Highline Magazine Edition 28

Page 1

The Classic ISSUE

28 2021


Who is Highline Magazine Editor: Brett Swanson Artist/Layout; Andy Ticehurst Contributors; Kaylene Oliver, Grant Woodhams, Andy Ticehurst. Photographers: Brett Swanson – Pirate Media Kieran Swanson – Pirate Media Andy Ticehurst – Andy Ticehurst Media Brett Williams – Lone Wolf Photography Rachel Cooper - Inaction Photos Leigh Reynolds - Inaction Photos Geoff Gracie (SA) Wayne Martin (WA)

www.HighlineMagazine.com.au

Cover – Main. David Donegan’s Sprint Pig belches smoke as he powers around Warrnambool’s Premier Speedway at a recent event. Donnaz’ performances have been gradually improving helped along I suspect by some advice from Aussie Champion Brett Lacey who was spied in the team’s corner from time to time. – Pirate Media Group photo. Inside cover: Ben Micallef’s debut season in Sprintcars has been both good and bad as the young “gentleman” has impressed with his performances in his standard LS1 powered machine against 410ci and 360ci opponents. Avalon however has not been too kind as seen in this huge wreck at the recent Diggers Cup. Young Ben also went upside down at Avalon earlier in the season. Thankfully young Ben was uninjured HIGHLINE MAGAZINE | EDITION 28 | 2 and now has the off season to rebuild. – Pirate Media Group photo.

Ben Micallef goes upside down. Brett S


Swanson Media.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Editorial

Welcome to edition 28. After seeming to take forever to get started, the covid shortened season is now almost over for the mainstream southern tracks. Darwin on the other hand is not far off kicking off a season that will once again be highlighted by the Chariots of Thunder series. Sydney – well that’s another story that you can read in this issue. The fact that most states even got in a season in some shape or form is something to be grateful for. A big shout out must go to all the clubs and promoters who worked hard to get the season underway within some restrictive Covid protocols that made it very difficult, if not impossible to run a profitable racemeeting. My home state of Victoria made a late start (December 27th) but thanks to a core of tracks including Avalon, Simpson and Premier Speedway Warrnambool, Sprintcar fans have been blessed. With very few visiting drivers for obvious reasons, local car numbers have still been solid and that’s despite the fact that another unusual Covid phenomenon has occurred. The issue I’m talking about is the one based around engine life. Many of the smaller local teams have not raced at all because for them running only half a season caused an unplanned issue.

4

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


PIRATES POINT OF VIEW

If they chose to race this season, then by mid-way of next seasons hopefully full season, they’d be up for an engine freshen and rebuild in

the way creating some history as the only Father (Darren) and son combo to both win titles with this series. Rusty now has series titles with

the middle of the season. For some it was wiser and easier to park it for this season and run the full deal next season.

the Eureka 410 series and the 360 Allstars series – probably another piece of Hickman and speedway history.

For a few other teams the above scenario caused a shift in focus. Some teams then determined to focus on 360ci competition leaving their 410’s fresh for next season. Bendigo’s Hickman family were one such outfit electing to chase the Australian Allstar Sprintcars Championship instead and young Rusty recently secured that crown along

What about Warrnambool’s James McFadden who made a late start to the season, then an early exit at the request of KKR and WoO and then grabbed a World of Outlaws win ahead of his Champion teammate Brad Sweet. J-Mac is in a prime position in one

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


respect in that having missed the opening races of the championship, he is not expected to contest for it.

Apparently, in order for it to be considered a “National” Championship, the class has to be run in at least four states. Currently 360 Sprintcars are “raced” only across the southern mainland, being Victoria, South Australia and West Australia. They do also have a presence in Queensland but are being stifled by promoters and politics.

This means he is unshackled. He has nothing else to do except go for the wins while Sweet needs to work between a balance of wins and consistent high finishes. Congratulations JMac, you are showing the Americans what we and Kasey Kahne already, that you are world class.

Add to this the growing number of LS engine Sprintcars now on the scene which currently run separately and together with SCCA licenced

360 Crossroads. Are Aussie 360 Sprintcars at a crossroads? Possibly from what I’ve been hearing. Word is that the SCCA, our National Sprintcar controlling body is seriously considering dropping the Australian 360 Championship from its roster.

6

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

360 Sprintcars in Victoria. By way of example Victoria hosts a three race “Triple Crown” series for 360ci Sprintcars annually (currently being contested as this issue is being put to bed). It is a great series and a way of fostering and promoting 360ci Sprintcars as part of the wider Sprintcar racing scene. Last weekend at the planned rain delayed round at Simpson Speedway a total of 36 cars were entered and of


