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Bhangra the night away Binghamton Bhangra hosts international dancing contest, see page 2

PIPE DREAM Tuesday, February 11, 2014 | Binghamton University | www.bupipedream.com | Vol. LXXXV, Issue 5

Asst. provost talks Civil Rights history Randall Edouard discusses timeline of black history, racism in the United States Souvik Chatterjee Contributing Writer

In honor of Black History Month, one Binghamton University faculty member

mapped out the broad history of the Civil Rights Movement. Randall Edouard, assistant provost and director of admissions at BU, led the audience Saturday through the century after the Civil War and

the journey from slavery to equal rights. “I don’t want to ever forget about the Civil Rights Movement,” Edouard said. “You have to give a history lesson to give justice to the civil rights

movements.” Edouard explained that following the Civil War, former slaves were granted citizenship and the right to vote though the 14th and 15th Amendments, respectively. However, despite

“You can’t be racist if you new laws, blacks faced longterm difficulties and injustices don’t have power. You just got including disenfranchisement, an opinion if you don’t have segregation and staunch power,” Edouard said. “That is opposition by whites toward their social mobility and See RIGHTS Page 5 equality.

Police Fraternity hosts arts show search for thief Suspect in West Gym theft sighted at Hess store

Photo Provided

Clark known for founding Watson, fellowship Geoffrey Wilson Assistant News Editor

Staff Reports Binghamton University Police are looking for help finding a suspect in a theft case. According to Investigator Patrick Reilly of Binghamton’s New York State University Police, a wallet was stolen from the West Gym locker room Wednesday, Jan. 22 at 10:30 a.m. while the victim was in class. A card from the victim’s wallet was used 20 minutes later at the Hess gas station on Vestal Parkway East. Reilly described the suspect as a “black or Hispanic male, about 5-foot-10 with short hair.” Reilly said he thinks that the suspect is a student because he walked from campus to the store and then walked across the Sherwin-Williams parking lot afterward. “I took that as not having a car and time frame from items put into unlocked locker at 10:30 a.m. and [the] card being used at 10:50 a.m.,” Reilly wrote in an email. “[T]hat would be about time for walking distance.” Anyone with information about the suspect should contact University Police at (607) 777-2275.

Former University president dies at 88

performers, and other students signed up to perform the day of the festival. Performances ranged from independent students to Mu Phi Epsilon, the professional music fraternity,

Clifford Clark, former Binghamton University president, died Jan. 31 in Detroit, Mich. He was 88. Originally the vice president for academic affairs, Clark was appointed as the fourth president of BU in 1975. According to Michael F. McGoff, senior vice provost at BU, Clark worked on how to advance BU prior to his presidency, making connections in both the political and business sectors. “He was knowledgeable about issues in higher education and he clearly identified with faculty concerns,” McGoff wrote.

See ARTS Page 4

See CLARK Page 5

Franz Lino/Staff Photographer

The Binghamton Gospel Choir performs during the second annual Arts and Music Festival Saturday in the Old Union Hall. A total of 14 registered groups entered the competition, hosted by Alpha Delta Phi Society.

Alpha Delta Phi society invites students, groups to perform Habin Kwak Contributing Writer

Ranging from independent performers to musical groups on campus, Binghamton University students

demonstrated their talents at Alpha Delta Phi Society’s second annual Arts and Music Festival. Hosted Saturday in the Old Union Hall, the event took place from 3 to 6 p.m. and was open to anyone and nearly any

kind of performance. “We do a lot with the arts and music, so it just seemed something natural to us,” said Kelsey Krause, one of the organizers of the Alpha Delta Phi Arts and Music Festival. There were 14 registered

NYC poetry group slams Undergrounds Nuyoricans comment on black experience in America Brendan Zarkower Contributing Writer

The Binghamton University Black Student Union continued the celebration of Black History Month Friday night with a Poetry Jam featuring members of the nationally renowned Nuyorican Poets Cafe. The Alphabet City-based group presented BU with verses that spoke directly to the large and diverse audience. The performers included Malcolm Wicks, Aja Monet, Mikumari Caiyhe and Mahogany

Browne. Each offered his or her own style and perspective that reflected the event’s theme of “illuminating black excellence.” Getting performers from Nuyorican to come to BU was a big accomplishment for the BSU. The Nuyorican slam team, on which Caiyhe currently competes, ranks consistently in the top five nationally for poetry slam events. “It’s all about sharing your experience. Telling everyone what it means to be black Tycho McManus/Staff Photographer

See SLAM Page 6

Aja Monet performs in a Poetry Jam hosted in the Undergrounds Friday evening. The event, which was held by the Black Student Union in celebration of Black History Month, featured BSU’s theme this year of “illuminating the black excellence.”


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www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

Binghamton gets Bhangra Fever

Kendall Loh/Photo Editor and Jenine Furtado/Assistant Photo Editor

Teams from around North America participate in fifth annual Indian folk dance competition Tania Rahman Contributing Writer The Osterhout Concert Theater came down with a case of Bhangra fever as 10 teams from cities across the U.S. and Canada performed their finest moves during the fifth year of the competition, hosted by Binghamton Bhangra. Teams from cities all over North America drew gasps and cheers from the crowd as they showed off

their signature styles on Saturday night. Two teams were all-female, while the rest were either all-male or co-ed. Bhangra is a traditional Indian folk dance with roots tracing back to the Punjab region. The dancers are known for elaborate, vividly colored costumes, as well as the use of hinged wooden clapping instruments called “saaps” and decorated sticks called “khunda.” Eight hundred audience members watched each team

play a short video before their performance. Several teams incorporated the use of modern non-Indian steps, while others climbed upon shoulders to jump through banners, or performed a light show in the dark. “It’s pretty amazing to see the cultural integration that takes place, and it’s impressive that Binghamton can bring in teams as far as California,” said Maggie Pictor, a senior double-majoring in Chinese and economics and a

former member of the Bhangra team at Binghamton University. This year’s first-place trophy went to First Class Bhangra, a team hailing from Pittsburgh, Pa. Judges based their decisions on components such as execution, stunts, synchronization, costumes, tradition elements and audience interest. Avneet Gujral, a senior majoring in biology and the captain of Binghamton’s Bhangra team, said that planning for this year’s event

took place immediately after last year’s show ended in early February. “We start by booking the venue, and it’s difficult to find a date that accommodates most teams,” Gujral said. The hardest part of organizing the event, according to Gujral, had to do with similar booking issues, like finding teams to compete and impartial judges to participate in the show. Forty-five teams applied to be in the contest, submitting video auditions as part of the application

process. Of the 45 teams that sent in videos, 10 were chosen to compete. “We are humbled,” said Veem Tambi, a member of the winning team. “Binghamton did a great job running the competition.” Several non-Bhangra dance teams also performed during the show, including an all-female dance-fusion team from Cornell University and BU’s KASA MODA hip-hop group.


PAGE III Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Pipe Line

Color me blind

State News 3,000 birds rescued in cockfighting bust in NY More than 3,000 birds were rescued in a three-county cockfighting takedown in New York this weekend that resulted in nine felony arrests, according to the state attorney general’s office. In a statement released Sunday night, Attorney General Eric Schneiderman said it was the largest cockfighting takedown in New York state and among the largest in U.S. history. Operation Angry Birds simultaneously targeted locations in Queens, Brooklyn and Ulster County with assistance from the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and the Ulster County Sheriff’s office, Schneiderman said. In New York, cockfighting and possession of a fighting bird at a cockfighting location are felonies, and each charge carries a maximum penalty of four years in jail and a fine of up to $25,000, according to the attorney general’s office. Paying to attend one of these events is a misdemeanor and carries a possible sentence of up to one year in jail and a $1,000 fine. NY Senate leader sees Astorino run for governor New York’s Senate Republican leader says he believes Westchester County Executive Rob Astorino will run for governor and that incumbent Gov. Andrew Cuomo is vulnerable. Sen. Dean Skelos said he believes Astorino will be their party’s candidate and he appears to also have Conservative Party support. The Long Island Republican also said on Monday he isn’t sure businessman and celebrity Donald Trump is serious about running, as Trump has suggested. Running statewide for governor is “a huge task” and between Trump’s television shows and other interests, he may be unable to devote the time. When asked whether he thinks incumbent Democrat Cuomo is vulnerable, Skelos said that’s true of everybody in politics and government. The “Astorino for Governor” campaign committee was registered with the state Board of Elections last week. Federal prosecutors get $4M from upstate NY cases Federal prosecutors report collecting more than $4 million from criminal and civil cases in the Northern District of New York last year. U.S. Attorney Richard Hartunian says collections include $2.6 million from criminal prosecutions. The district extends from the mid-Hudson Valley to the Canadian border and west to Syracuse and Binghamton. Its federal prosecutors say they worked with others in the Justice Department to collect another $14 million in joint cases as well as $11 million with other federal agencies and divisions. Forfeited money and other assets go to department’s Justice Asset Forfeiture Fund for crime victims and more law enforcement. Attorney General Eric Holder said last month the department collected about $8.1 billion altogether in civil and criminal cases for the fiscal year, which ended Sept. 30.

National University News 11 UGA fraternity members face hazing charges Police say nearly a dozen University of Georgia fraternity members face hazing charges after students were beaten with fists as part of an initiation ritual. University of Georgia police on Thursday obtained arrest warrants for the 11 members of the school’s Zeta Iota chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi. UGA Police Chief Jimmy Williamson says some of the students who were beaten were injured but none required medical treatment. The beatings happened Jan. 27 at the home of a member of Kappa Alpha Psi, which doesn’t have a fraternity house in Athens, Williamson told The Athens Banner-Herald. Police began investigating after receiving information from the school’s student affairs office about possible injuries at a pledge event, the police chief said. Nearly all of the suspects had turned themselves in to police Friday morning, the Athens newspaper reported. Each student was charged with hazing, a misdemeanor punishable by up to 12 months in jail and a $5,000 fine. Kappa Alpha Psi’s Zeta Iota chapter is under suspension while the matter is investigated internally by UGA’s Office of Student Conduct, said Victor Wilson, vice president of student affairs at UGA.

