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Style Retro Review Last in series focuses on immigrant’s memoir

Page 10

JANUARY 19, 2012 tevet 24, 5772

Vol. 55, No. 36

Pittsburgh, PA

Typewriters to talking

$1.50

Jews tackle end-of-life issues through book, JHF program BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

NCCME photo

The typewriter exhibit at the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education.

Catholic Holocaust center aspires for dialogue with Jews BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

GREENSBURG — “What is the role of good people in difficult times?” The words are collaged and encrypted and printed outright across eight antique typewriters on display at the National Catholic Center for Holocaust Education (NCCHE). The typewriters are the Shoainspired sculpture project of art students. But the question itself remains at the core of NCCHE, located — of all places — at Seton Hill University, Greensburg. The NCCHE is tucked away in a modest two-room suite in the administration building of the university, a small, Catholic, liberal arts school with a student body numbering about 2,000. The unassuming quarters of NCCHE, however, belie its loftier purpose: to counter anti-Semitism and to foster Jewish-Catholic relations.

“It’s important for everybody to study the Holocaust,” said NCCHE’s founder, Sister Gemma Del Duca, speaking from her home in Jerusalem, where she has lived since 1975. “But in a special way, for Catholics it is important, because we have a long history with the Jewish people, much of which is a dark history.” After the Catholic renewal prompted by Vatican II under the direction of Pope John XXIII, leaders of the Church encouraged Catholics to study both the Holocaust, and the role of the Church during that time, said Del Duca. “After Vatican II, we knew we had to face this history, and to study this history together and separately, so a kind of reconciliation and dialogue can take place,” she said. “Without Catholics studying the Holocaust, it is hard to have an authentic conversation with the Jewish people.” Del Duca, who travels back and forth

between Israel and the United States to promote Holocaust education, founded the Center in 1987, after having lived in Israel for more than 10 years, working with Father Isaac Jacob, founder and director of Tel Gamaliel, a small center for JewishCatholic relations. “In the summer of 1987 I was back at Seton Hill for the summer assembly of the Sisters of Charity,” recalled Del Duca. “Shortly before I arrived, Dr. JoAnne Boyle had been inaugurated as the new president. And in a meeting with her I discussed the possibility of a program for educators, and especially faculty and staff from Catholic colleges and universities, who would come to Israel for Holocaust study, research, experience.” The NCCHE opened Nov. 10, 1987 — the anniversary of Kristallnact. Since then, the Please see Center, page 8.

Most people have no say in when they die. But almost everyone has a say in how they die. The key, as difficult as it may be, is planning ahead. “I’ve worked with some amazing people that have confronted some pretty unimaginable things,” said Dr. Michele Reiss, the Pittsburgh-based therapist who worked with Randy Pausch (author of “The Last Lecture”) and his wife, Jai. “We can learn from these heroes.” Reiss has chronicled many of these stories in her book “Lessons in Loss and Living.” The book also includes helpful strategies for those facing a serious illness, and to grieving family members. Working with Randy and Jai Pausch inspired Reiss to write her book, she said. Pausch was a professor of computer science, human computer interaction and design at Carnegie Mellon University. Diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in his mid-40s, he died 18 months later on July 25, 2008, leaving behind his wife and three young children. Yet Pausch maintained a positive attitude throughout his illness, according to Reiss, because he always remembered his blessings. “He was able to understand that the proverbial cup is always half empty and half full,” she said. “He never lost sight of the half full part.” Although not everyone is a born optimist, Reiss believes one can train oneself to appreciate the good in life, even in the face of death. She recommends maintaining a “gratitude journal” as a tool for keeping a positive outlook. Please see End of life, page 19.

B USINES S 15/C L AS SIFIED 17/C OMMUNITY 12/O BITUARIES 18 O PINION 6/R EAL E STATE 16/S IMCHA 14/S TYLE 10/

Times To Remember

KINDLE SABBATH CANDLES: 5:05 p.m. EST. SABBATH ENDS: 6:08 p.m. EST.


2 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE

JANUARY 19, 2012

This week’s issue: OcTOber 9, 1973

Chronicle used maps, numbers, campaign appeals to cover YK War (Editor’s Note: Retro News is a column that will appear every week as part of the celebration of the Chronicle’s 50th anniversary. Each week, Retro News will look at a past issue of the Chronicle, encapsulate the news reported that week and comment on how those items pertain to today’s Jewish Pittsburgh.) In the dark early days of the Yom Kippur War, when Israel’s very existence hung in the balance, the Chronicle chose an unusual approach to its front-page coverage of the fighting. Instead of publishing stories from the front lines on page 1, the editors instead ran a full-length rough topographical map outlining the some of the highlights of the war to date. The map showed where Israeli jets struck Syria, where Egyptian MIGs hit Ismailia, the location of armor and infantry attacks against Israeli positions in Sinai, the point where Israeli and Syrian fighters clashed over the Golan and the site of Egyptian commando raid. The map didn’t come close to capturing the seriousness of the surprise war or how grim things were for Israeli troops in those first days of the fighting, but it was an eye-grabbing

graphic nevertheless, which directed readers to the coverage of the war on the inside pages. That coverage included a full-page ad on page 2 from the United Jewish Federation trumpeting: “Israel Is fighting for her life. YOU CAN HELP Not with guns Not with lives You can help with money. CASH NOW” Thus began the federation’s second wartime emergency campaign in six years. On page 3, the Chronicle published two side-by-side stories. One, labled “Action,” described the campaign, which was headed up by Federation President Donald Robinson. In a statement to the Chronicle’s readers, Robinson asked contributors to pay up all current and past contributions “at once,” to keep tabs on the war news by visiting a daily open house at the UJF office at McKee Place and to make advance payments to the 1974 Community Campaign.

The October 9, 1973, front page.

“The tragedies of the past few days … emphasize what we have known all along,” Robinson said in his statement. “The Jewish people must always be prepared to help each other. We need Israel as much as Israel needs us. Israel cannot stand alone. Israel must not stand alone.”

The second story on that page, written by Executive Editor Albert W. Bloom and labled, “Why?” was an analysis of what led up to the conflict. In it, Bloom called the timing of the attack — on the holiest day on the Jewish calendar — “the biggest blunder of all!” Bloom wrote, “They (Egypt and Syria) apparently thought their attack would catch Israel flatfooted with thousands of Israelis in their synagogues and temples during the long day of fasting and prayer, with war far from their minds. …” He also noted that Israeli Arabs were fasting, too, since the war started during the month of Ramadan. But Arab hopes for an easy victory faded. According to Bloom, Egypt and Syria were claiming huge victories Israel in the early days of the war, but were “vague” on details. Meanwhile, “Israel’s reports were free of bombast, but indicated strong counterpressure and steady forward movement on both fronts. …” As Israeli reservists at prayer were called up, “there [were] stories told of the young reservists leaping over their seats tallises … still draped over their shoulders and their kipot perched on their heads as they clambered aboard the mobilized trucks, buses, sheruts, and taxis and cars,” Bloom wrote. Please see Retro News, page 4.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 3

METRO Briefly

Rabbi Dr. Joseph S. Weiss and Rebbitzin Sara Weiss

The Kollel Jewish Learning Center will hold its annual Melava Malka dinner, Saturday, Feb. 25, 8:45 p.m., at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, Squirrel Hill. This year, Rabbi Dr. Joseph S. Weiss and Rebbitzin Sara Weiss, will be the guests of honor and recipients of the Rabbi Shaul Kagan Legacy Award in recognition of their dedication to Torah and outstanding service to the Jewish community of Pittsburgh. The Kollel will also present its Community Service Award to Ovadiah Tolbert and Zehava Waltzer-Tolbert for their community service. To commemorate this occasion, the Kollel will publish a tribute journal. Contact Sara Weiss at 412-420-0220 ext. 212 or sweiss@kollelpgh.org for more information.

Zionist Organization of America–Pittsburgh District will offer its Tolerance Education Program this year. Created by Chairman Emeritus Zalman Shapiro, the program takes the Holocaust into the classroom and culminates with a trip to the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C. More than 3,000 area high school sophomores have visited the museum program. The ZOA is working with the Pittsburgh Public Schools to determine which schools and students will participate. In addition, the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh will assist with the educational component. Trips are scheduled for March 19, 20, 26 and 27. Chaperones are needed for the trips. Contact Stuart Pavilack at 412-665-4630 or stuart.pavilack.pghzoa@gmail.com for more information. More than 200 participants are now signed up for the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh’s Centennial Mega Mission to Israel. That tally — 204 registered as of Friday — makes this the largest mission the federation has sent to the Jewish state in its 100-year history. The mission runs from June 19 to 28, and registration will be accepted until April 1. Contact the federation at 412-9925226 or at mission@jfed.org for more information. Please see Briefly, page 5.


4 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

METRO TOL*OLS students visiting PZ special needs group for three years BY TOBY TABACHNICK Staff Writer

Religious school students at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha have found that reaching beyond one’s comfort zone often can lead to big rewards. For the last three years, teacher Anita Kornblit, along with Director of Education Shelly Schapiro, have been taking a dozen students once a month to Poale Zedeck to learn and socialize with a group of teens and adults with special needs. The program began when the Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha students were in the third and fourth grades, and has continued for the last three years, with the

same students. The children, who are now in sixth and seventh grades, look forward to their trips to Poale Zedeck, Kornblit said. “Initially, they weren’t sure what to expect,” she recalled. “But once we started going, the PZ students and our children began to bond together, so we decided to take the same children each year.” A typical visit includes the two groups of students joining together in song and working on an art project. Schapiro reads a story to the combined group. There is also time for socializing. The visits were the idea of Kornblit, who is a member of Poale Zedeck. She had been looking for a mitzva project for

her students, and was familiar with Poale Zedeck’s special needs group, which has been run by teacher Harold Goldwasser for the past 40 years. “I spoke to Harold, and he said that no one had ever asked to visit his group,” Kornblit said. After gaining approval from Poale Zedeck’s rabbi at the time, Yisroel Miller, the visits from the religious school students began. “The visits have been very successful,” Kornblit said. “Now, we are at a point where they look forward to our coming, and our children enjoy it also.” While Kornblit still teaches third and fourth grades at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha, she nevertheless travels with the now sixth- and seventh-graders to Poale Zedeck each month. A teacher from the sixth and seventh grades also accompanies the group. The children have learned to see those with special needs in a different light, said Goldwasser. “The Tree of Life kids can see for later in life that these are real people, and that they shouldn’t be avoided,” he said. “They aren’t just a chesed (kindness) project. You can have conversations with them.” The visits to Poale Zedeck have even inspired some of the Tree of Life kids to seek out other opportunities to be involved in the special needs community. “Many of our children now go to Friendship Circle as a result, and one of

