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Retirement Living

Redefined

At Quail Haven Village there is a new face for retirement living. A face that is active, desires adventure, is vibrant and never dull. You might say we have redefined retirement living. Our central location within Pinehurst, wealth of activities, spacious apartment homes and access to a full continuum of care are just a few reasons so many choose to call Quail Haven home. Life is full of

Schedule a Visit of Our Garden Apartment Homes Call 910-684-4205 or visit our website

opportunity and our residents do not take a moment for granted. Schedule a visit today to see how you can redefine the way you live.

www.QuailHavenOfPinehurst.com Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm 155 Blake Boulevard, Pinehurst, NC 28374

A PART OF THE LIBERTY FAMILY OF SERVICES


Come enjoy the Southern charm and relaxed sophistication of Pinehurst & Southern Pines Foster

Jamie McDevitt, Broker/Owner 910.724.4455 JamieMcDevitt.com Jamie@JamieMcDevitt.com

Swift Fox Farm in Foxfire‌.one of the most affordable ten acre farms on the market! Beautiful and only $449,000.

107 NE Broad Street Southern Pines, NC


©2015 Pinehurst, LLC

It doesn’t take all day to get a massage ... unless, of course, you want it to.

A typical treatment at The Spa at Pinehurst usually lasts 50-80 minutes. But with spacious lounge areas, saunas, whirlpools, a swimming pool plus healthy snacks and smoothies, you can relax all day. So call the Spa to schedule an appointment that will benefit you long after your treatment ends.

$25 off treatments Monday-Thursday.

Located next to The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 855.318.6710 • pinehurst.com


PINEHURST

PINEHURST

$359,000

Exquisite townhome right in the heart of the Village. This gorgeous second floor home is accessed by elevator and enjoys private views of downtown Pinehurst. The property has been completely renovated with deep crown molding, hardwood floors, bookcases and much more. High ceilings and oversized windows give a wonderful open feel to the floor plan. 3 BR / 2.5 Ba 6 Holly House

PINEHURST

$565,000

$499,000

$389,000

“Talent, Technology & TEAMWORK” Moore County’s Most Trusted Real Estate Team

Lovely brick and wood custom home with outstanding detail!! Located on one of the best lots on Lake Pinehurst, this property has great curb appeal with mature landscaping. The interior is open with soaring ceilings, and window walls that practically bring the view inside. Beautiful wide lake front views!! This is a great space for the whole family and perfect place to enjoy living. 3 BR / 3 BA 1080 Burning Tree Road

PINEHURST

Immaculate brick and Hardiplank home in an ideal, private setting in the desirable gated golf community of Pinewild County Club. Hardwood floors throughout main living. Gourmet kitchen, and split bedroom plan. Easy breeze 3 season porch leads to stamped patio! Perfect to relax or entertain! 4 BR / 3.5 BA 27 Pinewild Drive

$515,000

$258.000 $179,000 Southern Pines Pinehurst $199,900 Foxfire Lovely and pristine in Longleaf CC Lovely updated golf-front home Cute cottage w/nice renovations 3 BR / 2 BA 3 BR / 2 BA 4 BR / 4.5 BA www.205HunterTrail.com www.4DogwoodCourt.com www.17ChestnutLane.com Enjoy great golf views from this all brick home in private location in gated community of Pinewild CC. Fabulous floor plan with formal living and dining ,plus a spacious family room that shares a fireplace with the master, hardwood floors & media cabinet/bookshelves. Hobby room a plus off the laundry room. Spacious rear deck to relax and entertain. 3 BR / 3 BA 28 Strathaven Drive

PINEHURST

PINEHURST

$320,000

$585,000 Aberdeen $145,500 Pinehurst Fantastic, all-brick golf front home Cute home on large corner lot 4 BR / 3.5 BA 3 BR / 2 BA www.80LakewoodDrive.com www.110RavenswoodRoad.com

Beautiful views of Lake Pinehurst and your own private dock make this lovely brick and wood custom home a very special place on the lake. Hardwood floors, crown moldings, big rear deck with retractable awning, solid cherry cabinets in the kitchen and large great room with fireplace. Four zone irrigation system that pumps from the lake and many more features. 3 BR / 2.5 BA 325 Lake Forest Drive SW

Beautifully kept home on quiet cul-de-sac in popular #6 offers a lot of house and a lot of privacy at a great price. Large great room with fireplace, sun filled Carolina room and master suite w/California closet. Upstairs has small office/playroom. Irrigation and large fenced yard make this a super house! 4 BR / 2.5 BA 105 Kingswood Circle

$329,000 $890,000 Longleaf CC $449,000 Pinehurst $239,000 CCNC Pinehurst $75,000 Pinehurst Custom Built Villa Overlooking Water Custom built all brick golf-front home Brick single story w/view of 17th green Covered porch & large fenced lot Updated Immaculate Golf View Condo 3 BR$289,900 / 2 BA 4 BR / 4 Full & 2 Half Baths 1 BR / 1 BA PINEWILD $495,000 3 BR / 2.5 BA PINEHURST 3 BR / 2.5 BA $425,000 PINEHURST www.16SteeplechaseWay.com www.110HearthstoneRoad.com www.8RoyalDornoch.com www.210StAndrewsCondo.com www.1340BurningTreeRoad.com

$1,295,000 $189,000 Pinehurst $269,000 Pinehurst $475,000 Pinebluff 7 Lakes West $635,000 Pinehurst Stunning custom home in Fairwoods on 7 Charming brick ranch home GorgeoustownhomeintheheartoftheVillage Open plan, gourmet kitchen, pool & more! Stunning All Brick Water Front 4 BR / 4 BA & 2 Half BA 3 BR / 2 BADouble the living space with extensive 3 BR / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 4.5 BA Fabulous custom golf front home with loads of upgrades and panoramic golf views. This Beautiful custom one owner home is truly a Pinehurst classic! outdoor living areas in this home haswww.135AndrewsDrive.com it all! Hardwood floors throughout main living areas. Gourmet kitchen with Located on the 13th fairway of Pinehurst #3, the views are spectacular. www.145SugarPineDrive.com Beautiful updated home. Large brick fireplace and tray ceilings in living room. www.170InverraryRoad.com www.105MastersWay.com www.6HollyHouse.com

granite countertops, large center island, and butler’s pantry. Master suite with restored Pantique fireplace. Split bedroom plan. Large rear deck with oversized stairs for expansive views of Holly Course #5. This is a great home for those who “want it all”. 3 BR / 3 BA 82 Pomeroy Drive

PINEHURST

$545,000

There are floor to ceiling window walls in living room, dining room and hearth room. Outstanding curb appeal and oversized deck in back with mature landscaping. So many things to love about this house. 3 BR / 3.5 BA 40 Hillcrest Road

PINEHURST

$315,000

Stunning Carolina room overlooking in- ground pool and backyard patio area with decorative brick wall, fire pit area and floodlighting. 3 BR / 3.5 BA 60 Briarwood Circle

PINEHUSRT

$395,000

$269,900 $187,900 Pinehurst $185,000 Southern Pines $225,000 Pinebluff Pinehurst $375,000 Foxfire Great home in family- friendly neighborhood Stunning new construction condo Golf front new construction in The Pines Immaculate all-brick w/golf views Elegant & luxurious w/spacious rooms 5 BR / 3 BA 3 BR / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 2 BA 2 BR / 2 BA 4 BR / 3 BA www.23BerylCircle.com www.100CypressCircle.com www.153LaurelOakLane.com www.18ShamrockDrive.com www.10StantonCircle.com

Lakefront living is its own reward but it is especially satisfying if you have a wonderful lakefront home on Lovely brick home is nestled on private, beautifully landscaped yard in Pinewild Country Wonderful custom all brick home located on the 2nd green of the Holly course at Pinewild one of the best lots on Lake Pinehurst with a desirable eastern exposure for maximum enjoyment of all Club. The floorplan is open and bright with a Carolina room that opens to an oversized Country Club – oversized lot is .8 of an acre. This home has been recently renovated with your lakeside activities. Even better if you have a heated$199,000 in-ground pool and your own private beach and deck. Spacious master Pinehurst has plantation shutters and two large walk in closets. Wonderful expanded living $298,000 area, hardwood floors and Lakes a full bath on the second floor for a studio, Seven South $279,500 Sevencurb Lakes West $895,000 Pinehurst $241,000 Seven Lakes South dock! This beautiful one story home, designed and built by the current owners, offers a well-designed appeal and priced to sell! exercise room, pool room, great room – great flex space and a 3 car garage. Wonderful 2-story home on cul-de-sac Completely Gorgeous4 BR home in the Old Town Greatto family home Charming front w/panoramic interior that takes perfectgolf advantage of all the wide water viewsview from the ceiling floor window walls w/private back yard / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 4.5 BA renovated golf front home overlooking the/lake 50 Pinewild 52 McMichael Drive3 BR / 3.5 BA 4 BR / 3BA 4 BR / Drive 3.5 BA 4 BR / 3 BA 3 BR 2.5from BAalmost every room in the house. 3 BR / 3 BA www.117OxfordCourt.com www.108Rector.com www.50OrangeRoad.com www.11GraysonLane.com www.122DevonshireAvenue.com 680 Lake Forest Drive SE

View Floor Plans and Tours of ALL OurMoore Listings and Seeand ALL MooreInformation County at View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Virtual Our Listings and See County Listings Community Listings and Community Information at

www.MarthaGentry.com www.MarthaGentry.coM

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007

Military?!Check out our Military Advantage Program at www.MarthaGentry.com

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007


YOU CAN DO THIS. WE CAN HELP.

Whether you’re feathering your nest or finding your first home, First Bank makes it easier to finance your dreams and get the job done.

C H O O SE F R O M

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WE HAVE 10 BRANCHES ACROSS MOORE COUNTY. FIND THE NEAREST ONE TO YOU, AND LEARN MORE ABOUT WHAT WE OFFER BY VISITING:

LOCALFIRSTBANK.COM Loans subject to credit approval. First Bank NMLS ID 474504.

Equal Housing Lender | Member FDIC


YOUR NEW ADDRESS IS STUNNING. Welcome to Pine Knoll, the accredited, full service retirement community where you have the freedom to do anything you want, anytime. This could be your new address where everything is taken care of: amenities, services, staff, dining, and healthcare. We’d love to see you and show you how your life can be more fulfilling. If you like what you see, call 910.246.1023, or email info@sjp.org.

Welcome. 590 Central Drive, Southern Pines, NC 28387 - 910.246.1023 - sjp.org A member of the St. Joseph of the Pines Aging Services Network continuing the legacy of the Sisters of Providence.


September 2015 Departments

Features

15 Simple Life

73 Last Sweet

18 PinePitch 21 Instagram Winners 23 Cos and Effect

74 Pottery Road

Jim Dodson

Cos Barnes

25 The Omnivorous Reader Brian Lampkin

29 Bookshelf

Kimberly Daniels Taws & Angie Tally

33 Proper English Serena Brown

Volume 11, No. 9

Poetry by Valerie Nieman By Serena Brown

Part three of our Scenic Byways series

78 Inside Out

By Deborah Salomon

What exactly is a pavilion kitchen? Come on outside and see

84 Mangum Opus By Deborah Salomon

Native son artist Bill Mangum celebrates Southern Pines with his new home collection

89 Along the Grapevine By Jan Leitschuh

An ode (sort of) to North Carolina’s most famous grape

92 A Dahl’s House By Deborah Salomon

Out on Young’s Road, a beautiful home full of bright colors and memories

103 Almanac

By Rosetta Fawley

Goddesses and gargoyles, gone moony, and the worm people cometh

Cover Photograph and Photograph this page by John gessner

35 Papadaddy’s Mindfield Clyde Edgerton

37 Vine Wisdom Robyn James

39 The Kitchen Garden Jan Leitschuh

41 Out of the Blue Deborah Salomon

43 Horse Sense

47 Pleasures of Life

Toby Raymond Melissa Goslin

51 Birdwatch

Susan Campbell

53 A Novel Year Wiley Cash

57 Sandhills Photo Club 61 Sandhills Journal

Bill Case

65 Sporting Life Tom Bryant

69 Golftown Journal Lee Pace

104 September Calendar 129 Writer’s Notebook Sandra Redding

131 SandhillSeen 141 PineNeedler Mart Dickerson

143 The Accidental Astrologer Astrid Stellanova

144 SouthWords Joyce Reehling

6

September 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Fall Collections THE DUX® BED Arriving Engineered to Help Relieve Back Pain Daily. The DUX component system is designed to resist gravity and weight to provide continuous, pressure-free support. Opulence of Southern Pines and DUXIANA at The Mews, 280 NW Broad Street, Downtown Southern Pines, NC 910.692.2744

at Cameron Village, 400 Daniels Street, Raleigh, NC 919.467.1781

www.OpulenceOfSouthernPines.com

Serving the Carolinas & More for 18 Years — Financing Available

ON A SAGGING BED THE DUX® THE BED SPINE IS CURVED. THE DUX® BED

Engineered Engineered to to Help Help Relieve Relieve Back Back Pain Pain The DUX component system is designed to resist gravity and The DUX component system ispressure-free designed to resist gravity and weight to provide continuous, support. weight to provide continuous, pressure-free support.

ON A FIRM BED THE SPINE IS CURVED. ON A SAGGING BED THE IS CURVED. ON SPINE A SAGGING BED THE SPINE IS CURVED.

ON A FIRM BED THEON SPINE IS CURVED. A FIRM BED THE SPINE IS CURVED.

THE DUX BED In a DUX bed the spine is supported in a natural, relaxed position for correct sleep posture.

THE DUX BED In a DUX bed theTHE spine is supported in a natural, DUX BED position for correct sleep in posture. In arelaxed DUX bed the spine is supported a natural, relaxed position for correct sleep posture.

SOUTHERN PINES | 280 NW BROAD ST. | SOUTHERN PINES, NC 28387 | 910-725-1577 RALEIGH | 400 DANIELS ST. | RALEIGH, NC 27605 | 919-467-1781

SOUTHERN PINES | 280 NW BROAD ST. | SOUTHERN PINES, NC 28387 | 910-725-1577 SOUTHERN PINES | 280 NW BROADST. ST.| |RALEIGH, SOUTHERN 28387 | 910-725-1577 RALEIGH | 400 DANIELS NCPINES, 27605 NC | 919-467-1781 RALEIGH | 400 DANIELS ST. | RALEIGH, NC 27605 | 919-467-1781

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Lakota Farm: Turn of the century elegance with modern conveniences. Wide plank antique heartpine flooring, beamed ceilings & fireplaces in every room. Restored & expanded in 2000. $1,950,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193 Jerry Townley 910.690.7080

Old Town Pinehurst: Premier property located on the 5th hole of the famous Pinehurst #2 course! Completely updated. Custom gourmet kitchen. Connected “Carriage House”. 4BR/5FullBA/ 2HalfBA. www.220midlandroad.isforsale.com $1,900,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

Knollwood Heights: Charming estate designed by

Old Town Pinehurst: “Shadowlawn” - English tudor on over

14 Appin Court: Stunning Pinewild golf retreat on 3.2 private

15 Bel Air: Spacious, open rooms with comfortable living area

CCNC: Meticulously renovated and maintained! Golf

1.5 private acres of lush grounds. Main Residence, plus a separate 2,200sf 3BR/3BA Guest Cottage. 6BR/7FBA/2HBA. Stunning property! $1,050,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

acres. 4 BR/3.5 BA, 3 car garage, pool, bocce ball court. Light flled rooms & open foor plan. Spacious family room with pool table & game area. $920,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

Donald Ross in the 1920s. Leaded windows, wide plank oak flooring, 3-Frplcs, & 2BR/2BA Carriage house. 4BR/7.5BA. Broker/Owner. $1,395,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

are featured in this charming home overlooking the 6th Hole of CCNC’s Dogwood Course. 2-Frplcs, Wide-Planked Hardwood Floors, Office & Walk-up Attic Stairs. 5BR/3.5BA. $899,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

front on 9th fairway of Dogwood course. Inviting and open floor plan for comfortable living and entertaining. 4BR/4BA. $799,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

For the Golf Lover: Spacious and elegant! 3 Bedroom,

3 Bath, custom home with sweeping golf views of the Magnolia Course in Pinewild CC. Superlative materials and workmanship throughout. $779,000 Bonnie Baker 910.690.4705

CCNC: Waterfront, rustic contemporary home on 2 lots. Renovated & Expanded in ‘04-’05. Double Fireplace between Living Room & Den. Marvelous water views from every room. 3BR/3.5BA. $695,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

CCNC Home with Pool: 4BR/4.5BA, hand-pegged wood floors, formal rooms, family room with see-through stone FP, 1st floor master suite, office, and a 3-car garage. $595,000 Carolyn Hallett 910.986.2319

CCNC: Spectacular views of the 4th green on Cardinal Course & the pond. Renovated & enlarged in ‘07-’08. Stunning Kitchen w/Wolf gas cooktop, Wolf oven, 2-drawer dishwasher & more. Selling as Furnished. 3BR/2.5BA. $580,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

190 Kings Ridge Court: Great location in Mid South Club! Qual-

text “BHHSNC305” to 87778

ity architectural details inside & out, with elegant one floor living. Features include: 10’ Ceilings, 8’ Doors, Hardwood Floors, Deep Ceiling Moldings, & Gourmet Kitchen. 4BR/3.5BA. $575,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

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Southern Pines: 910.692.2635 • 105 W. Illinois Avenue • Southern Pines, NC 28387 ©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of American, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC.


305 Maples Road: Charming cottage in desirable Weymouth Horse Farm: Custom 2-Stall Barn, with storage & a Heights, on an acre wooded lot, near Weymouth Woods State wash station, located in an Equestrian & Lake community. Park. Exquistely remodeled and explanded in ‘01. Maintained Immaculate 4BR, 3.5BA home with office, formal dining room, to perfection! 4BR/3.5BA. $535,000 family room w/frplc, & a spacious master suite. $510,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193 Karen Iampietro 910.690.7098

Pinemere: Executive home with lake view! A home with everything for the buyer who wants a great master suite with sitting area, 3 guest bedrooms, & bonus space for an additional bedroom with bath on 2nd floor. Carolina Room & Great Kitchen. $459,000 Kay Beran 910.315.3322

Pinehurst: Spacious, all brick, low maintenance, 4 Bedrooms, Office, Recreation Room. Pristine Condition! Virtual Tour: www.7FurlongPlace.com $367,900 Frank Sessoms 910.639.3099

Pinehurst National #9: Charming “Wedgewood Cottage” overlooks 8th green. 2BR/2.5BA, Furnished! Updated Ktchn, upgraded carpets/drapery. Perfectly located near tennis courts/pool! www.120CochraneCastleCircle.com $340,000 Frank Sessoms 910.639.3099

Sandhurst South:No expense was spared in making this a showplace! Vaulted ceiling, fireplace, hardwood flooring and windows that bathe rooms in natural light. Beautiful Kitchen. 3BR/2.5BA. Park-like setting. $325,000 Bill Brock 910.639.1148

Charming Old Town Pinehurst: Brick sidewalk, front porch,

Old Town Pinehurst: Easy stroll to the Village center or clubhouse. All brick home with many upgrades. Large Carolina room overlooks a private, landscaped patio & garden area. Partial finished basement with HVAC. 3BR/3BA. PCC available. $295,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

Quail Hill Condo: Prime Old Town is the setting for

this 3BR/3BA condo overlooking Golf Course #3. Cathedral ceiling, floor-to-ceiling windows and Frplc. Pinehurst CC Membership available. $295,000 Eva Toney 910.638.0972

Pinehurst: A home lovingly embellished with architectural details. Dual sided gas frplc in Living & Dining Rooms. Hardwood flooring in main living areas. Entertaining size deck overlooks serene grounds. 4BR/2BA. $239,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193

Aronimink: Fabulous, end unit condo with distant views of the

Pinehurst: Beautifully wooded 4+acre pice of property on Midland

Carolina Rm, private backyard. Updated w/hardwood, new carpet, paint. Just a short walk to the Village! PCC membership too! 2BR/2BA. $319,000 Carolyn Hallett 910.986.2319

10th Fairway on Course #5. Full PCC Membershp available. Furnishings available for purchase. Tranquil View & Beautifully Maintained! 2BR/2BA. $229,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193

Road, 1/2 mile from traffic circle going towards Southern Pines. House on property is uninhabitable & not to be entered. Land is rolling with beautiful pines. Perfect building site. $200,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

www.BHHSPRG.com We open Moore doors. Pinehurst: 910.295.5504 • 42 Chinquapin Road • Pinehurst, NC 28374 Berkshire Hathaway HomeSercies and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.Housing Opportunity.


Michael Lamb Interiors and Antiques

910.246.2177 128 W. Pennsylvania Avenue, Southern Pines, NC


Extraordinary Golf Front Home Country Club of North Carolina

PineStraw M A G A Z I N E

Jim Dodson, Editor 910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com Serena Brown, Senior Editor 910.693.2464 • serena@pinestrawmag.com Kira Schoenfelder, Graphic Designer 910.693.2508 • kira@pinestrawmag.com Lauren Shumaker, Graphic Designer 910.693.2469 • lauren@pinestrawmag.com Contributing Editors Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Sara King, Proofreader Contributing Photographers John Gessner, Laura L. Gingerich, Tim Sayer Contributors Cos Barnes, Tom Bryant, Susan Campbell, Bill Case, Wiley Cash, Geoff Cutler, Al Daniels, Annette Daniels, Mart Dickerson, Clyde Edgerton, Rosetta Fawley, Bill Fields, London Gessner, Melissa Goslin, Robyn James, Brian Lampkin, Jan Leitschuh, Meridith Martens, Valerie Nieman, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Toby Raymond, Sandra Redding, Joyce Reehling, Astrid Stellanova, Janet Wheaton

PS David Woronoff, Publisher

235 Quail Hollow Drive • Pinehurst Handsome colonial on 2.5 magnificently landscaped acres. Built in 1973, the 4 bedroom, 4.5 bath residence was rebuilt from the studs featuring reconfigured rooms, new floors, walls, ceilings, all new windows except on the facade, new bathrooms, kitchen, wiring, plumbing, appliances, duct work and heat & air. Lovely master bath is an addition, with an office and large walk-in closets absorbing the former bedroom space. The residence exhibits exquisite detail in every aspect of the finishes, from marble counter tops to to paneled walls. Kitchen opens to the family room and corner fireplace. Additional fireplaces are in master bedroom and library. $1,550,000

To view more photos, take a virtual tour or schedule a showing, go to:

www.clarkpropertiesnc.com

Maureen Clark when experience matters Pinehurst • Southern Pines 910.315.1080

12

Advertising Sales

Pat Taylor, Advertising Director Ginny Trigg, PineStraw Sales Coordinator 910.693.2481 • ginny@thepilot.com Deborah Fernsell, 910.693.2516 Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2489 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Advertising Graphic Design

Kathryn Galloway 910.693.2509 • kathryn@thepilot.com Kirsten Benson, Mechelle Butler, Scott Yancey Subscriptions & Circulation

Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine 145 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com www.pinestrawmag.com

©Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

September 2015P�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


910-684-1010

10910 US Highway 15-501 • Southern Pines NC 28387

www.pinehurstnissanonline.com


simple life

The Spirit of Opti By Jim Dodson

Twenty years ago this

month, I took my father on a long-dreamed-of golf trip back to England and Scotland, where he learned the game as a soldier prior to D-Day during the Second World War.

Being a veteran golf writer who’d chased the game extensively through England and Scotland, I set up what I believed to be a modest and meaningful itinerary appropriate to my dad’s physical infirmities, a roaming journey highlighted by visits to Lytham & St Annes Golf Club on the Lancashire Coast — where he was stationed during the war — with a finale at St Andrews, the Home of Golf. What I didn’t know at the moment we embarked was the full extent to which my dad’s cancer had returned after many years lying dormant, though I might have guessed as much by my mother’s comments as she saw us off at the airport in Greensboro. While my dad was charming the wings off a pretty airline employee, my mother gently took my elbow and calmly whispered: “Just so you know, darling, I’m completely opposed to you two going on this trip. The thought of your father walking those difficult courses in the rain and wind and cold, the two of you drinking beer and driving those narrow lanes gives me nightmares.” I patted her arm. “Everything will be just fine, Mom. Trust me. I’ll look after him. Besides, the beer is warm.” “Funny boy.” She managed a Steel Magnolia smile. But the look in her large blue eyes said she wasn’t even slightly amused. “I’ll look after him,” I promised She patted my arm. “You’d better, sweetie. If you don’t bring him back to me, you’ll need to seek asylum in Scotland.” For his part, you wouldn’t have detected anything amiss with my old man. He was visibly in high spirits and up to his old tricks with a charmed stranger, though as I learned just days later, his doctor had given him half a dozen weeks to live. My nickname for my father, dating nearly from our earliest days together on a golf course, when I was a hot-headed, club-throwing kid of 13, was Opti the Mystic. He was an adman with a poet’s heart, the most upbeat character and naturally optimistic human being I’ve ever known. As it turns out, we needed his famous optimism because just about everything that could go wrong did so almost from the moment we touched down in London in the midst of a driving rain storm. A scheduled round at Sunningdale Old — where Bobby Jones shot his perfect score — got washed away. Gale-force winds followed us all the way to the Lancashire coast, where I managed to book us into a historic Southport hotel that appeared to be holding a convention for narcoleptic seniors. The lobby was filled with napping gray-hairs as we stumbled in numb and dripping from an aborted round at nearby Royal Birkdale, where Arnold Palmer captured his first Open Championship in 1960. We managed to get four holes in, pulling trollies, before the Lancashire skies opened up with a vengeance. Instead, after cleaning up and having supper in the empty formal dining room, with fresh pints in hand we had a pitch and putt match through the

corridors of the famous Prince of Wales, doing only minor damage to the fading wallpaper and Queen Anne furniture. During the match, Opti told me a lovely story I’d never heard about his parents, my rural grandparents, who drove their elderly Hudson to New York City to meet him off the troop ship from England in 1945, their first trip ever out of North Carolina. My mother, then working for an admiral in Annapolis, took a train to join them for the big reunion. They all put up in a hotel somewhere around Times Square. After a day of sightseeing, my dad found my grandfather — a devoted fisherman — on the darkened terrace garden of the hotel smoking a King Edward cigar and practicing his casting with a new rod and reel my father purchased for him at a famous sporting goods shop on Fifth Avenue. “He was a proud but quiet man, as you may recall. He never said much. That was the Indian blood in him,” Dad explained, reminding me that my grandfather’s mother, the family story went, was an orphaned Cherokee infant when George Washington Tate — for whom Greensboro’s Tate Street is named — found her during one of his Western circuits to preach the Gospel at one of the frontier Methodist churches he established. He named her Emma and raised her with four strapping sons on a farm near Mebane. She grew up to marry a ne’er-do-well horse farmer and fiddle player named Jimmy Dodson who kept a large farm off Buckhorn Road near the junction of Dodson’s Crossroads outside Carrboro. This was the farm where my father spent his happiest summers as a boy, tagging along through the field where Aunt Emma, the local natural healer, gathered herbs and wildflowers for her famous medicines. “He suggested we have a little casting competition like the one you and I are having with golf clubs — right there on the terrace of the hotel.” “Who won?” “Don’t recall. I’m sure it was him.” Naturally, my old man won the chip and putt match at the Prince of Wales that evening. His seasoned British-made short game was a thing of beauty, even at age 80. As we headed for bed, another memory surfaced, another story I’d never heard. “True story. When your grandfather was dying he asked me to give him a proper shave. He said he didn’t want to meet his maker looking so poorly.” “Did you?” “Of course. He passed away the next day. That’s how we Dodsons seem to go, you know — clean shaven and without a lot of fuss and bother. Maybe that’s the Indian in us.” At Lytham the next day, where Jones captured the Open Championship in 1923, a retired club secretary named Tony Nixon greeted us warmly and sent us out to play a delightful round in good English sunshine with my dad spinning one great tale after another. Afterward, we retreated to a nearby tavern where a drunken Irishman unexpectedly exhumed my father’s most haunting memory from that time: a tragic plane crash on the air base where he was scheduled to fly a glider into Normandy but in the meantime wrote the base newsletter and was in charge of parachute packing. The crash of an Allied bomber making an emergency landing after repairs took the lives of forty-one villagers, including twenty-six 5 and 6-year-olds at the village church’s annex. Fearing the effect on public morale, news of the tragedy

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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simple life

never made the newspapers. But Bing Crosby was flown in to sing to the grieving families of Freckleton. My father, it turned out, was one of the first to arrive on the terrible scene, pulling victims out of the inferno. His burned hands sent him to the base infirmary — and knocked him out of the flight rotation. Given the high mortality rate of glider pilots in the subsequent invasion to liberate occupied France, the tragedy may be the reason I’m here today. “Life promises us sorrow,” Opti told me as we moseyed on up to Scotland, the last leg of our travels. “It’s up to us to add the joy.” The heavy rains followed us to Scotland, where the weather miraculously cleared long enough for us to play Turnberry and Gleneagles on glorious afternoons. We told tales and drank good warm beer the entire way, moving on to Gullane, where we played Muirfield with an old friend named Archie Baird and his little dog, Niblick. We finished up at St Andrews, missing our chance to play through the newly created daily lottery system but walking the Old Course at sunset, playing a round of air golf in the beautiful final rays of light falling over the cold North Sea and Eden Estuary. To no one’s surprise, Opti lived and worked longer than anyone expected him to — five more months, in fact. In late January, not long after his 80th birthday, he thanked his six employees, closed up his office behind Irving Park Plaza, and went home to die. I showed up a day or so later. With the help of a fantastic hospice worker named Bradley, I learned how to be my dad’s personal caretaker, performing tasks I never fathomed I would be capable of doing during those emotionally draining weeks that followed. As his days and nights inverted, we sat together having more conversations until one evening he asked me to give him a proper shave. “What’s that sound?” he asked as I carefully did my duty. I told him it was the sound of sleet falling outside. It was the first day of March. He smiled a little and told me not to worry, that skies would be sunny in the

You can build a

within your budget!

morning. He also said I should kiss my wife and take my two small children fishing. I assured him I would do so on both counts. Then he asked me to help him down the hallway to his wife’s bed. I closed the door behind me as I left, listening to my parents talk like shy newlyweds. Opti quietly slipped the bonds of this Earth early two mornings later, going the way Dodsons always seem to go — clean shaven and without much fuss or bother. It was a beautiful March morning. The little book I wrote about our last golf trip together, Final Rounds, was published the following November. It went on to become a surprise bestseller published in seven languages, selling more than half a million copies. After reading it, among other nice surprises, Arnold Palmer asked me to help him write his long-awaited memoirs. The estate of Ben Hogan followed. The thousands of letters I’ve received from fathers and sons and mothers and daughters since that time mean more than anything else. The spirit of Opti lives on. And the book is still in print, about to celebrate its 20th anniversary in late 2016. The letters still come. I answer every one of them. When Hospice and Palliative Care of Greensboro invited me to give the keynote speech opening their beautiful new facility in 1999, I was honored to do so, to explain how hospice care provided me with a life-affirming experience I wouldn’t trade for anything. For many years afterward, I was pleased to learn, hospice organizations around the country gave out copies of Final Rounds. Funny how so much life comes from death. Life promises us sorrow, you might say; it’s up to us to add the joy. Later this month, I get to do it again — serving as the emcee at Hospice and Palliative Care of the Sandhills. Somewhere, I’ll wager with a good healing pint of warm English beer, Opti the Mystic will be watching and smiling. PS Contact editor Jim Dodson at jim@pinestrawmag.com.

