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GottaRace.com.au Go G t aaR Race. cee coom om m.aa

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Who is Highline Magazine Editor: Brett Swanson Artist/Layout; Andy Ticehurst Contributors; Kaylene Oliver, Grant Woodhams, Andy Ticehurst, Shaun McDonald Photographers: Brett Swanson – Pirate Media Kieran Swanson – Pirate Media Andy Ticehurst – Andy Ticehurst Media Brett Williams – Lone Wolf Photography Geoff Gracie (SA) Wayne Martin (WA) Anthony Loxley / Full Throttle Publishing

Cover: Main: 2022 Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic (GASC) winner Lachlan McHugh. Bottom: More GASC Action as both Luke Stirton (left) and American Carson Macedo (right) are mid wreck. Inside cover: The sun beats down on the crews and fans as Time Trials commence on night two of the GASC.

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Editorial

Welcome to edition 31. To say that Highlines co-creator and layout artist Andy Ticehurst has really pulled his finger out on this issue is an understatement! Just over a week after the running of the South West Conveyancing 49th Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic, Issue 31 our “Classic” issue, is out full of our Classic coverage in words and pics thanks to the combined efforts of ace lensman Geoff Gracie and yours truly. Legendary scribe Grant Woodhams has once again scoured the library of historic shots provided by Anthony Loxley and Full Throttle Publishing and come up with his thoughts on the always changing body styles of speedway sedans in a stunning pictorial layout. The summer high season has been one a bit different to anything we’ve seen before. Tyre supply issues from Hoosier tires has meant that many teams have changed the way they race. No longer are they throwing tyres at the car as needed but rather they are being cautious and sometimes not risking their stock when a charge through the B-Main is required to make a secondary show. While this is a little bit tough on the fans, it is done with the bigger picture in mind. No one want’s to win a preliminary show only to run out of tyres while contesting the Grand Annual Classic. Now with the Classic over for another year,

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PIRATES POINT OF VIEW

maybe they will be a little less reticent to use the tyres on hand. Speaking of tyre supply issues, Highline understands it’s not across all brands, but rather across the preferred brand – Hoosier moreso than the others. Hoosier (now owned by Continental tire) in recent years has outsourced a lot of its rubber supply and tyre manufacture away from its US base for greenhouse and other reasons and then Covid has had such an effect that the sup-

ply has been disrupted. Word is that towards the end of last season the Outlaws were often using used rubber when possible. This means that supply is restricted and hence prices are up also. Incredibly our supposed peak governing body Speedway Australia is helping to fund the airfreight of Hoosier tyres to Australia. But that begs the question, what about the other brands and other classes?

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Last saturday night (Jan 29th) was Matt Smiths win in the Australian Speedcar Championship at Brisbane’s speedway. Congratulations to Matt and the team. They are worthy winners. Congratulations also to placegetters Kaidon Brown and Travis Mills and

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commiserations to defending title holder American Carson Macedo who was looking good until has car refused to fire for the all important 40 lap final. It has not been a good tour for the Californian and the Sean Dyson team in either the Sprintcar or the Speedcar.


PIRATES POINT OF VIEW

A big get well to Cal Whatmore and the gentleman in the crowd who was injured when Cal rode out a wicked wreck in the Speedcar title. Highline hopes both have a speedy and full recovery. Another Dumesny has scored a win at Warrnambool, with Matt Dumesny winning the prestigious Graeme McCubbin trophy at the Victorian Championship on January 1. That means Max, Marcus and now Matthew have all scored big wins at Max’s track. Interesting observer at that event was Kraig Kinser who is part of the Dumesny clan as long-time partner to Michaela Dumesny. Unfortunately Kinser left Australia

shortly after and was unavailable to race the Classic. Maybe next year? And finally, even though the 49th Classic has only just been run and won, nearly every Sprintcar fan in the land is already looking forward to the 50th running of the event next year when hopefully the whole country can race together as well as a horde of international invaders all vying for the $50,000 first place prize money, something that Highline Magazine announced two years ago, but that was finally officially announced last weekend. Enjoy.