Retro News: Continued from page 2. Pages 4 and 5 were devoted to news photos from the front lines with the headline, “Wing and a prayer in Yom Kippur War!” Pages 6 and 7, headlined “Israel and Arab States — Area of Populations,” was a two-page map of the Middle East and North Africa with outlining the population of the Arab world compared to Israel. Below

the seventh-graders thinks she wants to work with people with special needs as a career,” Kornblit said. “It has definitely helped sensitize them and give them an understanding of people with special needs,” Schapiro said. “They were hesitant at the beginning, but now they love it. They’ve grown up with it.” And the students at Poale Zedeck love the visits as well. “Our students look forward to their coming,” said Goldwasser. “It’s a party atmosphere. It’s a fun morning for them.” Goldwasser’s group receives funding from the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh, and is open to anyone in the Jewish community. Most participants in the program are not members of Poale Zedeck. The special needs group is usually divided into one section for those in their teens and 20s, and one for those in their 40s through 60s. The two sections come together when the children from Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha visit. The group meets every Sunday throughout the year for morning services, arts and crafts, stories, and a lesson in Torah, said Goldwasser. “We have general conversations about being good citizens, and talk about mitzvas we are all able to do,” he said. (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

the map a chart detailed the numeric superiority of Egypt’s and Syria’s army, navy and air force compared over Israel’s. — COMPILED

BY

LEE CHOTTINER

(For a more comprehensive look at the Oct. 9, 1973, Chronicle, visit the jewishchronicle.net and click on “archives” at the top of the page. Back issues of the Chronicle are archived by the Pittsburgh Jewish Newspaper Project.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 5

METRO Briefly Continued from page 3. NA’AMAT USA, Pittsburgh Council lunch and learn program will have Rich Feder speaking on “The Squirrel Hill Master Plan,” Wednesday, Jan. 25, at noon at the Labor Zionist Educational Center, 6328 Forbes Ave. Feder is vice president of the Squirrel Hill Urban Coalition. The program is free and open to the community. Call 412-521-5253 for more information. Central Scholarship and Loan Referral Service applications for the 2012-2013 school year are due by Tuesday, Feb. 7. CSLRS staff must interview first time applicants. One application, which can be completed online at centralscholarship.org, gives students access to numerous community scholarships.

CSLRS, a 45-year-old program of the Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh administered by Jewish Family & Children’s Service, coordinates the efforts of a group of organizations, agencies and scholarship endowment funds which provide scholarships to local Jewish students enrolled in accredited institutions of higher education. Last year CSLRS awarded $400,000 in scholarships to 220 area Jewish students. Contact Alayne Lowenberger, JF&CS scholarship program director, at 412422-7200 for more information. Rabbi Martin Siegel will be the scholar in residence at Temple Shalom, Wheeling, W.Va., Friday and Saturday, Feb. 3 and 4. Siegel, a retired rabbi and past spiritual leader of Temple Shalom, will deliver the D'var Torah Friday night, then lead a communitywide program Saturday on "The Real Meaning of the Ten Commandments."

Visit The Jewish Chronicle Website thejewishchronicle.net

Siegel is a past chair of the West Virginia State Council on the Arts, a leader in the effort to restore the West Virginia Independence Hall, and the developer of a Jewish studies program at Wheeling College (now Wheeling Jesuit University). He has written a several books and has taught at various colleges and universities. He is a founder and first president of the National Alliance to End Homelessness and the National Interfaith Alliance Against Substance Abuse. Since his retirement from congregational work, Siegel has been a teacher of the Bible and rabbinic literature. In 2008, he was appointed rabbi of the Baltimore-Washington Conference of the United Methodist Church — the first time a rabbi has been appointed to an official position by a Christian denomination. Contact Temple Shalom at 304-2334870 or info@templeshalomwv.org for more information.

BBYO is changing the name of its Teen Connect program to BBYO Connect, a division that creates a community of sixth-, seventh- and eighth-graders through social and meaningful experiences. Focused on Judaic, service and social programming, BBYO Connect builds a network of teens across North America at a critical age when middle school students begin to strengthen their identities, form social circles and prepare for high school and beyond. Teens are mentored by AZA and BBG high school teens to help them prepare for an easier transition into high school. The next BBYO event is Sunday, Jan. 29, 1 to 4 p.m., at Dave & Buster’s in the Waterfront, Homestead. Contact Chuck Marcus, senior program director, Keystone Mountain Region BBYO, at 412-421-2626 or at cmarcus@bbyo.org for more information.

Buy, Sell, Trade in the Classifieds Call Donna 412-687-1000


6 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

Opinion

The Jewish Chronicle David M. Caoin, CEO EDITORIAL STAFF Lee Chottiner, Executive Editor Angela Leibowicz, Community/ Web Editor Toby Tabachnick, Staff Writer SALES STAFF Susie Mangel, Senior Sales Associate Roberta Letwin, Sales Associate Donna Mink, Classified Sales PRODUCTION STAFF Dawn Wanninger, Production Manager Nancy Bishop Production Artist BUSINESS STAFF Joe Soloski, Comptroller Josh Reisner, Office Manager Marcy Kronzek, Subscriptions BOARD OF TRUSTEES Richard Kitay, President Cindy Goodman-Leib, Vice President Larry Honig, Secretary Andy Schaer, Treasurer Davida Fromm, Past President Carolyn Hess Abraham Brian Balk Daniel Berkowitz Lynn Cullen Milton Eisner Stephen Fienberg Malke Steinfeld Frank David Grubman Thomas Hollander Evan Indianer David Levine Ari Lightman Mitchell Pakler Amy Platt Benjamin Rosenthal Charles Saul Adam Shear Jonathan Wander Lou Weiss Published every Thursday by the Pittsburgh Jewish Publication and Education Foundation 5915 Beacon St., 3rd Floor Pittsburgh, PA 15217 Phone: 412-687-1000 FAX: 412-521-0154 E-Mail: newsdesk@thejewishchronicle.net SUBSCRIPTION: $45 in Pennsylvania $47 East of the Mississippi $49 West of the Mississippi and FL NEWSSTAND PRICE $1.50 PER COPY POSTMASTER: Send address change to THE JEWISH CHRONICLE, 5915 BEACON ST., 3rd Floor PITTSBURGH, PA 15217 (PERIODICAL RATE POSTAGE PAID AT PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA) USPS 582-740 Manuscripts, letters, documents and photographs sent to the Jewish Chronicle become the property of this publication, which is not responsible for the return or loss of such items. The Chronicle does not endorse the goods or services advertised in its pages and makes no representation to the kashrut of food products and services in said advertising. The publisher is not liable for damages if, for any reason whatsoever, he fails to publish an advertisement or for any error in an advertisement. Acceptance of advertisers and of ad copy is subject to the publisher’s approval. The Chronicle is not responsible if ads violate applicable laws and the advertiser will indemnify, hold harmless and defend the Chronicle from all claims made by governmental agencies and consumers for any reason based on ads appearing in the Chronicle.

Haredi should act he Chronicle has received reader feedback criticizing us for not adequately stating that only a small number of Haredi (ultra-Orthodox) Jews are actually taking part in these shocking actions in Israel. These actions include attacking girls they deem to be dressed immodestly and women for not sitting at the back of segregated buses, not to mention using symbols of the Holocaust to paint themselves as victims for defending their religious convictions. It’s a fair criticism, so we make that statement now: Only a small number of Haredi Jews, compared to the total number in Israel, are taking part in these activities. It’s true. We’ll go even further: A more accurate picture of Haredi Jews is the members of ZAKA, the team of emergency responders who travel to disaster areas the world over to assist people in need — including many non-Jews. The earthquake

T

in Haiti is a recent example of their good work. That said, the Haredi who are taking part in these odious activities do not constitute a small number in and of themselves. We’ve seen the pictures and video transmitted from Israel. It’s not just a handful of extremists standing on a street corner. Their demonstrations must be taken seriously. The truth is that the actions of this segment of Haredi, however many there are, embarrass not just the Haredi, but all Jews. We all share a common interest in seeing these activities come to an end. Simply condemning them, as Haredi groups have done, isn’t enough. The best way to do something is for the Haredi community to police itself, to make it clear that these activities won’t be tolerated, that there is a price to be paid, possibly in exclusion from community or religious activities.

If this sect of the Haredi wants to defend the institution of tzenius (modesty), that’s fine. As Agudath Israel America said in its Dec. 28 statement on the troubles in Beit Shemesh, “It would be tragic were the acts of violence to lead Jews to, G-d forbid, reject the culture of tzenius that has always been the hallmark of the Jewish nation, to regard Jewish modesty as something connected to violence and anger, rather than to refinement and holiness.” But defending tzenius can be done with responsible dialogue, using the media and debating opposing groups — all without slinging verbal and symbolic mud at other Jews. Only Haredi can deliver this message to other Haredi. More liberal Jewish organizations hold no sway with this community. The Haredi are good people, moral people, and responsible people; and this is the time to show it.

Israel’s ’74 pact with Syria shows we can deal with Iran joel rubin

WASHINGTON — In 1974, Israel struck a security deal with Syria that is still in effect today. The West should seek to do the same with Iran in 2012. When the subject of diplomacy with Iran comes up, the debate in Washington usually centers on whether a deal with Iran on its nuclear program would stick. But Middle Eastern diplomatic history is full of surprising twists, including diplomatic breakthroughs. Israelis understand this. Remember, in 1974, when Israel and Syria signed their Yom Kippur War “Separation of Forces Agreement,” they had just fought a disastrous war that lasted less than three weeks and killed nearly 20,000 people, including several thousand Israelis. The situation was grave for Israel, who was desperately fighting for its survival against a neighboring country who had a patron — the Soviet Union — with thousands of nuclear missiles at its disposal. Yet unfortunately, neoconservatives such as Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) and Republican presidential candidate Newt Gingrich do not want you to contemplate how Israel and Syria negotiated a diplomatic agreement that both sides have honored for nearly four decades, creating security and stability on their border. Instead, they want you to believe that it would be inconceivable that a country supposedly bent on annihilating Israel through invasion and backed by nuclear weapons could be trusted to make a deal. That was exactly the definition of Syria in 1974 and it is the definition of Iran today.