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September 2015P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PinePitch If you find storebought herbal teas a little lacking, help is at hand. On September 23 from 10 a.m. to noon, Norma Burns will show you how to grow, harvest and dry herbs to create your own special recipes. The workshop includes a culinary demonstration and tastings. And you get to take home a plant and your first personally created herbal tea. $30 for Horticultural Society members, $35 for non-members. Space is limited, so remember to register in advance and pay at registration. Ball Visitors Center, Sandhills Community College Horticultural Gardens, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. For more information, call (910) 695-3882.

Rabbiting On

6 String Drag

From September 24 – 27, the Judson Theatre Company will be performing the Pulitzer Prize-winning Harvey. Follow the story of the kind and charming Elwood P. Dowd. Elwood has one quirk: an unwavering friendship with a 6’3 1/2” invisible rabbit named Harvey. How to lose your mind and find true friends. Ticket prices vary, with discounts for groups of ten or more. For details and performance times visit judsontheatre. com or call (800) 514-3849. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst.

Best In Show

Celebrate the dog days of early autumn. Heel to Moore County Kennel Club’s annual two-day all breed shows on 12 and 13 September, 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., and be amazed by the variety of woofers on display. There’s shopping for your best friend too, everything from leashes to whitening shampoo. If Cavalier King Charles Spaniels and Golden Retrievers are your canines of choice, they have their own specialty day on September 11. The dog show takes place at Pinehurst Harness Track, Polo Field, 200 Beulah Hill Road South, Pinehurst. For more information about the show email Karolynne McAteer: karolynnem@gmail.com or visit mckcnc.com

Home to Roost

At last! September is here and The Rooster’s Wife drumrolls back out a new season. This month there’s rock ’n’ roll with 6 String Drag, the band that Patterson Hood says is “like reconnecting with a long lost friend.” For languid sophistication, hear the Peter Lamb Trio, sought out by swing dancers and a perfect nightcap for late-night lovers. For country and soul lovers there’s Sam Lewis, and for bluegrass lovers, Nu Blu. On September 3 at 7:30 p.m. Fayetteville residents have a treat in store: the Rooster’s Wife, First Thursdays at the Cameo, 225 Hay St., Fayetteville. Kerrville champ Wes Collins will be performing with Julie Elkins. Tickets at theroosterswife.org or at the Cameo. At the Poplar Knight Spot, Aberdeen, this month: September 13: 6 String Drag
 September 20: Peter Lamb Trio
 September 27: Sam Lewis, Nu-Blu The Rooster’s Wife, The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. For more information, call (910) 944-7502 or visit theroosterswife.org

For the dog-loving golfers among you, Monday 14 September is the Moore County Kennel Club Benefit Golf Tournament, at Whispering Woods Golf Course, 26 Sandpiper Drive, Whispering Pines. For golf tournament information email billpace50@gmail.com.

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September 2015P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

Photo by Michael Traister

Time for Tea


All the Fun of the Fair

An agricultural fair, carnival rides, games and food. What more need one say? The 69th Annual Moore County Agricultural Fair takes place September 29 through October 3. Jump on the mechanical bull and munch on a corndog. (Perhaps not at the same time.) Tuesday – Friday 5 – 11 p.m., Saturday 3 – 11 p.m. Parking $2. Admission: $5/ages 3 and over, Under 3 Free. Moore County Agricultural Fairgrounds, 3699 U.S. 15-501, Carthage. For more information, call (910) 215-6893.

Time to Collect

It’s said that if you have more than two of any item it’s a collection. If you’d like to learn about a more comprehensive way to start collecting, you need to be at Weymouth on September 20. From 4 – 6 p.m., Leslie Anne Miller will talk about her book Start with a House, Finish with a Collection, which offers a unique personal perspective on the journey of collecting American art and antiques. It is the story of how a couple’s use of American art and antiques evolved from furnishing a house into a full-blown passion, resulting in a museum-caliber collection. Miller will also discuss how to decide what to collect and how to start building a collection. Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities, 555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. For more information, call (910) 692-6261 or visit weymouth.org

It’s in the Stars

Southern Pines High School alumna Johanna Smith is the author of Star Gazer, The Horse Who Loved History. The Seven Lakes Kiwanis Club is donating copies to Moore County elementary schools. So look out for it in your child’s book bag. Star Gazer, a trotter who never wins a race, becomes a carriage horse in Philadelphia, where he learns about the Constitution and United States history. When disaster strikes the president, Star Gazer is the only one who can save him. Will he be up to the challenge?

Photograph by Steven Whitsitt

Star Gazer, The Horse Who Loved History is also available at The Country Bookshop, 140 North W Broad Street, Southern Pines.

Blues in the Night

Got the end-of-summer blues? Sing along with Grammynominated blues guitarist Bobby Messano at Pinehurst Live After Five on September 11. Sure to lift the spirits. Jump up from your picnic blanket for the special performance by our local First Responders Band. The What’s Fore Lunch food truck will be there and beer, wine, soda and water will be available. Proceeds will benefit Given Memorial Library. Pack a lawn chair in case of dance fatigue. 5:30—8:30 p.m. Tufts Memorial Park, 1 Village Green Road West, Pinehurst. For more information, call (910) 295-8656.

Southern (Pines) Hospitality

On Wednesday, September 30 over 1,000 cyclists will be visiting Southern Pines as they cycle the “Mountains to Coast” Tour, the state’s only fully-supported ride. The cyclists will arrive between noon and 6 p.m., riding through downtown and finishing at the Boys and Girls Club. As a host city, Southern Pines will roll out the red carpet with a First Friday-style reception from 5 – 8 p.m. Freewheel to the Sunrise to hear Holy Ghost Tent Revival. The party’s open to everyone, the more the merrier. For more information contact Kimberly Daniels Taws at The Country Bookshop on (910) 692-3211.

Bravery a Given

Jason Howk was involved in Afghanistan for over a decade. On September 10 at 3:30 p.m., he will be at the Given Memorial Library, discussing the country and its people, the United States’ recent military involvement there and the future of the country. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. For more information, call (910) 295-6022 or visit www.tuftsarchives.org.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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© 2015 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved • PANDORA.NET

© 2015 Pandora Jewelry, LLC • All rights reserved • PANDORA.NET

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162 162 NW NW Broad Broad Street Street Downtown Downtown Southern Southern Pines Pines 910.246.2002 910.246.2002

September 2015P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Instagram Winners

Congratulations to our September Instagram winners!

Theme:

Doors & Windows #pinestrawcontest

Next month’s theme:

“Team spirit”

Show us how you support your favorite team

Submit your photo on Instagram using the hashtag #pinestrawcontest (submissions needed by Monday, September 21st)

Featured Home of the Month

EXECUTIVE HOME on private cul-de-sec in the the sought after gated community of Pinewild Country Club. Surrounded by panoramic Golf Course views from nearly every room, this spectacular Custom Home is enhanced with an outdoor kitchen, cozy fireplace and TV area. Great for entertaining! Soaring ceilings, deep molding, hardwood floors and a large gourmet kitchen with great views. Meticulously landscaped, the grounds are as well architected as the the home itself . 6 bedrooms, 4 and one half bath, offered at $820,000

LIN HUTAFF’S PINEHURST REALTY GROUP 910.528.6427 • www.linhutaff.com linhutaff@lpinehurst.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Bring the kids to the shop to meet their favorite authors!

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 4,11,18 AND 25 AT 10:30AM

PRE-SCHOOL STORY TIME

and FOR MOM AND DAD...

“A child who reads will be an adult who thinks.”

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 12 AT 2PM

JANE MCCLAREN - HONEST EATING

McClaren’s book tells her own story of losing weight and how being honest with yourself about what and how much you eat is the only way to be successful in getting and keeping the pounds off. One of our employees lost 25 pounds 4 years ago using this book as motivation and has kept it off. This event is free and open to the public.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 16 AT 5PM

NINA DE GRAMONT - THE LAST SEPTEMBER

Brilliant rendering of love story, murder mystery, pitch-perfect study of horrific ordinary mental illness, and that rare coming-of-age novel that deals with adults who actually do come of age in the most difficult ways. This event is free and open to the public.

SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 20, 12-5PM

TRIANGLE READS

Beginning at 12:00 noon on Sunday, September 20th with a “Moveable Feast” -- a sit-down lunch where authors come to sit and talk with you right at your table, Triangle Reads features an afternoon of panels and book signings from some of your favorite -- and soon to be favorite! -- writers. You will also get to tour Trio -- the debut installation of art and music inspired by sixteen beloved works of Southern literature. Tickets are $99 and available through sibaweb.site-ym.com/event/triangle-reads. Books will be for sale from area independent bookstores, and every ticket includes a $20 voucher for the book tables.

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 10 • 4PM

INGRID LAW

Newbery Honor Winning author of Savvy, will visit the Country Bookshop with Switch which features the unusual Beaumont family and is truly about paying attention to the beauty and importance of every moment.” This event is appropriate for ages 7-14 and is free and open to the public.

Spend the day with two dozen authors... September 20, at the Hilton north Raleigh

SEPTEMBER 21 - 22 • 4-6PM

ALAN GRATZ

Author Alan Gratz will be at the Country Bookshop for informal chats with readers and writers. Alan has written a number of books for young readers including the NC Battle of the Books titles Brooklyn Nine, Samurai Shortstop and Prisoner B 3087. His newest book is: Code of Honor about a young boy whose West Point graduate brother has been accused of terrorism against the US. Alan’s books are appropriate for ages 8-18 and the meet-and-greets are free and open to the public.

Susan Verde Payne

*

*

Margi Preus *

Damon Tweedy

*

Jackson * Marly

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 1 • 5PM

KATHERINE APPLEGATE

The Country Bookshop is delighted to host Newbery Medal Winning children’s author Katherine Applegate for her only North Carolina appearance. In her first novel since winning the Newbery Medal, for the delightful family favorite The One and Only Ivan author Applegate delivers CRENSHAW, an unforgettable and magical story about friendship, fortitude and a loving family struggling to keep it together and to make ends meet. The Country Bookshop will partner with The Sandhills Coalition for Human care to sponsor a food drive which will run throughout the month of September and October. A limited number of Tickets are available exclusively at the Country Bookshop with the purchase of Applegate’s new book CRENSHAW.

The Country Bookshop 140 NW Broad St, Southern Pines, NC 910.692.3211 • thecountrybookshop.biz

Coffey

*

Hester

Zacharias

Joshilyn

Youmans * Billy Young * Amy Hill

Hearth * Joan Holub Spears

David

* Kim Wright * Karen *

Michael Cantor * James

Robert Beatty * Diane T. Farmer III * Sandra

Gutierrez * Elin Hilderbrand * Bridgette Lacy * Margaret Maron * Johnathan Scott Barrett * Holly Sullivan McClure * Deanna Raybourn * Bland Simpson * Ann Simpson * Shari Smith

www.Trianglereads.com produced by these great bookstores and literary sites


Cos and Effect

Special Olympian

Betsy Brouwers is a real champ — and an inspiration to her friends

d e n o i Fash

friendships

for a lifetime

By Cos Barnes

My good friend Betsy Brouwers is a

winner. She recently competed in the Moore County Spring Games for Special Olympics, which included track and field events at Pinecrest High School on April 24, following attendance at Kernersville on April 18 for the regional qualifier.

At the Spring Games for Special Olympics, where the athletes were housed on the NCSU campus and participated at Cardinal Gibbons High School, she won two silver medals in the softball throw and the standing long jump, as well as fourth place in the 50m walk. Betsy was one of 1,500 athletes from across the state, and one of eight track and field athletes from Moore County. The opening ceremonies were held at Walnut Creek Amphitheater. Betsy said they were entertained with a dance and were given cups as favors, and they were served lunch and dessert. John Buchholz directed the athletes’ practices beginning at Pinecrest High School in April. Betsy is a superb bowler, according to Melinda Ransdell, one of her coaches. Betsy has very limited vision, but her trainer says, “She stands at the lane after bowling her ball and waits to hear it make it to the end of the lane. She can apparently tell from the sound if she has made a good roll.” We who have known Betsy for a long time marvel at her ability to recognize our voices even if she can’t see us. She knows me the minute I speak a word. She also remembers everybody’s birthday and will surely give you a call to celebrate. Betsy is a strong swimmer, and she participates in cheerleading. She also plays piano. She has lived in Moore County since 1991 and has been an active member of the Arc since then. She has lived in two group homes in Moore County and is planning to move to a private home which specializes in alternative family living, which is more of a home-life environment. Go for it Betsy, and keep on winning medals. PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com.

At The Village at Brookwood, we know one size does not fit all. With a lovely campus of 50 acres and fewer than 200 residents, The Village is just the right size for building a close-knit community. Call today to schedule a visit.

800-282-2053

1860 Brookwood Avenue | Burlington, NC Proud to be a Part of Cone Health, The Network for Exceptional Care®

VillageAtBrookwood.org

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

23


HOME GROWN SINCE 1964. RESIDENTS DON & ALICE WOOD USING THEIR GREEN THUMBS IN OUR COMMUNITY GARDEN

A Faith-Based Not For Profit Continuing Care Retirement Community

500 E. Rhode Island Ave. Southern Pines, NC (910) 692-0300 www.penickvillage.org


The Omnivorous Reader

The Good Angel

Kristin Hersh’s account of her intimate life with musician Vic Chesnutt is a testament to the power of hard love — and the enduring human spirit

By Brian Lampkin

Many people were

introduced to the musician Vic Chesnutt by an interview with Terri Gross on NPR’s Fresh Air in December of 2009, despite the fact that Chesnutt’s first record was released in 1990. In that interview, Chesnutt talked openly about his flirtations with suicide, but made it clear that he had broken off his love affair with death. He died a few weeks later at age 42 from an overdose of muscle relaxants.

In retrospect, the interview is one of radio’s saddest transmissions. The palpable hope of the uplifting story of Chesnutt’s refusal to give up despite tremendous physical and psychological pain was yanked out from under the audience and we all free fell into public grief. Kristin Hersh’s unrelenting chronicle of her intimate life with Chesnutt, Don’t Suck, Don’t Die: Giving Up Vic Chesnutt, (University of Texas Press, 2015, $22.95) brings her private grief to light while also refusing to hide what made Chesnutt infuriating, difficult and disturbing. Hersh’s openness and honesty is a tribute to Chesnutt’s own unflinching look at reality. It is a book filled with hard love, but real love. Kristin Hersh is a musician of note in her own right. She was the force behind the influential and powerful band Throwing Muses before starting a solo career, which found her touring frequently with Chesnutt. Much of the memoir documents these tours through Europe and America — tours made even more challenging than every musicians-in-a-van story by Chesnutt’s complicated paralysis. A car accident at 18 (he has admitted

that he was drunk) left him at first a quadriplegic, though he was able to work his way back to some use of his arms. Hersh marvels at his ability to play guitar unlike any other human. “That car accident left you with exactly — and only — what you needed,” Hersh writes (the entire book is addressed to Vic). “What you needed to do this, to play songs that were just a little bit too much.” He was “broken in all the right places.” Hersh’s style and syntax take some getting used to. She’ll often leave off the subject of a sentence (“Sighed with his whole Buddha belly.” “Stepped out of the icy Alabama truck stop . . . ”) and at times she’ll leave out unimportant details that might clarify meaning but distract from the larger story being told. After a few pages, though, I grew accustomed to and then grew fond of her usage and idiosyncrasies. Like Chesnutt’s own tortured English, or rather, words bent to his own needs and uses, Hersh is after language that reveals Chesnutt and her relationship to him. Sometimes that takes a new approach. And new approaches were demanded of Chesnutt by his circumstances. He could not settle for the usual chords or notes because he physically couldn’t play them. He needed to combine words in new ways to more accurately express his unique vision. This book reveals his constant attention to his craft. Nearly every interaction with Chesnutt is punctuated with sudden bursts of new song lyrics and melodies spontaneously rising from the conversation at hand. It could frustrate normal modes of conversation, but Hersh could also marvel at the instinctive artist at work in front of her. A conversation about not giving up — musically or physically — turned into Vic singing a brand new couplet: “I am not made of wood / I am not a good . . . man.” He wasn’t, but Hersh offers that “you were maybe a good angel.” Outsiders, audiences, often presumed that Hersh and Chesnutt were married. They weren’t and they toured with their respective partners Billy and Tina, and much of the book focuses on the deep joy and terrible pain of married life and loss. Chesnutt needed Tina — sometimes to physically sur-

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

25


The Omnivorous Reader race to recovery

:

joint replacement program

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26

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vive — and that need tore at the relationship. And he damaged his relationship with Hersh to the point of complete separation. But Hersh refused to go away, refused to be pushed aside by Chesnutt’s isolation. Did he push friends and lovers away because he knew that the undertow of death was pulling him to sea? Hersh does not see him as selfless in that manner; more likely his innate crankiness and dissatisfaction left him as fed up with other humans as they were with him. It’s also tempting to think that Chesnutt was suicidal because of the physical discomforts of his paralysis. Maybe, but Hersh’s depiction suggests his affair with death predated the accident. It was in him like an extra organ at birth demanding a function that would negate its own existence. Perhaps the accident itself was an early insistence. Paradox and contradiction are centers of Chesnutt’s art — along with an unlikely musical and lyrical sweetness and longing for decent love and life. Many of his songs are convincingly optimistic because they recognize so much pain. For me, songs like “New Town” and “In My Way, Yes” — which I saw performed live in the Carrboro Arts Center and left me dazzled and even shamed by the small complaints of my life in the face of Chesnutt’s powerful assertion of existence — are meaningful examples of a possible way forward in life. Of course, they are challenged by his eventual suicide and negation of their ideals, but that confuses art with life. The art lives on no matter the choices of the artist. But Kristin Hersh doesn’t have the luxury of distance. She loved the artist and the art and they are not so easily separated. This memoir is not a biography or even an appreciation of the particulars of the music. It is about the difficulties of loving a difficult man’s art, and by extension, loving the creator. Hersh is often awed by Chesnutt’s talent, and her futile attempts to keep the talent alive are heartbreaking. Don’t Suck, Don’t Die addresses the complex relationship of the admirer of art to the artist. Chesnutt lived up to the first command, but he was unable to let Hersh’s will for him to live infuse him with his own will to go on living. In the end Hersh writes, “Then hope is gone and so are you . . . Everything dies. Love, even.” Then she closes the book with a selected discography that directly addresses the music with lines like: “Little . . . capture[s] the childlike bitter soul that was Vic at his best” and words like “brilliantly executed,” “heartbreaking work of exceptional gravity,” “overwhelming drama,” “dark magic,” and “reveals itself with such beauty.” The art goes on. Vic Chestnutt lives until the last person stops listening to the songs, and that won’t be anytime soon. PS Brian Lampkin is one of the owners of Scuppernong Books in Greensboro.

September 2015P���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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B oo k s h e l f

September Books By K imberly Daniels Taws

There’s a thread of domesticity run-

ning through this month’s book releases. When thinking about homes we might only consider the aesthetics. When thinking about homes in fiction we are asked to consider the layered meanings behind the surfaces and spaces that create our concept of the home.

Anne Tyler is an author who has made a career of studying the reaches of family and home. Her recent novel A Spool of Blue Thread follows several generations of the Whitshank family. In their Baltimore home, built by the patriarch in 1936, simple interactions of domestic life become a conduit to understanding the family’s feelings about age, race, class and gender. Mid September sees the release of Fates and Furies by Lauren Groff. The story follows the lives of Lotto and Mathilde, a playwright and his misunderstood wife, from their childhood experiences through the decades of their relationship. The parties thrown by the young couple in their first apartment create and crystallize roles that continue through their lives together. This novel exposes the complexities beneath each seemingly simple action and reminds us that in every marriage, family and home interactions hide layers of human complication. Meg Mitchell Moore’s upcoming novel The Admissions is about an upper class family with three children, too much to do and

a college admission process underway for the eldest when everything starts to unravel. The book raises interesting questions about perfection and home. In stark contrast is A Little Life, so good that it has been nominated for the Man Booker Prize but so graphic it is difficult to recommend. Author Hanya Yanagihara uses phenomenal skill to craft questions: Is home a Place? Can you forget the absence of a childhood home? What are the mechanisms of creating a loving home- at any stage of your life? Yanagihara’s searing novel answers these questions in a shockingly unforgettable way. What we understand about the nature that creates our human environment has been deeply shaped by the thinking of Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859). Andrea Wulf, author of Founding Gardeners, has a forthcoming biography of the visionary German naturalist, The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World. Von Humboldt had the talent of creating a poetic narrative from his interdisciplinary approach to scientific observation. His radical ideas, that the earth was not created only for man’s use, the idea of nature as home, have become mainstream. Thanks to this wonderful biography, the pioneering thinker will not be lost to history. Ruth Reichl’s cookbook My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes That Saved My Life, beautifully illustrates how life-giving the kitchen can be. Having lost her job as editor of Gourmet Magazine she was adrift, shocked and devastated. The book chronicles Reichl slowly cooking her way back to life. My Kitchen Year reads like a journal, and is as uplifting and inspiring as it is instructive.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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B oo k s h e l f

CHILDREN’S BOOKS By Angie Tally The Country Bookshop is celebrating its 62nd birthday with a full slate of children’s author events: Ingrid Law, Newbery Honor winning author of Savvy, will visit the Country Bookshop on Thursday, September 10 at 4 p.m. This event is free and appropriate for readers age 8-14. Ingrid will read and answer questions from her newest book: Switch, a companion book to Savvy. Both books feature the unusual Beaumont family and their kin. Upon reaching their 13th birthday each Beaumont receives an unusual trait or Savvy. In Switch, Gypsy Beaumont discovers she can see the past and the future and maybe even stop time. “Switch is about paying attention to the beauty and importance of every moment,” says Law. “About finding that beauty in ourselves, our friends and our loved ones, even those who at times may be a bit harder to love.” Author Alan Gratz will be at the Country Bookshop on Monday September 21 and Tuesday September 22 from 4 - 6 p.m. for informal chats with readers and writers. This event is free and appropriate for ages 8-18. Alan has written a number of books for young readers including the NC Battle of the Books titles The Brooklyn Nine, Samurai Shortstop and Prisoner B-3087. His newest book is Code of Honor. Kamran is a senior in high school. His brother Darius, a West Point graduate and Green Beret, has been sent to Iraq to fight terrorists. One day, Kamran is told his brother has been seen with terrorists and is leading them in a strike against a US embassy in Turkey. Everyone believes he is a traitor. Kamran’s world is flipped upside down. “This book draws you in and keeps you there until the final page. Readers who love action and suspense will love this new book by author Alan Gratz,” says reviewer Caleb N. Age 13. Katherine Applegate, Newbery winning author of The One and Only Ivan, will make her only North Carolina appearance in Southern Pines on Thursday, October 1 at the O’Neal School Auditorium. Applegate will present her new book Crenshaw, the story of a young boy whose family has fallen on hard times. He has an imaginary friend named Crenshaw, who just happens to be a giant cat. Crenshaw helps him deal with the many challenges he faces. Only 225 tickets will be available for this once-in-a-lifetime event. This event is appropriate for ages 7 and up. Please call The Country Bookshop at (910) 692-3211 for more information. PS

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P r op e r E n g l i s h

White Fright What’s this silly thing you Americans have about wearing white after Labor Day? Go ask your mother By Serena Brown

Many years ago my mother and I

watched a black comedy film called Serial Mom. The protagonist, played with relish by Kathleen Turner, was a serial killer in the guise of a middle class mother. Serial Mom’s victims had in some way transgressed her moral code, generally by upsetting her children, and so she would exact a grisly revenge for these misdeeds. It was an amusing film, and my mother and I enjoyed it. However, we were both left completely mystified by one of the murders. It occurred because the victim had worn white shoes after Labor Day. For years we laughed about this whenever we saw white shoes. Sometimes we wondered vaguely when this Labor Day occurred in the American calendar, but we never found out. My mother, a woman of some considerable chic, supposed it must be around September because that made fashion sense. It turns out that her educated guess was a good one. Whilst living in the States I’ve learnt when Labor Day occurs, and I’ve discovered — as you all know — that this rule about not wearing white is real and observed. Furthermore, it seems to extend to the entire wardrobe, not just the footwear. A glance at French Vogue indicated that graphic prints in monochrome colors and white fur are among the trends for autumn/winter this season. I own neither white fur nor white shoes, but I have just bought a pair of jeans in a snowy shade. In order to preserve their frosty sheen, I can only wear them when I can be sure that the dogs won’t jump up on me. That time is limited to about five minutes a month, and now it’s been curtailed even further by a new sartorial timetable. The thing is, September is the first month after May that it’s cool enough to wear jeans at all. Will I wear them this month and play the foreign card? Hmm. A combination of “when in Rome” and a heightened awareness of the importance of manners in my adopted home of the South will prevent me from feigning ignorance. However, I felt I wanted to get to the bottom of this convention before putting the jeans into a drawer for a whole fashion season. How to proceed? How to navigate this point of etiquette? I rang my friend the Southern Belle. Why, I asked her, was this rule in place? “I don’t know the exact reason,” she said. “It’s something that’s handed down. You just knew, even from when you were a little girl.” What’s the Belle going to do? She’s taking the modern approach: “I’m a working woman, and now there are white winter suits . . .” Yes, really gorgeous ones. And those monochrome prints. I conducted a survey. I asked the graphic designers in the magazine office.