Janine Furtado/Assistant Photo Editor

Anthony Parris, a senior double-majoring in psychology and human development, comments during “Color Me Blind” Monday evening in the Old University Union. Hosted by the Black Student Union, Binghamton Association for Mixed Students and SHADES, “Color Me Blind” aimed to discuss how it is impossible to be blind to certain characteristics placed on people by society.

Police Watch A lighter take on campus crime

Classic. No but really this is boring. FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 12:41 p.m. — Resident assistants in Dickinson Community’s O’Connor Hall called officers to the building due to a suspected case of possession of marijuana, said Investigator Patrick Reilly of Binghamton’s New York State University Police. When officers arrived, they were escorted to the room that the 18-yearold female suspect resided in and were let in by the suspect. Officers noticed a distinct odor of marijuana and an open window in one of the rooms. When questioned, the residents all denied that they were smoking marijuana. The suspect eventually admitted to being in possession of marijuana and handed over the marijuana as well as a metal pipe and grinder. The case was referred to the University’s Office of Judicial Affairs. Banksy Was Here FRIDAY, FEB. 7, 11:03 p.m. — Cleaners in the Couper Administration Building noticed graffiti in one of the men’s bathroom stalls, Reilly said. The cleaners saw the graffiti as they were cleaning the bathroom and saw that it was written in permanent marker. The graffiti said, “Have a nice day.” The cleaners were able to wash off the graffiti when they found it. There are no known suspects or witnesses. The case is still under investigation.

This Day in History February 11th 1990

Corrections Pipe Dream strives for accuracy in all we publish. We recognize that mistakes will sometimes occur, but we treat errors very seriously. If you see a mistake in the paper, please contact Editorin-Chief Christina Pullano at editor@bupipedream.com. stabilizing: Zack & Becca

Nelson Mandela is released after 27 years of incarceration at Victor Verster Prison.

Abandon Ferry SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 3:13 a.m. — Officers were called to Newing College’s Delaware Hall due to a report of public intoxication, Reilly said. The suspect, an 18-year-old female, was visibly intoxicated and refused to talk to the police when they arrived because she was worried that she would get in trouble if she spoke to them. They assured her that they only wanted to help her, and she eventually complied and the officers called Harpur’s Ferry for the female. When the female was released, she refused medical attention and left. Desk-structive SATURDAY, FEB. 8, 11:43 p.m. — Cleaners in Lecture Hall noticed a broken desk in Lecture Hall 14, Reilly said. The custodians were sure that the desk was not broken earlier in the day or on Friday. The custodians noted that there were activities going on in that lecture hall on Saturday, so they deduced that the desk was broken at some point that day. They also noticed footprints on a row of desks, which indicated that someone was either standing on the desk or tried to kick it over. There are no known suspects or witnesses. The case is still under investigation.

“Coming here and winning, I can’t even describe the feeling.” Sage Kotsenburg snowboarder and winner of the United States’ first gold medal at the Sochi Olympics

this issue though///lack of cheese on pasta :destabilizing


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Festival showcases student talent

Franz Lino/Staff Photographer

Arielle Biro, a sophomore majoring in biology, sings as part of the second annual Arts and Music Festival on Saturday afternoon. The event, which took place from 3-6 p.m., was open to all students and faculty and charged no admission fee.

We do a lot with the arts and music, so [the festival] just seemed ... natural to us — Kelsey Krause Festival Organizer

SHTY continued from Page 1 the Binghamton University Gospel Choir and Hoop Troop. “Our biggest purpose for the event is to showcase the diverse talents of the Binghamton student body and to create a literal stage for those who feel inclined to express themselves,” wrote Jesse Hickling, vice president of Alpha Delta Phi, in an email. Kelly Mercer, a member of the Mu Phi Epsilon co-ed

fraternity, played the cello beside her fellow fraternity members, who performed as a musical quartet. “The arts are something that are really important in my life,” said Mercer, a sophomore double-majoring in music and psychology. “I think it’s cool they hosted this.” Last year’s festival was sparsely attended, which some said was because of inclement weather. Hickling said the group was able to

ramp up the festival from last year with a greater variety in performances. “The largest difference between this year and last year was the involvement of other student organizations, such as Mu Phi Epsilon who put on wonderful performances, and other groups who tabled with us this year,” Hickling wrote. “I believe having the event at an inside location on campus (Old Union Hall) instead of outside as we did last year encouraged

more people to stop in and stay for the show as well.” Several members of Alpha Delta Phi Society said that the notion of establishing themselves on campus was their motivation for hosting the Arts and Music Festival. Hickling reflected on the success and progress her organization has seen and achieved at this point. “I thought it came out so much better than expected. [Mu Phi Epsilon] put on some

amazing performances, we had people reading poetry, and even rapping,” said Maria Uquillas, a member of Alpha Delta Phi and a sophomore doublemajoring in political science and economics. “I would say it was pretty successful overall.” Other performances included original songs, freestyle rap performances and slam poetry.

Edouard discusses black history The more we hear of what it took to advance, the more we have an understanding of where we've been and where we need to go —Ladene Miles Bourne Director of Haven after school program

RIGHTS continued from Page 1 the essence of racism.” Edouard discussed the landmark 1896 decision of Plessy v. Ferguson, which upheld racist policies through the “separate but equal” doctrine. The ruling stood for more than 50 years until it was overturned by Brown v. Board of Education. “Education is the right of all and not the privilege of a few,” Edouard said. Edouard also touched upon accomplishments of both W.E.B. Du Bois, who founded the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and Booker T. Washington.

“Du Bois argued that blacks should fight for social and economic equality all at once,” Edouard said. The modern Civil Rights Movement made headway with Rosa Parks’ refusal to give up her seat in a bus in Birmingham, Ala. in 1955, according to Edouard. Her actions resulted in the boycott of Birmingham buses for nearly a year, with blacks walking to work and profits sinking for bus companies. “She said ‘I’m tired.’ That’s all she did. I see about a thousand Rosa Parks just in my daily life, just tired people,” Edouard said. The March on Washington in 1963 and Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream”

speech brought the Civil Rights Movement to the national level, Edouard said, with more than 200,000 Americans of many races in attendance and many more watching the event televised. Days after courts ordered the desegregation of Birmingham in 1964, a church bombing killed four young black girls. Edouard said this act convinced President John F. Kennedy to risk his own political future and fully endorse the Civil Rights Movement. Following Kennedy’s assassination, President Lyndon B. Johnson pushed for the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the 24th Amendment, which prohibits the revocation of voting rights

due to failure to pay a poll tax. “We enjoy those fruits today because during the Civil Rights Movement, students across the South decided to change all that,” Edouard said. Edouard applauded BU President Harvey Stenger and Binghamton University for efforts such as the Educational Opportunity Program and the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion. He described the University as “one that gets it.” Edouard, born and raised in South Jamaica, Queens, attended the second-worst high school in the state. Despite this setback, he attributed his opportunity and success in working his way up in the world

to the work by proponents of the Civil Rights Movement. “We can never hear these stories enough,” said Ladene Miles Bourne, director of the Haven After School program. “The more we hear of what it took to advance, the more we have an understanding of where we’ve been and where we need to go.” The NAACP helped organize the event Downtown at the Broome County Public Library. Brenda Brown, an adjunct human development professor at Binghamton University and an event coordinator of the Black History Month Committee, invited Edouard to speak.


www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

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Clark remembered for promoting diversity CLARK continued from Page 1 “From the beginning I had the impression, and I was not alone, that Cliff Clark was here to take Binghamton to the next level.” One of the founders of the Thomas J. Watson School of Engineering and Applied Science, Clark planned for the school’s creation early on and used his connections to make the school a reality, according to McGoff. “It was Cliff Clark who, behind the scenes, brought these powerful people together to, over time, realize the vision he had years before to have engineering programs on the Binghamton Campus,” McGoff wrote. “Together, those founders, led by the chief founder, President Clark, overcame the strong

opposition and established the long sought after engineering programs on our campus.” Clark also pushed for a SUNY-wide fellowship program to support historically underrepresented groups, resulting in the Clifford D. Clark Graduate Fellowship Program for Diversity established in 1990. “He wanted to be sure, it was clear to me, that those chosen for these fellowships had everything it took to succeed academically,” McGoff wrote. “He wanted to support those graduate students who would literally change the face of Binghamton University. I worked with him to make those selections and it was abundantly clear that, to Cliff, these were among the most important decisions being made on the campus.”

During Clark’s presidency, the percentage of minority students at BU more than tripled from 5 to 16 percent in five years. “[As] President, he had made it abundantly clear that Binghamton needed more diversity on campus and he was going to lead the charge to make that happen,” McGoff wrote. “It was crucial to him.” Clark was also involved in expanding the Decker School of Nursing and creating the Binghamton University forum during his presidency. Despite leading BU through these changes, Clark was described as being softspoken and more interested in listening than speaking. “He was not a charismatic leader who could energize an audience, but in smaller groups he impressed with an empathy

and sincerity that won him the respect of his colleagues and the affection and admiration of his students,” said Clifford Kern, an economics professor at BU. McGoff drew parallels between Clark and current BU President Harvey Stenger, saying the two each had hands-on approaches to administration and set their sights on expansion. “Clifford Clark was a superb and visionary leader,” McGoff wrote. “He was exactly the right person to take SUNY Binghamton to the next level during some very trying times. He more than succeeded.” Clark was president for 15 years before stepping down in 1990 to rejoin the economics department as a professor. According to Kern, Clark took a personal approach with

teaching, getting to know each of his students, regardless of class size. Clark retired from teaching full-time in 1996, but remained on staff part-time until 2000. A World War II veteran, Clark served with the 42nd Infantry and helped liberate the Nazi concentration camp at Dachau, Germany in 1945. After the war, Clark earned his Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago. Clark is survived by his wife, Linda Beale, his son, Geoffrey and his daughter, Kathryn Clark Emery. Donations can be made in his memory in support of the Clifford D. Clark Fellowship Program for Diversity through the foundation at BU.

