Beijing under the instructions of Mr. Xiao-Long Liu and Mr. Ke-Qiang Sui. In 1997, Wang came to the states and attended Walnut Hill School in Boston as a full scholarship student studying with former violist for Borromeo String Quartet HsinYun Huang. The next year, he won the top prize in The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition and was accepted by the Curtis Institute of music where he studied with the member of Guarneri String Quartet violist Michael Tree and President of The Curtis Insititue of Music Roberto Diaz and Karen Tuttle. Deeply committed to chamber music, Wang has performed with such distinguished artists as Yo-Yo Ma, Sharon Robinson, Chao-Liang Lin, Jaime Laredo, Joseph Silverstein, Pinkas Zukerman, Barbara Westphal and the pop star Bono. He has appeared in both solo and chamber music performances at major venues includes the Carnegie, Lincoln Center Alice Tully and The Town Halls in New York, The Kimmel Center for the performing arts in Philadelphia, The Library of Congress, Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., Boston Jordan Hall, Majestic Theater and the Van Wezel Performing Arts Hall in Sarasota. As a member of Kansas City Chamber Music Society, his playing has been broadcasted frequently in many public radio stations. Wangâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s festival appearances have included Sarasota, Music Academy of the West, Marlboro, and Verbier in Switzerland. He also appeared as a guest soloist at the International Music Festival in Maine. Wang joined the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra viola section in December 2007. Previously he has performed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, the Philadelphia Orchestra and the New York Philharmonic. From 2004 to 2006, Wang served as principal viola at The Kansas City Symphony Orchestra. He had also been the associate principal viola at the Haddonfield Symphony, the principal viola at the New England Conservatory Youth Philharmonic Orchestra, a member of the Philadelphia Chamber Orchestra and the Curtis Symphony Orchestra.

AARON WHITE

Born in Muskogee, Oklahoma, bassist Aaron White began his musical studies in public school system after moving to Irving, Texas. He continued his studies at Southern Methodist University and then Duquesne University. His principal teachers include Thomas Ledeerer and Jeffrey Turner. Prior to joining the Pittsburgh Symphony, White was a member of the Louisville Orchestra and the Florida Orchestra.

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ANNE MARTINDALE WILLIAMS

Anne Martindale Williams has enjoyed a successful career as principal cellist of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra since 1979. Throughout her tenure with the Orchestra, she has often been featured as soloist both in Pittsburgh and on tour in New York at Carnegie Hall and Avery Fisher Hall. Williams was soloist with the PSO in the Pittsburgh premier of The Giving Tree conducted by the composer, Lorin Maazel. She has also collaborated with guest artists such as Yehudi Menuhin, André Previn, the Emerson Quartet, Lynn Harrell, Joshua Bell, Gil Shaham and Pinchas Zukerman in numerous chamber music performances. She made her London debut performing Dvořák’s Cello Concerto with the Royal Philharmonic, Andre Previn conducting. Her solo in The Swan on the Pittsburgh Symphony’s recording of Carnival of the Animals by Saint-Saëns was described by Grammophon critic Edward Greenfield as “…the most memorable performance of all.” Williams divides her time between the orchestra, teaching at Carnegie Mellon University, and solo and chamber music performances in America, Europe and the Far East. She has appeared in several nationally televised productions including Concertos, produced by the BBC and Previn and the Pittsburgh, produced by WQED. She has given master classes at many universities and festivals throughout the country, including The Curtis Institute of Music, SUNY at Stony Brook, Manhattan School of Music, the New World Symphony in Miami, the National Orchestral Institute, Aspen, Credo at Oberlin College and the Masterworks Festival. She also has performed at many of America’s prestigious summer music festivals including Aspen, Caramoor, Skaneateles, Maui, Rockport Festivals in Massachusetts and Maine, Grand Teton, Strings Festival in Steamboat Springs, Orcas Island, and Mainly Mozart in San Diego. For many years she has enjoyed performing throughout the country with her Piano Trio which includes her good friends Andrés Cárdenes and David Deveau. Anne Martindale Williams has performed numerous times as soloist with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra performing Schumann’s Concerto in A minor, Tippett’s Triple Concerto, Previn’s Reflections, Bach’s Brandenburg Concertos Nos. 3 and 6, Strauss’s Don Quixote, Bloch’s Schelomo, Dvorák’s Cello Concerto, Dutilleux’s Tout un monde lointain, Saint-Saëns’ Concerto No. 1 and Brahms’ Double Concerto, as well as Elgar’s Introduction and Allegro for String Quartet. In recent seasons she was featured in Haydn’s Concerto in C, Tchaikovsky’s Rococo Variations, Elgar’s Cello Concerto, and Haydn’s Sinfonia Concertante for Violin, Cello, Oboe, Bassoon and Orchestra, and Walton’s Cello Concerto. This season, she will be featured in Honegger’s Cello Concerto. Williams is a graduate of the Curtis Institute of Music where she studied with Orlando Cole. Her Tecchler cello was made in Rome in 1701. Her husband, Joe, is the director of student ministries at Beverly Heights Presbyterian Church in Mount Lebanon. They reside in Pittsburgh with their daughter, Claire, who is 15 years old.

SHANSHAN YAO

Chinese violinist Shanshan Yao joined the first violin section of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra in 2009, while still pursuing her master of music degree at The Juilliard School. As a soloist, Yao has performed with Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra, Calgary Civic Symphony, Banff Centre Chamber Orchestra and Japan’s Sendai Philharmonic Orchestra. She made her orchestra debut at the age of 12 with the 70 pittsburghsymphony.org


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Shanghai Radio Symphony Orchestra. In February 2009, her debut recital at Canada National Arts Centre, Ottawa, received critical acclaim. She was also invited to appear in a special performance for the former Secretary of State Colin Powell at the Eisenhower Fellowships Conference in Philadelphia. Yao is the recipient of numerous awards and prizes including first prizes in the Calgary Concerto Competition and Morningside Music Bridge Concerto Competition (Canada), second prize in the Shean String Competition (Canada), and Hellam Young Artists Competition (USA) as well as prizes in the Corpus Christi International Competition for Piano and Strings (USA) and the Michael Hill International Violin Competition (New Zealand). As one of the winners of the CBC Radio’s Up and Coming series – a showcase of promising young talents, she had the opportunity to share the stage with Jon Kimura Parker. Yao is also an established chamber musician and has participated in festivals such as Aspen Music Festival and School, Music from Angel Fire, The Banff Centre, Summit and Sarasota Music Festivals and Music @ Menlo where she served as chamber music coach in 2009. Her piano trio won the second prize in the National Music Festival in Canada. Yao has collaborated with such renowned artists as Ida Kavafian, Steve Tenenbom, Jeremy Denk, Ransom Wilson, among others. A violinist since age six, Yao enrolled at Shanghai Conservatory of Music when she was nine. She continued her studies in Canada as a full–scholarship student in Mount Royal Conservatory’s Academy Program. Yao received the bachelor of music degree from the prestigious Curtis Institute of Music, and master of music degree from The Juilliard School. Her teachers included Aaron Rosand, Donald Weilerstein, Ronald Copes, William van der Sloot and Xiaoming Wu.

AMANDA T. ZEHNDER

Amanda T. Zehnder has been associate curator of fine arts at Carnegie Museum of Art since February of 2010, and previously she had been assistant curator of fine arts at the museum since August 2005. She wrote the introduction for and helped organize the catalogue Modern Japanese Prints: The Twentieth Century, featuring more than 1000 prints from the collection. She also authored the new publication, Impressionism and Post-Impressionism: Collection Highlights. In addition to co-curating Impressionism in a New Light: From Monet to Stieglitz, she is also curating the upcoming exhibition Whistler and Rebellion in the Art World. Zehnder received her Ph.D. in art history from Bryn Mawr College, with a dissertation exploring the artistic relationship between Edgar Degas and Mary Cassatt. She earned her M.A. in art history from Bryn Mawr College, and a B.A. in art history from Mount Holyoke College.

UNIQUE CHAMBER MUSIC SEMINAR PRESENTED BY MUSICIANS OF THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AND SHADY SIDE ACADEMY

Play advanced chamber music, learn how to become a music entrepreneur, create your own highly paid gigs, run a successful teaching studio, and learn to play the Dollar Clef!

JULY 29—AUGUST 5, 2012, SPACE IS LIMITED!

Apply on-line at: ChamberMusicPro.com pittsburghsymphony.org 71


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EVERY GIFT IS INSTRUMENTAL The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is pleased to acknowledge the following members of our donor family who have made generous gifts of $500 or above to the Annual Fund in the past year. Those who have made a new gift or increased their previous gift are listed in italics. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy; however, if we have not listed you correctly, please call Thank You! 412.392.4842.