They feel self-conscious in September white. “Except for pants,” said Kira. “I pretty much wear white pants all year round.” What about Tom Petty? I wondered. My husband’s school roommate had a poster of Tom wearing white shoes. Is a rock god supposed to put his Chuck Taylors away after the long weekend? “Noooo,” said Lauren. “He’s Tom Petty. He can wear whatever he wants.” Good point. On the whole, Southern friends said they observed the rule. Some Northern friends said it didn’t count in the South, that the weather’s warmer for longer; others thought it was more carefully adhered to here. Just about everyone, regardless of origin, said they felt people were judging them if they set out in pallid apparel after the Labor Day holiday. A bit of digging round on the Web taught me that nobody seems to know precisely why white is a faux pas in fall. Some say the idea was introduced by fashion editors to kick off the autumn shopping season, others that it was a rule made up by the old guard in nineteenth century New York to distinguish themselves from the nouveau riche. There’s an argument that it simply made practical sense — again, in the Northeast, no mention of the sweltering Septembers of the South — to retrieve darker colors for the mucky city winters. However, Emily Post has declared the rule obsolete, and I came across reams of fashion editors writing about the white they’d be wearing this winter. Others pointed out that Coco Chanel wore white year-round. The most compelling argument I could find against wearing white after Labor Day, echoing the Belle’s reasoning, was that it was something one’s mother said one shouldn’t do. Eureka! There’s my loophole. If I ask my mother about wearing white after Labor Day she thinks of the brilliance of Kathleen Turner and roars with laughter. So stare at me disapprovingly if you like, but those white jeans are staying out until long after the fall. PS Serena Brown will be washing her whites over Labor Day weekend.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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papa d a d d y ’ s M i n d f i e l d

A Father’s Hope And dreams of a life-changing app

By Clyde Edgerton

It’s about 10

Illustration by harry Blair

a.m. and I’ve been working on the first draft of an essay for the September 2015 issue of this magazine. I’m taking a break. I’m leaning against the headboard of my bed, and my 12-year-old son is stretched across the foot of the bed reading a book I’ve suggested.

The idea for the planned essay started a few days ago when I was driving along thinking about war, about the Christmas event in World War II when Allied and German soldiers joined briefly on the battlefield to celebrate and talk together — before going back to war. I wondered what they talked about. Because I have children, I started imagining men from the opposing armies talking about their children. I wondered if they’d then worry about later shooting the man who was the father of children he’d heard about. I suddenly imagined a present day app that connects the cellphone of a father in an army about to go to war with the cellphone of a father in an opposing army. The theory is of course that the soldier-fathers, having been enticed into conversations with each other about their children, will be less likely to do battle because in doing so they may kill fathers with whom they’ve just had a conversation, a conversation about their children’s names, their likes, dislikes — about the fathers’ hopes for their children. Could something like a fathers-at-war app maybe work? How might I put this idea out into the world? As I wrote, the essay floundered. I look at my son, reading the Fred Chappell novel I Am One of You Forever (1985). He said he’d try at least as far as the end of the first chapter. I suddenly have three big thoughts in quick succession: 1) The fathers-at-war-app essay is going badly. 2) How lucky I am to suggest one of my favorite books to my son — and he gives it a try! 3) I Am One of You Forever is thematically related to the central idea in my failed essay in ways I couldn’t have imagined before this moment: The novel is about fathers, sons, uncles, family bonds and deep loss brought by all wars. When I read the novel decades ago, it reminded me of my childhood and my early relationship to my elders, my father and my favorite uncle especially.

(I just now asked my son if he’d read past the first chapter and he said yes.) The story, when I read it, brought to me the best aspects of my upbringing in a rural, Southern culture, and it brought home the unspeakable sadness invoked by the loss of young loved ones in battle. I hesitate to reveal more of the story because I don’t want to spoil it in case you decide to read it. (My son just stopped reading and left the book on the bed. It’s now about 10:30 a.m.) The book can’t mean to him what it has meant and means to me, but he did hesitate during his reading about five minutes ago and ask me, “What is buttermilk?” Answering his question gave me an opportunity to talk about my father, my father’s upbringing, pot liquor, pre-electricity methods of cooling food in a spring or open well, and other aspects about the culture of my childhood and the childhoods of my parents (Southern, rural), a culture that gets at least its fair share of a generalized, bad press. My father-at-war app idea rests on the notion that the concept of family and children may be paramount in the lives of most men. A reason for problems with the essay is that while writing, I became less sure of the truth of that notion. Many men pit religion, nationalism, greed, blood thirst and desire for action above all, especially concerns about someone else’s children. Right? Would a father-at-war app be a joke? A means to locate the enemy? I leave the father-app essay behind. A plug for I Am One of You Forever is a more appropriate subject for an essay — now, at least. After lunch and thinking through a new essay (this one), I’m worried that my son is giving up on the novel, but at 2 p.m. he’s back to reading it again. . . Ah, there is hope that he might finish. If he reads to the end, he and I can talk about the war in that book — WWII, the war of a couple of my uncles. And maybe we will talk about my war, Vietnam, back when I was very young and a bachelor, how it seemed right to go to it then . . . but not now. Maybe he and I can dream of an app that could help humanize soldiers, or more appropriately . . . political string-pullers around the world. PS Clyde Edgerton is the author of ten novels, a memoir and a new work, Papadaddy’s Book for New Fathers. He is the Thomas S. Kenan III Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at UNCW.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Vine Wisdom

Wine and Oysters The perfect pairing for great American dining

By Robyn James

I am a huge fan of oysters, particularly

Photograph by JOhn Gessner

raw oysters. It is said that oysters should only be eaten during the months with an “R” in them. September leads the season as the first “R” month. I checked out the theory and found out there is something to it. Apparently the warmer summer months create a large amount of algae that can transfer toxins into shellfish, especially oysters. Then there is the oyster fan base that says they just don’t taste good during the summer months.

Nowadays most restaurants and grocery stores get their oysters from commercially grown farms, and their oysters are totally safe all the time. During my research, I also discovered that a real connoisseur will serve oysters only with mignonette, a shallot and vinegar concoction that creates the quintessential complement to oyster consumption. What is the ideal beverage pairing for this special little shellfish? I was surprised to learn that distilled spirits can actually make the oyster indigestible, tasting terrible and possibly causing some, uh, discomfort. Wine, however, pairs beautifully, if you know the right ones to choose. The Chablis region of France is said to have fossilized oyster shells in its limestone-rich soil, creating a beautiful match with oysters. Also, the Muscadet region of France in the Loire Valley has a huge maritime influence that creates a unique flint-like salinity in its bone-dry white. Dry sparkling wine is always a hit with oysters; the effervescence complements the brininess of the oyster. If you simply must have a red with your meal, reach for a chilled bottle of Beaujolais; the fruity gamay grape offsets the pungent oyster. Here are my favorites:

Graham Beck Brut, South Africa, approx. $15

“A very pretty nose of fresh flowers, citrus and creamy toast leads into a balanced, rich, Chardonnay-like character on the palate. Minerally, clean, fresh but serious, this wine is food-friendly and elegant.” RATED EDITOR’S CHOICE, 88 POINTS, The Wine Enthusiast

Christian Moreau Chablis, Burgundy, approx., $29

“The 2013 Chablis has an engaging mineral-laced nose that seems to possess more vigor than the 2012. The palate is vibrant with crisp citrus fruit, very fine acidity and a sense symmetry on the finish that should see it age with style.” RATED 89 POINTS, ROBERT PARKER, The Wine Advocate

Domaine La Quilla Muscadet, Loire, France, approx. $13

A flinty white with Atlantic cool, this has the pale blandness of a juicy pear. The texture is firm, the flavors simple and tight, ready for the brininess of freshly shucked oysters.

Dupeuble Beaujolais, France, approx. $15

“It has a lovely, clean and pure bouquet with bright red cherries and fresh strawberry fruit leaping from the glass. The palate is medium-bodied with tensile tannin and a clean thread of acidity. This is bright and vivacious with a pleasing sharpness and focus on the tart finish. Enjoy over the next 5 to 7 years.” RATED 90 POINTS, ROBERT PARKER, The Wine Advocate PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at robynajames@gmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

37


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Out of the Blue

Feeling Old? Check the Official List

By Deborah Salomon

I cringe hearing people talk about getting old

as though they invented it. That’s the first sign of getting old. Sharing details. But, I admit, other signs exist. Over the past few months I’ve compiled a list. So when it fell out of the pocket of my (not quite mommy) jeans as I dumped them into the washing machine, I decided to share while still in possession of the required faculties. Here goes.

A person is getting old . . . When you refuse to dry clean jeans, not solely because of the expense, but because denim was invented before dry cleaning. When you expect a new car to have a certain smell, not to mention velvet-glide power steering. When you pay for something over five dollars with cash. Or, better yet, a check. With smartphone options, even credit/debit swipes are downtrending. When nobody at the table connects Ray Walston with red socks, Robin Williams with an extraterrestrial or Ray Bolger with creaky joints. When you expect a movie to have a plot or a story, some decent acting and maybe a twist — not just computer-generated effects — to justify the price of popcorn. Not that I’d ever buy popcorn, at 50 cents a kernel. When, after staying awake for the Academy Awards, you recognize everybody on the dead list and practically nobody up for Oscars. Ditto political debates. Where have all the seasoned statesmen-andwomen gone? When you still feel like painting toenails but can’t reach. When you’re absolutely, positively convinced that Gregory Peck, not George Clooney, is the best-looking man ever. OK, maybe a young Clint Eastwood. When canned soup starts tasting good.

When “Fly Me to the Moon” conjures Sinatra, not Armstrong. When Harris Teeter automatically applies the Thursday senior discount. When you know “Jeopardy!” answers but can’t spit them out in time. Honestly, I’d score huge on multiple-choice. When you remember when the Beatles’ hair was considered long — and Elvis’s gyrations indecent. When (w)rap meant something you did to gifts. When making a bucket list seems juvenile. How do you pack for Reykjavik, in November? Does Medicare work in Patagonia? Kuala Lumpur? When you wish you’d taken economics or the fundamentals of investing for college electives instead of geomorphology and 18th century Romantic poetry. When you want corn on the cob plain, not barbecue or teriyaki or chipotle. When the idea of a recliner no longer makes you snicker. When you don’t mind wearing the same outfit two days in a row because, really, who notices? When you long for the day when only slackers walked around with fourday beards. When the guy behind the wheel is the guy you pushed in a stroller. When Lanz, Ship ’n Shore, Jantzen, Junket, Spry and Postum channel dresses, blouses, swimsuits, pudding, shortening and coffee substitutes. When “unisex” meant mythical creatures making whoopee. When your kids are card-carrying AARPers. When you finally admit the things you put off learning until retirement will never be learned — and you couldn’t care less. When you start looking like your mother, for real. Then, the sign of resistance to old age: When you can make a list of signs that makes sense. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and The Pilot. She may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Ho m e tow n

Adventures of a Buzz Cut Kid Half a century ago, school began and the whole world changed

By Bill Fields

For the most

part, I have let birthdays ending in a zero have the traction of rain on a gable roof. But a particular anniversary — starting the first grade 50 years ago this September — has commanded my attention in a way that turning 40 or 50 did not.

“Flipper,” “Lost in Space” and “I Dream of Jeannie” were on television. “Yesterday” was on the radio, Hurricane Betsy was hammering the southern United States. I was a 6-year-old sporting Keds and a buzz cut who loved hamburgers and hated when Mrs. Caddell, our otherwise kind and wonderful teacher, made us lie down on little rugs for an afternoon nap. East Southern Pines Elementary was within walking distance from our neighborhood, even for a little fellow, but going to school for the first time was a far cry from the freedom of the ball-playing, tree-climbing, Tonka truck-driving days I had known. It was a whole new world of thick pencils and wide-ruled paper with which we practiced our Grade One reading list of 320 words and learned to spell. My early efforts were not always successful. Mostly because of my hero Willie Mays, who had just hit his 500th career home run, I loved the San Francisco Giants. I could handle the star centerfielder’s name, but had difficulty with third baseman “Jim Heart” and pitcher “Won Marchel.” We had crayons in sixty-four colors, although all the walls were sea-foam green, no doubt a calming paint job to counteract the Pop-Tarts, Sugar Frosted Flakes and Bazooka kids encountered in the mid-1960s. The green scheme was broken up by the black-and-yellow Fallout Shelter signs that were about as close as we got to the Cold War. The classrooms had tall doors with transoms, sturdy wooden desks and coat closets large enough to hold the wardrobe of a Hollywood star. Big windows were fitted with heavy venetian blinds, and before we had gotten out of elementary school one of them fell and struck a student, bloodying his head and

necessitating a bandage that made him resemble a Revolutionary War casualty. Our injuries were mostly minor scrapes sustained at recess or on “field trips” to the town park. (Mrs. Caddell was good with mercurochrome.) Every piece of equipment — swings, teetertotter, merry-go-round — was made of metal, which is as hard to fathom in these plastic, rounded edges and wood-chip times as cars without seatbelts. On a hot day, you could cook up a Neese’s sausage patty on the shiny surface of the slide. I would still take the burn on a bare leg over having to participate in another of the playground pursuits. When I was a kid, anything involving a ball I usually loved, but tetherball was the chemical-tasting, hollow, milk-chocolate Easter rabbit candy of sports. I detested trying to whack a ball on a rope around a pole. Half a century later it remains a mystery, sort of like the hot school lunches in the cafeteria, whose basement location and long line of garbage cans en route to the tray depository were not positive influences on the atmosphere. But taking food to eat in my “Combat!” lunch box was not nirvana either. Those little thermoses would break if you looked at them funny. Moreover, whether your sandwich was peanut butter-and-jelly, bologna or potted meat, by noon time it would basically taste like lunch box. As much as those smells and tastes take me back, it is the sight of a captioned drawing I did in my early months of first grade, displayed on parents’ night, that does a better job. It is of my mother, in a long red skirt and blue blouse. I got her raven hair right. Her skin, however, is alien-orange, and her shoes look like those of an 1875 frontierswoman. It was what I wrote under the picture that caught Mom’s attention. I revealed her age — older than most of the other mothers — in my description. But Mom didn’t hold a grudge. She got bath powder for me to give Mrs. Caddell at the end of the school year. My education — formal and otherwise — was off and running. PS Southern Pines native Bill Fields never lived on Connecticut Avenue but has lived in the actual Connecticut for a long time.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Ho r s e S e n s e

My Coco

The troubled race horse that helped save me

By Toby R aymond

Photographs contributed by Toby Raymond

When Coco hobbled off the truck at the

farm in Vermont from Suffolk Downs one cold, dreary November day, it was plain to see he was in trouble. A racing injury had ended his career. A gelding without any second career prospects, he faced an uncertain future, as so often happens to Thoroughbreds that are no longer serviceable.

But Coco was lucky. Fate had stepped in and played a hand. Through the workings of the New England Chapter of the nonprofit Communication Alliance to Network Ex-Racers (CANTER), he was swooped up and sent to me. I had been doing foster care and lay-up work with the organization for some time, the most demanding, heart-wrenching, and incredibly rewarding work all in one. As a result I was familiar with hard-luck cases. Every time a horse would come to me I was fulfilling a long-ago promise made to these remarkable creatures: that I would give back to them what they so unselfishly had given to me. My mission, as I saw it, was to take the best possible care of my charges, which meant that I needed to be creative, resourceful and relentless, as horse care can be a financial black hole. To that end, I wrangled a premium feed donation from one of the major manufacturers, nutritional supplements from another, negotiated all manner of horse wear, amassed an arsenal of first aid supplies from the local tack shop, and enlisted the most amazing volunteers ever who were committed no matter what.

Therefore it was practically a given that my best, most trusted friend and ally, Susan, was at the barn with me late that afternoon when the truck pulled up. While it was not unusual for horses to arrive in various states of disrepair, mentally as well as physically, Coco was different; Susan saw it too. Head held high and wide-eyed with fright, he was a study in contrasts. So thin it was a feat that he was able to raise his head at all, he managed to dance his way into the barn despite having a nasty medial basilar sesamoid fracture. All that aside — Thoroughbreds will be Thoroughbreds — what really pulled at my heart strings was how he behaved when he got into his stall. He made straight for the far corner, turned around and stood stock still, except for the trembling. He was petrified. I remember thinking: I get it. I had gone through a divorce, lost my savings in the stock market crash, and was making my way on shaky ground. As I inched over to where Coco was standing, I whispered all this to him. At first he seemed ready to jump out of his skin, but eventually he softened and let out a sigh of relief. And that was that. I had become his “person.” While Coco recuperated over the next eighteen months, I concentrated on getting him back to a good weight. It was a slow process but in due time his rail-thin frame and dull coat were transformed into a shiny, sleek form flanked by dapples. I also spent a lot of time working with him to understand that he was now in safe hands. Some days he was a blank slate and on others he was right there with me. He’d follow me around like a puppy dog, let me rub his ears — a really big deal — and nuzzle my pockets for the carrots he had come to expect. But nothing was more gratifying than when he would rest his head on my shoulder with half-closed dreamy eyes. Finally the day came when he vetted out sound. Of course, by then I was hopelessly in love with this wacky horse and decided to take steps to make him my own. While I’m a dedicated student of dressage, I know my limits. It was clear

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Ho r s e S e n s e

that I needed to be under the supervision of a trainer if I were to restart Coco. So off we went to a boarding stable, where we were to spend the next year. It was a pretty heady experience at first. Coco seemed to be a natural. He had a relaxed, scopey walk and was sensitive to the touch. He also appeared to have a good work ethic, putting his mind to the business at hand. Everything was looking up: a heartbreak story with a fairytale ending. But not quite. As our training progressed, Coco’s anxiety level seemed to rise as well, flagged by the reactionary behaviors he had exhibited when he first came to the farm. It started with his reluctance to have anyone handle him but me, which meant that I had to be present at the end of the day to bring him back to his stall from the pasture. He’d only eat while I stood by, and I was the only one who could put on the endless number of blankets required for a Vermont winter. I lived forty-five minutes away. I was driving up and down the road a lot. I tried everything I could think of to remedy the situation. I backed off on our training program and embarked on a series of treatments — chiropractor, massage therapy, joint injections, calming supplements, the works — but to no avail. It was when he began to stumble under saddle, even with a clean bill of health, that I pulled the plug. It was time to quit. And that’s when I realized Coco would be my cross to bear for the rest of his life. As all this was happening, I was getting ready to move to North Carolina. In typical Coco fashion, it took some time for him to settle in, but thanks to my other horse, Bean, and the easy living that is North Country in Vass, he slowly came around. Unfortunately, as time went on the “spells” surfaced once again. I’d walk into the pasture calling to him just as I had every other morning, except on this particular day, he would be on high alert — head in the air, ears pricked forward and unblinking eyes as large as saucers — and he’d wheel around and take off as I approached. No amount of horse whisperer techniques would calm him down. Coco was quite literally “off to the races.” By now many years had come and gone, and the episodes were getting worse. Not only were they increasing in frequency and duration, he began breaking out of his pasture. At last had come to an agonizing cross-road. I promise my animals they will never suffer in my care. I promise them a compassionate ending. My Coco, so beautiful, so gentle, so troubled. It was a sunny, blue sky morning when he was laid to rest in a shady grove under a magnolia tree. He went to sleep in my arms. He is at peace. April 18, 2001 — April 27, 2015. Coco, you will be forever missed. PS Here’s my bio: Toby Raymond is a rider and writer specializing in equine branding, pr and feature articles. Toby can be reached at Equine Creative Services – 802-353-2215 tlraymond2@gmail.com

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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P l e as u r e s o f l i f e

The Last Playhouse

An unlikely family heirloom finds its way home to the Pines

By Melissa Goslin

Photographs by Laura Gingerich

Sitting across the kitchen table from

Mike Murphy, I had to admit that I didn’t know most of the story I was there to write. He’d driven a playhouse up from his cousin’s house in Georgia, but I wasn’t sure what was special about it. Surely there were easier heirlooms to pass around than a six-by-fifteen-foot structure. So I asked him — what makes a person travel 300 miles to pick up a playhouse?

Murphy took a long sip of his coffee. “It was the last thing my grandfather ever built.” Instantly, I understood. When Tracey Bowman received plans for a playhouse at her baby shower, she knew exactly what to expect. The plans were a gift tucked inside a card from her grandfather, Alex Erwin. The play structure he intended to build for his greatgranddaughter was a replica of the one he had built in his own Atlanta yard after

Tracey — the oldest of six cousins — was born. “I can’t remember a time it wasn’t there,” Bowman said. “We all congregated at my grandfather’s and we would go out in the playhouse and entertain ourselves for hours. I still remember it was painted this bright royal blue color.” Erwin, affectionately known to his family as Poppie, began building the structure in 1998 after Bowman’s daughter, Leila, arrived. The new house had the same Dutch Colonial style with a few modern upgrades. Unlike the original version, this one had working windows and a top panel on the front door. Even with his wife in poor health, Erwin kept traveling to the house and working on it. Finally, on Easter Sunday of 2000, Bowman held a ceremonial ribbon-cutting to mark the grand opening of the new, sunny yellow playhouse. In time, Bowman had another daughter, Grace, who joined her sister playing in the backyard, echoing the hours Bowman herself had spent at her grandfather’s, having tea parties and pretending the windows were a drivethrough restaurant. When the girls started to grow up and enter their teenage years, the playhouse was used less and less, except when their younger cousins would come to visit. Facing a move, Bowman put a call out to the family. And Murphy, whose children were at the perfect age to play in it, answered. “I have my memories of playing in ours with my cousins. To have that same

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015P���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


p l e as u r e s o f l i f e

experience for my girls? I couldn’t pass that up,” Murphy said. He knew he had to go and pick up the playhouse, but what he didn’t know was how. The moving and transport companies he contacted all said they would have to disassemble it, which was a deal breaker for Murphy. When he told a client at his insurance company about the predicament, she offered to let him use her rollback truck. It was just the sort of neighborly hospitality that had led Murphy and his wife, Melissa, to fall in love with Southern Pines. A native of Raleigh, Murphy had planned to take over the Nationwide Insurance office for a while before eventually returning to Apex. “We absolutely fell in love with this area. There’s no moving now,” he said.

With the truck on loan, Murphy called one of his good friends in Raleigh, who agreed to go along for the ride. “I had some straps. And I had a tarp,” Murphy laughed. “Everything always works great in your mind.” When they arrived in Georgia, the house was already up on jacks. “Here’s the thing about my grandfather — whatever he built was sound. And it was heavy,” Murphy said. Luckily, the winch was able to pull it onto the truck without any issues. Getting it home, however, was another story. With a few shingles sacrificed to the open road, the playhouse was ready to land in its new North Carolina home. The yard, however, had other ideas. In a precarious turn of events, Murphy drove it into his back yard, where it landed in the center of the yard instead of the nice, prepared pad he’d made for it by the fence line. With the encouragement of his friend and the help of a tow rod, he was able to push it into place without losing more than one 2-by-6 support beam. Watching the reactions of his daughters, Annaka and Maggie, Murphy knew it was well worth the trip. “Their jaws were as low as they could possibly go,” Murphy said. Murphy’s mom, Michelle, agrees. “I’m so proud that Mike did that, and now that his kids have it.” Michelle remembers getting the call about the first playhouse that was being built. She’d always wanted one growing up, but they had never gotten one. Shortly after, her mother also called looking to get a pony to pull a cart around for the grandkids. “Now that I’m a grandparent, I understand. Completely,” she laughed, saying the old adage is true: If Mom says no, ask Grandma. Two years — and one move — later, the playhouse still provides hours of fun for the Murphy girls, as well as for James, the latest addition to the Murphy household. When they’re in town, Leila and Grace also love visiting it and seeing their younger cousins carry on the family tradition. “My grandfather didn’t say much, but when he did talk, it was important,” Murphy said. “I know he’s watching them play in the playhouse he built. Honestly, what could be better than that?” PS Melissa Goslin is a freelance writer. She can be reached at mg@melissagoslin.com. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Celebrating 35 Years of Hospice Care

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B I R D WA T C H

Belted Kingfisher

The graceful aquatic feeder with the distinctive rattling call

By Susan Campbell

Often heard before they are seen, belted

kingfishers are a year round fixture across North Carolina. Requiring water for foraging and steep slopes for breeding, they can be found along any of our rivers, creeks, and ponds. Their long, rattling call is distinctive among the many familiar birds that call the Piedmont home.

One of three species of kingfisher found in the United States, the belted kingfisher’s range is extensive and year round across most of the continent. Breeding birds from Canada may migrate southward in search of open water in winter. A percentage of the North American population winters in south Florida as well as Mexico. It is assumed that most local breeding birds simply wander to where the fishing is good in the colder months; not making any real migratory flight in the fall. Belted kingfishers are top-heavy looking birds with powdery gray plumage and a raggedy crest. They get their name from the swath of gray plumage across their breasts. These birds are one of the few species in which the female has brighter plumage than the male. Females sport an additional band of chestnut feathers just below their gray “belt.” Otherwise kingfishers have a characteristic large head, thick neck and heavy, long pointed bill. They are built for plunging head first into the water after prey. They often sit on a convenient perch above the water, such as a branch or electric wire and then dive when they spot prey. However they are also capable of hovering for short periods above potential food items before descending to grab a fish. Belted kingfishers actually have a wide prey base, feeding on all sorts of aquatic organisms but also taking other types of food, such as small birds

and even berries, if the opportunity arises. Belted kingfishers require a steep slope for nesting. Although this is usually a river bank, they may also use human created habitat such as tall dirt piles, which can be a ways from water, if they are big enough and have a sheer drop on at least one side. This type of nesting substrate makes it difficult for terrestrial predators to reach the kingfisher’s nest. The tunnel into the nest chamber is typically several feet long and is sloped upward, presumably to protect the nest from rises in water level along rivers and streams. The kingfisher’s tunnel opening is large, being at least three inches in diameter. Also there will be the characteristic fishy aroma from recent droppings, separating it from other bank dwellers, such as bank or roughwinged swallows. In spring, the belted kingfisher pair will search out a nest site. The male will probe the dirt in suitable spots until he finds the right spot. Once he is satisfied with his choice, he will signal to the female by flying back and forth from her perch to the chosen location. After the burrow has been excavated, five to eight eggs will be incubated in the nest chamber for almost a month. Once hatched, the young will be tended to by the parents for about another month before fledging occurs. While in the nest, the young kingfishers have highly acidic stomachs and will be able digest scales, bones and other hard parts of what they are fed. By the time they leave the nest burrow, however, the birds will be regurgitating pellets made up of those typically indigestible parts, as adults do. So the next time you hear a loud rattling sound coming from on high look up. You may just catch sight of one of these energetic fast flying fishers! PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, or by calling (910) 585-0574.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Onsite Pharmacy, Lab and Imaging

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September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


A N o v e l Y e ar

The Watchman Cometh

As the controversy swirls around the newly released work by iconic Southern writer Harper Lee, a deeper unanswered question lies in our discussions of race in America

By Wiley Cash

When Go Set a Watchman, Harper Lee’s long-

awaited second novel, was released on July 14, 2015, we learned that Atticus Finch is and has always been a racist. Across the country, fans of To Kill a Mockingbird mourned the loss of a man who’d embodied our national sense of social justice for the past fifty-five years, but I wasn’t one of them.