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SEDANS......... THE SHAPE OF THINGS PAST

Article by Grant Woodhams

Photo’s courtesy Anthony Loxley/Full Throttle Publishing. 8

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he first speedway sedan race in Australia was held in the 1950’s. There were ‘races’ at several tracks when the Stock Car craze swept Australia. But it is difficult to name an exact date when a pure stand alone sedan race without the deliberate crashing and bashing, that the Stock Cars were famous for, was held. There is some evidence to suggest it was held at the Skyline track in the hills of Adelaide though ultimately that is a difficult fact to prove. But Skyline’s Bill Evans promoted a division called Australian Hot Rod Stock Cars as early as 1955. A program cover from that year at the Skyline Motordrome shows a handsome field of sedans, mainly composed of pre-World War Two American sedans. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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From my own perspective I started going to Westmead and Windsor speedways in Sydney in the early 1960’s and both tracks had substantial numbers of drivers racing in what were known as Stock Rods. Other tracks in other States had similar divisions and most of these vehicles utilised the bodies of pre-World War Two American cars although there was also a smattering of British and European makes. At Westmead it was difficult not to notice the

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Peugeot of Gary Cooke nor the Vanguard of Alan Adams. Both drivers and their cars were of substantial ability. But apart from exceptions such as Cooke or Adams (who eventually gave up the Vanguard for an older American style) the Fords, Dodges, Buicks, Chevrolets and Chryslers dominated. But by the mid 1960’s more modern body shapes had started to creep into the sport. One of the first that I noticed was future Speedcar star Howard Revell’s blue and white FX Holden. Realistically finding a suitable body with engine to race as a Stock Rod was becoming a harder assignment. The changing body styles would foreshadow a huge change to sedan racing and within a few years the once popular Stock Rods had almost disappeared. In

their place all over Australia came what were generically referred to as Production Sedans, although the actual name differed from State to State and sometimes from track to track. These were the cars we all drove. A vast collection of makes and models. During the early 1970’s there was everything from Minis to Monaros and they all raced together until the Sedan sanctioning bodies determined otherwise and created different categories. But mainly we were able to recognise the body shape of a vehicle, an HK Holden, a GTHO Falcon. Yes hard to believe but cars only a few years old at the time raced at the speedway. Rotary Mazdas, Jaguar XJ6’s, Citroens, P-76’s, they were all there. Volkswagens even!

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It was an era when some would argue that the sedan was king. It was easy to identify with the cars and when Grenville Anderson ruled the roost in his Holden Toranas some of us thought that sedans would always remain at number one! But the big spending end, the division that ultimately became Super Sedans, started to move away from the cars we’d most likely see on the street. Corvettes and Mustangs rolled onto the track, an American team turned up in Chevrolet Monzas and soon the game started to be played a different way. Meanwhile the creation of five distinct racing divisions by the then Australian Sedan Car Federation (nowadays known as Speedway Sedans Australia) saw Holden Commodores and Ford Falcons consolidate their positions in the speedway

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world. Depending on what was seen as the better vehicle at the time sometimes entire fields of Street Stocks and Modified Sedans in particular would be made up exclusively of these two makes. And on some occasions an entire field might be one particular brand, if not model. It was a far cry from the all makes racing that had founded the sport. Today when it comes to Super Sedan or Late Model racing, arguably the pinnacle of speedway sedan competition in Australia, there is virtually nothing about the shape of the car that is vaguely like a modern car. The body is simply a shell wrapped around a purpose built chassis and engine. A pure speedway vehicle with no resemblance to anything we know.

I take nothing away from Late Model or Super Sedan drivers and their cars. Their racing is magnificent and their machinery first class. A far cry if you like from the dizzy days when pre-WW2 cars were all you had. But the character of racing has changed enormously. There are no longer any David v Goliath battles of Mini v Monaro, Fiat v Ford... the lovely shapes of a sedan world that is now mainly a distant memory.

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This years’ 49th annual South West Conveyancing Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic was a “classic” event in every sense of the word and despite some difficult scenarios around tyre supply and a new track surface, the final result was worthy of the title. The winner was pacey from Thursday night at Mt Gambier’s Kings 16

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Challenge where he was unlucky not to win and then smashed all comers on the opening qualifying night of the Classic before having to fight hard to score his first Grand Annual Classic win. Who? None other than Queenslander Lockie McHugh driving the Nick Speed fettled, Barry Waldron owned NQ7. McHugh started from pole for the main event and led early until two


time and defending champ James McFadden surged past to take up the front running on lap six. McHugh led lap seven and McFadden lap eight through lap 25 when McHugh retook the lead which he maintained until the end. McHugh also set the fastest lap of 11.077 seconds on his second rotation. McHughs’ margin of victory was a mere .322 seconds.

