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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE thejewishchronicle.net DECEMBER 15, 2011 KISLEV 19, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 31

Pittsburgh, PA

Happy H a n u k a

Happy Hanukkah Ha p C h py an uk ah !! B USINES S 19/C L AS SIFIED 21/C OMMUNITY 15/O BITUARIES 22 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 20/S IMCHAS 14/S TYLE 10/T ORAH 21

Times To Remember

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2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

DECEMBER 15, 2011

Metro Festival of LED Lights

Karp leaving AJL in May; agency to re-evaluate job before filling it BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

Chronicle photo by Lee Chottiner

Members of Temple Shalom, Wheeling, W.Va., recently erected their renovated Chanuka light display for the annual Wheeling Festival of Lights. This year, the display was rewired and refitted to use light-emitting diode (LED) lights, which are more energy efficient and environmentally sensitive than standard incandescent lights. The display will be up through Jan. 8, 2012.

Homegrown history New online curriculum to focus on Pittsburgh’s Jewish past BY LEE CHOTTINER Executive Editor

A new curriculum, designed to teach Jewish Pittsburgh history to students from grade school to high school, is in the final stages of development. The three-level curriculum — one each for upper elementary, middle and high schoolers — has been in the development stage for about a year and is being financed by the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh and the Heinz History Center. The $20,000 curriculum was financed with a $15,000 grant from the federation with the balance coming from an IMLS (Institute of Museum and Library Services) grant to the Heinz History Center to work with teachers to create online educational materials. The Agency for Jewish Learning and the Rauh Jewish Archives at the Heinz are working jointly on the project, which is now ready for testing in a classroom setting. “It’s something I’ve always wanted to do for years,” Susan Melnick, curator of the Rauh, said of the project. For now, the curriculum, titled “Connecting Pittsburgh Jewish Youth with their Local Jewish Heritage,” is intended for use by Jewish Pittsburgh’s three day schools, the J-Site supplemental

Amy Karp, adult learning coordinator at the Agency for Jewish Learning, will leave Pittsburgh at the end of May to join her husband, Dan, who has accepted a new job in Chicago. “It’s very sad; we’re very connected here,” Karp said. “It’s a very hard decision, but sometimes you have to do what’s best for your family.” Karp will depart after 14 years working at AJL and 20 in the Pittsburgh area. “I’m hugely disappointed to lose her — as a colleague and as a friend,” AJL Executive Director Edward Frim said. “We have a very active adult learning program that does not exist elsewhere, and Amy has been a big part of that program over the years.” He said, though, that he will use this time to re-evaluate the position before deciding how to fill it. “We’re going to take this opportunity to step back and consider the future direction of the program,” Frim said. “We’re going to evaluate what the needs are and determine what the job description is going to be. The bottom line is there will be work to be done and there will be someone to do it.” As adult learning coordinator, Karp oversees all adult education programs AJL offers — Melton Mini School, legal education, special speaker series, etc. — and collaborates with Jewish institutions and synagogues on education programs. She also administers the i-connect Israel Scholarship and the Passport to Israel programs for the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Rabbi Scott Aaron, AJL community scholar, said in an e-mailed announcement of Karp’s pending departure that the agency will arrange “an appropriate opportunity” Please see Karp, page 23.

About the cover …

Rauh Jewish Archives photo

Children playing baseball at the Irene Kaufmann Settlement playground, July 1936.

school for Jewish teens, and religious schools. With some modifications, though, Rauh and AJL officials say it could also be used in the public schools. “There’s been talk with the Heinz History Center about the different ethnic communities in the city,” AJL Executive Director Edward Frim said. “If there’s a class doing work on the ethnic experience in Pittsburgh, this may be appropriate.”

The new curriculum, which combines archival material from the Rauh and lesson plans developed by the AJL, breaks down like this: • Upper elementary school pupils will be introduced to leading personalities in Jewish Pittsburgh history — Annie Jacob Davis, Henry Ellenbogen and Bertha Rauh for examples. The unit will Please see Curriculum, page 23.

For this year’s Chanuka cover contest, schools from around the county inundated the Chronicle with submissions. With this happy situation in mind, we decided it would be more appropriate to select six winners instead of one, to reflect the quality of these student artists. Therefore, this year’s Chanuka cover is a collage of holiday drawings. Congratulations to our winners: Rochel Deray, 9, Yeshiva Schools; Sarale Friedman, 9, Yeshiva Schools; Sophie Levitt, 9, Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha; Elsa Blodgett, 5, Rodef Shalom Congregation; Talia Gelman, 5, Community Day School; Dana Engel, 8, Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha. The rest of this year’s submissions will appear on the Chronicle’s website, thejewishchronicle.net. Our thanks to everyone who participated in this year’s Chanuka cover contest.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 3

METRO Briefly

Kol Shira, a Pittsburgh Jewish women’s a cappella ensemble, is holding a CD release party and open house at Pinsker’s Judaica Center, Murray Avenue, Squirrel Hill, Thursday, Dec. 22, from 8:15 to 10:30 p.m., for women only. “Speak to the Heart” is the first release for the group. The album features traditional music from the liturgy to modern tunes. Songs are in English, Hebrew, Yiddish and Ladino. Kol Shira is comprised of seven Jewish women representing all levels of observance. The music selected by the group is inspired by their identities as Jewish women. The group composes its own arrangements, rehearses them weekly and performs in venues around Pittsburgh including synagogues, senior centers and

private homes. Contact Kol Shira at kolshirapgh@gmail.com or 412-2237KOL for more information. Joan Nathan, the author of 10 cookbooks and the host of the PBS television series “Jewish Cooking in America,” will conduct cooking demonstrations, Wednesday, Dec. 21, 10 a.m. at the Shadyside Market District, and 2 p.m. at Pine Township Giant Eagle. Nathan will share recipes from her books, “Joan Nathan’s Jewish Holiday” Joan Nathan and “New American Cooking,” The programs are free. Visit marketdistrict.com for reservations. The Jewish Women’s Foundation of Pittsburgh announced its 2011 domestic and Israel grants last week, totaling $30,000. The seven grants were awarded in the categories of economic security of women and education: • Bethlehem Haven — $6,000 for Project Employ, a supportive employment program that provides homeless women with the skills, experience and attitude needed to get and maintain employment on a long-term basis; Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

METRO

Solomon: Genocide in Darfur remains critical issue BY BRANDT GELMAN Chronicle Correspondent

Daniel Solomon, a junior at Georgetown University and national student director of STAND (the student-led division of United Against Genocide), traveled to Pittsburgh this past weekend to impart one message: The genocide taking place in Sudan “is not over.” Speaking at local venues during his stay in Pittsburgh, Solomon, a Jewish student leader, captivated audiences with his wealth of knowledge on the issues taking place in the Sudan and his immense enthusiasm to inspire a means for global change. He addressed audiences at the Hillel Jewish University Center and Congregation Beth Shalom. One driving factor behind Solomon’s trip to Pittsburgh was the area’s commitment to widening STAND’s influence on a global level. With core chapters at the University of Pittsburgh and Pittsburgh Allderdice High School, Solomon was anxious to connect with many young adults who share the same passion as he does to create change within our world. “The change we want to take place is not something that can happen overnight,” Solomon said. “It is great to see how many students have the desire to commit to organizations such as STAND, to help bring change to the world.” STAND has been called the fastest

Daniel Solomon (left): Darfur is no longer a hot-button issue.

growing student movement in the world today. Since the first STAND chapter formed in 2004, the organization has grown into an international network of more than 850 chapters at schools around the world. Many Jewish students, locally and nationally, have been attracted to this movement.

Solomon said he always knew he wanted to participate in a humanitarian organization such as STAND, and has taken paths throughout his entire life to ensure his voice will be heard. Growing up in New York City, Solomon went on to attend Georgetown University where he is majoring in international politics. He first became involved with STAND when he was appointed National Education Coordinator during the 2011 school year. Over the last few years, Solomon admits the national swell to squash the genocide in Darfur has slowed. “I think one of the reasons there is not as much out there on Darfur now is because it is not a hot-button issue,”

Solomon said. “Just because it is not a hot-button issue does not mean the situation has gotten any better.” Solomon’s visit to Pittsburgh was sponsored in part by the Allderdice branch of STAND. Eliza Pugh, a senior at Allderdice and co-president of the local chapter said bringing in Solomon to speak to the organization was important. “It was great to have Daniel here,” Pugh said. “We try to do a lot as an organization, and Daniel has been a help.” Pugh said the Allderdice branch of STAND has held fundraisers such as a Barnes & Noble gift-wrapping drive and bake sales to help raise money for the organization. She added that the group has tried to make connections with many local political leaders to generate awareness to their cause. According to Pugh, Allderdice founded its branch of STAND during the 2006 school year. Since then, the group has grown and now has weekly meetings to discuss the state of the organization. As Solomon displayed during his time in Pittsburgh, STAND is not merely an organization that simply raises money for those in need. During a question and answer-type setting at Beth Shalom Saturday, Solomon patiently answered a bombardment of questions from an audience that admittedly was ignorant of many of the issues taking place in the Sudan. Solomon made it clear that educating the public on the issues at hand is just as important as any other function of the organization.

(Brandt Gelman can be reached at bgelman55@gmail.com.)

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. • Gwen’s Girls — $5,000 for its entrepreneurship program, which serves 50 to 60 at-risk girls, ages 12 to 18, who are clients of Gwen’s Girls; • Hillel Jewish University Center — $3,500 for The Lessons of a Lifetime, a program that offers an opportunity for college age women to meet and get to know seniors in the Jewish community; • Jewish Family & Children’s Service — $4,000 for Age Up, Not Out, a program that helps young women, ages 18 to 24, who are exiting the foster care system obtain the skills they need to enroll in school and/or obtain meaningful employment; • Jewish Residential Services — $5,500 for a Fairweather Lodge feasibility study. JRS is considering the development of a lodge for six to eight women with a history of mental illness. The Fairweather Lodge program addresses the need for such people to obtain meaningful and sustainable employment, and to belong to a community that supports their recovery; • National JWF Grant Collaborative — $5,000 for Israel Grant, a collaborative effort with 12 other JWFs from around the country focusing on several issues facing Israeli women. This is a twoyear, $5,000/year, commitment; and • Standing Firm — a $1,000 grant to educate regional employers about the financial, safety and human costs of partner violence on the workplace and workforce and to arm them with tools for taking effective organizational action. Jewish Residential Services is exploring a partnership with Mainstay Life Services, an organization that provides residential support to individuals with intellectual disabilities, to develop a high quality, residential home rich in Jewish culture and tradition for young adults (ages 18 to 35) with intellectual or multiple disabilities in Squirrel Hill. The vision is that this home will include a high level of family involvement, engagement in the Squirrel Hill Jewish community and a place where Jewish holidays and traditions will be celebrated and observed. JRS is currently compiling a list of interested individuals who have consolidated waiver funding through the Department of Public Welfare, Office of Developmental Programs. Contact Shani Lasin, JRS project coordinator, at slasin@jrspgh.org or 412-325-0039. The Sixth Annual “Words to be Heard” Scholarship Contest is open to high school students throughout western Pennsylvania. Students are asked to create proposals to discourage underage drinking and drunk driving, or texting while driving. They may submit entries using their choice of creative options, including essays, videos, PowerPoint presentations, brochures and websites. One grand prize scholarship of $5,000, three second-place scholarships of $2,500 and three runners-up scholarships of $1,000 will be awarded. Since the scholarship contest began in 2007, sponsor Edgar Snyder & Associates has awarded 48 scholarships totaling $55,000. Students entering the contest must be graduating high school seniors who will attend a four-year college or university

in summer or fall 2012. Visit edgarsnyder.com for more information. All entries must be postmarked on or before March 30, 2012. Gemilas Chesed Synagogue will hold a memorial service to honor Rebbetzin Denah Chinn, Sunday, Dec. 18, at 2 p.m., in the bais hamedrash of the synagogue. The congregation also will hold its annual Chanuka dinner, Sunday, Dec. 25, in the main social hall of the synagogue following the mincha/maariv services, which will begin at 4:45 p.m. Call the office at 412-678-8859 for reservations. Chabad of the South Hills and the Jewish Community Center will host a Chanuka seniors luncheon with latkes, Wednesday, Dec. 21, at 12:30 p.m. at the South Hills JCC, 345 Kane Blvd.; the building is wheelchair accessible. Contact Barb at 412-278-2658 or barb@chabadsh.com for reservations. Beth Samuel Jewish Center’s annual Chanuka party, “Latke Fest,” will be held Sunday, Dec. 18, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m., at 810 Kennedy Drive, in Ambridge. There will be a latke luncheon, children’s crafts and a silent auction. “Eastern Watershed,” a Pittsburgh klezmer quartet, will be performing. There is a charge; children under 12 are free. Call 724-266-5238 for reservations. Aleph Institute, a Jewish nonprofit agency that supports incarcerated Jewish men and women and their families, will conclude Jewish Prisoner Awareness Week with an open house, Sunday, Dec. 18, from 5 to 7:30 p.m. at the Aleph Center, 5804 Beacon St., Squirrel Hill. Aleph Institute currently has 90-plus volunteers who see more than 2,000 Jewish men and women incarcerated in the Pittsburgh region, but many more remain who are not visited on a regular basis. Contact Aleph at 412-421-0111, ext. 100 or receptionist@alephne.org for more information. Chabad of the South Hills will hold its annual Chanuka toy drive for underprivileged and hospitalized children in the Pittsburgh area and will be collecting new unwrapped gifts. Some ideas include board games, art sets, Legos, dolls and playhouse toys. Toys can be dropped off Monday, Dec. 12, through Monday Dec. 19, at 1701 McFarland Road, Mt. Lebanon or E2 Toys 2 Try, Scott Towne Center, 2101 Greentree Road, Scott Township. Contact barb@chabadsh.com for more information. Congregation Beth Shalom will hold its second annual Latkepalooza!, Sunday, Dec. 18, from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m., in the Samuel and Minnie Hyman Ballroom. The program will feature varieties of latkes, Chanuka music, carnival games, arts and crafts, sufganiyot (Israeli Chanuka donuts), a gift basket raffle, and a lottery dreidel raffle. Beth Shalom also is holding a winter clothing drive that will donate new coats, scarves, hats and gloves to local families in need. Please bring new items for donation. There is no charge to attend, but a contribution is appreciated. Contact Beth Shalom at 412-421-2288 or communications@bethshalompgh.org for more information.


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

The Jewish Chronicle

Opinion

David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Frank David Grubman Carolyn Hess Abraham Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA EXCLUSIVE RIGHTS TO JEWISH TELEGRAPHIC AGENCY AND FEATURE SERVICE) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Shades of Rosa Parks ore than half a century after Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat on a public bus in Montgomery, Ala. — a defiant gesture that sparked the American Civil Rights Movement — Israel, sadly enough, is still dealing with her own civil rights issues. But on Monday, Jews were treated to another sign that Israelis from both ends of the political spectrum are fed up with this segregation. On that day, at the same event — a conference on human trafficking — Israeli President Shimon Peres and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu came out publicly against efforts by some haredi Orthodox Jews to segregate women in public, especially on public buses. “Women’s place in the public sphere must be guaranteed and equal,” said Netanyahu. “Equality between men and women is total. So it has been and so it will continue to be. This trend contradicts Jewish tradition.” Said Peres, “If a man doesn’t want to get on a bus, he shouldn’t get on; no one is forcing him. But no man has the right to force a woman to sit wherever he decides. In the public sphere there shall be no discrimination.”