While the 1962 film adaption of Mockingbird starred Gregory Peck in an Academy Award-winning turn as Atticus Finch, most Americans read the novel as part of school curriculum. I came to Mockingbird in my 20s after completing my undergraduate degree, and I didn’t see the film until I was well past 30. By then I’d encountered countless examples of racial injustice in both my country and my country’s literature, and I was no more shocked by the unfair treatment of Tom Robinson, a black man accused of raping a white woman, than I was by the apparent benevolence of Finch, a white man who offers Robinson legal representation in a case that hinges on the race of both the victim and the accused. Three days after the release of Go Set a Watchman, Jabari Asim, a writer and professor at Emerson College, published an essay titled “Rethinking To

Kill a Mockingbird,” in which he argues that the novel is similar to Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin in that it is “a form of literary ointment for white guilt, meant to soothe outbreaks of conscience while dispelling perceptions of how pervasive white supremacy is.” What does it mean to say that the novel appeases white guilt while dispelling notions of white supremacy? Perhaps the simplest answer to this question is to consider that most readers of Mockingbird recall Finch’s spirited defense of Tom Robinson over the fact that Robinson is lynched after being found guilty; more emphasis has always been placed on the perceived bravery of Finch’s courtroom performance instead of the real tragedy of Robinson’s death. Although I share both Asim’s critique of Mockingbird’s characterization of African Americans as well as his view of the novel as a racial balm for white culture, I’d be remiss and frankly dishonest if I refused to acknowledge the role it played in both the civil rights movement and the opening of Southern literature to a wider audience. There is no doubt that To Kill A Mockingbird changed people’s minds, spoke to their hearts, and informed their literary tastes. It also highlighted a society and legal system that were grossly imbalanced. It took the federal government eight more years to reach the conclusion that Harper Lee reached in 1960. At President Lyndon B. Johnson’s request, the Kerner Commission sought to uncover the root of social unrest and the lack of opportunity in African-American communities. The commission’s findings, while fraught with anachronistic and often crass

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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language, reflected what anyone paying attention to race relations already knew: “Our nation is moving toward two societies, one black, one white — separate and unequal.” For the next decade, popular culture reflected this bifurcation of American society. On television, Good Times showed the plight of African Americans in the inner city; The Jeffersons portrayed the questions of legitimacy and social limitations faced by upwardly mobile African Americans; and All in the Family used humor to display the insidious nature of racism in white America. And then, a decade and a half after the Kerner Commission report, The Cosby Show debuted on NBC, and suddenly both black and white America were exposed to something they’d never seen on television: an upper-middle class African-American family that seemed unbound by racism and untethered to the limitations of the past. Cliff Huxtable was a doctor; Claire Huxtable was an attorney; their children were smart, well-behaved, and college-bound. Not only were the Huxtables an ideal African-American family, they were an ideal family, period. Suddenly, white America could feel good about the progress made since the findings of the Kerner Commission and the portrayals of the struggles of African Americans in the previous decade. Like Asim’s take on To Kill a Mockingbird, The Cosby Show provided “ointment for white guilt, meant to soothe outbreaks of conscience while dispelling perceptions of how pervasive white supremacy is.” But that’s not what I was thinking about as a 7-year-old boy sitting on the living room floor in our house in Gastonia, North Carolina, a city whose history is rife with racial division and social struggle. When I looked at Cliff Huxtable, I saw only one thing: an ideal father. Previous generations had worshipped the heroic Atticus Finch in his spectacles and suits; my hero wore bright sweaters, leather loafers and khakis, but what they didn’t share in their wardrobes Finch and Huxtable made up for in worldviews. The Cosby Show featured countless teachable moments in which children learned about honesty, decency, fairness and equality, even if these lessons were taught in what was portrayed as a post-racial America. After The Cosby Show went off the air in 1992, it seemed that Bill Cosby couldn’t leave his Dr. Cliff Huxtable persona behind. He took on social issues that often found him using scathing humor and shame to preach on community and personal responsibility. He set himself as a pillar of morality in the same manner he portrayed Cliff Huxtable as the ideal father figure. Around the time Go Set a Watchman was released in July, transcripts of a deposition Bill Cosby gave in a 2005 civil suit were also released. The suit involved a woman who’d accused Cosby of drugging her before sexually assaulting her. In the transcripts, Cosby casually admits to a number of affairs, and he even admits to acquiring drugs with the intent to use them on women with whom he wanted to have sex. Go Set a Watchman reveals that Finch had spent decades working behind the scenes in Maycomb, Alabama, to ensure that African Americans only progressed socially and economically at a rate permissible to him, a rate he wanted to control; the novel outs him as a racist, an identity he kept secret from his children and therefore secret from the readers who’d long adored him. The transcripts out Bill Cosby as a sexual deviant, a sociopath, in short, a criminal. While readers across the country spent the long, hot July days lamenting the fall of Atticus Finch and shaking their heads over the behavior of a man I still view as Dr. Cliff Huxtable, I spent those days coming to terms with the ways in which the public faces of our heroes are often used to mask awful truths about their interior lives. And then it dawned on me: Atticus Finch and Cliff Huxtable are not men. They’re not even people. They’re fabrications, and they, just like the personas they create and the moral convictions they espouse, are nothing but fiction. PS Wiley Cash is a New York Times best-selling author whose second novel, This Dark Road to Mercy, was released last year. He lives in Wilmington.

September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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Take a Glimpse into Pinehurst’s Past…

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September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sandhills Photography Club “Golf” Competition Winners

CLASS A WINNERS 1

4

5 2

3 CLASS A WINNERS 1 1st Place – Donna Ford – Sandshot 2 2nd Place – Tom Reedy – A Family Affair 3 3rd Place – John German – A Caddy’s Life

6

4 Honorable Mention – John German – Waiting for Dad at the Open 5 Honorable Mention – Tom Reedy – Following Phil 6 Honorable Mention – Gisela Danielson – In Our Lifetime!

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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CLASS B WINNERS

1

3

5 CLASS B WINNERS 1 1st Place – Barbara Gault – Wente 2 2nd Place – Cathy Locklear – Lining up the Putt 3 3rd Place – Susan Capstick – After Eighteen

2

4

6

4 Honorable Mention – Chuck Kersey – Four Putters 5 Honorable Mention – Barbara Gault – Lakewood 6 Honorable Mention – Steve Hoadley – Playing at the Beach

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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125 NE BROAD STREET DOWNTOWN SOUTHERN PINES 910-246-0552

September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


S andhi l l s J o u rna l

The Ride Stops Here

The Southern Pines community comes together to host the cross-state “Mountains to Coast” bicycle ride

By Bill Case

Photograph by John Gessner

Fittingly, he arrives for his inter-

view at the coffee shop astride his Bianchi Café Racer town bike. Comfortably clad in denim shirt and khaki shorts, Southern Pines resident Rick Dedmond, 67, is eager to talk about Cycling North Carolina’s upcoming “Mountains to Coast Ride,” which kicks off on Friday, September 25, in mountainous Waynesville. After a seven day, 400-mile journey across the heart of the state, the ride concludes at Oak Island on Saturday, October 3. For the first time since 2000, the Town of Southern Pines will host one of the ride’s overnight stops on Wednesday, September 30. Other overnight stops along the route include Hendersonville, Shelby, Concord, Lumberton and Whiteville. No one is better qualified to discuss the tour than Dedmond. The retired

attorney is the only Sandhills resident to have completed all previous sixteen rides, vividly recalling the first Mountains to Coast Ride in 1999, which covered a daunting 700 miles over two weeks from the most westerly point of the state (Murphy) to the most easterly (the Outer Banks). Thereafter, the ride’s organizers mercifully shortened the tour to one week. Bicycling has been part of Dedmond’s life since boyhood when he delivered the Charlotte Observer via his two-wheeler in Shelby, North Carolina (overnight stop on Day 2 of this year’s tour). The University of North Carolina undergraduate and law school alum has spent countless hours on a bike. Since landing in the Sandhills in 1978, he has pedaled a minimum of 4,000 miles annually. Many of those miles were logged outside North Carolina in other cross-state tours. Once, after finishing a rigorous ride from Memphis to Chattanooga, Dedmond rode another 444 miles through the Smokies back home to Southern Pines. While relishing his opportunities to cycle through other regions of the United States, Dedmond believes there is no place like home for great biking. “North Carolina’s diversity is wonderful,” he says. “Riding your bicycle through our rural areas slows everything down and allows you time to savor the scenery in front of you. And for me, Moore County is as picturesque as any area of the state.” His fellow Sandhills Cycling Club (SCC) members marvel at Rick’s encyclopedic knowledge of North Carolina’s country roads — and just about everything else. “We call him ‘Rickpedia’ because he knows every bump and

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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turn in every road,” explains Ken Howell, a frequent cycling mate. “But that’s not all. During the course of a ride, he also will tell you who owns the neighboring properties and the date the owners bought them!” Not surprisingly, Dedmond was part of the concerted lobbying effort to schedule Southern Pines as an overnight stop for this year’s tour. For several years, he and other SCC members who habitually rode in Mountains to Coast tours would compare notes and concur that Southern Pines would make an ideal overnight stop. During the 2014 tour, Dedmond, Howell and others took advantage of every opening to beat the drum on behalf of Southern Pines with the officials from North Carolina Amateur Sports and its Cycling North Carolina affiliate. Howell, who owns a masonry company in Aberdeen, described the pitch this way: “We know what cyclists like on these tours. Yes, they need a camping area. But they also like to experience a vibrant and historic downtown area where they can walk around, check out local stores and eat something other than fast food after a hard day of biking. Music or entertainment afterward is great too. Of course, downtown Southern Pines fits that bill perfectly. With all our merchants who would benefit, we were sure we could raise sponsorships that would cover the cost of additional police and safety needs and a musical performance at the Sunrise Theater as well. Better yet, the proposed camping area at Memorial Park is located only a few blocks away from downtown. The Boys and Girls Clubs of the Sandhills were willing to make their facilities available for those riders who preferred to sleep indoors. There would also be ample room at the park for other infrastructure requirements of a tour stopover such as temporary shower trucks, portable toilets, massage therapists, et cetera.” A number of Sandhills’ locals, businesses, city governmental, and community organizations banded together to throw their collective weight behind the campaign. The Moore County Convention and Visitors Bureau, Moore County Chamber of Commerce, the Southern Pines Business Association, the Southern Pines Bicycle and Pedestrian Advisory Committee, and SCC agreed to play their respective parts in promoting the event and obtaining necessary sponsorships to defray expenses. Ragan Williams, the Director of Cycling North Carolina, credits Southern Pines for starting early, making a cogent case, and bringing a sense of energy and enthusiasm to its campaign. “They got after us early,” he says. “And the excitement of the town really impressed us.” Williams, a Raleigh resident, had not previously visited Southern Pines, but was impressed when he came here to meet with the Southern Pines team. “Southern Pines and for that matter Moore County fit well

September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


S andhi l l s J o u rna l

For further information about the “Mountains to Coast Ride,” check out www.cnc.ncsports.org Retired attorney and Sandhills resident Bill Case has segued into his second life as an author and columnist.

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with the concept of the ride which is to promote heritage tourism in rural North Carolina.” Williams points out that riders this year hail from 39 states and several foreign countries, and that it is not uncommon for many of them to make return visits to (or even settle in) the communities they pass through on tours. More immediately, it’s estimated that the Mountain to Coast riders will spend $250,000 in Southern Pines during their brief stay. Given these benefits, it was relatively easy to convince local merchants and other supporters to raise $10,000 in sponsorships. These contributions will pay for a Wednesday evening performance at the Sunrise Theatre by Holy Ghost Tent Revival, shuttle buses between Memorial Park and downtown, and additional police services. Numerous local volunteers will also be on hand to make sure things run smoothly. First Health Fitness Group Coordinator Jodi Heimrich, meanwhile, has assisted in preparing a “virtual goodie bag” of discount coupons for participants, convinced that Mountains to Coast and other biking events like upcoming Tour de Moore (scheduled for September 7) do much to enhance the quality of life in Moore County. “Many of the cyclists in events like Mountains to Coast are upper-income people. Showcasing the many outdoor activities in the area encourages those folks to revisit and perhaps live here.” Southern Pines Mayor David McNeill agrees. “Outdoor sports such as cycling, golf, equestrian and running are all an integral part of the quality of life here. Southern Pines’ involvement in Mountains to Coast is a prime example of how people here are willing to give back to their community.” Dedmond says the Concord to Southern Pines stage is one of the most grueling of the 2015 tour. The 80-mile route is the longest of all, and there will be several stiff climbs through the Uwharrie Mountains around the Mt. Gilead area. Pinehurst’s village green, well-stocked with liquids, apples and energy bars, will serve as the riders’ final rest stop before reaching their destination. The cyclists will no doubt be relieved and delighted to arrive in downtown Southern Pines. Though he used to race some in his 30s, do not expect Rick Dedmond to be among the first wave of speedy arrivals on Broad Street around 11:30 a.m. Rickpedia is likely to be taking his time, providing detailed information to his fellow riders pertaining to the route’s country roads and contiguous properties. But there is no doubt that Rick will finish strong in his hometown, “right on time.” PS

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64HIGHLY September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills TRAINED EXPERTS IN

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S porting Lif e

Dove Season

When summer melts into fall and memories change as time passes

By Tom Bryant

I pulled the old Bronco into

the pines and circled around to park close to the ancient dead longleaf. I had noticed the year before that doves loved to rest on the branches before dropping into the field to feed. This is one of my favorite times of year, one week before dove season and the beginning of bird hunting. It never changes. In all the years I’ve been in the woods and before each dove season, I still feel like a kid on Christmas Eve. I eased out of the truck and set my dove stool back in the pines a bit, primarily for shade but also not to disturb hungry doves. The weather had been sizzling. It always is, I thought. September can be as hot as August. Weatherwise they sort of run together, but at sundown a slight difference can be discerned when the white-hot sun slowly approaches the horizon. It’s something to do with the shadows and colors and smells and sounds as the scorched Earth starts to rest, beginning a slow move to fall and another season. About ten or fifteen doves flew tree-high over the cut cornfield and angled toward the dead pine as if on strings. I stayed motionless and watched as they were joined by several more. They effortlessly glided from the tree to the field and began picking and grazing like barnyard chickens. I sat quietly and watched as the birds on the ground were joined by more

of their Confederate gray cousins. In just a few minutes, it was amazing to see the field carpeted with birds, little heads darting back and forth with metronome regularity. As quickly as they came, and as if a uniform signal had been given, they all rose as one and headed to the trees surrounding the pond, probably to roost for the evening. I continued to sit in the same spot to see what would happen at dusk when evening settled on the farm. An owl called near the beaver pond, and purple martins began darting across the sky catching bugs for supper. Thinking of food, I meandered back to the Bronco, opened the back, and grabbed a pack of nabs from my gunning bag and a cold libation from the cooler. I wondered how many times I had done this. It’s been a bunch. September and dove season go together like December and Christmas. As the years have rolled by, I’ve found that narrowing a happening down to a month has become too much of a burden, so I’ve decided to just use seasons as a calendar. Here we are rapidly pushing August behind us and roaring on into September and fall, and yet we still have about a month left of summer. So let’s start with summer. I’ll think of a great memory from a summer past, then one from a fall, likewise a memorable happening from winter and spring. Forget the months, the seasons will take care of themselves. Let’s give it a try. Summer, that’s easy. It was the mid ’60s, I was fresh out of the Marine Corps and back in school, rambling, trying like crazy to grab some direction from somewhere, when I met this cute co-ed. She was a student at the University of North Carolina at Greensboro (formerly Woman’s College), majoring in elementary education. Eight months later, we were married and have lived a wonderful life. This August we will have been together for over fifty years. I still remember what my dad said the first time he met Linda.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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S porting Lif e

“Son, the best day’s work you’ve ever done is to convince this lovely girl to be your bride. You’re a lucky man.” I heard the owl again. It had moved from the beaver pond into the pines behind me and was probably getting ready for its evening hunt. The sun was about gone and shadows from the trees across the cut field loomed my way. I could see a couple of deer ease out into the edge and slowly begin to graze. Tonight would have a full moon, and I decided to sit for a spell and see what would happen when it came up over the eastern tree line. As the grayness of sundown gave way to the dark of night, the moon slowly added its brightness to the scene. More deer came out into the open, and I could see white tails flash sporadically. There were probably ten or fifteen small does and some young ones in the mix. A couple of the youngest scampered about playing deer tag, their moms grazing contentedly. There is one thing I’ve learned in my years of living and probably the reason I’m a Presbyterian: Good and bad things happen sometimes, with no rhyme or reason. They were just meant to be, and that’s something I think about in the fall. My dad, one of the finest men I’ve ever known, died in the fall, October to be exact. He was 55 years old. A job-related illness, lung cancer, grabbed him just as he was ready to launch a more fun time for himself and my mom. A part of Tom Brokaw’s Greatest Generation, my father served in the Navy during World War II and, like many others of that time, came home after saving the world and got down to the business of providing a living for his family. Every now and then, when I pass a mirror or catch a reflection of myself in a store window, I see my dad. It’s a funny sensation. As my mom often tells me, you have to take the bad with the good; and in keeping with that old saying, our son Tommy was born a year later. My dad died in October, Tommy was born the following year, in November. Both fall happenings, one terribly bad and one unbelievably good. Tom never met his granddad, but it’s uncanny how much alike they are. The moon was now fully over the horizon, and I decided to fire up the old Bronco and head home. I realized placing memories in seasons worked pretty well. Or better yet, I thought — and a whole lot less complicated — let the memories come when they will, who cares about the time line. The important thing is creating them; each season has room for many more. PS

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Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


G o l ftown J o u rna l

Artists and Engineers

Why we need to put the “art” of playing by feel back into the game

By Lee Pace

Spread out before me

in the dining room at Pinehurst Country Club one July evening were a hundred fresh and innocent golfing faces, their skin tinged by the sun that day, their golf tans exposed by their sleeveless dresses and smart sandals. Normally an after-dinner talk anywhere in the Sandhills is child’s play, the sexagenarians slurping up the story of how Ben Hogan won his first pro tournament at Pinehurst in 1940 or my fly-on-the-wall snippets of following Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw around on their restoration of Pinehurst No. 2 in 2010-11. But I wasn’t as confident on the history angle for this group of participants in the 2015 Women’s North and South Amateur. Ninety-five percent of them hadn’t even been born when Jack Nicklaus II won the 1985 North and South; gads, most of their parents hadn’t even met by then. They knew Twitter and Instagram. They didn’t know Herbert Warren Wind. What in the world of value or interest could I impart upon these young ladies who’d just finished the first round of stroke-play qualifying, leading to match play on No. 2 that resulted in Bailey Tardy winning the 113th rendition of this venerable golf competition? Their golf lives were ahead of them — college golf for most of them, the LPGA Tour for some, the simple love of playing the game through the chapters of jobs and marriages and parenting to come for nearly all of them. I hearkened back thirteen months earlier, to the Monday preceding the 2014 U.S. Open at Pinehurst when Payne Stewart was posthumously honored by the USGA with its prestigious Bob Jones Award. I told the young ladies, their parents and a few dignitaries — including N&S champions from more than half a century ago, Peggy Kirk Bell and Barbara McIntire — of Paul Azinger’s heartfelt tribute to his friend, his salutation of Stewart having so gracefully been “an artist in a game that increasingly had too many engineers” before his tragic death in October 1999, four months after winning the ’99 Open on No. 2. What a fascinating subject and what great advice to a golf neophyte. Jack Nicklaus said it best so many moons ago: “You train by mechanics. You play by

feel.” Sadly, today in golf, too many young players are mechanics, prisoners of their left brain and dependent on caddies to line then up and Trackman to register a dynamic loft and smash factor. Many day-to-day activities and sports skills are marriages of the respective domains of the left and right orbs of the brain. The trick is to play to one’s strengths but never become immersed in one to the detriment of the other. The left brain is the realm of logic, numbers and legal briefs. On the golf course it tells you 153 yards to clear the bunker, 165 to the pin, aim a ball and a half to the right, firm enough to track 17 inches past the hole if it misses. Homer Kelley wrote The Golfing Machine from his considerable left brain, weaving geometry and physics into the golf swing (did you know that today a certified Golfing Machine instructor can aspire to a level of “Golf Stroke Engineer Doctor”?), and Tom Kite was as left-brained as you can be in the early 1980s when he developed his three-wedge, three-swing system for shots inside 110 yards — 60-degree wedge with backswing to 10:30 on the face of a clock for a shot of 70 yards, for crying out loud. Stewart and Seve Ballesteros were the maestros of right-brained golf, the province of painting and poetry and the rustle of the wind in the trees and the jagged edges of the bunkers. USGA Executive Director Mike Davis talked often during his tours of No. 2 with Coore & Crenshaw about how a tauter course with the fairways pounded by more sand and less irrigation demanded more right-brained skills. “Today’s golfer is a paint-by-numbers kind of guy,” Davis said one day. “He’s not used to planning what happens to the ball after it lands. On a firmer course, on the links courses of Great Britain, you have to plan for the roll of the ball. That’s a wonderful element of golf and one that we’re missing in this country on our over-fertilized, over-watered courses.” Azinger practices bunker shots with his ears, the clubhead passing through the sand making a certain pa-toots sound that tells him when the length and depth of his divot is ideal. Adam Scott plays a fade by “quieting my arms,” and Crenshaw reads greens with his feet. Jim Furyk told The Golf Channel not long ago he plays by feel and leaves the technical stuff to his teacher and father. Bobby Clampett, an early devotee of The Golfing Machine, admits his quest for the perfect swing in the 1980s led him to pro tour ruination, and today his Impact Zone golf instruction business of books, tapes and schools is built around creating good impact — two inches into the ball, four past it — and the hell with how you get there. That Stewart would thrive on Pinehurst No. 2 was the ultimate testament to his ability to play with feel and intuition. Caddie Mike Hicks remembers reading

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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only one putt for Stewart all week, and Stewart’s first day on premises in 1999 consisted of a tour of No. 2 with a putter, a couple of wedges and a notebook, all to map out a plan for negotiating the devilish array of pimples and dimples around the turtle-back greens. No. 2’s greens are a laboratory for right-brained research, the golfer having to pick a club, trajectory and landing point, and punch in the projected roll out and the slope and speed of the green. If this kind of talk seemed somewhat familiar to the young ladies, I reminded them they’d probably heard it connected to the recent travails of Tiger Woods, whom Azinger says dominated golf a decade ago with the ultimate artist and engineer skills but now is far too mired in the technical gunk, talk of “glutes firing” and “baseline shifts” and the mantras of at least five teachers who’ve worked on his swing over his golf life seemingly polluting a fresh, clean, uncluttered approach to a shot. “It’s difficult to watch a Vincent Van Gogh paint by numbers,” Azinger says. “I want to see Tiger come back and get all of this stuff out of his head. Something is happening in the strongest and greatest mind that golf has ever known that is different, and he has got to fix it. It is not just physical.” I told the ladies of watching the 2008 U.S. Amateur championship match on No. 2 with Danny Lee pitted against Drew Kittleson. Two elements of Lee’s 5-and-4 win stand out — Lee’s ability to overpower a soft No. 2 course with short irons into every par-4s and Kittleson’s obsession with getting his ball lined up ever so perfectly on every putt. Most of us place our ball on the green with the name imprint or perhaps a custom-drawn Sharpie line pointing at our line of roll. Kittleson did so as well but to the extreme, standing over a putt, backing off to adjust his ball infinitesimally, standing over it, backing off yet again. “If he gets to the tour, they’ll chew him up and spit him out with this crap,” one man with the background to know chafed from the gallery. I told the ladies that Danny Lee had recently won the Greenbrier Classic on the PGA Tour and banked nearly $3 million, and the obsessive-compulsive Kittleson missed three of three cuts in 2010-11 in his only appearances on tour. “Enjoy your time on No. 2,” I said to them. “Look at the Payne Stewart statue walking off the 18th green. Remember how much art he brought to the game of golf.” Whether anyone was paying attention, I have no idea. But it resonated the next time I teed off. I remembered one of my best rounds ever was shot with two swing thoughts: Stop, and go. Wise counsel for the engineer and artist within all of us. PS Lee Pace’s book, The Golden Age of Pinehurst — The Story of the Rebirth of No. 2, is available onsite and online at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club.

September 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015 Last Sweet Not like early summer juice bursting under thin skin Candor peaches dawning in pecks and half-bushels along Route 220, or Redhaven, Winblo, and Ellerbe swelled to a swagger with midsummer drowse of cicada and honeysuckle: Fall peaches have grown slowly under a shortened sun, and duskier shadows drape the shoulders of Carolina Belle, mellowing outward from the pit, the flesh grown close into a furrowed pericardium, scarlet and sweet at its vitals. — Valerie Nieman

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Scenic Byways Part Three

Pottery Road Blissfully far from anywhere

By Serena Brown • Photographs by Laura L. Gingerich

A

n impressive avenue of cedar trees marks the beginning of the Pottery Road. Yet it transpires that the cedars are not cedars. “We call these cedars, but they’re actually junipers,” Jesse Wimberley told Laura Gingerich and me. “We do have a true cedar, the Atlantic white cedar that everyone calls a juniper.” Who planted the trees all those years ago? Most likely it was a scion of one of the grand families who moved down here from the Northern states in the early 1900s to become peach farmers. They were, as Katharine Ball Ripley wrote in her memoir Sand In My Shoes, “as likely to be someone you would meet at one of the university clubs as a native son of the soil.” A pickup truck slowed to a halt next to us. “Do you need assistance?” called out the driver. “Oh! No, thank you,” Laura answered. “We’re fine. Just taking some photographs.” That was our introduction to the Pottery Road, Highway 705, which starts in peach country and runs up to Robbins, from whence it winds northwest to Seagrove. It feels blissfully far from anywhere. We discovered a place of self-suffiency, where neighbors help out neighbors and families’ roots reach far into the history of the country, woven into the land as road names on the map. “One of the highlights of this trip is the transition from Sandhills to Piedmont,” said Jesse. “What’s interesting here is how the natural history created the human history. We just left the Sandhills, and from pine and turpentine now we get into pretty serious farming. And pottery. They’ve been doing that here since the 1700s. At this point there’s no more sign of the Sandhills at all. It’s all farming and clay.” Our next stop was the tiny settlement of Frogtown. We parked by the old smokehouse at Teague’s Frogtown Pottery, owned by Fred and Jean Teague. Jean was turning a pot when we arrived. We stood by in awe as a shrimp ring grew from her skillful hands. Jean has always lived in Frogtown. She enlightened us as to the origin of the charming name: “My great-grandfather, Stephen Harrison Garner, he was a well digger. If he didn’t finish at night he’d put boards across so people didn’t fall in. In the morning there’d be frogs in there and he’d throw them all out the top. He came to be know as Frog, and so people called it [where he lived] Frogtown after him.”