The only constants were 2018 Champion Corey McCullagh who started 3rd and held that position throughout the race, and fourth starting and finishing Grant Anderson who had a great weekend winning an ultra-exciting feature on night two, but more on that later. To keep the trend going maybe we should rename him Grant McAnderson. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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A relaxed Jamie Veal scored fifth ahead of Ian Madsen, the everimproving Tate Frost and the hard charging, and sole American in the field, Carson Macedo, who charged from 23rd (2nd last) to eighth. Ryan Jones (5th) fell to ninth and former Champ Robbie Farr pushed the Saller Racing entry from 13th to complete the top ten. Lisa Walker became the first South Australian female to qualify for the big dance but sadly was the first and only retirement after 9 of the 40 scheduled laps.

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Avalon. As always, the build-up started midweek at Avalon raceway before a large crowd for the running of the Presidents Cup. McFadden’s Monte Farms WA17 was immediately on the pace setting fastest qualifying time while McCullagh (South West Conveyancing) set fourth fastest time. However, McCullagh hit the wall and spun and stalled on his first lap so only his slowest time would count set on the crash lap. Still, to go actually lap fourth quick with an out of square car was a fair effort not that it counted for anything.


The different race format of Time Trials and only one heat per car meant that a couple of favoured competitors packed up early after unsatisfactory heat runs concerned about tyre supply for the Classic and not being willing to risk burning up some rubber in attempts to qualify through the C and B Mains.

Walker who is forced to do his racing south of his home state won the CMain from Marcus Green having his first race with a 410 and who led the first six laps, and Tim Van Ginneken and Andrew Hughes.

In between the C and B Mains the fireworks display was launched while The hot weather (30 degrees +), which track works were undertaken entertainprevailed for the whole five days, ing the fans who barely noticed the made it hard for all clubs to keep a Drew family rework the track. good track under the drivers despite their valiant efforts. A further delay was endured however when the VFRS (Victorian Fire and Tate Frost, Bobby Daly, Dayn BentvRescue Service) truck left the infield to elzen and Matthew Dumesny won the try and douse a grass fire across the four heat races. road allegedly started by a fireworks Impressive Queenslander Callum ember. The local Lara CFA (Country HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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Fire Authority) soon arrived allowing the VFRS to return to the track and for the B-Main to begin.

tyre wear and moved up two spots to make the transfer with Cameron Waters completing the transferees as Paul Solomon put on a late charge Brett Milburn led the B-Main flag to that really would have benefitted flag with Brendan Quinn holding sec- from a mid-race caution period. ond for the duration. Veal risked the

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Buddies Jack Lee and McFadden would share the front row for the prestigious Presidents Cup and despite his best efforts, Lee couldn’t hold back McFadden from leading every lap and scoring his third straight Presidents cup. Farr shortly

passed Lee for second while Matt Egel grabbed third by lap 5 and the threw it all at Farr at each and every opportunity. Sadly, the track was not conducive to two wide racing and Egel lost a position each time he tried an outside pass eventually