INDIVIDUALS MAESTRO’S CIRCLE $100,000+ Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. Juergen Mross The musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Dick & Ginny Simmons Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Usher Arthur & Barbara Weldon BENEFACTOR’S CIRCLE $50,000 - $99,999 Audrey & Jerry McGinnis Perry* & BeeJee Morrison Mr. Steven T. Schlotterbeck FOUNDER’S CIRCLE $25,000 - $49,999 Anonymous Mr. & Mrs. James R. Agras Bill & Loulie Canady Randi & L. Van V. Dauler, Jr. Steven G. & Beverlynn Elliott Mr. & Mrs. Ira H. Gordon Marcia M. Gumberg Drue Heinz Elsie & Henry Hillman Audrey R. Hughes Tom & Jamee Todd Jon & Carol Walton Helge & Erika Wehmeier James & Susanne Wilkinson 72 pittsburghsymphony.org

CHAIRMAN’S CIRCLE $20,000 - $24,999 Anonymous John H. Hill Tom & Dona Hotopp Barbara Jeremiah Rick & Laurie Johnson Deborah Rice $15,000 - $19,999 Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Churchill Ron & Dorothy Chutz James K. & Sara C. Donnell L. Patrick & Marsha Hassey Douglas B. McAdams Joanne B. Rogers Mr. Max Starks & Dr. Tiffany Calloway Starks Elizabeth Burnett & Lawrence Tamburri GUARANTOR’S CIRCLE $10,000 - $14,999 Anonymous (2) Michele & Pat Atkins Allen Baum & Elizabeth Witzke-Baum Benno & Connie Bernt Nadine E. Bognar Kathryn & Michael Bryson Jane & Rae R. Burton

Dr. Rebecca J. Caserio Roy & Susan Dorrance Jean & Sigo Falk Barbara Jeremiah Robert W. & Elizabeth C. Kampmeinert Nancy & Jeff Leininger Janet & Donald Moritz Bob & Joan Peirce Pauline Santelli The David S. & Karen A. Shapira Foundation John P. & Elizabeth L. Surma Jill & Craig Tillotson Ellen & Jim Walton Dr. & Mrs. Merrill F. Wymer DIRECTOR’S CIRCLE $7,500 - $9,999 Michael & Carol Bleier Betty Diskin in memory of Arthur, William & Robert Diskin Dr. & Mrs. Martin Earle Caryl & Irving Halpern Joseph & Dorothy Jackovic Mr. & Mrs. Frank Brooks Robinson Alece & David Schreiber James & Janet Slater


individual donors

$5,000 - $7,499 Anonymous (2) Alan L. & Barbara B. Ackerman Dan & Kay Barker Noah Bendix-Balgley Michael & Sherle Berger Ted & Kathie Bobby Ms. Spencer Boyd Mr. & Mrs. Christopher Brent Larry & Tracy Brockway Dr. & Mrs. Sidney N. Busis Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Calihan James C. Chaplin Joseph* & Virginia Cicero Mr. & Mrs. E. V. Clarke Mr.* & Mrs. Eugene Cohen Estelle Comay & Bruce Rabin Basil & Jayne Adair Cox Ruby A. Cunningham Alison H. & Patrick D. Deem Philip J. & Sherry S. Dieringer William S. Dietrich, II* Mr. & Mrs. J. Christopher Donahue Mr.* & Mrs. Thomas J. Donnelly Mr. William J. Fetter Mr. & Mrs. Milton Fine Terri H. Fitzpatrick Robert & Jeanne Gleason Marjorie Burns Haller Gail & Gregory Harbaugh Mr. & Mrs. J. Brett Harvey Christiane & Manfred Honeck Mrs. Milton G. Hulme Elizabeth S. Hurtt Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Jamison, Jr. Eugene F. & Margaret Moltrup Jannuzi Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Craig Jordan Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Kahn Mr. & Mrs. R. Drew Kistler D. H. Lee, Jr. Anne Lewis Sally Minard & Walter Limbach Doris L. Litman Mr. & Mrs. Thomas McConomy Robert & Dana McCutcheon Devin & Shannon McGranahan Mr. & Mrs. Martin G. McGuinn Dr. Kenneth & Mrs. Tracey Melani Marilyn & Allan H. Meltzer Sam Michaels Robert D. Mierley Family Foundation II

Jim & Peggy Degnan June & Barry Dietrich James N. Dill, Jr. Elaine A. Dively Dr. James H. Duggan & Mary E. Duggan Mr. Frank R. Dziama Frederick & Ruth Egler Marlene & Louis Epstein Ms. Kelly G. Estes & Mr. Hank Snell Henry & Ann Fenner Donna & Bob Ferguson Mr. & Mrs. Hans Fleischner Kimberly & Curtis Fleming J. Tomlinson Fort Ms. Janet Frissora Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Gailliot Gary & Joanne Garvin Mrs. Merle Gilliand Nancy Goeres & Michael Rusinek Kenneth & Lillian Goldsmith Mrs. Lee C. Gordon George & Jane Greer Mr. & Mrs. George V. Grune, Jr. Mr. & Mrs.* Charles H. Harff Carolyn Heil Karen & Thomas Hoffman Dr. & Mrs. Allen Hogge Dorothy A. Howat AMBASSADORâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CIRCLE Hyman Family Foundation $2,500 - $4,999 Leo & Marge Kane Anonymous (8) Mr. & Mrs. Arthur J. Kerr, Jr. Barbara & Marcus Aaron, II Sydelle Kessler Mr. & Mrs. Francis A. Balog Charles & Kathleen Kovac Dr. & Mrs. John C. Barber Cliff & Simi Kress Philip & Melinda Beard Mr. & Mrs. Robert Lane Dr. & Mrs. David Beaudreau Judith & Lester* Lave David Blair & Marianne Arthur S. Levine, M.D. & Linda Bokan-Blair S. Melada Marian & Bruce Block In Memory of Elliott (Bud) Lewis Diana Block & Christopher Kiehl Barry Lhormer & Janet Markel Mrs. William A. Boyd Mr.* & Mrs. Howard M. Love Mr. & Mrs. Kenneth Brand Mary Lou Magee Gary & Judy Bruce Jeanne R. Manders* Charles* & Patricia Burke Lucine & John Marous James & Margaret Byrne James C. & Jennifer Martin Mr. & Mrs. Frank V. Cahouet Dave & Kathy Maskalick Gail & Rob Canizares Victoria & Alicia McGinnis Roger & Judy Clough George & Bonnie Meanor Charles C. Cohen & Michele M. Mary Ellen Miller McKenney Montgomery IP Associates Bill & Cynthia Cooley Betty & John Mussler Cyert Family Foundation Barbara & Eugene Myers Mr. & Mrs. G. A. Davidson, Jr. Maurice & Nancy Nernberg Ms. Jamini Davies Eliza & Hugh Nevin Ada & Stanford* Davis Fritz Okie

Morby Family Charitable Foundation Betty & Granger Morgan Gerald Lee Morosco & Paul Ford, Jr. Mildred S. Myers & William C. Frederick Elliott S. Oshry Shelley, Dana, & Arthur Palmer Dale & Michele Perelman Dr. & Mrs. William R. Poller in honor of our four grandsons Mr. & Mrs. John R. & Svetlana S. Price Mr. & Mrs. William E. Rinehart Mr. & Mrs. William F. Roemer Millie & Gary Ryan Nancy Schepis Robert & Janet Squires Marcia & Dick Swanson Mrs. Carol H. Tillotson Jane F. Treherne-Thomas Thomas L. & Bonnie W. VanKirk Dr. Michael J. White & Mr. Richard LeBeau Nozomi Williams in Honor of Sally Webster and Susan Bassett Rachel & Franny Wymard

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H. Ward & Shirley Olander Thaddeus A. Osial, Jr. M.D. & Linda E. Shooer Robert & Lillian Panagulias Drs. J. Parrish & C. Siewers Richard E. & Alice S. Patton Eric & Sharon Perelman Mr. & Mrs. William C. Pohlmann Richard E. Rauh Dr. Tor Richter in memory of Elizabeth W. Richter James W. & Erin M. Rimmel Mr. & Mrs. Robert W. Riordan Mr. & Mrs. Daniel M. Rooney Abby & Reid Ruttenberg Donald D. Saxton, Jr. in memory of Barbara Morey Saxton Karen Scansaroli Mrs. Virginia W. Schatz Leonard & Joan Scheinholtz Michael Shefler Kay L. Shirk Dr. Marcia Landy & Dr. Stanley Shostak Paul & Linda Silver James & Janet Slater Mr. & Mrs. Harry Steele Lowell & Jan Steinbrenner Drs. Michael & Beverly Steinfeld Dr. & Mrs. Leonard Stept Theodore & Elizabeth Stern Margaret Tarpey & Bruce Freeman Richard & Sandra Teodori Dorothea & Gerald* Thompson Mr. & Mrs. Harry A. Thompson, II Mr. & Mrs. Arthur W. Ticknor John & Nancy Traina Konrad & Gisela Weis Carolyn & Richard Westerhoff Seldon & Susan Whitaker Dr.* & Mrs. George R. White Mary Jo Winokur Drs. Barry Wu & Iris Tsung in honor of Louise Wu Naomi Yoran Harvey & Florence Zeve Dorothea K. Zikos Robert P. Zinn & Dr. Darlene Berkovitz ENCORE CLUB $1,500 - $2,499 Anonymous (10) Mrs. Ernest Abernathy Andrew & Michelle Aloe 74 pittsburghsymphony.org

Dr. Madalon Amenta Joan Frank Apt Mrs. Jane Callomon Arkus Mr. & Mrs. David J. Armstrong Dr. & Mrs. Alan A. Axelson Mr. & Mrs. Robert Y. Ball Mrs. Barbara C. & Mr. Ralph J. Bean, Jr. Fred & Sue Bennitt Jeanne & Richard F. Berdik Dr. Michael & Barbara Bianco Mr. Michael E. Bielski Philip & Bernice Bollman Donald W. & Judith L. Borneman Dr. Carole B. Boyd Bozzone Family Foundation Gary & Connie Brandenberger Hugh & Jean Brannan Mr. & Mrs. James H. Bregenser Lawrence R. Breletic & Donald C. Wobb Jill & Chuck Brodbeck Myron David Broff Roger & Lea Brown Howard & Marilyn Bruschi David L. Buchta & Harmon K. Ziegler William Burchinal Dr. & Mrs. John A. Burkholder Gene & Sue Burns Dr. Bernadette G. Callery & Dr. Joseph M. Newcomer Susan S. Cercone Mrs. Arthur L. Coburn, III Christine & Howard Cohen Mark & Sherri Cohen Mr. & Mrs. Joseph Alan Cope Rose & Vincent A. Crisanti Marion S. Damick Jerry & Mimi Davis Alfred R. de Jaager Armand C. Dellovade Mr. & Mrs. James R. Drake John & Gertrude Echement Linda & Robert Ellison Marvin Fields & Kate Brennan* Albert L. Filoni Mr. & Mrs. James A. Fisher Mr. & Mrs. Joseph P. Fisher Chauncey & Magdaline Frazier Dina & Jerry Fulmer Dr. & Mrs. J. William Futrell Keith & Susan Garver Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Gebhardt Alice V. Gelormino Mr. & Mrs. David C. Genter Dr. Robert Joel Gluckman & Susan Johnson