PIRATES POINT OF VIEW

those 16 were LS powered. Even Domain Ramsey, who has a fleet of racecars including 410 & 360 Sprintcars, Speedcars and a Late Model, had an LS motor in for the event. And don’t be fooled into thinking that those 16 cars accounted for the full roster of Victorian LS cars – It didn’t. There are plenty more of them out there. Speaking of LS engine Sprintcars, one thing I don’t understand is why the Sprintcar Allstars don’t allow the LS cars to contest their events when they are allowed to race in SRA nee SCCA sanctioned open and 360 races? Pure 360 car numbers have dwindled over the last couple of years and in all honesty an LS powered car is not going to outperform a good 360 car but they can augment the field and bring new players into the fold and the sport who otherwise may not be there and who may end up racing in the premier 410 division. I love the start and the end of the season because of the weather. I know that sounds a bit strange because it is colder and wetter at each end rather than in the middle. The reason I love it is because those drivers that are using artificial, and illegal mechanical advantages such as Traction Control (TC), do not have such an advantage. TC really works best on a dry slick (summer) track when wheel spin is the biggest

impediment to forward drive. When tracks are moist and hooky, everyone is getting good drive and any unlawful advantage is negated. What is really interesting is that some drivers that generally win suddenly look just average towards seasons end and those with pure talent get a chance to really shine. Speaking of speedway loves – you’ve got to love Late Model sedans even if you’re a die-hard open wheel fan. They’re big, and loud with huge motors of over 500 cubes for some of them, and they try their best to shake themselves apart and turn themselves inside out while mostly putting on some awesome side by side racing. Me personally, I can’t what for next seasons postponed Aussie Title at Premier Speedway. And finally a big personal thank you to Avalon promoters Jeff and Rod Drew for recognition of my 35 plus years of involvement in this sport we all love. I don’t do it for the glory, but the pure love of it – all of it – and all classes. But it is nice and humbling to be recognised for those efforts something Brad McClure is also sharing after a long career as one of the nations best Street Stock racers. Thank you. Cheers.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


SWANSON recognised for outstanding service Story: Andy Ticehurst Images: Geoff Gracie

Highline’s own Brett “Pirate” Swanson was recently recognised by the Drew family for his 35 years of commitment to the sport. Not only an ace lense man but also respected journalist/media member and venue commentator. “Very surprised and honoured to be recognised by the Drew family and Avalon Raceway with a special achievement award as part of their annual Easter Trail extravaganza” stated Swanson.

8

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


I’ve enjoyed many nights of awesome speedway action at Avalon, and many other speedways across Australia and the USA for a long time. Being able to report, shoot and talk about those experiences is priceless” he also went on to say.

“Lockie” has been a stalwart and founding member of his home track Heytesbury Stockfeeds Simpson Speedway and to be recognised for this especially by another track, I think is a great honour, and one that is well deserved.

Many clubs recognise special achievements from within their membership base, but Avalon have

Well done Jeff and Rod Drew, your recognition of those around the sport, from around the wider realm

set the standard by recognising many worthy people over the years from all facets of the sport be it car owners, flaggies, push car drivers, officials and many others including people inextricably linked to other tracks like another of last night’s recipients Jim Lock.

is truly magnanimous and you yourselves should be recognised for your efforts not only to provide a place to race but to give a little bit back to many of the unsung heroes of the sport.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


T R O P S R O T O M N I N A M WO Woodys Speedway History

er g n a h c e m a g a s a It w STORY: GRANT WOODHAMS

PHOTOS: FULL THROTTLE PUBLISHING, PIRATE MEDIA GROUP PHOTO AND ANDY TICEHURST MEDIA

W

omen have been involved in motor racing as long as the sport has existed but perhaps unfairly and irresponsibly the media has often focused on everything but their ability to ride a motorbike or race a car. The earliest women I saw racing were at Westmead Speedway in Sydney in the early 1960’s. They raced Stock Rods, both in women’s only events but also alongside the men.

10

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


White comes from Lindsay Oklahoma. Barely in her mid twenties White survived a horrifying wreck early in her racing career that could easily have killed her. She was left with substantial critical burns

from the United States. For long time Warrnambool Grand Annual Classic followers the name Crocker should be familiar. She qualified for the A Main in 2004. Driving a borrowed car she only

over much of her body, but fought back to recover and race again.

lasted a few laps when the power steering line blew covering her in oil and forcing her infield. Earlier in the night she was declared the winner of the B Main when she was deemed to have been deliberately crashed out while leading.

White is the most recent in a small line of women from overseas who have travelled to Australia to race. Her recent stay was the second time she had been down here. She has indicated that she would like to return. In the US she runs the Lucas Oils ASCS 360 series and at the time of writing had one Feature win to her credit. Personable and friendly the diminutive driver spent most of last summer racing in Western Australia. Prior to White, Erin Crocker, another Sprintcar driver made the journey down 12

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

But quite probably the first woman to come to Australia to race was Irish born Fay Taylour. Taylour’s career was exceptional because she initially raced solos and then made a mark when she raced speedcars. She first raced in Australia in the summer of 1929 and won races against the best in Perth, Adelaide and Melbourne before crashing in Sydney and waking up in hospital.