M

They were referring to segregated buses in Jerusalem and other parts of the country, which the haredi — ultrareligious Jews — are demanding, but many other Jews in Israel, and the Diaspora, are opposing. It’s a long overdue gesture by Israel’s two highest-ranking leaders, and it’s hardly a coincidence that they made the same declaration on the same day at the same event. By no means, though, is this the first blow struck against religious segregation in the Jewish state. Israel’s High Court of Justice ruled Jan. 6 that gender segregation on public buses was legal only with passenger consent, and ordered that signs designating buses as segregated be removed and replaced by signs informing passengers that they had the right to sit wherever they wanted. The ruling was in response to a petition against bus lines that serve mostly haredi communities, but are open for all public commuters. According to Israel’s daily Haaretz, several women complained of being “verbally and physically assaulted” for failing to sit in the back of the bus. “A public transportation operator, like

any other person, does not have the right to order, request or tell women where they may sit simply because they are women,” Supreme Court Justice Elyakim Rubinstein wrote in his ruling. “They must sit wherever they like.” Interestingly enough, Rubinstein added these words: “As I now read over these lines emphasizing this, I am astounded that there was even a need to write them in the year 2010. Have the days of Rosa Parks, the African American woman who collapsed the racist segregation on an Alabama bus in 1955, returned?” We hope not, but as Rabbi Stanley Davids, the past president of the Association of Reform Zionists in America (ARZA), and his wife, Resa, made abundantly clear on their recent visit to Pittsburgh, the haredi still exercise far too much control over public and religious life in Israel, and American Jews must play a greater role in speaking out against it. The haredi have the right to live and worship as they please; they do not have the right to impose their lifestyle on the rest of Israel, and they shouldn’t expect American Jews to remain silent while they do it.

Genocide law has necessarily evolved since Holocaust Menachem Z. Rosensaft

NEW YORK — On Dec. 11, 1946, the United Nations General Assembly adopted Resolution 96(I), which declared genocide, defined as “a denial of the right of existence of entire human groups,” to be “a crime under international law, which the civilized world condemns, and for the commission of which principals and accomplices — whether private individuals, public officials or statesmen, and whether the crime is committed on religious, racial, political or any other grounds — are punishable.” This resolution was adopted in the shadow of the annihilation of approximately 6 million European Jews as part of Hitler’s “Final Solution of the Jewish Question,” and less than two months after 10 leaders of the Third Reich were executed at Nuremberg for “crimes against humanity.” In addition to the Holocaust’s Jewish victims, up to 220,000 Sinti and Roma were similarly killed during World War II, as were Polish intellectuals and Communist officials, among other targeted groups. Germany was not solely responsible for such atrocities. The collaborationist French authorities rounded up tens of thousands of Jews and deported them to their death, and the Nazi puppet

regime in Croatia murdered hundreds of thousands of Serbs alongside Yugoslavia’s Jews. It was in this context that a Polish Jewish lawyer named Raphael Lemkin coined the term genocide, by which he meant “the destruction of a nation or of an ethnic group,” in his 1944 book, “Axis Rule in Occupied Europe,” from the ancient Greek word genos (race, tribe) and the Latin cide (killing). In a subsequent 1946 article, Lemkin broadened the meaning of genocide to also include religious and racial groups. The need for such an expansion of the legal lexicon became clear after the full scope of the human devastation perpetrated by Nazi Germany had been laid bare before the International Military Tribunal at Nuremberg. “By implication,” the New York Times declared in an editorial Aug. 26, 1946, “genocide has already been recognized as a distinct crime, with a distinct technique and distinct consequences. It now remains to incorporate the term in international law, which is what Professor Lemkin has already half accomplished.” Less than two-and-a-half years later, Dec. 9, 1948, the U.N. General Assembly completed this process by adopting the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Henceforth, the international community ostensibly committed itself “to prevent and to punish” a series of specific acts “committed with intent to destroy, in whole or in part, a national, ethnical, racial or religious group, as such.” The Convention differs from, and is weaker than, the 1946 U.N. Resolution in that while it added “ethnical” entities to the protected groups, it no longer covers

killings or persecutions committed on “political” or “other” grounds. Unfortunately, the ambiguities inherent in such inconsistent characterizations of genocide have allowed for a sophistic intellectualization of the term. Professor Steven T. Katz of Boston University, for example, rejects the Convention’s definition as simultaneously too narrow in scope — he would include “political, social, economic, and gender victimization” — and too broad — he refuses to recognize as genocide anything less than the intended physical destruction of an entire given group. As far as he is concerned, any intent to kill only some members of such a group — Bosnian Muslims in Serb-claimed territory as opposed to all Bosnian Muslims anywhere — does not qualify. Thus, Professor Katz, who happens to be a friend of mine, recently told the New York Times that the massacres of Tutsis in Rwanda constituted only “mass murder.” I respectfully disagree. No survivor of any genocide deserves to have his or her suffering trivialized or belittled. It is simply unconscionable to suggest that Tutsis murdered in Rwanda solely because they were Tutsis, or Bosnian Muslim men and boys shot to death at Srebrenica by Serbian thugs for no reason other than their ethnicity, were any less the victims of a genocide than my grandparents and brother who were gassed at the Auschwitz-Birkenau death camp. Genocide is not the only abomination made explicitly punishable in the wake of the Holocaust. Crimes Against Humanity, the once amorphous cause of action created in August 1945 for the purpose of prosecuting major Nazi war Please see Rosensaft, page 9.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 7

OPINION

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ers that will require annual mileage improvements significant enough to save 4 billion barrels of oil and prevent 2 billion metric tons of greenhouse gas pollution between 2012 and 2016. This is hope and change we should all believe in. Mindy S. Fleishman Squirrel Hill

Column omitted facts Thank you for Abby Wisse Schachter’s Dec. 8 piece, “Obama and the do-something Congress.” The current Congress earned a 9 percent approval rating (lower than porn, polygamy, and the BP oil spill). I was curious as to what the 9 percent approved. The piece omitted reference to the “Ryan Plan” passed by this House of Representatives, which would eliminate Medicare as we know it. Would seniors gladly relinquish current Medicare guarantees in return for the “freedom” to find their own private health care insurance with only a subsidy voucher from the government? Only President Obama and the Democratic-controlled Senate stand between seniors and that horrible fate. The congressional achievements lauded in the piece are troublesome. The Iran sanctions, as currently written, could backfire causing alienation from potential allies and further weaken the global economy with higher energy prices. The Keystone pipeline decision was delayed in order to address the concerns of Nebraska farmers over polluted water systems. The 20,000 jobs (13,000 construction and 7,000 indirect supply chain) number associated with the project was refuted in November by the pipeline operator when the Trans-Canada CEO admitted that the 13,000 construction jobs component was based on 6,500 jobs per single worker per year for two years. States that have passed harsh deportation laws, such as Alabama, are having second thoughts as local economies have suffered. I am confident that President Obama is addressing these serious issues in the same measured, thoughtful manner as he rescued this country from the brink of economic ruin as he took office during the worst recession in 50 years; rescued the auto industry; achieved health care reform; signed a fair pay act; tightened control of the credit card industry; made the world safer by eliminating Bin Laden and Qadafi; and, last but not least, concluded a deal with all the top U.S.-based automak-

Exaggerated job figure A correction to Ms. Schachter’s Dec. 8 column, “Obama and the do-something Congress.” In her article she stated that President Obama’s blocking the passage of the Keystone XL Pipeline cost the country 20,000 jobs. I don’t know where she got that number as no source was cited, but the industry that is promoting the pipeline has inflated the number of possible jobs created to make approval of the pipeline more appealing to Americans. An independent study done by Cornell University concluded that the actual number of jobs created would have been between 4,600 and 2,500. The fact that President Obama has not yet given permission for this pipeline to be built in the way it is proposed is a bold move to protect the health of citizens and the environment over that of profits for the fuel industry. Perhaps Ms. Schachter is willing to sacrifice her own health and that of her family for jobs, but fortunately President Obama, at least in this instance, is not. The risks to our environment posed by the Keystone XL Pipeline can do extreme and permanent damage to the future of the planet. Even if you don’t care about having a sustainable planet, which I have to admit I truly don’t get, from an economical prospective, people getting sick increases health care costs, which does not help our economy. The jobs bill and extending the payroll tax would help our economy and actually build infrastructure — something that would increase the health of our nation. If Ms. Schachter is most concerned about job creation, why has she been silent about the Republican’s blocking of the approval of these bills? Michelle Diamond Squirrel Hill

Care assailed This past summer, my father spent 10 weeks undergoing rehabilitation in the Please see Letters, page 9.


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

OPINION Mind the widening gap between Orthodox and other Jews gary rosenblatt

NEW YORK — When journalist Peter Beinart talks about the growing alienation between young American Jews and Israel, and with their Jewish practice, he is quick to point out that he isn’t referring to the Orthodox. Indeed, young Orthodox Jews, reflecting their elders’ behavior, are the exception to his rule, deeply committed to their religion and the Jewish state. At a time when the issue of West Bank settlements is increasingly divisive in much of the American Jewish community, it’s still a no-brainer among the Orthodox, who support the settlements enthusiastically. (In fact, it seems like some Orthodox congregations here rarely invite a speaker from Israel who lives inside the Green Line.) Settlements are but one issue where the gap between the Orthodox community and the rest of American Jewry is disturbingly wide, and growing, from politics in the Mideast and Washington to religious practice, education and family values. I’m often taken aback by how little each group is aware of, and sensitive to, the concerns of the other. For example, one reason why support for the Jewish communities in the West Bank is a given in Orthodox synagogues is because many congregants have family members, friends and former neighbors living there. (Keep in mind that the large majority of Americans making aliya each year are Orthodox.) It is not uncommon for congregants to visit Israel several times a year, especially if they have a son or daughter studying in an Israeli yeshiva post-high school, which has become the default pattern for Orthodox teens over the last two decades. In recent years, there has been a major shift in voting patterns from Democrat to Republican among the Orthodox, primarily over the issue of Israel. Whether or not he is seen as a Muslim or follower of Rev. Jeremiah Wright — it seems unlikely he could be both — President Obama is viewed with deep suspicion, if not outright hostility, as a negative factor for the Jewish state. The fact that the levels of strategic and military cooperation between Jerusalem and Washington are at a high point is trumped by the troubled personal relationship between Israel’s prime minister and the American president, and the feeling that Obama has disrespected Netanyahu publicly and privately. More and more I hear friends in the Orthodox community express their willingness to vote for anyone but Obama in the 2012 election, convinced that he has no patience or sympathy for Israel. Even moderates in the Orthodox community

on domestic issues say they are willing to tolerate an ultra-conservative president who will be demonstrably supportive of Israel. That reflects the fact that many Orthodox Jews list “Israel” as the No. 1 issue on which they will determine who to vote for next year in the national elections, unlike most other Jews. One reason why close to 80 percent of American Jews voted for Obama in 2008, and a majority will do so again next year — though his numbers are likely to decline — is that only a small percentage of the U.S. Jewish community is Orthodox, generally estimated at between 10 and 20 percent. Most American Jews are still liberal, and see themselves as supportive of Is-

At a time when the issue of West Bank settlements is increasingly divisive in much of the American Jewish community, it’s still a nobrainer among the Orthodox, who support the settlements enthusiastically.

rael, certainly, but also caring deeply about a wide range of domestic concerns, from the economy to human rights, and deeply distrustful of Republican candidates who speak about their fervent Christian beliefs. According to a recent American Jewish Committee survey of American Jewish attitudes, 53 percent of American Jews disapprove of Obama’s policies toward Israel; among Orthodox Jews the disapproval rate is 81 percent. Overall, 45 percent of American Jews approve of Obama, a 23 percent drop-off from 2008, but 6 percent higher than Americans in general; among Orthodox Jews, who represent 9 percent of the AJC sampling, Obama’s disapproval rate is 72 percent. But politics is not the only issue that divides the Orthodox and overall Jewish communities. It really goes deeper, to issues of values, and Orthodox Jews are more traditional not only in religious practice but in cultural behavior as well. They marry younger, have more children and put a great emphasis on intensive Jewish education. Day schools and yeshivas are a major priority, with a focus increasingly on the tuition crisis. The combination of a sinking economy and large number of children is making affordability a huge concern for Orthodox families. But they believe the general Jewish community, including the federation world, is not interested enough to alleviate their plight in a meaningful way. So, Orthodox Jews tend to see federations as not addressing their needs, and federations see the Orthodox as not wanting to be involved in the communal agenda and campaign. Which is a shame, because if more Orthodox Jews Please see Rosenblatt, page 20.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 9

OPINION Rosensaft: Continued from page 6. criminals, have now been codified in the Statute of the International Criminal Court to include murder, extermination, torture, rape, and sexual slavery, among other specified offenses, “when committed as part of a widespread systematic attack directed against any civilian population, with knowledge of the attack.” Such crimes against humanity also form the cornerstones, together with genocide and war crimes, of the statutes of the International Criminal Tribunals for Rwanda and the Former Yugoslavia, as well as the law under which Khmer Rouge leaders are now being tried for atrocities committed in Cambodia by the Pol Pot regime between 1975 and 1979. As we mark the 65th anniversary of the first formal recognition of genocide as a crime under international law, we

LETTERS

TO THE

EDITOR

Continued from page 7. Carnegie Unit of Charles Morris, where our experience differed markedly from Russellyn S. Caruth’s account of her family’s experience in the Allderdice Unit (“Great care,” Dec. 6). Although we felt that our father received excellent rehabilitation from the therapists at Charles Morris, we were dissatisfied with other aspects of his care and treatment while there. We encountered various quality problems, including a lack of follow-through on certain matters when brought to staff’s attention, as well as the seemingly sudden departure of two professionals assigned with oversight of his care. There were

should reflect on the progress we have made since the time when heads of governments and their acolytes believed that they could murder Jews, Roma and Sinti, Armenians or members of other national, religious or ethnic groups with impunity. We must also keep in mind at all times that while posthumous justice for the victims of genocide is an important consideration, the most critical imperative of both Resolution 96(I) and the Genocide Convention has always been the prevention of future carnages. One need only look at Darfur to realize that this goal is far from accomplished. We have indeed evolved since the end of World War II, but not yet enough to be considered truly civilized. (Menachem Z. Rosensaft is an adjunct professor of law at Cornell Law School, lecturer in law at Columbia Law School, and distinguished visiting lecturer at Syracuse University College of Law.)

also losses of a number of personal items, including a sweater, a hearing aid, and his bingo winnings. Particularly troubling was the careless disregard for his personhood on occasion, and we often felt that certain actions were done on the basis of staff needs and convenience, rather than in his best interests. For example, the mustache that he had worn for more than 40 years was shaved off, and no one seemed to care when his friend reported that he had been dressed in oversized clothing that obviously belonged to another patient. Overall, it was a very disappointing experience. We had expected much more from a Jewish Association on Aging facility. Kim Smith Brookline, Mass.