The parallel between Syria in 1973 and Iran in 2012 is clear. Just like in 1973, a war with Iran today would unleash, according to pro-Israel commentator Jeff Goldberg, massive dangers to both Israel and the whole Middle East. Just like in 1973, a war with Iran today would still require a diplomatic deal tomorrow. Importantly, military action with no clear endgame, as Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta reminds, would not resolve our concerns about Iran’s nuclear program. Instead, according to leading Iran expert Vali Nasr, it would likely accelerate the Iranian nuclear activities about which the West is so concerned. Yet when neoconservative war advocates, such as Max Boot, call for preemptive military action against Iran, they often cite the Israeli actions in the 1967 Six-Day War and the 1981 Osirak attack against Iraq’s nuclear facilities as evidence that military strikes are the only path available for the West. That’s engaging, as former national intelligence officer for the Middle East Paul Pillar explains, selective history. However, engaging in selective history — such as ignoring the lessons of Israel’s Yom Kippur War and diplomacy with Syria — can lead to major miscalculations that, in today’s case of Iran, may undercut the goal of preventing an Iranian nuclear weapon. A fair reading of Israel’s history with its adversaries should therefore make us cautious about using military force to achieve this goal. Today’s situation with Iran is perilously close to Israel’s situation with Syria prior to the 1973 war, where stalemate dominated and diplomacy was in short supply. The end result of that experience was that diplomacy was still needed to resolve the conflict between the two countries. Interestingly, diplomacy with Iran today should be even more plausible than it was between Israel and Syria in 1974, as leading Israeli national security officials such as Defense Minister Ehud Barak

and former Mossad chief Meir Dagan do not view Iran as an existential threat, as opposed to the very real existential threat that Syria posed to Israel in 1973. And like in 1973, what we currently have, according to Gary Sick, a National Security Council official in the Reagan administration, is a stalemate. We should learn from the 1973 stalemate experience and move more aggressively diplomatically, so that it doesn’t take a war in the region to show us once again that, even after a war, we’ll still need diplomacy to resolve our concerns. This is primarily because a military attack against Iran — despite the protests of the war advocates — will also produce a stalemate. The only way to avoid stalemate — other than by concluding a diplomatic deal — is by massively invading and occupying Iran — a country that is three times the size of and much more nationalistic and well-defended than Iraq. Fortunately, Americans wisely do not support a repeat of the Iraq war in Iran. Therefore, it is time to obtain security and stability in the region through concerted diplomatic activity. Avoiding war is a precursor to achieving such stability, as war will only produce stalemate at best. At worst, war would be uncontrollable, unleashing a scenario where the overall outcome that we want to avoid — a massive war in the Middle East that could threaten Israel’s survival — would become a reality. So let’s skip the war and just move to the diplomacy. After all, if the Israelis could cut a deal in 1974 with a country like Syria, certainly the international community and the U.S. could seek to do the same today with a country like Iran. (Joel Rubin, director of policy and government affairs at Ploughshares Fund in Washington, D.C., and a Pittsburgh native, can be reached at joelr@thejewishchronicle.net. His views are his own and not necessarily those of Ploughshares Fund.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19 , 2012 — 7

OPINION

Letters to the editor We invite you to submit letters for publication. Letters must include name, address and daytime phone number; addresses and phone numbers will not be published. Letters may not exceed 400 words and may be edited for length and clarity; they cannot be returned. Mail, fax or e-mail letters to: via e-mail :

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Unfair tax system I cannot imagine a more poignant and moving letter than Jeffrey Lewin’s (“Food, meds, or taxes,” Jan. 5), a man who is a longtime disability retiree who left the labor market after a long and productive career in the public sector. Mr. Lewin notes through his personal experience the cruel and heartless nature of one of the most inequitable levies, the property tax, a burden that is accentuated this year through the expensive, inequitable property reassessment, which is being forced on the region by a Common Pleas Court judge and the Supreme Court whose decisions are made in a vacuum with no regard for the panic, confusion and fear that they generate or for the unfairness of the levy that is imposed.

Even if subjective assessment values were largely accurate, which they are not, given that the “assessors” have no real estate market acumen and do not enter the home, this is a system that imposes a burden with no connection to the individual’s ability to pay. It is not fair nor will it ever be perceived as fair. We would like to look to our highly compensated General Assembly members for help, but there are few profiles in courage there. Those who represent areas of the state outside Allegheny County are not willing to substitute a more equitable levy for the albatross with which Allegheny County is saddled, and they would not dare insist on uniformity in assessments, as it would subject their constituents to the same horror that we southwestern Pennsylvanians are experiencing through their unwillingness to act. I suppose if individuals such as Jeffrey Lewin find themselves on the street, it is simply collateral damage that must be inflicted as we burn the village to save it. Is it any wonder that confidence in government and political apathy continue to metastasize? Oren Spiegler Upper St. Clair


8 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

OPINION/METRO

Message to my people: We are all in this together ABBY WISSE SCHACHTER

“In 50 years, Israel will be like Iran,” an Israeli friend wrote to me when she forwarded the video of 8year-old Naama Margolese and the harassment she’s endured at the hands of some Haredi Jews in her Beit Shemesh neighborhood. Some Jewish childhood friends of mine similarly condemned the same Haredi Jews, using terms such as fanatics, extremists and zealots. They wrote on Facebook defining these ultra-Orthodox Jews in the same terms as Islamic terrorists who kill and maim in the name of Muslim purity. As terrible and shocking as the video might be, however, I think equating spitting with murder is crossing the line. “Official” Jews have been a bit more measured in their criticism of the Beit Shemesh Haredim. “The government of Israel needs to stop being coerced into allowing the Haredi community to

choose to be poor, uneducated, and exempt from serving the country in some form,” declared Rabbi Daniel R. Allen, executive director of the Association of Reform Zionists of America. These Jews have removed themselves from Klal Yisrael, Allen seems to be saying, and the solution is Israel’s government forcing them back into line. Meanwhile, Jewish journalist Sarah Wildman defended judging these beyond-the-pale Jews in The Forward. “When Haredi men and women put their children in striped pajamas and place a yellow star emblazoned with the word “Jude” on their chests and parade in the streets of Jerusalem to protest the secular world,” Wildman wrote, ���we can call that spitting on the graves of our ancestors.” So we can call ourselves reasonable and feel free to condemn some other Jews for forcing Jewish women to sit at the back of the bus and spitting on little girls walking to school for alleged immodesty. After all, we are supposed to feel free to criticize our brothers and sisters in Israel. That’s showing our true love and caring for our fellow Jews, right? When the shoe is on the other foot, however, we tend to react rather badly to receiving criticism. Think back to December when the Israeli government put out some ads targeting

yordim (native-born Israelis who no longer live in Israel) suggesting they move back to their homeland. The thrust of the ads was that Israelis can live in America happily but doing so will mean their kids will assimilate. One ad showed a girl and her parents Skyping with grandparents in Israel. The conversation turns to the current holiday and when the grandparents who have a glowing menora in the background ask their granddaughter what day it is she replies “Christmas.” In another ad, a boy cannot rouse his napping father by calling out “Dad” but the father wakes immediately when the boy whispers “Abba.” To say these ads caused a firestorm is to put it mildly. The Jewish Federations of North America sent a strongly worded letter to Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu in Israel demanding the ads be pulled. “While we recognize the motivations behind the ad campaign, we are strongly opposed to the messaging that American Jews do not understand Israel. We share the concerns … that this outrageous and insulting message could harm the Israel-Diaspora relationship,” JFNA declared in a statement. Meanwhile, the Atlantic’s Jeffrey Goldberg really blew his top. “The idea, communicated in these ads, that America is no place for a proper Jew, and that a Jew who is concerned about the Jewish future should live in Israel, is archaic, and also chutzpadik (if you don't mind me resorting to the vernacular),” Goldberg averred. Only trouble is that the United States is no place for “a proper Jew,” to use Goldberg’s terminology, and the proof is that most of us don’t choose to live Jewish lives. Synagogue membership, federation participation, day school populations are all falling, not rising. Fifty-five percent of us marry

Center: Continued from page 1.

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center’s annual Kristallnact commemoration has drawn hundreds of people to the tiny Westmoreland County campus, said Wilda Kaylor, its associate director. Area survivors attend Kristallnacht at Seton Hill, and share their stories with the community. It has become a very popular event on campus. “The chapel is filled. And with students,” said Rabbi Sara Rae Perman of Congregation Emanu-El Israel in Greensburg, and vice chair of the National Advisory Board of NCCHE. “It’s just amazing.” Perman finds it particularly amazing that the NCCHE is located at Seton Hill. “The first time I came up here — for Kristallnacht — I said, ‘Why are they doing this? Why is this happening here?’ This was 25 years ago. Why are they doing this on a Catholic campus?” Perman said. “I think this is one of the hidden secrets of our community.” Other educational opportunities provided by NCCHE include an online program in genocide and Holocaust studies, and speakers and films on campus.

non-Jews. And furthermore, sad as it is to admit, outside the Orthodox community, we are culturally encouraged to allow intermarriage and even condone it. We aren’t supposed to judge anyone harshly for choosing to intermarry. We aren’t supposed to have a negative reaction to those who raise their kids in homes where non-Jewish holidays are celebrated. We are supposed to be happy that some Jewish preschools accept children of intermarried parents. We aren’t supposed to proselytize for Judaism (even to other Jews) and, heaven forbid, we even suggest converting to Judaism. So why shouldn’t the Israeli government actually argue that Israelis living here are losing something when they intermarry? The real problem with the ad campaign wasn’t the idea behind it but rather that it didn’t go far enough. There was a distinction made between assimilating Israelis and assimilating American Jews. Assimilating is assimilating is assimilating, whether you are Israeli or American. It means deemphasizing your minority Jewish culture, religion and heritage in favor of prioritizing the majority non-Jewish culture. And why shouldn’t the government of the Jewish homeland argue against that? Here’s the tough reality: We are one people — one. What happens among some of us has an impact on the whole. If we American Jews have the right to criticize Israel politically, religiously, however, Israelis have the right and privilege to do the same. It will help serve the Jewish whole when we move toward caring about — not condemning — each others’ fate. (Abby Wisse Schachter, a Pittsburghbased political columnist, blogs for the New York Post at nypost.com/blogs/capitol.)