She returned again the following season. However within two years women were banned from racing solos and she switched to cars where she proved to be equally as successful. After the Second World War she ventured to the United States where she discovered Midget (Speedcar) racing and took it up with great enthusiasm. She travelled to Australia during 1952 and 1953 and raced in Adelaide, Melbourne and Sydney. Taylour’s career and life both in and out of speedway is quite fantastic and Brian Belton’s book Fay Taylour – The Queen of Speed is highly recommended. After Taylour it was over ten years before another woman made the trip. Barbara ‘Bobbi’ Borghese was a weekly racer in her home state of New York competing against men mainly in the Modified and

Sportsman Sedan divisions at the Freeport Track on Long Island. She raced successfully at Claremont (Perth) and Rowley Park (Adelaide) although the car she was provided to race with was more like a Stock Car. The good looking and fast talking Borghese was a promoter’s dream. At around the same time Nanae Okomoto, a Japanese solo rider appeared at the Sydney Showgrounds. She was the first overseas female solo rider to race since Fay Taylour. She had substantial experience in Japanese speedway though it was considerably different to Australian racing. Her bike a Kyokuto was 350cc and only used petrol.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Veronica McCann

Kristen Brown

14

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


Jessica Moulden

Harlli White

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Erin Crocker

Dianne Tobias

As a consequence in handicap races she started 40 yards ahead of the starting gate. She only made one appearance but was unplaced in both her rides. Pam “Pinky” Bennett was another Solo rider who spent some time in Australia. Californian Bennett came to Australia in the late 1970’s as a teenager and raced 16

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

in Adelaide, Brisbane and Sydney. Incredibly Bennett is still racing in the US today. Several American Compact Speedcar/ Formula 500 drivers including Denise Bennett, Marie Schneider and Dianne Tobias toured in the 1980’s and 1990’s. Bennett who toured with her husband


Wayne was also an accomplished speedcar driver who was the Arizona Champion in the early 1980’s. Tobias was from the famous Tobias racing family and was also an accomplished race car builder. An amazing story could be written about the highs and lows of her life while Schneider was a versatile driver who also raced up the famous Pikes Peak. Add in Solo riders Jessica Lamb (England) and Stina Borufsen (Sweden) and

we have a list of at least ten women who have hit our tracks in one division or another over the years. There may have been others and I apologise if I’ve missed them. In a sport that has historically been dominated by men and in the main reported on by men it has often been difficult for women racers to get themselves treated seriously.

y d o Wo

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Lest We

Diggers Cup - Avalon Race

T

he now annual Diggers Cup for 360 Sprintcars is not just a race, but a recognition of those brave men and women who have fought for our country or work in the armed services supporting our troops. It is an at times poignant event where teams and fans show their respect for all who’ve served and observe in hushed silence the playing of the last post and a minute’s silence followed by the Rouse, on this occasion played by Ethan Chute.

keenly fought for. The Diggers Cup is also the highlight of a three-race triple crown for 360 Sprintcars that commenced the previous night at Premier Speedway after the opening round the previous week at Simpson speedway was postponed due to rain. Young gun Jordyn Charge finally had some redemption for a season that had so far not gone to plan after last years’ breakout season.

Charge scored the win at Warrnambool It’s a moment that reminds us that without from LS powered Justin Barton with Austhe efforts and sacrifices of those men and sie Speedcar Champ Kaidon Brown comwomen, we may not be here playing freely pleting the podium in the David Dickson with our favourite toys – Sprintcars. owned machine. This was only Browns second race in a Sprintcar. All this makes it a special race, that is

18

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


e Forget

eway, Melbourne Victoria On a track that was dryer and slicker from early in the evening the LS powered cars were less disadvantaged than if it was juiced up and Barton used his skill to run down Brown with about five laps to run and in the words of SRA official and former racer Kevin McCallum, “If it was a 30 lap race instead of 25, Barton probably would have won it.” The following night at Avalon Grant Anderson in the Brad Foster owned V11 led every lap from the front row but Charge was literally on a charge as he picked off the cars ahead of him one by one. With just a couple of laps to go he was closing quickly but he would only get one chance. If he didn’t get the pass made and showed his nose, Anderson would no

doubt lift to take the win. In a crushing blow to Anderson, Charge snared him behind a lapped car and dived up the inside on the last lap while Anderson got baulked on his highline, and that was all it took. Anderson was magnanimous in defeat while Charge celebrated two wins in two nights. Charles Hunter put in a similar, but not quite as successful charge through the field to grab a fine third place. The final round of the Triple Crown series has now been scheduled for May 1st at the sensational Simpson speedway with a stand-alone event in between (April 24th) at the always exciting Nyora raceway.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

20

Competitors and crews line-up to pay tribute to the ANZACs - Pirate Media G HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Group Photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

22

Competitors and crews line-up to pay tribute to the ANZACs - Pirate Media G HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Group Photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Peter Swandale, the highly decorated Vic Robb (President of the Lara RSL), an 24way. – Pirate Media Group photo HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

nd chaplain Mark Bateman in a solemn moment shared by the entire speed/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

26

Adam Culinger (76), Daniel Scott (91), Eddie Lumbar (36) and Mitch Smith (7 HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

75) take a heat race start. – Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