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

Style Former Major Leaguers building ‘Team Israel’ BY KEN MANDEL JNS

When Shawn Green retired from Major League Baseball at age 34, he traded the game he loved for the relaxed life of a family man and eventual author. As teams contacted the outfielder/first baseman over the next four years to check about a comeback, Green maintained that the itch to play hadn’t returned. Then Team Israel called, and he couldn’t resist. Along with former Jewish major leaguers Gabe Kapler and Brad Ausmus, Green signed up to build an Israeli team and qualify for the 2013 World Baseball Classic (WBC), a feat that would transform the country from a baseball afterthought into a contender. “To have a chance to play on a limited basis, and representing Israel is going to be fun,” Green told JNS. “I’m thinking of some kind of player/coach role, but nothing is set in stone. I’m just looking forward to helping any way I can.” The 16-team qualifying round, which will exclude current major and minor leaguers, is slated for September or October at a site to be determined. Superstars could join if Israel advances from its bracket to the WBC in March. Through the WBC’s Heritage Rule, anyone who can be a citizen of a country can play for that team, allowing Israel to recruit from an impressive pool of Jewish-American talent that includes National League Most Valuable Player Ryan Braun, Texas Rangers second baseman Ian Kinsler and Boston Red Sox third baseman Kevin Youkilis. While the involvement level of each player remains unclear, the trio of retired veterans is committed. They met with Israeli baseball officials last month to discuss the options. Lending their names can’t hurt a country where soccer and basketball garner the most fans. Baseball, however, is not ignored in Israel, despite the failed experiment of the Israel Baseball League (IBL), whose 2007 inaugural season was its last. The country belongs to the European Baseball Federation and hosted the championship qualifying rounds in July. The four-day event, which featured the United Kingdom, Georgia, Lithuania and Israel, drew more than 4,000 fans, nearly 10 times more than similar tournaments held at the same time. According to Peter Kurz, the secretary-general of the Israel Association of Baseball (IAB), more than 2,000 children and adults are playing baseball in Israel. Getting Jewish role models such as Green, Ausmus and Kapler to contribute in coaching, recruiting and fundraising, he said, will help generate excitement. “There is a lot of interest in baseball,” Kurz said. “Our main goal is to develop baseball in Israel by putting a competitive team together.” Should the 24-player squad advance to

Shawn Green: player/coach for Team Israel?

the main tournament, the IAB hopes to create enough buzz to raise $3 million to build a state-of-the-art home stadium in Ra’anana. That would advance the sport in Israel and create a stronger bridge between the Israeli and American Jewish communities. “This impacts the North American and Israeli Jewish communities more than the athletes themselves,” Gabe Kapler said. “Those people are going to be psyched. It’s worth dreaming about what could happen because this creates momentum and excitement, which in turn gets

WKnight94 Photo

more people who want to participate.” Beyond that, Kapler echoed the sentiments of the fraternity of athletes proud to shatter the notion that Jewish kids should pursue academics. After some lean years, today’s crop of Jewish Major Leaguers also includes Oakland’s Craig Breslow, Texas’s Scott Feldman and New York Mets’ first baseman Ike Davis. “It battles the stereotype that Jews aren’t good athletes, which I think is what fires us up the most,” said Kapler, the possible manager of Team Israel. “It’s difficult to hear. I believe there are

fewer athletes because of parental guidance and not an inability to perform. More Jewish parents are steering their children away from athletics, stereotypically. “It’s easy to find a doctor, lawyer or somebody in Hollywood to look up to, but there are fewer Jewish athletes. When a Jewish athlete gets to the highest level, it automatically becomes a big story in the Jewish community. That’s where I see the impact.” That’s why being a part of this team was an obvious step for Kapler, who understands what it means to inspire Jewish kids. A Star of David tattoo adorns his left calf with the inscription “Strong Willed, Strong Minded” in Hebrew, and the dates of World War II with the Holocaust motto “Never Again” sit on his right calf. To him, being Jewish is more than symbolism. “There’s always the dynamic of, ‘Are you supporting a Jewish endeavor because you go to synagogue every night, fast on the high holidays and follow Jewish tradition and law?’ ” he said. “Then there’s the element of, ‘This is who I am. This is where I come from. This is what I’m proud of.’ Scenario number two is where I fit best, and why I feel this is a natural fit.” The decision to compete was similarly easy for Brad Ausmus, who is Jewish on his mother’s side. Though he wasn’t raised Jewish, he often heard stories from his grandfather. When he arrived as a Major Leaguer, he realized how much he meant to people. “Jewish fans would come up to me and talk about how they were proud to have a Jewish major leaguer on their team, whether I was in San Diego, Detroit or Houston,” Ausmus said. “I would get letters from Jewish children. I quickly realized that American Jews identified with me because of my heritage. I’m very proud of that.” Green takes it to another level. In a book he wrote that was released this summer, “The Way of Baseball: Finding Stillness at 95 mph,” he describes his spiritual outlook on staying in the moment and finding full awareness, presence and fulfillment in any endeavor. As a member of the Los Angeles Dodgers, Green felt honored to wear the same uniform as Sandy Koufax and always embraced his role in the community. “The Jewish people embraced me, and I embraced that as well,” Green said. “There aren’t as many Jewish athletes, so it’s important that the ones who are out there be role models. I was encouraged early in my career to embrace that attention, and I want to pass that on. “If Team Israel can find a way to qualify, it would be a big deal,” he added, “and I would hope we could get the superstars to play for us instead of the U.S. team. It would be a lot of fun.”


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 11

SPORTS

Say it ain’t so, Ryan; say it ain’t so JONATHAN MAYO

The Chosen 1s

I am what many would call a jaded baseball writer. While I still have passion for the game and beauty of it when it’s played between the lines, I’ve grown cynical when it comes to the various off-the-field issues that surround it. That’s particularly true when it comes to the role performance enhancing drugs (PEDs) have played in today’s game. No positive test, I told myself, would really surprise me. I might have held out hope for certain players, but I thought there was no way any one player’s positive test would truly disappoint me. Set the bar low, that way you’re sometimes pleasantly surprised. I know, a dark worldview, but can you really blame me? But then the news of Ryan Braun’s positive test hit, and it rocked my philosophy to the core. There are a number of reasons why this has sent me reeling. One is I’ve known Braun for a while, interviewing him for the first time when he was a junior at the University of Miami, the

year the Milwaukee Brewers drafted him in the first round. Another is that he doesn’t fit the profile, does he? We all want those who test positive to fit the Barry Bonds or Manny Ramirez mold. Alex Rodriguez didn’t fit in terms of body type, but his general demeanor left many in the sports world less than compassionate. And while perhaps Pirates fans aren’t exactly members of the Ryan Braun fan club because of past tensions, most would probably begrudgingly admit that Braun has conducted himself as a model citizen on and off the field. Maybe we don’t like the Brewers, but a guy who signs a long extension before he hits free agency so he can stay in a smaller market, with the team that drafted him, isn’t that what we want here? But I’m dancing around the real issue, aren’t I? The real reason this story has thrown me is because he’s Jewish. Sure, it’s only on his father’s side, but Braun has always embraced that part of his family’s history and I’m sure I’m not the only one who was dreaming of Braun playing for that Israeli World Baseball Classic team. Having one of “us” test positive for a higher level of testosterone — that’s all we know right now and there have been sources that have said in reports that it’s not a “PED, drug or steroid of any kind” — is a very hard pill to swallow. We have so few Jewish sports

Ryan Braun

heroes to look up to, and now the one who was at the top of the list, the recent winner of the National League Most Valuable Player award, is facing a very large fall from grace. What to do about this information?

It had come to the point where any positive test came with an automatic conclusion of guilt. It didn’t matter how vehement the denials, did it? If someone tested positive, they were guilty before proven innocent, end of story. How many of you doubt for a second that Bonds or Roger Clemens took PEDs? Yet here I am looking at these stories of Braun’s positive test and I want to give him the benefit of the doubt, at least until more information comes to light. I want to hear what he has to say — he told my MLB.com colleague Adam McCalvy via text, “I would love to talk, but unfortunately I'm not really allowed to say anything right now. My day will come soon, though.” I want him to have his day. I want him to be able to explain this in some way where a 50-game ban isn’t an inevitability. And this goes counter to how I’ve reacted to every other positive test story. Is it fair that I’m treating Braun differently than all those others? Probably not, yet I will continue to do so until there’s more proof. Call me inconsistent; I can handle it. I just hope that the standard I’ve held Braun up to — one that he’s managed to live up to until now — can hold up. I want him to prove me right. Or, when I look at my dark side honestly, prove me wrong. Say it ain’t so, Ryan, say it ain’t so.

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchronicle.net


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 13


14 — HE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

Simchas CUSTOM MEMORY PILLOW

Engagements

Births Carmeli: Alison Spatz Levine and Daniel Carmeli announce the birth of their daughter, Noa Spatz Carmeli, Nov. 5. Grandparents are Max Levine and Hilary Spatz and Aviva and Rami Carmeli of New York City. Great-grandparents are Phyllis (Sidney) Spatz and Mildred (Harry) Levine.

What can you do with your children’s old baby clothes? How can you remember a deceased loved one in a special way? How can you make a bar/bat mitzvah gift or anniversary present stand out? Let us take your sentimental clothing and pictures and construct a one-of-a-kind patchwork pillow. The process is reasonably priced, local and incredibly unique. Cost starting at $65.

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Farkas/Richman: Charlese and Joel Farkas announce the engagement of their daughter, Emily Jennifer, to Robert Richman, son of Harriet and Dr. Lawrence Richman of Bath, Ohio. Emily graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in media communications. She is the senior manager of campaign at the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Robert attended American University and the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He is an attorney in private practice. Emily’s grandparents are Annette K. Liptz, Jeanne Lichter Podolsky, and the late Harold Farkas. Roberts’s grandparents are Ruth Ungar and the late Joseph Ungar and Dorothy Richman and the late Ernest Richman.

Shapira/Valler: Susie Shapira and W. Michael Valler Jr. announce the birth of their son, Aidan Robert, July 29. Grandparents are Barbara and Danny Shapira and Nina and William Valler Sr. Great-grandmother is Helen Carpenter. Aidan is named in loving memory of his maternal great-grandfather, Robert Carpenter. His Hebrew name, Calev Shaul, is in loving memory of his maternal and paternal great-grandfathers, Cuddy Briskin and Saul Shapira.

B’nai Mitzva Matthew Eric Scott, son of Amy and Jeffrey Scott, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Dec. 17, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are Linda and Leonard Bernstein, the late Maxine Scott, and Bill Scott.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 15

Community A

From the Riverview Towers kitchen As the Riverview Towers community gears up for Chanuka, three residents and the kitchen staff pulled out some of their favorite holiday recipes to share.

CAULIFLOWER LATKES 2 eggs plus 2 egg whites 1 peeled onion 1 head fresh, steamed cauliflower cut into several pieces 2 to 3 tablespoons flour Salt and pepper to taste Oil for frying

C

Process onion in food processor until chopped. Add eggs and process briefly. Add in cauliflower pieces and flour. Mix, being careful not to overdo it; consistency should be chunky.

L O

Heat oil in pan. When hot, put batter by the tablespoon into frying pan and fry 3 to 4 minutes on each side. ••• Pictured in the Riverview Towers kitchen are Pat Wolf and Uri Fakiro, owners of Pittsburgh Kosher Food Management, food service providers for Riverview, on the right. On the left is the Riverview cook, Justin Szuch. Holding up the tray is kitchen helper Robert Kirksey.

STREUDEL FROM WILMA LEVINE

PINEAPPLE BREAD PUDDING FROM FRIEDA SAFYAN

S E R L O O K

(3 or 4 Servings)

2 sticks margarine at room temperature 2 cups sifted flour 1/2 pint sour cream (Refrigerate overnight)

1 stick margarine 2 eggs 1/2 cup sugar 5 slices white bread or challa 1 can drained crushed pineapple (large can) 15 oz. 1 apple sliced (small apple)

Divide dough in small balls (5 or 6). Roll out and fill one at a time with: grated apples (2 or 3), nuts, preserves, raisins, cinnamon and sugar. Sprinkle bread crumbs on dough before filling. Do not grease pans. Bake at 350º about 30 to 45 minutes. until light brown. Cool and sprinkle with powdered sugar.

Melt margarine. Beat eggs, add sugar and melted margarine. Add drained pineapples and sliced apples. Add bread which has been broken into small pieces or cubes — crust and all. Bake at 350º about 45 minutes or until slightly brown on top. Cut in squares for serving when cool. This is a wonderful recipe in place of noodle pudding as a side dish.

CHOCOLATE CHIP ORANGE SCONES FROM MYRNA ROSENSTEIN

2 cups all purpose flour 1/3 cup granulated sugar 2 teaspoons baking powder 1/2 teaspoon salt 1/2 cup unsalted butter, chilled 2 large eggs

1/4 cup orange juice 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1/2 teaspoon grated orange peel 3/4 cup miniature semisweet chocolate chips 1 egg white mixed with 1/2 teaspoon water for glaze (optional)

Preheat over to 425º. Butter a 9-inch-diameter circle in the center of a baking sheet. In a large bowl, stir together the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt. Cut the butter into 1/2inch cubes and distribute them over the flour mixture. With a pastry blender or two knives used scissors fashion, cut in the butter until the mixture resembles coarse crumbs. In a small bowl, stir together the eggs, orange juice, vanilla and orange peel. Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture and stir to combine. The dough will be sticky. With lightly floured hands, knead in the chocolate chips until they are evenly distributed. With lightly floured hands, pat the dough into 8-inch-diameter circle in the center of the prepared baking sheet. If desired, brush the egg mixture over the top and sides of the dough. With a serrated knife, cut into 8 wedges. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes, or until a cake tester or toothpick inserted into the center of a scone comes out clean. Remove the baking sheet to a wire rack and cool for 10 minutes. With a spatula, transfer the scones to the wire rack to cool. Recut into wedges, if necessary. Serve warm, or cool completely and store in an airtight container. These scones freeze well. Makes 8 scones. (This recipe is from “Simply Scones,” by Leslie Weiner and Barbara Albright.)


16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

ORGANIZATION DIRECTORY ADATH JESHURUN CEMETERY Office: 1310 Eagles Nest Lane Monroeville, PA 15147 412-508-0817 Renee Abrams, Pres.; Paul D. Levin, V.P.; Laura Cohen, Secy.; Bill Berkowitz, Martin Elikan, Allan Goppman, Sandy Goppman, Howard Goldstein, Ted Heyman, Earl Kaiserman, Louis Kushner, Susan Peschin, Barbara Scheinberg, Bd. Members; Susan Cohen, Office Admin.