Perhaps most importantly, NCCHE strives to be a national resource for the Catholic Church. “Our primary focus is to educate Catholic educators about the Holocaust so they can teach students to promote JewishChristian relations,” Kaylor said. “As a Catholic center, we are dealing with some of the issues of the Church during the Holocaust, and some of the controversy — like, did the pope (Pius XII) do enough to help? Did the people of Poland do enough?” Every three years, NCCHE hosts a national conference, and each summer sponsors a 20-day educational residency at Yad Vashem for educators. “We continue to recruit participants for the summer seminar program at Yad Vashem, and we try to pass on to educators, and they in turn to their students — a new generation — important lessons for bettering our world in a dynamic, tangible way,” Del Duca said. The center does that, she added, “by dialoguing with history, with documents, but above all with people, Holocaust survivors, Catholic and Jewish leaders, scholars, professors, teachers and with each other.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 9

OPINION A time for truth: Why we need another Durban conference Guest Columnist DEXTER VAN ZILE WASHINGTON — It is time for another Durban Conference. No, I’m not asking for a repeat of the U.N.-sponsored festival of Jew-hatred that took place in South Africa in 2001. The last thing we need is to have Israel demonized by Islamists and their allies in the West. We do not need another conference where so-called human rights activists lament the fact that Hitler did not “finish the job” and where Arab lawyers hand out booklets with swastikas superimposed over the Jewish Star of David. What we need is a human rights conference worthy of the name. We need a conference that speaks the truth about the impact of Islamist ideology and sharia law on human rights, not just in the Middle East, but in Muslim-majority countries throughout the world.

We need a conference where adherents of the Bahá’í Faith describe the persecution they have endured in Iran. We need a conference where Bahá’í leaders tell the world about the destruction of their national center in Iran with pickaxes in 1955. We need a conference where Iran’s leaders are confronted with the executions of more than 200 followers of the Bahá’í faith since the Islamic revolution in 1979. We need a conference where Assyrian Christians can tell their story of oppression at the hands of Islamists in Iraq who are trying to drive them out of their homeland. We need a conference where Assyrian Christians can talk about the bombings, the shootings and the abductions they have endured on a regular basis over the past decade. We need a conference where Iraqi Christians, who numbered 1.5 million in 2003 and now number less than 500,000, can explain why they are leaving the country of their birth. They need a chance to make their case for an autonomous province in Iraq where religious and ethnic minorities can gather together against Islamists intent on making them disappear. We need a conference where Coptic

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Christians in Egypt can describe the humiliation and acts of violence they endure on a daily basis in their homeland. We need a conference where Coptic Christians can describe the ongoing attacks on their churches and their very lives. We need a conference where Coptic Christians can describe the church bombings, the abductions, the rapes and forced conversions they endure at the hands of Islamists in Egypt. We need a conference where Christians, whose churches have been destroyed in Nigeria and Ethiopia, can describe the attacks they’ve endured at the hands of Islamists. We need a conference where activists from groups like Open Doors, Voice of the Martyr’s and Christian Solidarity International, testify to the suffering Christians have endured under Sharia law throughout the world. We need a conference where women who have endured beatings at the hands of the Taliban in Afghanistan can tell their story. We need a conference where women who have been beaten and punished for refusing to wear burkas can speak of the oppression they have endured.

We need a conference where women who have been set on fire or have been splashed with acid by their relatives can tell their story. We need a conference where victims of rape who have been charged with adultery by the police that should have arrested their rapists can testify to the injustice. We need a conference where Christian men from the Philippines who were castrated after marrying Muslim women can tell their story. We need a conference where gay men and lesbians can speak of the violence they have endured under Islamic regimes throughout the world. It is a time for truth. People of good will throughout the world have a right and an obligation to insist that Muslim leaders of all stripes take an honest look at what is happening in the countries they lead and govern. We need to ask them if this is the type of world a loving god would have us live in.

(Dexter Van Zile is the Christian Media Analyst for the Committee for Accuracy in Middle East Reporting in America, or CAMERA).

Check out the blogs at www.thejewishchronicle.net


10 - THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

Style ‘Promised Land’ a real life memoir of immigrant life in America

RETRO REVIEWS BY HILARY DANINHIRSCH Chronicle Correspondent

(Editor’s note: This is the last in a yearlong series in which Chronicle Correspondent Hilary Daninhirsch reviewed Jewish-themed books that have been out of print for decades, or remain in print but are hard to find.) It is fitting to conclude the yearlong Retro Review column with a book that is marking the centennial of its own publication. In 1912, Mary Antin wrote “The Promised Land,” her memoir and firsthand account of her emigration experience from Polotzk, Russia, to the tenements of Boston. I was lucky enough to get my hands on a copy of the original 1912 version from the library; in this copy, black and white and sepia photographs adorn each chapter. More recent paperback printings are available. Antin was so changed by her immigration experience that she wrote this memoir at the young age of 30, explaining in the opening lines: “I was born, I have lived, and I have been made over. Is it not time to write my life’s story? I am just as much out of the way as if I were dead, for I am absolutely other than the person whose story I have to tell. Physical continuity with my earlier self is no disadvantage. I could speak in the third person and not feel that I was masquerading.” In the first part of the book, Antin describes with frightening clarity what it was really like to live in Russia under the czar, in a Jewish ghetto called the Pale, where life for the Jews was exceptionally unpleasant. Like many Jews, Antin’s father struggled to support his wife and four children but was subject to unfair taxes and other obstacles in place specifically for Jews. Antin, whose name was “Masha” back then, was subjected to cruel torments by other children and despite a thirst for knowledge, had no access to books. Reading this section of the book catapults

Original Cover

the reader into a world resembling scenes and characters from “Fiddler on the Roof,” but with a harsher dose of reality. When Antin was about 12, her father, who had several years earlier gone to America in search of the ever-elusive American dream, sent for the rest of the family. While her parents were still struggling financially in their new country and had two more babies (one of which Antin teasingly called “superfluous”), coming to America for Antin was like a rebirth; she Modern Cover blossomed in the welcoming arms of her new country, taking every opportunity to learn everything she could. She mastered English quickly and even attended a prestigious school. Calling herself “retrospectively introspective,” she observed: “America was bewilderingly strange, unimaginably complex, delightfully explored. I rushed impetuously out of the cage of my provincialism and looked eagerly about the brilliant universe. My question was, What have we here? — not, What does this mean? That query came much later.” On the flip side of her assimilation into her new country, she shed some of her Jewish identity, a process that began in Russia when she secretly witnessed her father turning off a lamp on Shabbos. The book is part anecdotal and part

introspection. There are amusing scenes, such as Antin’s utter confidence that a Boston newspaper would publish her school poem about George Washington (they did, indeed) that she hand-delivered to the editor and her constant run-ins with the cruel tenement landlady. Antin’s memoir touches upon issues of sociology, assimilation, religious persecution and freedom. At a time when women were still relegated to child care, when American women still lacked voting rights, when women were not always fortunate enough to receive an education, this book is a colossal achievement. What also makes this book extraordinary is that even though the author’s native language is not English, the book is poetic in its prose. At times, her writing is a little florid, but her intelligence and insights override this minor flaw. The children’s picture book “Streets of Gold”

Mary Antin

political issues and went on to publish other works, though she is best known for “The Promised Land.” Though she suffered from mental illness in the latter part of her life, she left behind a memorable legacy after her death in 1949. (Hilary Daninhirsch can be reached at hdaninhirsch@gmail.com.)

A cheder in Polokzt, Russia. The image is one of many in “The Promised Land.”

by Rosemary Wells is based on “The Promised Land” and includes passages from the original book. Mary Antin went on to become an immigration rights activist; she lectured on

Book Review “The Promised Land” by Mary Antin Houghton Mifflin, original hardback copy, publication date: 1912, 373 pages.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 11

SPORTS JCC defeats Pittsburgh Project BY ZACHARY WEISS Chronicle Correspondent

Following a loss to Career Connections, the JCC Boys’ varsity basketball team downed previously unbeaten Pittsburgh Project 52-42 Thursday, Jan. 12. The win created a three-way tie for first place in the Greater Pittsburgh Independent Basketball League going into this week’s contests. Ben Katz led all scorers with 21 for the JCC, while teammate Jesse Goleman banked 12 points. Jonathan Blue led Pittsburgh Project with 14 points. “I thought it was really important, especially now in the season because we want to make a point about who we are and where we stand in this league,” Goleman said. “Pittsburgh Project beat us twice in our home gym last year, so we just wanted to come out and make a statement.” JCC controlled the tempo — and the lead — for most of the first quarter, but could not pull away as Pittsburgh Project’s Blue kept things close. Two late shots from Katz allowed the JCC to take a 13-9 lead after one quarter. The JCC’s Scott Horvitz came off the bench in the second quarter and teamed with Katz to box out and out jump Pittsburgh Project for rebounds. The JCC led 23-19 at the half. “Scott was one of our top rebounders today and that’s what we need from him,” JCC Head Coach Andy Pakler

said. “If he can continue to do that, he’s going to be a huge part of what we do.” Coming out of the break, the JCC went on offense in the third quarter, frustrating Pittsburgh Project and going on a 72 run and taking a 30-21 lead in the process. “It’s all about setting the tone and coming out and being physical,” Katz said. “We had to set the tone, just like we did in the first quarter, come out and play hard, make your shots and keep the pace going.” With Pittsburgh Project trailing 34-27 going into the final period, the pace of play picked up as the JCC ratcheted up their physical intensity, staking itself to a commanding 40-30 lead. Pittsburgh Project, though, switched to a press defense. The look confused the JCC, which committed some turnovers, enabling Pittsburgh Project to cut the lead to 42-38. But JCC figured out the press leading to two easy baskets from Goleman and a physical lay-up by Katz who was fouled when he shot the ball. This proved to be the turning point in the game. When Katz made the free throw the JCC took a 49-38 lead, their biggest lead of the game, and never looked back. The team next faced Propel Tuesday, Jan. 17 and visited Urban Impact Thursday, Jan. 19. (Zachary Weiss can be reached at yngzc@yahoo.com.)


12 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

Community A

Sock puppets for patients

Lighting the menora

C L O S

KMR BBYO photo

Keystone Mountain Region BBYO members joined nearly 40 others during a Mitzvah Day project where sock puppet monkeys were made for patients at Children’s Hospital. Mitzvah Day offers the volunteers many opportunities to give back to their communities. Pictured from left are KMR BBYO Alum and Advisor in Training Leah Cullen; Abby Neft; Hannah Frank, KMR BBYO regional n’siah; Jenny Park; Leah Marcone; and Leah Popkin.

as decorative as a miniature work of art. At the same time, by topping a protein food such as meat, fish, cheese, or egg with a vegetable, a wellbalanced meal is created.”