In each of his race starts Ben Micallef made shockers and then spent each rac side of Marcus Green in the more potent Skidmore Brothers V71. – Pirate Med

28

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

ce passing cars to recover the lost positions. Here he passes around the outdia Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Renmarks Daniel Evans turned his striking S44 into something less pretty in th 30– Pirate Media Group photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

his incident when he half spun and triggered a considerable pile-up. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

The winning pass. This is the moment that Jordyn Charge shot underneath erstw 32 second in two days. – Pirate Media Group photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

while race leader Grant Anderson on the last lap to take the feature win, his /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


THE END OF AN ERA...... OR A SELL - OUT. Every speedway venue wants a sell-out, that is a sell-out crowd, packed to capacity with no room for anymore spectators. However, in the case of Sydney Speedway it’s the fans and competitors that have been sold-out. As if it wasn’t bad enough that the hallowed turf of the Sydney Speedway, Valvoline Raceway, PCR or whatever you prefer to call it was sold out from under the fans, competitors and even sponsors, what was totally disgusting was the way that fans and competitors were bent over and given a big one up the backside by the last promotional body – Made Too Go Pty Ltd (MTG). There was no chance for the fans and competitors to have one last season to then Segway straight into a new era of Sydney speedway at the new venue at Eastern Creek. Hell, myself and many other interstate fans and racers were looking forward to the chance to say farewell and take in one more race at a venue that was well known world-wide and which proclaimed itself as Australia’s best dirt track speedway. 34

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


Story by Brett Swanson Images: Some of the sports best Make no mistake, this will have a huge and lasting effect on the Sydney scene that may take years to recover from. It’s so disheartening to see that a promoter can suddenly turn their backs on the fans so quickly. Barry Waldron was a super fan, initially. He owned race cars, and I think he still does. He put together a car and team for Robbie Farr and gave him free reign to race whenever and wherever he and crew chief Nick Speed wanted to and the ride was said by Farr’s mother Robyn to be “Robbie’s until he decides he doesn’t want it anymore.” Waldron was hooked and wanted more, he bought a Late Model sedan for Robbie to play in when he wasn’t in the Sprintcar and in between he gained control of not one, but three tracks.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was leadi o

John Morris photo.

36

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ing all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


He took control of Parramatta City Raceway and spent money putting people in place, (whether they were the right people or not is another issue) and improving and rebuilding facilities. One track was not enough – he then sought to buy Adelaide’s Speedway City venue when the freehold was on the market. Again, he was being hailed as a saviour and great man, as the Adelaide venue was in its day one of the best facilities around and the sport needed it to continue. Rumours suggest when the asking price was increased without notice at the last moment, Waldron, possibly in retaliation, sought and gained control of Murray Bridge Speedway that was sited and hour and a bit up the freeway to the east. Again, people were put in place and money spent on improvements.

38

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

The final piece of the three-state track “ownership of control” was Toowoomba in Queensland. A couple of other entities had tried to run it after gaining a lease from the owning club and finally Waldron had it. Once more people and facilities were put in place and a tri-state/raceway competition was formed with good money on offer to teams who supported all three tracks. Waldron, either personally or through his various entities or companies had spent a lot of money on our sport and he was one of those people that the sport badly needed and craved more of. He was digging deep with cars and tracks. He wasn’t in it for the money as such, at least initially, as everyone knows, this is a hard sport to make a living from.


Parramatta was the crown jewel, as it had been for years and things were going along well, or at least well enough. Then suddenly it changed. The whole world changed for that matter. The NSW state Government decided it needed to take back control and ownership of the land the speedway sat upon, land that was never privately owned but was held by the Granville Showground Trust and leased to Waldron and the previous promoters. The government needed it for something that would serve a higher public good, at least that’s what they think. Did the government or the showgrounds trust advise the Waldrons about this reclamation early on? Apparently not if recent events are to be believed, but possibly so. Not many people really know or are willing to admit.

Suddenly the news hit, the speedway was to be shut down, raized, obliterated, wiped off the map and soon! MTG, the promoting company, feigned total ignorance and any prior knowledge of the planned closure and through its spokespeople and fan base whipped up a maelstrom of support and public outcry that this could happen so swiftly with no plans to replace, compensate or support the sport. The government was allegedly caught out by the public mood and quickly had to back pedal and modify its plans with a stay of execution that would give the speedway a further year of existence which would be followed by the theoretically seamless relocation to a new, as yet unannounced government built replacement speedway (later shown to be at Eastern Creek).