✡ ADAT SHALOM B’NAI ISRAEL/BETH JACOB 368 Guys Run Rd. (Fox Chapel Area) Cheswick, PA 15024-9463 412-820-7000 • Fax: 412-820-9725 Web site: www.adatshalompgh.org Yaier Lehrer, Rabbi; Marc L. Silverman, Pres.; Dr. Nancy Berk, 1st V.P.; Jeremy Kronman, 2nd V.P.; Jodi Lindner, Rec. Secy.; Amy Himmel, Asst. Rec. Secy.; Seth Schanwald, Treas.; Jill S. Rook, Exec. Dir.; Gail Schmitt, Preschool & Religious Dir.; Andrea Lehman, Sisterhood Pres.; Bud Kahn, Men’s Club Pres.

✡ AGENCY FOR JEWISH LEARNING 2740 Beechwood Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-1101 x3101 • Fax: 412-521-1120 Web site: www.ajlpittsburgh.org Cheryl Moore, Pres.; Richard Kann, Charles H. Saul, Esq., Wendy M. Mars, Ph.D., Barbara K. Shuman, V.P.’s; H. Arnold Gefsky, Esq. Secy.; Peter Braasch, Asst. Secy.; David Sufrin, Treas.; Yale A. Rosenstein, Asst. Treas.; Edward Frim, Exec. Dir.

✡ AHAVATH ACHIM CONGREGATION 500 Chestnut St. Carnegie, PA 15106 Web site: www.thecarnegieshul.org E-mail: info@thecarnegieshul.org Richard D’Loss, Pres.; Larry Block, 1st V.P.; Paul Spivak, 2nd V.P.; Elaine Rosenfield, Secy.; Joel Roteman, Treas.; Cecily Routman, Ernest Halle, Isadore Horowitz, Marcia Steinberger, Harris Tisherman, Bd. of Dirs.; Roseann Tisherman, Sisterhood Pres.

✡ THE ALEPH INSTITUTE — NORTH EAST REGION Hyman & Martha Rogal Center 5804 Beacon St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-0111 x101 Fax: 412-521-5948 Web site: www.alephne.org • info@alephne.org E-mail: rabbivogel@alephne.org Rabbi Moishe Mayir Vogel, Exec. Dir.; Marty Davis, Chairman of the Bd; Barry Lembersky, Estelle Comay, Steven Robinson, Charles Saul, Jon Pushinsky, Jim Rogal, Steve Adelkoff, Charles Perlow; Board members.

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR TECHNION PITTSBURGH CHAPTER WOMEN’S DIVISION 108 Beechmont Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-441-2118 Evelyn Engelberg, Beatrice ‘Bicky’ Goldszer, Anne Krieger, Chairwomen of the Bd.; Jose Chigier, Alexandra Greenberg, Judy R. Robinson, Pres’s.; Barbara Samet, Norma K. Sobel, V.P.’s; Gertrude Brog, Rec. Secy.

✡ BBYO Keystone-Mountain Region 5738 Darlington Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-2626 Hannah Frank, Regional N’siah; Evan Kimel, Regional Godol.

BETH EL CONGREGATION OF THE SOUTH HILLS 1900 Cochran Rd. Pittsburgh, PA 15220 412-561-1168 • Fax 412-561-5320 Web site: www.bethelcong.org E-mail: bethel1900@juno.com Alex Greenbaum, Rabbi; Steve Hecht, Exec. Dir.; Rabbi Amy Greenbaum, Spiegel Religious School Dir.; Holly Cessna, Early Learning Center Dir.; Miles Kirshner, Pres.; Dennis Holzer, Exec. V.P.; Bob Silverman, Admin. V.P.; Andrew Schaer, Ed. V.P.; Nina Kaplan, Fin. V.P.; Stacey Reibach, Fndrsng. V.P.; Cliff Spungen, Membership V.P.; Edie Yorke, Fin. Secy.; Alan Rosenthal, Assist. Fin. Secy.; David Cohen, Treas.; Mark Perilman, Asst. Treas.; Beth Pomerantz, Rec. Secy.; Sylvia Slavkin, Sistrhd. Pres.; Brian Moidel, Alan Scheimer, Men’s Club CoPres.’s.; Amy Karp, USY Dir.; Rachel Zuckman, Kadima Dir.

BETH HAMEDRASH HAGODOL/BETH JACOB SYNAGOGUE 810 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15219 412-471-4443 Ira Michael Frank, Pres.; Sherman Weinstein, 1st V.P.; Lee Oleinick, 2nd V.P.; Edward M. Goldston, Secy; Leonard Skirboll, Treas.; Brian Cynamon, Asst. Treas.; Arlene Neustein, Sisterhood Pres.

B’NAI EMUNOH CONGREGATION 4315-19 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-1477 Dr. Joseph S. Weiss, Rabbi; Joel Pirchesky, Pres.; Elaine Levine, V.P.; Bernice Faigen, Secy.; Elaine Levine, Treas.; Bernice Faigen, Sisterhood Pres.; Milton Zelkowitz, Men’s Club Pres.; Amy Cohen, Barry Faigen, Lee Golden, Eugene Hastings, Richard Levine, Lee Moses, Lee Perelstine, Bd. of Trustees.

✡ CONGREGATION BETH SHALOM 5915 Beacon St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-2288 Fax (412) 421-5923 Web site: www.bethshalompgh.org E-mail: office@bethshalompgh.org Michael Werbow, Rabbi; Benjamin Rosner, Cantor; Liron Lipinsky, Head of Schools; Robert Zaremberg, Torah Reader; Lonnie Wolf, Cemetery Dir.; Carolyn Gerecht, Youth Dir.; Rabbi Donni Aaron, Youth T’Filah Dir.; Rabbi Mark N. Staitman, Rabbinic Scholar; Stefi Kirschner, President; Gerald Kobell, Esq., Exec. V.P.; Jeffrey Rosenthal, V.P.; Howard Valinsky, V.P.; Lester Shapiro, Secy; Michael Samuels, Tres; Connie Pollack, Immed. Past Pres.; Ann Gould, Sisthd Pres.; Marc Berliner, Men’s Club Pres.; Maya Rosen & Andy Weissfeld, USY co-pres.

BETH ISRAEL CENTER P.O. Box 10873 Pleasant Hills, PA 15236 412-655-2144 Website: www.bethisraelpgh.org Art Weinblum, Pres.; Martin Pomerantz, 1st V.P.; Shirley Schultz, 2nd V.P.; Rachel Weinblum, Treas.; Bill Hunt, Fin. Secy.; Ed Myerson, Rec. Secy.; Ron Weiss, Corr. Secy.; Marni Latterman, 2 Yr. Dir., 1st. Yr.; Shirley Ravets, 2 Yr. Dir., 1st Yr.; Irv. Selsley, 2 Yr. Dir., 2nd Yr.; Bill Hunt, 2 Yr. Dir., 2nd Yr.; Janet Selsley/Joan Glickstein, Sistrhd Rep.; Robbie Greenberger, Past Pres.; Amy Greenbaum, Rabbi.

CHABAD OF CMU 5120 Beeler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-772-8505 Fax: 412-345-8388 Web site: www.chabadofcmu.com E-mail: Rabbi@chabadofcmu.com Rabbi Shlomo and Chani Silverman, Co-directors.

BETH ISRAEL CONGREGATION 265 North Ave. Washington, PA 15301 724-225-7080 Web site: www.mybethisrael.org E-mail: bisrael@pulsenet.com Richard Littman, Pres.; Richard Belkin, Esq., V.P.; David S. Posner, Esq., Treas.; Deborah Sekel, Sec.; Richard Belkin, Esq., Immed. Past Pres.; David C. Novitsky, Rabbi; Richard Pataki, M.D., Paul Wodlinger, M.D., Lewis Green, Marilyn A. Posner, David S. Posner, Esq., Jon S. Adler, M.D., Carol Adler, Stephen McCloskey, Esq., Richard Lasday, D.V.M., Richard Littman, Past Pres's; Carol Adler, Marc Simon, Judith Pataki, Marilyn Bernzweig, Marilyn Gilman, Esq., Stephen McCloskey, Esq., Shirley Morris, Marilyn A. Posner, Stephen Richman, Esq., Bd. of Dir.'s.

✡ CONGREGATION BET TIKVAH P.O. Box 10140, Pittsburgh, PA 15232 Hotline: 412-256-8317 Web site: www.bettikvah.org E-mail: info@bettikvah.org

✡ CONGREGATION B’NAI ABRAHAM 519 N. Main Street Butler, PA 16001 E-mail: congbnaiabraham@zoominternet.net Find us on Facebook Cantor Michele Gray-Schaffer, Spiritual Leader; Philip Terman and Chris Hood, Co-presidents; Martin Meyer, V.P; Eric D. Levin, Treas.; Shirley Grossman, Secy.; Bernard H. Levin, Immed. Past Pres.; Roberta Gallagher, Principal.

BETH SAMUEL JEWISH CENTER 810 Kennedy Dr., P.O. Box 219 Ambridge, PA 15003 724-266-5238 Web site: www.bethsamuel.org E-mail: info@bethsamuel.org Stephanie Wolfe, Rabbi; Susan Hazen, Pres.; Lynn Klein, 1st Pres.; Dr. Paul Freeman, 2nd V.P.; Dan Geller, Past Pres.; Karen Beaudway, Rec. Secy.; James Neft, Treas.; Gil Isaacs, Fin. Secy.; Helen Blair, Roger Segeleon, Jeff Ross, and Isaac Shina, Bd Trustees.

COMMUNITY DAY SCHOOL 6424 Forward Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-1100 • 412-521-4511 Web site: www.comday.org Avi Baran Munro, Head of School; Tzippy Mazer, Head of Hebrew/Judaic Studies; Richard Sternberg, Head of Lower School; Linda Hurwitz, Head of Middle School; Judy Goldman, Admission Dir.; Bari Weinberger, Chief Fin. Off.; Samantha Rothaus, Dir. of Institutional Advancement; Tim Richart, Asst. Dir. of Institutional Advancement; Jordan Hoover, Tech. Dir.; Howard Valinsky, Pres.; Amy Dubin, V.P.; Stuart Kaplan, V.P.; Jean Reznick, Secy.; Derek Smith, Treas.

B’NAI B’RITH INTERNATIONAL MISSION AND TRAVEL OFFICE Allegheny/Ohio Valley Region 1831 Murray Ave., Suite 204 Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Toll free: 877-222-9590 412-521-2390 • Fax: 412-521-0386 E-mail: nkaplan@bnaibrith.org Dr. Steve Smiga, Pres.; Sharon Moskowitz, Secy.; Nina Kaplan, Director.

CONGREGATION DOR HADASH 5898 Wilkins Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-5158 Web site: www.dorhadash.net Pam Goldman, Kathy Blee, Co-Pres.’s; Wendy Kobee, Admin. V.P.; Miri Rubinowitz, Ritual V.P. ; Cheryl Klein, Cantor; Jean Clickner, Rec. Secy.; Harry Levinson, Treas.; Wendy Osher, Social Action

Chair; Mark Rubenstein, Membership Chair; Barbara Baumann, Dan Leger, Prog. Co-Chairs; Sarah Angrist, Ruth Drescher, Adult Ed. Co-Chairs; Judy Grumet, Life Events Chair; Rachel Hovne, Social Events Chair; Jo Recht, Dor Hadash Religious School Liaison; Donna Coufal, KOL Editor; Daniel Mosse, Member at Large; Leslie Hoffman, Congregation Mgr.; Deane Root, Past Pres.

CONGREGATION EMANU-EL ISRAEL 222 North Main St. Greensburg, PA 15601 724-834-0560 • Fax: 724-834-7650 Web site: www.congregationemanuelisrael.org E-mail: ceimain50@aol.com Sara Rae Perman, Rabbi; Irene Rothschild, Pres.; Mark Greenfield, 1st V.P.; Marc Werksman, 2nd V.P.; Gary Moidel, Treas.; Virginia Lieberman, Rec. Secy; Carol Ratner, Membership; Barbara Wilder, Rel. School Principal; Ronda Goetz, Rel. Practices; Esther Glasser, Endowment/Gifts/ Memorials; Shirley Shpargel, Library Head; Liz Eisenstatt, Library Asst.; Nancy Krokosky, Caring Committee; Robert Gelman, Terri Katzman, Robert Slone, Spec. Evnts.; Sinde Snitger as Sisterhood Pres. & Fund Raising Chair.

FORWARD SHADY APARTMENTS 5841 Forward Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-3065 Fax: 412-521-6413 E-mail: forwardshady@srcare.org Peter Sukernek, Pres.; Yale Rosenstein, V.P.; RaeGayle Pakler, Secy.; Terry Lerman, Treas.

THE FRIENDSHIP CIRCLE OF PITTSBURGH 5872 Northumberland St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-224-4440 Web site: www.fcpgh.org info@fcpgh.org Rabbi Mordy and Rivkee Rudolph, Exec. Dir.’s; Dr. Laura Marshak, Prof. Advisor; Shaina Teitelbaum, Prgrm. Coord.; Odaiah Leeds, I-Volunteer Coord.; Kaitlin Hens-Greco, Prgrm. Mgr.; Judy Wein, Chair of the Bd.; Fred Rock, Treas.; Elyse Averbach Prgrm. Assoc.; Dr. Daniel Rosen, ViceChair; Jan Engelberg, Secy.; Steve Halpern, Stuart Horne, Deb Myers, Alex Paul, Chuck Perlow, Lori Plung, William Rudolph, Dr. Marty Supowitz, Dr. Jamie Stern, Jillian Zacks, Dir.’s.

GEMILAS CHESED CONGREGATION 1400 Summit St., White Oak, PA 15131 412-678-8859 • Fax: 412-678-8850 Web site: www.gemilaschesed.org E-mail: gemilaschesed@gmail.com Rabbi Moshe Russell, Interim Rabbi; Gershon Guttman, Pres.; Ruth Gordon, V.P.; Judy Greenman, Secy.; Richard Bollinger, Treas.; Gershon Guttman, Gabbai Rishon; Alan Balsam, Yonasan Blailock, Gabbaim Sheini; Elinor Luzer, Sistrhd. Pres.

HADASSAH GREATER PITTSBURGH CHAPTER 1824 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-8919 Fax: 412-421-0535 Toll Free 1-877-421-8919 Web site: www.hadassah.org/pittsburgh E-mail: bcpittsburgh@hadassah.org Zandra Goldberg, Pres.; Francine Surloff, Dir.; Becky Abrams, Chana Brody, Kathy DiBiase, Miriam Rudel Quast, V.P.’s; Marci Scott, Rec. Secy.; Deborah Rudoy, Corr. Secy.; Nina Kaplan, Treas.; Nancy Shuman, Advisor; Lynda Heyman, Immed. Past Pres.