He was exactly the right person to take SUNY Binghamton to the next level during some very trying times. He more than succeeded — Michael McGoff Senior Vice Provost

Photo Provided

Clifford Clark, former Binghamton University president, back left, pictured among most of the founders of the Watson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. Clark, 88, died Jan. 31 in Detroit, Mich.


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Slam poets hit BU SLAM continued from Page 1

Pipe Dream Photographers Wanted Pipe Dream is looking for dedicated and talented photographers to join our elite team. We are looking for students who wish to pursue photojournalism as a hobby or career. If interested, email photo@bupipedream.com

through your own story, through your own words,” Wicks said. Through his poems, Wicks shared his thoughts about what it means to be black and the personal significance spoken word takes on in his life. Monet offered a different perspective on the same issues. Her verses featured intensely personal criticisms interwoven with lyrics about her life and family. The annual event was put together by Madjeen Garcon, vice president of BSU. Every year, the BSU works to find talented poets to come to the University and spread the culture of spoken word. “When I thought about Black History Month, I wanted to put out the image of AfricanAmerican accomplishments,” said Garcon, a senior doublemajoring in sociology and political science. “I wanted to illuminate the brightness of the things we’ve accomplished.” Themes ranged from personal to political, but all the performers brought powerful prose, which was punctuated by a final group performance by Caiyhe and Wicks. The verse was staunch criticism of the New York Police Department’s “stop-and-frisk” tactics. “Only crime committed — excessive possession of melanin.” The University Union Undergrounds was filled past capacity with members from outside the University community attending, alongside many students. “I feel like there’s a great black community on campus, so I wanted to come out and be more a part of it,” said Georgia Sackey, a freshman majoring in English who attended the event.

Tycho McManus/Staff Photographer

Malcolm Wicks shares his poems with the crowd at the Poetry Jam held in the Undergrounds Friday evening. Through his poems, Wicks shared his thoughts about what it means to be black and the personal significance spoken word takes on in his life.

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RELEASE Arts & Culture

Nick Kushner has been painting with own blood since age 15 Emily Mancini and Odeya Pinkus | Staff Writers When we refer to an artist’s blood, sweat and tears, we usually mean it figuratively. But not for Nick Kushner. The Los Angelesbased painter has gained quite a reputation for using “the most personal pigment” in his art: his own blood. Kushner’s solo exhibition, “Aceldama,” opened for a public viewing on Friday, Feb. 7 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the JungleScience Gallery and Art Laboratories on Court Street and will be on display until April. The exhibit featured original works by Kushner,

all created with his blood. His paintings, both beautiful and chilling, adorned the walls to be appreciated by students, local artists and community members. Kushner’s paintings, which feature a unique blend of dark and surrealistic imagery, have been published and exhibited around the world. His rise in the artistic community has been marked by a show in downtown LA with celebrity guests including Marilyn Manson, an interview on A&E and mentions on Playboy Radio. Kushner first began using blood in his work when he was 15, as a “statement of intent” to assert his identity. Over time, his

work evolved, and blood became his full-scale art medium. However, working with blood isn’t easy. “Blood is a somewhat volatile and fragile medium; its application must be done gradually and delicately in order to portray subtleties,” Kushner said. “A base coat must be laid down and allowed to set before applying additional layers in order to build and develop the different tones and extremes in shades. The style of painting I use can be compared most closely to watercolor.” Getting blood, though, isn’t as easy as buying paint. Kushner uses professional tools to pull the

blood from his body. “At first, I began by creating a wound and milking the blood directly from the source,” Kushner said. “As my use of blood evolved, I’ve used phlebotomy tools such as butterfly needles and blood storage vials.” Each painting requires two to six vials of blood. Although the blood storage vials are efficient for long-term works, Kushner still uses a portion of blood fresh from the wound in each of his paintings to maintain his direct artistic connection. “The philosophy I’ve most closely associated with is alchemy, where the creation process of each piece is a

transformative process,” Kushner said. “Because I transmute a literal piece of myself into my work, each painting becomes a living part of myself and each its own independent entity.” Under titles such as “Angel Lust” and “The Devil Has Four Legs,” each piece is uniquely absorbing and intricately detailed, with clear attention to texture and color value. Kushner’s stunning self-portrait “The Immoralist,” named for an André Gide book of the same title, creates a nearly threedimensional-looking effect from the expertly layered blood. “I was impressed to see the range of tones he was able to get out of the blood,” said Derek Smith, a senior majoring in Arabic. “I feel like it’s a pretty original concept.” Kushner was amicable and approachable, taking time to speak with anyone and everyone that wanted to learn more about him and his art. Having the exhibit in Binghamton made it all the more personal for Kushner, as much of his artistic and family legacy is located here. “Aceldama” was dedicated to Kushner’s grandfather, Walter Luckert, a Binghamton native and artist who showcased his work throughout upstate New York, including a solo show at Binghamton University in 1979. “Binghamton has always been important to me,” Kushner said. “It has rich cultural influences beneath the surface, from punk rock to Rod Serling. And although it has this innate element to it, growing up in Binghamton rather than a large city lends itself to a certain isolation. And this I think is important because it allows an individual to have

enough space to hone his or her identity, without being inundated by what may be in vogue or going around them in a larger area.” Kushner’s mother, father, half-sister and fiancee were all in attendance at the exhibition. Ashley Chello, Kushner’s sister, reflected upon her initial reaction after learning of her brother’s chosen medium. “It was kind of different. I wouldn’t say surprising but definitely different,” Chello said. “The way he took it, the way it has morphed into this fantastic art form is awesome … I’m really proud of him.” Though the process of extracting blood is painful, Kushner finds it both cathartic and creatively significant. “Art has always been something which I felt should be meaningful and powerful, more than just a hobby,” Kushner said. “Dependent upon intent and pursuit of the artist, it can be used to portray a concept aesthetically pleasing on simply a surface level or it can have the power to change thought and affect the world.”

Kushner still uses a portion of blood fresh from the wound in each of his paintings to maintain his direct artistic connection.

Shakespeare and Frost, as told by high schoolers Students from Stamford school district recite poems in Poetry Out Loud contest poetry recitation contest for high school students, came to Watters Theater, bringing from Stamford We are often isolated from students community arts and culture Central School District to events as college students, perform in the Southern choosing to stick to the Tier regional level of the Contestants comfort and convenience of competition. campus. But on Friday, the recited the works of greats like Robert Frost, Edgar Allan Poe community arts came to us. Poetry Out Loud, a national and William Shakespeare. Nicole Santalucia, a doctoral candidate in creative writing and head of the Binghamton Poetry Project, organized the event. “I personally found it inspiring to organize the event because poetry was the common ground for everyone involved,” Santalucia wrote in an email. “An event like this reminds all of us that poetry is the center of our lives.” The competition consisted of two rounds in which each of the seven participants recited one poem. The mission of Poetry Out Loud focuses on a greater appreciation of literature, public speaking skills and self-confidence. High school sophomore Ashley Conklin opened the Anna Szilagyi | Contributing Writer

Each student confronted the often intimidating art of poetry by interpreting the source material in his or her own way.

competition with an ode to Robert Frost, bringing the timeless poem “The Road Not Taken” to life on stage. Each student confronted the often intimidating art of poetry by interpreting the source material in his or her own way. The competition combines elements of slam poetry and spoken word with the history of poetry. It also exposes the students to new literature. Judges included Binghamton University lecturer Joe Weil, Executive Director of the Broome County Arts Council Sharon Ball and doctoral candidate in creative writing Dante Di Stefano. Adam Brunner, an intern for the Binghamton Poetry Project and a sophomore majoring in English, served as the accuracy judge. Students were scored based on presence, articulation, understanding of the poem and accuracy, among other categories. “Having to memorize a poem is incredibly rough … just the fact that you need to understand how the poem

is meant to be spoken,” said Krislyn Gordon, a senior at Stamford and runner-up of the competition. Ninth grader Anthony Ortiz won first place at Poetry Out Loud with his recitations of William Shakespeare’s “Sonnet 29” and Edgar Allan Poe’s “Alone.” Both Gordon and Ortiz will compete in a state-level competition at SUNY Albany that will determine which students will compete in the National Finals in Washington, D.C. “This event really contributed to our goal of fostering a poetic community at Binghamton,” Brunner said. “We’re so grateful to Poetry Out Loud for holding the competition on our campus, and I definitely hope to see more outside poetry organizations taking an interest in us.”

Dassie Hirschfield/Contributing Photographer


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www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

The GIM diet: living off free food for one week One student does the impossible and successfully eats mostly Nirchi's for five days Odeya Pinkus | Staff Writer They said it was impossible. They said it would never last. But after a week undercover, Release is here to tell you that the age-old myth has been proven true. You can, in fact, survive only on free food given out by student groups during General Interest Meeting (GIM) week. At the beginning of every semester at Binghamton University, many student organizations attempt to entice new members and expand their listservs through the three P’s: PowerPoints, presentations and, most importantly, pizza. Yes, the biannual GIM week has just passed, and from the March of Dimes to the Undergraduate Anthropology Organization, GIMs all over campus offer the promise of a free dinner in exchange for only your time. Theoretically, any student willing to sit through 10 minutes of E-Board introductions can skip out on buying Sodexo food for the night. It seems as if there is

enough Nirchi’s going around to sustain the average college student, but is it true? To find out, Release decided to put this to the test. The challenge was clear. The rules were in place. Five days. No Sodexo. Only free food given out on campus. Armed with only a box of cereal from Walmart (unfortunately, there is no such thing as a breakfast GIM), I set out to finish the week as a nomad, traveling from one club to the next to forge for food. I woke up Monday with confidence, waiting for my B-line/menu to arrive in my inbox. For my main course, I’d have pizza at Campus Climate Challenge, followed by dessert at either Peace Action BU, Rainbow Pride Union or the Vietnamese Student Association. As the day wore on, however, I realized a lot more planning would need to go in for the week. It also dawned on me that there is no such thing as a lunch GIM. After waiting it out in a rather cranky manner, I finally found some free cookies in the station lobby of WHRW 90.5 FM, as well as some chips