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finishing fifth behind Lee and states- and fourth. man Daniel Pestka. This meeting also saw the return of Peter Doukas, Ian Madsen, Veal, Bordertowns’ Dylan Jenkin after a Matt Dumesny, and Quinn all put on multi-year lay-off and he qualified solid forward charges to complete straight into the feature as fourthe top ten. teenth qualifier but failed to finish the final. Brenten Farrer and Marcus Dumesny were eliminated early with In the main event McHugh outFarrer heading skyward. gunned McFadden off the line to lead with veal pushing J-Mac back Anderson and Tate became entan- even further on lap four. gled and then Frost was run over and eliminated by Veal as Frost and Anderson became untangled. On lap 10 a freak power outage A close shave for Veal who was plunged the whole track into darkamazingly able to continue. ness at full race speed. Google Dyson Motorsport for in car footage of Mt Gambier the back out with Macedo. The heat failed to let up as the teams and fans trapsed across the Incredibly, no one ran into each border to Mt Gambier where a pow- other or the wall in what was a er black-out made this an unforget- very scary situation as Ryan Jones table night for the wrong reasons. stated, “I’ve never been scared in a After 37 cars had taken time in four Sprintcar before until then!” groups McHugh emerged fastest on 10.914 with McFadden, Ryan Jones Quick reactions by the infield perand Veal fastest in their respective sonal saw car headlights quickly ilgroups and in cumulative order. luminated to at least add some light The traditional two heats per car to the situation. were won by Egel, McHugh, McFadden, Madsen, Steven Lines, Following the obligatory waiting Marcus Dumesny, Jock Goodyer period for the track lights to cool and Ben Morris. before they could be re-lit, the race resumed and it seemed the break Guns Farr and Egel were forced had benefited McFadden who by into the B-Main where they ran Lap thirteen was back in second first and third respectively with Joel place and then took the lead with Heinrich and Brock Hallett second five laps to run going on to win from 22

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an unlucky McHugh, Veal, David Murcott (as good as it would get for Murky’ this weekend) and Macedo. Warrnambool Friday. The first half of the split field faced the scorching heat on Friday, and something seemed to be missing from the event. It didn’t have the hype and expectation of previous years, probably due to the effects of Covid and the lack of Americans in the field. Still, for the purists it was a big Sprintcar show with top quality combatants, but McHugh showed from the get-go that he was going to be a true contender. The first of two flights, yes two – a controversial issue - was led by Veal’s 10.576 lap with the top six drivers all under 11 seconds.

citing the fact that the track was sitting baking under the sun and the later runners would be disadvantaged. This outcry was led by McHugh. Finally, the top 8 cars, including Lisa Walker were all under the 11 second mark. Bobby Daly and Madsen won the opening heats and McHugh won the third which saw the demise of contender Darren Mollenoyux in a rollover. McCullagh, Frost, Macedo, McHugh, and young Queenslander Cody Maroske won the remaining heats that ran without major incident.

The B-Main was won by Farrer from the unlucky Brock Hallett, Adam King and Lachlan McDonough. McHugh had been running wide open from his first lap but Madsen McHugh was quickest of the second beat him off the line in the prelimiflight at 10.581, but this was beset nary feature and led the first dozen with dramas after a handful of cars laps of the A-Main before McHugh had set times when the ambulance finally secured a solid pass and led was urgently dispatched to attend the remainder of the race, winning a gentleman just outside the entry by 2.655 seconds. McCullagh, Macgates who’d suffered a heart attack. edo and Veal completed the top five Sadly, that man passed away. High- in a locked down speed fest. line extends its condolences to the As a consolation, Madsen set the gentleman’s family and friends. fastest lap of the race in a race that While the paramedics were doing was a bit processional in the latter their utmost to save a life, some half. competitors were agitating to get the complete second flight re-run 24

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Saturday Saturday was another hot day with the other half of the hot field. This group seemed more competitive if time trials were any indication with McFadden setting fast time in flight 1 at 10.716 from Anderson and Farr, with the top 11 cars all under 11 seconds. Eleventh quick was Jordyn Brazier having his first race in two years - you couldn’t tell. The second flight saw Goodyer quickest from Grant “Slayer” Stansfield as the only two drivers in the ten second bracket as the track was obviously slowing already. McFadden opened his account with a win in the opening heat that saw Phil Micallef ride out a wild wreck in only his second run with a 410 under the bonnet. Anderson, Egel, and Stansfield won the opening cluster of heats before McFadden, Ryan Jones, Ryan Newton and Luke Stirton won the inverted heats.

It started with McFadden and Callum Walker sharing the front row and as expected J-Mac launched into the lead with Walker holding onto second for the first five laps before Anderson took over the chasing. From here the race became enlivened as Anderson ran down McFadden and the pair commenced a battle that had the fans on their toes. Following a restart Anderson divedunder McFadden into turn three and half the infield erupted but when the cautions flew the concern was that J-Mac would not let that happen next time around. Anderson however would not be denied and officially took the lead on lap 20 but the battle continued with McFadden trying the top to no avail. Meanwhile Marcus Dumesny had been moving up from his seventh starting position to be third and closing in. With just a handful of laps to go the top three were locked together and then on the last lap the track was blocked by a cluster of lapped cars all fighting each other.