HEBREW FREE LOAN ASSOCIATION 4315 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-8868 Fax: 412-422-7410 Michael Danovitz, Pres.; Paul Reznick, 1st V.P.; Bret Solomon, 2nd V.P.; Stanley Maharam, 3rd V.P.; Alex Kiderman, Treas.; Jonathan Isaacson, Asst. Treas.; Elaine L. Supowitz, Secy.; Stefanie F. Behrend, Asst. Secy.; Norma Williamson, Exec. Dir.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE SEPTEMBER 29, 2011 — 17

ORGANIZATION DIRECTORY HILLEL ACADEMY 5685 Beacon St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-8131 Fax: 412-521-5150 Daniel Kraut, Esq., CEO; Rabbi Avrumi Sacks, Prncpl & Edu. Dir.;Elky Langer, Coord. of Crrculm & Instrct. K-12; Rabbi Sam Weinberg, Asst. Prncpl. 7-12 Boys & Girls; Rabbi Dov Nimchinsky, Judaic Studies & Edu Prog. Coord 1-6; Yikara Levari, Mashgicha Ruchanit, 7-12 Girls; Rabbi Yisroel Smith, Masgiach Ruchani, Boys H.S; Phyllis Harris, Dir. Spec Svcs. K-12; Barbara Chotiner, Erly. Cildhd. Coord.; Reb Danny Shaw, Coord. Athletics & Student Life; Selma Aronson, Exec. Admin; Hadar Glazer, Admin. Assist.; Adina Shayowitz, Admin. Assist.; Chevi Rubin, Admin. Assist. to the Prncpl.; Sarah Hartman, Fin. Mgr.; Adam Reinherz, Dir. Comm. Rltns.

EDWARD AND ROSE BERMAN HILLEL JEWISH UNIVERSITY CENTER OF PITTSBURGH The Mildred and Joseph Stern Building 4607 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-621-8875 Ext. 100 Fax: 412-621-8861 Web site: hilleljuc.org E-mail: info@hilleljuc.org Aaron Weil, Exec. Dir. & CEO; Beverly Brinn, Dir. of Development; Caryn Goldenberg, Asst. Dir. of Development; Olivia Payne, Operations Mgr.; Carly Adelmann, The Janet L. Swanson Dir. of Jewish Student Life at the Univ. of Pittsburgh; Benjamin Berlow, Dir. of Jewish Student Life at Carnegie Mellon Univ.; David Katz , Dir. of J’Burgh, Sara Heal, Assist. Dir. of J’Burgh; Gail Childs, Brd. Chair; Zachary Block, Vicky Hoffman, David Kalson, Robert Markovizt, Elliott Oshry, V. Chair’s; Susan Berman, Immed. Past Pres.

HOLOCAUST CENTER OF THE JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER PITTSBURGH 5738 Darlington Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-1500 Fax: 412-422-1996 Web site: www.holocaustcenterpgh.org David Sufrin, Commission Chr.; Moshe Baran, Holocaust Survivors Org. Pres.; Paula Sittsamer Riemer, Legacy Group Coord.

ISRAEL BONDS 6507 Wilkins Ave., Suite 101 Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-362-5154 1-800-362-2669 E-mail: Pittsburgh@israelbonds.com Marian Ungar Davis, Interim Campaign Chair; Sharon P. Moskowitz, Exec. V. Chair; Stuart L. Silverman, M.D., V. Chair; Warren Sufrin, Chair of the Bd. of Gov.; Janice L. Greenwald, Women’s Div. Chair; Emery J. Levick, Registered Rep.; Patricia Minto, Office Mgr.; Harold F. Marcus, Exec. Dir.

ISRAEL HERITAGE ROOM University of Pittsburgh Web site: www.pitt.edu/~natrooms Susan Binstock Rosenberg, Chair; Ruth Gelman, Eileen Lane, Dr. Alex Orbach, Judith Robinson, Dr. Adam Shear, Marcia Weiss, Vice Chairs; Ruth Gelman; Treas.; Dr. Nancy Glynn; Corr. & Fin. Secy.; Sylvia Busis, Nancy L. Shuman, Hon. Chairs

JEWISH ASSISTANCE FUND P.O. BOX 8197 Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-3237 David M. Maretsky, Pres.; James F. Reich, Exec. V.P.; Sylvia Elias, Sol Ruben, Richard J. Wolk V.P.’s; Meyer Grinberg, Secy.; Louise Silk, Chairman of the Trustees Committee; Ellen Primis, Exec. Dir.

JEWISH ASSOCIATION ON AGING 200 JHF Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-420-4000 • Fax: 412-521-0932 Douglas Ostrow, Chair.; William Brandeis, Vice Chair; Mitchell Pakler, Treas.; Jim Lieber, Secy.; Deborah Winn-Horvitz, JAA Pres. & CEO; Steve Halpern as the Chair-Elect

JEWISH CEMETERY & BURIAL ASSOCIATION OF GREATER PITTSBURGH P.O. Box 81863, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-553-6469 Dr. David Rosenbloom, Pres.; Jerry Sapir, 1st V.P.; Jonathan Schachter, 2nd V.P.; Harvey Wolsh, Chairman; Lonnie Wolf, Treas.; Libby Forman Zal, Historian; Wendy DeRoy, Exec. Dir.

JEWISH WOMEN’S CENTER OF PITTSBURGH P.O. Box 81924, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-8044 • Web site: www.jwcpgh.org Malke Frank, Pres.; Pat Cluss, Secy. & Newsletter; Mimi Reznik, Treas. & Membership; Barbara Baumann, V.P. & Membership; Adi Rapport, Debbey Altman Diamant, Program.

JEWISH WOMEN’S FOUNDATION OF GREATER PITTSBURGH 234 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-727-1108 Fax: 412-681-8804 E-mail: jcohen@jwfpgh.org Lori Guttman, Hilary S. Tyson, Co-Chairs; Judy Greenwald Cohen, Exec. Dir.

JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF GREATER PITTSBURGH Squirrel Hill 5738 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-8010 • Fax: 412-521-7044 South Hills 345 Kane Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15243 412-278-1975 • Fax: 412-446-0146 Jeffrey B. Markel, Chair of the Brd.; Marc Brown, Ellen Kander, Ellen P. Kessler, James S. Ruttenberg, V. Chairs; Scott D. Leib, Treas.; Carole S. Katz, Asst.Treas.; Lee Hurwitz, Secry.; Steven Rock, Asst. Secy.; Meryl K. Ainsman, Immed. Past Chair; Brian Schreiber, Pres. & CEO.

JEWISH FAMILY & CHILDREN'S SERVICE 5743 Bartlett St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-7200 Fax: 412-422-9540 Website: www.jfcspgh.org Joel M. Rosenthal, CPA, Board Chair; Jeffrey D. Freedman, PhD, Wendy M. Mars, PhD, Vice Chairs; Stanley Levine, Treas.; Fern Grossman Schwartz, Secy.; David R. Lassman, Ad Hoc Member; Aryeh Sherman, Pres. & CEO.

✡ JEWISH FEDERATION OF GREATER PITTSBURGH 234 McKee Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-681-8000 Louis Plung, Board Chair; Eileen Lane, Douglas Ostrow, Cynthia D. Shapira, V. Chairs; Meryl Ainsman, Treas.; Ellen Kessler, Asst. Treas.; James P. Wagner, Secy.; Edgar Snyder, Asst. Secy.; William Rudolph, Immed. Past Chair; Jeffrey H. Finkelstein, Pres. & CEO.

✡ JEWISH NATIONAL FUND 5915 Beacon St., 5th Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-3200 • Fax: 412-521-3420 Adrienne T. Indianer, Reg. Director.

✡ JEWISH RESIDENTIAL SERVICES 4905 Fifth Ave., Suite #3 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-325-0039 Administrative Office Fax: 412-621-4260 Web site: www.jrspgh.org E-mail: info@jrspgh.org Deborah Friedman, Exec. Dir.; Linda R. Lewis, Dir. of Operations; Jessica Feldman, Dir. Howard Levin Clubhouse; Audra Thomas, Dir. of Residential Support Services; Marty Brown, Prgrm. Coord. of Residential Support Services; Nancy Elman, Pres.; Reid Roberts, Judy Greenwald Cohen, V.P.’s; Adam Hertzman, Treas.; Alan Friedman, Secy.

✡ JEWISH SPORTS HALL OF FAME of W. PA and Sports for Israel Irene Kaufmann Building 5738 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-8010 • Fax: (412) 521-7044 Arnie Reichbaum, Pres.; Bunny Morris, V.P.; Alan Mallinger, Secy.; Robert Goldstein, CPA, Treas.

✡ JEWISH WAR VETERANS Allegheny County Council 1526 Trinity St., Pittsburgh, PA 15206 412-441-1634 Clarence “Code” Gomberg, Cmdr.; Jacob A. Notovitz, SVC; Stanley Rolnik, JVC; Isadore Horowitz, Judge Advocate; William Aronson, Adjutant; C. Code Gomberg, Quartermaster.

JEWISH WOMEN INTERNATIONAL c/o Linda Reifman 464 N. Wickham Road #168 Melbourne, FL 32935 321-600-4013 E-mail: jwipgh@aol.com

KOLLEL JEWISH LEARNING CENTER Mailing Address P.O Box 81036, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Street Address 5808 Beacon Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-420-0220 Fax: 412-420-0224 Web site: www.kollelpgh.org E-mail: mail@kollelpgh.org Rabbi Aaron Kagan, Rosh Kollel - Dean; Rabbi Levi Langer, Rosh Kollel - Dean of Torah Studies; Shelly Itskowitz, Women’s Program Dir.; Philip Milch, Esq., Pres./Chair; Rabbi Avrohom Rodkin, Adult Ed.

LADIES AUXILIARY at Weinberg Village 200 JHF Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-2586 Ruth B. Markowitz, Pres.; Cyna Glatstein, Soc. Service V.P.; Lila Horowitz, Treas.; Evelyn Scharf, Corr. Secy.; Mary Meo, Rec. Secy.; Mary Meo (A-B) (PZ), Ruth Altshuler (C-D-E) (M-N-O), Gertrude Brog (F-G), Gerry Silverman (H-K-L), Fin. Secy’s.; Leslie Foxson, Administrator.

LADIES HOSPITAL AID SOCIETY 3459 Fifth Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-648-6106 Fax: 412-692-2682 Web site: www.lhas.net E-mail: LHASOffice@LHAS.net Laura Penrod Kronk, Pres.; Jackie Dixon, Lisa Gaydos, Carole Kamin, Mary Ellen Wampler, V.P.’s; Ruby Kang, Secy.; Jodi Amos, Treas., Barbara Adelson, Lori Brinker, Sandra Chernew, Carrie Conboy, Violet Gallo, Mary Beth Hacke, Jayme Latta; Bonnie Levine, Christine McCormick, Mary Novick, Marolee Pollock, Cynthia Roth, Ruth Rubenstein, Nancy Samson, Carole Miner Schuman, Susan Varga, Dolores Warwick, Marcia Weiss, Debi Wheeler, Betsy Wotherspoon, Beverly Wukich, June Yonas, Dirs.; Dee Dee Troutman, Exec. Dir.

LUBAVITCH CENTER SYNAGOGUE 2100 Wightman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 (Corner of Hobart & Wightman in Sq. Hill) 412-422-7300 Yisroel Rosenfeld, Rabbi; Dr. Abraham J. Twerski, Pres.

NA’AMAT USA Pittsburgh Council 6328 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-5253 • Fax: 412-521-5285 Web site: www.naamat.org E-mail: naamatpgh@hotmail.com Judy Kornblith Kobell, Pres.; Marcia J. Weiss, Exec. V.P.; Barbara Oleinick, Dorothy Greenfield cul. V.P.; Lidush Goldschmidt, Roselle Solomon, Membership V.P.; Saralouise Reis, Sibyl Treblow, American Affairs & Allied Act. V.P.; Carl Solomon, Treas.; Cookie Elbling, Barbara Rosenstein Rec. Secy.;

Emma-Lou Rosenstein, Diana Spodek, Corr. Secy.; Gloria Elbling-Gottlieb, Norma Kirkell Sobel, Spiritual Adop./Schlshp. Chrmn.; Debby Firestone, Immed. Past Pres.; Dee Selekman, Exec. Dir.

NATIONAL COUNCIL OF JEWISH WOMEN 1620 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-6118 • Fax 412-421-1121 Web site: www.ncjwpgh.org Hilary Spatz, Pres.; Bonnie Rubin, Chief Operating Officer; Cathy Cohen, Phyllis Cohen, Debbie Levy Green, Jennifer Honig, Susan Jordan, Roxanne Wolk, V.P.’s; Jan Engelberg, Rec. Secy.; Dena Chottiner, Asst. Rec. Secy.; Dorothy Grinberg, Corr. Secy.; Paula Garret, Treas.; Cheryl Braver, Asst. Treas.

NEW LIGHT CONGREGATION/ OHR CHADASH 1700 Beechwood Blvd., Pittsburgh PA 15217 412-421-1017 Web site: newlightcong.org Jonathan Perlman, Rabbi; Harvey Brotsky, Rabbi Emeritus; Barbara Caplan, Helene Harris, CoPres.’s.; Karen Coburn, Fin. V.P.; Marilyn Honigsberg, Membership V.P.; Carl Solomon, Fin. Secy.; Ruth Ginsburg, Corr. Secr.; Ileen Portnoy, Rec. Secry.; Cheryl Potance, Sisterhood Pres.; Dan Stein, Men's Club Pres.

OHR NISTAR HAVURAH COMMUNITY FOR SPIRITUAL FRIENDSHIP Web site: rabbiwithoutborders.org E-mail: rabbiadalah@verizon.net Rabbi Adalah Caplowe

ORT AMERICA GREATER PITTSBURGH CHAPTER 5145 Beeler St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-683-0207 Website: www.ortamerica.org Barbara Tisherman, Pres.; Alice Kuller, Treas.; Shirley Cantor, Membership Outreach; Janet Slifkin, Ellen Reichbaum, Robin Weinstein, Events; Cathy Frank, Communications; Norma Ziskind, Corr. Secy.; Shirley Cantor, Card Sales.

PARKWAY JEWISH CENTER 300 Princeton Dr. Pittsburgh, PA 15235 412-823-4338 • Fax: 412-823-4338 Web site:www.parkwayjewishcenter.com E-mail: parkwayjc@verizon.net Cantor Richard Berlin, Spiritual Leader; Robert Korfin, Pres.; Laurie Barnett Levine, Sisterhood Pres.

PASTE Pittsburgh Association of Synagogue and Temple Executives Joel Don Goldstein, FSA, President (Tree of Life*Or L'Simcha); Bill Padnos, Program Chair (Temple Sinai); Jeffrey Herzog, FTA (Rodef Shalom); Steve Hecht, Treasurer (Temple Beth El); Jill Rook, (Adat Shalom); Saralouise Reis (Temple Emanuel); Ed Smith (Ohav Shalom), Members.