Duncan McInnes/Contributing Photographer

Five days. No Sodexo. Only free food given out on campus. at the Uppergrounds. In a better and more optimistic mood, I made my way to my first GIM. Luckily, there was enough pizza to go around so not only did I fill up, but I slyly took a piece for lunch tomorrow. This would soon become a nightly routine as there was simply no other way but to stock up. I saved cookies from Peace Action BU, more cookies from WHRW and some salad from the Pipe Dream office. I gained some culture at the Vietnamese Student Association that evening, enjoying traditional rainbow dessert, an interesting dish that I can only describe as a colorless bubble tea. Surprisingly good, I was wondering if the rest of my week would follow with such success. Tuesday morning brought a new bowl of cereal and an abandonment of breakfast norms. Free brownies from the radio station lobby seemed to be a perfect mid-morning snack. My leftover cookies from yesterday and my heated-up Nirchi’s kept me going until 6 p.m., when I was finally able to get some vegetables from Intellectual Decisions on Environmental Awareness Solutions (IDEAS), followed by some kale chips from the Food Co-op. My real dinner rolled around at 8 p.m. in the form of more pizza from the Undergraduate Anthropology Organization. Each day I could tell my Nirchi’s tolerance was building, preparing me for the week ahead. Bearcats for Israel broke the monotony with a falafel and shawarma dinner. Now with a newly restored level of protein, I realized that I could not package falafel for the

Free food diary Monday:

Tuesday:

Wednesday:

Thursday:

Friday:

Bowl of cereal Campus Climate Change Peace Action BU WHRW 90.5 FM Uppergrounds Pipe Dream Vietnamese Student Association

two slices of pizza cookies cookies chips salad rainbow dessert

Bowl of cereal WHRW brownies Black History Month movie night popcorn One slice of pizza left over from Campus Climate Change IDEAS chips, salsa, hummus, cherry tomatoes and celery Food Co-op kale chips Undergraduate Anthropology Organization three slices of pizza

Bowl of cereal One slice of pizza left over from Undergraduate Anthropology Organization Bearcats for Israel falafel and shawarma Hindu Student Council one slice of pizza

Bowl of oatmeal (ran out of milk) One slice of pizza left over from Hindu Student Council March of Dimes Society of Women Engineers

Bowl of oatmeal “International Coffee Hour” Women’s Student Union

following day, but the Hindu Student Council came to my rescue. With just two more days left in the square clutches of a Nirchi’s box, I was more than excited for the week to end. On Thursday night, as I stopped by the March of Dimes for a slice, I was suddenly excited by what I thought was tomato and basil pizza. Were there more vegetables in my future? Sadly, no — it was just a slightly overcooked portion of sauce. Feeling dejected, there was nothing more to do than wait for deliverance to come in the form of a Wegmans dinner from the Society of Women Engineers. This was also probably the closest I will ever

one slice of pizza pasta

raspberry pastry, cookies, banana bread, a banana and cranberry juice pizza, guacamole, chips and cheese cubes

come to being in Watson. It was finally the last day of the challenge. The previous night I was unable to find pizza, so to gain lunchtime nourishment I spent my afternoon at the International Coffee House event, watching the Olympics with international students. That night, I celebrated my near-achievement by coming full circle with another slice of pizza from the Women’s Student Union. My Nirchi’s cleanse was coming to a close, and I would like to hope that my cholesterol levels will recover one day. During GIM week, I learned a lot about student life on campus, but mostly about myself. I learned that the human body has a pizza tolerance, and you

shouldn’t surpass it. I learned that there are extremely large amounts of welcoming and friendly clubs at BU. Thanks to the Hindu Student Council, I learned that India is the world’s largest democracy. I made new international friends through the Coffee House, caught Bhangra fever and even got a free button from Peace Action BU. While the whole experience was surely worth it, I was happy that my week as a hunter-gatherer had ended. I was finally ready to rejoin the rest of civilization, knowing that the myth had been proven true — you can live off free food during GIM week.

Satisfy your hunger for Asian cuisine in Binghamton The meals you should order at a few of the finest restaurants in the Southern Tier Gabriella Ginsberg | Staff Writer Asian cuisine is amazing. Noodles, curry, stir-fry, rice, crisp vegetables — the list goes on. It’s time to stop throwing your money at Mein Bowl and try some authentic grub at the Southern Tier’s Asian restaurants while supporting local businesses. Here are the finest Asian restaurants you can get in the Binghamton area, rated out of five stars. VESTAL Lemongrass Kitchen, 1550 Vestal Parkway East — This Thai restaurant is a great value with great taste. The entrees are more than shareable — one main dish lasts one person about three meals. The pad Thai boasts deliciously thick noodles. The Hawaiian mango chicken and yellow curry are also excellent choices. If you still need enticing, there is a coupon for Lemongrass in the Campus Special booklet! Rating: êêêê Ebishura, University Plaza — Half-priced sushi on Mondays at this closer-than-close Japanese

spot has never been a secret, and it’s always completely worth it. You can order off the menu and grab plates of sushi, seaweed salad or mussels, among other choices. Plates are priced by color and are perfect for munching while you wait for your custom rolls or dishes. My favorites are the Alaska, sweet potato tempura and crab tempura. Go at off-peak hours and you won’t have to wait long. Rating: êêêê1/2 Nhu Y, 3701 Vestal Parkway East — Pho is an option that many people don’t often think of first, but it’s not something to miss out on. This tiny Vietnamese restaurant is cash-only, but very reasonably priced. A steaming bowl of roasted duck or fresh fish pho is perfect for the single-digit weather. If you’re feeling extra hungry, try the summer rolls as an appetizer. Rating: êêê1/2 JOHNSON CITY Sabaidee, 36 Jennison Ave. — This Thai place is tucked in Downtown Johnson City, but grab a few friends and make the

trip. Most of the entrees are in the $7-$8 range and are extremely tasty. Though the dining room’s ambiance won’t blow your mind, the green curry fried rice and yellow coconut curry with chicken make this out-of-the-way gem rather worth it. Rating: êêêê Phuong Nam Vietnamese Restaurant, 29 Willow St. — Phuong Nam features a mouthwatering selection of Vietnamese food, starting with the beef pho. The broth is complex in a great way — light, but so flavorful. The noodles themselves are perfect, and the whole thing is made even better with fresh bean sprouts. The clay pot salmon is beyond tender with a rich and slightly smoky taste. The spring rolls are also yummy, especially the peanut dipping sauce. Don’t expect leftovers here because you will devour everything. Rating: êêêê BINGHAMTON Thai Time, 96 Front St. — Everyone knows about Thai Time, but there’s a reason everyone keeps returning: It’s superb. The

File Photo

exposed brick wall contributes to a modern atmosphere, and the place is a popular choice for Binghamton’s young and cool. The Thai iced tea is great. The

curry puffs and crispy spring rolls iced teas as you die of thirst. The are flawless. The pineapple curry fried rice and drunken noodle are is good but extremely spicy, so ask also great picks! Rating: êêêê1/2 about dishes before you are forced to chug several aforementioned


www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

RELEASE

9

'Flappy Bird' phone app goes south this winter Game developer pulls iPhone and Android game from store after gamer backlash

Dong Nguyen

Geoffrey Wilson | Assistant News Editor Within a month, the mobile game “Flappy Bird” soared in popularity only to crash and burn as quickly as it rose. Released in May 2013, the app remained relatively unnoticed until a spike in popularity in January, becoming the most downloaded app for the month and resulting in a port from iOS to Android. The game received greater attention after Vietnam-based developer Dong Nguyen reported that the app generated about $50,000

per day in ad revenue. Despite the rampant success, Nguyen announced via Twitter that he was removing the game for unspecified reasons, saying it was unrelated to legal issues but implying that his reasons involved the heavy media coverage surrounding the game. “I am sorry ‘Flappy Bird’ users, 22 hours from now, I will take ‘Flappy Bird’ down,” Nguyen tweeted. “I cannot take this anymore.” The game’s charm comes from its simple-to-learn but difficultto-master mechanics. Players simply tap the screen to make a

small, pixelated bird flap its wings, causing it to rise or fall while guiding it through obstacles in the form of pipes. There is no end, as players simply compete against their friends for the highest score they can manage. While people who already downloaded the game can still play it, the absence of “Flappy Bird” has resulted in multiple eBay listings of phones with the game installed, with prices ranging up to $90,000, as well as a plethora of “Flappy Bird” clones, mimicking the gameplay. Various controversies surrounded the game, ranging

from questionable art assets, with the game’s iconic pipes seemingly taken directly from the “Super Mario Bros.” series being unoriginal at best, to theories that Nguyen used bots to generate artificial reviews, creating the groundswell that led to legitimate popularity. The popularity of “Flappy Bird” exemplifies the issues with mobile gaming, with the game’s success trumping the various issues surrounding it. The platform lends itself to lighter games, with users preferring a title they can play for short periods and

that will keep them entertained. While console and PC games have leaned closer to heavier, narrative experiences, mobile titles are only required to focus on mechanics. While this is not necessarily a bad thing, it leads developers to cut corners to maximize profit and hook its players. Even if Nguyen didn’t steal art from Nintendo, the inspiration for his art is obvious, and the whole thing comes off as a tasteless rip-off. The rise of “Flappy Bird” rip-offs drives the point home, with developers rushing to capitalize on the game’s removal. Originality and

innovation are discouraged when it is easier to simply copy what works. Even “Flappy Bird” is based on the mechanics of titles like “Helicopter Game.” Despite all this, mobile titles are undoubtedly popular and unquestionably profitable. While there is still success to be had with this model, it comes off as seedy, and until it changes, the market will inevitably stagnate with developers trying to one-up each other. When this happens, it’s the players that lose.

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~Hey guys~ Happy third week of classes. You’re doing great. You work hard! You deserve the uting to society. You’re not embarrassing yourself and others. You’re the image of perfect he appropriately. Your friends, family and neighbors respect you. That 4.0 is within


ese weekends. You NEED the alcohol. You’re actively contribealth. You’re spending your money wisely, budgeting yourself n your reach. You’re unique! Anyway. Keep it up.