Dr. & Mrs. Sanford A. Gordon Rick & Stephanie Green William & Victoria Guy Mr. & Mrs. George K. Hanna Lauren Harder & Jason Kass Susan & David Hardesty Jay Frey & Michael Hires Mr. & Mrs. C. T. Hiteshew Alysia & Robert Hoyt Dr. & Mrs. John W. Hoyt Micki Huff Mr. & Mrs. Tom Hunley Phillip Injeian Mary Lee & Joe Irwin Mrs. Maureen Jeffrey Alice Jane & Paul R. Jenkins Barbara Johnstone Barbara B. Jones* Jackie & Ley Jones Mr. & Mrs. Jayant Kapadia Mr. & Mrs. David N. Kaplan Gerri Kay Judge William Kenworthy & Mrs. Lucille Kenworthy Gloria Kleiman James & Jane Knox Ms. Dawn Kosanovich George & Alexandra Kusic Dr. Joseph & AnnaMae Lenkey Dr. Michael Lewis & Dr. Katia Sycara Roslyn M. Litman Tom & Gail Litwiler George & Jane Mallory Mr. Sheldon Marstine Dr. Richard Martin in Memory of Mrs. Lori Martin Carolyn Maue & Bryan Hunt Jean H. McCullough Mary A. McDonough Margaret J. McGowan Alan & Marilyn McIvor Sherman & Sue McLaughlin Susan Lee Meadowcroft Muriel R. Moreland Jim & Susan Morris in Honor of Kay Stolarevsky Abby L. Morrison Lesa B. Morrison, Ph.D Dr. & Mrs. Etsuro K. Motoyama Gerd D. & Helen Mueller Mr. & Mrs. Patrick M. Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Donnell Dr. Karl R. Olsen & Dr. Martha E. Hildebrandt Ellen Ormond Warren & Rena Ostlund


individual donors

Dr. Paul M. Palevsky & Dr. Sharon R. Roseman Mr. & Mrs. James Parker Seth & Pamela Pearlman Connie & Mike Phillips Mr. & Mrs. Edward V. Randall, Jr. Cheryl & James Redmond Mr. & Mrs. Philip R. Roberts Mr. Stephen Robinson Dr. Lee A. & Rosalind* Rosenblum Judy & Stanley Ruskin Drs. Guy & Mary Beth Salama Thomas & Perri Schelat Joseph Schewe, Jr. Esther Schreiber Dr. Allan & Mrs. Brina D. Segal Preston & Annette Shimer Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Shoop, Jr. Dr. Ralph T. Shuey & Ms. Rebecca L. Carlin Juliet Lea Hillman Simonds Dr. & Mrs. Dennis P. Slevin Manny H. & Ileane Smith Marisa & Walter C. Smith Mrs. Alice R. Snyder Sandy & Mr. Edgar Snyder Hon. & Mrs. William L. Standish Lewis M. Steele & Ann Labounsky Steele Mr. & Mrs. James E. Steen Barbara & Lou Steiner Jeff & Linda Stengel Fred & Maryann Steward Dick & Thea Stover C. Dean Streator Mr. & Mrs. Harold H. Stroebel Mr. & Mrs. Frank Talenfeld Dr. & Mrs. Ronald L. Thomas Mr. & Mrs. Walter W. Turner Bob & Denise Ventura Jim Walker & Jonnie Viakley Mr. & Mrs. Timothy Vismor Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Vogel Dr. Ronald J. & Patricia J. Wasilak Ms. Sally Webster & Ms. Susan Bassett Mr. & Mrs. Raymond B. White Mr. & Mrs. Thomas White Elizabeth & Frank L. Wiegand, III Sarah C. Williams & Joseph Wilson, III Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. Witmer Elle & Joe Wymard Miriam L. Young

Robert S. Bernstein & Ellie K. Bernstein Fund Don Berry SYMPHONY CLUB Dr. & Mrs. Albert W. Biglan $500 - $1,499 Harry S. Binakonsky, M.D. Anonymous (30) Franklin & Bonnie Blackstone Mr. & Mrs. Gary Abbs Mr. & Mrs. W. Gerald Blaney Frederic & Deborah Acevedo Mr. & Mrs. Harry E. Blansett, Jr. Mary Beth Adams Diane C. Blanton Dr. & Mrs. Siamak Adibi Joseph & Shirley Bonner Dr. Lawrence Adler & Ms. Judith Mr. Albert Bortz Brody Betsy Bossong R. Ward Allebach & Lisa D. Dana & Margaret Bovbjerg Steagall Dr. & Mrs. A’Delbert Bowen Mr. Christopher D. Allen & Ms. Matthew & Leslie Braksick Claudia Mahave Robert N. Brand David & Andrea Aloe Mr. & Mrs. William H. Brandeis Craig & Dawn Anderson Gerda & Abe Bretton Donald D. Anderson Mary & Russell Brignano Mrs. Doris Anderson Mary L. Briscoe Mr. & Mrs. Thomas W. Suzy & Jim Broadhurst Angerman Mr. Stephen Bronder The Rev. Drs. A. Gary & Judy Suzanne Broughton & Richard Angleberger Margerum Warren J. Archer & Madeline C. Timothy R. Brown & Heidi K. Archer Bartholomew Mr. & Mrs. Charles Armitage Nancy & John Brownell James & Susanne Armour John T. Buckley & Emily J. Gerry & Jack* Armstrong Rosenthal Ruth Bachman in Memory of Mr. & Mrs. A. H. Burchfield James Bachman Timothy & Linda Burke Ms. Elizabeth Bakoss Mr. & Mrs. James Burnham Lorraine E. Balun Rev. Glen H. & Carol Burrows Dr. Esther L. Barazzone Barbara & David Burstin Richard C. Barney James & Judith Callomon Robert & Loretta Barone Andrés Cárdenes & Monique Robert Bastress & Barbara Mead Fleischauer Dr. & Mrs. Albert Caretto, Jr. Robert W. & Janet W. Baum Richard & Jeanne Carter Barbara N. Baur Charles & Donna Cashdollar Vitasta Bazaz & Sheen Sehgal James P. Cassaro Fund in Memory of Dr. Janet E. Chadwick Kuldeep Sehgal Sue Challinor & Matt Teplitz Dorothy Becker Dr. Thomas S. Chang Kenneth & Elsa Beckerman Monsignor Willliam G. Nick & Dotty Beckwith Charnoki, P.A. Yu-Ling & Gregg Behr Peggy & Joe Charny Vange & Nick Beldecos Craig D. Choate Judith Bell Kenneth & Celia Christman Edgar & Betty Belle David Clark & Janese Abbott Bendix-Balgley Fund of the Tides Mr. & Mrs. William Clarkson Foundation William & Elizabeth Rudy & Barbara Benedetti Clendenning Eleanor H. Berge Mrs. Sarah Clendenning Ms. Evelyn Berger & Mr. Un Kim Dr. Peter & Judy Berkowitz Mr. & Mrs. Philip Coachman Mrs. Georgia Berner & Mr. James Stuart & Cathryn Coblin Farber Jared L. & Maureen B. Cohon Mr. & Mrs. Isaias Zelkowicz Mr. & Mrs. Charles Zellefrow

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Alan & Lynne Colker Dale Colyer Ms. Patricia Cover Barton & Teri Cowan Susan & George Craig Susan O. Cramer Melvin R. Creeley David & Marian Crossman Mr. & Mrs. Daniel G. Crozier John D. & Laurie B. Culbertson Susan Campbell & Patrick Curry Zelda Curtiss Cynthia Custer Dr. & Mrs. Richard Daffner Joan & Jim Darby Mr. & Mrs. William J. Darr Norina H. Daubner Joan Clark Davis Marlene & Richard Davis Bruce & Rita Decker Charles S. Degrosky Captain Ronald M. Del Duca, USN (ret.) Dr. & Mrs. Gregory G. Dellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Omo Lynn & David DeLorenzo Dr. Jau-Shyong Deng Mr. & Mrs. Edward DePersis Valerie DiCarlo Mr. & Mrs. Victor J. DiCarlo Mrs. Tika Dickos Richard & Joan DiSalle Docimo Family Mr. & Mrs. Todd Donovan Dr. Jane Donovan & Dr. W. G. Donovan Anthony V. Dralle Mary Jo Dressel Mary A. Duggan Jeff & Wendy Dutkovic Mary Jane Edwards Christopher & Gretchen Elkus Eugene & Katrin Engels Roger & Beverly Engle Arnold & Eva Engler Dr. Timothy Evans Tibey & Julian Falk Tony Farah, MD Dr. & Mrs.* John H. Feist Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Ferlan Madelyn & John Fernstrom Mrs. Orlie S. Ferretti Ms. Janet Fesq Dr. Joseph Fine Paul & Joanna Fitting Mr. & Mrs. David Fitzsimmons Ms. Ann P. Flaherty Mr. Mark F. Flaherty 76 pittsburghsymphony.org