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

40

James Selwyn photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Some sources within the industry and with government contacts have said that MTG were well aware of the impending closure but chose to say nothing and then rode on the coattails of the public uproar while publicly berating the gov-

ernment for its supposedly bad and covert handling of the repossession. Those same sources have suggested that MTGs vocal outcry didn’t sit well with the government and was in fact a “cry wolf” Whether they did or whether they didn’t know is irrelevant, as the fans and racers were given another year to enjoy their last time(s) before moving on to a new venue. But then things changed again – Covid. We all know and experienced first-hand,

42

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

the effects of Covid on our lives and our passions, and yes it did affect some states and their speedways severely early on. Victoria didn’t get started until December 27, but Queensland and South Australia were almost like normal and W.A. was up and running ahead of

Victoria also. Meanwhile in Sydney MTG blamed COIVD. The season start has been delayed due to Covid, they said. We’ll get going in November they said. Then it was delayed again and February was given as a start date completely missing all the traditional high season, big dollar, big attraction shows the track is known for. Then it went quiet and meanwhile local clubs have to look elsewhere. Some did, some didn’t for whatever reason.


Rumours started circulating, that it was all over and the track was in a run-down state with long grass and equipment removed from the venue. “Oh-no, not so.” they said as they got stuck into mowing the metre tall grass, “We’re not done yet.” Again. it all went quiet but there was still the chance for one last big hurrah, a swan song that would have been an absolute sell-out of fans and racers. Deathly quiet however, despite the rumours that MTG had received a bonus

payment from the government to vacate early and that construction/clearing work had already commenced. Suddenly confirmation in a sense this month (March 2021) when all clubs or

interested parties were told come to the track and take anything that belonged to them or it will be thrown-out. Over and out. Done and dusted. And similarly to the famed Liverpool Speedway – it was gone. No fanfare, no big send off. The Waldron speedway promotional empire appeared to be over. Toowoomba had been sublet to Archerfield promoter John Kelly or he had been placed there as the track manager – one or the other. Kelly himself may be looking for another venue of his own if his Brisbane venue

ever does shut down. Ironically, it’s been the reverse in his scenario with Archerfield as each year we hear it’s the tracks last season and then the next season it opens up again, thankfully. Kelly it has been suggested is also very interested

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was leadi o

44

James Selwyn photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ing all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


in securing the reigns at the new Sydney speedway. At Murray Bridge, the pre-Christmas races were promoted by the club, with a review to be done post-Christmas to see whether Waldron’s leasing entity would resume its role.

Andy Ticehurst Media Image The sad part about all this is that the sport, especially in Sydney, will be set back on its heels with many fans and competitors drifting away from the sport due to a lack of a race space. Car owners have sold or will sell their cars and may never come back, so too the fans. Many will have discovered other ways to fill their summer Saturday nights, and this may take years to recover from but hopefully not.

46

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

Sydney and Australian speedway competitors and fans have been screwed over once again despite the promise of a shiny new, state of the art facility. To a large degree Sydney players were spoilt with an inner city venue that had survived for a long time and didn’t necessitate the need or desire to foster racing at other more regional venues. Let’s


hope this silent apathy doesn’t come back to bite us on the butt big time. In my home state of Victoria we haven’t had a capital based track since the Melbourne Speedbowl closed in the late eighties. Adelaide has been the same but only since Speedway Park/City/Adelaide Motorsport Park closed its doors with a whimper. Racers in those states are now used to travelling to race and have done so as needed and in the case of Victorians, for decades now. So I guess the lesson to take from this is never assume your local track will always be there, and while you don’t need to do it every other week, travel to other tracks and build something with them because you never know they could become your favourite track or your only track.

sure of the beloved PCR. All we asked was an opportunity to blow out the candles and turn off the lights and say goodbye – properly. Post script: A token farewell was handed out when management announced a chance for fans to enter the grounds one last time – but only into the car park. Small jars containing track dirt were available for sale as keepsakes while at the same time track merchandise was available for sale. Was this really a farewell opportunity or am I being cynical in thinking it was merely an opportunity to sell off the remaining track merch in one last cash grab!

The sport needs people like Barry Waldron, people with a passion and the deep pockets to support it and he should be thanked for what he has contributed to the sport in so many ways. Sadly however, Waldrons efforts have been tarnished by the way his entity, MTG, has handled the demise and clo-

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


The Fifty for 50

M

any of our older readers will know immediately what I mean when I call this year’s Fifty for 50 on the Australian Day weekend the “Claytons” Classic.

48

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

For our younger readers Claytons was the brand name of a non-alcoholic, non-carbonated beverage coloured and packaged to resemble bottled whiskey. It was the subject of a major marketing campaign in Australia in the 1970s and 1980s, promoting it as “the drink you have when you’re not having a drink” at a time when alcohol was being targeted as a major factor in the road death toll. Claytons has not been advertised on tel-


0 or Claytons Classic. evision since the 1980s, yet the name has entered into Australian vernacular. It stands for an ersatz or dummy thing, or something that is obviously ineffective. For example, a common-law couple might be described as having a “Claytons marriage”. A knowledgeable but unqualified handyman could be referred to as a “Claytons carpenter”. The term can also be used as an insult.

ford venue was instead muted and stunted by tough Covid restrictions and with no end in sight the club took the unprecedented decision to postpone this year’s GASC.