Photos by Franz Lino, Staff Photographer


MISSING

CAT

When opportunity knocks, it could knock here…

-Answers to "Ted" or "Senator Kennedy". or here

or here

or here or here

-Tabby cat with white paws, unusually prominent testicles, and a contagious lust for life. -Last seen chasing the Rathskellar down State Street.

or here

-Enjoys balls of yarn, lapping milk, and historical fiction. or here

-Reward of up to Seventeen BitCoins (Depending on the physical and psychological conditon in which cat is returned.)

or here

Grow your own way. At PwC, opportunities are everywhere. We’ll help you find the career path that’s right for you. We’ll coach you, mentor you and refine your skills. We’ll offer you a variety of experiences so you can build relationships and grow your career — your own way. So whenever your next opportunity comes knocking here, you’ll be ready to answer. pwc.com/campus

© 2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, a Delaware limited liability partnership. All rights reserved. PwC refers to the United States member firm, and may sometimes refer to the PwC network. Each member firm is a separate legal entity. Please see www.pwc.com/structure for further details. We are proud to be an Affirmative Action and Equal Opportunity Employer.

SUNY at Binghamton_9.32x16_v1.indd 1

10/2/2013 5:56:36 PM

-If you have any infornation, please contact the Feline Crimes department of UPD.


RESEARCH DAYS | MARCH 26-28

Call for student posters & displays Research Days offer a chance for undergraduate and graduate students from all academic disciplines to showcase their research, scholarly and creative work. All formats are welcome, including posters, displays, slide presentations and video. Student work will be displayed at one of two separate sessions in the Mandela Room on Friday, March 28: one at 11 a.m. and one at 1 p.m. To submit a poster or presentation — and to learn more about Research Days — visit go.binghamton.edu/ researchdays.

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

FEBRUARY 28 Questions? Contact Rachel Coker at rcoker@binghamton.edu.

Bioethicist Jonathan D. Moreno of the University of Pennsylvania will deliver the keynote: “Mind Wars: Brain Science and the Military in the 21st Century” 7 p.m. March 26, University Union Mandela Room

Sponsored by Academic Affairs, Division of Research, McNair Scholars Program, Undergraduate Research Center


14

FUN

February 11, 2014 | www.bupipedream.com

Fun Page Fun Fact: The backs of ears look and feel like Ravioli. Think about it... try it... isn't that fucking crazy? In Corn We Trust...?

Bad Karma

Mike Manzi

Binghamton Ninja

Chris Walsh

Sam Gelman

RELEASE DATE– Thursday, August 23, 2007

Los Angeles Times Daily Crossword Puzzle Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis ACROSS 1 Guzzle 5 Respond to cuteness 9 Road crew equipment 14 Toy city block 15 Out of the harbor 16 Mozart’s “Idomeneo,” e.g. 17 He sang about Alice 18 Beatle George’s sitarist friend 19 “Fabulous!” 20 DOWN 23 Thou, now 24 Get a move on 25 Engine performance aid 28 Cadillac Escalade, for one 31 DOWN 35 Opening 37 Distort, as a news story 38 Field: Prefix 39 Dog in a horned helmet 42 Away from the weather 43 Posed again 45 Time of action 47 DOWN 50 Base force, briefly 51 Dinner twosome? 52 Computer filename extension 53 Very early 55 DOWN 61 Magical Hindu 64 Scotch __ 65 Drink in a tasse 66 Dwelling 67 Not-so-friendly look 68 Race place 69 Malice 70 Isn’t right 71 It covers all the bases DOWN 1 Sporting, with “in” 2 Saarbrücken sir 3 Fruit named for its appearance 4 Inane

56 “Madcap Maxie” 36 Barrier at a zoo 5 Where to see of ’30s boxing 40 Nocturnal stars 57 Unoriginal one acronym 6 Hirsute Genesis 58 Pinatubo output 41 Fishing vessels character 59 Beyond the 44 Something to 7 Nephew of 6horizon prove Down 60 Pained reaction 46 Auto on the 8 Slow-motion 61 Personal Autobahn discipline preference, in e48 Losing string 9 Fairway bends mail slang 49 Plant with 10 Garland __: 62 Homer stickers former Texas Simpson’s dad 54 Center of Florida music venue 63 __-Tiki 55 Spot cousin 11 New York’s Tappan __ ANSWER TO PREVIOUS PUZZLE: Bridge 12 Stat for Greg Maddux 13 Snitch 21 He succeeded Boutros 22 Uncles and aunts 25 Weaving course 26 Mechanic’s job 27 Mystery author Elizabeth 28 Hardly prevalent 29 Encourage 30 Link for opponents? 32 East ender? 33 First name in talk shows 34 Not so hot 8/23/07 xwordeditor@aol.com

By Stella Daily and Bruce Venzke (c)2007 Tribune Media Services, Inc.

8/23/07

Our Aemittephagus Future

Seth Wegener


Missed Pipe Dream's GIMs? It's not too late to join! Pipe Dream isn't just for English majors. We are looking for students of all majors to help us write, design, photograph, cartoon, copy edit and more!

Email Manager@bupipedream.com for more information.


SPORTS

18

www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

COMMENTARY

'Opposition' shouldn't mean 'enemy' in NCAA sports Jeff Twitty Contributing Writer

From heated rants to brawls on ice, it seems at least from the occasional sports watcher’s perspective that athletes are angrier about more things today than ever before. The stress of thousands of fans and a slew of reporters constantly monitoring every move made and tweet sent by these athletes would be enough to make any professional frustrated. But what happens when that line of professionalism is blurred by the principle of amateurism? The most recent example of this amateur frustration occurred this past Saturday, when Marcus Smart, a basketball player at Oklahoma State University, came under fire after shoving an opposing fan out of frustration in a loss against Texas Tech University. Later, it was rumored that the

man had been calling Smart everything from a “piece of crap” to racial slurs to incite the struggle. Right on cue, fans and reporters alike took to numerous outlets to voice their opinions, support and confusion about what they had just witnessed. But the word the game’s television broadcaster chose to describe Smart’s behavior was the most telling of all: “disgusting.” Many of those who have attended sporting events beyond the level of T-Ball have bared witness to outrageous and, dare I say, disgusting fan behavior. From as early as high school sports, and in some places as early as junior high athletics, fans are trained to take the term “opposition” as a synonym for “enemy.” Students see their school’s athletes as their personal gladiators rather than the guys who sit next to them in English class. I have personally seen studentathletes get booed off of courts and fields, reminiscent of what would be done to a lackluster

professional, as entire fan sections rejoice. With some NCAA programs drawing crowds and coverage that rival those of the NBA and NFL on a regular basis, it is very easy to forget that “student-athlete” is more than just a term for a pro who’s not quite a pro yet. It is instead a title representative of the responsibility that these individuals have taken on. There are many studentathletes who have earned their way into their respective institutions through superior academics paired with their athletic prowess. However, the stereotypical image of “the jock getting a scholarship to toss a ball around” is still one that lingers and affects the light in which student-athletes are seen. In some cases, it can affect how they are treated, be it through a casual conversation in the dining hall or through University of Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron’s mother tweeting that Florida State University quarterback

BEARCAT BRIEFS

Jameis Winston should learn to speak English. Despite arguments over the ethics of the admission of student-athletes, one thing remains true: Their athletic ability and competition is for the betterment of their institutions. This is true in the same sense that competition among students in the classroom can create a better academic atmosphere for a university. The only difference is that competitive sports programs are an amazing way to bring recognition, money and applicants to a university relatively quickly — though this can certainly carry a nasty backlash for the individual. I’m sure thousands of fans don’t heckle you while taking a chemistry quiz. I would hope your face wouldn’t be plastered on news outlets if you failed said quiz, and I would really hope a full-scale investigation wouldn’t be launched on you if you were great at chemistry. This is not to say that passionate school spirit

Staff Reports

The Binghamton men’s tennis team split a pair of weekend matches, defeating Cleveland State at home but falling at No. 58 Penn State. Sophomore Alexander Maisin led the Bearcats (2-3) with an unblemished record in both singles and doubles. Pitted at No. 4 singles in both weekend matches, Maisin downed each opponent in straight sets. He also teamed up with junior Aswin Nambi at No. 2 doubles for a pair of wins, the victory over Penn State serving as Binghamton’s sole triumph in doubles. Sophomores Eliott Hureau and Sid Hazarika, who earned a pair of victories against Cleveland State, were Binghamton’s only other multiple winners.

Garn's No. 1 finish highlights track's weekend

Students see their school’s athletes as their personal gladiators rather than the guys who sit next to them in English class.

Hofstra downs wrestling Bearcats can't keep up fast pace set by Reed, Deuel Jeff Twitty

Men's tennis splits pair of weekend matches

should be extinguished in any sense, nor is this to excuse inappropriate behavior made by student-athletes — playing collegiate sports is a privilege. However, the willingness of fans and media to parade or shame the character of a student based on his or her successes or pitfalls in what should be an extracurricular activity ought to be rethought. If for no other reason than it is inconsistent with the implied “academics first” mindset exhibited in the term “student-athlete,” the scrutiny these students endure is unfair. Tailgates, boosters and all of the revenue that comes with major sports programs can all be great for universities. But when an atmosphere is created in which the colors of a school are more important than its founding mottos, principles and duties, we lose sight of what can truly be disgusting about a warped definition of “student-athlete”.

Contributing Writer

A pair of familiar foes squared off on the mat Friday night for the first time as members of a new conference, and the home team won. The Binghamton wrestling team captured the first two bouts, but host Hofstra rattled off eight straight wins for a 28-8 victory as the former Colonial Athletic Association rivals met for the first time as constituents of the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association. The Pride (6-6, 4-2 EIWA) proved their dominance by handing the Bearcats (4-11, 3-8 EIWA) one of their largest losses of the season. BU head coach Matt Dernlan said he hates to use the word “flat” to describe his team, but he did say that Friday’s performance was “a little off.”