Jane Flanders* James & Ellen Flanigan Jan Fleisher Suzanne Flood Mrs. Barbara E. Forrester Janice & Larry Foulke Mr. & Mrs. K. H. Fraelich, Jr. Mrs. Natalie H. Friedberg Friends of the PSO John & Elaine Frombach Lorie Fuller Normandie Fulson Ann & Bruce Gabler Mr. & Mrs. Robert H. Gallagher Gamma Investment Corporation Marlene E. Gardner Mr. & Mrs. Paul R. Gaudelli Joan & Stuart Gaul Pete Geissler Dr. & Mrs. Brian Generalovich Dr. & Mrs. Geoffrey Gerber Mr. & Mrs. William P. Getty Mr. & Mrs. Charles E. Getze Josie & Geoff Gibson Revs. Gaylord & Catherine Gillis Mike & Cordy Glenn Daniel & Marcia Glosser Fund Dolores Gluck Mr. & Mrs. Ted Goldberg Walter L. Goldburg Samuel H. Golden Mr. Thomas W. Golightly & Rev. Carolyn J. Jones Dr. & Mrs. C. B. Good Mr. James Gorton & Mrs. Gretchen Van Hoesen The Graf Family Laurie Graham Ms. Rosanne Granieri & David Macpherson Mr. & Mrs. Frank Grebowski Charlotte T. Greenwald Dr. & Mrs. M. Joseph Grennan Mr. & Mrs. Steven Gridley Mr. Matteo Gruelle Hanna Gruen Ira & Anita Gumberg Dr. Alberto M. Guzman Jerome P. & Claire B. Hahn Kristine Haig & John Sonnenday Marnie & Jim Haines Jim & Mary Hamilton Jeanne M. Hanchett Rev. Diana D. Harbison Tom & Kathy Harrick Mr. & Mrs. Edward J. Harris Mrs. Mary O. Harrison Ms. Christine A. Hartung

Mr. & Mrs. Calvin R. Hastings Mr. & Mrs. Jack W. Hausser Jana & Fil Hearn Cathy & John Heggestad Dr. & Mrs. Fred P. Heidenreich Ms. Martha S. Helmreich in Honor of my mother, Anne J. Schaff Eric & Lizz Helmsen Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Henderson Paul Hennigan Mr. & Mrs. Daniel H. Hepler Bob & Georgia Hernandez Marianne & Marshall Hess Douglas & Antionette Hill Dr. & Mrs. John B. Hill Dr. Joseph & Marie Hinchcliffe Mr. Carlyle Hoch Ms. Donna Hoffman & Mr. Richard Dum Clare & Jim Hoke Philo & Erika Holcomb Katherine Holter Dr. & Mrs. Elmer J. Holzinger Mr. & Mrs. Michael E. Hooton Mr. & Mrs. G.T. Horne Thomas O. Hornstein Charitable Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Hope H. Horst Drs. Mary & John Hotchkiss Anne K. Hoye Mr. & Mrs. Alan R. Huffman Mr. & Mrs. Elwood T. Hughes Jean & Richard Humphreys Robert & Gail Hunter Joan M. Hurrell Dr. & Mrs. Robert W. Hyland, Jr. George L. Illig, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. David Iwinski, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Samuel A. Jacobs Lynne & Blair Jacobson Dr. & Mrs. Joseph Willcox Jenkins Dawn M. Johnson Richard C. Alter & Eric D. Johnson Mr. & Mrs. Robert A. Johnson Tom & Cathie Johnson Mrs. Barbara B. Johnston Tom & Wendy Jones in Honor of Chris Wu Dr. Raymond M. Juriga Richard & Barbara Kahlson Alice & Richard Kalla Daniel & Carole Kamin Julie & Jeffrey Kant Dr. & Mrs. Peter D. Kaplan


individual donors

Flo & Bob Kenny Rhian Kenny Ruth Ann & Eugene Klein Lynn & Milton Klein Peggy C. Knott Hetty* & James Knox Mr. & Mrs. Thomas A. Kobus Ms. Marilyn Koch Nancy & Bill Koch Dr.* & Mrs. Kian S. Kooros William B.* & Karen M. Kost Stephen Kostyniak Carly, Catherine & Kim Koza Madeline Kramer in Memory of Fred Kramer Helen Aldisert & William L. Krayer Mr. & Mrs. John Krolikowski Alice & Lewis Kuller Robert A. & Alice Kushner Betty Lamb Dr. Michael Landay Dr. & Mrs. Howard N. Lang Earl & Marilyn Latterman A. Lorraine Laux Marvin & Gerry Lebby Drs. Grace and Joon Lee Mr. David W. Lendt Father Ronald P. Lengwin Robert W. Lenker Sally Levin Claire & Larry Levine Dr. & Mrs. Herbert & Barbara Levit Mrs. William E. Lewellen, III Phillip & Leslie Liebscher Robert & Janet Liljestrand Elsa Limbach Mr. & Mrs. Kurt L. Limbach Mr. & Mrs. James T. Linaberger Lawrence & Jacqueline Lobl Constance T. Long Don & Hanne Lorch Mrs. Sybil S. Lowy Francis & Debbie Lynch Pat & Don MacDonald William & Nora MacDonald Neil & Ruth MacKay Prof. Heather MacLean Hank & June Mader Mrs. George J. Magovern, Jr. John K. Maitland Mr. & Mrs. Robert Malnati Carl & Alexis Mancuso Mr. & Mrs. Bernard S. Mars Thomas & Elizabeth Massella Helen F. Mathieson

Dr. William Matlack & Leslie Crawford Matlack Kenneth & Dr. Carol N. Maurer Ms. Sidney F. McBride Mr. & Mrs. Jon W. McCarter McCarthy Rail Insurance Managers, Inc. David & Carol McClenahan Mr. Samuel A. McClung Jonathan & Kathryn McClure Mary C. McCormick Margaret S. McCoy Mrs. Samuel K. McCune Keith McDuffie Kent & Martha McElhattan Mary & R. Lee McFadden Mr. & Mrs. Michael H. McGarry Carol Jean McKenzie Jean & John McLaughlin Mr. & Mrs. William P. Meehan Mr. David Givens & Mr. Stephen Mellett Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Mellon Barbara Sachnoff Mendlowitz Robert & Elizabeth Mertz Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Mrs. William Metcalf, III. Mr. & Mrs. Roger F. Meyer Bridget & Scott Michael Dr. & Mrs. Donald B. Middleton Robert & Miriam Miller Mr. & Mrs. Stuart M. Miller Dr. & Mrs. Vincent P. Miller, Jr. Dr. Samuel* & Nessa Mines Catherine Missenda Paul & Connie Mockenhaupt Mr. Jason Mooney Amy & Ira M. Morgan Gary L. Morrell Connie & Bruce* Morrison Dr. & Mrs. William S. Morrison Mr. & Mrs. Jeffrey Morrow Frank & Brenda Moses Mr. & Mrs. Richard Munsch David & Joan Murdoch Mary & Jim Murdy Terrence H. Murphy Mr. & Mrs.* Albert C. Muse Dr. & Mrs. Donald D. Naragon Dr. & Mrs. Michael S. Nathanson Dr. & Mrs. Dennis W. Nebel Dr. Nancy Z. Nelson Rev. Robert & Mrs. Suzanne Newpher Patricia K. Nichols Renee K. Nicholson

Mr. & Mrs. James Niece Mr. & Mrs. David Nimick Dr. Sean Nolan Nan R. Norris Charles & Lois Norton Heidi Novak Maureen S. O’Brien Mr. & Mrs. Jack Offenbach Dr. & Mrs. Kook Sang Oh Paul & Nancy O’Neill Vince Ornato Dr. & Mrs. Richard A. Orr Dee Jay Oshry & Bart Rack John A. Osuch Sandy & Gene O’Sullivan Dr. & Mrs. Henry Overbeck Doug & Suzanne Owen Mr. & Mrs. William A. Partain Dr. Anthony William Pasculle Patricia Passeltiner John & Joan Pasteris Kenneth Patterson Camilla B. Pearce Mr. & Mrs. Gerald F. Pellett Daniel M. Pennell Dr. Jeffrey & Francesca Peters Ms. Dorothy Philipp Mr. & Mrs. Jon R. Piersol Drs. Robert & Kathy Piston Edward & Mary Ellen Pisula Dr. & Mrs. Frederick Porkolab David & Marilyn Posner Mrs. Mildred M. Posvar Eberhard Pothmann Mrs. Shirley Pow Ms. Mary Alice Price Myrna & Gerald Prince Mercedes & John Pryce Robert & Mary Jo Purvis Liberty & Andrew Pyros Mr. & Mrs. C. J. Queenan, Jr. Fran Quinlan Dr. * & Mrs. Donald H. Quint Barbara Rackoff James & Carol Randolph Barbara M. Rankin Drs. Bruce & Jane Raymond Dave & Joan Reale Dr. & Mrs. John A. Redfield Mr. Joseph J. Regna, Jr. Paul & Dorothy Reiber Eric & Frances Reichl Ms. Victoria Rhoades Carraro Dr. & Mrs. J. Merle Rife Carol & Patrick R. Riley Mavis & Norman Robertson Edgar R. & Betty A. Robinson Mr. William M. Robinson pittsburghsymphony.org 77


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Sharon & Jim Rohr Mr. & Mrs. C. Arthur Rolander Mr. & Mrs. Howard M. Rom Elaine Rosecrans Janice G. Rosenberg Mr. & Mrs. Byron W. Rosener, III Mrs. Louisa Rosenthal Carol & Scott Rotruck Dr. & Mrs. Wilfred T. Rouleau Joseph Rounds Mr. & Mrs. Gerald Rubenstein Mr. & Mrs. Edmund S. Ruffin, III Mr. R. Douglas Rumbarger Mr. Robert Rupp Mr. Leo P. Russell Mrs. John M. Sadler Dr. James R. Sahovey Tamiko Sampson Dr. & Mrs. Isamu Sando Dr. Carlos R. Santiago Bill McAllister & Janet Sarbaugh Stephen & Susan Sargent Sally & Keith Saylor Eric Schaffer & Michelle GraySchaffer Charlie Ward & Marita Schardt Albert & Kathleen Schartner Ann & Bill Scherlis Dr. Melvin & Catherine Schiff Mr. & Mrs. George Schneider Mr. & Mrs. K. George Schoeppner Bernie & Cookie Soldo Schultz Mr. & Mrs. Harry W. Schurr, II. Mary Ann Scialabba Robert & Sharon Sclabassi George & Marcia Seeley Mr. & Mrs. David P. Segel Aleen Mathews Shallberg & Richard Shallberg Richard F. & Linda W. Shaw Judith D. Shepherd Mr. & Mrs. Raymond V. Shepherd, Jr. Dr. Charles H. Shultz Mr. & Mrs. Herbert J. Shure Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Shure Rhoda & Seymour Sikov Marjorie K. Silverman Marilyn & Norman A. Sindler Ms. Ann Slonaker Nancy N. Smith Elaine & William Smith Wallace & Patricia Smith Bill & Patty Snodgrass 78 pittsburghsymphony.org