Ricky Maiolo, Ben Morris, Glen Sutherland and Jack Lee made the transfer from the B-Main leaving favoured guns Goodyer and Murcott out of luck. Would this cost Anderson a deserved win as he got blocked in? Saturdays A-main was the great Would the path luckily open for eipart of the weekend as the final ther J-Mac or Dumesny to grab the turned into a brilliant race. win? We all held our breath! HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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Dennis Jones ignores the heat from this belching oil fire off the headers at Ava 26

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was also caught out in this heat As the trio came off turn four for the when Jamie Heyen had a wild molast time Anderson was still in front, ment and McHugh was unable to just, with Dumesny snatching secavoid him. McHugh got the meond on the line from McFadden in a chanical defect flag which means thrilling finish. he was still classified as a heat finisher and with the points that go The official margins were 0.156 to with it despite only completing two Dumesny and 0.574 to McFadden. laps – the sixth place points would Slayer Stansfield was fourth a mere prove hugely beneficial. 0.321 seconds off a podium finish with Ryan Jones completing the top Hallett finally had some luck go his five. way with a win in heat two and Michael Tancredi found some speed Anderson explained in victory lane, to take out heat three. “Normally I ease up towards the end but this time I didn’t”. Heat four hurt Macedo’s chances McFadden conceded. “I just when he and Matthew Reed were couldn’t run the top. I tried.” sliding each other at each end of The stage was now set for a comthe track until slight contact bebined field to survive one more tween the pair saw Macedo ride out heat, and the heat of a new day to a wild looking wreck. Chris McInerset up another Classic final. ney won the heat. Sunday.

Heat 5 was straight forward with Goodyer getting the win as did The final set of heats can kill your Troy Hose and Dayn Bentvelzen in chances of becoming a Classic the next two heats. Note how the champion but even a non-finish in “Guns” were struggling to move forhis final heat, really didn’t hamper ward in the reverse points heats. McHughs’ challenge but it did hurt a The final heat saw Andrew Hughes couple of others. grab a win while Luke Stirton exited in high flying fashion after contact Farrers challenge stayed alive in with Cameron Waters. the opening heat but Matthew Dumesny was done and dusted when With all the heats and preliminary McDonough tagged the wall and features run the points were tallyed Dumesny couldn’t avoid him and and Hallett and Coby Elliot jumped flipped. The car was junked while from C-Main 1 to the back of BDumesny had a sore neck. McHugh Main 1 and Dennis Jones and Hose 28

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went from C-2 to B-2.

the infield for a class photo followed by introductions and a fireworks disB-Main 1 saw the first “Open” red at play. All of this was done after more Warrnambool for some time when track work was performed leaving Ross Jarred had a wild flip in turn many wondering why all this wasn’t three that damaged the catch fence done while the track prep was bewhich needed repairing. ing undertaken. The open red highlighted Macedo’s frustration when he came over and had words with Reed about their earlier heat race clash. Clearly the Americans mind wasn’t totally focused on the B-Main and a shot at making the feature.

Despite his near miss McHugh was on pole from McFadden and McCullagh. Anderson, Ryan Jones, Madsen, Veal, Marcus Dumesny, Lisa Walker, Frost, Stansfield, Terry Rankin, Farr, Maroske, Jordyn Charge, Milburn, Pestka, Daly, Jake Smith, Egel, Hutchins, Quinn, MacMore strangeness happened earlier edo and Delamont completing the when Tim Hutchins hit the turn two 24 starters for the 49th Classic. marker tyre and knocked it onto the As stated at the outset McHugh led infield where it was hit by Tancredi. away until a brief back and forth A dispute then ensued as Hutchins battle went the way of McFadden who was clearly the cause of the as Macedo started his rise through incident was restarted back in his the pack. original running position. Frantic efforts by a couple of teams to get By lap 9 the race would see its only Hutchins put to rear of the field fol- retirement from Lisa Walker with lowing the Open red clearly came numerous great battles going on to nought despite photographic throughout the pack. evidence of Hutchins triggering the incident. McHugh was shadowing McFadden while McCullagh and Anderson When all the drama was over were never far away in their own Hutchins kept his third place behind battle but not quite quick enough to Daly and Jake Smith and ahead really threaten the lead duo. of Macedo and was into the big dance. With 14 laps left to run McHugh B-2 saw Pestka, Egel, Quinn and retook the lead as this high-speed Jackson Delamont graduate to the race continued non-stop with conmain event also. cerns now turning to tyre longevity The qualifiers were assembled on and whether they could maintain HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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Tim Van Ginneken (44), Lachlan McHugh (NQ7) and Carson Macedo (N99) ba into the A-Main. The other two packed up early. 30