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Fred Teague’s uncle Charles Teague was the first turner at Jugtown, the pottery built in the early 1920s by Jacques and Juliana Busbee to preserve the craft of the Seagrove area’s potters. We looked around the shop, drinking in the display of rich creams and browns, pretty speckles and deep cobalt blue. “We come up with all the glazes we’ve got here,” Jean said. “We like to make stuff that people can use every day.” Dinner services are flanked by pound cake molds, apple baking dishes and irresistible baby sets. A wall is lined with thank-you letters from children who have visited and tried their hands at the potter’s wheel. Family members popped in and out as we talked. The Teagues’ grandchildren Joshua and Addison Allen help out when they’re not at school. Before we left, Fred Teague taught us a true potter’s art: how to roast peanuts on a kiln lid. “You dust it off, lay the peanuts on top,” Fred smiled. “Those are good peanuts.” “705. It’s a great road,” said Laura as we left Frogtown, thrilled by our visit. We headed for Robbins, Jesse and Laura discussing kayaking spots and pointing out the putting-in place at Bear Creek. Just north of Robbins, Richard Broker continues the area’s farming tradition. He specializes in breeding pure Ankole-Watusi cattle. “Isn’t this just a slice of heaven?” Laura observed as we turned into the driveway at River Oaks Cattle Company. By the farm’s bunkhouse, Broker and ranch-hand LC Cassidy told us about the cattle. “They are sacred animals to the Tutsi tribe,” said Broker as he showed us historic photographs. “They date back 6,000 years.” “Our goal is to maintain the breed,” he continued. “There are just a few of them. You can’t get them imported anymore.” Broker pursues that goal with great integrity. He keeps a small herd, “About twenty mama cows and two bulls. That’s the right size for me to take care of.” He is meticulous in remaining true to the breed standard and rigorously avoids breeding purely for horn size or to raise trophy game animals. He will sell animals to other breeders, zoos and safari parks where he knows they will be well looked after. River Oaks Cattle Company welcomes visitors, and Broker and Cassidy are happy to impart their considerable knowledge of the cattle. “The big horns are a defense mechanism,” Broker explained. “They use them to gather the calves together to sleep, then they surround them.” They also regulate the animals’ body temperature in the African climate. Blood circulating through the horns keeps the cattle cool. We couldn’t wait to see these extraordinary beasts. “All right,” said Broker. “We’ll call ’em in.” A magnificent sight, at first they seemed intimidating, but “they’re very gentle,” Broker assured us. “Temperament, disposition, is a big thing with these animals.” However, as with any animal, “You have to pay attention,” said Cassidy, smiling. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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How did Broker come to farm this incredible breed? “I was just amazed at them,” he said. “It intrigued me so much, to be able to do something to preserve that breed.” As we watched the gorgeous creatures file out of the pen and into the field, calves gamboling at their sides, we could see why. “So, where are we going now?” asked Laura once we had torn ourselves away from the pastures. “I think we should probably go to Jugtown,” Jesse replied. A rural idyll unrolled before us. “It’s like stepping back in time. In a good way,” said Laura. “There’s a slice of Americana for you. Right slap in the middle of . . .” she paused. “Wherever we are.” We were not lost. I can say this definitively because I was map reading. The effrontery of my traveling companions was incredible, to disparage my orienteering skills when we had come so far. “Why wouldn’t we trust a Brit with a 1970s Gazetteer?” laughed Jesse. “It’s the next road on the right,” I retorted. “There! Thank you very much.” It had started to mist with rain when we reached Jugtown. A delicious scent emanated from the flowers by the path. Through a nearby window we caught a glimpse of a potter working. Vernon and Pam Owens, their son Travis and daughter Bayle are all potters. Bayle is also a skilled weaver. Vernon and his brother Bobby are grandsons of J. H. Owen, the first potter to work with Jacques and Juliana Busbee in the early 20th century. The Owens family’s history is inextricably entwined with the history of Jugtown. The family showed us the Jugtown Museum, which traces the evolution of the area’s pots. Pam explained how the transition went from utilitarian to decorative and then returned to use, but not strictly utilitarian. “It’s full of transitions because it’s a pottery with longevity,” she said. “Here the pots were old shapes from all over the world. Simple. Understated. Not necessarily easy to make, but flowing.”

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To get a map: Sandhills Area Land Trust 140 A S.W. Broad Street Southern Pines Phone: (910) 695-4323 or The Pilot Offices 145 W. Pennsylvania Ave. Southern Pines

It seemed like all human history was contained in the room. “People come in here and just hang out with the pots,” Pam told us. “It’s a learning experience for them and it’s an inspiration for us.” The Owenses still dig their clay locally. Bobby Owens was mixing clay when we met him. “It’s been fifty-six years,” he said with a smile. He also mixes all the glazes. “I don’t mind the dirty work at all.” “It’s a family thing,” he added. “This is a one-of-a-kind place.” Travis showed us the groundhog kilns, so called because they are built into the earth. “They look pretty much like they did when the pottery was started,” he said. Then he stepped back to allow us to walk into Vernon’s workshop. There, a study in infinite patience and craftsmanship, Vernon was working. We were transfixed. “There’s no good way to learn to make pottery except to work in it,” said Travis, showing us his workshop, which adjoins his father’s. Travis’s vocation to work in pottery was clear. “It was a family thing for me and I wanted to keep it that way because I thought it was pretty special.” “That was so special,” Laura echoed Travis’s words as we settled into the car. “We are so lucky. I feel so honored that I just photographed Vernon at work.” We left behind clay country and stopped by the peach orchards, with a small detour to Ben’s Ice Cream for Sandhills-style refreshment. Sometime later Laura and I drove back down Highway 24/27, the same road that we had traveled at the beginning of our adventures on the SALT Scenic Byways. We passed Maness Pottery and Music Barn, the lost town of Parkwood and noted the creeks that have so shaped the history of the area. “When was that?” asked Laura of our first journey. “April,” I replied. “Well, there goes a season.” We crossed McClendon’s Creek. “I’m glad we did this,” I mused. “I am too. It makes me feel more connected to where we live,” said Laura. “It’s a good lesson, wherever we are, to find out where we live.” PS PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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t

Inside Out Life is good, al fresco

By Deborah Salomon Photographs by John Gessner

T

hey could have had a treehouse, a cabana, a gazebo, a yurt. Instead, Scott Harris and Jeff Kelly bejeweled their backyard with a self-described “kitchen pavilion.” Pardon the understatement. This open-air, roofed, three-section, one-of-a-kind structure is to ordinary Carolina rooms what Cole Porter was to song-writing: “It’s De-Lovely.” Not “Too Darn Hot?” Rarely. The reflective metal roof plus powerful ceiling fans wafting air from over the pool keep folks comfy. Then, come winter, a fire pit and native stone fireplace with raised hearth provide warmth “Night and Day.” Still, the concept gave architect Lynn Anderson pause: “I was a little circumspect, reserved,” Lynn says, now that the fait is accompli. “The bugs, the heat, the pine pollen — a lot of reasons not to do it.” But, she continues, “Scott and Jeff were so excited about the idea.” Scott Harris grew up with five siblings on a Carthage tobacco farm, became a stylist, opened The Hair Market in Southern Pines. “Then I met this guy.” Jeff Kelly, the guy, also with Tar Heel tobacco roots, was a commercial real estate developer in Washington, D.C. The idea: “We tried to recreate an oasis,” Jeff says, meaning their getaway fifty feet from the Potomac, where they unwound on the dock. “We had an incredible life there,” Scott adds, wistfully. Why leave? Scott wanted to be near his aging parents. Jeff was ready to retire. Both had visions of a knock-your-socks-off outdoor environment adjoining a house with panache, walking distance to downtown. The Prohibition-era cottage they found had already been redone. Its halfacre lot accommodated a double garage addition — and the pavilion. Scott: “We wanted a backyard we could live in — a place where we

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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could cook and eat year-round.” The house stays cooler when cooking happens outside, they discovered. “It should blend with the existing house, a natural evolution,” Jeff adds. “Not too big, not too small, just the right size,” meaning about 400 square feet. They acquired the cottage in 2013, finding inspiration for the pavilion at the Rassie Wicker Park pavilion in Pinehurst. Scott and Jeff talked, Lynn Anderson listened. “They didn’t want a polished look,” she recalls. Not campgroundstyle, either. Durable was the password. Huge cedar timbers, appearing vaguely tobacco-warehouse, support a roof with a 3-foot overhang which keeps out rain. Concrete floors stained to resemble leather and upholstered furnishings aren’t porchy. Stainless steel kitchen cabinets provide security — although so far, critters have not discovered the encroachment. A leaf blower, used daily, clears debris. These backyardigans chose not to connect pavilion to house except by a brick walkway. An outdoor shower and bathroom opening onto the yard ensure separation. Guests and Scott’s extended family enter from the driveway through a gate with bell and peephole. Now, where shall we gather for chilled wine and grilled shrimp skewers? Scott and Jeff have their coffee on cool evenings — or take Sunday afternoon naps, any season — in the sitting room with fire pit. Its screened walls are hung with ceiling-to-floor drapes made from painters’ drop cloths that can be unfurled for privacy or protection. Look at that beveled glass chandelier that Jeff found in a West End antique shop, for $80. Stunning. Otherwise, recessed lighting creates a glow. The second area, open-air, holds the expandable dining table and stone fireplace, reminiscent of rock walls in the Western Carolina mountains. Over its cedar mantel hangs a tobacco palette, to honor Scott’s father. “He would have loved to sit out here and smoke,” Scott says. A copper-clad bar defines the kitchen. “We love to cook. We love to eat,” they proclaim, in unison. Scott studied in France, feels passionate about good wine — even bartered haircuts for cooking classes. His kitchen is a marvel of en plein air adaptations: an oversize grill with two counter-mounted burners but no oven. A dishwasher and distinct kitchen hot water heater but only a small under-counter fridge/freezer. A glass-front cabinet that makes colorful Fiestaware part of the décor. A wine barrel converted into a hand-washing station. Everything works, from concept to execution. Best of all, on steamy evenings Scott walks home from Orange, his new salon, jumps into the pool, then migrates to the outdoor kitchen, where birds watch dinner preparations. Against this background Scott and Jeff entertain several times a week, usually informal potlucks. “The people we invite are blown away,” Scott says. So confirms “yoo-hoo” neighbor Pridie Ariail, who moved nearby — and got invited. “From my second floor I look down on the loveliness, the pool, something you only see in magazines. That’s when the green-eyed monster envy grabs me.” All’s well that ends in the pavilion. “We knew what we wanted. We built exactly what we wanted,” Scott says. “I’m ecstatic.” Or, as fellow-bon vivant Cole Porter hummed, “You’d be so nice to come home to . . .” PS

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Mangum

Opus S

North Carolina’s celebrated artist brings his homey touch to his native Sandhills By Deborah Salomon

ongs were named for New York, Chicago, San Francisco. Nashville scored on TV. Philadelphia brought home two Oscars. And now Southern Pines, the furniture collection designed by “North Carolina’s artist” William Mangum and produced by Klaussner Home Furnishings of Asheboro, scored at the High Point Market. But an artist, stooping to tables and chairs, headboards and cupboards? Picasso painted on ceramic plates. Architect Frank Gehry designed chairs. Leonardo DaVinci drew plans for the first food processor. Besides, home goods, like art, often reflect society, from unrelenting Shaker practicality to the gilded curlicues of Louis XIV. Interesting — but hardly Bill Mangum’s impetus. In an era when the Tar Heel trinity of tobacco, textiles and furniture has withered away, Mangum seeks to refocus attention on the state. His first collection, Carolina Preserves, introduced in 2013, featured the Blue Ridge (mountains) and Sea Breeze (coast) groupings. Bill credits its success to name recognition — his. To seal the deal, Bill will even paint a landscape in size and mode to hang over a Mangum breakfront. His choice to call the new collection Southern Pines has personal significance. Bill was born in Pinehurst, survived a bumpy childhood in Fayetteville and elsewhere but found his purpose at Sandhills Community College. “I was a terrible student in high school — SCC was the only place that would take me.” Here, a series of instructors inspired him to produce art in several forms. “I went from the bottom of the class to the dean’s list,” he says, Later, at UNCG, he discovered watercolors, still his favorite medium. Photorealism best expressed his desire to picture, in fine detail, North Carolina’s land and seascapes. Bill’s use of light has been compared to 17th century Dutch painter Jan Vermeer. His favorites are Winslow Homer and John Singer Sargent. However, this Tar Heel had no desire to don the “starving artist” mantle. Furniture, in collaboration with Klaussner, might expand his brand and profits. Licensing isn’t new: Other companies produce collections bearing the names of Arnold Palmer, Ernest Hemingway, fellow-N.C. artist Bob Timberlake, even Humphrey Bogart. Coming soon for country music fans, Klaussner’s The Trisha Yearwood Home Collection. Klaussner suited Bill because it was “right down the road” from his Greensboro home and gallery, also that the upholstered pieces are made in North Carolina, while others are constructed from American woods shipped to a onemillion square foot factory in Vietnam.

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Loblolly Kitchen Island

Westend Sofa Table

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Weymouth Dining Table PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Southern Pines Home Collection

He visited the plant: “The raw wood goes in one side and the finished piece comes out the other. Klaussner told me they never had anybody as intimately involved in production.” This includes choosing woods, finishes, hardware, creating and tweaking design; one piece — a kitchen island — morphs into a bar, gate-leg table, wine rack and storage shelves. Some pieces duplicate the practical yet stylish furniture in Mangum’s home. And it’s not for nothing that he has thirty years of experience in publicity and marketing: “I understand color, balance and scale,” he says. The affiliation with Southern Pines/Pinehurst holds another attraction, similar to Pebble Beach, where Bill lectures, socializes and paints golfscapes — obvious high-end souvenirs. His furniture line, however, is priced mid-range. Jacquard fabrics on the upholstered pieces interpret his paintings. He suggested pine cone and dogwood motifs — “a rich cottage feel” in wide-plank head and footboards; the dining table has gun-and-Bible drawers, common in the days when the father might defend his family during a mealtime attack or read scripture at Sunday dinner. Drawers now store cutlery and table linens. Southern touches like piecrust table tops and zinc sideboard surfaces continue the authenticity. Bill named pieces from the Southern Pines line Weymouth, Pinebluff, Whispering Pines, Loblolly, Westend, Forest Creek and Pine Needles.

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If Carolina Preserves scored a home run, Southern Pines has been a grand slam at showrooms, Bill says. The collection hit the retail market this summer. The Mangum touch has also been licensed to other companies producing occasional tables, nightstands and rugs. His revamped Greensboro gallery, in a suburban strip center, is staged to illustrate how his paintings blend with the furniture. “Bill has been very fortunate to make a living [with his art] and also make an impact in the state [with his charitable works],” says long-time assistant Joy Ross. Tall, lanky, soft-spoken, intense, Bill doesn’t fit the artsy stereotype. He appreciates being known for business acumen, also as a promoter, on canvas and in wood, of his home state. “I would starve to death in New Mexico,” Bill says. “North Carolina is an artist’s paradise — the colors, the diversity of topography and four seasons. I adore my state and capture it in every way possible.” PS William Mangum Fine Art, 2146 Lawndale Drive, Greensboro. Info: (336) 3799200 or williammangum.com Anyone who’s tasted them is urging Deborah Salomon to introduce her own line of baked goods. We suggest she call them Ms. Debbie Cakes.

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Pinecrest Dining Collection

“I adore my state and capture it in every way possible.”

Pinebluff Bed PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Along the Grapevine A family tradition of farming North Carolina’s native muscadine grapes — and why we should be eating and drinking them By Jan Leitschuh • Photographs by Laura Gingerich

On a high slope off N.C. 211— well past West End but before Candor —

our own little slice of Moore County Tuscany thrives. A spare stucco farmhouse crowns a hill. Sun-drenched fields luxuriate. Mature grapevines link sisterly arms and march neatly up the slope, their exuberant foliage casting ultramarine shadows between the rows. Though the grapes are Carolina natives, not European, the scene lacks only tall Italian cypresses lining the drive. What is this curious place, this hilly vineyard in pancake-flat farm country? Bruton Vineyards, LLC, of Samarcand, with its graphic lines of vines, draws the eye of passersby on this busy stretch of highway more renowned for its peach orchards than its muscadines. Yet it was not always a grapevine paradise; once it also partook of the area’s peach history. The pretty 89-acre farm now hosts 12 acres of muscadine grapes, some pine forest, ponds, three acres of rabbiteye blueberries and almost an acre of raspberries. But in the early 1920s, the previous owners “planted peach trees,” says Dr. Betty Bruton Bradley, current manager and daughter of the owner. “The Bird family put those trees in.” But the hopeful enterprise promptly went bankrupt: “They didn’t plan on peaches taking five years to make a crop,” she says. It was then, three generations ago, that the rolling Moore County property passed into the hands of the Bruton family, a name long associated with neighboring Montgomery County. “There have been Brutons in Montgomery County from 1740 on, and still are,” says Bradley. But in 1928, Bradley’s grandfather Earl saw all the now-mature peach trees that were growing on the N.C. 211 property and bought the land. “He was the sheriff of Montgomery County for a long time,” says Bradley. “His people were from Biscoe.” Now, he was a peach grower. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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The graceful, rolling land, today flanked by horizontal soybean fields and a farm of flat solar panels, remained in peach production until the 1960s. But alas, peach trees have a limited life span, and the mortgage-paying crops are often nipped by late frosts. As peach trees gradually died out, Bradley’s father, Ed, now managing the farm, decided to plant something less susceptible to diseases and quirky spring cold spells — and something with a far longer lifespan. That something was long-lived muscadine grapes. Native to North Carolina, the 400-yearold “mothervine” — the world’s oldest known cultivated muscadine vine — still stands in Manteo. The early French explorers, followed by the English, found a land overflowing with grapes and took plants back to Europe. While these grapes failed to thrive in England’s damp, chilly conditions, the muscadine vines grew rampant in the Carolinas. Indeed, Southern Pines was once known as “Vineland” for good reason. The tough-skinned bronze and purple grapes had figured out how to survive — even thrive — in whatever conditions the steamy, buggy Carolinas could toss at them. Some say that is because of the vigorous growth of the vines, and the chemical reaction of the fruit in response to stress, that muscadines produce unique antioxidants that repel pests — and just happen to be the closest thing to the Fountain of Youth in plant form. “Muscadines are one of nature’s richest sources of antioxidant polyphenols,” writes the American Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry. “Muscadines also have over 88 distinct phytonutrients that are rarely found in our diets.” The antioxidants in muscadines help protect the body from damaging effects of oxygen free radicals, which can contribute to degenerative diseases. “Muscadines have more antioxidants than even blueberries,” says Bradley, a family physician, “and this helps cells repair themselves and prevent mutations. Some people spit the seeds out, but the resveretrol is most concentrated in the skin and seed. For those making wine, they should not remove the skin while fermenting, because that’s where the good stuff is.” And, as the English discovered, muscadines made a heady wine, a concept previously unheard of among the natives. The native vine began to be cultivated and improved. Acreages were planted throughout the Carolinas. The first muscadine winery opened in Halifax, North Carolina, in 1835. After the Civil War production of the sweet wine took off. “Grapes flowed into wineries at Castle Hayne, Conover, Eagle Springs, Gibson, Littleton, Louisburg, Manteo, Murphy, Peachland, Pettigrew State Park, Holly Ridge, Samarcand, Tryon, Warrenton, Willard, Edenton and Icard,” says the NC Department of Agriculture. Muscadine wine was THE American wine until Prohibition. One Southern entrepreneur, Paul Garrett, developed a new label, “Virginia Dare” and, trading on the pride of a young nation, began promoting American wines for Americans. Virginia Dare, white and red, became the nation’s leading-selling wine. It won the grand prize in the Louisiana Purchase Exhibition in 1904. According to the sixth federal census, “North Carolina was the leading wine producing state in the U.S.” It took a lot of grapes to make wine, and a lot of vineyard acreage. Muscadines were the fashion — until, suddenly, they weren’t. Muscadine wine production sustained a mortal wound in 1919 when Prohibition took hold. As with the great cider orchards of the North, over the next fourteen years the great acres of Southern muscadine vines were mostly pulled up and the fields replanted with something less controversial. Though Prohibition was repealed in 1933, the damage was done, and the infrastructure dismantled. While a few — like the Bruton family — replanted muscadine acres in the 1960s, it wasn’t until the 1970s and ’80s that certain law revisions and economic incentives offered by the state of North Carolina once again induced the planting of more than merely a few vines for the home garden. By the late ’60s, Bradley’s father was well into muscadine production. Young Betty was in junior high school, and was influenced by the environmental awareness that was growing in the nation. Bradley says her father was “a modern farmer — he believed in better living through chemistry. He was not organic. We would have long arguments around the dinner table about Silent Spring, Rachel Carson’s paradigm-shifting environmental book.” Besides pest-resistant muscadines, Bradley’s father also grew tobacco, small grains and blackberries. At the time Ed Bruton planted his muscadines, there were no wineries in NC. “The law had to change,” says Bradley. “The farm sold all the grapes to a winery in South Carolina for awhile, and then developed the pick-your-market.” Today, Bradley sells mainly to people who make jam and also make their wine at home.

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She does a few farmers markets, and vends a few weeks of grapes through the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative. But mostly, the fields get picked clean by those who drop in when the “OPEN” sign goes out on N.C. 211. Muscadine season generally opens the weekend before Labor Day although weather can alter that slightly. The peak usually comes in early September. There are bronze grapes, black grapes, green grapes, grapes with names like “Cowart,” “Doreen,” “Carlos” and “Noble.” Bradley’s favorite? She favors Doreen, a late white grape “that makes excellent wine. It just tastes like honey. In fact, some people blend that with their Noble to give the wine a little extra flavor. That’s what we make our jam with. Commercial wineries love Carlos — we have 2 acres that are solid Carlos, with some vines over 55 years old.” Many customers return yearly. “I have some folks who get together and come from as far as Virginia. They’ll take 4-500 lbs. One guy with a truck comes down and gets it all,” she says. But mostly, she says, people come and get two buckets full and make one batch of wine. “Some home winemakers will mix berries and grapes,” she says. “If you don’t have time to make wine during grape season, you can crush them and freeze. When you’re ready, thaw it out and have it warm so it doesn’t kill the yeast. Same thing for jam; freeze now, make it later.” Pickers get to use the crusher for free, a delightful hand-operated tool with a hopper for the grapes atop. In go the grapes, out comes crushed grape mush, ready for jamming or fermenting — all without crushing the large seeds of the muscadine. Bradley enjoys the variety: “Some people want to wash their grapes, some people want the natural yeasts. Everybody has their own recipe.” She’s made some homemade wine, of course. Jams and jellies too. When she has time, she issues jams and jellies and muscadine juice under her own Bruton Vineyards label. As for organic, Bruton Vineyards is not certified, but follows many of the practices. “It’s a laudable thing to do,” she reflects. “I think all growers ought to limit their pesticides and take care of the Earth. But there are certain crops for which it is not feasible in this area. Actually getting certified is expensive. Organic fertilizer is three times the cost.” And some of the rules, such as those regarding treated posts, are prohibitive. Bradley does use herbicides, and her support posts are treated wood “so they won’t rot,” she says. “Thus, I can’t be certified. But I don’t spray anything.” Her blueberries and raspberries grow apart from the grapes, “and these blocks are treated organically.” Bradley’s father died in 2002. “So I rent the farm from Mom and manage it so she can still live here.” Bradley’s been back on the farm since 2008, running operations and caring for her 88-year-old mother. This is no small thing for a woman who never planned to be a farmer, as Bradley works full-time as a licensed family medicine physician with FirstHealth Family Care of Candor . Even more difficult, prior to coming to Candor in 2013, Bradley commuted to the Asheboro and Randleman offices of White Oak Urgent Care. Both enterprises are in her blood, but only one lodges deep within her heart. Bradley left the farm for pre-med at UNC-Chapel Hill, then was admitted to Duke University Medical in 1979. “I always planned to go into medicine, not farming,” she says. “My inspirations were my family doctor here in Candor, and the good example of my Uncle David.” “Uncle David” Bruton, a pediatrician and much-admired community figure, founded Sandhills Pediatrics. “He was my father’s younger brother by fifteen years. He grew up on the farm, farming with everybody,” she says. The majority of the farmland that the family still owns is over the county line behind Farmers Market Road. “The whole cloverleaf intersection where 211 and 220 come together was part of the farm,” says Bradley. “There were 25-30 acres that the state took for eminent domain.” Brother Bill grows pecans and hay near the cloverleaf. Despite Bradley’s intense full-time job, farm rhythms are dictated by the nature of the crop. In February and March the vineyards get pruned, the busiest time. June means raspberries, blueberries are late June to mid-August, grapes fruit in September and early October. “We have been here a long time farming,” reflects Bradley.” My father and his dad, that’s what they loved to do. Then they educated us, and medicine is what I love to do. I’m past getting out there for an eight-hour day. But I like to see things taken care of.” And in September the grapes return the favor. PS Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Story of a house

A Dahl’s House A farm without horses, a house without borders offers peace and comfort, the perfect gathering place for friends

D

By Deborah Salomon • Photographs by John Gessner

eep in Southern Pines Horse Country, shaded by fruit-laden fig and chestnut trees, perfumed by gardenias and camellias, rises a house individual and personal, surprising, absolutely Dahl-ing. Look beyond Sweet and Sourwood Farm, the title when purchased in 1993 by Inge Dahl and her dashing fiancé Al Turino. They were New Yorkers living among the horse set, in ritzy Westchester County. Al played polo and Inge, of Scandinavian descent, had ridden at the Royal Stables in Copenhagen, albeit in rubber boots. A friend discovered that keeping horses cost a fraction in Southern Pines — and relocated. Inge had never heard of the place. She and Al motored down for a visit: “We turned off U.S.1 onto Youngs Road,” Inge recalls. “All I saw was trailers. I asked Al if he got the right directions because our friends would never live here.” Four miles later Inge discovered not only impressive hous-

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es, stables and pastures, but blue skies, sunshine and a mild January climate. Y’all come. They did. Suitable properties were scarce. “Two bedrooms, two bathrooms, three fireplaces on a pond — this could work for us,” Inge decided, after inspecting Sweet and Sourwood. A guest cottage and grill house for outdoor entertaining sealed the serendipity. Although never a horse farm, usage had been grandfathered in. Besides, the intangibles conveyed a faintly European aura, rather like Inge, who traveled the world as press liaison for Columbia Pictures. She set about Ingelizing the acquisition with a style honed at The School of Visual Arts in New York, using artifacts from her travels. Notice the foyer: Heavy hangs equestrian art in local hunt boxes, whereas Inge has

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framed an oversize Hermès silk scarf in a jumper motif. Elegant, charming, absolutely Inge.

ing space where Americans usually put an island enforced the European aura.

Inge in the kitchen …

Inge, the hostess …

Carpenter-made wormy chestnut cupboards and a 20-foot storage wall, original to the house built in the 1980s, are rare, conversation-provoking, therefore irresistible to a woman who shuns cookie-cutter anything. In 1904 a blight killed off three billion chestnut trees, many in the Southeastern mountains. Reforestation has been minimal. Pre-blight, chestnut was used extensively in construction and furniture. When old buildings came down, lumber was repurposed as country-chic. During minor kitchen renovations, enough wood to cover the fridge door was salvaged. Lacquered bumpy-brick flooring, a cathedral ceiling with skylight, a high soffit shelf for plants and antique bird cages, Carolina-made tile backsplash, a pot rack on the hood over a free-standing industrial gas range, and a massive pine breakfast table occupy-

But, even with a fireplace and seating area, something was missing from this core room. “I needed a place to serve a nice meal to friends,” Inge says, meaning three courses for up to ten guests. So she pushed out a wall overlooking the pond, creating a dining solarium accommodating a contemporary burled maple table surrounded by chairs upholstered in pin-striped Earth tones. Overhead hangs an unlikely crystal chandelier, fit for a ballroom, acquired by a coin toss at an estate sale. Guests, the hostess says, gravitate to the kitchen workspace for drinks before dinner, later to the wormy chestnut bookshelves to admire photographs of Inge with Paul Newman, Inge with Sean Connery, Inge with Jane Fonda, Dustin Hoffman, Glenn Close and others — plus a second framed Hermès scarf, this one concerning riding boots.

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A stuffed pheasant perches high above the mantel — but no TV. “It didn’t seem right (for this room),” Inge says. Inge’s knowledge of equestriana, hence her décor proclivity, broadened while operating a Southern Pines tack shop and art gallery before resuming real estate brokerage.

Inge in the living room …

“In Scandinavia, yellow is common,” she explains, perhaps to brighten the long, dark winters. Living room walls pack a chrome-yellow punch to shame Manhattan taxicabs. Inge started out tamer, but Al said if you want to make a statement, make it. Besides, no color better backdrops Inge’s collection of blue and white antique Royal Copenhagen china, along with stunning, twisting cobalt Murano glass displayed on tables and built-in shelves flanking the second fireplace. This visual stimulation makes paler yellow sofas fade away.

Inge in the guest bedroom …

Again, color rules, here on wide, flat woodwork and window frames painted field-poppy red. This step-down room is located near the living room, in a wing separate from the kitchen/gathering area. A massive bed

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and dresser carved (in North Carolina) from light woods and a flowery quilt might be Alpine Swiss, Yorkshire or French country.