Marcie Solomon & Nathan Goldblatt David Solosko & Sandra Kniess Fund Dr. & Mrs. Edward M. Sorr in support of music & wellness Drs. Horton C. & Jannene M. Southworth Samuel & Judith Spanos R. Palmer Spierling Richard C. Spine & Joyce Berman Henry Spinelli Janet H. Staab Jim & Judy Stalder Patricia D. Staley Gary & Charlene Stanich Dr. James Staples Shirley & Sidney Stark, Jr. Dr. & Mrs. Terence Starz Mr. & Mrs. Robert B. Stayer William H. Steele Bronna & Harold Steiman Gene & Charlene Stewart Mr. & Mrs. Bernard P. Stoehr & Family Dr. & Mrs. Ron Stoller in Memory of Joanne Smaldino In Memory of Miss Jean Alexander Moore Mona & E.J. Strassburger Richard A. Sundra, in Loving Memory of Patricia Sundra C.J. Sylak, Jr. Stuart & Liz Symonds Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Szejko Carol L. Tasillo Mr. & Mrs. William H. Taylor, Jr. Gordon & Catherine Telfer Mr. Philip C. Thackaray Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Thompson Mr. & Mrs. George H. Thompson Bob & Bette Thomson Gail & Jim Titus Denny & Colleen Travis Rosalyn & Albert Treger Paul A. Trimmer Jeff & Melissa Tsai Eric & Barbara Udren Diane & Dennis Unkovic Theo & Pia Van De Venne Suzan M. Vandertie Mr. & Mrs. Jerry E. Vest Cate & Jerry Vockley Edward L. & Margaret Vogel Linda & Don Wagenheim Wagner Family Charitable Trust

Bill & Sue Wagner Suzanne & Richard Wagner C. Robert Walker John & Irene Wall Mr. & Mrs. John Wandrisco Mr. W.L. & Dr. B.H. Ward Tony & Pat Waterman Ellen Mandel & Lawrence Weber Marvin & Dot Wedeen Elaine Weil William C. Weil Jodi & Andrew Weisfield Bill Weiss Norman & Marilyn Weizenbaum Mr. & Mrs. James P. Welch Nancy Welfer J.B. Weller Frank & Heide Wenzel Mrs. Louis A. Werbaneth Nancy Werner Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Westerberg James Whitehead Dr. Philip M. Wildenhain & Dr. Sarah L. Wildenhain Robert & Carole Williams Ruth Williams in Honor of Anne M. Williams and her parents Dr. Ann G. Wilmoth Mr. & Mrs. Miles C. Wilson James & Ramona Wingate Marie & Daniel Winschel Sheryl & Bruce Wolf Sidney & Tucky Wolfson Rufus J. Wysor Mark & Judy Yogman Ms. Susan Yohe Marlene & John Yokim Dr. & Mrs. Jack Yorty Hugh D. & Alice C. Young Dr. Mark C. Zemanick Mr. & Mrs. Walter Ziatek Simone Ziegler Mrs. Patricia M. Zimba The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra would like to thank the generous individuals whose gifts we cannot recognize due to space constraints. Please read their names on our website at pittsburghsymphony.org. Current as of April 9, 2012

*deceased


foundations & public agencies

FOUNDATIONS & PUBLIC AGENCIES Anonymous (1) Allegheny County Allegheny Regional Asset District The Almira Foundation Bessie F. Anathan Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Benjamin and Fannie Applestein Charitable Trust Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation Meyer & Merle Berger Family Foundation, Inc. Allen H. Berkman and Selma W. Berkman Charitable Trust The Louis & Sandra Berkman Foundation H. M. Bitner Charitable Trust Maxine and William Block Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Paul & Dina W. Block Foundation Bruce Family Foundation Henry C. Frick Educational Fund of The Buhl Foundation The Jack Buncher Foundation Anne L. and George H. Clapp Charitable and Educational Trust Compton Family Foundation The Rose Y. and J. Samuel Cox Charitable Fund Kathryn J. Dinardo Fund Peter C. Dozzi Family Foundation Eden Hall Foundation Lillian Edwards Foundation Eichleay Foundation Jane M. Epstine Charitable Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Fair Oaks Foundation, Inc. Falk Foundation The Fine Foundation The Audrey Hillman Fisher Foundation, Inc. Ann and Gordon Getty Foundation Goldberg Family Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation The Grable Foundation Hansen Foundation The Heinz Endowments Elsie H. Hillman Foundation The Emma Clyde Hodge Memorial Fund May Emma Hoyt Foundation Milton G. Hulme Charitable Foundation Roy A. Hunt Foundation Eugene F. and Margaret Moltrup Jannuzi Foundation Roy F. Johns, Jr. Family Foundation Howard G. and Frances Y. Jones Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Thomas Marshall Foundation Massey Charitable Trust Ruth Rankin McCullough Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation Richard King Mellon Foundation R.K. Mellon Family Foundation

Mid Atlantic Arts Foundation through USArtists International Howard and Nell E. Miller Foundation Millstein Charitable Foundation The Charles M. Morris Charitable Trust National Endowment for the Arts Vernon C. Neal & Alvina B. Neal Fund The Norbell Foundation A.J. & Sigismunda Palumbo Charitable Trust Parker Foundation The Lewis A. and Donna M. Patterson Charitable Foundation W. I. Patterson Charitable Foundation The Lewis A. and Donna M. Patterson Charitable Foundation Pennsylvania Council on the Arts Pennsylvania Department of Community & Economic Development Anna L. & Benjamin Perlow Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Pauline Pickens Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation The Pittsburgh Foundation Pittsburgh Symphony Association The Platt Family Foundation Norman C. Ray Trust The Donald & Sylvia Robinson Family Foundation The William Christopher & Mary Laughlin Robinson Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Rossin Foundation Ryan Memorial Foundation The H. Glenn Sample Jr. MD Memorial Trust James M. & Lucy K. Schoonmaker Foundation The Mrs. William R. Scott Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Alexander C. and Tillie S. Speyer Foundation Symphony East Symphony North Symphony South Tippins Foundation Edith L. Trees Charitable Trust Wallace Family Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Rachel Mellon Walton Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Weiner Family Foundation Samuel and Carrie Arnold Weinhaus Memorial Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Robert and Mary Weisbrod Foundation Hilda M. Willis Foundation Phillip H. and Betty L. Wimmer Family Foundation Current as of April 9, 2012

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CORPORATIONS Includes annual corporate donations and sponsorships BUSINESS LEADERSHIP ASSOCIATION SIGNATURE CIRCLE $75,000 AND ABOVE Acusis Allegheny Technologies Incorporated BNY Mellon EQT Corporation Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield PNC DIAMOND CIRCLE $40,000 - $74,999 Bobby Rahal Automotive Group PPG Industries Foundation PLATINUM CIRCLE $20,000 - $39,999 Alcoa Foundation Cohen & Grigsby, P.C. Columbia Gas of Pennsylvania Curtiss-Wright Flow Control Company Delta Air Lines, Inc. Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh Giant Eagle H. J. Heinz Company Foundation LANXESS Corporation MSA Charitable Foundation Peoples Natural Gas Pittsburgh Steelers Sports, Inc. Thorp Reed & Armstrong LLP Triangle Tech Group United States Steel Corporation UPMC & UPMC Health Plan GOLD CIRCLE $10,000 - $19,999 Anonymous American Eagle Outfitters Foundation American Environmental Services, Inc. Bayer USA Foundation Citigroup Clearview Federal Credit Union Dollar Bank Ernst & Young LLP 80 pittsburghsymphony.org

Fairmont Pittsburgh & Habitat Restaurant The Frank E. Rath-Spang & Company Charitable Trust Hefren-Tillotson Macy’s Foundation SILVER CIRCLE $5,000 - $9,999 AlphaGraphics in the Cultural District Ansaldo STS USA, Inc. Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Calgon Carbon Corporation Chesapeake Energy Corporation The Common Plea Catering Inc. Deloitte Eat’n Park Restaurants Federated Investors, Inc. Gleason, Inc. Heritage Valley Health System KPMG LLP Levin Furniture MEDRAD Mozart Management Mylan Pharmaceuticals Oliver Wyman PwC Reed Smith LLP Ruth’s Chris Steak House Schreiber Industrial Development Co. SYCOR West Penn Allegheny Health System BRONZE CIRCLE $2,500 - $4,999 A.C. Dellovade, Inc. Bank of America Merrill Lynch Burrell Group, Inc. Cipriani & Werner PC Dominion Resources ELG Haniel Metals Corp. Elite Coach Transportation Fort Pitt Capital Group Koppers Lighthouse Electric Company, Inc. Marsh USA Inc.