“I swore when I took on this job that I would never not run the Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic!” Stated club General Manager David Mills recently referring to an earlier club management’s decision to not run the final night of the 2006 event due to In this particular scenario, the term Clayrain. tons Classic is not used as an insult, but The club did the right thing by advising rather to record an event that in any other fans and competitors well in advance that year, or century for that matter, would have the GASC would not happen this year, and been know as the Grand Annual Sprintcar then as restrictions started to ease slightly, Classic (GASC). they came up with a plan to somewhat satisfy those hardcore fans while at the same Sadly the Covid 19 pandemic effectively time celebrating their Allansford 50th Annikilled off this years running of the time honoured Classic, with no international competi- versary – the Fifty for 50. tors, very few interstate teams and fans that Companion speedways Avalon and Borcould cross borders, and a restricted crowd derline (Mt Gambier) were on board with capacity. their annual Presidents Cup and Kings Challenge respectively and so for 2021 What should have been the Premier instead of having a five night roadshow with Speedway Clubs celebrations of their 50th year of operation since moving to the Allans- a host of high profile Americans, we had the next best thing. Four consecutive nights with arguably the best of Australia’s Sprintcar talent competing for some still serious coin – hence – the South West Conveyancing Fifty for 50, aka “The Claytons Classic”. Hats off to all involved for what was four great nights of fantastic racing.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was leadi o

Supercar Star Cameron Waters in action early on at Avalon’s President’s Cup.

50

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ing all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

– Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

“General” Jack Lee in a spot of trouble during the President’s Cup, – Pirate Me

52

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

edia Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

After announcing that this season would be his last as a full time competitor, m 54fine style taking the comapanion Street Stock feature win at Avalon. – Pirate M HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

multiple Aussie Street Stock Champ Brad McClure started his farewell tour in Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


Kings Cars’ Presidents Cup. The Wednesday night crowd at Avalon for the Presidents Cup built steadily to it’s 3,000 fan capacity as more and more people knocked off from work and headed in the general direction of Geelong.

witness McHugh, who’d been absent from Avalon, fairly dominate with quick time in his flight, surprisingly no heat wins, but a win in the Gold Shoot-out to give him pole position from where he went on to score the win.

A capped field of cars that included Australian and Classic Champions put on a show for the fans as reported contemporaneously on our facebook page. The final was a high-speed display of skill mostly on the highline, with the pack being constantly shuffled before James McFadden won from Jamie Veal, Darren Mollenoyux, Corey McCullagh, Matt Egel and Grant Anderson. Surprisingly, Robbie Farr never looked overly at home in the Matt Eastham V88 as Eastham usually has his cars’ handling superbly but the veteran grafted hard for a top ten finish as did track hero Brett Milburn who had to race his way from the B-Main. The supporting Street Stocks almost outshone the Sprintcars with every race a 2,3, 4 or even 5 car dice. Eventually local favourite Brad McClure scored the win in the Routleys Bakery feature having just announced his retirement from full time racing at seasons end. David Barrie and Morris Ahearm completed the competitive podium. Kings’ Challenge.

Behind him McCullagh and Egel were looking good for a podium until they ended their races with contact with lapped cars with just two laps to run elevating Daniel Pestka to second with Marcus Dumesny next ahead of Farr, Anderson (from 12th) and McFadden who’d been forced into the B-Main after a heat race DNF when he clipped Lisa Walker and suffered a flat tyre.

The Borderline Speedway has always been a Highline Magazine favourite venue Only one issue from the meeting though and we’re sure it’s one of Lachlan McHugh’s – no media write up on the website or Facealso as he always has great speed at the book page. picturesque speedway. Again, it was a good crowd on hand to 56

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


McHugh and Mollenoyux put on a show of fast side by side racing in the opening feature laps before McHugh settled into the For those who’d not seen McHugh in aclead as those behind constantly shuffled the tion for some time, his first appearance back deck with “Molly”, McFadden, Brad Keller, at Premier Speedway was stunning. Clearly Anderson and Egel absolutely blistering around the clayway. South West Conveyancing Fifty for 50 Night 1.

Just when it appeared that McFadden was starting to run down the leader a caution appeared and on the restart Egel launched a do or die attack that could fry his tyres but instead propelled him into second from where he continued to chip away at the gap to the point that the lead two were nose to tail as they took the chequered flag with Mollenoyux completing the podium. Let me tell you, these guys were simply the quickest things ever around this track and every lap was a hold your breath moment as they powered on perilously close to the walls at speeds that you were positive they wouldn’t be able to avoid an impact, but yet they did.

all those wins against local Queensland competition and the union with Nick Speed and East Coast Pipeline Racing had instilled immense confidence in him. That and the old adage that it takes a few years to really come to terms with racing a Sprintcar. From his first lap it looked like he’d cut 100 laps at the venue just yesterday. There was no feeling out the track, it was just instantly mash the peddle. It was amazing there wasn’t a bulge in the floor pan he was kicking it that hard. That’s not to say others like McFadden, McCullagh,, Mollenoyux and co were slow, but they race here all the time.