E R L O

MOCK TOMATO BORSHT (HOT)

(As part the Chronicle’s 50th anniversary celebration, The Chronicle Cooks will take an occasional look at recipes and their stories over the years. To read the full article, visit thejewishchronicle.net and click on archives. Here is a recipe from the March 22, 1962, edition.) Looking at the food column and these recipes from 1962 gives us an opportunity to make a few observations about that period. Soup mixes were a really, really, big thing when they were introduced. Why use fresh spices when you can throw in some soup mix? No one cared about or even knew about the health problems sodium can cause. Do you know how much sodium is in soup mixes and canned soup? People liked to make “mock” foods. I have an old recipe for “mock” potato pancakes using cauliflower. Curry equals an exotic flavor. An open-face sandwich can be a miniature work of art. Fair is fair: No doubt, observations will be made about our eating habits 50 years from now. From the column:

O

Chabad Fox Chapel photo

Chabad Fox Chapel held its sixth annual menora lighting event Dec. 21 at Fox Chapel Plaza, followed by an indoor festival. Pictured from left are Dr. Marc Rice, Natalie Rice, Debbie Witchel and Bob Witchel.

“Thanks to the large variety of kosher soups now available, canned, bottled, packaged mix, or compressed cake, there is enough choice to banish any chance of monotony. “These soups may be served without any alteration, but with a few imaginative additions, they become more like the ones we make at home. A little minced watercress adds novelty to cream of tomato soup. A dash of curry gives exotic flavor to cream of celery. Both soups are equally good hot or cold. … “Since the soups available are milchig, fleishig, and parve a wide selection of sandwiches can be made to accompany them. The open-faced sandwiches which are the joy of calorie counters can also be made

1 cup finely shredded cabbage 2 cups water 1 10 ½ ounce can condensed tomato soup 1 teaspoon kosher parve onion soup mix 1 teaspoon kosher parve mushroom soup mix Place the cabbage and water in a saucepan, bring to a boil, then simmer for 10 minutes. Add the remaining ingredients, stir until blended, then bring to a boil. Taste and add more soup mix if desired. This amount serves 3. CALIFORNIA DIP SANDWICHES 1 large cucumber 2 teaspoons sugar 2 tablespoons vinegar 1/3 cup dairy sour cream About 1 teaspoon parve kosher instant onion soup mix 1 cup fine curd creamed cottage cheese 2 hard cooked eggs, sliced 4 large slices rye bread or pumpernickel Peel the cucumber and slice thin. Add the sugar and vinegar and marinate for 30 minutes. Stir from time to time to coat each slice. Drain thoroughly, then press lightly to remove remaining liquid. Combine the cream with the onion soup mix. The exact amount of mix needed will vary with the brand used and with your own taste. Use enough to give the cream a definite but not overwhelming flavor. Stir the cream gently into the cucumbers. Spread the cheese evenly on the bread and arrange the egg slices over it. Top with the sour cream and cucumber mixture. Cut each sandwich into quarters for easier eating.

(Angela Leibowicz can be reached at angelal@thejewishchronicle.net.)


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 13

TRAVEL

The lost Jewish presence in Jericho is being rediscovered BY JUDY LASH BALINT JointMedia News Service

Ask Israelis what first comes to mind when they think of Jericho, and nine times out of 10, you’ll hear “casino” or perhaps “Area A-off-limits.” It’s the rare Israeli in 2012 who’ll mention the town half an hour north-east of Jerusalem as the first place Joshua led the Israelites into the land after crossing the Jordan. In fact, Jericho, the oldest continuously inhabited city in the world, has been devoid of any normal Jewish presence since 1994, as the Gaza-Jericho Agreement phase of the Oslo Accords mandated that the lush oasis fall under Palestine Authority control. Since then, Jericho has borne witness to various phases of the Israeli-Palestinian relationship. Like King David’s birthplace Bethlehem, now also under P.A. control, Jericho stands as one of several examples of important historic sites whose links with the Jewish people are in danger of fading due to a lack of Jewish presence and a strong economic incentive to emphasize Christian sites. Today, one of Jericho’s main sources of income is Christian tourism. The small, sleepy town of 20,000, which is surrounded by acres of banana groves, welcomes busloads of pilgrims. A cable car takes them up the hill known as the

Benjamin Balint photo

Overlook Jericho from Mt. Temptation.

Mount of Temptation, where stairs lead to a Greek Orthodox monastery and a restaurant offers spectacular views toward Jordan. Less than a 10-minute drive away, through flat, sandy fields where wild camels graze, is Qasr al Yahud, the spot on the Jordan River where Christians

believe John the Baptist baptized Jesus. Renovated by Israel’s Ministry of Tourism at a cost of $3 million, the site was reopened last July. It now hosts thousands of the faithful who come to be baptized under the gaze of Jordanian troops stationed a few yards away on the east bank of the muddy trickle of river. Very few Jewish groups venture through the deactivated minefields to visit the place named for the Jews crossing the Jordan after the exodus from Egypt — Qasr al Yahud in Arabic means the place where the Jews “broke” the water. Entry into Jericho itself is forbidden to Israelis by Israeli law — apart from groups with an Israeli army escort, who are occasionally permitted to visit the remains of the Shalom al Yisrael synagogue. The synagogue is believed to date back to the 6th or 7th century C.E. and sits in the basement of a nondescript building at the western edge of town. An intricate mosaic still visible on the floor depicts a menora and a shofar along with the inscription “Shalom al Yisrael” — Peace unto Israel. According to Annex II of the Gaza-Jericho Agreement of 1994, “Religious affairs in the ‘Shalom Al Israel’ synagogue in Jericho shall be under the auspices of the Israeli authorities.” In fact, Israeli authorities have taken little interest in the site, leaving it to tiny groups of yeshiva students who have intermittently tried to preserve a presence there. Before the

second intifada, Palestinians even charged admission to Jewish tourists who ventured into the site. Today, the mainstay of concern about Jericho comes from the few hundred families living in several small communities overlooking it. At Mitzpeh Yericho, a predominantly religious community of 400 families, longtime resident Moshe Eyal explains how a mixed group of religious and secular young people wanted to settle on government land adjacent to Jericho in 1977. However, Defense Minister Ezer Weizman refused to give permission. Agriculture Minister Ariel Sharon suggested they move up the hill to the current site, with its panoramic vistas over the stark desert. Eventually two communities were formed: on the hill sits Mitzpe Yericho, a small town that today includes a yeshiva, a wedding hall and an electronics business; and Vered Yericho, in the valley, just south of Jericho. A more recent addition to the Jewish communities surrounding Jericho is Mevo’ot Yericho, a village of 27 families founded in 1999 just north of Jericho in the Jordan Valley. Evidence of ancient Jewish settlement in the area is easy to identify. Remains of aqueducts from the Hasmonean period are visible on the community’s main street, and the remains of the 6th century Na’aran Synagogue and its beautiful mosaic floor are within walking distance.


14 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

Simchas Engagements

Magid/Garcés: Dale and Lynn Magid Lazar of Pittsburgh announce the engagement of their daughter, Jessica Michele Magid, to Juan Patricio Garcés, son of Juan Garcés and Ivonne Olivares. Jessica is also the daughter of Dr. Warren and Beth Magid of York, Pa. Jessica’s grandparents are Bernice and Arthur Friedland of Cumberland, Md.; Gertrude Magid of Glen Burnie, Md., and the late Robert Magid. Juan’s grandparents are Rosa Olivares of the 1V Region of Chile, and the late Osvaldo Olivares; and the late Juan Garces Rubilar y Betsabé Hernandez Castro of Santiago, Chile. Jessica graduated with a bachelor’s degree from Brandeis University and a master’s degree from Emerson College in global marketing, advertising and communications. She is assistant registrar at the Nido de Aguilas International School. Juan graduated from the Las Americas University in Santiago with a degree in information technology, and works for comScore, Inc. as a software and web developer. A September wedding is planned.

B’nai Mitzva Lindsey Michelle Aranson, daughter of Rick and Nancy Aranson of Atlanta, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Jan. 21, at Tree of Life*Or L’Simcha Congregation. Grandparents are Patti G. Shensa of Pittsburgh, the late Michael J. Aranson, and Richard and Barbara Barnett of Jasper, Ga. Greatgrandparents are the late Dr. Joseph and Mae Greenberger and the late Milton and Pearl Aranson.

Zachary Dylan Fertal, son of Dave Fertal and Suzanne and Chris Nagel, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Jan. 21, at Temple Emanuel. Grandparents are Jamie Blatter, Russell Gries, and Susan and Ron Fertal.

Hannah Finestone, daughter of Angela and Ross Finestone, will become a bat mitzva Saturday, Jan. 21, at 10:30 a.m. at Temple Sinai. Grandparents are the late Judy Abbadini and Eileen and Stephen Finestone of Vero Beach, Fla.

Ellie Jill Levine, daughter of Gina Favish Levine and the late Stuart M. Levine, became a bat mitzva Dec. 27 in Jerusalem. Grandparents are Evelyn Favish, the late Rabbi Joseph H. Levine and the late Dr. Elinore C. Levine.

Brett Weinberg, son of Oscar and Laura Weinberg, will become a bar mitzva Saturday, Jan. 21, at Temple Beth Emet in Pembroke Pines, Fla. Grandparents are Morley and Cheryl Weinberg of Pittsburgh, Sandra Weinberg of North Miami Beach, and Charles and Isabelle Troy of Litchfield Park, Ariz.

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THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 15

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16 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

GLOBE Briefly

the case with the White House.

