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The Pittsburgh Promise

Annual Report 2014


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

We Envision A city at the core of a strong region whose neighborhoods are vibrant, inclusive, and attractive to young and senior people, as well as businesses small and large A public school district at the center of the city that provides enviably excellent education to all of its children A generation of young people at the heart of the district who are equipped to pursue higher education with vigor and who are dedicated to a lifetime of service

Board of Directors

Staff

Franco Harris (Chair) Member, NFL Hall of Fame Owner, Super Bakery, Inc.

Pamela Little-Poole Youth Organizer A+ Schools

Lauren Bachorski Communication and Project Manager

Martin McGuinn (Vice Chair) Chairman and CEO (Retired) Mellon Financial Corporation

David Malone President and CEO Gateway Financial Group

Candi Castleberry Singleton (Treasurer) Chief Inclusion & Diversity Officer, UPMC

William Peduto Mayor City of Pittsburgh

Olga Welch, EdD (Secretary) Dean, School of Education Duquesne University Charles Burke, Jr. Chairman The Grable Foundation

Cindy Shapira Senior Policy Advisor Allegheny County Executive David Shapira Executive Chairman Giant Eagle, Inc.

Debra Kline Demchak Community Leader

Edith Shapira, MD Psychiatrist Private Practice

Kirk Johnson SVP, Wealth Management Merrill Lynch

Kiya Tomlin Owner & Designer Kiya Tomlin Pittsburgh

Maxwell King President and CEO The Pittsburgh Foundation

Demetri Zervoudis Senior Vice President Bayer MaterialScience

Linda Lane, EdD Superintendent Pittsburgh Public Schools

Saleem Ghubril Executive Director The Pittsburgh Promise

Anne Lewis Chair Oxford Development Company

Afiya Bey High School Internship Coordinator Shawn Butler Director of Programs Janay Coleman Scholarship and Development Coordinator Saleem Ghubril Executive Director Amirah Hunt Scholarship Manager Marsha Kolbe Development Manager Steve Kroser Data and Technology Coordinator Gerry LaVan Director of Development Katina Lee Development and Operations Coordinator Betsy Magley Major Gifts Manager Phil Mollenkof Communication and Design Manager Julia Shepard Events and Research Manager Gene Walker Program Manager


THE WHOLE WORLD FALLING INTO PLACE A story, an urban legend perhaps, makes its reappearance on occasion. It is about a dad who works at home while also caring for his 5-year old son. Needing an hour of uninterrupted time, he found in a magazine a picture of the world, which he cut into small puzzle pieces and gave to his son to put together. A few short minutes later, the son announced that the task was done. Baffled by the apparent genius of his son, the dad inquired about how this was possible. The little boy turned the puzzle upside down and showed his dad a picture of a child. “When you put the child together, Daddy, the whole world falls in place.” We unhesitatingly affirm the truth that is implied in this short story. Our focus begins and ends and is sustained by an unwavering devotion to doing that which keeps, or brings, the child together. And, we will keep repeating this effort until every child is “together,” and the adults and the systems that serve all children commit to this vision, and roll up their sleeves to work together toward it. Franco Harris Chairman of The Board

We have some deeply held convictions. They include the belief that: • All kids are our kids, and the best for which we work and wish for our own children is also that for which we work and wish for others’ • Inside every child lives a promise, and it is the privilege of all adults to bring that promise to full life

Saleem Ghubril Executive Director

• Keeping our children emotionally and physically safe, while also equipping them to spread their wings and soar, is our sacred duty • Our globe, nation, region, and city will rise or fall in proportion to how well we love, raise, serve, teach, and inspire our children • The soil in which our children must flourish includes homes and schools, neighborhoods and economies, and it is our common work to prepare, plant, water, weed, and feed that soil In order to turn these convictions to actions, we set the following ambitious goals: 1. We will send all eligible urban youth to college or trade school with a scholarship 2. We will promote the reform of urban schools so that young people are prepared for successful and meaningful lives 3. We will invest in our region’s workforce by preparing the next generation of workers to meet the demands and opportunities of our economy

4. We will raise $250 million in order to fulfill our promise for generations to come

In the following pages, we report on the results of our efforts to reach these goals. We recognize that all success is the result of the efforts of many. We give thanks for our students, our schools, our community, and our investors. Each of them - each of you - is Pittsburgh’s promise.

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

S T U D E N T S

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GOAL 1:

We will send all eligible urban youth to college or trade school with a scholarship.

In order to promote the pursuit of post-secondary education among urban youth, and make it accessible to as many as possible, The Pittsburgh Promise offers two products:

• The Core Promise Scholarship • The Promise Extension

The Core Promise Scholarship – up to $40,000 over 4 years – is the mainstay of The Pittsburgh Promise’s work. It is available to every student who meets the following criteria: 1. Residency: Lives in the City of Pittsburgh for at least the four years of high school 2. Enrollment: Attends Pittsburgh Public Schools for at least the four years of high school 3. GPA: Graduates with a minimum cumulative high school grade point average of 2.5 4. Attendance: Maintains a minimum cumulative high school attendance rate of 90% We believe, and data verify, that GPA and attendance are good predictors of post-secondary success. That is why we set the minimums at modest, but not prohibitive, levels. However, in order to give a second chance to students who fall short of Promise-eligibility but who still desire to pursue higher education, we designed our second product, The Promise Extension. This is a “lifeline” which we offer to students whose GPA is between 2.00 and 2.49. We provide them with a scholarship to attend Community College of Allegheny County for one year, and if they maintain at least a 2.00 college GPA, they can then pursue their education with a scholarship at CCAC or another post-secondary school in Pennsylvania.