PITTSBURGH AREA JEWISH COMMITTEE PAJC 4905 Fifth Ave., Suite #5 Pittsburgh, PA 15213 412-605-0816 Web site: www.pajc.net E-mail: pajc@pajc.net Marshall Dayan, Pres.; Eva Blum, Chair; Ray Baum, Marla Perlman, Dan Resnick, V.P.'s; Michael Goldstein, Treasurer; Deborah Fidel, Esq., Exec. Dir.; Susan Simons, Coord. Youth Progs.

PITTSBURGH CONFERENCE OF JEWISH WOMEN’S ORGANIZATIONS 102 Ohio Ave. Glassport, PA 15045 412-672-3979 Dena Chottiner, Pres.; Sheila Cohen, Connie Pollack, Carol Wolsh, V.P.’s; Karen Egorin, Rec. Secy.; Ann Gould, Corr. Secy.; Judy Kornblith Kobell, Treas.; Diana Spodek, Aud.; Beverly Americus, Fin. Secy.


18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

ORGANIZATION DIRECTORY PITTSBURGH JEWISH PUBLICATION & EDUCATION FOUNDATION (THE JEWISH CHRONICLE) 5915 Beacon Street 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217-2005 412-687-1000 • Fax: 412-521-0154 Web site: www.thejewishchronicle.net E-mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net Richard Kitay, Pres.; Cindy Goodman-Leib, V.P.; Larry Honig, Secy.; Andrew Schaer, Treas.; Davida Fromm, Past Pres.; Davida Fromm, Past Pres.; Carolyn Hess Abraham, Brian Balk, Daniel Berkowitz, Lynn Cullen, Milton Eisner, Stephen Fienberg, Malke Frank, David Grubman, Thomas Hollander, Evan Indianer, David Levine, Ari Lightman, Mitchell Pakler, Amy Platt., Benjamin Rosenthal, Board Members.

PLISKOVER ASSOCIATION, INC. P.O. Box 8237 Pittsburgh, PA 15217 E-mail: pliskover@pliskover.com Web site: www.pliskover.com Irv Weiner, Pres,; Paul Weiner, V.P.; Ann Gould, Fin. V.P.; Jared Kaufman, Media Services V.P.; Cheryl Kaufman, Treas.; Honey Forman, Rec. Secy.; Barbara Rosenzweig, Corr. Secy.; Marilyn Brody, Cookie Danovitz, Ron Gould, Ernie Pearl, Bud Roth, Kimball Rubin, Frank Rubin, Gloria Shapiro, At Large Brd. Members.

CONGREGATION POALE ZEDECK 6318 Phillips Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-9786 Web site: pzonline.org E-mail: info@pzonline.org Leonard Plotkin, Pres.; James Joshowitz, 1st V.P.; Dr. Ya’aqov Abams, 2nd V.P.; Joel Ungar, 3rd V.P.; Aron Pfeffer, Fin. Secy.; Bonnie Linzer, Rec. Secy.

POALE ZEDECK SISTERHOOD Anita Kornblit, Judy Mendelson, Chaya Pollack, Liora Weinberg, Presidium; Marilyn Swedarsky, Donor V.P.; Raye Felder, Program V.P.; Michelle Goldwasser, Ali Tuchman, Membership V.P.’s; Betty Kane, Rec. Secy.; Marcia Robkin, Fin. Secy.; Betty Kane, Judy Meyers, Social Secy.’s; Gladys Tabachnick, Treas.

POALE ZEDECK MEN’S CLUB Sidney Silverman, Pres.; Norm Tabachnick, V.P.; William Hoffman, Treas.; Al Dubinsky, Secy.

RAUH JEWISH ARCHIVES Senator JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER 1212 Smallman St. Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412-454-6406 • Fax: 412-454-6028 Judith R. Robinson, Chair Advisory Com.; Susan M. Melnick, Archivist.

RIVERVIEW TOWERS APARTMENTS 52 Garetta St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-521-7876 • Fax 412-325-7041 http://www.riverviewtowers.com Gregory A. Weingart, Pres.; Mitchell Pakler, V.P.; Herb Wolfson, Treas.; David Ainsman, Peter Brown, Robin Elson, Allison Feldstein, Shirley Forbes, Jeffrey Herzog, Rebecca Bachner Lasus, Lynette Lederman, Barry Roth, Mark Simon, Peter Smerd, Susan Wolf, Lou Zeiden, Dir.’s; Hanna Steiner, Exec. Dir.; Karen Hochberg, Immed. Past Pres.

RODEF SHALOM BROTHERHOOD Alan Cabin, Pres.; Richard Meritzer, Exec. V.P.; Ed Mandell, David Serbin, V.P.’s; Mark Stone, Treas.; Al Rosenfeld, Rec. Secy.

RODEF SHALOM SISTERHOOD Beth Frost, Pres.; Elaine Rybski, Exec. V.P.; Rochelle Sufrin, Janet Ocel, Pam Harbin, V.P.’s; Renice Binstock, Corr. Secy.; Elizabeth Clewett, Asst. Corr. Secy.; Cindi Drofzaun, Rec. Secy.; Barbi Mendlowitz, Asst. Rec. Secy.; Colleen Wolfson, Treas.; Gladys Maharam, Asst. Treas.; Fran Lefkowitz, Fin. Advisor.

SHAARE TORAH CONGREGATION 2319 Murray Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-8855 • Fax: 412-521-9938 Rabbi: 412-377-1769 Web site: www.shaaretorah.net E-mail: ShaareTora@aol.com Daniel E. Wasserman, Rabbi; Eliezer M. Shusterman, Assoc. Rabbi; Eddie Shaw, Pres.; Jonathan Young, V.P.; Erik Cooper, Secy.; Kira Sunshine, Treas.; Brian Cynamon, Gabbai; Mrs. Shirley Dorsey, Sisterhood Pres.

THE SHAARE TORAH SISTERHOOD Shirley Dorsey, Pres.; Florence Black, 1st V.P.; Hannah Dorsey, 2nd V.P.; Sharon Snider, 3rd V.P.; Renee Rockman, Rec. Secy.; Elinor Young, Asst. Rec. Secy.; Elinor Young, Corr. Secy.; Barbara Cynamon, Fin. Secy.; Florence Black, Treas.

TEMPLE B’NAI ISRAEL 2025 Cypress Dr., White Oak, PA 15131 412-678-6181 • Fax: 412-896-6513 Web site: www.tbiwhiteoak.org E-mail: tbioffice@gmail.com or Paul Tuchman, Rabbi; Richard Leffel, Pres.; Lindi Kendal, V.P.; Shirley Gernsback, Secy.; Stephen Klein, Treas.

TEMPLE DAVID CONGREGATION 4415 Northern Pike, Monroeville, PA 15146 412-372-1200 • Fax: 412-372-0485 Weiger Religious School 412-372-1206 Web site: www.templedavid.org E-mail: tdoffice@templedavid.org Rabbi Barbara Symons, Education Dir. /Rabbi; Jason Z. Edelstein, Rabbi Emeritus; Beverly Reinhardt, Office Mgr.; Rabbi Barbara Symons, Prncpl.; Barbara Fisher, Religious School Admin. Assist.; Norman Chapman, Choir Dir.; Robert Bell, Pres.; Andrew Schmitt, Exec. V.P.; James Jones, Fin. V.P.; Reena Goldberg, Religious School V.P.; Jay Goodman, Worship & Ritual Practices V.P.; Mark White, Past Pres.; Harvey Wolfe, Comptroller; Steve Lippock, Secy.; Phillip Sulkin, Brotherhood Pres.; Lisa Chotiner, Sisterhood Pres.; Aviva Symons, Youth Group Pres.

TEMPLE EMANUEL OF SOUTH HILLS 1250 Bower Hill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15243-1380 412-279-7600 • Fax: 412-279-7628 Web site: www.templeemanuelpgh.org Mark Joel Mahler, Rabbi; Jessica E. Locketz, Assoc. Rabbi; Saralouise Reis, FTA Exec. Dir.; Nan Simon, ECDC Dir.; Lynn Richards, Pres.; Marcy Bernson, Eric Bernstein, Jesse Sweet, Lori Shure, V.P.’s; Beth Erlanger, Peggy Kindler, Jane Kogan, Jill Mandelblatt, Fin. Secy.’s; Matt Schwartz, Treas.; David Weisberg, Asst. Treas.; Leah Rubenstein, Secy.; Todd Kart, Brotherhood Pres.

RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION 4905 Fifth Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15213-2953 412-621-6566 • Fax: 412-687-1977 Web site: http://www.rodefshalom.org E-mail: info@rodefshalom.org Aaron B. Bisno, Sharyn H. Henry, Amy B. Hertz, Rabbis; Dr. Walter Jacob, Rabbi Emeritus & Sr. Scholar; Donald L. Simon, Pres.; Ann B. Roth, Sr. V.P.; Richard S. Simon, Harlan Stone, V.P.’s; John S. Spear, Secy.; Janice B. Henry, Asst. Secy.; David A. Strassburger, Treas.; Eric Kruman, Asst. Treas.; Jeffrey S. Herzog, Exec. Dir.

TEMPLE OHAV SHALOM 8400 Thompson Run Rd. Allison Park, PA 15101 412-369-0900 • Fax 412-369-0699 Web site: www.templeohavshalom.org E-mail: esmith@templeohavshalom.org Art Donsky, Rabbi; Amanda Russell, Music & Youth Coord.; Ed Smith, Admin.; Bonnie Valinsky, Preschool Dir.; Jackie Leicht, Admin. Ass’t. & Bookkeeper; Richard Knabel, Custodian; Ralph Karsh, Pres.; Ken Eisner, Exec. V.P.-Admin.; Bob Gibbs, Treas; Reggi Levin, V.P. Lifelong Learning; Andrea

Jacobs, V.P. Preschool; Larry Goldberg, V.P. Youth; Rebecca Mason, V.P. Membership; Alysia Knapp, V.P. Fundraising; Maury Locke, V.P. Spiritual Enrichment; Chip Dougherty, V.P. Social Action; Kathy DiBiase, Past Pres.; Mike Rosenzweig, Rec. Secy.; Ken Knapp, Corr. Secy.; Mike Daninhirsch, Michelle Leavitt, Jim Levin, David Marx, Leslie Snow, Marti Swiger, Andi Turkheimer, At-Large; Kristi Karsh, Ellen Sapinkopf, WOS Reps.; Larry Goldberg, Men’s Club Pres.; Ali Karsh, Roz Knapp, Youth Rep.’s; Bill Lowenberger, Leadership Develop./Election Chair (ex-officio).

TEMPLE SINAI 5505 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-9715 • Fax: 412-421-8430 Web site: www.templesinaipgh.org E-mail: office@templesinaipgh.org James A. Gibson, Sr. Rabbi; Rabbi Ronald B.B. Symons, Dir. of Lifelong Learning; Sara Stock Mayo, Cantorial Soloist / Chaplain; William K. Padnos, Exec. Dir.; Marilee Glick, Ed. Dir.; David Hirsch, Pres.; Richard Kalson, 1st V.P.; Karen Levin, 2nd V.P.; Philip Lehman, 3rd V.P.; Saul Straussman, Secy.; John Schiller, Treas.; Nancy Gale, Asst. Treas.; Alison Yazer, Fin.Secy.; Deborah Dunton, Asst. Fin.Secy.; Ed Korenman, Immed. Past Pres.; Frank Schwarz, Past Pres.

TREE OF LIFE SYNAGOGUE P.O. Box 264 Uniontown, PA 15401 724-438-0801 E-mail: TreeofLifeSynagogue@hotmail.com Myrna Giannopoulos, Milton Kronick, Morton Opall, Co-Pres.’s.; Elaine Malyn, Secy.; Ralph Mazer, Treas.; Marsha Mazer, Chester Miller, Sam Simon, Bd. Members; Rosalie Opall, Shirley Radman, Sisterhood Rep.; Dr. Perry Haalman, Spiritual Leader.

TREE OF LIFE*OR L’SIMCHA CONGREGATION 5898 Wilkins Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217-1299 412-521-6788 • Fax 412-521-7846 Website: www.tolpgh.org E-mail: tolpgh@aol.com Chuck Diamond, Rabbi; Alvin K. Berkun, Rabbi Emeritus; Joel Don Goldstein, FSA, Exec. Dir.; Shelly Schapiro, Principal; Corey Gross, Dir. of Youth Services; Paula Garret, Suzanne Schreiber, Co-Pres.’s; Fred Davis, Craig Frischman, Ben Simon, Julie Stern, Daniel Weiner, V.P.’s; Adam Berger, Robin Friedman, Bonnie Silverman, Members at Large; Michael Eisenberg, Treas.; Irwin Harris, Secy; Alan Gordon, Lou Weiss Immed. Past Pres.’s.

TREE OF LIFE*OR L’SIMCHA SISTERHOOD Mickie Diamond, Pres.; Terrie Myer, Finance V.P.; , Bernice Simon, Education, V.P.; Mary Dawn Edwards, Mary Dawn Edwards, Fin. V.P.; Rec. Secy. & Treas.; Sylvia Moidel, Fin. Secy.; Gertrude Marcuson, Ina Sable, Corr. Secy.’s; Sharon Weisberg, Aud.; Marlene Haus, Patricia Lemer, Iris Nahemow, Bd. members

TREE OF LIFE*OR L’SIMCHA MEN’S CLUB Irwin Harris, Pres.; Bob Fierstein, Harry Abrams, Michael Eisenberg, V.P.’s; Harold Segal, Secy.; David Lilien, Treas.; David Dinkin, Chair, Ritual Comm.

✡ TRI-STATE REGION FEDERATION OFJEWISH MEN’S CLUBS, INC. Warren Sufrin; Pres.; Michael Rosenberg, V.P.; Cliff Spungen, Treas.; Robert Zaremberg, Rec. Secy.; Rabbi Alex Greenbaum, Spiritual Adv.; Marc Berliner, Irwin Harris, Bud Kahn, Brian Moidel, Dan Stein, V.P.’s

✡ YESHIVA SCHOOLS 2100 Wightman St. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-422-7300 Fax: 412-422-5930 E-mail: mail@yeshivaschools.com Website: www.yeshivaschools.com Rabbi Yisroel Rosenfeld, Dean; William C. Rudolph, Chair. of the Brd; Howard Balsam, Shlomo Jacobs, Pres.’s; Charles Saul, V.P.; Fred Rock, Treas.

✡ YOUNG JUDAEA WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA REGION 1824 Murray Ave. Pittsburgh, PA 15217 412-421-8919 E-mail: bcpittsburgh@hadassah.org Zandra Goldberg, Pres. Hadassah Greater Pgh.; Karen Morris, Youth Comm.

✡ YOUNG PEOPLES SYNAGOGUE 6404 Forbes. Ave P.O. Box 8141 Pittsburgh, PA 15217-8141 412-648-2419 Web Site: yps-pgh.org E-mail: mhershb100@aol.com Marshall Hershberg, Pres.; Marc Pomerantz, V.P.; Rebecca Spiegel, Secy.; Theodore Stern, Treas.