Mascaro Construction Company Pittsburgh Corning Corporation Pittsburgh Valve & Fitting Co. Sarris Candies, Inc. Silhol Builders Supply The Techs WPXI-TV BUSINESS PARTNERS PEWTER LEVEL $1,000 - $2,499 Berner International Corp Bowles Rice Attorneys at Law Bridges & Company, Inc. Dickie, McCamey & Chilcote, P.C. ESB Bank Elements Contemporary Cuisine Ellwood Group, Inc. FISERV Jendoco Construction Corporation Kerr Engineered Sales Company Lidia’s Italy Pittsburgh MacLachlan, Cornelius & Filoni, Inc. McKamish, Inc. Morgan, Lewis & Bockius LLP Nocito Enterprises, Inc. Oxford Development Company Rothman Gordon PC Schneider Downs Six Penn Kitchen Stringert, Inc. Trebuchet Consulting LLC United Safety Services, Inc. Wampum Hardware Inc. PARTNER LEVEL $500 - $999 Allegheny Valley Bank Big Burrito Restaurant Group Bombardier The Buncher Company Cantor & Pounds Dental Associates Consolidated Communications Crawford Ellenbogen LLC Enterprise Bank Flaherty & O’Hara, P.C.


corporations

General Wire Spring Co. Goehring, Rutter & Boehm Hamill Manufacturing Company Hertz Gateway Center, LP The Hite Company Hoffman Electric Inc. The Jas H. Matthews Educational & Charitable Trust John B. Conomos, Inc. K&I Sheet Metal, Inc. Lucas Systems, Inc. Marstrand Industries, Inc. Metso Minerals Industries, Inc. Meyer, Unkovic & Scott LLP Attorneys at Law Mitsubishi Electric Power Products, Inc. Modern Reproductions, Inc. Neville Chemical Company Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neal Steel, Inc. PGT Trucking

Pittsburgh Wool Company Inc. Pzena Investment Management, LLC Scott Metals Inc. Steptoe & Johnson PLLC Triad USA Tube City IMS, LLC Wagner Agency, Inc. Weltman, Weinberg & Reis Co., LPA Westmoreland Mechanical Testing & Research, Inc. We would like to thank all corporations that contribute to the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Please see our website for a complete listing at pittsburghsymphony.org. Current as of April 16, 2012

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In addition to income from the Annual Fund, the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is dependent on a robust Endowment to assure its financial stability. Gifts from Legacy of Excellence programs are directed to the endowment account to provide for the PSO's future. The Steinberg Society honors donors who have advised the PSO in writing that they have made a provision for the orchestra through their estate plans. Members of the Sid Kaplan Tribute program have made a planned gift to the endowment of $10,000 or more to commemorate a particular person or event. Endowed Naming Opportunities for guest artists, musicians' chairs, concert series, educational programs or designated spaces allow donors to specify a name or tribute for ten years, twenty years or in perpetuity. For additional information, call 412.392.3320.

STEINBERG SOCIETY Anonymous (13) Siamak & Joan Adibi Rev. Drs. A. Gary & Judy Angleberger The Joan & Jerome* Apt Families Francis A. Balog Robert & Loretta Barone Patricia J. Bashioum* Scott J. Bell Mr.* & Mrs.* Allen H. Berkman Dr. Elaine H. Berkowitz Benno & Constance Bernt Marilee Besanceney* Michael Bielski Ruth M. Binkley* Thomas G. Black Barbara M. Brock Lois R. Brozenick Gladys B. Burstein Helen B. Calkins * Janet T. Caputo* Bernard Cerilli* Judy & Michael Cheteyan Educational/Charitable Foundation Mr. & Mrs. David W. Christopher Mr. & Mrs. Edward S. Churchill Dr. Johannes Coetzee* Mr.* & Mrs. Eugene S. Cohen Basil & Jayne Adair Cox Rose Y. Cox* Chester* & Caroline* Davies Jean Langer Davis* Katherine M. Detre* Dr.* & Mrs*. Daniel J. Dillon In memory of Stuart William Discount Mr.* & Mrs. Thomas J. Donnelly Mrs. Philip D'Huc Dressler* Frank R. Dziama Steven G. & Beverlynn Elliott Jane M. Epstine* Emil & Ruth* Feldman Mrs. Loti Gaffney Keith & Susan Garver The Estate of Olga T. Gazalie Mr.* & Mrs.* William H. Genge Ken & Lillian Goldsmith C. Ruth Gottesman* Anna R. Greenberg May Hanson* Elizabeth Anne Hardie Charles & Angela Hardwick Carolyn Heil 82 pittsburghsymphony.org

Eric & Lizz Helmsen Mr.* & Mrs.* Benson Henderson Ms. Judith Hess Mr. John H. Hill Doris M. Hunter, M.D.* Mr.* & Mrs.* William C. Hurtt Philo & Erika Holcomb Ms. Seima Horvitz* Florence M. Jacob* Esther G. Jacovitz Eugene F. & Margaret Moltrup Jannuzi Foundation Patricia Prattis Jennings Jane I. Johnson* Mr. & Mrs. Robert S. Kahn Mr. Sid Kaplan* Lois S. Kaufman Miss Virginia Kaufman* Stephen & Kimberly Keen Mr. Arthur J. Kerr, Jr. Ms. Bernadette Kersting Dr. Laibe A.* & Sydelle Kessler Walter C. Kidney* John W. Kovic, Jr.* Mildred Koetting* Raymond Krotec* Mr.* & Mrs.* G. Christian Lantzsch Stanley & Margaret Leonard Frances F. Levin Margaret M. Levin* Martha Mack Lewis* Edith H. Lipkind Doris L. Litman Penny Locke Edward D. Loughney* Lauren & Hampton Mallory Beatrice Malseed* Jeanne R. Manders* Dr. Richard Martin in Memory of Mrs. Lori Martin* Dr. Marlene McCall Elizabeth McCrady* J. Sherman & Suzanne S. McLaughlin George E. Meanor Mary K. Michaely * Catherine Missenda Ms. Jean L. Misner Dr. Mercedes C. Monjian Mr. & Mrs. Paul J. Mooney Dr. Michael Moran Perry* & BeeJee Morrison Mildred S. Myers

Dr. Nancy Z. Nelson Eda M. Nevin* Rhonda & Dennis Norman Rose Noon* Thaddeus A. Osial, Jr. M.D. Irene G. Otte* Mrs. Dorothy R. Rairigh* Barbara M. Rankin Richard E. Rauh Cheryl & James Redmond Mr. & Mrs. William E. Rinehart Yvonne V. Riefer* Martha Robel* Donald & Sylvia Robinson Mr. & Mrs. David M. Roderick Mr.* & Mrs. William R. Roesch Charlotta Klein Ross Mr. & Mrs. Gary L. Ryan Virginia Schatz Nancy Schepis In Memory of Isaac Serrins from Mrs. Isaac Serrins Michael Shefler Mr. & Mrs. Richard P. Simmons Audrey I. Stauffer* Dr. & Mrs. Leonard A. Stept In Honor of Dr. Raymond Stept from His Loving Family Mrs. Margaret Stouffer in Memory of Miss Jean Alexander Moore In Loving Memory of Father and Grandfather William Steinberg from Silvia Tennenbaum & Family Richard C. Tobias* Tom & Jamee Todd Mr. & Mrs. Gideon Toeplitz Mrs. Jane Treherne-Thomas Eva & Walter J. Vogel Mr. & Mrs. George L. Vosburgh In Memory of Isaac Serrins from Mr. & Mrs. Ira Weiss David G. Weiss* Brian Weller Donald Frederick Wahl* Mr. & Mrs. Raymond B. White Sara Cancelliere Wiegand * James & Susanne Wilkinson Mr.* & Mrs.* Arnold D. Wilner Mr. & Mrs. Thomas Witmer Patricia L. Wurster Rufus J. Wysor Naomi Yoran Miriam L. Young


legacy of excellence

SID KAPLAN TRIBUTE PROGRAM

The Sid Kaplan Memorial Hallway given by David Kaplan in appreciation of generous gifts commemorating family and friends In Honor of Dr. Raymond Stept from his loving family

In Honor of Mariss & Irina Jansons and friendship from Dr. Laibe* & Sydelle Kessler Honoring my dear friend, Marvin Hamlisch, from Mina Kulber

In Loving Memory of Martin Smith, PSO Horn, 1980-2005, from his siblings Todd Smith, Judy Dupont, & Susan Noble

ENDOWED CHAIRS Principal Horn Chair, given by an Anonymous Donor First Violin Chair, given by Allen H. Berkman in memory of his beloved wife, Selma Wiener Berkman Michael & Carol Bleier Horn Chair given in memory of our parents, Tina & Charles Bleier and Ruth & Shelley Stein Jane & Rae Burton Cello Chair Cynthia S. Calhoun Principal Viola Chair Virginia Campbell Principal Harp Chair Ron & Dorothy Chutz First Violin Chair Johannes & Mona L. Coetzee Memorial Principal English Horn Chair George & Eileen Dorman Assistant Principal Cello Chair Albert H. Eckert Associate Principal Percussion Chair Beverlynn & Steven Elliott Associate Concertmaster Chair Jean & Sigo Falk Principal Librarian Chair Endowed Principal Piccolo Chair, given to honor Frank and Loti Gaffney William & Sarah Galbraith First Violin Chair The Estate of Olga T. Gazalie First Violin Chair Ira & Nanette Gordon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; The Gracky Fund for Education & Community Engagement Susan S. Greer Memorial Trumpet Chair, given by Peter Greer Caryl & Irving Halpern Cello Chair William Randolph Hearst Endowed Fund for Education Vira I. Heinz Music Director Chair

Principal Pops Conductor Chair Endowed by Henry & Elsie Hillman Tom & Dona Hotopp Principal Bass Chair Milton G. Hulme, Jr. Guest Conductor Chair given by Mine Safety Appliances Company Mr. & Mrs. Benjamin F. Jones III, Principal Keyboard Chair Virginia Kaufman Resident Conductor Chair, Lawrence Loh Stephen & Kimberly Keen Bass Chair G. Christian Lantzsch & Duquesne Light Company Principal Second Violin Chair Mr. & Mrs. William Genge and Mr. & Mrs. James E. Lee Principal Bassoon Chair Nancy & Jeffery Leininger First Violin Chair Edward D. Loughney Co-Principal Trumpet Fiddlesticks Family Concert Series Endowed by Gerald & Audrey McGinnis Honoring The Center for Young Musicians Mr. & Mrs. Martin G. McGuinn Cello Chair Dr. William Larimer Mellon, Jr. Principal Oboe Chair, given by Rachel Mellon Walton Messiah Concerts Endowed by the Howard and Nell E. Miller Chair Donald I. & Janet Moritz and Equitable Resources, Inc. Associate Principal Cello Chair The Perry & BeeJee Morrison String Instrument Loan Fund The Morrison Family Associate Principal Second Violin Chair Mildred S. Myers & William C. Frederick Co-Principal Oboe Chair