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

RECEIVING SCHOLARSHIPS AND LEANING INTO THEIR FUTURES The Pittsburgh Promise began to grant scholarships in 2008. As of October 2014, we have supported 5,323 students as follows: • 4,621 students received a Core Promise Scholarship • 702 students received a Promise Extension By Ethnicity and Gender African American Caucasian Asian, Hispanic, Pacific Islander, Multi-Racial Female Male Pell-Eligible (Low Income) Average High School GPA

Core Promise 38% 56% 6% 60% 40% 58% 3.17

Promise Extension 68% 27% 5% 50% 50% 73% 2.26

Although Promise Scholars attend nearly 100 different institutions across Pennsylvania, this table displays those institutions that have served at least 1% of Promise Scholars since 2008:

Post-Secondary Institution Community College of Allegheny County University of Pittsburgh, Main Campus Slippery Rock University Robert Morris University Point Park University Indiana University of Pennsylvania Penn State University, Main Campus Clarion University Carlow University California University of Pennsylvania Duquesne University Penn State University, Allegheny Campus Edinboro University Temple University Chatham University University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg Campus La Roche College Bradford School Penn State University, New Kensington Campus Carnegie Mellon University Kaplan Career Institute Penn State University, Beaver Campus Art Institute of Pittsburgh 4

Promise Scholars 1197 251 225 197 189 168 167 143 136 135 134 133 121 107 87 80 75 64 56 55 54 54 50

Percent of All Scholars

Percent of All Core Promise Scholars

Percent of All Extension Scholars

25.6% 5.4% 4.8% 4.2% 4.0% 3.6% 3.6% 3.1% 2.9% 2.9% 2.9% 2.8% 2.6% 2.3% 1.9% 1.7% 1.6% 1.4% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.2% 1.1%

20.0% 6.0% 5.5% 4.7% 4.6% 3.9% 4.2% 3.0% 3.2% 3.1% 3.4% 3.0% 2.6% 2.7% 2.1% 2.0% 1.7% 1.3% 1.4% 1.4% 0.8% 1.2% 1.0%

61.3% 0.3% 1.2% 1.8% 1.1% 2.1% 0.0% 3.8% 1.4% 2.0% 0.2% 2.4% 3.0% 0.0% 0.6% 0.2% 0.9% 2.0% 0.3% 0.0% 3.3% 0.8% 1.5%


RECEIVING SCHOLARSHIPS AND LEANING INTO THEIR FUTURES An observable trend reveals that more of the Core Promise scholars are attending 4-year institutions with significant declines in attendance at 2-year institutions. This trend became more pronounced in 2012. It is possible that the increase of the scholarship award from $5,000 to $10,000 per year, which occurred in 2012, played a role for students who would have otherwise enrolled in 2-year or out-of-state schools that are not eligible for Promise funding.

Post-Secondary Institution

Enrollment Change: 2008 - 2013

Penn State University, New Kensington +6.3% Indiana University of Pennsylvania +4.4% California University of Pennsylvania +3.8% Penn State University, Beaver Campus +3.2% Temple University +2.8% Point Park University +2.6% Robert Morris University +2.0% Duquesne University +1.9% Slippery Rock University +0.9% Art Institute of Pittsburgh +0.4% Carnegie Mellon University +0.1%

Post-Secondary Institution

Enrollment Change: 2008 - 2013

La Roche College Clarion University University of Pittsburgh, Main Campus Bradford School Chatham University Edinboro University Kaplan Career Institute Carlow University University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg Campus Penn State University, Allegheny Campus Penn State University, Main Campus Community College of Allegheny County

-0.3% -0.5% -0.8% -0.8% -1.1% -1.5% -1.5% -1.6% -1.8% -2.8% -4.8% -13.6%

Low income students represent more than 70% of the enrollment of Pittsburgh Public Schools and the Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise. Promise scholarships are added to financial aid as the last dollar and before loans. In most cases Promise scholarships are the final piece of the financial puzzle, enabling our students to consider post-secondary education and graduate with little or no debt. As this table demonstrates, in the first six years of operation, Promise Scholars received nearly $230 million in grants and scholarships (not including loans), of which $49 million was from The Pittsburgh Promise. Sources of Grants and Scholarships Provided to Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise: 2008 – 2014 (As of September 2014) Pittsburgh Promise Scholarships Need-Based Federal Grants (Pell and FSEOG) Need-Based State Grants (PHEAA) Institutional Grants Other Grants Total Scholarships and Grants

$49,100,000 $54,881,782 $32,739,138 $77,828,246 $14,696,644 $229,245,810

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

PERSISTING TOWARDS A DEGREE Creating opportunities for urban youth to pursue higher education is an important enterprise. It is transformative for individual youth, impactful for families, and significant for the preparedness and vitality of our region’s workforce and economy. Therefore tracking the students’ persistence in higher education, and their eventual attainment of a degree, diploma, or a certificate, is an equally important enterprise. Persistence rates refer to students who enroll in the fall of their first year and return to any institution in the fall of their second year. For a comparative benchmark, we use data provided by the National Student Clearinghouse (NSC). There are some limitations to using NSC data for this comparison. The table below highlights the differences between the demographics of the national and Pittsburgh data sets:

Demographics African American Students Caucasian Students Hispanic Students Asian/Pacific Islander Students American Indian/Alaskan Students Multiracial Students Free and Reduced School Lunch Students GPA Floor

National Data

Pittsburgh Public Schools Data

Urban, suburban, exurban and rural

Urban

15% 52% 24% 5% 1% 3% 50% No floor

53% 34% 2% 4% 0% 7% 71% 2.00 floor

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PERSISTING TOWARDS A DEGREE Despite the significant demographic differences between the NSC and Pittsburgh Public Schools data, Core Promise Scholars are persisting in higher education at rates that are comparable to students across the United States.

80% 78%

79% 80%

75% 79%

75% 79%

77% 79%

77% 79% NSC Cross-cohort Comparison

Promise 2008-2012 CORE

NSC 2012 Comparison

Promise 2012 CORE (N=700)

NSC 2011 Comparison

Promise 2011 CORE (N=650)

NSC 2010 Comparison

Promise 2010 CORE (N=697)

NSC 2009 Comparison

Promise 2009 CORE (N=747)

NSC 2008 Comparison

Promise 2008 CORE (N=572)

Source: Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

The Pittsburgh Promise extends a “second chance� to students who do not meet our core eligibility requirements, especially the 2.5 GPA minimum. Extension Scholars are persisting at rates that are below the NSC average for 2-year public institutions. We continue to work closely with the District to prepare all students to successfully pursue and persist at post-secondary education, knowing that the challenges they face may go beyond financial or academic preparedness.