Inge in the master suite …

After intense yellow, poppy red and wormy chestnut, a boudoir with sponged ice pink walls, white homespun coverlet, white brick fireplace and pastel accents speaks to a different Inge. “The pink makes me feel good,” she says. A door opens out onto a tiny terrace, also facing the pond. Several smaller rooms were joined to create a dressing closet and spa bathroom circling back into a laundry room/office, where Inge’s two rescue watchdogs recline on a support mattress.

Inge outside …

Her front porch, furnished in a single bench, has two doors: red kitchen door to the right, carved main door to the left — a preview of the unusual floor plan. Although the carving was in place before Inge’s ownership, it dovetails her taste. Inge learned that a duck decoy craftsman carved symbols into the cedar slab: a hummingbird flitting around a gum tree, with sourwood leaves nearby — all against a Carolina moon. The 5-acre property abutting the former Firestone estate is a botanical trove which includes two chestnut trees which, miraculously, survived the blight.

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Inge wanted a deck overlooking the forest; she chose a semi-circular design centered by a pergola twined with jasmine branches. The fig tree hanging over the railing bore 3,000 fruits last season. Here she sits, listening to the bubbling antique ceramic fountain, made in Germany, whose journey ends with a twist worthy of O. Henry.

Before Inge …

Custom builder Alex Bowness remembers the project well. “I was thrilled to get the job — one of my first,” he says. Sweet and Sourwood, designed by E.J. Austin for Diana and “Buck” Douglas, fell between minimalist and simple, Alex recalls. “They wanted a cleaner look, not a lot of flourishes — natural rather than refined.” The wormy chestnut was his idea. “I moved here from Linville, where my father’s construction business had a lot

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of it. The Douglases fell in love with it, so I had it shipped from the mountains.” Bowness believes this installation of the rare wood is the most extensive, perhaps the only use of it, in Moore County.

“Coming home should feel like you have arrived …”

Inge Dahl’s real estate slogan applies best to her own house showcasing her many facets to guests who arrive for dinner, for overnight or longer. She stopped riding after Al suffered a serious accident, but horses stabled at adjacent farms keep the spark alive. “I treasure my time in and around my home with my animals. It is so peaceful, comforting, and gives me much happiness and contentment,” Inge says, which any realtor will confirm is, unlike wormy chestnut, priceless. PS

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September 2015i�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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HARDWOOD

September 2015i�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


By Rosetta Fawley

“The Richmonds are flooded, electricity’s gone off. God is testing us and I for one am gonna be prepared. Where’s the vodka?” — From September (1987, Woody Allen)

Going All Moony There will be a total lunar eclipse at the end of this month. In North Carolina we’ll see it on the night of the 27th and morning of the 28th. The moon will appear red, a nice match for the fall colors. Turn off the lights, put out a lawn chair and sit back for the show. If you get thirsty, reach for a cocktail. Recipes abound for Eclipses and are as diverse as they are prolific. They feature ingredients from sloe gin to mescal. Sloe gin can be tricky to get, so if you want your cocktail to be the appropriate rosy shade you might consider cranberry juice, Campari or grenadine. Probably not all together, though.

The Worm People Cometh Goddesses and Gargoyles September 8 is the anniversary of the unveiling of Michelangelo’s statue of David. The year was 1504. So this might be the month to think about some statuary for your own landscape. Not everyone has access to huge blocks of marble and an artistic genius, but, no matter what your budget or creative connections, garden art can considerably enhance a space. Stone, copper and bronze will all acquire a lovely patina over time. Glass gives a clean, contemporary feel and terra-cotta a Mediterranean warmth — do bear in mind though that terra-cotta is not frost-friendly. Ceramic tiles make pretty talking points and concrete can be dyed different colors to match any themes you may have running through your garden. There are probably all sorts of aesthetic rules about what to put where, but the Almanac’s only stipulations are to choose something you love and not to give two hoots about what anybody else thinks. Be as whimsical or as classical as you like. Whether you have a passion for sprites and gargoyles or sundials and Greek goddesses, display your taste with panache. If you fall out of love with something immovable you can grow a climbing rose over it.

September 23 is the first day of autumn. It is also the anniversary of the Concordat of Worms, which took place in 1122. In fact, this was a papal agreement brokered near the city of Worm=s in Germany, but the name put the Almanac in mind of the gardener’s wriggly friends. Fall is often a time that people notice their garden’s earthworm inhabitants. Those little piles of dirt that poke up through the lawn and beds are called castings, and they’re the good sign of an earthworm population. Don’t be annoyed that it’s messing up the lawn. Castings are far richer in nutrients and organic matter than the surrounding soil. They produce micronutrients, phosphorus, nitrogen and potassium for your plants. In other words, those tiny hillocks of dirt are little mines of nature’s very best fertilizer. The wormy wonders also aerate the soil, spread moisture and break down leaves. Falling leaves are ideal for encouraging an earthworm population. Keep leaf piles moist and as the leaves start to decay the worms will feast on them. As you gather produce from your garden through the autumn, leave the roots to decay so the worms can eat them. No need to worry about live roots because the worms only like decaying material. Furthermore, as you move into winter pruning, leave cut matter on the ground. It may not look very tidy but the earthworms will make short work of it and the mess won’t be around for long. If you find smaller, redder worms working above ground, these are composting worms. They’re all good for the garden.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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&

Arts Entertainment C a l e n da r

Pinewild’s Veteran Support Week 9/

Big Daddy Love at First Friday

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7–12

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Library Card Sign-up. September is Library Card Sign-up Month. Stop by and sign up to get access to a world of resources, both at the Library and from your home computer or mobile device. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6928235 or sppl.net.

September will also launch the Library’s programming theme for the year, “One Community, Many Voices,” focusing on oral tradition and showcasing the stories of our town. It will feature the Library as a place to share stories, interests, and experiences across generations as we “Grow Great Readers” in Southern Pines.

Tuesday, September 1

NATURE TALES. 10 a.m. – 11 a.m. for ages 2 to 4, and 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. for ages 5 and 6. “Growing Vegetable Soup.” Preschool story and nature time. Cost and registration: No cost for program, but please preregister online or by phone 2 business days in advance. (Admission to garden is not included in program. Please stop at the Gift Shop to check in as a member or to pay admission.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 20) or capefearbg.org. Key:

• •

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Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

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Wednesday, September 2

Friday, September 4—6

LITERARY EVENT. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Writersin-Residence Monthly Reading Series. Pat Riviere-Seel and Marjorie Hudson will read. Pat is the author of the poetry collections Nothing Below But Air and The Serial Killer’s Daughter. Open and free to the public. Boyd House, Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

HORSE SHOW. 12 p.m. Five Points Horse Trials. Call for schedule of events. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074.

Thursday, September 3

FALL CONCERT SERIES. 6 – 8 p.m. “Sounds of the French Quarter,” an outdoor performance by the Fayetteville Symphony at The Cape Fear Botanical Gardens. Beverages, food, beer, and wine available for purchase. (The concert will be moved indoors if necessary.) Cost: Free to members; nonmembers, please call for prices. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 36), or fayettevillesymphony.org.

LECTURE. 1 – 2 p.m. “For A Simple Glass of Water.” Dr. Robert Miller discusses aquifers, their use by North Carolinians, and their ongoing availability. Free and open to the public, but pre-registration is requested. (The program does not include admission to the Garden—general admission applies.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221.

• • Film

Harvest Festival and Grape Stomp 9/

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Friday, September 4

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while The Mike Wallace Quartet entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/person. Reservations and pre-payment are required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 3690411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

FIRST FRIDAY. 5 – 8:30 p.m. A family-friendly, community event with live music by Big Daddy Love. Food, beverages, and entertainment. Free admission. Sunrise Green Space, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: firstfridaysouthernpines.com.

ART EXHIBIT OPENING. 6 – 8 p.m. “Art, Naturally,” paintings by Mark Stephenson and woodturned sculptures by Jerry Measimer. Opening night reception hosted by artists and family. Exhibition dates: Sep 4 – 25. The Arts Council of Moore County, Campbell House Galleries, 482 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or MooreArt.org.

Sports

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Oktoberfest 9/

Supper on the Grounds

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Friday, September 4—6

FOOD AND WINE EVENT. “Taste of the New South.” Sip and savor your way through Labor Day weekend with beer and wine tastings, culinary demonstrations by award-winning chefs, an authentic Southern tailgate, oyster roast, and more. Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Call for costs, times, and details. Info: (855) 235-8507 or Pinehurst.com.

Saturday, September 5

NATURE TALES. 10 – 11 a.m. for ages 2 to 4, and 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. for ages 5 and 6. “Growing Vegetable Soup.” Preschool story and nature time. Cost and registration: No

24

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cost for program, but please pre-register online or by phone two business days in advance. (Admission to garden is not included in program. Please stop at the Gift Shop to check in as a member or to pay admission.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 4860221 (ext) 20 or capefearbg.org.

promises good food, dancing, and great beach music. There will also be a silent auction, raffle, 50/50 drawing, and cash bar. Cost: $20. Net proceeds go to Moore County Special Olympics and the Interfaith Food Pantry of Aberdeen. Tickets required for attendance and must be purchased by Sep 2. Southern Pines Elks Lodge, 280 Country Club Circle, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 585-7292 or mooreshaggers@gmail.com.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Diane Kraudelt and learn about her techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom.

LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. Whiskey Pines performs at the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066.

Sunday, September 6

SHAG SOCIETY’S FUNDRAISER. 6:30 – 11 p.m. Moore Area Shag Society’s 2015 Annual Fundraiser Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

They’re back!

MET OPERA | $25 PER INDIVIDUAL TICKET Tickets Now on Sale

Author at The Bookshop

• • • Film

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 3 p.m. “Intro to

Literature/Speakers

Ticket s on ! Sale Now BOLSHOI | $27 PER INDIVIDUAL TICKET Ticket Now on Sale

• • Fun

History

Sports

at the

Located in Beautiful Downtown Southern Pines

250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC • 910-692-8501

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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HISTORIC OLD TOWN

Village of Pinehurst Rich in History, Southern Charm & Amenities... All Within A Scenic Stroll!

Apparel

Service has always been my first priority.

CoolSweats That’s why I chose Well•Spring.

Boutiques Eye Max Optical Boutique The Potpourri Old Sport & Gallery

From my early days in the Coast Guard to a thirty-year term in the United States Congress, I’ve dedicated much of my life to serving others. Like my signature sport coat and passion for politics, that hasn’t changed in retirement. A genuine commitment to service and excellence is one of the many qualities that makes Well•Spring an ideal choice for retirement living. Howard Coble

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Salons & Spas Elaine’s Hairdressers www.well-spring.org 4100 Well Spring Dr., Greensboro, NC 27410 (800) 547-5387 • (336) 545-5400

Restaurants & Pubs

A member of Well•Spring Services, Inc.

Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour & Gift Shoppe

Services

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Village of Pinehurst Rentals & Golf

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September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r Weymouth Woods and Ecology of the Sandhills.” Program includes an indoor presentation and an optional short hike. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Monday, September 7—12

PINEWILD’S VETERANS SUPPORT WEEK 2015. All donations go to local veteran support organizations. This event includes golf at Pinewild Country Club’s Championship Magnolia and Holly courses and a Vehicle Show Social. Monday: Raffle prizes displayed at PWCC and raffle tickets go on sale for $10. Wednesday, 8 a.m.: Golf at PWCC. Cost: $40, includes a raffle ticket (PWCC donates $21 to the listed Veteran Support Groups). Members pay $10 for a prime tee time and raffle ticket (PWCC donates $10.) Friday, 4 – 7 p.m.: Annual Vehicle Show Social at PWCC, includes entertainment, light snacks, a silent auction, and great vehicles. Saturday, noon: Raffle closes and winners notified. Info: Kevin Carroll, (910) 420-2292 or (910) 684-0020 or go to mschneider.us/vetsweek.

Monday, September 7

XS HORSE SCHOOLING DAY. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Cross country schooling event. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074.

Wednesday, September 9

Sandhills Woman’s Exchange. 10 a.m. Grand Reopening of the 1810 historical log cabin, which will be operating from September to late May (excluding January) every Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunch served from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Known for its homemade chili, lemon pie, and quaint dining room. Gift shop features local artisans’ crafts. (Note: Volunteers needed.) Sandhills Woman’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677. For volunteering, (910) 783-5169.)

Thursday, September 10

Library BIRTHDay. All day. The 20th Anniversary Dedication Day includes games, displays, and refreshments and culminates in a multi-generational presentation by Sherri Lovett at 5:30 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6928235 or sppl.net.

AFGHANISTAN TALK. 3:30 p.m. Jason Howk will discuss Afghanistan and its people, our recent military involvement there, and a look at its future. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022.

WREATH-MAKING DEMONSTRATION. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Join flower and plant design instructor Aldena Frye for a fall wreath-making demonstration. Cost: $15/ Sandhills Horticultural Society members; $20/nonmembers. Space limited. Sandhills Horticultural Gardens Ball Visitors Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 695-3882.

FALL CONCERT SERIES. 6 – 8 p.m. “Motown Sound,” an outdoor performance by the Fayetteville Symphony at The Cape Fear Botanical Gardens. Beverages, food, beer, and wine will be available for purchase. (The concert will be moved indoors if necessary.) Cost: Free to CFBG members; non-members, please call for prices. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 36) or fayettevillesymphony.org.

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

MEET THE AUTHOR. 4 p.m. Newbery honor recipient Ingrid Law will visit the Country Bookshop for a meet and greet and discussion of her middle-grade book series (Savvy, Scumble, and Switch) about the magic of friendship and the power of family. Ages 8 – 13. Free and open to the public. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

Friday, September 11

Film

always

Well, you’ve wanted one.

BLACK & WHITE BALL. 7 – 10 p.m. Carolina Pines Chapter of USA Dance invites you to kick off National Ballroom Dance Week with an evening of fun, music and dancing. Cost: $11 cash at door. Elks Lodge, Country Club Circle, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 331-9965.

PINEHURST LIVE AFTER 5. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. An evening of music, food, and fun for everyone to honor our area’s First Responders. Bobby Messano’s band performs. Lawn chairs and blankets welcome. Coolers not allowed. Food trucks and beverage vendors on-site. Tufts Park, 120 Cherokee Road, Village of Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900.

BEACH FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while The Sand Band entertains you with live music. Cost: $10/person. Reservations and pre-payment are required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

FREE CONCERT AND RECEPTION. 6 p.m. reception, 7:30 p.m. concert. In conjunction with the Lafayette Birthday Celebration, Methodist University will present “Arias and Artifacts” at Hensdale Chapel, 5400 Ramsey St. (Methodist University), Fayetteville. The reception will be at Davis Memorial Library, 5400 Joe Stout View Drive, Fayetteville. Info: Arleen Fields at (910) 630-7412 or afields@methodist.edu.

Saturday, September 12

PINEHURST PATRIOTS WEEKEND. 8 a.m. – 9 p.m. Multiple events and programs, including painting “patriotic canvases,” live entertainment, games and activities for kids, and displays of military weapons systems and vehicles. Vendors on site for lunch and other concessions. Entertainment provided by Jason Adamo, NC-based soul/ rock singer songwriter. Evening concert by the Army Ground Forces Concert Band. Call for complete schedule of events and activities. Free to the public. Tufts Memorial Park. 1 Village Green Road W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2951900 or vopnc.org.

What’s Next? That’s where we come in.

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HISTORICAL RE-ENACTMENT FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. “Festival of Yesteryear: A Celebration of Early America” focuses on the Colonial and Revolutionary War periods, and features re-enactors demonstrating various aspects of daily life. Living history groups include Camp Flintlock and the North Carolina Highland Regiment. Children can learn a variety of trades through hands-on crafts and activities. Concessions will be provided by R-Burger. Admission is FREE. Museum of the Cape Fear Historical Complex, 801 Arsenal Avenue, Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-1330

MAKER SATURDAY. 11 a.m. Explore Snap Circuits®. Maker Saturdays allow students to explore technology in a relaxed environment. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net.

• • •

BEGINNERS DANCE CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Learn the Rumba, a slow romantic Latin dance, and the exciting

Key:

Cha Cha! No pre-registration necessary. Cost: $10 cash. Pinehurst Executive Center, 5 Dawn Road, at N.C. 5 and Blake Blvd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 331-9965.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Charlie Roberts and learn about his Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

190-A Turner Street, Southern Pines NC 28387 910-692-8303 fciginfo@fcignc.com www.fcignc.com

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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ca l e n d a r techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom.

HARVEST FESTIVAL AND GRAPE STOMP. 11 a.m. – 6 p.m. 11th Annual Fall Harvest Festival and Grape Stomp. Live music, vendors, wine, grape stomping and picking. Free admission. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 2 p.m. Jane McClaren will discuss her book, Honest Eating, her own story about losing weight and being honest with yourself about what and how much you eat. This event is free and open to the public. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

New friends, good times, and new memories await you! No entrance fees • Own your own home Age in place with all levels of care • Onsite Wake Forest Baptist Health Clinic

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Moore County Kennel Club 2-day, all-breed dog show. Pinehurst Harness Track, 200 Beulah Road S, Pinehurst. Info: karolynnem@gmail. com or mckcnc.com.

GRANDPARENTS DAY CHILDREN’S AUTHORS WORKSHOP. 10 a.m. –12 p.m. Meet local children’s book authors Cos Barnes, Mary Ann Urda, Rebecca Lapping, Christine Englefried, and Jimmy Paulk. Workshop includes readings, drawing activities, and refreshments. Moore County Senior Enrichment Center, 8040 US 15-501, West End. Info: (910) 215-0900.

September 12—13

RENAISSANCE FAIR. Fort Bragg’s Annual Renaissance Faire, an Elizabethan-era festival. Features role players, archery contests, period-inspired food and games, jousting, a masquerade ball, and more. Call for times and details. Smith Lake Recreation Center, Smith Lake Road, Fayetteville. Info: (910) 396-9126 or fortbraggmwr.com.

Sunday, September 13

PINEHURST PATRIOTS WEEKEND. 12 – 4 p.m. Multiple events and programs including local entertainment, picnic lunches, antique-car display, and ice cream sundaes (sundaes free to all first responders, active-duty military, and veterans). Country artist Brad Long & his band will perform. Call for complete schedule of events and activities. Free to the public. Tufts Memorial Park. 1 Village Green Road W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or vopnc.org.

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 3 p.m. “Caterpillars.” The Park Ranger will describe the life cycles of butterflies and moths, particularly the larval life stage the caterpillar. Program includes a short (1-mile) walk through the park. Visitors Center Auditorium, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Moore County Kennel Club 2-day, all-breed dog show. Pinehurst Harness Track, 200 Beulah Road S, Pinehurst. Info: karolynnem@gmail. com or mckcnc.com.

LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Rock ‘n’ roll band 6 String Drag performs. Cost: $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

Monday, September 14

GOLF TOURNAMENT. Moore County Kennel Club Benefit Golf Tournament. Whispering Woods Golf Club, 26 Sandpiper Drive, Whispering Pines. Info: billpace50@gmail.com.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

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• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


markitecture markwesleyparson

markwesleyparson.com

910•692•8550

HOME AND GARDEN DESIGN PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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PineStraw CreativeWorkshops

Back By Popular Demand

Say No to Auto

The Dance of Photography

Are you stuck on auto? Having a hard time embracing the camera

In this one day workshop, students will be challenged to produce images that are technically correct and beautifully composed by using advanced features on the camera and training the eye for artistic interpretation. Technique meets artistry to create photographs that stir the senses and evokes an emotion by the viewer.

Digital photography basics with Laura L. Gingerich

user manual? Are your photos lacking the “wow” factor? If yes, this beginner workshop is for you. This easy-going, hands-on course is designed to get beginners off automatic by understanding the capabilities of the digital camera and unleashing the inner photographer. Transform a snapshot into a work of art through lectures, lively discussions, field work and friendly critiques. No previous knowledge or experience required. Topics Covered: What makes a great image? Aperture. Shutter speed. Exposure Compensation. ISO. Color. Composition. Workshop List: Digital SLR camera or camera with manual controls. Camera manual. Bag lunch.

Where: Pinestraw Magazine 145 W. Pennsylvania Ave l Southern Pines When: Saturday, October 3, 2015 l 9am-3pm Cost: $95, limited to 8 attendees Instructor: Laura L. Gingerich Register: 910-693-2508 (by September 28)

Say good bye to blasé images with Laura L. Gingerich

Topics Covered: Camera Mechanics. The Exposure Triangle. Reading the Histogram. The Digital Darkroom. JPEG and RAW. The Art of Seeing. The Elements of Design.

Workshop List: Digital SLR camera or camera with manual controls. Camera manual. Bag lunch.

Where: Pinestraw Magazine 145 W. Pennsylvania Ave l Southern Pines When: Friday, October 9, 2015 l 9am-3pm Cost: $95, limited to 8 attendees Instructor: Laura L. Gingerich Register: 910-693-2508 (by October 2)

For More Information: 910-693-2508 • pinestrawworkshops@gmail.com

Chuck & Mary Bolton

Custom Homes

Design • Build • Remodel

910-673-3603 • 4317 Seven Lakes Plaza

www.BoltonBuildersInc.com boltonbldrs@boltonbuildersinc.com

Quality. Solutions. Value.

“We can match your house and meet HOA requirements!” “New Location coming soon in Aberdeen!”

North Carolina Sales Headquarters

The Shed Depot of NC

2700 South Horner Blvd. • Sanford, NC

919.776.0206 • www.sheddepotnc.com 110

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R eal E state in the Sandhills ca l e n d a r

SANDHILLS PHOTOGRAPHY CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. The speaker will be Mark Buckler. Hannah Center, O’Neal School, 3300 Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: sandhillsphotoclub.org.

SIP & PAINT WITH JANE. 5 – 7 p.m. Join resident artist Jane Casnellie for an evening of sipping and painting and take home your own masterpiece! No experience necessary. All materials provided, including a glass of wine. Cost: $35. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info and registration: (910) 255-0665.

Choosing a home is challenging, securing a mortgage shouldn’t be. Introducing the OVM Financial Loan Products

VA • FHA • USDA • Conventional • Reverse • Purchase • NC Housing •

Monday, September 14 and 15

PAINTING CLASS (OIL). 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Taught by Laine Francis, this 2-day Impressionism class will focus on color and how to see it and mix it, making the best of lights and darks. We will work from photo references of children (not portraits), using simple shapes without detail. $80. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-3979.

Tuesday, September 15

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF MOORE COUNTY MEETING AND LUNCHEON. 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Annual kick-off meeting. The public is welcome to attend, but must reserve no later than September 11. Cost: $13, payable by check made out to LWVMC. Table on the Green Restaurant, 2205 Midland Drive, Pinehurst. Info: Call Charlotte at (910) 944-9611.

www.ovmfinancial.com/CoriWaldschmidt Call me today for more information

JAMES BOYD BOOK CLUB. 2 p.m. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

YOGA. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Tuesdays, Sep 15 through Oct 6. This class is for beginners and those who want a gentle, mindful approach to yoga focusing on proper breathing, stretching, strengthening, mental focus, and relaxation. Bring a yoga mat and towel. Cost: $30/resident; $60/non-resident. Please pre-register. Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

Tuesday, September 15—20

Maintenance-Free Living

Spacious Cottage Homes from $339,900 3-4BR/3B • Double Garage • Carolina Room Golf Front • Study • Hardwood • Granite Visit Longleaf Sales Office

Furnished Model

Longleaf Golf & Country Club on Scenic Midland Road O #140706-104. We lend to the following states: Virginia, North Carolina and South Carolina. NMLS#86788. (www.nmlsconsumeraccess.org) 2014 OVM Financial, Inc. www.ovmfinancial.com All rights reserved. #1010123 Exp 1/16.

910-692-3111 800-522-9426 www.longleaf@longleaflifestyle.com Lifestyle Communities of NC, Ltd.

Walk out your front door... to one of Arnold Palmer’s Signature Courses. Membership to Mid South Club and Talamore Golf Club included…

HORSE SHOW. The Arabian Horse Association’s 13th Annual Sport Horse National Show includes youth, jumper, dressage, hunter, and English disciplines. Tours of Total Arabian Interactive Learning (T.A.I.L.). Gov. James B. Hunt Horse Complex, NC State Fairgrounds, 1025 Blue Ridge Road, Raleigh. Info: (303) 696-4500 (ext 569) or Mikayla.Boge@arabianhorses.org.

Wednesday, September 16

MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Nina de Gramont will be discussing her book, The Last September, a love story, murder mystery, and pitch-perfect study of mental illness. This coming-of-age novel deals with adults who come of age in the most difficult ways. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

Wednesday, September 16—18

PRESERVATION NC ANNUAL CONFERENCE. This 3-day event will be held in Salisbury. Keynote speakers will be Tom Mayes and Don Rypkema. Conference includes educational sessions, tours, award presentations, and more. For information on schedule, costs, locales, and registration contact Lauren Werner @ (919) 832-3652 (ext 238) or visit presnc.org.

DETACHED VILLAS NOW AVAILABLE

Maintenance Free Living at its Best! Prices start at $299,900 Shown by appointment only - 910.724.9555 www.CamdenVillas.net

ACRYLIC PAINTING WORKSHOP. “Inside Acrylics,” with Phil Garrett. Learn how to work with the

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

VA Approved

Mary Wilson-Wittenstrom, Realtor

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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“Eat, Kiss & Smile Better” Open Wednesday through Saturday 200 Westgate Dr, Suite C, Pinehurst

www.sandhillsweekenddental.com

910-687-4423

September Poplar Knight Spot 6:46pm: Sept. 13 Six String Drag Sept. 20 Peter Lamb Trio Sept. 27 Sam Lewis, Nu-Blu Cameo Theater, Fayetteville: Sept. 3, 8 pm - First Thursday, Wes Collins, Julie Elkins

Poplar Knight Spot 114 Knight St., Aberdeen 910•944•7502 theroosterswife.org 112

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September PineNeedler Answers from page 141

R E D O A T O M S E N E

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Encore

ca l e n d a r new acrylic materials to create transparency and surface textures. All skill levels welcome. Call for availability, times, and costs. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-3979.

Thursday, September 17

WINE AND WHIMSY PAINTING CLASS. 5:30 – 7 p.m. Enjoy a glass of wine or beer while painting your masterpiece (this month, a whimsical owl). Cost: $20/ CFBC member; $25/non-member (includes canvas, paint, brushes, palette, easel, and instruction). Wine, beer and snacks will be available for purchase. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221.

BALLROOM FOR BEGINNERS. 6:30 p.m. Carolina Pines Chapter of USA Dance invites you to learn to dance the Tango and try the sexy Salsa! $10/person. Class held at Pinehurst Executive Center, 5 Dawn Road, at N.C. 5 and Blake Blvd, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 331-9965.

ART EXHIBIT AND OPENING RECEPTION. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. “Diversified Clay: An Invitational.” This exhibit of Piedmont potters is presented by The David McCune International Art Gallery. The reception and exhibit are free and open to the public. The exhibit runs Sep 17 – Nov 14 at the William F. Bethune Center for Visual Arts, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Silvana Foti at (910) 425-5379 or davidmccunegallery.org.

Friday, September 18

PRESERVATION NC ANNUAL CONFERENCE. The Weymouth Center in Southern Pines will receive the Minnette C. Duffy Landscape Preservation Award from Preservation North Carolina at the awards ceremony during their annual conference in Salisbury. Meroney Theater, 213 S Main St., Salisbury. Info: Lauren Werner @ (919) 832-3652 (ext 238) or visit presnc.org.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while The Mike Wallace Quartet entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/person. Reservations and pre-payment are required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendor will be on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

BARGAIN BOX II NON-PROFIT THRIFT SHOP

Bene fits Moo re Cou nty Charities & Nurs ing Schol arshi ps for SCC Stud ents Donations Accepted During Regular Business Hours

Tuesday-Saturday 10am-4pm 7299-A, 15-501 in Eastwood (Behind Wylie’s Golf Cart) 910-235-5221

Buying Vintage

Sunshine Antique & Mercantile Company Buy, Sell or Trade Specializing in Primitive & Country Furnishings Thursday- Saturday 10 to 5 Monday-Wednesday by appointment or chance 115 N. Sycamore St., Aberdeen, NC (910) 691-3100 shop • (919) 673-9388 or (919) 673-9387 cells

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 10 a.m. “Slithering Snakes (for Wee Ones!).” This program offers a fun opportunity for children ages 3 to 5 to learn more about these awesome animals. Includes games, crafts, and meeting a pet snake. Parents are expected to participate. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Architecturals 40% OFF Patio Furniture 20% OFF Antiques 10% OFF

5336 NC Hwy 211, West End, NC 27376 (at the traffic light)

910-673-2065

Tues-Sat 11am-4pm • Sun 1pm-4pm www.westendpastimes.com

JAZZ AND BLUES CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. The Friends of Music presents jazz and blues guitarist Wesley

••• • •

• • •

819 Hope Mills Road, Fayetteville Ed Hicks (910) 425-7000 edhicks82@aol.com • warpathmilitaria.com

September 5th - OctOber 31St

PHOTOGRAPHY EXHIBIT. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. “Land of Dreams.” The photography of Bryce Lankard, will be exhibited in the Union-Zukowski Lobby & Gallery, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Brenda Jernigan at (910) 6307454 or bjernigan@methodist.edu.