“It just wasn’t consistent with how we have been [performing] this past month,” Dernlan said. “At times it looked like we lacked the confidence to be the aggressors … I hope it was an anomaly.” After an outing plagued by missed opportunities on takedowns and close losses, Dernlan stressed that his team must apply a “laser focus” as they approach their final three matches. That intense focus level was apparent early, as 197-pound senior Cody Reed and heavyweight junior Tyler Deuel earned back-to-back major decision victories to put Binghamton on the board first. Although Hofstra claimed the remainder of the night’s victories, Binghamton continued to display strong showings on the mat. The matches fought in the 125- and 133-weight classes were particularly noteworthy.

125-pound junior David White took Hofstra redshirt senior Jamie Franco — a multipletime NCAA qualifier — to a second tiebreaker period before a 2-1 loss. 133-pound sophomore Mike Sardo also put forth one of his “most complete matches of the year,” according to Dernlan, in a 5-1 loss against Hofstra redshirt freshman Jamel Hudson. With the Bearcats scheduled to face three more opponents, including a competitive EIWA Bucknell team, before heading to the conference championship next month, the Hofstra match will serve as a lesson on the importance of consistency. However, this is a team that knows better than to let a loss linger. “I have a short memory,” Dernlan said. “We just have to put it all behind and move forward.”

Staff Reports

The Binghamton track and field squads competed at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge at Penn State Saturday, with the men capturing sixth and the women taking seventh in the eight-team field. But the most notable Binghamton performance of the weekend came via the legs of junior Jesse Garn, who won the 1,000-meter run at the New York City Armory Collegiate Invitational. Garn’s time of 2:21.99 narrowly edged Mohamed Souleiman of Ottawa (2:22.46) and defeated runners from power conference programs such as Kansas, Duke and Villanova. Only one other Bearcat won an event over the weekend. Sophomore Ethan Hausamann secured first place in the 3,000-meter run at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge with a time of 8:25.21. For the women, sophomore Nina Sarmiento set a school record in the 600. She finished seventh at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge with a time of 1:36.93.

Help photo get back on its feet. Email Photo@bupipedream.com

Wrestling Schedule BU @ Buffalo

BU vs. Bucknell

BU vs. Bloomsburg

DATE

DATE

DATE

Feb. 14

Feb. 21

Feb. 22

LOCATION

LOCATION

LOCATION

Alumni Arena

West Gym

West Gym

TIME

TIME

TIME

7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

Missed our GIMs? Don't worry! It's not too late to get involved! Email Photo@bupipedream.com


www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

OPINION

17

Guest: Feminism discussion needs a clear definition of terms It's time to bring some facts and clarity to the recent debates over women's rights movements Naomi Barnett Guest Columnist

There’s a bit of a misrepresentation and misunderstanding surrounding the opinion of students at this University in regards to the topic of feminism. As the feminist that I am, I wish to enlighten not only the author of the editorial entitled “I Am Not a Feminist,” but also many other misinformed students. As any typical college student doing web research would do, I’m going to quote my favorite free information-providing website: Wikipedia. “Feminism is a collection of movements and ideologies aimed at defining, establishing, and defending equal political, economic, and social rights for women. This includes seeking to establish equal

opportunities for women in education and employment. A feminist advocates or supports the rights and equality of women.” Wait. That can’t be right. It didn’t say anything about bra-burning, man-hating or establishing dominance as the stronger sex! Maybe that’s because … that’s not what feminism is. Or about. Maybe it’s encompassed those attitudes at times, but that’s neither the mindset of every feminist nor the ideals of the group as a whole, especially within a movement that is always changing. The reason why this belief in gender equality is called feminism is because, for the most part in our society, women are more downtrodden socially, politically and economically. The ideology takes the name of the group being oppressed, although does not, anywhere, claim that men have it entirely easy. Maybe “oppressed” isn’t the right word either. Women can vote, we can drive, we are technically free to wear whatever we want and speak our mind. We are free to

go to college and work hard to land the jobs that we have pursued. However, as of September 2013, white women, in America, the wealthiest demographic, only make about 76 cents for every dollar men make. This is for myriad reasons, one of which being that women don’t feel that they can land higher jobs that have historically been reserved for men, and therefore, might not try. These numbers are based on income averages, and we must take into account that some women work less due to parenting. However, more fathers are taking time off to stay at home with their kids, but they are still made fun of and criticized for performing a job that isn’t “manly.” Men, in feminism, are being given more rights, too — the right to go grocery shopping, to participate in women’s studies classes and clubs and to not go to the gym. The right to express themselves in a way that they believe suits them — just as women do. As of now, we still haven’t had a female president or vice president — maybe

because she wasn’t the proper person for the job, or maybe because a large portion of the country thinks that a woman will decide to go to war once a month when she gets emotional. Feminism believes that a woman should land a job based on her qualifications. To address the social aspect of feminism’s definition, we must look directly back at some claims and examples that were made in the recent article. Just because sexual assault and rape are not commonly reported occurrences in Binghamton does not mean that this country does not have a problem. 89,000 people reported rape in the U.S. this year, and on average, 60 percent of rapes go unreported. On the list of the countries with the highest amount of rape, the U.S. is listed, while India is not. In too many countries, being gang-raped and murdered happens repeatedly and constantly. Women are accused by safety professionals that their clothes or lack thereof are the reasons they were raped. In the past, we have not been taught to

feel good about our bodies. Dove and Aerie, as mentioned, have made their campaigns because of the increasing strength of the feminist movement. If women had always been praised for being whoever they were, in terms of clothing, body type and makeup, the unique progressiveness of these campaigns wouldn’t need to be acknowledged. A woman should not need a movement to define that she is capable of doing everything a man can do, and that she should feel good and safe. However, feminism exists because women today are not completely equal. We’re getting there, and being able to state your mind is a great start — but first, it is important to understand the implications and definitions of your beliefs. You’re a feminist if you believe in equality for both men and women, and that’s why more of you are feminists than you think. — Naomi Barnett is a sophomore double-majoring in English and marketing.

Is BU football realistic? Sex, love and your iPhone A cost-benefit analysis of the perennial question

Tech's role in relationships remains a mixed bag

This, fortunately, is the easiest to answer. It isn’t an issue. The untapped former-industrial land in the surrounding community provides abundant space for massive real estate projects. The fact that the stadium wouldn’t be directly situated on campus is undoubtedly a negative, though, considering the already meager attendance rates at on-campus games. A more pressing issue, perhaps, is reconciling a team with the University mission and vision. Football is, of course, an excellent way the University can build and support an extensive alumni network. However, this wouldn’t ensure total compliance on behalf of alumni. Indeed, BU’s collegiate niche is an affordable, public research university. Many alumni take pride in BU’s lack of a football team as being indicative of the University being “different” or “academically focused.” Considering the allocation of time and resources that would be necessary for a football team, keeping this risk in mind is extremely important. Speaking of allocation of resources, funding is an obvious road bump. Public colleges have been, in the past five to 10 years, a cyclical story of budgetary constraints. The University could bond out the construction of a stadium like it has done with the

and the possibilities it creates for new relationships. Technology has become akin to a necessity. Some may even call it a necessary evil, which is reflected in the realm of relationships and sex. We text more than we talk to people a lot of the time nowadays, and while that can be a good way to reach your significant other when you need to, it’s also given birth to the “over-involved” lover and created a new realm of compatibility. It’s convenient, and it helps people overcome distance, but it also can be extremely dangerous in terms of sexting. Internet dating has opened up literally a whole new world in terms of dating; people you might never meet in real life who are very compatible with you could be found just around the corner. However, is there something to be said for starting a relationship organically? A lot of people tend to think so, or we all probably wouldn’t go out to bars as much and spend as much time dressing up as we do. There’s also an extremely dangerous component of Internet dating: The falsification of intentions and identity cannot be ignored and certainly ranks among the top points regarding the “evils” of technology. The best technologies that have aided human sexuality are of a slightly different sort: the advancement of contraceptive

Jake Ethé Contributing Columnist

This semester, I am enrolled in a class taught by Brian Rose, vice president for student affairs, called “Higher Education and Athletics.” In it, we are taking up a research project aimed at formulating a costbenefit analysis of a Binghamton University football team. Last week, the Editorial Board published a humorous piece deeming the creation of a BU football team ineffectual and counterproductive. Even with its sarcastic tinge, however, it does raise an interesting question. Binghamton, as a university, is undoubtedly on an upward trend. It was recently named the 10th best public college by the Princeton Review. Obviously, BU aspires to surpass that placement. Yet, every public college ranked above it has a football team. So, it begs the question: Would BU benefit from having a football team? The answer, of course, is maybe, but to avoid fence-sitting, I’ll answer with a qualified no. Let’s review some of the points: There’s the issue of location.

new residential communities, but you can’t bond out operating costs and scholarship costs for a football team. This is a clear negative to the balance sheet. This only begins to skim the surface of the positives and negatives that creating a football team for BU would entail. Other issues could include Title IX gender equity issues, NCAA Division I requirements, conference alignment, academic support for new athletes, recruiting and long-term sustainability. A more intricate examination of universities that have created a football team over a five- to 10-year span would be necessary in order to put together a more comprehensive, empirical report. Still, on the surface, it seems that the Editorial Board got it right. Neither the Board, nor myself, inevitably, is the first to write on the topic of a BU football team. This is an age-old conundrum. As such, people will continue to consider and write about whether or not Binghamton University should have a football team. As for me, judging by the issues covered and the extensive list of those not yet covered, I’m going with no. — Jake Ethé is a freshman majoring in political science.