67%

NSC 2010 Comparison

NSC 2011 Comparison

NSC 2012 Comparison

NSC Cross-cohort Comparison

37%

30%

33%

Cross-cohort 2008-2012

66%

Promise 2012 Extension (N=75)

66%

Promise 2011 Extension (N=88)

67%

Promise 2010 Extension (N=127)

Promise 2009 Extension (N=170)

58%

69% NSC 2009 Comparison

46%

Source: Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

It should be noted that, aside from the general demographic differences between national and local data, the NSC data for 2-year institutions includes students whose high school GPA may be as high as 4.0. No Promise Extension students have a GPA that is higher than 2.49. 7


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

ATTAINING A DEGREE, DIPLOMA, OR CERTIFICATE Core Promise Scholars from the first two cohorts (classes of 2008 and 2009) are attaining Bachelor’s degrees within 4 years at rates that exceed national benchmarks at some institutions, match them at others, and lag behind them at one. The institution type is defined by the highest degree offered by that institution.

Core Promise Scholars Attaining a Bachelor’s Degree in 4 Years Compared to ACT National Rate by Institution Type Classes of 2008 and 2009

53% 52% 53%

53%

53% 48% 41%

53%

53% 48%

45%

32%

29% 21%

25%

24% 24% 13%

PhD Private

PhD Public

MA Private

MA Public

BA/BS Private

BA/BS Public

(N=208)

(N=261)

(N=97)

(N=155)

(N=43)

(N=55)

Core Promise: At same institution ACT Comparison: At same institution Core Promise: At transfer institution Source: Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

The ACT benchmark tracks only students who first enroll and then remain to complete their education at the same institution. Of more importance to The Pittsburgh Promise is that students complete their education, regardless of transferring institutions, which is why we show the light-colored bar.

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ATTAINING A DEGREE, DIPLOMA, OR CERTIFICATE Core Promise Scholars from the first cohort (2008 only) are attaining Bachelor’s degrees within 5 years at rates lower than the ACT comparison, which does not count students who transfer institutions. When transfers are included, Core Promise Scholars’ 5-year graduation rates are compelling. 100%

Core Promise Scholars Attaining a Bachelor’s Degree in 5 Years Compared to ACT National Rate by Institution Type Class of 2008 68% 64% 62%

63%

60%

57% 47%

59%

58%

55% 49% 43% 38%

36%

27%

9% 0%

PhD Private

PhD Public

MA Private

MA Public

BA/BS Private

BA/BS Public

(N=102)

(N=126)

(N=42)

(N=59)

(N=4)

(N=8)

Core Promise: At same institution ACT Comparison: At same institution Core Promise: At transfer institution Source: Learning Research and Development Center, University of Pittsburgh

According to the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES), “Graduation rates are calculated to meet requirements of the 1990 Student Right to Know Act, which required post-secondary institutions to report the percentage of students that complete their program within 150 percent of the normal time for completion, which is within 6 years for students pursuing a bachelor’s degree.” NCES reports that 59 percent of first-time, fulltime students who began seeking a bachelor’s degree at a 4-year institution in fall 2006 completed the degree at that institution within 6 years.1 1 U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics. (2014). The Condition of Education 2014 (NCES 2014-083), Institutional Retention and Graduation Rates for Undergraduate Students.

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

ATTAINING A DEGREE, DIPLOMA, OR CERTIFICATE We celebrate the accomplishments of our 1,083 Promise Scholars who, by September 2014, had earned a degree, diploma, or certificate. By gender and ethnicity, they are:

Gender Graduates Percentage

Post-Secondary Institution CCAC Pitt Penn State Slippery Rock Point Park Robert Morris Bradford California U Duquesne Clarion Carlow Kaplan IUP Chatham CMU Edinboro Temple PTI Rosedale PCI (Sanford Brown) Empire La Roche Allegheny College Everest St. Vincent Seton Hill Art Inst. Pgh Triangle Tech W & J ITT Tech U Penn Cheyney S. Hills Beauty Westminster Other Schools Total 10

African American

Caucasian

Asian or Pacific

Hispanic

Multiracial

F M 251 96 23% 9%

F M 399 270 37% 25%

F M 12 10 1% 1%

F M 7 3 1% 0%

F M 25 10 2% 1%

African American

Caucasian

Asian or Pacific

Hispanic

Multiracial

F M 38 15 10 6 18 8 14 7 10 1 5 6 12 4 9 4 3 15 6 14 14 6 17 3 11 2 1 12 1 4 1 3 1 9 1 8 1 1 2 5 2 1 4 3 2 1 2 1 2 1 1 1 3 3 3 6 3 251 96

F 63 65 28 12 20 18 17 15 17 6 15 8 4 12 6 5 8 1 5 5 7 5 4 3 4 4 5 1 3 3 4 26 399

M 36 33 36 21 14 15 2 5 8 3 3 15 4 8 12 14 1 3 5 1 5 3 2 21 270

F 1 4 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 12

M 2 2 2 1 2 1 0 10

F 1 2 1 1 1 1 0 7

M 1 2 0 3

F M 3 4 1 2 3 1 1 1 2 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 0 25 10

Total 1083 100%

Total 158 126 100 55 46 45 40 36 33 32 30 28 27 26 24 23 22 19 17 16 13 12 11 11 10 9 8 8 8 7 7 6 6 6 58 1083


OUR GRADUATES SPEAK Wade Lipscomb High School: Allderdice, Promise Scholar College/Degree: Penn State University: BS Petroleum and Natural Gas Engineering Current Job: Petroleum Engineer Employer: Range Resources “Initially, I planned to join the Army with the intent of one day becoming an engineer. My family did not have the means to send me to school, but The Promise allowed me to attend college and focus on my education, as opposed to worrying about how I was going to pay for it. Currently I am a rotational engineer. I started out in reservoir engineering. I spend most of my time doing economic and operational analyses.”