Dance/Theater Fun History

ROLEX & TUDOR Especially 1950s-1980s era GMT & SUBMARINER WARPATH MILITARY COLLECTIBLES

SALE!

Antiques & Newtiques

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

and Military Watches

FALL CLEARANCE

OKTOBERFEST. 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Coinciding with Germany’s Oktoberfest, this year’s 2-day event includes games, contests, delicious food, beer, and wine. The “Kinder Platz” kids zone includes carnival games, bounce houses, and face painting. Cost: $5 for wristbands for the kids zone for all-day play on Saturday. Village Arboretum, adjoining Wicker Park, 10 Rassie Wicker Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900.

Antiques Collectibles Fine Furniture Old Dolls Old Toys & Trains Glassware China Civil War Militaria US Coins Located in Town & Country Antique Mall • Hwy. 1 Aberdeen (across from Aberdeen Lake/Park) 910-944-3359 • 910-638-4542 • apbrill@earthlink.net

Rustic, Retro, Funky, Shabby Chic & Antique

The Vintage Barn Unique Hand Picked Finds

108 McReynolds St • Carthage

919-924-7260

RAILSIDE

ARCHITECTURAL & ANTIQUES 123 EXCHANGE ST., ABERDEEN • 910-690-3089 • Wed - Sat 11 to 5

Advertise your antique, consignment or thrift shop on the PineStraw Encore Page! Call 910-692-7271

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Dining Guide

The

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MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET MONDAY • THURSDAY • SATURDAY Tomatoes, Fruits, Veggies, Jams, Meats, Flowers & Plants, Goat Cheese, Prepared Foods, Baked Goods, Crafts, Peaches, Corn Mondays- FirstHealth (Fitness Center) Facility courtesy of First Health

lunch tues-sat 11-3 dinner wed-sat 5:30-9:30

Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Broad St & New York Ave 8am-Noon Will be open through October 31th

195 bell avenue southern pines 910.692.7110 www.195americanfusion.com

Lunch Tues-Sun 11 am- 2:30 pm

Fresh Baked Daily Cronuts & Danish Croissants & Breads

Eat in or Carry out

Omelets Salads & Burgers sandwiches

Open Year Round • Thursdays - 604 W. Morganton Rd

american fusion cuisine

chef prem nath

Breakfast Tues-Sat 8 am- 10:30 am

170 Memorial Dr • Pinehurst 2pm-5:30pm Will be open through October 26th (Armory Sports Complex) Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Southern Pines 9am-1pm

supporting local farmers

Bakehouse & Cafe

Saturdays - Downtown Southern Pines

Call 947-3752 or 690-9520 for more info. hwwebster@embarqmail.com Web search Moore County Farmers Market Local Harvest www.facebook.com/moorecountyfarmersmarket SNAP welcomed here

Home of the Famous

ona Burger! Barcel Where European Tradition Meets Southern Charm Follow Us on

910-944-9204 • 120 N. Poplar St., Aberdeen www.thebakehouse.biz

Restaurant Authentic Thai Cusine

U.S. Hwy 1 South & 15-501 1404 Sandhills Blvd. Aberdeen, NC 28315

Smoke Free Environment Lunch

Closed Monday Tuesday - Friday 11:00am - 2:30pm Saturday Closed for Lunch Sunday 11:30am - 2:30pm

Dinner

Tuesday - Sunday 5:00pm - 9:30pm Saturday 4:00pm-9:30pm

Dress Up Your Homes’ Kitchen! 28 Balsamics, 25 Olive Oils, Pastas, Herbs & Spices, Salts, Olive Oil Skin Care Products, Gift Sets

10% OFF

Monthly Featured Pairings

See our menu on MooCo under Oriental Restaurants

(910) 944-9299

Carryout and Vegetarian Dishes 114

thepinehurstoliveoilco.com

105 Cherokee Rd • Village of Pinehurst

910.986.0880

September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r Orsolic. This event is free and open to the public. Hensdale Chapel, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Linda Volman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@methodist. edu.

Saturday, September 19

OKTOBERFEST. 12 – 6 p.m. Second day of 2-day event. Includes games, contests, delicious food, beer, and wine. The “Kinder Platz” kids zone includes carnival games, bounce houses, and face painting. Cost: $5 for wristbands for the kids zone for all-day play. Village Arboretum, adjoining Wicker Park, 10 Rassie Wicker Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900.

NC POETRY SOCIETY MEETING. All day. Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: www.ncpoetrysociety.org/events or (910) 692-6261.

CRAFT DAY. All Day. “International Talk Like A Pirate Day.” Self-led crafts will be set up for families and children to enjoy. Just bring your creativity and don’t forget to talk like a pirate for a special prize. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235.

INFANT/CHILD CPR CLASS. American Red Cross class, hosted by the Pinehurst Fire Department, focuses on life-saving techniques for obstructed airways for both the infant and child and CPR techniques for infants and children ages 1 – 11. Certification is good for two years. Pre-requisite: Completion of American Red Cross Babysitting Class. Cost: $58. Pinehurst Fire Department, 405 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-2817, (910) 295-1900, or pinehurstrec.org.

FAMILY DISC GOLF CLINICS. 10 – 11:30 a.m. This FREE disc golf clinic is designed for families to participate together regardless of ability or skill level. Instruction and discs will be provided. Please bring water and appropriate attire. West Pinehurst Community Park, 861 Chicken Plant Road. Info: (910) 295-1900. Pre-registration is required at www.pinehurstrec.org.

SUNDAY KIDS MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. Cinderella. This 2015 version of the classic fairy tale brings the characters to life in a live-action film. Free refreshments will be served. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235.

LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Acoustic jazz quintet Peter Lamb and the Wolves performs. Cost: $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Linda Griffin and learn about her techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom.

HORSE CHAMPIONSHIP PREP. 8 a.m. (all day). Opportunity to receive feedback in dressage, drive a cones course, and practice obstacle skills for national championships. Everything you need to get ready for the Pine Tree and Katydid CDEs! Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074.

TRIANGLE READS. 12 p.m. A sit-down lunch with authors, followed by an afternoon of panels and book signings. Tour Trio, the debut installation of art and music inspired by 16 Southern literary works. Costs: $99 (includes $20 voucher for books). Books will be for sale from area independent bookstores. Tickets available through sibaweb.site-ym.com/event/triangle-reads#. Info: (910) 692-3211.

LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. Tim Wilson performs at the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066.

Sunday, September 20

Monday, September 21

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 3 p.m. “Geology of the Sandhills.” Join the Park Ranger to learn where all the sand in The Sandhills comes from and much more. Visitors Center Auditorium, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

WOMEN OF WEYMOUTH MEETING. 9:30 a.m. Following coffee, there will be a speaker. Open to Weymouth members and guests. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

• • •

AUTHOR EVENT. 4 – 6 p.m. Leslie Anne Miller will

Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Home of the award winning

Revolutionary Burger Specials Change Daily Check out our web page www.TheSquiresPub.com

1720 US 1 South Southern Pines, NC 910-695-1161 To advertise, call 910-693-7271

discuss her book, Start with a House, Finish with a Collection, which offers a unique, personal perspective on the journey of collecting American art and antiques. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

Casual Dining, Serious Food!

Film

Vintage Fashion Show. 10:30 a.m. This Sandhills Woman’s Exchange fundraiser includes brunch Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

Come enjoy our Italian Atmosphere for great food with friends and family! Tues., Wed., & Thurs. Fri. & Sat. Sun. & Mon. 5pm to 9pm 5pm to 10pm Closed

We accept reservations. 515 S.E. Broad St | Southern Pines, NC 28387 910-725-1868 | www.curtscucina.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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© Silhouette

Fabulous Finds in Fayetteville

Silhouette ~ Tom Ford t ~y mFerragamo ~ Porsche Design ~ Valentino D e s i gFord n a n d q u a li ~ a d e in A u s t r i a | w w w. s ilh e t t e . c o m | v i s i t u s Design on Silhouette ~ Tom Ferragamo ~o uPorsche ~ Valentino Calvin Klein ~ Christian Dior ~ Gucci ~ John Varvatos Calvin Klein ~ Christian Dior ~ Gucci ~ John Varvatos other Luxury Eyewear other Luxury Eyewear

www.metrospecs.us

910.221.0191

201 South McPherson Church Road / McPherson Square Suite 105 in Fayetteville

PineStraw Ad Aug.2015.indd 1

8/11/15 9:33 AM

Fun Fall Fashions Now in Store

Consignment Bookstore

Store Closing Sale The Pilgrim’s Journey Homeschool Bookstore is Closing It’s Doors

Shop 50% Off! September 1st-30th

Classroom Materials Homeschool Curriculum Educational Games & Toys The Pilgrim’s Journey Bookstore www.thepilgrimsjourney.com

886 Elm Street, Fayetteville, NC (Located behind Eutaw Shopping Village next door to Eutaw Round-ABout Skating Center off of Bragg Blvd.)

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high cotton high cotton CONSIGNMENT boutique | 910.307.5353 3010 Traemoor Village Dr., Suite 190, Fayetteville, NC 28306

high cotton CONSIGNMENT | 910.483.4296 2800-4 Raeford Rd., Fayetteville, NC 28303 follow us on facebook

September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r and a grand array of gorgeous costumes from the Moore County Historical Society and donated vintage dresses from the late 1800s to the 1920s and 1930s. Cost: $40/ person, which is tax deductible and helps support the Exchange and the 1810 cabin. Carolina Hotel Cardinal Ballroom, Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677 or Cav Peterson at (910) 295-0799.

CHAMBER MUSIC. 8 – 9:30 p.m. Windsync, a woodwind quintet, is the first of 4 concerts in the 2015-16 Classical Concert Series. This charismatic ensemble is recognized internationally for dramatic and adventurous programming. Cost: Series of 4 concerts is $89/ACMC members; $105/non-members. Single Tickets are $30 (if available). Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or mooreart.org.

Monday, September 21—24

AUTHOR EVENT. 4 – 6 p.m. Author Alan Gratz will discuss his books (Prisoner B3087, Brooklyn Nine, League of Seven, and Samurai Shortstop), answer questions, and chat about the writing process. His newest book, Code of Honor, is the story of an Iranian-American who learns that his brother has been labeled a terrorist and must save his brother’s life and his country from a deadly terrorist attack. For ages 12 and up. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

Tuesday, September 22

SENIORS DAY OUT: TANGER OUTLETS. 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. Fall is in the air and it’s time to work on that winter wardrobe. From Coach to Michael Kors, there is something for everyone. Cost: $16 residents/$48 non-res-

Visitors Center, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 695-3882.

idents (includes transportation). Assembly Hall Lobby @ Assembly Hall, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

LUNCH ’N’ LEARN. “Starworks Program.” The Sandhills Woman’s Exchange presents Joe Grant’s beautiful glass works from Central Park, N.C. Cost: $25 for lunch and program. Reservations required; maximum of 35 guests. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: Call 910-295-4677 for reservations.

CALLIGRAPHY ART CLASS. 1 – 3 p.m. (Also meets Tuesday, September 29) Barbara Sickenberger instructs this class for beginners (right hand only). Basic exercises include making curved and straight lines, all letters of the alphabet, and actual words. Learn the strategies of spacing. Make your own card. Cost: $40. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-3979.

PAINTING CLASS (ALL MEDIA). 1 – 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Sep 23 through Oct 28. For all levels of experience. Artist Eileen Strickland, covers basic information on materials, techniques, color theory, and composition. Cost: $35/resident; $70/non-resident. Classes will be held in the Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Please pre-register. Info: (910) 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

Tuesday, September 22

BOOKSTORE EVENT. Time TBD. Celebrating Big Magic by Elizabeth Gilbert (author is not appearing). The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

TAI CHI. 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. Wednesdays, Sep 23 through Oct 14. Lee Holbrook instructs these classes based around the gentle circular movements of Tai Chi to increase body awareness, coordination, and longevity while strengthening immunity. For people of all levels. Cost: $21/resident; $42/non-resident. Please pre-register. Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

Wednesday, September 23

INTRODUCTORY DANCE CLASS. 7 p.m. Celebrate National Ballroom Dance Week and try something new. Learn the basics for the lovely elegant Waltz and the exciting Cha Cha! $10/person. Class held at Pinehurst Executive Center, 5 Dawn Road, at N.C. 5 and Blake Blvd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 331-9965.

Thursday, September 24

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY WORKSHOP. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. “Growing And Making Your Own Herbal Tea,” Norma Burns instructor. Through culinary demonstration and tastings, learn to grow, harvest, and dry herbs to create your own special recipes. Take home a plant and your personally created herbal tea. $30/members; $35 non-members. (Space is limited to 40. Payment due at registration.) Sandhills Horticultural Gardens-Ball Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

BOLSHOI BALLET IN CINEMA

Dance/Theater

NATURE DISCOVERY HIKE. 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. During “Take A Child Outside Week” discover the fascinating plants, animals, and animal signs that can be found at the Garden. This hike is for children 5th grade and younger with their parents. Free with Garden admission. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 20) Pre-registration required no later than September 22.

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

the USA Make the eco-friendly switch to paperless hand drying

DIRECT FROM MOSCOW

GISELLE 10/11 JEWELS 11/15 THE LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS 12/6 THE NUTCRACKER 12/20 ADDITIONAL SHOWS IN 2016! SUNRISE THEATER 250 NW BROAD ST. SOUTHERN PINES SUNRISETHEATER.COM 910-692-3611 FOLLOW US: INSTAGRAM SUNRISE.THEATER TWITTER #SUNRISETHEATER #BOLSHOIBALLET #METOPERA

Our american hand dryers are quiet, vandal-resistant, low maintenance and come with a 10 year warranty.

PINNACLE DRYER www.PinnacleDryer.com • 800-943-7937

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 4 p.m. “Nature’s Treasure Hunt.” Join a member of Weymouth’s park staff for a fun and informative introduction to reading maps and using a hand-held GPS while taking a 2-mile hike along the park’s trails. Bring water and bug spray, and dress accordingly. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Saved the World will be shown in Huff Concert Hall, followed by a panel discussion. This feature-length film tells the true story of Stanislav Petrov, the Soviet lieutenant colonel who singlehandedly prevented nuclear Armageddon at the height of the Cold War. 5400 Ramsey St. (Methodist University), Fayetteville. Info: (910) 630-7243.

Thursday, September 24—27

BEACH FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while The Sand Band entertains you with live music. Cost: $10/person. Reservations and pre-payment are required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

BARBECUE PICNIC. 6 – 9 p.m. “Supper on the Grounds.” Kick off Weymouth Center’s Fall Season with BBQ pork and chicken and all the trimmings and dessert, catered by Jordan’s BBQ. Music and beverages included. Cost: $25/person. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

LIVE THEATER. Harvey is the story of Elwood P. Dowd, a charming man who has an unwavering friendship with a 6 foot, 3½ inch invisible rabbit named Harvey. Presented by the Judson Theatre Company. Info: Please email JudsonTheatre@gmail.com for times, ticket prices, and discounts or call (800) 514-3849. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst.

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 7 p.m. “Spider Eyes (night) Hike.” Join the park ranger for a nighttime, 2-mile walk through the park to look for glowing spider eyes! Bring a flashlight. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

FALL CONCERT SERIES. 6 – 8 p.m. “A Night on Broadway,” an outdoor performance by the Fayetteville Symphony at The Cape Fear Botanical Gardens. Beverages, food, beer, and wine will be available for purchase. (The concert will be moved indoors if necessary.) Cost: Free to CFBG members; non-members, please call for prices. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 36) or fayettevillesymphony.org.

Friday, September 25 PAINTING CLASS (OIL). 1 – 4 p.m. Fridays, Sep 25 through Oct 30. For all levels of experience. Artist Eileen Strickland covers basic information on materials, techniques, color theory and composition. Cost: $35/ resident; $70/non-resident. Classes will be held in the Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Please preregister. Info and registration: (910) 295-1900 or 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

FOLK FESTIVAL. Celebrate cultural diversity at the Arts Council of Fayetteville/Cumberland County’s 37th International Folk Festival with the Parade of Nations, live performances, authentic cuisine, arts and crafts vendors, children’s area, and Native American Cultural Showcase. Free. 300 Hay St. (Downtown), Fayetteville. Info: (910) 323-1776.

• •

INTRODUCTORY DANCE CLASS. 7 p.m. Enjoy National Ballroom Dance Week and try something new. Learn some new moves for your slow dancing and have some fun with the Swing! $10/person. Class held at Pinehurst Executive Center, 5 Dawn Road, at N.C. 5 and Blake Blvd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 331-9965.

• Key:

FILM AND DISCUSSION. 7 p.m. The Man Who

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

• •

XTREME GAMES NIGHT. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. A night of karaoke, flag football, dodge ball, laser tag, karaoke and more for kids ages 11 – 14. Pizza, hot dogs, candy, popcorn, and drinks available for purchase. Cost: $10 for wristbands (available for purchase in advance at Pinehurst Village Hall or the night of the event). Rassie Wicker Park, 10 Rassie Wicker Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900.

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Saturday, September 25—27

Saturday, September 26

MAKER SATURDAY. 2 p.m. Explore GoldieBlox®. Maker Saturdays allow students to explore technology in a relaxed environment. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net.

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 9 a.m. “National Public Lands Day.” Weymouth Woods is hosting a kidfriendly volunteer day for a trail-improvement project

Sports

SALE ‘Truck On’ Over for our biggest in-stock

PAPER SALE!

Select Stationery Buy One, Get One Free Must be same design. Crane excluded

Other unique items also on sale!

Stationery

and Gifts

2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst 910-295-4333 Cash or check on sale items!

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September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r lasting approximately 2 hours (but you can leave earlier). All ages and generations welcome! Wear work clothes, closed-toe shoes and bring work gloves, water, and bug spray. Please pre-register to help Weymouth plan accordingly. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. The Sandhills Chapter of AACA will host their annual antique car show sponsored by Pinehurst Parks & Rec. Gates open at 9 a.m. with the award ceremony at 3 p.m. Admission is free to the public. Village Arboretum, adjoining Wicker Park, 10 Rassie Wicker Drive, Pinehurst. Info: John MacIntyre at 910-215-0828 or (910) 295-1900.

ART & ANTIQUE FAIR. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. 1st Annual McDonald Artisan Farm & Antique Fair. Join us for a day of local arts and crafts, music, food, fun, and more for the entire family. 1615 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. Info: mcdonaldartisanfarm.com. Info: 910-690-9969.

PINEHURST PROMENADE. 6 – 8 p.m. Preview 3 historic homes in Old Town Pinehurst. Includes hors d’oeuvres, beverages, live entertainment, and historical information about the Village of Pinehurst. Cost: $75 (includes Sunday’s promenade of 9 homes). Tickets available at Given Tufts and the Outpost. All proceeds to benefit Given Tufts. Complimentary shuttle service from Given Outpost (the Old Post Office building, 95 Cherokee Road). Parking available in Tufts Park parking lot in the Village Center. Info: (910) 215-8814 mrsmccaffrey@nc.rr.com.

Sunday, September 27

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 3 p.m. “Become

Info: (910) 692-2167 or sandhillsnature.org.

a Junior Ranger” during “Take a Child Outside Week,” a perfect time to learn about the Junior Ranger program and how to earn a Weymouth Woods patch and certificate. Most appropriate for ages 6 to 12. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

POND EXPLORATION. 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. During “Take A Child Outside Week,” explore one of the Garden’s ponds and learn what kind of critters hide in the mud, and get to see them up-close! This program is for middle and high school students. Free with Garden admission. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 20) Pre-registration required no later than September 25.

LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Pop-country songwriter and performer Sam Ellis and Americana bluegrass band Nu-Blu perform. Cost: $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

NICK JONAS CONCERT. 8 p.m. National recording artist Nick Jonas will perform at the Riddle Center. Tickets are required and will be sold to the public as available, starting Sep 1, on a first-come, first-served basis. Cost: $20. 5400 Ramsey St. (Methodist University), Fayetteville. Info: Methodist University Student Involvement Center at (910) 630-7022 or visit methodist.edu.

SUNDAY FILM SERIES. 2:30 p.m. This movie for adults is based on the Gillian Flynn novel Gone Girl. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235.

PINEHURST PROMENADE. 11:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Preview 8 special, historic homes in Old Town Pinehurst. Cost for Sunday only: $25 in advance and $30 day of tour. Tickets available at Given Tufts and the Outpost. Complimentary shuttle service from Given Outpost (the Old Post Office building, 95 Cherokee Road). Parking available in Tufts Park parking lot in the Village Center. All proceeds to benefit Given Tufts, a 501© not-for-profit organization. Info: (910) 215-8814 mrsmccaffrey@nc.rr.com.

Monday, September 28

SANDHILLS NATURAL HISTORY SOCIETY MEETING. 7 p.m. Charlie Williams presents a lively history in period costume of André Michaux’s 1790s botanical explorations in the Carolinas. Visitors welcome! Weymouth Woods Auditorium, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Tuesday, September 29

AGRICULTURAL FAIR. 5 – 11 p.m. The 69th Annual Moore County Agricultural Fair runs through Saturday, October 3 and includes carnival rides, games, and food. Costs: Admission $6/persons age 3 and over; free under age 3. Parking $2. Fairgrounds located at 3699 US-15 501, Carthage. Info: (910) 215-6893 or moorecountyfair.vpweb.

NATURE STUDY PROGRAM. 6 p.m. “Wild Foods Hike.” Kids, bring your folks and join a Park Ranger for a hike that will reveal the fruits and nuts that are in the forest at this time of year and how they are useful to both animals and people. Bring water and bug spray. Visitors Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Wednesday, September 30

LIVE MUSIC. 5 p.m. Holy Ghost Tent Revival performs at Cycle North Carolina. Sunrise Green Space, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501.

Thursday, October 1

AUTHOR TO THE BOOKSHOP. 5 p.m. Katherine Applegate, Newbery winning author of The One and Only Ivan will make her only North Carolina appearance in Southern Pines to present her new book Crenshaw. The story follows a young boy whose family has fallen on hard times, so creates an imaginary friend in the form of a giant cat, that helps him deal with many of the challenges he faces. Ages 7 and up. Tickets limited, and available with purchase of Crenshaw from The Country Bookshop. Info/tickets: (910) 692-3211.

WEEKLY HAPPENINGS Mondays

MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET. 2 – 5:30 p.m. Produce only, fresh and locally grown. FirstHealth Fitness Center,
170 Memorial Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 947-3752 or moorecountync.gov or localharvest.org.

BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

Tuesdays—Saturdays

SANDHILLS WOMAN’S EXCHANGE. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Lunch served from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Gift shop features local artisans’ crafts. (Note: Volunteers needed. For Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

more information, call (910) 783-5169.) Sandhills Woman’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677.

Tuesdays

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. The focus of these storytimes, for all children through age 5, will be stories, songs, fun, and activities to build skills necessary for kindergarten. No program on Wednesday, September 2. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net

SANDHILLS FARMERS MARKET. 3 – 6 p.m. Fresh and locally grown fruit and vegetables. Village Center Parking Lot, 1 Village Green W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 6870377 or moorefarmfresh.com.

BABY BUNNIES STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. This storytime, reserved for babies from birth to 18 months, will engage parents and children in early literary practices. No program Tuesday, September 1. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. BROWN BAG LUNCH/GAME DAY. 11:30 a.m. Bring your lunch and enjoy fellowship and activities, including card games, board games, and the Wii. The Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

Thursdays

TAI CHI FOR HEALTH. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Practice this flowing Eastern exercise with instructor Rich Martin at the Cape Fear Botanical Garden. Cost: Single class: $15/ member; $17/non-member. Monthly rates available. (No refunds or transfer for these classes.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville, Info and registration: (910) 486-0221.

COOKING CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Chef Maria DiGiovanni leads hands-on preparation of menu items (gnocci, Thai, ravioli, Moroccan, Lebanese, connolis, or pasta). Reservations and prepayment required. Call for prices and specific menu. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or the flavorexchange.com.

SHAG DANCING LESSONS. 6 – 7 p.m. Beginning level and advanced beginning. Enjoy music and socializing while you learn popular shag moves and get a great workout. No partner required. Bring a pair of shoes with smooth soles. Cost: $30/resident; $60/non-resident. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Road S, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2951900 or pinehurstrec.org.

MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Produce only, fresh and locally grown. Armory Sports Complex, 604 W Morganton Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 947-3752 or moorecountync.gov or localharvest.org.

Wednesdays

• • • Film

people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

• •

MAHJONG (Chinese version). 1 – 3 p.m. A game involving skill, strategy, and calculation (played by 4 people). Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. (910) 692-7376.

Sports

QUALITY WORKMANSHIP WITH M E T I C U L O U S AT T E N T I O N T O D E TA I L

“Your Office Furniture Solutions”

DMI Desk w/ Return List Price $4,300

Special Close-Out Price $795

KEN RICE, OWNER OVER 30 YEARS EXPERIENCE NC LICENSE NO. 54148

910-673-3917

W W W. L E C L A I R E C O N S T R U C T I O N . C O M

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Come see our selection of over 500 New & Used Chairs in Stock. 3864 US Hwy. 15/501, Carthage

(910) 947-2541

dak@pinehurst.net • www.daksoffice.com

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ca l e n d a r

Fridays

Let us build your dream home...

PRE-SCHOOL STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 p.m. A great way to start off the weekend and get scrumptious ideas. No Reservations Needed. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or theflavorexchange.com.

COOKING CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Chef Maria DiGiovanni leads hands-on preparation of menu items (gnocci, Thai, ravioli, Moroccan, Lebanese, connolis, or pasta). Reservations and prepayment required. Call for prices and specific menu. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or the flavorexchange.com.

Saturdays

SANDHILLS FARMERS MARKET. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Fresh and locally grown fruit and vegetables. Village Center Parking Lot, 1 Village Green W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 687-0377 or moorefarmfresh.com.

COOKING CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Chef Maria DiGiovanni leads hands-on preparation of menu items (gnocci, Thai, ravioli, Moroccan, Lebanese, connolis, or pasta). Reservations and prepayment required. Call for prices and specific menu. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: 910-725-1345 or the flavorexchange.com.

CUSTOM HOMES REMODELING METAL BUILDING

Proudly supporting the Military. Ask us how you can receive your custom home plans for FREE. WINNER OF 4 - 2014 HOME OF THE YEAR AWARDS! Certified Green Professional • NC Housing Hall of Fame

Daniel Adams, Owner

Phone: (910) 295-1504 • Fax: (910) 295-1549 Email: Danny@danieladams.com PO BOX 3090 • Pinehurst, NC 28374 www.danieladams.com

MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET. 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. Produce only, fresh and locally grown. SE Broad St. and New York Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 9473752 or (910) 690-9520 or moorecountync.gov/index.php/ farmers-market.

Art Galleries ABOUT ART GALLERY inside The Market Place Midland Bistro Building, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst. The gallery features local artists. Open Monday-Friday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (910) 215-596.