Jake Lewis Sex Columnist

Does technology help or hinder relationships? Seriously, I’m asking, because there isn’t an easy answer. I started thinking about this because of a new MTV show called “Are You The One?” Basically, 10 guys and 10 girls have to guess whom a computer program has determined they’re the most compatible with in order to win a prize. It doesn’t matter if they have meaningful connections with other contestants; if they don’t figure out their match according to the algorithm, they don’t get anything. This show, like many of the other romance-competition reality shows out there, takes the concept of love and twists it. Unlike other shows, however, it appears to heavily lean on technology for perfect matches. Is it possible for a program to know what you want more than you do? Or are we exhibiting a reliance on technology to a perhaps unsettling extent? Of course the issue isn’t as black-and-white as those two options, but for the purposes of this column, I’m going to focus on those two opposing concepts: our heavy dependence on technology

Guest: ASA's Israel boycott unjust Three BU professors have signed the hypocritical resolution Justin Hayet Guest Columnist

Just as finals began to take full swing this past December, the American Studies Association (ASA) passed a resolution that degraded its existing integrity as well as the values embedded within American culture that the ASA seeks to protect. The ASA resolution is a boycott of Israeli higher education institutions. Three Binghamton University professors — Joseph Keith, Ali Mazrui and James Petras — voted in favor of this resolution. Although BU does not have an official American studies department, these three professors are voting members of ASA. The boycott states that the ASA stands in “solidarity with scholars and students deprived of their academic freedom and it aspires to enlarge that freedom for all, including Palestinians. The ASA’s endorsement of the academic boycott emerges from the context of US military and other support for Israel; Israel’s violation of international law and UN resolutions.” Beyond the boycott of Israel, the hypocrisy lies in the obvious truth that any academic boycott undercuts the values and even the history upon which the field of American studies is built. It’s shameful that American values are being manipulated and undercut by an organization that is so meticulously

exercising the all-too-familiar double standard that the Jewish state knows all too well. There’s no boycott resolution by the ASA regarding Syria, after over 100,000 dead and 8 million displaced by President Bashar al-Assad’s murderous regime. And beyond the Middle East, there is no boycott of China’s academic institutions, despite China’s blatant disregard of anything that favors democracy or human rights. There is no boycott of Russian institutions, despite Russia mounting anti-gay laws and President Vladimir Putin’s heinous weekly statements regarding such issues. Most shocking of all, there’s no resolution against the eight Palestinian universities, all built by Israel with Israeli taxpayer money, despite the Palestinian Authority’s praise of suicide bombers or the Palestinian Authority’s treatment of women and homosexuals. There’s no resolution by the ASA condemning the Palestinian Authority or their universities despite their weekly calls, during the peace talks, that within a future established Palestinian state there will be no Jews allowed, as President Mahmoud Abbas said in 2010, “I will never allow a single Israeli to live among us on Palestinian land.” That rhetoric, words blatantly ignored by the American media, speaks for itself. And yet Israel, a state made up of 1.6 million Israeli Arabs with full citizenship and rights, is pointed out among the world’s worst offenders, despite offering these Israeli Arabs undoubtedly the best quality of life the Middle East has to offer. This was recently seen as Monaliza

Abdo, a Christian Arab citizen of Israel, proclaimed to the world that she is proud to be an Israeli Arab serving the Israeli Defense Forces. “I keep the country safe, not only for the Jews, but for the Arabs too. I would sacrifice my life for the state of Israel and all of its citizens,” she said in front of a world that only ignored her truth. If the ASA is truly serious about its resolution, the organization and its blind followers should henceforth abandon the use of all Israeli innovations and inventions of the 20th and 21st centuries, which likely have intellectual property ties to the Israeli institutions the ASA seeks to boycott. “What inventions?” you may rightfully inquire. Simply search “Israeli inventions” on Google, and thanks to the Israeli-developed Intel computer chip, your computer will process thousands upon thousands of pages. Over 200 universities across the nation have stood up in opposition to this resolution. However, BU, the Northeast’s “premier public institution,” has remained silent, as three BU professors have supported a clear double standard for the one and only Jewish state, the only democracy in the Middle East. In the face of this emerging trend of boycotts against America’s one true ally in the Middle East, the BU community has made no attempt at an uproar condemning the boycott. Will you too opt to continue to remain silent? — Justin Hayet is a sophomore majoring in political science.

methods and increased measures of STD protection. These have few drawbacks in a majority of cases, but they still carry inherent risks, especially when they use chemicals that could be potentially harmful. Also, even though they are good, none of them are foolproof. Back to the original question, I think we do rely too much on technology. Or, rather, we’ve developed quite the dysfunctional relationship with it. In this day and age, we rely on technology so much that we do a disservice to ourselves. A computer program might tell me my perfect match immediately, but I miss out on the growth I get from guessing. I’ve only had two relationships in my life, and I learned so much from them, even though they weren’t my perfect matches. We may socially stunt ourselves through our reliance on technology, and with that we lose out on personal growth through interpersonal relationships and physical connections. Technology should be used to enhance relationships, not determine them for us. So while technology is alluring, I like to think I’d pass on the algorithm in favor of some good old-fashioned trial and error; every mistake you make brings you closer to the solution. — Jake Lewis is a senior majoring in English.

Letter to the Editor Dear Editor, I am a female student, a senior at Binghamton University. I have never before felt so strongly the need to voice my opinion on something published in the Pipe Dream. Recently, an article on feminism, as well as a response to the original article, were posted. In reading both articles, I find that both authors have a fundamental and serious misunderstanding of modern feminism. Their confusion is understandable, and shared by many. Modern feminism is not about bra burning, and it’s not about hating men, and it’s certainly not about “seeing women as victims, and men as tyrants.” Modern feminism, in a very basic sense, is about asking for equality for both genders. Both women AND men can label themselves as feminists. It is not about dragging men down so that women can stand atop them and proclaim victory. It’s about leveling the playing field. I see the original article as a little too glass half empty, and the response as a little too glass half full. If you’re damned if you do, and damned if you don’t, then the glass is just plain empty. The truth is that our culture places very little value on women, and the evidence is everywhere. Please note, I’m not placing blame on any particular group. Individuals are certainly capable of rising above this, and I know plenty of truly decent men who exhibit an attitude opposite to this cultural norm. I also know women who spend time devaluing themselves in a twisted effort to find some self worth. I think it’s obvious that we have taken a very strange step backward in the movement toward equality among the sexes. I think the political positioning on recent women’s rights issues is still

solid in the minds of anyone paying attention to the news in the past two years. The point is that while we waste our time arguing about how full the glass is, a greater power is working over time behind the scenes to put women back in their “place.” We should be using this time to explore options that would place the feminist movement forward. I would like to believe that at this time, the feminist movement stands for much more than equal rights for women, but that it’s about equal rights for everyone - men, women, LGBTQIA, minorities, etc. This is about moving forward together and correcting those things are just not acceptable in our modern society. In summary, while I commend any woman willing to raise her voice and discuss feminism, I have to question the aim of those two recent Pipe Dream articles. I think it would be more useful to spend some time analyzing the way our culture treats gender in general objectifying women and demonizing men and ignoring those who deviate from the accepted sexual and gender norms. A discussion of this would be immensely more effective than one dimensional articles based on a confused view of feminism. Side Note: It would be extremely beneficial for anyone not convinced that our society devalues women to take a look at a documentary that came out in 2011, Miss Representation. In addition, the foundation behind this film, The Representation Project, is coming out with a film later this year analyzing American masculinity. I would highly recommend checking out their website. http:// therepresentationproject.org/ Mariah Haley Class of 2014


SPORTS

18

www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

COMMENTARY

'Opposition' shouldn't mean 'enemy' in NCAA sports Jeff Twitty Contributing Writer

From heated rants to brawls on ice, it seems at least from the occasional sports watcher’s perspective that athletes are angrier about more things today than ever before. The stress of thousands of fans and a slew of reporters constantly monitoring every move made and tweet sent by these athletes would be enough to make any professional frustrated. But what happens when that line of professionalism is blurred by the principle of amateurism? The most recent example of this amateur frustration occurred this past Saturday, when Marcus Smart, a basketball player at Oklahoma State University, came under fire after shoving an opposing fan out of frustration in a loss against Texas Tech University. Later, it was rumored that the

man had been calling Smart everything from a “piece of crap” to racial slurs to incite the struggle. Right on cue, fans and reporters alike took to numerous outlets to voice their opinions, support and confusion about what they had just witnessed. But the word the game’s television broadcaster chose to describe Smart’s behavior was the most telling of all: “disgusting.” Many of those who have attended sporting events beyond the level of T-Ball have bared witness to outrageous and, dare I say, disgusting fan behavior. From as early as high school sports, and in some places as early as junior high athletics, fans are trained to take the term “opposition” as a synonym for “enemy.” Students see their school’s athletes as their personal gladiators rather than the guys who sit next to them in English class. I have personally seen studentathletes get booed off of courts and fields, reminiscent of what would be done to a lackluster

professional, as entire fan sections rejoice. With some NCAA programs drawing crowds and coverage that rival those of the NBA and NFL on a regular basis, it is very easy to forget that “student-athlete” is more than just a term for a pro who’s not quite a pro yet. It is instead a title representative of the responsibility that these individuals have taken on. There are many studentathletes who have earned their way into their respective institutions through superior academics paired with their athletic prowess. However, the stereotypical image of “the jock getting a scholarship to toss a ball around” is still one that lingers and affects the light in which student-athletes are seen. In some cases, it can affect how they are treated, be it through a casual conversation in the dining hall or through University of Alabama quarterback AJ McCarron’s mother tweeting that Florida State University quarterback

BEARCAT BRIEFS

Jameis Winston should learn to speak English. Despite arguments over the ethics of the admission of student-athletes, one thing remains true: Their athletic ability and competition is for the betterment of their institutions. This is true in the same sense that competition among students in the classroom can create a better academic atmosphere for a university. The only difference is that competitive sports programs are an amazing way to bring recognition, money and applicants to a university relatively quickly — though this can certainly carry a nasty backlash for the individual. I’m sure thousands of fans don’t heckle you while taking a chemistry quiz. I would hope your face wouldn’t be plastered on news outlets if you failed said quiz, and I would really hope a full-scale investigation wouldn’t be launched on you if you were great at chemistry. This is not to say that passionate school spirit

Staff Reports

The Binghamton men’s tennis team split a pair of weekend matches, defeating Cleveland State at home but falling at No. 58 Penn State. Sophomore Alexander Maisin led the Bearcats (2-3) with an unblemished record in both singles and doubles. Pitted at No. 4 singles in both weekend matches, Maisin downed each opponent in straight sets. He also teamed up with junior Aswin Nambi at No. 2 doubles for a pair of wins, the victory over Penn State serving as Binghamton’s sole triumph in doubles. Sophomores Eliott Hureau and Sid Hazarika, who earned a pair of victories against Cleveland State, were Binghamton’s only other multiple winners.