Jackman Pfouts Principal Flute Chair, given in memory of Mr. & Mrs. Arthur Jackman by Barbara Jackman Pfouts Pittsburgh Symphony Association Principal Cello Chair Reed Smith Chair honoring Tom Todd Horn Chair James W. & Erin Rimmel Percussion Chair Mr. & Mrs. William E. Rinehart Oboe Chair Donald & Sylvia Robinson Family Foundation Guest Conductor Chair Martha Brooks Robinson Principal Trumpet Chair Mr. & Mrs. Aaron Silberman Principal Clarinet Chair Mr. and Mrs. Willard J. Tillotson, Jr. Viola Chair Tom & Jamee Todd Principal Trombone Chair Rachel Mellon Walton Concertmaster Chair, given by Mr. & Mrs. Richard Mellon Scaife Jacqueline Wechsler Horn Chair given in memory of Irving (Buddy) Wechsler Barbara Weldon Principal Timpani Chair Hilda M. Willis Foundation Flute Chair Thomas H. & Frances Witmer Assistant Principal Horn Chair The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra wishes to thank individuals who have made gifts or provisions through the Legacy of Excellence programs. If you find that your name has not been listed and should be, or if you would like additional information about making gifts to the endowment, please call 412.392.3320. Current as of March 14, 2012 *deceased pittsburghsymphony.org 83


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COMMITMENT TO EXCELLENCE

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra is grateful to our Commitment to Excellence Campaign donors and is pleased to acknowledge the following members of our donor family who have made gifts of $1,000 or more to the Commitment to Excellence Campaign. Every effort has been made to ensure accuracy; however, if we have not listed you correctly, please call 412.392.2887.

$1,000,000+ Anonymous (1) BNY Mellon The Buncher Family Foundation Eden Hall Foundation Beverlynn & Steven Elliott The Heinz Endowments Elsie & Henry Hillman The Estate of Virginia Kaufman The Richard King Mellon Foundation PNC R.P. Simmons Family Redevelopment Assistance Capital Program Arthur & Barbara Weldon $500,000 - $999,999 Anonymous (1) Dollar Bank Roy & Susan Dorrance The Giant Eagle Foundation Mr. & Mrs.* J. Robert Maxwell Catharine M. Ryan & John T. Ryan III Tom & Jamee Todd $250,000 - $499,999 Allegheny Technologies Incorporated Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation Edward S. & Jo-Ann M. Churchill Mr. & Mrs. J. Christopher Donahue Mr. & Mrs. Ira H. Gordon Drue Heinz Trust Tom & Dona Hotopp G. Christian Lantszch* Lillian Edwards Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Thomas McConomy Mr. & Mrs. Thomas J. Usher Jon & Carol Walton Thomas H. & Frances M. Witmer $100,000 - $249,999 Anonymous (4) Wendy & David Barensfeld in memory of Dr. Robert E. Herlands Kathryn & Michael Bryson Rae & Jane Burton 84 pittsburghsymphony.org

Mr. & Mrs. Joseph L. Calihan The Estate of Johannes Coetzee Randi & L.Van V. Dauler, Jr., Emma Clyde Hodge Memorial Fund EQT Corporation The Estate of Beatrice Malseed The Estate of Donald F. Wahl Falk Foundation & Sigo & Jean Falk Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Gailliot Goldman Sachs Gives Ira & Anita Gumberg Hansen Foundation William Randolph Hearst Foundation Hefren-Tillotson Barbara Jeremiah Rick & Laurie Johnson Nancy & Jeff Leininger Mr. & Mrs. Martin G. McGuinn Perry* & BeeJee Morrison Rachel Mellon Walton Fund of The Pittsburgh Foundation Mr. & Mrs. William E. Rinehart Samuel & Carrie Arnold Weinhaus Fund Edward D. Loughney* Bill* & Carol Tillotson Helge & Erika Wehmeier James & Susanne Wilkinson Hilda M. Willis Foundation $50,000 - $99,999 Estate of Florence M. Jacob Benno & Constance Bernt Michael & Carol Bleier Sidney & Sylvia Busis Ann & Frank Cahouet Ron & Dorothy Chutz Basil & Jayne Adair Cox Estate of Olga T. Gazalie Marvin & Terre Hamlisch Robert W. & Elizabeth C. Kampmeinert A. W. Mellon Foundation James & Joan Moore Donald I. & Janet Moritz Mildred S. Myers & William C. Frederick Elliott S. Oshry Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

Reed Smith LLP Abby & Reid Ruttenberg John P. & Elizabeth L. Surma Jacquelin G. Wechsler $25,000-$49,999 Anonymous (1) Alan L. & Barbara B. Ackerman Astorino Larry & Tracy Brockway Robert C. Denove Pamela R. & Kenneth B. Dunn Martin & Lisa Earle Eichleay Foundation Ernst & Young LLP Nancy Goeres & Michael Rusinek Ms. Anna Greenberg Stephen & Kimberly Keen Mrs. H.J. Levin Betty & Granger Morgan The Pittsburgh Foundation Mr. & Mrs. Frank Brooks Robinson Mr. & Mrs. William F. Roemer Stan & Carole Russell Karen Scansaroli James M. & Lucy K. Schoonmaker Foundation Schreiber Industrial Development Co. Mr. & Mrs. James E. Steen The Estate of Joan Dillon Milton & Nancy Washington Harvey & Florence Zeve $10,000 - $24,999 Anonymous (1) William & Frances Aloe Charitable Foundation AlphaGraphics in the Cultural District The Louis & Sandra Berkman Foundation Michael E. Bielski Estate of Ruth M. Binkley Mr. & Mrs. Daniel Booker AndrĂŠs CĂĄrdenes & Monique Mead James C. Chaplin Virginia K. Cicero The Estate of Richard C. Tobias The Estate of Jane I. Johnson Greg & Ellen Jordan Ruth Feldman* & Emil Feldman


commitment to excellence Elizabeth H. Genter David & Nancy Green Caryl & Irving Halpern David G. Hammer The Walt Harper Memorial Fund W.S. & Linda J. Hart Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield Karen & Thomas Hoffman Ms. Seima Horvitz Mark Huggins & Bonnie Siefers David & Melissa Iwinski Eric & Valerie Johnson Rhian Kenny Judith & Lester* Lave Carolyn Maue & Bryan Hunt Douglas B. McAdams Alicia & Victoria McGinnis Mary Ellen Miller Maureen S. O'Brien Mr. & Mrs. Thomas H. O'Brien Thaddeus A. Osial, Jr. M.D. & Linda E. Shooer Robert & Lillian Panagulias Mr. & Mrs. John R. Price Deborah Rice James W. & Erin M. Rimmel Judy & Stanley Ruskin Max & Tiffany Starks Estate of Audrey I. Stauffer Elizabeth Burnett & Lawrence Tamburri The Chester A. Davies Trust Edward L. & Margaret Vogel Mrs. Evette Wivagg Rachel W. Wymard Seldon & Susan Whitaker Dr. & Mrs. Merrill F. Wymer $5,000-$9,999 Jim & Jane Barthen Scott Bell Betsy Bossong Allan J. & Clementine K. Brodsky Roger & Judy Clough Estelle Comay & Bruce Rabin Philip J. & Sherry S. Dieringer Mr. & Mrs. David Ehrenwerth Mr. Ian Fagelson Dr. & Mrs. Lawrence Ferlan Mr. & Mrs. Ronald E. Gebhardt Gail & Gregory Harbaugh Mr. & Mrs.* Charles H. Harff Eric & Lizz Helmsen Richard & Alice Kalla Jack & Virginia Kerr Douglas W. Kinzey Cliff & Simi Kress

Betty L. Lamb Jeanne R. Manders* Scott & Bridget Michael Mr. & Mrs. Stuart M. Miller Robert Moir & Jennifer Cowles Mary & Jim Murdy Mr. & Mrs. Hale Oliver Mr. & Mrs. Michael B. Pollack Tor Richter in memory of Tibbie Richter Marcie Solomon & Nathan Goldblatt Dr. & Mrs. Leonard Stept Dick & Thea Stover Becky & Herb Torbin Jane F. Treherne-Thomas Dr. Michael J. White & Mr. Richard L. LeBeau Mr. & Mrs. Thomas D. Wright Robert P. Zinn & Dr. Darlene Berkovitz $1,000 - $4,999 Anonymous (7) Mr. & Mrs. John Crile Allen, Sr. Mr. Thomas L. Allen David & Andrea Aloe Joan & Jerome* Apt & Family John H. Ashton Dr. & Mrs. Alan A. Axelson Kathleen & Joseph Baird Richard C. Barney Robert W. & Janet W. Baum Philip & Melinda Beard Yu-Ling & Gregg Behr Patti & Sandy Berman Georgia Berner Ms. Mary Biagini Drs. Barbara & Albert Biglan Mr. Stuart Bloch Paul E. Block Marian & Bruce Block Nadine E. Bognar Jim & Debbie Boughner Mr. & Mrs. David A. Brownlee Lois R. Brozenick Howard & Marilyn Bruschi Doug Burns Burrell Group, Inc. Mr. & Mrs. Douglas Cameron Mr. & Mrs. Brian & Shannon Capellupo Dr. Rebecca Caserio Gloria R. Clark Mr. Ray Clover Dr. Richard L. & Sally B. Cohen Bill & Cynthia Cooley Stacy Corcoran Rose & Vincent Crisanti Patricia Criticos Donna Dierken Dado Ada & Stanford* Davis