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attle out the Presidents cup. Only Van Ginnken would attempt to race his way

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this 11 second per lap pace and still Classic which will be the fiftieth runhave enough tyre tread to make the ning of this grand event after it was end of the race. formally announce by Tanya and Alistair McKean from South West So, for the first time since 2015, the Conveyancing that the event would Classic feature went 40 laps nonpay $50,000 to the winner, as restop with only one retirement, a vealed by Highline Magazine about credit to the drivers, crews and War- two years ago. rnambool club who’d all toiled hard over three, four or five 30+ degree Expect a return to the hype and real days. It wasn’t a 40-lap record but it excitement that this event generates was a damn good race with different and deserves, but which was lackrace leaders and a new champion ing slightly from this-years running, in McHugh. as a top-class field from all of Australia and the USA collect together to fight it out for Australia’s premier Official results were (starting posi- Sprintcar race. tion) 1. McHugh (1), 2. McFadden (2), 3. McCullagh (3), 4. Anderson Oh, and watch out Skippy – Lox(4), 5. Veal (7), 6. Madsen (6), 7. ley’s coming back. Frost (10), 8. Macedo (23), 9. Ryan Jones (5), 10. Farr (13), 11. Marcus Dumesny (8), 12. Charge (15), 13. Daly (18), 14. Maroske (14) (39 laps), 15. Stansfield (11), 16. Jake Smith (19), 17. Hutchins (21), 18. Pestka (17), 19. Egel (20), 20. Milburn (16), 21. Rankin (12), 22. Delamont (24), 23. Quinn (22) and 24. Lisa Walker (9) 9 laps.

The focus now shifts to next years 32

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Mates James McFadden and Jack Lee shared the Presidents Cup front row. 34

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Geoff Gracie caught Brenten Farrer flipping out of the Presidents Cup. 36

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The cost of victory – a totally used up right rear on the Monte Farms WA17. 38

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All the Presidents Men – Jack Lee (3rd), James McFadden (1st) & Robbie Farr 40

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Luke Weel made an immediate impact on the Sprintcar ranks, but mostly not th nship at the same venue whenhis he was takentemporarily. out of the event someone else’s wreck. Championship ended season – in Photo Geoff Gracie.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was leadi o

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he way he or the team wanted. This wreck during time trials for the Victorian

ing all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

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The sole American competing down under this season on the east coast was C Sean and Felicity Dyson seen here at Premier Speedway, Warrnambool. 44

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Californian Outlaw Carson Macedo driving both the Sprintcar and Speedcar for

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While Michael Coad is an absolute stand out in the Super Rod division his tran would have hoped with this Geoff Gracie shot being just one of the wrecks he’s 46

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nsition to racing in the reverse direction and in a Sprintcar hasn’t been what he s endured with a wing over his head. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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In the infield with candle power – Geoff Gracie photo

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Crew Chief Trevor Green holds onto Victorian Title winner Matthew Dumesny a title winner Max also joining the fun. – Geoff Gracie photo. 50

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as tightly as he holds onto the winners hardware with Proud dad and multiple

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Defending Victorian Champion David Murcott gave it his all in the Downing Bro 52

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others famous #97 but couldn’t hold onto his title. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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A nervous budget racer Kevin Reeves sits waiting to fulfill a dream of contestin 54

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ng his first Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic as a driver. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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Young Queenlander Cody Maroske (27) races hard with seven time Eureka Se 56

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eries and now Warrnambool resident Mr Speed Matthew Reed. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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An inglorious but necessary part of any race meeting, the start line, gets laid do hort. 58

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own by a young Warrnambool crash crew member observed by one of his co-