The big incident of the race came on lap 12 as Marcus Dumesny slammed the turn two wall hard in a shower of sparks after contact with Brock Hallett, destroying the Rowett Motorsport #47. Supercar Ace Cameron Waters in only his third Sprintcar race, and first with a 410, was adapting quickly and should soon be making feature grids if he continues his desire to get dirty which he admits and expects will keep him sharp in the Supercar off-season. In the C-Main Robert Nicholas had a big crash in turn four after riding the right rear of Ben Morris. Brett Milburn would eventually win the caution filled race ahead of Jordyn Charge, Dennis Jones and Bobby Daly. The B-Main ran flag to flag with Tate Frost /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was leadi o

Robbie Farr teamed with Victory Lane Race Gear proprietor Matt Eastham to w 58Challenge. Geoff Gracie Photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ing all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

wheel the normally potent V88 seen here at speed at Mt Gambiers’ Kings /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Following on from his National F500 title Tasmanian Jock Goodyer is starting to 60Gambier. Geoff Gracie Photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

o assert himself as a true Sprintcar Contender on any night such as her at Mt /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


making it to the A-Main along with Johnny Vogels, Robbie Farr and Brad Warren who was loving being back in a Sprintcar. McHugh scored the pole with a win in the dash series for the second straight night. Even the support categories were exceptional with veteran Ewan McKenzie taking the invitational Super Rod feature from Jamie May and Michael Coad while Jacob Mills scored the Street Stock win with a penultimate lap pass of David Barrie after having been sent to the rear earlier on. Steven Watts completed the streetie podium. Night 2. A new style of race was the highlight of the final night of the Fifty for 50 with a 50 lap race featuring a pit stop at a potentially unknown point of the race. And for the third straight night McHugh featured highly only this time it was for the wrong reasons as he exited the race in a huge car crushing three car wreck. After starting from the pole McFadden was at the front of the field for the entire journey as he defeated Veal and Mollenoyux in what was his second victory of the Claytons Classic weekend.

and let the teams refettle the steads. Interestingly after just 19 laps most, if not all of the leaders had blistered their right rear tyres which added further intrigue with 31 more laps still to be run. With that in mind McFadden’s post-race comment that he “really abused my tyres because we could with the stoppage, it was basically just two short main events, so I was driving hard. When you have guys like Jamie and Molly behind you that’s what you need to do” is an interesting thing to say. With 50 laps ahead McFadden would lead away ahead of Dumesny, Veal, McCullagh and McHugh. The top five would stay extremely close but the track was still extremely fast making it hard to pass highlighted by the fact that just prior to the open red McFadden was finding it hard to negotiate lapped traffic, especially as he attempted to put a lap on Farr. The caution for the open red would come out on lap 19 as John Vogels hit the turn 1 wall cutting down his right rear tyre. The open red allowed for the crews to make as many changes as they could during the seven minute open red, including changing tyres, which is something that all but two teams took advantage of.

While on this night the heat racing was, to be honest, boring, one lane high speed, folAt the stoppage the order was McFadlow the leader affairs, the finals came alive den, Veal, Dumesny, McHugh, Mollenoyux, with the unique feature being full of great McCullagh, Egel, Jock Goodyer, David Murracing and controversial incidents. cott and Domain Ramsay. 50 laps was clearly going to be too big of an ask on the rear tyres and probably fuel also and with an indefinite pit stop there was plenty of strategy in the first portion of the race which ended up being only 19 laps long after John Vogels cut a tyre. Officials used this as the opportunity to stop the field

62

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |

On the resumption the only change among the leaders was Egel, who retired after five laps with suspension damage and Grant Anderson who made his way to position 8. The real shuffle and controversy in the order came on lap 29 as Mollenoyux tried


an inside pass on McHugh in turn three with McHugh running high and catching the fence and rolling hard. As the car bounced back across the track it was collected by Matt Reed and Anderson who had nowhere to go, with Anderson also going upside down.

Brad Warren would also roll over in turn two after hitting the wall shortly after the restart for the Cooley incident. Milburn, Jake Smith, Reed and Jessie Attard made up positions 21 to 24 in the feature after being the top 4 at the end of the 15-lap last chance qualifier.

Under red, McHugh made his way over to Molly’s car to voice his displeasure feeling Molly had squeezed him on purpose as the crowd threw some NASCAR style “Rubbins’ racin’” barbs at the quick Queenslander. All I can say is when you race hard sometimes it comes back on you as McHugh had earlier left Molly no room who’d half climbed the front straight wall as a result.

Qualifying saw Darren Mollenoyux set the quickest time overall of 11.658 winning $500 from Tony Loxley and Full Throttle Publishing, producers of the forthcoming Grand Annual Sprintcar Classic 50 year history book.

McFadden would lead away at the restart from Veal, Mollenoyux and Dumesny and through a further caution before taking his friends and sponsors Tanya Jasper and Alistair McKean from South west Conveyancing’s money making it a very rewarding month of January for he and the team.

In the Street Stocks Feature it was local star Steven Watts who held off the hard charging retiree Brad McClure in a thrilling 15 laps Main Event.