Dr. & Mrs. Gregory G. Dell'Omo Valerie DiCarlo June & Barry Dietrich Lisa Donnermeyer John & Gertrude Echement Francis & Gene Fairman, III In Honor of Ruth Feldman* & Emil Feldman Mrs. Orlie S. Ferretti Jan Fleisher Mr. & Mrs. Joseph U. Frye Friends & Family of Stanford P. Davis Bruce & Ann Gabler Dr. R. Kent Galey & Dr. Karen Roche Gamma Investment Corporation Kathleen Gavigan & William B. Dixon Mr. & Mrs. James Genstein Bernard Goldstein, M.D. & Russellyn Carruth Mr. Thomas W. Golightly & Rev. Carolyn J. Jones Mr. & Mrs. Thomas C. Graham John F. Gray Mr. & Mrs. Frank T. Guadagnino Kristine Haig & John Sonnenday Deirdre & Brian Henry Carol E. Higgins Adam & Allison Hill Kelvin Hill Esther & Terry Horne Mr. & Mrs. Thomas O. Hornstein David & Mary Hughes Hyman Family Foundation Mary Lee & Joe Irwin Vincent J. Jacob Mr. & Mrs. Richard A. Jacobs, Jr. Maureen Jeffrey Trust Susan & Wyatt Jenny Mr. & Mrs. Wilbur S. Jones Leo & Marge Kane Joan M. Kaplan Mr. Navroz J. Karkaria Judge William Kenworthy & Mrs. Lucille Kenworthy Jan & Guari Kiefer Aleta J. & Paul King Carly, Catherine & Kim Koza Elaine & Carl Krasik In Memory of Jack Larouere Mike LaRue & Judy Wagner A. Lorraine Laux Mr. & Mrs. Frederick C. Leech John Lenkey, III Dr. Joseph & AnnaMae Lenkey Frances F. Levin Ken & Hope Linge Tom & Gail Litwiler E.D. Loughney MacLachlan, Cornelius & Filoni, Inc. Mary Lou & Ted N. Magee pittsburghsymphony.org 85


2011-2012 SEASON

Carl & Alexis Mancuso In Memory of Elizabeth & Leonard Martin Dave & Kathy Maskalick Mr. & Mrs. Joseph A. Massaro, Jr. Mr. & Mrs. Water T. McGough, Jr. George & Bonnie Meanor Marilyn & Allan Meltzer Merrills Family Burl J. F. Moone, III Arthur J. Murphy, Jr. Terrence H. Murphy Mr. & Mrs. Perry Napolitano Dr. & Mrs. Harry M. Null Dr. & Mrs. Arthur Nussbaum Roger & Sarah Parker John & Joan Pasteris Richard E. & Alice S. Patton Camilla B. Pearce & Dan Gee* Joseph & Suzanne Perrino Kears & Karen Pollock Ms. Mary Alice Price Symphony East Barbara Rackoff Bruce S. Reopolos Mr. & Mrs. Philip R. Roberts Betty & Edgar R. Robinson

Mr. William M. Robinson Bruce & Susy Robison Dr. Lee A. & Rosalind* Rosenblum Charlotta Klein Ross Joseph Rounds Millie & Gary Ryan Gail Ryave & Family Mary Sedigas Mrs. Virginia W. Schatz Allyn R. Shaw, William M. Shaw III & Family, Susan Wambold Michael Shefler Mr. & Mrs. Raymond V. Shepherd, Jr. Dr. Ralph T. Shuey & Rebecca L. Carlin Paul & Linda Silver Laurie & Paul Singer Lois & Bill Singleton Marjorie A. Snyder Martin Staniland & Alberta Sbragia Shirley & Sidney Stark, Jr. Sarah & Thomas St. Clair Jeff & Linda Stengel Stringert, Inc.

Peter Sullivan Mr. & Mrs. Frank Talenfeld Dorothea & Gerald* Thompson Dennis L. Travis & Colleen Bryne Travis Jeff & Melissa Tsai Drs. Ben Van Houten & Victoria Woshner John & Linda Vuono Jim* & Mary Jo Winokur Scott & Stacy Weber Marvin & Dot Wedeen Jodi & Andrew Weisfield Mr. & Mrs. Richard Zahren We would like to thank all of our donors to the Commitment to Excellence Campaign. A complete listing can be found on our website at pittsburghsymphony.org Current as of April 9, 2012 *deceased

SPECIAL NAMED GIFTS BNY Mellon ........................................Recordings & Electronic Media and Artistic Excellence Programs Benno & Constance Bernt ......................................................................................................Stage Right Door Rae & Jane Burton ........................................................................................................................Garden Bench Randi & L. Van V. Dauler, Jr. ........................................................Mozart Room Elevator & Garden Bench William S. Dietrich, II* ............................................................Endowment for PSO Educational Programs Dollar Bank ..............................................................................................Community Engagement Concerts Mr. & Mrs. J. Christopher Donahue ................................................................................Music for the Spirit Roy & Susan Dorrance ..................................................................................................Music for the Spirit EQT Corporation ..................................Community Engagement & EQT Student Side-By-Side Program Mr. & Mrs. Henry J. Gailliot ..........................................................................................................Grand Piano Goldman Sachs Gives ........................................................................Community Engagement Concerts Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield ..................................................................Music and Wellness Program Elsie & Henry Hillman ..................The Henry L. Hillman Endowment for International Performances Ms. Seima Horvitz ........................................................................................................................Garden Bench David & Melissa Iwinski ..........................................................................................................Stage Left Door Lillian Edwards Foundation..........................................................................................Heartstrings Program Mr. & Mrs.* J. Robert Maxwell ......................................................................President and CEOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ................................................................................Grand Tier Door - Right Center PNC ..................................................................................PNC Walkway at Heinz Hall and PNC Tiny Tots Mr. & Mrs. William E. Rinehart ................................................................................................Grand Piano Mr. & Mrs. William F. Roemer....................................................................................................Garden Bench Catharine M. Ryan & John T. Ryan III ............................................................................Music for the Spirit Alece & David Schreiber ............................................................................................................Garden Bench Harvey & Florence Zeve ........................................................................................................Garden Bench Current as of March 6, 2012 86 pittsburghsymphony.org


2011-2012 SEASON

HEINZ HALL BOX OFFICE Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Saturday from Noon to 4 p.m. Weekend hours vary based on performance times. Tickets may be purchased by calling 412.392.4900 and are also available at Theater Square Box Office. THE LATECOMER’S GALLERY, located behind the Main Floor, affords patrons who arrive after the beginning of a concert the opportunity to enjoy the performance until they can be seated. Latecomers will be seated at suitable intervals during the program, at the discretion of the conductor. The Latecomer’s Gallery is also available for parents with younger children.

THE MOZART ROOM AT HEINZ HALL Just seconds away from your seats, enjoy an all new dining experience with The Common Plea. pittsburghsymphony.org/mozartroom Reservations at 412.392.4879.

SPECIAL ACCOMMODATIONS, such as requests for wheelchair accessible locations, may be made when purchasing tickets. Hearing assistance devices are available in the Entrance Lobby. Doormen and ushers are also available for assistance with these needs. RESTROOMS are located on the Lower, Grand Tier and Gallery levels and off the Garden and Overlook rooms; a wheelchair-accessible restroom is on the Main Floor. FOR LOST AND FOUND ITEMS, call 412.392.4844 on weekdays from 10 a.m.-5 p.m. THE ELEVATOR is located next to the Grand Staircase.

HEINZ HALL IS A NON-SMOKING BUILDING AND HAS A NO SMOKING POLICY.

AN ATTENDED COAT CHECKROOM is available in the Dorothy Porter Simmons Family Regency Room, located on the Lower Level or in the Grand Lobby. Coin-operated lockers are located on the Lower, Grand Tier and Gallery levels. REFRESHMENT BARS are located in the Garden and Overlook rooms and in the Grand Tier Lounge. Intermission beverages may be ordered prior to performances. Water cups are available in the restrooms. FIRE EXITS are to be used ONLY in case of an emergency. If the fire alarm is activated, follow the direction of Heinz Hall ushers and staff to safely evacuate the theater.

CONCIERGE SERVICE, in the Entrance Lobby, is available to assist with information about Heinz Hall, the Cultural District and area attractions and to help with dining, hotel, entertainment and transportation concerns.

THE EMERGENCY REGISTRY BOOK, for the convenience of physicians and others who may be called in an emergency, is located at the concierge desk. Please turn off cellular phones and pagers upon entering the theater and refer all emergency calls to 412.392.2880.

FOR MORE INFORMATION AT CONCERTS: Penny Vennare, Event Supervisor; Tina Castrodale, Concierge; Ron Ogrodowski, Concierge. 14 88 pittsburghsymphony.org

Can I organize a group for a concert? Absolutely. With a group ticket purchase you receive discounted tickets, priority seats, personalized service and free reception space. For more information, call 412.392.4819 or visit our website at pittsburghsymphony.org/groups

What time should I arrive for concerts? You may want to arrive at least 20 minutes prior to concert start time to allow time for parking, entering the hall and finding your seat. BNY Mellon Grand Classics patrons have the opportunity to attend Concert Preludes, which begin one hour before the concert in the auditorium. What should I wear to concerts? There is no official dress code for events in Heinz Hall. Many patrons wear business attire, and many prefer to be more casual. Wear whatever makes you feel comfortable.

May I bring my children? Introducing small children to music is important to the PSO and we welcome young children to our youth concerts and Fiddlesticks Family Series. Children, approximately age six and over, are welcome at all performances with a purchased ticket. The Latecomer’s Gallery and lobby video monitors are always options for restless children. May I take pictures? All still and video photography, or audio recording are strictly prohibited at all times.

How will I find parking? Pittsburgh’s Cultural District can be very busy but guaranteed prepaid parking is available to all ticketholders in the Sixth & Penn garage across from Heinz Hall. Ask about prepaid parking when you order your tickets. What can I do to support the PSO? Your ticket purchase supports the PSO and we thank you! However, ticket sales only cover a portion of our operating costs. To make a tax-deductible gift to the PSO, contact our Donor Relations department at 412.392.4880 or visit us online at pittsburghsymphony.org How can I get someone from the PSO to speak at our event? The volunteers of the Speakers Bureau would like to share their passion for the PSO with the community by providing a speaker for you and your organization. If you are interested, please call 412.392.2235.


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PSO Program Book - April 27 - May 15  

PSO Program Book - April 27 - May 15