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An awesome sight – the four wide salute on night one of the Grand Annual Cla 2018 Champion Corey McCullagh (V90), Carson Macedo (N99) and Ian Mads thew Reed (V92) and Steven Lines (V45) visible amongst the pack. – Geoff Gra 60

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assic. The Preliminary feature winner Lachlan McHugh (NQ7 outside) flanks, sen (NS4) with Tate Frost (T62), Bobby Daly (V8), Cody Maroske (Q27), Matacie Photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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Queenslander and Warrnambool rookie Ryan Newton ignores the smoke as he sic. 62

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e cuts a couple of timed laps on night two of the Grand Annual Sprintcar Clas-

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Murray Bridge’s Ryan Jones and Sydney’s Jordyn Brazier (NS21) power throug 64

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gh the dust from the start line kicked up by those just ahead. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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65


Terang’s Jack Lee struggle’s on with a broken front wing in the family’s “Second waved at him for a couple of laps. 66

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d” car. The wing clearly impaired his vision including not seeing the flag being

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67


Impressive young Queenslander Callum Walker gasses the Q33 hard alongsid fault of his own this was about as good as it got for the Ascot earthmoving Con field (88) who had an great weekend racing hard with former Champ Robbie Fa 68

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de pole sitter James McFadden in night two’s feature event. Sadly through no ntracting and Demolition supported team. Just behind is Grant “Slayer” Stansarr and making Sundays’ main event. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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69


Oval Express Magazine’s former publishers/editor and photographer Michell an time giving the drivers the four wide signal – worthy recognition for the years of 70

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nd Phil Jordison were coaxed back to the Speedway and clearly enjoyed their f top quality photography and publishing from the duo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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71


Brett Milburn and Matt Egel personify the close and clean racing that is a hall m 72

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mark of the Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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73


Albury’s Grant “The Gun” Anderson has a lot of supporters around the country was more pleased when the second-generation racer scored his second Class the infield and catching him in action for all prosperity. 74

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and especially amongst the Victorian photographers and media so no one sic preliminary feature in a brilliant three way battle than those watching from

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75


These guys are just some of the volunteers that toil hard in hot fireproof overall volunteers all across this great sport. 76

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ls to make racing safer each and every meeting. A big shout out to all track

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77


This moment for budget racer Jamie Heyen also caught out eventual Classic w with McHugh a semi professional driving for one of the best funded teams in th Racing team.

78

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winner Lachlan McHugh. The two team couldn’t be more diametrically opposed he country while Heyen does it for the fun in the small budget Heyen Family

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79


This wreck by Carson Macedo came from an innocent touch of wheels between qualify through the B-Main which he did before putting on a big charge in the fin 80

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n himself and Matthew Reed and would lead to the American being forced to nal. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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81


This shot had me questioning the new clay compound of the Warrnambool trac The clay seems to bind itself into a very solid and hard mass that even a shove this clay is everything they hoped for. Early days yet though. 82

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ck as this track worker struggled to extract clay from Luke Stirton’s wreckage. el has trouble penetrating. I’m not criticising the track just questioning whether

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83


Supercar racer Cameron Waters pushes the McQuinn/Chief Racing V6 hard an ingly quickly adapted the winged wonders. 84

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nd is now considered just one of the boys, not a novelty, as he has not surpris-

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85


This image captures the controversial moment that Tasmanian Tim Hutchins hi chance B-Main. Hutchins made his first ever Classic feature despite this misha 86

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its and dislodges the infield marker tyre that caused a stoppage during the last ap. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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87


Full Throttle Publishing’s and one of Australia’s best speedway authors and pho sweeping the water off the concrete pole line prior to racing on night three. The the Warrnambool-Cobden road in the early hours of the morning. – Geoff Grac 88

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otographers Anthony Loxley grabbed a broom and helped with the task of ere’s no truth to the rumour that he learnt his technique sweeping roadkill off cie Photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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89


Geelong’s Domain Ramsey fronted with a neat looking V2 and raced hard this 90

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time with young Tasmanian Jock Goodyer. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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91


The graduating class of 2022. 92

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The 2022 Grand Annual Classic Champion Lachlan McHugh. 94

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95


The Classic podium aka the big Macs – left to right James McFadden (2nd), La 96

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achlan McHugh (1st) & Corey Mc Cullagh (3rd). HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

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