Garn's No. 1 finish highlights track's weekend

Students see their school’s athletes as their personal gladiators rather than the guys who sit next to them in English class.

Hofstra downs wrestling Bearcats can't keep up fast pace set by Reed, Deuel Jeff Twitty

Men's tennis splits pair of weekend matches

should be extinguished in any sense, nor is this to excuse inappropriate behavior made by student-athletes — playing collegiate sports is a privilege. However, the willingness of fans and media to parade or shame the character of a student based on his or her successes or pitfalls in what should be an extracurricular activity ought to be rethought. If for no other reason than it is inconsistent with the implied “academics first” mindset exhibited in the term “student-athlete,” the scrutiny these students endure is unfair. Tailgates, boosters and all of the revenue that comes with major sports programs can all be great for universities. But when an atmosphere is created in which the colors of a school are more important than its founding mottos, principles and duties, we lose sight of what can truly be disgusting about a warped definition of “student-athlete”.

Contributing Writer

A pair of familiar foes squared off on the mat Friday night for the first time as members of a new conference, and the home team won. The Binghamton wrestling team captured the first two bouts, but host Hofstra rattled off eight straight wins for a 28-8 victory as the former Colonial Athletic Association rivals met for the first time as constituents of the Eastern Intercollegiate Wrestling Association. The Pride (6-6, 4-2 EIWA) proved their dominance by handing the Bearcats (4-11, 3-8 EIWA) one of their largest losses of the season. BU head coach Matt Dernlan said he hates to use the word “flat” to describe his team, but he did say that Friday’s performance was “a little off.”

“It just wasn’t consistent with how we have been [performing] this past month,” Dernlan said. “At times it looked like we lacked the confidence to be the aggressors … I hope it was an anomaly.” After an outing plagued by missed opportunities on takedowns and close losses, Dernlan stressed that his team must apply a “laser focus” as they approach their final three matches. That intense focus level was apparent early, as 197-pound senior Cody Reed and heavyweight junior Tyler Deuel earned back-to-back major decision victories to put Binghamton on the board first. Although Hofstra claimed the remainder of the night’s victories, Binghamton continued to display strong showings on the mat. The matches fought in the 125- and 133-weight classes were particularly noteworthy.

125-pound junior David White took Hofstra redshirt senior Jamie Franco — a multipletime NCAA qualifier — to a second tiebreaker period before a 2-1 loss. 133-pound sophomore Mike Sardo also put forth one of his “most complete matches of the year,” according to Dernlan, in a 5-1 loss against Hofstra redshirt freshman Jamel Hudson. With the Bearcats scheduled to face three more opponents, including a competitive EIWA Bucknell team, before heading to the conference championship next month, the Hofstra match will serve as a lesson on the importance of consistency. However, this is a team that knows better than to let a loss linger. “I have a short memory,” Dernlan said. “We just have to put it all behind and move forward.”

Staff Reports

The Binghamton track and field squads competed at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge at Penn State Saturday, with the men capturing sixth and the women taking seventh in the eight-team field. But the most notable Binghamton performance of the weekend came via the legs of junior Jesse Garn, who won the 1,000-meter run at the New York City Armory Collegiate Invitational. Garn’s time of 2:21.99 narrowly edged Mohamed Souleiman of Ottawa (2:22.46) and defeated runners from power conference programs such as Kansas, Duke and Villanova. Only one other Bearcat won an event over the weekend. Sophomore Ethan Hausamann secured first place in the 3,000-meter run at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge with a time of 8:25.21. For the women, sophomore Nina Sarmiento set a school record in the 600. She finished seventh at the Sykes & Sabock Challenge with a time of 1:36.93.

Help photo get back on its feet. Email Photo@bupipedream.com

Wrestling Schedule BU @ Buffalo

BU vs. Bucknell

BU vs. Bloomsburg

DATE

DATE

DATE

Feb. 14

Feb. 21

Feb. 22

LOCATION

LOCATION

LOCATION

Alumni Arena

West Gym

West Gym

TIME

TIME

TIME

7:00 p.m.

7:00 p.m.

2:00 p.m.

Missed our GIMs? Don't worry! It's not too late to get involved! Email Photo@bupipedream.com


SPORTS

www.bupipedream.com | February 11, 2014

19

BU finds offensive rhythm too late in loss at Maine BEARCATS TOP 3 SCORERS

10.3 1. Sherae Swinson

8.3 2. Morgan Murphy

8.1 3. Vaneeshia Paulk

BU @ Maine

53

Xindi Tian/Contributing Photographer

Junior forward Sherae Swinson’s team-high 13 points were not enough to overcome Binghamton’s early deficit.

Bearcats drop ninth straight after scoring just 18 first-half points E. Jay Zarett Pipe Dream Sports Second-half offensive woes defined the Binghamton women’s basketball team’s two outings preceding Sunday’s clash with Maine. The Bearcats bucked that trend in Orono, but their 50 percent second-half shooting clip couldn’t propel them past the Black Bears, who maintained a double-digit halftime lead for a 65-53 victory. “It’s a little frustrating right now for everyone,” BU head coach Nicole Scholl said. “I think the kids know how they are capable of playing, and we are just not playing to our abilities right now.” With the game’s first five minutes as the exception, the Bearcats’ first-half play was abysmal. A layup by Maine junior guard Ashleigh Roberts opened the scoring before

BU senior guard Vaneeshia Paulk quickly tied the score at two. Backto-back jumpers gave Maine (13-11, 7-4 America East) a five-point lead before two consecutive baskets by BU forwards Morgan Murphy and Sherae Swinson pulled the Bearcats (4-20, 1-10 AE) to within one with 15 minutes left in the half. From that point on, Binghamton’s offense went cold. Maine managed a 12-0 run over five minutes, and BU would not score again until another Murphy jump shot made the score 19-8 with seven minutes remaining in the period. The Bearcats would only score 10 more points in the half, and headed to the locker room trailing, 33-18. Binghamton took a 17.9 percent shooting clip into the break. “In the first half, we didn’t execute on offense really well,” Scholl said. “Maine did a good job being physical with us and trying

to take us out of our game. We got down early and just had a tough time going back.” The beginning of the second half looked similar to the first. A 3-pointer from Maine sophomore guard Sophie Weckström and two free throws by sophomore forward Mikaela Gustafsson pushed the lead to 20 points. The Bearcats’ deficit would balloon to 26 points with 10 minutes remaining in the game. But Binghamton refused to quit. Led by Paulk and senior guard Stephanie Jensen, who hit two 3-pointers, the Bearcats capped off the game on a 22-8 run. “I think it was a focus on our execution on offense,” Scholl said, referring to her team’s second-half success. “We used our screens better and had a lot more shot confidence in the second half. Our cutting was a little bit more aggressive, and we played disciplined.”

Swinson scored a team-high 13 points for the Bearcats and earned Co-Player of the Game honors. Paulk finished with 10 points and a game-high seven rebounds, while Murphy chipped in with eight points and six rebounds. Maine found strength in its depth, as 11 Black Bears contributed at least one field goal in the contest. Weckström finished with a gamehigh 16 points and four 3-pointers, while sophomore forward Liz Wood contributed 13 points and six rebounds. Binghamton currently sits at the bottom of the AE standings, tied with UMBC and two games behind seventh-place UMass Lowell. With its three-game road trip in the rearview mirror, Binghamton is scheduled to return home for a clash with second-place New Hampshire. Tipoff is set for 7 p.m. in the Events Center.

65 BU vs. UNH DATE

Feb. 12 LOCATION

Events Center TIME

7:00 p.m.


SPORTS

WOMEN'S BASKETBALL

BU drops ninth straight Page 19

Tuesday, February 11, 2014

Skid snapped at eight

Tommy Dempsey has strained his vocal chords several times this season shouting at his players to sprint to the defensive end instead of celebrating a big shot. But if the rest of the Binghamton men’s basketball team follows the lead of sophomore

Binghamton vs. Maine

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Maine fails to eclipse 60-point threshold for third time this year

73 Stories by Ari Kramer | Sports Editor

For updates on Binghamton basketball, follow @BingBBallBlog on Twitter.

58

'Playing on another level,' Reed secures AE co-Player of the Week Jordan Reed earned America East Co-Player of the Week honors for the third time this season, the league announced on Monday. Reed, who split the award with Vermont senior Sandro Carissimo, averaged 21.5 points, 15.5 rebounds, 2.5 blocks and two steals while shooting 55 percent from the floor in a pair of games last week. With Reed’s 23 points and 15 boards inspiring his teammates on Feb. 4, the Binghamton men’s basketball

team nearly upset Stony Brook at the Events Center. Four days later, the Bearcats downed Maine, 73-58, behind Reed’s 20 points and 16 rebounds. Reed had been mired in a slump since BU head coach Tommy Dempsey pulled him for the second half of a Jan. 15 loss at Stony Brook. Dempsey suspended his leading scorer for the Jan. 20 loss at Albany, and in the four games preceding the Feb. 4 meeting with the Seawolves, Reed

averaged 9.8 points and 4.8 rebounds. “Quite honestly, Jordan’s just playing on another level the last couple of games,” Dempsey said following the win over Maine. “When he plays at that level emotionally, it gives his coaches, his teammates, the young team that he’s playing on a confidence that, ‘Alright, let’s just go with this guy right now.’ He’s diving on every ball and diving into the bleachers … it’s inspiring.”

guard Jordan Reed, Dempsey won’t have to worry about his players’ proclivity for relishing a moment in the days following the Bearcats’ 73-58 win over Maine. “It makes me more hungry, I know that much,” Reed said of the team’s first victory since

Jan. 9. “Now that we have a good hypothesis of what’s successful, it feels great. I just want to go out there and try it and get more wins for the Bearcat nation.” For a full story on Saturday’s game, visit bupipedream.com/ sports/basketball.

Spring 2014 Issue 5  
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