✡ ZIONIST ORGANIZATION OF AMERICA Pittsburgh District 6507 Wilkins Avenue-Suite 102 Pittsburgh, PA 15217-1367 412-665-4630 Email: stuart.pavilack@zoa.org Stuart V. Pavilack, Exec. Dir.; Ira Michael Frank, Pres.; Zalman Shapiro PhD, Chairman Emeritus; Lawrence N. Paper, Esq., Jeffrey L. Pollock, Esq., Michael Vanyukov PhD, V.P.’s; Marion Taube, Treas.; Marian Salamon, Rec. Secy.; Ruth Solomon, Corr. Secy.; Phyllis Silverman, Scholarship Com. Chrwmn.; Jeanne Bair, Membership Com. Chrwmn.

ORGANIZATIONS!

For information about arranging for space in the Organization Directory, please call Josh at 412-687-1000. The updating of the directory is the responsibility of each individual organization. All changes must be mailed to The Jewish Chronicle, 5915 Beacon Street, 3rd Flr., Pittsburgh, PA 15217; faxed 412-521-0154; or e-mailed joshr@thejewishchronicle.net.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 19

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20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

METRO Rosenblatt: Continued from page 8. were active in federation, chances are there would be more attention given to the day school agenda. In addition, the Orthodox perceive the mainstream Jewish organizations as having too liberal an agenda, championing a strong church-state divide, for example, when many parents of day school children would prefer vouchers or some other form of government financial aid.

As society has become more open, religious families are increasingly conservative, culturally as well as politically. It’s true of Americans in general, and it certainly holds among Jews. Orthodox families often are resistant to sending their children to universities where coed dorms, sexual experimentation, drinking and drugs are common. And while the majority of American Jews admire the Orthodox for their commitment to Torah study and observance, and preserving family and tradition, they also feel alienated from their very different worldview,

seen as sheltered and parochial. That love-hate feeling works both ways, with Orthodox Jews regarding the high intermarriage and assimilation rates among most of American Jewry as a disregard for essential Jewish values and deeply disturbing in terms of the future. A number of surveys show that with Orthodox women averaging between 3.3 and 7.9 children (the more observant, the more children) as compared to 1.86 for other Jewish women, it won’t be too long before the Orthodox become the majority of an American Jewish community that will continue

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(Gary Rosenblatt, editor and publisher of The New York Jewish Week, can be reached at Gary@jewishweek.org. This column previously appeared in the Week.)

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to decline in overall numbers. Whether or not anything can be done to stem the growing divide within and among our people, at least we should be more aware of it, and talk about it. There are discussion groups between Jews and Christians, and Jews and Muslims; how about a few more between Orthodox Jews and the rest of the community?

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 21

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE 5915 BeaCon ST., 3rd Flr., PiTTSBurgh, Pa 15217 HELP WANTED

POSITION WANTED

USY ADVISOR, Beth EL Congregation vibrant conservative synagogue in Pittsburgh’s South Hill seeks youth advisor for its awardwinning USY Chapter. The ideal candidate has a strong Jewish background & experienced working with teenagers. Must be able to coordinate local programming and interface with other chapters in region. Time commitment averages 6-10 weekly hours. Send resume and letter of interest to Mindy Hutchinson, mbbh043@yahoo.com. ••• HOLIDAY DINNER Server & Kitchen help needed in Sq. Hill home on 12/23 – 12/25, experience helpful. Reply nbeassistant@verizon.net or 412-421-8498. ••• NEED SOMEONE to do ironing & light housework. References needed, call 412-889-5960 between 3 pm & 5 pm. ••• HOME INSTEAD SENIOR Care needing week-end caregivers. Rewarding work with seniors, make a difference in the life of an elderly person by joining our #1 non. Medical team of caregivers. Car is required, training is provided, Flexible schedule, all shifts EOE. 412-731-0733.

HOME HEALTH CARE specialist in hospice, dialysis & direct care. Will work any shift. Call Patricia Spencer 412-229-8760. ••• BOYD COMMUNITY Service proving personal care, transportation, light housekeeping, meal preparation & shopping. Reasonable rates and hourly services. Contact Sonya Boyd 412-731-0279. ••• CAREGIVER/ Caring Hands, Personal Touch Elder Care. Experienced with references & reasonable rates. Call 412-841-0146. •••

POSITION WANTED THE CARE REGISTRY, INC provides nurse aides and companions to offer one on one care for you in your home. The workers are screened and bonded. All shifts and live in care available. The Care Registry is licensed by the PA Dept. of Health. Low rates! Care management also available. 412-421-5202 or www.TheCareRegistry.com ••• CAREGIVER CONNECTION A PA. Licensed home-care registry, Jewish Family & Children’s Service refers screened, JF&CS trained caregivers providing short/long-term personal care services to seniors at affordable rates. Available 24/7, call 412-422-0400 or 877-243-1530 (toll free). ••• CAREGIVER AVALIABLE to take care of your loved one. Reliable with references. 412-418-8511.

MALE CAREGIVER looking to take care of your male love one. References, Act 33/34 clearance & years of experience working with Stroke, Dementia & Parkinson’s, call 412-805-5375. ••• EXPERIENCED CAREGIVER Available 24/7, excellent references. Trained in First Aid & CPR, all clearances. 412224-0439. ••• CAREGIVER AVAILABLE with 20 years’ experience, excellent references, reliable transportation, NS, clearances. Available some evenings, will do light cooking. 412-793-7468. ••• LAUNDRY & IRONING & also available to do home or office cleaning, clean out basement, garage or yard .References 412-390-9151.

BUYING AUTO/TRUCKS/ JUNK REMOVAL SELLING & BUYING Auto’s & JUNK Removal. Cars, Trucks, Vans, SUVs, Quit Driving, Death, Wrecks, Antiques, Classics & Junkers. FREE Legal Title Transfer! Vehicle Removal from Your Property. Denny Offstein Auto Sales 724-287-7771. Paying Cash, Honest Fair Prices!

CHAIR CANING CANE & ABLE Chair caning, hand pre-woven cane rush reed & wicker repaired. Reasonable rates pick up & deliver. Charyl Hays 412-655-0224.

COMPUTER NICE JEWISH Boy, offering the full range of computer services, from advising and teaching to repair and support. I will come to your house or apartment, fix any problem you’re having & teach you what you need to know to use it. I have 14 years’ experience working with people of all ages. . No job is too large or small, and nobody is too computer illiterate. (Really) CALL JASON 412-401-1204, or visit my web www.computerwizard.us. References available.

DRIVER NEED A RIDE? Call Norm, he will drive you. Doctors, shopping, anything that needs to be done. Experienced, insured, great references and reasonable rates. Available le for airport pickup or departure. Norm 412-521-6999.

FOR SALE STAIR LIFT 12 step stair lift in excellent condition. $750.00 contact 412276-7235.

MUSICAL ENTERTAINMENT THE HOT MATZOHS, Pittsburgh’s #1 Klezmer Band, is available for your Wedding, Bar/Bat Mitzvah, Corporate or other special event! The dynamic band, featuring violinist Barbara Lowenstein (founder), offers many styles of music in addition to Klezmer, e,g, classical, jazz, swing and folk. Call 412-344-3338 or 412-3030746. e-mail: barbsviolin@gmail.com.

PLASTERING PLASTER/PAINTING Marbleized painting & drywall, free estimates, excellent references. Call Herzel 412422-5486.

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TORAH ‘From darkness to light’ Portion of the Week RABBI AMY B. HERTZ RODEF SHALOM CONGREGATION Veyeshev, Genesis 37:1-40:23

In this week’s Torah portion, Vayeshev, our patriarch Jacob learns of the supposed death of his beloved son Joseph. In point of fact, Joseph is not actually dead, but rather has been sold into slavery by his brothers. Still, Jacob’s reactions to the reports of Joseph’s death are no less fraught with real emotion and intense grief. Upon seeing evidence of his son’s death, namely Joseph’s torn, tattered and bloodied coat of many colors, Jacob rents his clothes, dresses himself in sackcloth, and mourns his son yamim rabim (many days). Jacob is inconsolable, even by those closest to him. His other children try to comfort him. And yet, as the Torah tells us, Jacob is unable l’hitnachem, to be comforted at the loss of Joseph. Jacob believes that he will go to his own grave still mourning this profound loss. Like Jacob, we are often overwhelmed with sadness and grief when someone we love dies. We may feel as though we aren’t going to make it, that

life will never be normal again, that we will always be broken, or that we will never experience life with joy and without sadness. These feelings can be hard to bear sometimes. In truth, when someone we love dies, the pain of that loss does not go away; it changes. Or, as Rabbi David Wolpe so beautifully writes, “There is no magic answer to loss. Nothing, not even time, will make the pain completely disappear. But loss is transformative if it is met with faith. Faith is our chance to make sense of loss, to cope with the stone that rolls around in the hollow of our stomachs when something we loved, something we thought was forever, is suddenly gone.” I have found this to be true in my own life. Though difficult, Judaism encourages us to cultivate faith even in times of loss, fear and great sadness. That is our perennial challenge … to truly believe that we can move from narrow places to freedom, from despair to hope, from darkness to light. May we always remember this and believe it to be true. Shabbat Shalom. And may your Chanuka be filled with limitless light.

(This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

LEGAL NOTICES Letters of Administration of Testamentary Letter of Administration of the Estate of Frances J. Bradosky, Jr., deceased, of Pittsburgh, Allegheny County, PA No. 021106184 have been granted to April Lewis, 376 Wall Ave., Wall, PA 15148, who requests that all persons having claims against the Estate of this Decedent make known the same in writing to her or her attorney, Thomas E. Pandaleon, Esq., 6824

Thomas Blvd., Pittsburgh, PA 15208, and all persons indebted to this Decedent make payment to the same. 3Th 030, 023, 016 ESTATE NOTICES Letters have been granted on the estate of each of the following decedents to the personal representative named, who requests all persons having claims against the estate of the decedent to make known the same in writing to him or his attorney, and all

persons indebted to the decedent to make payment to him without delay: CLAIR, Sidney, a/k/a Clair, Sidney Sholem, deceased, of Pittsburgh, PA, Allegheny County; No. 07006 of 2011 or to: Ira Clair, Executor, 2719 West Chase Avenue, Chicago, IL 60645 c/o Gail Kraut, Esq., Greenfield & Kraut, 1040 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15219-6201. 3Th 023, 016, 009

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22 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

OBITUARY DAVIS: On Tuesday, Dec. 6, 2011, Sylvia J. Davis, 91; beloved wife of the late Herbert J. Davis; mother of Barbara Davis-Adams and Scott Kuyk, Gloria L. Calkins, and the late Jack E. Davis; daughter of the late Jacob and Mollie Smith; loving grandmother of Bryan and Becca Adams, Jessica Adams, Mark and Mara (Liebling) Addison, Greg and Debbie Liebling; greatgrandmother of Mollie Addison and Joseph Liebling; sister of Herman and Manene Smith, Della Weiss, and her late and cherished sisters Rose Rubin Selkowitz and Ethel Ritt; also survived by many beloved nieces and nephews. Services were held at Beth Abraham Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Alzheimer's Association, PO Box 96011, Washington, DC 20090-6011. Arrangements by D'Alessandro Funeral Home, LTD, 4522 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com

LEVINE: On Sunday, Dec. 11, 2011, Stuart M. Levine; beloved husband of Gina Favish Levine; loving father of Melanie, Stephanie and Ellie; son of the late Rabbi Joseph (Elinore) Levine; brother of Alissa (Roy) Page of Colo.; uncle of Cassidy and Jeremy; nephew of Rabbi Baruch (Corrine) Levine and Bonnie Cohen. Services and interment were held at Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Jewish National Fund, 5915 Beacon Street, 5th Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com SIMON: On Sunday, Dec. 4, 2011, James Carey Simon, 89, originally of McKeesport, Pa.; humble, unfailingly kind, calm. These words only begin to describe James Carey Simon, a true patriarch to his family. Mr. Simon died unexpectedly at his home on Sunday, Dec. 4 at age 89. James was born in McK-

eesport, Pa., the youngest of three children of Abraham Simon, dean of the McKeesport legal establishment, and Edith Firestone, who played in the ladies' orchestra. Jim was the ultimate Boy Scout leader. He was always trying to do the right thing. Jimmy, as he was always called, was passionate about airplanes from a young age, landing his pilot's license before his driver's license. One aunt always promised she would buy him an airplane when he was old enough. A few years later, he tried to collect. No such luck. Jim graduated from Shady Side Academy, which he attended with his brother, Henry. In 1942, he graduated from Penn State University with a degree in English literature. He met the love of his life, Shirley Jaskol, of Clairton, Pa., in an elevator at the University of Pittsburgh's Cathedral of Learning. They married in September 1948 and were inseparable the next 63 years until Mr. Simon's death -- JimandShirley as one word. One defining event of Jim's life was serving as a 1st Lieutenant in the U.S. Air Force during WWII. He served in the 486th Bomb Squadron, in England, from May 1944 to August 1945. A daring co-pilot on B17s, he was a true American hero, flying more than 35 missions over Germany. He received several medals in-

cluding a 7 Oak Leaf Cluster. Jim and Shirley had three children. Thomas and his wife, Kate, both medical doctors, gave the couple comfort, happiness and two grandchildren, Mark and Jennifer. Though rarely prone to bragging, Jim would talk about his grandchildren's many achievements. It was a quiet pride. Alan, the second child, and his wife, Jeanette, made them laugh and entertained them with music, cooking and gardening. The youngest, Robin, to whom he will always be daddy, lived next door. Jim so loved having her close by. Jim was an avid golfer, often frustrated by that little white ball. He was proud of two two! hole-in-ones. He was an active member at Temple Emanuel in Beverly Hills, Calif., and served on the Municipal League and city planning commissions for many years. His life work ranged from selling airplane parts to real estate appraising. An environmentalist before his time, he often rode his bicycle to work the same bicycle for 40 years. Mr. Simon is survived by his wife, Shirley, three children, spouses and grandchildren. He is also survived by his sister, Alma Simon Balter, of Fort Lauderdale. He was her rock, as he was for Alma's daughter, his niece, Margie Balter.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011 — 23

METRO Curriculum: Continued from page 2. include photos of the subjects, discussions of their lives and archival items related to their accomplishments. There also will be a genealogy component. • Middle school students will study the “assimilation” of Jewish Pittsburgh. Archival photos from the Irene Kaufmann Settlement will address activities through which Jewish youth and adults were Americanized, such as dances and baseball games. Students will be asked what is American about the activities they see and what, if anything, remains Jewish. “The kids are challenged to see what the changes are,” Melnick said, adding, “how they became Americans.” • High school students will do a series of interviews with senior citizens. They will select topics then interview seniors about their experiences related to those subjects. The high school students will use archival websites of the University of Pittsburgh, National Council of Jewish Women Pittsburgh Section, Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project and the Rauh for their research. The Rauh website, which will be launched in January, will also host the curriculum. “There will be an education page on it [the Rauh website] and those packages will be there,” Melnick said. “We hope it will be used in the Jewish schools and possibly used more generally to teach kids about our history.” None of the three units is excessively long, she added. “It’s very limited in time, so it wouldn’t take a semester. It would take a few lessons, and we’re very

Karp: Continued from page 2. sometime in the spring to honor her. Karp works as a youth director at Beth El Congregation of the South Hills, where her husband is a Torah reader. She was recruited 14 years ago by Tsipy Gur to work at the AJL, then known as the Jewish Education Institute. “She was looking for someone for my position,” Karp recalled. Gur was talking to someone at Beth El who recommended me, so that started the process.” “We saw an incredible rise in the in-

excited about that.” Barak Naveh and Melissa Werbow developed the curriculum, which is part of the centennial celebration of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh. Naveh and Werbow were given wide discretion, Naveh said, though they understood the subjects of the lesson plan couldn’t be obscure figures in Jewish history. “It had to be [about] people for whom they had a lot of pictures and documents, which makes sense,” Naveh said. “You want the kids to access that, and you want the Heinz History Center to be involved with this.” He hopes teachers and students continue to develop and enhance the curriculum once it’s made available online. “We want this curriculum to be a living, breathing thing that both teachers and students love — and teachers don’t love a script,” Naveh said. “I think creative teachers love an outline and good ideas, and direction to good resources, and that’s what I hope we provided.” He also hopes the students find parallels between the history they study and their own lives. For example, he emphasized the importance of dealing with the assimilation of Jews in the middle school unit. “When you’re in middle school, fitting in versus being your own person is a huge issue,” Naveh said. “So we felt that was really important and really relevant. … They could ask questions [about historical subjects] they’re probably asking of themselves.”

(Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

terest for adult Jewish education over the last 15 years, which I think is consistent with other cities,” she continued. “It’s a national trend. I think we were instrumental in bringing creative programs to Pittsburgh at a time when they were looking for new challenges.” Karp doesn’t know yet what she will be doing in Chicago, where she and husband, Dan, began married life. Although, “I will … be looking to working for the Jewish community in Chicago, because that’s my passion.” (Lee Chottiner can be reached at leec@thejewishchronicle.net.)

We acknowledge with grateful appreciation contributions from the following: Donor

In MeMory of

RUTH ALTSHULER......BELLE & NATHAN BENNETT DAVID & PHYLLIS BERTENTHAL ......................SYDNEY BERTENTHAL MARILYN G. BLATT-FENNER ...............ROSE BLATT FAYE J. BLEIBERG........................MAX MALLINGER FAYE J. BLEIBERG ..................BESSIE M. BLEIBERG MENDEL BROOKNER ....................ABE BROOKNER FLORENCE BURECHSON ..........................HERBERT BURECHSON FLORENCE BURECHSON ................SARAH SCHOR DR. & MRS.HOWARD COHEN & FAMILY...................................................IDA C. WISE PHYLLIS R. COHEN..........................ABE M. COHEN SUZANNE FALK..............................CAROLINE FALK BEN FINESOD..................................ESSIE FINESOD MARILYN GALBRAITH..........MELVIN SILBERBLATT ROGER S. GALLET............................LOUIS GALLET NATALIE SANDS GEMINDER ..........BESSIE SANDS NATALIE SANDS GEMINDER ...............................MARY WEINERMAN JEAN C. GERSHON ............................ROSE COHEN GERALD GOLD ............................THEODORE GOLD MARILYN GOLDMAN .....................RALPH SWARTZ EVA & HARLAN HANDLER .............CELIA KADDELL MR. & MRS. EDWIN HEPNER ........PEARL HERMAN MR. & MRS. EDWIN HEPNER..........ZELDA SPARKS HEPNER JERRIE JOHNSON...............................ABE MULLEN CELE KANSELBAUM .........ARNOLD KANSELBAUM LARRY & ROBIN KANSELBAUM...................ARNOLD KANSELBAUM JILL M. KLEIN.......................................YETTA KLEIN RUTH KLEIN ............SYLVIA PORTNOY MORETSKY HAROLD D. LENCHNER ...........ALBERT LENCHNER HARRIETTE R. LIBENSON.......................HAROLD J. RUBENSTEIN HARRIETTE R. LIBENSON ..........FANNIE KATZMAN RUBENSTEIN

Donor

In MeMory of

HARRIETTE R. LIBENSON ...........................LOUIS J. RUBENSTEIN HARRIETTE R. LIBENSON..........................ERWIN L. RUBENSTEIN JOYCE & LEN MANDELBLATT .......................LOUIS B. SUPOWITZ JEROME MATTES....................LUELLA M. MATTES JEROME MATTES.........................MORRIS MARTIN JEROME MATTES .............................RUTH MARTIN SUSAN & MELVIN MELNICK ...................................ANNA NATTERSON PAULA R. OHRINGER ...............PHILLIP GOODMAN RITA H. REESE .....................DR. EDWARD F. REESE RUTHE REICH.............................JACOB L.SURLOFF MARION & MORRIS RIEMER......LENA & LOUIS REIMER BORIS ROKHKIND........................ROSA ROKHKIND MARC ROSENSTEIN .......................LILLIAN COHEN JAMES C. RUTHRAUFF..............CHARLOTTE JUNE RUTHRAUFF AMY B. SCHLESINGER .........................NORMAN H. SCHLESINGER CARYN I. SCHLESINGER ......................NORMAN H. SCHLESINGER BERNARD SCHMITT...............MARCIA E. SCHMITT JEAN D. SIEGEL.............................FREDA ABRAMS OWEN S. SIMON................ETHEL SIMON COOPER VIOLET SOFFER..................................IDA L. GUSKY BARBARA & ROBERT SOLTZ ............HARRY SOLTZ SONYA SYDNEY ............................MAX SHULMAN SONYA SYDNEY ........................ELLA MARKOWITZ SYBIL WEIN..............................DOROTHY ABRAMS GOLDIE W. WEISS...........RAYMOND D. WEINBERG MARCIA J. WEISS........................ANNE C. WEISS & DR. LOUIS WEISS JUDI WOLF .................................LILLIAN SHERMER SUSAN M. ZEFF...............HARRY & REBECCA ZEFF SUSAN M. ZEFF ................................DEANNA ZEFF LOU ZEIDEN.........................................MAX ZEIDEN

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 18: SUSAN BAROTZ, IRVING I. CHICK" BOGDAN", VICTOR CHESTERPAL, MARC LEON FRONT, GUSSIE W. KELLER, RAE KLEINERMAN, MEYER LEBOVITZ, HON BENJAMIN LENCHER, DR. HYMAN LEVINSON, HYMAN DR LEVINSON, HYMAN LEVY, HERMAN LITTLESTONE, FANNIE MALKIN, MAX MALLINGER, ALBERT MARCHAND, LOUIS MENZER, JENNIE S. MINTZ, JOSHUA L. PAUL, FANNIE RICE, SELIG A. ROSENFIELD, FREDA SACKS, SEMA SARBIN, KALMAN SCHECHTER, BERNARD SHULGOLD, MARVIN L. SILVERBLATT, SELDA SIMON, HARRIET SISSER, ROSE SPECTOR, FREDDY STERN, HERMAN STERN, STANLEY SUNSHINE, SAM SWARTZ, ALEXANDER I. VAYSBERG, ESTHER R. WECHSLER, BELLE WEINSTEIN, BENJAMIN WIKES. MONDAY, DECEMBER 19: JULIUS BERLINER, JACOB BRAUN, FANNIE CHATKIN, FLORENCE MEYERS CLOVSKY, DAVE COHEN, SAM COHEN, LEONARD SAMUELS FINKELHOR, EDWARD L. FRIEDMAN, REBECCA FRISHOF, ALFRED KRAUSE, BORIS KUNST, WILLIAM AARON KUNTZ, ESTHER LATOFSKY, LOUIS J. LAWRENCE, MAX LEMELMAN, DORA LEVIN, PEARL B. LEWIN, HARRY LEWIS, VICTOR MEYER, PAUL LEONARD ORRINGER, SARAH YOUNG PRETTER, MABEL RECHT, HYMEN ROSENBERG, ABRAHAM G. ROSSEN, BENJAMIN ROTHMAN, EVA RUBENSTEIN, JOSEPH SCHWARTZ, ANNIE SEGALL, LILLIAN SHERMER, JACOB SMOLEVITZ, NATHAN STUTZ, ERNA SUESS, SAMUEL Z. UDMAN, LOUIS WASBUTZKY, I. BARNES WEINSTEIN, SYLVIA WEINSTEIN, BARNET WOLF. TUESDAY, DECEMBER 20: BENJAMIN AMERICUS, WILLIAM ARONOVITZ, FANNIE GERTRUDE BECKER, BELLE BENNETT, NATHAN BENNETT, JOSEPH BRAUNSTEIN, ALBERT BURSTIN, JACOB S. CHUSSITT, HANNAH COHEN, MEYER FINEBERG, BENJAMIN FINKELHOR, LOUIS FISHMAN, PHILIP HOFFMAN, HARRY KAWOLSKY, MILTON KUPERSTOCK, SAMUEL KURFEERST, SAMUEL LEFF, MAX LEVANT, MAX LEVENTON, BENJAMIN LEVIN, DR. A. J. LEVIN, ABRAHAM LINCOFF, JACOB LURIE, RAE M. MARTIN, DR. MORRIS MASER, ELLIOTT MURSTEIN, MILLIE MURSTEIN, HARRY PINSKY, BENJAMIN JACOB PLATT, SHIRLEY REISER, BELLE RICHMAN, LEON RYAVE, BENNETTE SADIGURSKY, ADOLPH SECHER, HANNA SELIGMANN, GEORGE SHRIBER, HARRY SIMON, FANNIE SOLOW, MOISHA SPECTOR, PHILIP STEIN, EDITH FINEGOLD WAPNER, SARAH SCHLEIFER WISE, PVT. LILLIAN WOLOVITZ, MAX ZEIDEN. WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 21: YANKEE BARBAKOW, ROSE LEVENTHAL BARRES, REBECCA BERNEY BERMAN, NATHAN MEYER CAHEN, ESSIE FINESOD, HYMEN GLICKMAN, RALPH HOFFMAN, HARRY KATZEN, BESSIE HILL KREMER, ISAAC LEVIN, IDA LUBOW, ROSE MARK, SYLVAN METH, MORRIS SAMUEL MOLTZ, MAX MONSEIN, CHUMA NOBEL, MOSES NOBEL, JULIA OPPENHEIMER, MAX OSGOOD, JOSEPH PECHERSKY, GOLDIE FANNIE RABINOVITZ, JOSEPH SIDNEY ROBIN, JOSEPH RUBIN, MARY R. SACHS, DOROTHY SAUL, NATHAN SAVITZ, DOROTHY WEISS SCHACHTER, BERTHA SCHLESINGER, JOSEPH SCHWARTZ, SYLVIA SNYDER SEALFON, BARNET SEDLER, YEHUDA SENZAL, BENJAMIN S. SHAPIRO, ISADORE SHERMER, ESTHER RAISEL SHRUT, ESTHER MINNIE STEIN, FANNIE STEIN, LOUIS SUGERMAN, RALPH MORRIS SWARTZ, CHARLES TILLMAN, MARY WEINERMAN, SOLON M. WEINTHAL, FREYDA ZENZAL. THURSDAY, DECEMBER 22: ROSE BLATT, REUBEN BLIWAS, RAYMOND COLE, LENA EISENBERG, JACOB ERENRICH, BIRDIE WEILER GREENBERG, EDITH GROBSTEIN, LEOPOLD KORNITZER, REBECCA MARCUS KRAMER, ROSELLA CHUSSITT KRAUS, CELIA LIBERMAN, PVT. JACK LINTON, THOMAS J. LIVINGSTON, ROSIE MARKOWITZ, ALFRED MEITNER, SARAH MERVIS, MORRIS MILLER, HENRY NEAMAN, ED NEWMAN, DASA NOWSKY, BEN PERLMAN, STELLA G. PERVIN, LOUIS RATNER, SADIE S. RICE, T/SGT. ISADORE RIDER, LOUIS RIEMER, JOHN ROTHSTEIN, LAWRENCE E. SCHACHTER, MARCIA E. SCHMITT, SARAH SCHOR, HERMAN SCHWARTZ, MARY SCHWARTZ, IRVING W. SHIFLET, LOUIS SKIRBOLL, CHARLES STEWART, ALEXANDER M. STUTZ, FANNIE WHITE, DAVE L. WYCKOFF. FRIDAY, DECEMBER 23: ELLA BRAEMER, MEYER COHEN, HARRY B. CRAMER, ANNE G. DIZNOFF, ESTHER H. FRIEDMAN, BENJAMIN GORDON, ALEXANDER GROSSMAN, JOSEPH GRUMER, SYLVIA RUDOV KLEIN, MAX KWELLER, NELLIE LEVENSON, IDA BUCK LEVY, HARRY LIEBERMAN, DAVID LIPKOVICH, P. A. LOVE, ALFRED (KURLIE) MILLER, ROSE MILLER, ESTHER MONHEIM, MARVIN MORRIS, REBECCA PEARLSTEIN, JONAS POSER, SOLOMON REICHER, JEANNETTE M. RICH, SAMUEL ROSENZWEIG, SOPHIE RUBEN, SIDNEY J. RUDOLPH, IMAN SAMUELS, NORMAN H. SCHLESINGER, DR. DONALD M. SCHWARTZ, MORRIS SERBIN, BESSIE SHERMAN, ESTHER B. SKIRBOLL, VIOLET SLESINGER, GOLDIE SOLOMON, MORRIS A. TAYLOR, LOUIS VENIG, PESHIE FEINERT ZASLOFF. SATURDAY, DECEMBER 24: FREDA ABRAMS, BENJAMIN BITTERFIELD, ROSE COHEN, ISAAC DOBKIN, STUART RICHARD HARRIS, ZELDA SPARKS HEPNER, WILLIAM L. KAPLAN, MORRIS L. KARP, FRANK LEVINE, KATIE FREDA LEVINE, MEYER LEVY, ELLA FARBER LIPMAN, RHODA LIPNER, BABETTA LIPPMAN, HELEN MARKOVITZ, HARRY MARSHALL, EVA S. MERVIS, RUTH MERVIS, RAY NATHAN, ISAAC OBERMAN, PAULINA OPPENHEIM, DANIEL PIMENTEL, HYMAN PLOTKIN, HERMINA GLUCK ROSENBERG, SAMUEL RUBIN, ISAAC SEDER, HENRY SEEGMAN, CSIPA SHAPIRO, MARC WELLS SHAPIRO, SARAH SHEFFLER, ELIZABETH SHERMAN, MOSES SKOLSKY, REVA STEIN, HENRY W. STONE, GEORGE J. TIGAR, RACHEL WECHSLER, GERTRUDE WERNER.


24 – †HE JEWISH CHRONICLE DECEMBER 15, 2011

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The Jewish Chronicle December 15, 2011