JointMedia News Service

Pop singer’s father apologizes for antiSemitic comment

Netanyahu: U.S. sanctions on Iran ineffective, more action needed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said Monday that the U.S. sanctions imposed on Iran so far have been ineffective, and that the international community should impose tougher measures on Tehran’s oil industry and its Central Bank, Israel Hayom reported. Speaking at a Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee meeting, Netanyahu said that Iran was penetrating Iraq at a fast pace and that instability in the country had increased since the United States withdrew its forces. Netanyahu said that the situation called for a strengthening of Israel’s defenses against aerial and ground attacks. Echoing Netanyahu’s remarks, Deputy Prime Minister and Strategic Affairs Minister Moshe Ya’alon said on Sunday that the U.S. government was not advancing tough sanctions against Iran due to internal political considerations during an election year. Ya’alon said that while the Iranian issue remains at the top of the global agenda, and European leaders in France and Britain are taking a hard line against Tehran by understanding the need for sanctions against it's oil exports and central bank, this was not

Rev. Keith Hudson, the father of pop megastar Katy Perry, apologized for antiSemitic comments he made, and argued that his words were taken out of context, ABC News reported. “You know how to make the Jew jealous? Have some money, honey. You go to L.A., and they own all the Rolex and diamond places. Walk down a part of L.A. where we live, and it is so rich it smells. You ever smell rich? They are all Jews, hallelujah. Amen,” he said at a church in a suburb of Cleveland on Jan. 5. After the Anti-Defamation League and the Simon Wiesenthal Center both condemned the remarks, Hudson released a statement, saying, “I used images about Jews rooted in the worst anti-Semitism in the past, images that at times led to the persecution and murder of Jews … I used them without ever considering what they meant.”

Jewish couple narrowly escapes sinking ship The Israel National News reported that several Jewish passengers, including Americans and Israelis, were rescued from the Italian Costa Concordia cruise liner that sank off the coast of

Tuscany last weekend. A young Jewish couple from Florida was having dinner on the ship when it hit a sandbar and flipped to the side. Joseph Saba, whose son David was on the ship, said: “They felt something hit from below, ‘Bap, bap, bap!’” After being rescued by a lifeboat, the couple is grateful they got away with their lives, although they lost all of their belongings. “He doesn't have a passport. They need to go to the embassy to see what they need to do to come back. They don’t have any clothes or anything,” Joseph Saba said. As of Sunday five people have been confirmed dead in the disaster, the BBC said.

Nazi railroads can’t do business with Florida Proposed legislation forces any railroad company to reveal whether it participated in the genocide of the Jewish people during the Holocaust before it can be allowed to do business with the state of Florida, The News Service of Florida reported. Bill S.B. 546 refers to any railroad company that transported Jews to Nazi concentration camps during World War II and is now seeking rail contracts from Florida. Specifically, however, the bill targets the French national railroad SNCF, which had been used by the Nazis for this purpose. SNCF wanted to plan a high-speed rail project in Florida last year, but Gov.

Rick Scott killed the project. Sen. Eleanor Sobel (D-Hollywood) sponsored the measure. It was unanimously approved and goes next to the Community Affairs Committee.

Survey shows most Jewish college students love Israel Young college Jews strongly support Israel, a new study sponsored jointly by The Israel Project and the American Israeli Cooperative Enterprise shows. Conducted by Public Opinion Strategies, the survey represents the opinion of 400 Jewish undergraduates. Among Jewish students, 66 percent said they feel close to Israel. This is comparable to the American Jewish Committee’s survey of the national Jewish community, in which 68 percent said the same. “Our survey found that Jews … believe that caring about Israel is an important part of being Jewish, think American and Israeli Jews share a common destiny and agree American Jews should support the policies of the government and express any criticism privately,” said Mitchell Bard, executive director of the nonprofit American Israeli Cooperative Enterprise and cofunder of the research. The survey shows that Jewish college students feel closer to Israel if they attended a Jewish day school, a summer camp, or were involved in a youth group.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 17

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TORAH Pausing to think Portion of the Week RABBI NOSSON SACHS UPMC SHADYSIDE Vaera, Exodus 6:2-9:35

Prior to the plague of hail, Pharoah and the people of Egypt were warned that anything left out in the field would be crushed and destroyed by the hail. The Torah relates that those who feared the word of G-d brought their cattle and property inside. Those who “did not pay attention” (asher lo sam leebo) left their servants and cattle out in the field to die. One would have to be quite dense to not get what was happening. Hail was already the seventh plague. By this time, Moshe had an established track record. How could anyone not take some precautions, fearing that perhaps Moshe would be right again? Rav Yissachar Frand offers an explanation: Those who “did not pay attention” were not only ignoring this warning about the plague of hail. They had never truly paid attention to any of the plagues. They were so numbingly immersed in their busy lives that they failed to notice that their world was falling apart. People like that can be banged over the head six times and it will not make a difference. They are people who do not stop to think about what is happening around them. When we’re done laughing at those blind Egyptians we need to turn our sight inward and wonder whether we

don’t suffer from the same disease. Our lives are full of mechanical and elecTheoretically, tronic conveniences. each one should make life easier and less hectic. We should have time to spare, but each one ultimately adds an additional level of speed and stress to life. The phones never stop, the email must be answered, text messages, tweets, carpools, television programs demand our time. We rush, sleep-deprived, through our days without pausing to notice where we are really going. This is a terrible disease. It can become so bad that one can see six plagues and it will not make an impression. Our marriages and children can be falling apart. We fail to notice. We entertain ourselves to death. Life is flying by unnoticed. The Talmud [Brochos 43b] states, “A person should not take big steps, because big steps diminish one’s eyesight by 1/500th. The remedy is Kiddush and Havdala.” What is the meaning of this Gemara? Perhaps the Gemara is telling us that Shobbos, which begins with Kiddush and ends with Havdala, is the antidote to our hectic (big step) lives. On Shobbos the hectic pace of life stops. It is replaced with gently burning candles, long meals, leisurely walks, time spent with family, Torah study and synagogue. Shobbos allows us to pause and think. Shobbos restores our vision and allows us to notice the miracles happening around us every day. Good Shobbos! (This column is a service of the Greater Pittsburgh Rabbinic Association.)

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18 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012

OBITUARY CHIZECK: On Saturday, Jan. 14, 2012, at Harrisburg Hospital, Rosalyn N. Chizeck, 84, of Harrisburg. She was born in Pittsburgh Nov. 4, 1927, to the late Michael and Florence (Fellman) Wnuk. A graduate of Schenley High School, she was the salutatorian of her class and attended the University of Pittsburgh. Rosalyn worked as a bookkeeper and was a consummate homemaker and mother. She was an active member and volunteer of Temple Ohev Sholom, in Harrisburg, and the Sisterhood of Temple Ohev Sholom. A past board member of Temple Ohev Sholom, she was active with B’nai B’rith Women. In 2006, she and her late husband, Aleck, received the community Mitzvah Heroes award from Temple Ohev Sholom for their volunteerism. Rosalyn was known as a very welcoming and outgoing person, making anyone and everyone feel at home at the Temple. She enjoyed reading, word games, keeping up with current events, singing and attending musical performances. She was the widow of Aleck H. Chizeck. Surviving are three daughters, Susan P. Chizeck and her husband William Pervin of Dallas; Janet R. Messer and her husband Stephen of Chandler, Ariz., Gerri L. Chizeck of Baltimore; siblings Irving Wnuk of Pittsburgh, Marshall Wnuk of Pittsburgh, Hermine Schwartz of Los Angeles, Phyllis Tucker of Pittsburgh; grandchildren Benjamin Messer, David Messer and Hannah Pervin. She was preceded in death by a brother, Gary Wnuk, and two sisters, Eleanor Kenan and Lois Braden. Services were held in the Book-

staber Chapel of Mount Moriah Cemetery, with Rabbi Peter Kessler officiating; interment at Mount Moriah Cemetery, Thursday, Jan. 19, at 7 p.m. in the Manor at Oakridge, 4500 Oakhurst Blvd. Harrisburg, PA. Contributions may be made to Temple Ohev Sholom 2345 N. Front St., Harrisburg, PA 17110 or to the Day School at Baltimore Hebrew, 7401 Park Heights Ave., Baltimore, MD 21208-5490. Arrangements by Hetrick-Bitner Funeral Home 3125 Walnut St., Harrisburg, PA 17109. www.hetrickbitner.com DUNN: On Sunday, Dec. 18, 2011, Rose Dunn, 105, originally from Ukraine, died peacefully at her home with family present. She was predeceased by her husband Abe Dunn and daughter Miriam Nadoff, and is survived by her daughter Bruche Sherman, 11 grandchildren and their spouses, and numerous great- and great-great-grandchildren. Interment was in Israel. A passionate supporter of Israel, she was a leader in the Pioneer Women’s organization, as well as Yeshiva Womens Auxiliary. An independent and inspirational woman, she is remembered for her wisdom, her charitable works, her compassion for others, her love of children, and her baking. Memorial contributions may be made to Jewish National Fund, 5915 Beacon St., 5th Floor, Pittsburgh, PA 15217, or Yeshiva Schools of Pittsburgh, 2100 Wightman St., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. GLYNN: On Tuesday, Jan. 10, 2012, Norman S. "Norm" Glynn, 81, of Delray Beach and formerly of Pittsburgh; beloved husband of Toby (Haber) Glynn; devoted father of Michael (Nancy) Glynn of Pittsburgh, Pamela (Andrew) Harris and Gary (Susan) Glynn

of Cincinnati; adoring grandfather of Trevor, Abby and Lindsey Hams, Alexandra Glynn, and Lauren and Joshua Glynn; brother of Charles Glynn and the late Stanley Glynn; also survived by dear nieces and nephews. Services and interment Temple Sinai Memorial Park, Plum. Contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, 320 Bilmar Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15205 or JDRF - Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, 960 Penn Ave., Ste. 1000, Pittsburgh, PA 15222. Arrangements by D'Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com

Mentser. Harvey was an attorney who worked as a public defender then later as a private practitioner. He was an avid sports fan. Services were held at the Beth-El section of Mt. Lebanon Cemetery; a memorial service was held at Montefiore Hospital. Contributions may be made to Squirrel Hill Meals on Wheels, 5005 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217, Carnegie Library, 4400 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 or Beth Israel Center, P.O. Box 10873, Pittsburgh, PA 15236. Arrangements by John F. Slater Funeral Home, Inc., 4201 Brownsville Road, Pittsburgh, PA 15227. www.johnfslater.com

LINTON: On Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012, Ruth (Arnheim) Linton; beloved wife of the late J. Leonard Linton; beloved mother of Harold (Nadyne) Linton, Robert (Karol) Linton, Leonard (Judy) Linton and Lee Linton; sister of the late Stanley Arnheim and Richard Arnheim; grandmother of David, Courtney, Michael, Matthew, Joshua and Jonathan; great-grandmother of Zachary, Zoe and Matthew; she will be missed by many nieces, nephews and friends. Ruth was a lifelong Pittsburgh resident, a successful business woman, and a talented weaver. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment West View Cemetery of Rodef Shalom Congregation. Contributions may be made to C.O.R.E., 204 Sigma Drive, Pittsburgh, PA 15238. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