Daniel Romaniello High School: Brashear, Promise Scholar College/Degree: Alleg. County Fire Academy & the Center for Emergency Medicine: Certificate in Emergency Medical Technology and Basic Fire Fighting Current Job: Emergency Medical Technician Employer: Scott Township & Ross/West Emergency Medical Services Authority “ Growing up, I was always into fire trucks and firefighting so it was a dream to work in this field. In 2010, just a year and a half after I lost my dad to cancer, I became an EMT. I came from a working middle class family, and I thought I would have to depend on student loans. Instead, I was able to study, with The Promise scholarship, Emergency Medicine at Pitt, and I don’t have any loans to pay back. I appreciate that The Promise was an advocate of not only four-year bachelor’s programs but of other post-high school options.”

Sha-Phawn Williams High School: Schenley, Promise Scholar College/Degree: Lincoln University of PA: BS in Biology (Emphasis in Chemistry) Current Job: Pharmacy Intern Employer: Center for Pharmacy Services & attending graduate school “ In high school, I did not have any savings and I didn’t think I had the grades to attend college. Once I realized The Promise wanted to invest in me, I decided to invest in myself. I always liked science and math so choosing to become a Biology major was easy. I didn’t realize I wanted to become a pharmacist until my junior year of college. The help my uncle received from a pharmicist during his struggle with a medical condition is a testament of how much a pharmacist can impact a patient’s life.”

Zachary Ziegler High School: Carrick, Promise Scholar College/Degree: PTI: AA in Mechanical Drafting & Computer Sciences Current Job: Mechanical Designer/Draftsmen Employer: Tenova Metals “ The Pittsburgh Promise took a huge amount of financial stress off of deciding to go to school. I chose to become a Mechanical CAD draftsman and designer because it would get me a great career and a step towards eventually continuing on to become an engineer. All my life I’ve had great artistic and visualization skills, as well as good mathematical knowledge. You need equally strong parts of all three in order to be a decent draftsman.” 11


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

S C H O O L S

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GOAL 2:

We will promote the reform of urban schools so that young people are prepared for successful and meaningful lives.

The “bulls-eye� for our work with Pittsburgh Public Schools (PPS) is that 80% of all 9th grade students will attain a post-secondary degree, diploma, or certification. The students entering 9th grade when we launched The Promise in 2008 graduated from high school in 2012. They will finish their postsecondary education somewhere between 2016 and 2018. Despite the relatively short history of The Pittsburgh Promise, since 2007, we have seen a small increase in the number of PPS 9th graders who finish high school and attain a post-secondary degree, diploma, or certificate. Needless to say, our shoulders must remain to the wheel. In order for the 80% long-term outcome to be achieved, the educational ecosystem must reach a number of significant goals along the way. These include the following: Goal

2014 Benchmark

100% of 3rd grade students read at grade-level

58% Advanced/Proficient

100% of 9th grade students are ready for Algebra 1

54% Advanced/Proficient

90% of all of PPS students graduate from high school

71%

90% of graduates enroll in post-secondary schools

49%

85% of post-secondary students persist: Year 1 to 2

77%

Approaching, and consistently hitting, this target will require hefty commitments from families, Pittsburgh Public Schools, the Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers, elected officials and governmental agencies, foundations, businesses, and community organizations. It is our hope and expectation to see even greater and more coordinated collaboration among all of these community stakeholders in public education.

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

RAISING HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATES The 4-year cohort graduation rate has increased from 65% for the class of 2009 to 71% for the class of 2014.

4 and 5-Year High School Graduation Rates

70%

65%

2009

69%

74%

74%

70%

71%

2012

2013

68%

66%

65%

2010

2011

5-Year Graduation Rate 4-Year Graduation Rate

Graduation rates for Pittsburgh Public Schools are based on the calculation now used by the Pennsylvania Department of Education. The cohort graduation rate tracks individual students from 9th grade through graduation. The first step is defining the cohort of students, which starts with the first-time 9th graders in a given year. We add students who transfer into the cohort at any time during high school, and subtract students who transfer out of the district. Of the remaining students, we observe who has earned a high school diploma within four or five years of the original cohort’s 9th-grade year.

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71%

2014


RAISING HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATES Much of the graduation rate increase is due to gains among African American students, whose 4-year graduation rates increased from 57% to 65%, and 5-year rates grew to 71%. Though there are still racial achievement gaps in graduation rates, that gap has dropped by nearly 50% over the past five years.

4-Year High School Graduation Rates By Race

78%

75%

76%

77%

65% 60% 57%

2009

2010

77%

77%

66%

65%

2013

2014

59%

2011

2012

Caucasian Students African American Students

5-Year High School Graduation Rates By Race

79%

65%

2009

77%

78%

79%

78%

70%

71%

2012

2013

66% 62%

2010

2011

Caucasian Students African American Students 15


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

RAISING HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATES Across schools, 4-year graduation rates for the class of 2014 ranged from 64% at Carrick, Milliones University Prep, and Westinghouse high schools, to 96% at Science and Technology Academy.

4-Year Graduation Rates 96% 87%

82%

83%

64%

64%

Westinghouse

SciTech

Obama

Carrick

CAPA

Brashear

Allderdice

Perry

66%

64%

Uprep

72%

Class of 2014

Nationwide, large urban school districts with high percentages of low-income students often fare less well than their suburban or rural counterparts. While Pittsburgh ranks in the top quartile in that mix of urban school districts, our goals and aspirations go much higher. Our nation, and city, owe our children much better.

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RAISING HIGH SCHOOL GRADUATION RATES According to GradNation: A Campaign of America’s Promise Alliance, 2012 graduation rates in big city school districts that have a high concentration of low-income students are as follows:

State  Texas Ohio Iowa Maine Florida Nebraska Arizona Washington Kansas West Virginia Pennsylvania Tennessee Illinois New Jersey Delaware California New York Maryland Massachusetts Minnesota Louisiana Connecticut Michigan Rhode Island Utah Connecticut Oregon Mississippi Nevada Pennsylvania Wisconsin Missouri Virginia Indiana Colorado Ohio Louisiana Alabama Georgia Minnesota

District Name Houston Columbus Des Moines Portland Miami-Dade County Omaha Phoenix Seattle Wichita Kanawha County Schools (Charleston) Pittsburgh Public Schools Shelby County Schools (Memphis) Chicago Newark Christina School District (Wilmington) Los Angeles New York City Baltimore City Boston St. Paul East Baton Rouge Bridgeport Detroit City Providence Salt Lake City Hartford Portland Jackson Clark County Philadelphia Milwaukee St. Louis Richmond Indianapolis Denver Cleveland Recovery School District (New Orleans) Birmingham City Atlanta Minneapolis