MOORE COUNTY’S MOST TRUSTED PLUMBING COMPANY Service & Repairs | Residential & Commercial Remodels | New Construction

Artist GAlleRy OF SOUTHERN PINES, 167 E. New Hampshire Avenue., Southern Pines. Features art and fine crafts from more than 60 North Carolina artists. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon – 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst. Showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Carol Bechtel, Jason Craighead, Linda Ruth Dickinson, Bruce Dorfman, Kathleen Earthrowl. Meetthe-artist opportunities available. Monday-Friday (closed Wednesday), 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 1 – 4 p.m and special appointments. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue., Southern Pines. Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and every third weekend of the month from 2 – 4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. Exchange Street Gallery, Artists League of

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

& Repair, LLC

Call Jeremy Lowder 910-673-5291

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street in historic Aberdeen. “It’s Southern, Ya’ll,” works of Pat McMahon and Betty DiBartolomeo. September 2-28. Regular hours noon to 3:00, Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. The Gallery at Seven Lakes at the St. Mary Magdalene building, 1145 Seven Lakes Drive. Just nine miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211, this gallery is dedicated to local artists. Wednesday-Thursday 1 – 4 p.m. Hastings Gallery in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. – 9 p.m., Friday 7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. HOLLYHOCKS ART GALLERY, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Features artwork by local award winning artists, Diane Kraudelt, Linda Griffin, Jessie MacKay, Julie Messerschmidt, Charles Roberts, and artist/owner, Jane Casnellie. Monday-Saturday 10:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Sunday 4 – 9:30 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www.hollyhocksartgallery.com. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 21 Chinquapin Road, Pinehurst. Features local artists. Tuesday-Saturday 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www. ladybedfords.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen. Specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Monday, Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. SANDHILLS WOMEN’S EXCHANGE, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. All merchandise at the Exchange is handmade by consignors who live in the community. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Tuesday through Saturday. Lunch served 11.30 a.m – 2 p.m. (910) 295-4677.

Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908.

Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines. Showcases art of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Monday, Wednesday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., (910) 695-0029.

Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2 – 5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (9 10) 947-2331.

SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Dr., Aberdeen. Tues.Sat. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery. com.

House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051.

Studio 590 by the pond in Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle, Pinehurst. This historic log cabin is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. (910) 639-9404.

Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1 – 4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739.

Nature Centers

North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261.

Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882.

Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642.

White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100.

Shaw House. Open 1 – 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. (910) 692-2051.

Weymouth Woods Sandhills Natur e Pr eserve (898 acres). 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167.

Union Station. Open 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin. Open 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677. PS

VILLAGE ARBORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

To add an event, email us at pinestraw.calendar@gmail.com by the first of the month prior to the event. Or go to www.thepilot. com and add the event to our online calendar.

Historical Sites Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Key:

• •A Art

Music/Concerts rts

Dance/Theater

& C ulture

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

Benedict Cumberbatch

Hamlet by William Shakespeare directed by Lyndsey Turner produced by Sonia Friedman Productions presented by barbican

Showing October 15 & 16 2pm October 17 7pm

$25 Reserved Seating all shows The Sunrise Theater 910.692.3611 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC information@sunrisetheater.com www.SunriseTheater.org The Sunrise Preservation Group is a 501(c)(3) Tax-Deductable, Non-Profit Organization

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Arts & C ulture

2015/16 MOORE COUNTY/SOUTHERN PINES SEASON Orchestral Love Stories

OPENING NIGHT

Russian Spectacular

THUR, FEB 4, 2016 | 8PM

FRI, OCT 2, 2015 | 8PM

Andrew Tyson, piano

Favorite Light Classics

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons TUES, MAR 22, 2016 | 8PM

SAT, NOV 14, 2015 | 8PM

A Baroque Christmas SUN, DEC 6, 2015 | 7:30PM

Beethoven’s “Emperor” Concerto

SEASON FINALE

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto

SUN, JAN 17, 2016 | 7:30PM

Inon Barnaton, piano

THUR, APR 28, 2016 | 8PM

Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin

LEE AUDITORIUM, PINECREST HIGH SCHOOL, SOUTHERN PINES

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September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Arts & C ulture

FALL 2015 CLASSES OIL and ACRYLIC

IMPRESSIONISM (OIL) Laine Francis - Monday/Tuesday September 14/15, 10:00-3:00, $80 OIL PAINTING WITH COURTNEY Courtney Herndon – Friday/Saturday, October 20/21 9:00-3:30 $110 LOCAL SCENES AND LANDSCAPES Harry Neely – Thursday/Friday, October 22/23, 10:00-3:00 $80

WATERCOLOR

WATERCOLOR PENCIL Sandra Kinnunen – Thursday, October 8, 9:00-12:00 $30 WATERCOLOR EXCITEMENT Irene Dobson – Tuesday, October 27, Wednesday, October 28, 9:00-12:00 $60

DRAWING

CALLIGRAPHY Barbara Sickenberger - Tuesday, September 22, Tuesday, September 29, 1:00-3:00 $40 FIGURE DRAWING (WITH A LIVE MODEL) Linda Bruening - Wednesday, October 7, 9:00-12:00 $40 DRAW IT I - HOW TO DRAW AN OBJECT Sandra Kinunnen – Thursday, October 15, 10:00-3:00 $40 FIGURE DRAWING (WITH A LIVE MODEL) Linda Bruening - Thursday, October 29, 9:00-12:00 $40

COLORED PENCILS

Make your Mark To advertise on PineStraw’s Arts & Culture page, c a l l 9 1 0 - 6 9 2 - 7 2 7 1

WATERCOLOR PENCIL Sandra Kinnunen – Thursday, October 8, 10:00-3:00 $40

OTHER MEDIUMS

SCRATCHBOARD Emma Wilson – Wednesday, September 2, 10:00-3:00 $40 BLOCK PRINTING Lynn Goldhammer – Tuesday/Wednesday, September 8/9, 12:30-4:00 $92 - Supplies included SILK SCARVES Kathy Leuck – Wednesday, September 30, 9:00-2:00 $77 – Supplies included GO WITH THE FLOW-BASIC ALCOHOL INK Pam Griner – Saturday, October 10, 12:00-3:00 $40 - Supplies included PRINTMAKING MADE EASY-MONOPRINTS Sandy Stratil – Monday, October 19, 10:00-4:00 $53 INK-TASTIC-INTERMEDIATE ALCOHOL INK Pam Griner – Saturday, October 24, 12:00-3:00 $50 - Supplies included ET GALLERY EXCHANGE STRE

“POSTCARDES” HOMeo FROM DiBartelom

Betty and Harry Neely h Sept. 29th Show runs throug

Follow us on

Check us out & register at www.artistleague.org 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen • 944-3979

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Arts & C ulture

Celebrate Heritage Month In Scotland County Four Cultures • Four Weekends • Four Festivals

KUUMBA FESTIVAL Celebration of our African-American Heritage. Saturday, September 26th from 9:00 to 4:00 in Market Park in Laurinburg. Free. www.kuumbafestnc.com

SCOTLAND COUNTY HIGHLAND GAMES Saturday, October 3rd from 9:00 to 4:00 at the John Blue Complex. Advanced ticket are $12 for adults, $3 for children ($15 and $5 at the door). www.schgnc.org

JOHN BLUE COTTON FESTIVAL Celebrates our rural roots. October 10th – 11th at the John Blue Complex. $5 for adults. Free for children 6 and under. www.johnbluecottonfestival.com

STORYTELLING FESTIVAL OF CAROLINA Held October 16th through the 18th presents world-renowned storytellers performing each day from 9:30 to 5:00. For ticket info, visit www.storyartscenter.org

Fall 2015 – www.visitnc-soul.com 126

September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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Service is our middle name

707-H S. Pinehurst St. Aberdeen, NC 910-944-2044 www.sunbeltservicepros.com

September 2015 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


By Sandra Redding

I find television very educating. Every time someone turns on the set, I go into the other room and read a book. — Groucho Marx

Literary Events

September 10–12 (Thursday–Saturday). 2015 Festival of Books and Authors — Bookmarks, Winston-Salem. David Baldacci starts things out on September 10, with authors eating and greeting on the 11th and family-friendly, free activities on the 12th. Look for downtown readings, presentations, panel discussions, workshops and book signings. Registration: bookmarksbookfestival.org. September 15–19 (Tuesday–Saturday). On the Same Page Literary Festival: A Celebration of Reading, West Jefferson. Come for one day or all five to hear writers like Ann Pancake and Edward Kelsey Moore. Explore a medley of activities, including workshops, book fair, readings, lunch with an author and hikes. Most events free but registration is required: onthesamepagefestival.org. September 19 (Saturday), 10 a.m. N.C. Poetry Society Annual Meeting, Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities, Southern Pines. Join fellow poets for readings, presentations, poetry competition, an open mic and lunch. Info: ncpoetrysociety.org.

Read something that will make you look good if you die in the middle of it. — P. J. O’Rourke

Congratulations

In July at the 2015 N.C. Writers Conference Banquet held at the Washington Civic Center, in Little Washington, members and guests roasted and toasted Michael Parker, the 2015 honoree. A distinguished professor at UNCG and author of six novels, “Parker writes descriptions as precise as line engravings, more revealing than recordings or photographs.” That, according to The Washington Post. Gabrielle Brant Freeman of Greenville won first place ($200) in the 2015 Randall Jarrell Poetry Competition. Her winning poem, “Failure to Obliterate,” will be published by storySouth. Recently published N. C. books: Heading East? Check out John E. Batchelor’s Chefs of the Coast: Restaurants & Recipes from the North Carolina Coast . . . Prefer

mystery? Deceived: A Sam McClellan Tale, by Laura S. Wharton, is an exciting thriller that takes place at Carolina Beach . . . Poetry enthusiasts should dip into two new chapbooks from Jacar Press: The Vishnu Bird, by former N. C. Poet Laureate Kathryn Stripling Byer, and Astir, Kevin Boyle’s newest collection . . . N. C. State professor Cat Warren penned the perfect book for pet owners. What the Dog Knows reveals how her cadaver dog, Solo, sniffs out truffles, bedbugs and graves . . . Speaking of graves, history buffs will appreciate So Much Blood: The Civil War Letters of CSA William W. Beard, 1861– 1865, co-authored by Bill Trotter of Greensboro . . . The reissued version of Curing Time, by Tim Swink, contains discussion questions, always popular with book club members. Info: tj.swink@yahoo.com or Pegasusbooks.net.

Lesson

Most readers are impatient. If the first paragraph of a book doesn’t satisfy, they go to the next book. Successful first lines of novels need a hook and spinner. Some writers use rich sensual descriptions or succinctly depict characters and settings. The best add a dollop of mystery or humor. Recently, after perusing several books penned by N.C. authors, I selected beginnings that opened the door, inviting me in for an interesting ride. Charles Frazier, Nightwoods: “Luce’s new stranger children were small and beautiful and violent.” Jan Karon, Somewhere Safe with Somebody Good: “His wife was determined to march him to the country club this Saturday evening. Worse, he’d have to stuff himself into his old tux like sausage into a casing.” Robert Morgan, This Rock: “Preacher Liner said he would let me preach the Sunday after Homecoming. He’s a big heavy feller with droopy jowls, and he said it as a favor to Mama more than anything else cause no preacher likes to share his pulpit, not any that I ever heard of.” Michael Parker, All I Have in This World: “The town was small and so was the boy. His name was Randy and he was Maria’s size exactly. They fit together tongue and groove, which to Maria, who at seventeen had never had a boyfriend, meant that it was meant.” Kathy Reichs, Flash and Bones: “Looking back, I think of it as race week in the rain. Thunderboomers every day. Sure, it was spring. But these storms were over the top.” PS Greensboro writer Sandra Redding’s novel, Naomi Wise: A Cautionary Tale, is a riveting story about heartbreak and hope in a Quaker community.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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SandhillSeen

Colette Leber

War Horse Event Series Carolina Horse Park Sunday, July 12, 2015

Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Mike Plumb, Shellie Sommerson Holly & Tony Faye Riportella

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Darcy Dean on Trigger

Amanda Anderson, Dante, Chris Oswald, Tiger

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Dr. Tom Daniel, Jane Murray

Angelo Lobsinger, Anne Chapman

Rachael Eckert Will Faudree

Marcie Quist, Katherine Smart

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015i��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Franklin Ward, Mary Jane Thomas

Dinner to Honor Pinehurst Police Quail Haven Saturday, July 25, 2015 Photographs by Al & Annette Daniels

Norma Sullins Jim Beach, Angela & Jamie Boles

Ray Fiorillo, Kathleen & Bill Shulby, Nancy Fiorillo Margaret Widman, Rhonda Phipps, Pinehurst Police Chief Earl Phipps, Bill Hipple

Pinehurst Police Officer Cameron Parent, Deputy Police Chief Rickey Gooch

Pinehurst Police Officer Keith Gorham

Mary Agnes Bolden, Ray & Nancy Fiorillo, Betty Tucker

Joanne Walsh, Brad Johnson

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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SandhillSeen

Bob, Jen and Noah Kissinger

Donald Parks

A Stroke of Patriotism Railhouse Brewery Saturday, July 18, 2015

Photographs by London Gessner Joanne, Joel, and Michael Rabdau

Sandra Holloway, Livie McCue Jan Leitschuh and Lindsey Simmons

Drew Williams and Mike Baker

John & Rachel Junio, Leonard Walker, Vincent Alaniz

Tod Crosby, Stacey Ingram, Alan Parker and Mandy Midgett

Bob Way and Denise Perry

Mary Maloney, Carol Ray, Susan Foster

John McMahon and Sgt. Ronald Richards

Joan Williams and Mary Ann Halstead

Betsy, Hannah and William Saye

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015i��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Michelle, Chris, and Thalia Couch

SandhillSeen

Charlotte Owen, Katie Crouch

Weymouth’s Summer Concert Series Breakfast Club Band Thursday, July 30, 2015 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Fallon, Jaiden, and Brianna Brewington

Ashley Gonzalez, Yashira Cangas

Danielle Hill, with Max John Tampa, Robyn James, Julie Tampa

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Laura Hale, Cindy McGurk

Carole Boxell, Lauri Carter, Judi Kempf

Jethro, Jasper, Jennifer, Josie Jowanda, Conan Bateman

Janine Cone, Jordan Medlin, Kea Capel

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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SandhillSeen

Scott & Michele Murphy

First Friday Downtown Southern Pines Friday, August 7, 2015

Photographs by London Gessner Rick Catana, McKenzie Cooper, Mitchell Casey, Olivia Matcham Patricia Tocco and Joel Martin Libba & John Oettinger

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Kevin Otis, Frank and Inge Wanko

Caroline, Wyatt & Shaun Carlson

Mitch Lancaster, Elizabeth Oettinger

Jack & Joyce McKenna

Missy, Taylor Bunch, Whitney Parker

Emily & Anthony Parks

Uwe Hagedorn, Mark Wathen

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September PineNeedler Football 1

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By Mart Dickerson

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8 Make over 1 Zeus' wife 9 cookies Beehive State 2 Famous 20 21 22 23 snack with tortilla 3 Football 10 Megahertz, (abbr.). chips 11 Football snack with 24 25 26 4 Principle pepperoni 27 28 29 30 31 5 halloween 15 mo. Horse’s walking 6 bullfight cheer sound 32 33 34 35 36 37 7 outgo 17 Game cubes 38 39 40 8 Make over 19 Aurora 9 beehive state 41 42 43 22 Choose 10 Megahertz abr. 25 Football salty snack 44 45 46 11 Football snack with 26 “In a ____,” irritated pepperoni 47 48 49 50 51 Apexsound walking 15 horse's27 17 Game cubes 28 Not near 52 53 54 55 56 57 19 aurora 29 More reasonable 58 59 60 61 62 22 Choose30 Tiny particles 25 Football salty snack 63 64 65 31 Smidgeon 26 'In a ____", irritated 33 __ d’etat 66 67 68 27 apex 35 Evenness, as a 28 not near hanging picture 29 More reasonable 36 Canal 30 tiny particles 29 Maintain34 labored ACROSS 58 Mounts (2 wds.) ACROSS 37 Colorer 31 smidgeon 32 Flying saucer 1 Old, ugly woman 60 Phantom of ___ 38 Western bars 39 Egg-shaped __ d'etat 33 33 Siamese,40calicos, for 4 Sounds disapproval 63 Football snack with woman earthenware 1 old,ofugly a hanging 35 evenness, 40 as H.S. dance example dip 4 sounds of disapproval 41 advanced showing 8 Tush picture 42 New Testament long 34 Labored 64 Part of a chain 42 Writer bombeck 8 tushbird 12 Flightless 36 Canal letter Compete against, 38 Western43 bars 12 Flightless bird 65 old “Game, ____, Match” 13 Organization 37 Colorer45 Grain concerned 44 opportunely 66 BBQ roasting skewer 13 organization 40 with Earthenware concerned with civil 39 egg-shaped 46 Radar echo Football refreshment civil(abbr.) liberties (abbr.) 41 Advanced liberties 46 showing 67 Dueling sword40 h.s. dance Moral principle Gangster's girlfriend 47 14 47 Metric weight unit (alt, spelling) 14 Moral principle 68 Scandinavian country 42 new testament long letter Point, as a gun old two-seater car 50 16 48 Petroleum export 42 Writer Bombeck 16 Old two-seater car that borders Norway, 45 Grain 51 brand of laundry detergent 18 "razzle, ____" group, for short Finland, (abbr.) 43 Compete against, old 18 “Razzle, ____” 46 radar echo 20 Computer code for 52 tax specialist, abr. 49 Bases for plaster 44 Opportunely 20 Computer code for 47 Metric weight unit characters 53 slaps 51 Heeded thefor alarm characters DOWN Peroleum export group, 48 46 Football55 refreshment Football snack, with celery 21 Winnie the __ clock 21 Winnie the __ 1 Zeus’ wife short and blue cheese 23 Collection of animals 47 Gangster’s girlfriend Shoshonean for plaster 23 Collection of animals 2 Famous cookies49 bases 53 50 Point, as58 a gun Cancer society Mounts (2 wds.) 24 american 54 Institution heeded the alarm clock (abbr.) 51 24 American 3 Football snack with Phantom of ___ (abbr.)Cancer 51 Brand of60laundry shoshonean 53 56 Shot up, as a child Society (abbr.) tortilla chips detergent63 Football snack with dip 25 Catch some Z's (abbr.) 54 Institution 57 Satisfy, like an 25 Catch some Z’s 4 Principle of a chain treesTax specialist, 64 Part 26 Gets liquid from pine 52 (abbr.) a child 56 shot up, as appetite 26 Gets froma pine 5 Halloween mo. It __ upon Midnight53 Clear... "Game, ____,Match" 27 liquid 65 Slaps like Drink an appetite 57 satisfy,59 slowly trees bbQ roasting 6 skewer 29 Maintain Bullfight cheer drink slowly 55 Football66 snack, with 59 61 With it 27 It32 __ Upon a dueling sword7 Outgo Flying saucer 67blue celery and cheese 61 With it Midnight ClearCalicos, . . . for 62 Vane direction 33 siamese, 68 scandinavian country that 62 Vane direction borders norway, Finland, abr. example 16

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Sudoku:

Fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3x3 box contain the numbers 1–9. Puzzle answers on page 112

Mart Dickerson lives in Southern Pines and would welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle masters. She can be reached at gdickerson@nc.rr.com.

35 Shaw Rd SW, Pinehurst $750,000 MLS#170362 Meticulously restored 1922 cottage on beautiful 1 acre lot, just a few blocks from Pinehurst Resort. Over 3500sf main level living with 4bd/4ba, full basement w/ double garage, private inground pool and much more. Detailed list of features available upon request.

Kim Stout 910-528-2008

5 8

9 1 7 6

2 4 6 9 7 3 4 7 5 3 9 6 2

VINTAGE CLASSIC IN THE VILLAGE

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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September 2015i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e A c c i d e nta l A st r o l o g e r

Get You a Cherry Slurpee and Enjoy the Equinox, Star Children! By Astrid Stellanova

September may be the ninth month, but it means seven. In the

cosmos, seven is a very lucky number. My sweetheart Beau and I shop exclusively at the 7-Eleven throughout the whole month of September. Grab a Slurpee and watch summer sliding on out, faster than you get to the bottom of the cup. There’s also more to celebrate when it comes to astral parties. The autumn equinox falls on the 23rd. My new car tag says “Ad Astra,” dear readers, which means, “to the stars.” Virgo (August 23—September 22) You give off a lot of radiance this month; you feel good, look good, and don’t you know it, Birthday Baby? There’s nothing like gifts and cake to set a good mood, and there’s a lot to look forward to long after the wrappings are in the recycling bin. During the 13th, there is a partial solar eclipse that you will find sparks more than a little energy and special oomph factor for Virgo. By the 27th, a total lunar eclipse will give you a sense of peace you haven’t had in a long while. Then, to top it all off, there’s more happening in the stars that gives you plenty to think about. Adapt, adjust and just try not to bust, Star Child. Libra (September 23—October 22) This is worth knowing: Mercury is in retrograde between September 17 and October 9 in your sign, Libras. So make the most of the time beforehand, because the retrograde leaves you a little bit out of sorts. OK, Honey, a lot out of sorts. Some say “don’t sign, don’t buy” during retrogrades. I just say, swim against the tide and enjoy the exercise. Helps firm up them flabby upper arms. Scorpio (October 23—November 21) Pay attention late in this month when there are some absolutely fabulous things happening in the night sky. On September 27, there is a total lunar eclipse. Look up; you may find something unusual also happens in how you feel about your time on planet Earth. You will find yourself in an entirely unusual and exciting position — even when upright, Baby Cakes. Sagittarius (November 22—December 21) It’s true, and just about exhausting for you. Someone close to you has been doing a Benjamin Button and acting stupider and stupider. You can’t make them wise up any more than you can bend spoons with your big toe. Shift your attention to becoming a bigger person, and graduating to the next astral plane like the star that you are. Capricorn (December 22—January 19) Your temper is getting hotter than a solar flare. If somebody crosses you, you are out of control, Honey. Get it in check. Life is not about getting in the last word. Would you rather hold onto righteous indignation, or would you rather be the favorite neighbor everybody wants to share watermelon and homemade ice cream with? Practice smiling; it won’t hurt a bit. Aquarius (January 20—February 18) Just because somebody you know very, very well can cuss the paint off your toenails don’t mean they are right. The worst thing about someone closest to you is how they manage to intimidate you with just a cross look and a smart alecky comeback. Caving in to them may seem easier, but that isn’t how you become your best self. They are smugly superior and haven’t earned the right to be the boss of you. Pisces (February 19—March 20) The lunar eclipse on September 27 will close out a chapter in your life that you have

been reading and stewing over for a long, long time. Say goodbye to some baggage you’ve been carrying around like your life depended upon it. Now it’s someone else’s problem — never should have been yours to carry anyhow. With a lighter load, your heart is going to lift, and next month you finally get something long owed or promised. Aries (March 21—April 19) In the train station of life you always want to sit in the first-class section with your head high, even if you were riding to prison. That’s part of what makes me smile about Aries; you know how to live it up, as if each day is your last, whether you are at the ice cream store or sitting on death row. You are a cheeky monkey who makes life in general a lot more fun; that’s an adorable trait, Star Child. Go first class; you are the first sign in the cosmos, and never destined to ride in cargo. Taurus (April 20—May 20) There is a pattern of innovation in your life right now that is pretty unusual. Ride that wave. You may feel frustrated that your last creative effort was not as well-received as hoped, but be patient as the tide is turning. You get noticed and rewarded for having special insights that leave some jealous and others downright slack-jawed. And just as a beauty pointer: Update your wardrobe while you are riding high. You are overdue to be a teensey bit selfish, Sugar. Gemini (May 21—June 20) Honey, some collect tolls and others seemed destined to pay them. You have your hand out saying “gimme” but sooner or later the Universe will remind you it’s better to extend a hand to someone else. This is a time where giving is going to pay you much bigger psychic rewards; check your impulse to muscle to the front of the line. Give a little. Cancer (June 21—July 22) It appears to me that you are on the cusp of making a personal breakthrough you couldn’t have guessed would ever, ever happen. The step you take may look small to others, but it is a big step ahead for you. Treasure your good fortune; be thankful. It is going to open something up within you that could transform everything ahead. This is a surprising period for small miracles in your life that will pay big in your sense of happiness. Leo (July 23—August 22) Leos keep their trials and tribulations to themselves, and only like to talk about the triumphs. That’s fine, but your friends want to know you on a deeper level. This means it is time to share your story — without leaving out the not-so-good bits. There is someone you believe who wronged you that you actually wronged. Examine yourself, Sweet Thing. Resist the urge to make your life a living fiction, no matter how great a storyteller you are. PS

For years, Astrid Stellanova owned and operated Curl Up and Dye Beauty Salon in the boondocks of North Carolina until arthritic fingers and her popular astrological readings provoked a new career path.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2015

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southwords

Pine Pace

By Joyce Reehling

One day it occurred to me that a change, a

shift, had happened. It was not just that I felt more Southern than Northern by virtue of a change in the pace of my walk, but it was also that my purpose had shifted without much effort.

I am basically the same person who arrived here seven years ago, but the pines and people have rubbed some knots out of me. My fast-paced life in theater and commuting to “the City” every day had wound me tight. The mad scramble to reinvent oneself every five minutes had wound me tighter. Darling husband might argue there are knots that still need undoing. He is usually right about these things. But knots are not easy to undo, no matter the time in the pines. The South and retirement, which I hope to embrace more fully with each month, have slowed me down some. But as anyone can tell you, retirement is a busy time if one is not careful. I am in the process of pulling back from activities I threw myself into when we first arrived. Of late I have been thinking about purpose and the direction to take for the next thirty years. For the first fifty-eight years I had a strong and demanding path. I am now almost free from that path. It is time to redirect. Darling husband is top o’ the list. Tick-tock cries the clock, so every moment needs to be honored. He and I are not Velcro-ed together during the day but we do derive great joy from our deliberate time together. I want more of that anywhere we can get it, be it here, Boone or Paris. I want devoted time with my girlfriends here and up North and time with my resilient mom, who greets 90 in August. I want time in my chaise with a book. Here is the other joy I have found in this place: The pace that is changing me is also bringing gifts of chats on the street, in the lobby of The Sunrise

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Theater and in the halls of The Pilot. If I choose I can slow down to enjoy life and y’all. But it is a choice we have to make for ourselves. To my brethren who must drive 65 in a 45 mile an hour zone I say: This may sound odd, but you are wasting time rather than gaining it. The rush really doesn’t deliver. Besides, I usually see you at the same red light I reach going 45. Or I pass you in a roadside conversation with one of the officers who enforce our not rushing. It ain’t worth it. You are killing your own joy. Walking down the streets of Southern Pines or any town down here, I am saddened when I see folks on phones. Put them down and look in the windows, look in the eyes of the person passing and say “Hey.” This delivers more than a distracted chat that you probably don’t need to have anyway. In this century Americans are obsessed with appearing to be busy, famous or overwhelmed. There is a belief that this denotes importance. The truth is most of us are just regular folks. For us the most important thing we can do is hear our inner voice, listen to the people we are with, and be open to the happy accident of unplanned encounters. Relearning this has been my newest joy at age 66. But at 10 or 90, it is a life-saving thing. My change is to slow down and try to put down devices. My purpose is to serve others by simply being present where I am. The pines and people are teaching me to be present in my day and slow down just enough to do good rather than do a lot. Here, in the land of the longleaf, the tall and lovely pines rustle on a breezy day. If you sit on the Java Bean deck or in the new Pinehurst green or in your backyard, you will hear the shush and sighs of the needles, not unlike the gentle sounds we use to lull babies to sleep. When I stop long enough to hear this, my mind relaxes. Time slows down. I remember that I am home and not required to rush. It just takes practice for this morphing Northerner. PS Joyce Reehling is a veteran actor of stage and screen and an old friend of PineStraw.

September 2015i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

Illustration by Meridith Martens

How the longleaf breezes taught a speedy Northerner to slow down Southern-style


Buyer, Purveyor & Appraiser of Fine and Estate Jewellery 229 NE Broad Street • Southern Pines, NC • (910) 692-0551 • in-House Repairs Mother and Daughter Leann and Whitney Parker Look Forward to Welcoming You to WhitLauter.


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September PineStraw 2015  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

September PineStraw 2015  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

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