NATHAN: On Friday, Dec. 30, 2011, in Aventura, Fla., Joseph (Jack) Bernard Nathan, formerly of Pittsburgh; beloved husband of Jackie; loving father, grandfather and great grandfather to his son Marc (Cathy) and their children Craig, Kevin (Catalina) and their child Mateo, Lindsay (Paul), Casey and Megan, and his daughter Janine Pawlowsky (Michael), and their children William (Alexandra) and Jason. He was predeceased by his parents Goldie and Frank, his sister Thelma and his brothers William and Raymond. Services were held at Levitt Weinstein Memorial Chapel; interment Vista Gardens Memorial Cemetery 14200 NW 57th Ave., Miami Lakes, FL 33014. www.vistamemorialgardens.com

MENTSER: On Sunday, Jan. 1, 2012, Harvey Bruce Mentser, 57, of Shadyside and formerly of Seattle; son of Genevieve "Jenny" (Helfgott) and the late Morris Mentser; brother of Susan

SACHS: On Wednesday, Jan. 11, 2012, Leon Sachs; beloved husband of the late Alice Vogel Sachs; beloved father of Marcia and Jerome Levin of N.Y., Synthia and Ira Weiss of N.H., and David and Cherisse Sachs of Calif.; also survived by five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Poale Zedeck Memorial Park Cemetery. Contributions may be made to a charity of the donor's choice. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com SOLOMON: On Thursday Jan. 12, 2012, Seymour Solomon, 94, of Squirrel Hill; beloved husband of 65 years of Ruth M. Solomon; loving father of Michele (Ken Fryncko) Solomon Fryncko and Jeffrey H. (Aileen) Solomon; grandfather of Jason Alan (Daniell) Baer, Melissa Polly and Adam Jacob Solomon, Kenneth J. (Gail) Fryncko Jr., and Stephanie Fryncko; great-grandfather of Olivia Please see Obituaries, next page.


THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012 — 19

METRO End of life: Continued from page 1. “Once a day, write down three to five things you are grateful for,” she said. “They can be little things. And writing it down is better than just thinking it. If you write it down regularly, you start to train your brain to think that way.” Having prioritized the important things in life can also help ease the dying process, Reiss said. And one should not wait until one is dying to do so. “Somewhere in this life — long before serious issues arise — we should not lose sight of what is truly important to us,” she said. “And what is most important to us is usually people. You would hate to wake up one day, and wish you had spent your life differently.” Achieving closure with loved ones can be crucial in lending comfort to those who are dying, said Ralph Capone, medical director of the Sivitz Jewish Hospice. To that end, it is sometimes best to choose hospice care, providing an opportunity to spend meaningful time with their family and friends, rather than dying in a hospital while undergoing extreme life-prolonging treatments. The goal of hospice is to provide symptom management, Capone said, not to hasten the dying process. At hospice, the emotional, spiritual, and psychological needs of a patient are treated, and pain management is provided. Hospice care is not curative. “We have to recognize the limits of technology, and recognize when technology is no longer serving the patient,” Capone said. “Treating human life with dignity is important until the end,” he said. In the Middle Ages, Capone noted, people died slowly at home, giving them time to make their final peace with family

Obituaries: Continued from previous page. and Alexa Baer, Owen and Cealy Fryncko and Nicholas Rodgers. As a member of the Greatest Generation, he was a World War II U.S. Army Tank Commander; he served in armored reconnaissance with the 12th Armored Division. As such, he was one of the first soldiers to enter and liberate the Dachau Concentration Camp. After the war, Solomon and his wife were proprietors of Milligram's General Store in Harwick, Pa. He worked as a mason for over 60 years; Solomon was a member of the Pollock Lodge in Tarentum, as well as the chairman of the trustees of the Jewish Family Assistance Fund. A private service was held in Homewood Cemetery. Contributions may be made to Young People's Synagogue, 6404 Forbes Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or to the Zionist Organization of America, Pittsburgh District, 6507 Wilkins Ave., Suite 102, Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by D'Alessandro Funeral Home, Ltd., 4522 Butler St., Pittsburgh, PA 15201. www.dalessandroltd.com TYSON: On Monday, Jan. 9, 2012, Shirley G. (Temeles) Tyson; beloved wife of Harvey J. Tyson and the late Dr. Harold Goldblum; beloved mother of Lee Goldblum, Pamela (Jeffrey Kaisershot) Goldblum, Jeffrey Goldblum and the late Rick Goldblum; sister of Arlen (Marlene) Temeles, the late Roy Temeles, and the late Bernice (late Joseph)

members and friends, and to have closure. “Today, we’re robbed of that opportunity,” he said. “And for many patients, it’s important to have that closure.” “Closure,” in fact, is the name of a five-year initiative, sponsored by the Jewish Healthcare Foundation, to help facilitate planning for the end of life, and to educate people about the various end-of-life options available to them. “Our overall goal is to change people’s expectations for care at the end of life,” said Nancy Zionts, chief program officer for the JHF. “Closure,” which can be found at closure.org, provides tools and resources for families, allowing them to be proactive in planning for the death of loved ones. “It’s mostly about conversations,” said Zionts, emphasizing that people should to talk about what they want and don’t want at the end of life. “It’s really important that families think about these issues when they are not in a crisis situation.” Like Capone, Zionts believes that lifeprolonging technology can rob people of a comfortable and peaceful end-of-life experience. “Often, we cure someone to death,” she said, adding that most people, if given the choice, would not wish to die attached to machines in a hospital. Hospice and palliative care are what people want when they are dying, Zionts said, but these choices need to be discussed before a death is imminent. “People need to know they have a right to direct their own care, and to even refuse care,” Zionts said. “Sometimes they find out too late that they could’ve been more of a player in their own life — and death.” (Toby Tabachnick can be reached at tobyt@thejewishchronicle.net.)

Geffner; sister-in-law of Evelyn Temeles; aunt of Jon (Molly) Tyson, Samantha (Michael Schwartz) Tyson, Marisa Porter, Gillian Porter, Lisanne (Jeff) Semion, Randy (Rhonda) Temeles, Sherri Temeles, Penny (Ralph Dioletta) Temeles, Tony Brockway, Sam (Gabriela Larios) Temeles, Sam (Mare) Geffner and Debbie (Bill Holcomb) Geffner. Services and interment were private. Contributions may be made to UPMC Shadyside Hospital c/o CardioPulmonary Rehabilitation, Suite #302, 523 S. Aiken Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com WEIN: On Sunday, Jan. 15, 2012, Joseph Wein, (four days shy of) 84; beloved husband and best friend of Rosalyn Eisner Wein; loving father of Cheryl (David) Weisberg, Tedd Wein, and Alisa (Robbie) Oppenheim; son of the late Thomas and Sophie Wein; brother of the late Morris Wein, Victor Wein, and Rosalyn Goldberg; brother-in-law of Sam and Irwin Eisner; grandfather of Lee, Elana, Robin, Amy, Michael and Sari; also survived by a niece, nephews and cousins. Services were held at Ralph Schugar Chapel; interment Beth Shalom Cemetery. Contributions may be made to B'nai B'rith, 1824 Murray Ave., Ste. 302, Pittsburgh, PA 15217 or HadassahGreater Pittsburgh Chapter, 1824 Murray Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15217. Arrangements by Ralph Schugar Chapel, Inc., 5509 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15232. www.schugar.com

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In MeMory of

DAVA BERKMAN .......................ESTHER BERKMAN CLARYNE & SANFORD BERMAN......................................ARTHUR W. FRIED CHARLOTTE BLUESTONE..........LEON BLUESTONE CHARLOTTE BLUESTONE ..........MORRIS VINCOUR PAULA CALLIS ..................................MEYER WEISS LOIS CRONE ............................DAVID SILVERBLATT STACEY EISNER..............................LOTTIE GERBER SHIRLEY ESTNER ............................HELEN CITRON WILLIAM FAIRMAN....................GEORGE FAIRMAN WILLIAM FAIRMAN ....................FLORENCE STONE SHERMAN FARBSTEIN............JULIA P. FARBSTEIN ROBERTA FELDMAN ...........JOSEPHINE FELDMAN SHARON & MORRY FELDMAN ...................................JEFFREY S. WEISS EILEEN FOX...................................MOLLIE SAMUEL ABE FRIEDMAN ...................................MILTON RIPP SHIRLEY GOLD..........................JACOB J. GORDON SUSAN GOLDMAN ...............ISADORE PACHTMAN MARK HELLER ...................................ETHEL RUBEN BELLA HEPPENHEIMER...............................HELENE HEPPENHEIMER ILENE ISKOE .................MARTHA TRACHTENBERG MARY JATLOW.................................CELIA GLANTZ LESLIE & CAROL ANN KLEIN ...........................................ERNESTINE KLEIN SHARON KNAPP .........................NETTIE GALANTY SHARON KNAPP .................................LEAH KNAPP LEONARD KOPELSON .............MIRIAM KOPELSON

Donor

In MeMory of

DR. SEYMOURE KRAUSE......SAMUEL M. KRAUSE JACK LANDIS ...............................RAE G. LEBOVITZ JERRY & JUDITH LEBOVITZ ....................................ELSEI P. LEBOVITZ MEL & RACHEL LEFF............................JAMES LEFF JAY LIPP...................................................ALICE LIPP IRENE S. LOUIK ......................BERTHA ACKERMAN MARY B. MARKS ............................JOSEPH BAKER MARY B. MARKS ........................ESTHER R. KARPO IDA JEAN & ROBERT MCCORMLEY.....................BENJAMIN SILBERMAN S. SANFORD NEFT ........................FLORENCE NEFT MARCIA & JOEL PLATT..............MADYLENE PLATT RONNA ROBINSON ........................MILTON LINDER ARLYNE SEGALL ...........HARRY & RAE BERNNARD MR. AND MRS. MARTIN SILVERMAN............................MOLLIE GREENFIELD DALE SINGER ................................SAMUEL SLOAN JOYCE SINIAKIN & FAMILY .......................................JENNIE MURSTEIN JOYCE SINIAKIN & FAMILY ...........................PHILLIP & BESSIE ESCOTT EVELYN SOLOMON ....................JOSEPH & JENNIE SHRAYER LYNDA LEE STERN .......SYLVIA & EDWARD STERN IRIS TENNENBAUM ......................ABE KOTOVSKTY ARNOLD WAGNER..........................TILLIE SCHILLIT