2012 Graduation Rate 79% 79% 79% 77% 76% 76% 75% 75% 74% 72% 70% 70% 69% 69% 68% 67% 66% 66% 66% 66% 66% 66% 65% 65% 65% 65% 63% 63% 62% 62% 62% 62% 61% 60% 59% 59% 59% 56% 51% 50%

% Low-Income 68.50% 74.70% 63.30% 56.00% 55.80% 63.30% 74.10% 51.40% 75.70% 56.20% 71.00% 86.10% 82.90% 76.00% 56.60% 89.80% 71.30% 68.60% 85.90% 75.20% 61.70% 99.20% 74.90% 94.50% 59.40% 92.00% 52.10% 71.80% 64.70% 72.80% 76.10% 69.40% 56.50% 62.20% 75.70% 99.90% 75.60% 82.30% 71.60% 59.90% 17


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

FOCUSING ON PROMISE-READINESS BY HIGH SCHOOL As stated earlier, students must maintain a minimum GPA of 2.50 and 90% school attendance in order to be eligible for a Core Promise Scholarship. Our “safety net” program – The Promise Extension – supports students whose GPA is in the 2.00-2.49 range and gives them the opportunity to attend the Community College of Allegheny County for one year. If they gain their academic composure, they could become eligible for the Core Promise. As the next two tables reveal, the percentage of Promise-eligible students varies significantly among high schools, which raises important questions about the many factors that contribute to student achievement, including equity, effective teaching, family health, and community support systems. CAPA leads the pack with sustained high performance. Allderdice, as it has throughout its history, continues to deliver solid educational outcomes. Brashear and Carrick have seen some fluctuations but appear to be climbing and providing acceptable results. Perry has experienced steady decline and, along with Westinghouse, delivers unacceptably low outcomes. Starting with August 2014, both schools have new and proven leadership and approaches to student achievement that cause us to begin the new school year with hopeful, but guarded, optimism. The three schools that are relative newcomers to the PPS system – Obama Academy, Milliones University Prep, and Science and Technology Academy – have not yet had enough time to establish meaningful trends.

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FOCUSING ON PROMISE-READINESS BY HIGH SCHOOL Eligible for a Core Promise Scholarship (GPA = 2.50 or higher, attendance = 90% or higher) 100% CAPA Allderdice Sci-Tech Brashear Carrick

50%

Obama University Prep Perry Westinghouse

0%

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

Eligible for a Core Promise or Extension Scholarship (GPA = 2.00 or higher, attendance = 90% or higher) 100% CAPA Allderdice Sci-Tech Brashear Carrick 50%

Obama University Prep Perry Westinghouse

0%

2008

2009

2010

2011

2012

2013

2014

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

FOCUSING ON PROMISE-READINESS BY HIGH SCHOOL The wide disparity in performance that is present among high schools is even more visible when calculated by gender and ethnicity. While the majority of Caucasian graduates in the class of 2014 were eligible for the Core Promise or Extension scholarships, this was true for only half of African American graduates. In both groups, females outperform males.

Promise Eligibility by Race and Gender, as Determined by GPA & Attendance (Class of 2014)

91% 84%

81% 73%

57% 49% 42%

Female

30%

Male

African American

White

Core Promise or Extension

African American

White

Core Promise

In partnership with Pittsburgh Public Schools and other community organizations and leaders, The Promise leads or supports key initiatives that aim at the roots of these disparities in order to eliminate them. These include:

• Efforts to promote higher school attendance rates through the “Be There” campaign

• Campaign to promote kindergarten enrollment such as “Ready Freddie”

• Mentoring programs such as the “Be a Middle School Mentor”

• Mentoring activities with high school students, focused on African American students known as “We Promise”

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• Peer support in all high schools through “Promise Ambassadors”

• College tours to over 40 higher education institutions


OUR STUDENTS SPEAK

ERIKA, OBAMA

TEIREIK, CAPA

MEGAN, BRASHEAR

NIGER, OBAMA

“One day I want to open my own business. The Promise has opened many doors to make that possible.”

“The Promise kept me hopeful about college and gave me the line of sight.”

“The Promise has been a catalyst in bettering my education.”

“The Promise offered me an internship that encouraged me to try new things and give back.”

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

W O R K F O R C E

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GOAL 3:

We will invest in our region’s workforce by preparing the next generation of workers to meet the demands and opportunities of our economy.

Although The Pittsburgh Promise is most known for providing scholarships to urban youth to pursue post-secondary education, The Promise’s mission is laser-focused on strengthening the educational ecosystem in our communities, and deploying a well-prepared and diverse workforce to meet the needs of our employers. The Pittsburgh Promise hosts an annual “Career Launch” event that is co-sponsored by more than 60 companies that support our work. The purpose of the event is to: • Introduce aspiring workers to potential workplaces • Orient recent graduates to personal attributes that are required for professional success • Train candidates for the rigors of interviews • Equip job seekers with the technical “difference-makers” that cause a resume to stand out • Provide graduates with the opportunity to make personal connections with those who hire As reported earlier, 1,083 students have earned a degree, diploma, or certificate with scholarships from The Promise. These companies, and others, have been pleased to hire our graduates: Aéropostale Allegheny Conference Alpern Rosenthal American Eagle Outfitters Bayer Center Bayer MaterialScience Bloomfield Garfield Corp. BNY Mellon California University of PA CardWorks Chatham University Cigna City of Asylum City of Pittsburgh City Theatre Dollar Bank Duquesne University EQT Corporation ExxonMobil Family Behavioral Services Four Seasons Hotels & Resorts GAI Consultants Girl Scouts Heinz Endowments Highmark Horhut Tree Experts Junior Achievement