Earlier Domain Ramsay was having a great night with victory in Dash 1 in a new 8 lap track record of 1.28.476. It took the likes of McFadden to secure the pole position for the Main event, bettering Ramsay’s 8 lap time with a new race record of 1.28.276.

Night 1’s $500 Tony Loxley/Full Throttle Publishing prize had gone to McHugh with a 10.688 second lap.

McClure chased Watts all the way to the line but couldn’t edge out Watts with the W11 of Jacob Mills hanging on for third. The Super Rods again played their part on Premier Speedway’s biggest weekend with a shortened A-Main over 10 laps going to Dane Court from Jamie May (W8) and Ewan McKenzie.

A field of 20 drivers fronted for the CMain with Peter Doukas and Joel Heinrich leading the pack as the red lights came out for Troy Hose on lap 2 who rolled in turn 1. Doukas and Heinrich would hang on to transfer to the back of the B-Main along with Kristy Ellis. Brayden Cooley was running inside a transfer spot racing hard for the lead with Brett Milburn in the B-Main until he tagged the turn one and then turn three wall and rolled hard before being hit by Kristy Ellis.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Grant Anderson in the family’s V37 races hard with Brad Keller on a blackening

64

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

g Borderline clayway. Geoff Gracie Photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Troy Hose will not be enjoying this high flying wreck. Geoff Gracie Photo. 66 HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Geoff Gracie snapped this awesome ex Bob Kelly “Winfield” Gambler as part o

68

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

of Borderlines support action.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

This is not how David Donegan wanted to start his “Classic” week – nosing into

70

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

o the wall in hot laps. – Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

J-Mac, James McFadden shot from the outside of Avalon’s turn 3 in one of his 72– Pirate Media Group photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

s last runs before heading back to the USA and onto the World Of Outlaws trail. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

A different view as Jake Smith flames out as he heads out the Avalon gate bac

74

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

ck to the pits. – Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Just one shot in the controversial incident that saw Lochie McHugh crash out – 76– Pirate Media Group photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

– hard – in the Fifty for 50 event at Warrnambools Sungold Stadium. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

A nice night for racing at the Fifty for 50, The “Claytons” Classic. – Pirate Media

78

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

a Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

80

Local ace Steven Watts and retiring veteran Brad McClure go hard at it in awe HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

esome Street Stock action at the ‘Bool’. – Pirate Media Group photo.v

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

82

Kayla Knox backs her “Streetie” in hard as she puts on a show for the Avalon HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

crowd. – Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Not to be outdone Paul Baker backs his Super Rod even harder but on the Wa

84

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

arrnambool highline – Pirate Media Group photo.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

While Baker was backing it in Peter Gale was not having the same level of fun 86– Pirate Media Group photo. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

n with this engine issue and fire ruining his weekend early. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Former Victorian Late Model Champion Lachlan Onley in action trying unsucc 88– Photo by Rock Solid Productions. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

cessfully to defend his title at Ballarat’s Redline Raceway. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Callum Harper gives it everything at the recent Victorian Title at Redline Racew

90

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

way. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Todd Bayley (19) slides under Callum Harper on his way to the Victorian Late M 92– Photo by Rock Solid Productions. HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Model Championship by 0.806 seconds at Redline Raceway. /HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Late Model Podium. Left to right, Brendan Hucker, Todd Bayley, Callum Harpe

94

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

er and Chevy Edwards. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Anthony Beare’s Aust1/#46 Commodore looks a bit beaten up as he leads Mor 96Street Stock Championship, this one being held at Alexandra Speedway. Photo HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

rris “Oggie” Ahearn in some early action on his way to his seventh Victorian o by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Mick Dann having a tyre let go on the second night of the Victorian Street Stoc

98

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

ck title at Alexandra Speedway. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Albert Fell barking some flame on night #1 of the Victorian Street Stock title. –

100

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Bradley Hill tipping into turn one during early heat race action at the Victorian S

102

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Street Stock title. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

104

From front to back, Leigh Gooding, Wade Fell & Adrian Lawrence at the Victo HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

orian Street Stock title. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Crew hard at work preparing Kayla Knox’s Street Stock prior to title heat racin

106

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

ng. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Scott Secombe & David Barrie during Street Stock heat racing at the Victorian

108

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Title. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

VSC Sports Sedan support category from front to back, Anthony Knight, Luke

110

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

Fallon & Harry Orme. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


nship at the same venue when he was taken out of the event in someone else’s wreck.

Steven Lines in the Brian Hall WA3 was a surprise winner of the USC round at Warrnambool recently. What’s so surprising about Lines winning, right? The reason it was surprising was that James McFadden in the Monte WA17 was lead o

Victorian Street Stock title podium (L-R), Morris Ahearn, Anthony Beare & Jaso

112

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |


ding all feature long until inexplicable spinning out of the lead a short distance from the chequered flag handing the win to Lines. Lines luck however, deserted him at the same venue a couple of weeks later in the Victorian Champi-

on Degoldi. – Photo by Rock Solid Productions.

/HIGHLINE-MAGAZINE


114

HIGHLINE MAGAZINE

| EDITION 28 |