SUNDAY, JANUARY 22: RUTH BOIMEL, NATHAN COHEN, EVA DAVIDSON, ABRAHAM J. EPSTEIN, GERTRUDE FRIEDLANDER, ISADORE GOODMAN, MARY UNIKEL HEDEMAN, HARRY LEGON, MAX LEVENSON, TILLIE LEVENSON, MAX LEVINE, VICTOR LEVINE, ESTHER MALLINGER, JULIA MANKIN, MAURICE MARKEL, ROSE H. MIRSKEY, DAVID NEWMAN, BENJAMIN G. OCHS, MARIAN POLLACK, ESTHER RACUSIN, SAMUEL RATUSCH, EUGENE NEIL REUBEN, SARAH ROTH, ANNA RUZENWICH, MORRIS SCHAFFEL, ROSE SCHWARTZ, LEAH SHEINBERG, NACHUM RUBEN SISSMAN, LOUIS SNYDER, RAE SOLOMON, ROSE STONE, DR. LEONARD STUTZ, PAULINE WEINER, TANIA YORK, BENJAMIN A. ZACKS, ISAAC ZECHER, ABRAM M. ZIEDEN, ABRAM M. ZIEDMAN. MONDAY, JANUARY 23: PHILIP BACKER, JACK BERMAN, BERNARD BIGG, AARON H. BRAUNSTEIN, DAVID DUGAN, LOUIS FINEBERG, ABRAHAM J. FRIEDMAN, LAWRENCE F. FRIEDMAN, SAM GERSON, HARRY GLICK, JAMES A. GLICK, NATHAN GREENBERG, FRANCES S. WINSBERG GUSKY, SAMUEL HARRIS, SARAH KALLUS, HARRY LEBOW, BETTY LENCHNER, DORA R. LEVENSON, FANNY LEVINE, ABE D. LEVY, BESS LEVY, JACOB LINDER, ESTHER LIPSICH, VIOLET SEMINS PARIS, MINNIE PECARSKY, BESSIE KRASIK RASKIN, ISADORE REISBERG, FANNIE FINKELPEARL ROBIN, CHARLOTTE RUBIN, BEN SCOLNIK, ABE SEEWALD, LENA SEGAL, JACOB SHAPIRO, SARAH ESTHER SILVERBLATT, REBECCA SISSER, DR. BERNARD J. SLONE, FANNIE SMOLEVITZ, ESTHER CHARIE SOLOMON, JENNIE S. SOLOMON, ROSE STEINBERG, ANN TERGULITZA, MYER TOIG, FREDA VENETSKY, SAM R. WEISS, ISRAEL J. WILLIAMS. TUESDAY, JANUARY 24: REBECCA BETTY ALPERT, BLANCHE STEIN BANOV, MATILDA BARNETT, IRENE BLOOM, CECILE K. BROWN, IDA SCHERMER BURSTIN, FLORENCE RAVICK FISHKIN, GOLDIE FRIEDMAN, HERMAN FRIEDMAN, BESSIE GOLDSTEIN, HARRY B. HARRIS, LEOPOLD HEPPENHEIMER, JENNIE HOFFMAN, ALEX HONIG, VIVIAN S. HYMAN, SAMUEL KLEIN, CARL J. KLETZ, ALBERT LEBOVITZ, JAMES LEFF, DAVID LEVY, MATHILDA LINDNER, ILENE GROSSMAN MATTOCK, TEMA MESSER, HAROLD MITTMAN, MAYER ODLE, MAYER OLDE, HELEN ORTH, BERNARD PERIS, MORRIS ROSENBLOOM, LEAH ROSENFELD, BEATRICE RITA WEIL RUBEN, DR. MAX A. RUBINSTEIN, ESTHER SADOWSKY, ELIZABETH ALPERT SAPEER, ANNA L. SAVILLE, MAX SCHLESSINGER, HARRY SCHMIDT, GERTRUDE SHAKESPEARE, MORRIS SHENDOWICH, RABBI KALMAN SLIFKIN, WILLIAM SOLOMON, WILLIAM SPOKANE, BENJAMIN STEIN, MORTON STEIN, ROSE TAUBER WASSER, ANNA WATTENMAKER, ROSE WEDNER, JONAS H. WEIL, GOLDIE WOLFE, MARY SULKES WOLK. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25: EMIL BAHM, SYLVIA S. BERGER, FRANCES LEVENSON CAREY, RUTH H. COHEN, FANNY EISENFELD, HARRY T. FEINBERG, NOCHIM GELMAN, PHILIP GOLDBLUM, NORMA MARKS KLEIN, SAMUEL E. KLEIN, MILTON E. KLEIN, MD, ANNE KLIEGER, ROSE L. KLINE, SAMUEL LEVINE, ESTELLE E. MARTIN, JACOB ALEX MILLER, JACOB H. MILLER, BESSIE NETZER, HAROLD J. PASEKOFF, RACHEL PLACK, DR. GEORGE RAFFEL, IRWIN REUBEN, SAMUEL RICHMAN, MOLLIE ROBINSON, SAMUEL ROBINSON, JACOB ROSENBERG, LOUIS L. SCHWARTZ, EVA SEDER, ANNA SHAPIRO, ANNA SHAPIRO, BESSE GRINBERG SHAPIRO, SOPHIE SHAPIRO, ANNA SIGESMUND, CHAIM SILBERBLATT, CHAIM SILBERBLATT, SOLOMON SILKEN, YETTA SINGER, HENRY SOLOMON, ELDER H. STEIN, BERTHA STEINITZ, ALBERT J. SUPOWITZ, ROSE TABOR, LOUIS TENENOUSER, DAVID VICTOR, JOHN D. WHITEMAN, GOLDIE H. ZACKS. THURSDAY, JANUARY 26: ISABELLE PITLER BACKER, MOLLIE BECK, BEN BREMAN, SAMUEL DARLING, IRVIN FRANK, HARRY FRIEDMAN, LOUIS M. GARDNER, GOLDIE GOLD, SAMUEL SHY GOODMAN, SIDNEY H. GREEN, JOSEPHINE CITRON GROSS, FLORENCE HIEDOVITZ, LUCILLE UNGER HILL, PAUL IBE, MAX M. JACOBSON, FANNIE KLEIN, ROSE KLEIN, REGINA KOSSMAN, MORRIS KROW, ETHEL KRUKOFF, SARAH LEIBER, ISAAC A. LEWIS, ROSE LINDER, ABRAHAM MANDELBLATT, SOLOMON MIDDLEMAN, SIMON MOLL, YITTA MOSKOWITZ, MEYER POPKINS, LOUIS ROSENBLOOM, LOUIS Z. RUBIN, FANI SAFIR, JOSEPH SAFIR, HARRY SAUL, BLANCHE L. SCHWARTZ, BERNICE SEMINS, MABEL H. SHAEFFER, LENA SHAPIRO, SYLVIA SILBERMAN, WILLIAM SIVITZ, ABA MARJASZ SOMMERSTEIN, WILLIAM SUGAR, ABA MARJASZ SUMMERSTEIN, RUSSELL TANUR, JOSEPH WEISS, BENNETT ZEFF. FRIDAY, JANUARY 27: SAMUEL BAEM, BERTHA BAER, HARRY N. BAILISS, LIBBIE CALLET, R. OSCAR COHEN, SARA T. DAVIDSON, GEORGE J. FAIRMAN, JOSEPH GRAY, DR. JOHN J. HORWTIZ, SARA R. JACOBSON, SAM KAUFMAN, LILLIAN KLEIN, MAX KWELLER, FANNIE KWALWASSER LAZAR, REGINA GLUCK LEBEAU, SCHIMEN HIRSH LEVIN, MORRIS LEVY, KATIE LINCOFF, JOSEPH H. LUXENBERG, MAURICE A. MARCUS, HARRY MEYER, MARY MYERS, IRWIN NEWMAN, LT. LOUIS NEWMAN, LOUIS POLLOCK, HARRY PRETTER, RACHAEL RAPAPORT, BELLA RICHMAN, DOROTHY ROSENTHAL, MAX ROTH, MAX RUBIN, MOLLIE SAMUEL, NATHAN SCHEIN, MARTIN E. SELIGMAN, JACOB SHAPINSKY, DR. ABRAHAM SHAPIRA, OTTO SLIFKIN, FLORENCE STONE, PAULINE STRAUSS, MEYER STRENG, MOSES TENENBAUM, MOSES R. TRAUERMAN, JENNIE WALK, IRENE M. WOLFE, ETTA YOUNG, VICTORIA ZIMMER. SATURDAY, JANUARY 28: GERTRUDE BERENFIELD, HARRY BERNNARD, NATHAN BILDER, SIGMUND BLOCK, PAUL CARPE, JOEL DAVID COHEN, MORRIS COHEN, LILLIAN COOK, MINNIE FARBER, MORRIS FLESHMAN, SAMUEL J FRANKEL, PAUL FREEDMAN, JENNIE GLICK, RAYMOND GORDON, SANFORD K. GREENBERG, MORRIS GROSSMAN, LIPA HAIMOVITZ, JOSEPH HERMAN, EDWARD HERTZ, ROSE KITMAN, ANNA HARR KRAUSE, HARRY LAUTMAN, SYLVIA LEBMAN, IDA RAE LEVENSON, JULIUS A. LEVY, YETTA MALITOVSKY, MAY MARIANS, MORRIS OSGOOD, MADYLENE PLATT, DORA PLEET, ISSAC PORTNOY, JACK QUINT, HERMAN A. REICH, FANNIE ROSE, DOROTHY ROSENTHAL, ALEC SAMUELS, DR.EUGENE J. SCHACHTER, ROSE SCHWARTZ, ROSE SCHWARTZ, REUBEN SHURE, SHOLEM SIGLER, GERTRUDE SILBERMAN, JACOB SILVERBLATT, MAX SILVERMAN, MILTON SILVERSTEIN, DR. DAVID SIMON, JACOB W. SIMON, RACHEL SINGER, SADIE KURTZ SNIDER, HARRY SPERO, JULIA STERN, HYMAN SUGAR, DR. NOAH L. SUNSTEIN, PEARL VOLENSKY, ALVIN WEINBERGER, ESTHER PAKLER WEISS, MOISHY N. WOLOVITZ, WILLIAM A. ZEFF,


20 — THE JEWISH CHRONICLE JANUARY 19, 2012


The Jewish Chronicle January 19, 2012