Leadership Pittsburgh Magee-Womens Hospital of UPMC Manchester Youth Dev. Center MedExpress Omni Hotels & Resorts Pa Cyber Charter Schools Penguins Shop Pittsburgh Pirates Pittsburgh Public Schools Pittsburgh Regional Alliance PNC Financial Services Range Resources Rite Aid Pharmacy Robert Morris University Sci-Tek Consultants St. Irenaeus School Tenova Metals The Pittsburgh Promise U.S. Steel University of Pittsburgh UPMC UPMC Healthplan UPMC Mercy Hospital Wayfair WDTV-West Virginia WorkingBuildings WVU Healthcare 23


THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

ALIGNING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH THE DEMANDS OF THE MARKET According to the Allegheny Conference on Community Development and the Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board, less than 40% of the 25,000 jobs that are available in the region require a 4-year degree, while more than 60% of the jobs require specialized technical training. Furthermore, nearly 20% of the high school graduates from Pittsburgh Public Schools are not using their Promise scholarship although they are eligible for it. We hold the conviction that a high school diploma is no longer enough to earn a family-supporting wage, while a 4-year degree is not always necessary. There is an apparent incongruence between available jobs and the skillsets of our workers, which may negatively impact our region’s economic vitality, technological agility, and quality of life. It also impedes the ability of our most vulnerable students to effectively compete in the economy and lead fruitful and independent lives at work, at home, and in the community. In order to diminish the impediment faced by many students and meet the demands of the market, The Pittsburgh Promise and Pittsburgh Public Schools joined forces to deliver a workforce development initiative aimed at helping 10th, 11th and 12th grade students pursue career and technical training, workforce certifications, and post-secondary education credits. The program is designed in collaboration with the Community College of Allegheny County, the Energy Innovation Center, the Sprout Fund, Three Rivers Workforce Investment Board, and with insight, input, and support from the region’s employers.

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Available Programs in September 2014: • Heating, Ventilation & Air Conditioning (HVAC) • Health Careers • Culinary Arts Additional Programs coming in 2015: • Information Technology • Energy/Natural Gas • Advanced Manufacturing and Welding


ALIGNING THE NEEDS OF STUDENTS WITH THE DEMANDS OF THE MARKET This new workforce development initiative allows participating students to receive an “advance” on their Pittsburgh Promise scholarship to earn up to 24 post-secondary credits, two regulatory certifications, two industry certifications, numerous skills badges, driver’s education, and a Pennsylvania Driver’s License by the time they finish high school. Students continuing their post-secondary education after high school could be eligible to receive the remainder of their Promise scholarship. To illuminate a clear path to employment or further education after high school, The Pittsburgh Promise: • Introduces relevant careers and pathways to all students in Pittsburgh Public Schools • Equips students and families to make choices that capitalize on the region’s opportunities

• Expands the technical educational choices available to students

• Provides financial aid to high school students to earn technical credits and certification

• Provides transportation to go to and from technical education institutions

• Offers Driver’s Education to eligible students to enhance their ability to gain and keep jobs

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT One of our programs is a young initiative we call the Executive Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise. The heart of this initiative is to ensure that our highest performing students are connected with our most generous supporters as early as possible, so that we can maximize the opportunities for business engagement, student growth, and fulfillment of our mission. This program creates a permanently named scholarship for companies or individuals who support The Promise at a minimum level of One Million Dollars. We then match the donor with Promise scholars whose field of study is aligned with their missions and who might be candidates for their workforces. Executive Scholars are chosen by academic performance (3.5 GPA or higher), commitment to community, demonstrated leadership skills, dedication to education, and relevant field of study. By creating this pipeline early, we increase the likelihood of bringing our best talent back to our city, we reduce recruiting time and costs, and we ensure that The Promise fund is sustainable for years to come. We launched this program in 2012 with five companies and 25 Executive Scholars. In 2013, we grew to eight companies and 40 additional scholars. In 2014, we grew again to nine donors and another 45 students. To-date, we have 110 Executive Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise who are aligned with eight great companies and one pillar Pittsburgh family.

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FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT Below are the 2014 recruits, and the esteemed companies and families with which they are identified.

UPMC Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise Thomas Brewton High School: Obama Academy College: Penn State University Major: Business

Highmark Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise Alexis Mighty High School: Science and Technology Academy College: University of Pittsburgh, Greensburg Major: Pre-Medicine

Lindsay McParlane High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: Allegheny College Major: Communication and Creative Writing

Aysar Gharaibeh: High School: Allderdice College: Carnegie Mellon University Major: Business

Daniel Trompeter High School: Allderdice College: Temple University Major: Business

Brianna Blotzer High School: Brashear College: La Roche College Major: Radiology

Breona Turner High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: UPMC Shadyside School of Nursing Major: Nursing

Courtney Killmeyer High School: Brashear College: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Major: Nursing

Jordan Tyler High School: Science and Technology Academy College: Penn State University Major: Engineering

Joshua Patton High School: Brashear College: Allegheny College Major: Political Science and Spanish

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT American Eagle Outfitters Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

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BNY Mellon Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

Megan Butter High School: Brashear College: Penn State University Major: Communications

Chesarai Williams High School: Carrick College: Slippery Rock University Major: Business

Kielle Deanda High School: Westinghouse College: California University of Pennsylvania Major: Journalism and Business

John Micklo High School: Allderdice College: Robert Morris University Major: Computer Information Systems

Zoe Grubbs High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Major: Fashion Merchandising

Lara Potenziani High School: Brashear College: Penn State, Behrend Major: Accounting

Nicole Lennartz High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: Duquesne University Major: Communications, Minor: Violin Performance

Matthew Walker High School: Science and Technology Academy College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Engineering

Max Zack Yoffee High School: Allderdice College: Penn State University Major: Finance

Rosie Williams High School: Perry College: Robert Morris University Major: Business


FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT Giant Eagle Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

McGuinn Family Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

Jayla Akers: High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: Penn State University Major: Communications and Public Relations

Kendre Crawford-Blue High School: University Prep College: Penn State University Major: Nursing

Brandon Hutton High School: Obama Academy College: Duquesne University Major: Business

Chelsea Geruschat High School: Carrick College: Penn State University Major: Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Abdullahi Mada High School: Allderdice College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Electrical Engineering

Jordan Lawson High School: Allderdice College: Penn State University Major: Political Science and Business

Ian Milbee High School: Carrick College: Robert Morris University Major: Accounting

Zachary Neal High School: Brashear College: Duquesne University Major: Nursing

Timothy Williams High School: Brashear College: Washington and Jefferson College Major: Biochemistry

Sam O’Shell High School: Allderdice College: Community College of Allegheny County Major: HVAC

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT Mylan Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

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PNC Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise

Brittany Creely High School: Carrick College: Duquesne University Major: English

Alan Hord High School: Science and Technology Academy College: Penn State University Major: Political Science

Dana Strabryla High School: Carrick College: Carlow University Major: Nursing

Anita Trimbur High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Creative Writing

John Chmura High School: Perry College: Penn State University Major: Nuclear Engineering

Elizabeth Bagley High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: West Chester University Major: Business Management

Kausar Shaikh High School: Creative and Performing Arts School College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Biology and Pre-Medicine

Marcus Dean High School: Perry College: Westminster College Major: Communications

Wesley Lebarty High School: Brashear College: Community College of Allegheny County Major: Computer Science

Tajendra (T.J.) Subedi High School: Brashear College: University of Pittsburgh, Titusville Major: Computer Engineering


FILLING THE PIPELINE WITH TOP TALENT Thermo Fisher Scientific Scholars of The Pittsburgh Promise Kondaker Ahmed High School: Obama Academy College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Biology and Chemical Engineering

Danyelle Frischman High School: Allderdice College: Penn State University Major: Communications

Kaitlyn Mahouski High School: Carrick College: Indiana University of Pennsylvania Major: Computer Science

MaryKate Freeman High School: Carrick College: Robert Morris University Major: Environmental Science

Bani Randhawa High School: Allderdice College: University of Pittsburgh Major: Political Science and PreMedicine

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

F U N D R A I S I N G

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GOAL 4:

We will raise $250 million in order to fulfill our promise for generations to come.

The Pittsburgh Promise’s fundraising campaign is one of the largest efforts in the region. It is a strategy to impact the region’s quality of life and economic vitality by ensuring that its urban core is built on superb public schools and high quality communities. In 2007, McKinsey and Company conducted a study to evaluate the effectiveness of the strategy, and to determine the financial model that would be required to sustain it. McKinsey concluded that the strategy was sound and that it would cost $250 million to sustain it for approximately three decades. The Promise was launched in December 2007 with a breathtaking $100 million commitment by UPMC. Their commitment included an initial $10 million to mobilize the scholarship program for the Class of 2008 and an additional $90 million challenge grant to spur a community-wide campaign to raise an additional $150 million over 10 years. Remarkably, but not surprisingly, Pittsburgh’s institutions, businesses, and families stepped forward and responded generously to the challenge, by giving more than $74 million. As of September 2014: • 32 Foundations granted $56 million • 78 companies donated $16.3 million • 3,800 individuals gave $2.1 million (this does not include those who gave through their family foundations) • We are 70% of the way toward reaching our ambitious goal

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

THANK YOU In April 2013, we announced Phase Two of the campaign with the hope of reaching the fundraising goal earlier than the original date of June 2017. Pittsburgh’s leadership community, once again, stepped forward to serve and lead. We delight in expressing our deepest gratitude to these committed leaders who are helping us continue the climb toward our ambitious vision for Pittsburgh’s future. Honorary Co-Chairs Heather Bresch (Mylan) Bill Demchak (PNC) Kim Fleming (Hefren Tillotson) Chuck Hammel (Pitt Ohio) Franco Harris (NFL/Super Bakery) Henry Hillman (Hillman Company) Laura Shapira Karet (Giant Eagle) Mario Lemieux (Pittsburgh Penguins) Anne Lewis (Oxford Development) Jerry MacCleary (Bayer MaterialScience) David Malone (Gateway Financial) Kent McElhattan (Industrial Scientific) Robert Nutting (Pittsburgh Pirates) Robert Paul (Ampco Pittsburgh) Jeffrey Romoff (UPMC) Art Rooney (Pittsburgh Steelers) Scott Roy (Range Resources) Vince Sands (BNY Mellon) Susan Baker Shipley (Huntington Bank) Spencer Todd (Thermo Fisher Scientific)

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Institutional Campaign Committee Marty McGuinn and David Shapira, Chairs Randy Dearth (Calgon Carbon) Laura Ellsworth (Jones Day) Joe Gordon (Pittsburgh Steelers) Celia Huber (McKinsey) Bill Hunt (Elmhurst) Ken McCrory (Parente Beard) Robert McCutcheon (PwC) David Murdoch (K&L Gates) Grant Oliphant (Heinz Endowments) Ken Service (University of Pittsburgh) Howard Slaughter (Christian Mgmt. Enterp.) Steve Spolar (Pittsburgh Post-Gazette) Chuck Stout (D. B. Root) Winthrop Watson (Fed. Home Loan Bank) Ira Weiss (Weiss Burkardt Kramer, LLC) Susan Yohe (Buchanan Ingersoll Rooney) Demetri Zervoudis (Bayer)

Individual Campaign Committee Peter Mathieson and Susan Baker Shipley, Chairs Georgia Berner (Berner International) Ray Betler (Wabtec) Carol Brown (Pittsburgh Cultural Trust) Carrie Casey (Casey Equipment) Bob Cindrich (Cindrich Consulting) Debbie Demchak (Community) Mark Laskow (Greycourt) Ann McGuinn (Community) Greg Spencer (Randall Enterprises) Spencer Todd (Thermo Fisher Scientific) Grassroots Campaign Committee Candi Castleberry Singleton and Susan Paine, Chairs Cornelia Davis (PPS) Bill Isler (Fred Rogers Company) Tracy Johns (PPS) Patti Popek (Promise Parent) Richard Reed (Pgh. Parks Conservancy) Olga Welch (Duquesne University) Mardi Royston and the 100 members of the Keepers of The Pittsburgh Promise


THANK YOU Pittsburgh’s foundations and companies have grasped the importance of The Promise to the quality of opportunity, quality of education, and quality of the workforce in the region. Our heartfelt thanks and enduring gratitude go to the following legendary institutions:

$100 Million UPMC $10 Million to $24.9 Million The Grable Foundation The Heinz Endowments The Pittsburgh Foundation $5 Million to $9.9 Million Richard King Mellon Foundation $1 Million to $4.9 Million American Eagle Outfitters BNY Mellon Charitable Foundation Claude Worthington Benedum Foundation Eden Hall Foundation Highmark Hillman Foundation Massey Charitable Trust McGuinn Family Foundation Mylan PNC Foundation The Buhl Foundation The Giant Eagle Foundation Thermo Fisher Scientific

$500,000 to $999,999 Bayer USA Foundation The Fine Foundation The University Club of Pittsburgh Charitable and Educational Trust $100,000 to $499,999 Alcoa Anonymous Benter Foundation Constellation Energy Group Foundation Direct Energy Franco Harris Super Bakery H.J. Heinz Company Foundation Huntington National Bank Lumina Foundation for Education Michael Baker Corporation Foundation Pennsylvania DCED Peoples Natural Gas Pitt Ohio Express Range Resources The Birmingham Foundation The Mascaro Family Foundation The Roy A. Hunt Foundation UPMC Health Plan Walnut Capital/Bakery Square Waters Charitable Trust

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THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE Annual Report 2014

THANK YOU $50,000 to $99,999 Allen & Selma Berkman Charitable Trust Citizens Bank FISA Foundation IBEW Keepers of The Pittsburgh Promise PricewaterhouseCoopers, LLP Reed Smith Oliver High School Class of 1959 Alum W. I. Patterson Charitable Fund $10,000 to $49,999 Adams Foundation Inc. Alpern Rosenthal BDO AT&T Inc. Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC Cleveland Brothers Eat’n Park Hospitality Group EDMC EQT Foundation Ernst & Young Fair Oaks Foundation, Inc. Federal Home Loan Bank of Pittsburgh First Niagara Bank Gailliot Family Foundation Gateway Financial GE Company Health Care Division Goehring, Rutter & Boehm Gurtner Construction Co., Inc. Hefren-Tillotson Industrial Scientific Foundation Jewish Women’s Foundation Lanxess Corporation Mathieson Family Foundation Molyneux Industries, Inc. Morby Family Charitable Foundation, Inc. National Council of Jewish Women Oxford Development Company Philip Chosky Charitable Foundation Pittsburgh Federation of Teachers Pittsburgh Pirates Pittsburgh Steelers 36

PNC Charitable Trust Rugby Realty Snee-Rienhardt Charitable Foundation The Burke Foundations Partnership The Charles R. Burke, Jr. Foundation The Jack Buncher Foundation The Pennsylvania Society The Sylvia and Martin Snow Charitable Foundation Turner Dairy Farms, Inc. Weiss Burkardt Kramer LLC $5,000 to $9,999 Allegheny Technologies Beckwith Family Foundation Brayman Construction Corporation Burns & Scalo Campbell Durrant Beatty Palombo & Miller Deloitte Dollar Bank Dominion Foundation Eckert Seamans Educational Testing Services First Commonwealth Bank GlobalScholar Jendoco Construction Corporation Jewish Healthcare Foundation SPEO, Inc. The David & Margaret Engel Family Foundation The Leonard Grasso Charitable Foundation The Steven & Gail Burke Foundation $1,000 to $4,999 AFTRA Anonymous Arthur J. Gallagher & Co. Bridges & Company, Inc. Broadbent Family Foundation C.S. McKee, LP Chuck Sanders Charities Coalition For Christian Outreach Columbia Gas of PA

Comcast Financial Agency Corporation Cowden Associates Inc Dapper, Baldasare, Benson, Behling & Kane Des Moines Branch NAACP Deutscher Sport Dilworth Traditional Academy Doubletree Hotel Dulle Enterprises Inc. Equitable Gas Company, LLC First National Bank of PA Google Greater Pittsburgh E-Commerce Partners Greybeard Advisors, LLC Grove City College Hamilton Community Foundation Hyman Family Foundation Trust JFS Wealth Advisors K & L Gates Leadership Pittsburgh Maurice Falk Fund McKinsey and Company Medexpress Urgent Care Merrill Lynch Newspaper Guild of Pittsburgh Paul and Dina Block Foundation Peabody 1960 50th Reunion Philips Respironics Pittsburgh Advertising Federation ProTech Compliance, Inc. Rock Entertainment, LLC RTI International Metals, Inc. S & T Bank Shell Oil Smithfield Trust The Hillman Company The Techs Industries US Foods Veritas Communications Advisors


PLEASE CONSIDER FINANCIALLY SUPPORTING THE PITTSBURGH PROMISE TODAY. While institutions have been remarkably generous toward, and deeply invested in, the work of The Pittsburgh Promise, we have also seen significant growth in individual giving which is key to our continued fundraising efforts. Considering the young life of The Promise, and the budding nature of our affinity group, we are humbled by the nearly 4,000 individuals who have made personal contributions to make higher education accessible to Pittsburgh’s kids. Not only does every gift impact the lives of many, it also grows and leverages other resources. Every gift made to The Pittsburgh Promise is matched by a gift from UPMC.

YOUR DONATION

UPMC MATCH

TOTAL GIFT

$100 $300 $1,000 $1,500 $3,000 $5,000 $10,000 $15,000 $150,000 $500,000 $1,000,000

$67 $200 $667 $1,000 $2,000 $3,335 $6,670 $10,000 $100,000 $335,000 $670,000

$167 $500 $1,667 $2,500 $5,000 $8,335 $16,670 $25,000 $250,000 $835,000 $1,670,000

There are several convenient ways to make your gift:

ONLINE pittsburghpromise.org

MAIL Mail your check to: 1901 Centre Ave, Suite 204 Pittsburgh, PA 15219

UNITED WAY Use our agency code number 19130 when donating.

Use our agency code number 9576075 when donating.

On behalf of the thousands of students and countless other individuals whose lives have been impacted by your investment, please accept our heartfelt thanks. 37


1901 Centre Avenue Suite 204 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 15219 phone 412.281.7605 fax 412.281.7638 www.pittsburghpromise.org

Profile for The Pittsburgh Promise

The Pittsburgh Promise Annual Report 2014  

The Pittsburgh Promise Annual Report 2014  

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