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Live the Lifeyou want

Enjoy golf privileges at 8 premier courses!

Call today and reserve your private tour of our spacious homes, quaint cottages and beautiful apartments. Discover all Pine Knoll and Belle Meade have to offer as two

Nationally Accredited Continuing Care Retirement Communities.

Call

910-246-1008 today for lunch and a tour!

St. Joseph of the Pines is the leading provider of senior living and healthcare serving the Sandhills region since 1948.

www.sjp.org


September 2011 Volume 6, No. 9

Departments

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10 17

Sweet Tea Chronicles

62 The Brown Compound By Deborah Salomon Where beauty and surprises abound

PinePitch Postcard from Nicaragua

72 Last of His Breed By John Wilson

78 Small Is Beautiful By Noah Salt 82 Emily’s Garden By Noah Salt

A legendary inn and the man who owned it Unlimited beauty in limited space

19 21

Cos and Effect Cos Barnes The Omnivorous Reader

25 29 31

Bookshelf Hitting Home Dale Nixon The Kitchen Garden

89 September Almanac

Stephen E. Smith

52 Home & Horse By Deborah Salomon How a horse-loving couple transformed Fox Lake Farm

Jim Dodson

Cassie Butler

Features

Jan Leitschuh

35 37 39 41 42 45 49

Vine Wisdom Robyn James Spirits Frank Daniels III Out of the Blue Deborah Salomon Birdwatch Susan Campbell The Sporting Life Tom Bryant Golftown Journal Lee Pace Pleasures of Life

Nicole White 114

Calendar 129 SandhillSeen 141 The Accidental Astrologer Astrid Stellanova 143 PineNeedler Mart Dickerson 144 SouthWords Kelly Ann Miller

A famous poet and a woman of the stage meet in a special garden

The perfect month to harvest, plant and plan 91 Designer Living Rooms A trio of talented designers show their stuff 97 Hunt & Gather Our intrepid style hunters are at it again 01 Wake Up Call By Deborah Salomon 1 Perfect linens and a fresh breeze mean peaceful sleep

02 The Fine Art of Staging a House 1 By Mary Elle Hunter Secrets to a well-shown home 04 A Room of My Own 1 By Kathryn Galloway And baby makes two

Cover Photograph by John Gessner Photograph this page by Tim Sayer

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


DUX The Bed For Life

The Bed Your Back Has Been Aching For ™

Back pain can interfere with your sleep and with your quality of life. The DUX® Bed has thousands of springs that contour to your body to help keep your spine gently supported in a natural position. Back pain eases away as your body stays in perfect alignment. Say good-bye to back discomfort and hello to DUX!

The DUX Bed helps the spine rest in a natural position.

DUXIANA at The Mews Downtown Southern Pines 910.725.1577


PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Kathryn Galloway, Associate Art Director Ashley Wahl, Editorial Assistant Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Photographers

John Gessner Laura L. Gingerich Tim Sayer Hannah Sharpe

Contributors

Cos Barnes, Tom Bryant, Cassie Butler, Susan Campbell, Maureen Clark, Frank Daniels III, Mart Dickerson, Mary Elle Hunter, Robyn James, Pamela Powers January, Jan Leitschuh, Kelly Ann Miller, Dale Nixon, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Noah Salt, Lisa Sauder, Astrid Stellanova, Angie Tally, Nicole White, John Wilson

David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Ginny Kelly, 910.693.2481 • ginnykelly@thepilot.com Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Marty Hefner, 910.693.2508 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Pat Taylor, Advertising Director 910.693.2505 • pat@thepilot.com Advertising Graphic Design

Kathryn Galloway, B.J. Hill Mechelle Wood, Scott Yancey, Kristen Clark Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488 • dstark@thepilot.com PineStraw Magazine 910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2011. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PINEHURST

303 Hampton Drive – 2 BR / 2 BA / Nicely Renovated

This charming unit in the Hamptons of Pinehurst is a rare find. The beautiful renovations and open floor plan together make this home a true gem. It features hardwood floors, large picture windows, vaulted ceiling, granite kitchen counters, tile floors, built-in shelving, a gas fireplace and lots of storage room. Its easy living at its best! $182,500 Code 744

www.303HamptonDrive.com

PINEHURST

44 Deerwood Lane – 4 BR / 2.5 BA/ Pinehurst #6

SEVEN LAKES NORTH

105 Cobblestone Court – 3 BR / 2 BA / Water View

Enjoy the relaxing water views from the enclosed front porch. Inside the functional kitchen will be a favorite gathering spot with a pretty workspace and oak cabinets. The home features 2 guest bedrooms and a master suite with private bath. The living room has a vaulted ceiling with wood beams and brick fireplace. Enjoy time on the lower level with a rec room and workshop! $144,000 Code 633

SOUTHERN PINES

195 Midland Road – 3 BR / 2 BA / Open Plan

This one story brick ranch has been elegantly renovated and has an open floor plan and many inviting features including: hardwood floors, lots of windows overlooking an oversized yard, chair railing, crown molding, granite counters, built-in desk, bay window, built-in shelving and a circular tray ceiling just to name a few. You’ll enjoy the short walk to the Village of Southern Pines to take advantage of dining and shopping! $172,000 Code 731

www.105CobblestoneCourt.com

www.195MidlandRoad.com

SEVEN LAKES SOUTH

SEVEN LAKES WEST

135 Lancashire Lane – 3 BR / 2 BA / Gated Community

142 Banbridge Drive – 3 BR / 3 BA / Golf Front

This lovely all brick home offers upscale landscaping and a bright and open floor plan that is sure to please. Features include hardwood flooring, crown molding, decorative chair railing, chandelier lighting, vaulted ceiling, gas fireplace, bay window, granite kitchen counters, tile floors, main level master bedroom, generous sized guest bedrooms and lots of storage! $329,900 Code 743

This terrific home has a bright and open floor plan and has lots to offer. The kitchen has lots of cabinets and work space for the cook. The living room features a vaulted ceiling and fireplace. The master bedroom has a walk-in closet and private bath. Additional features include: 2 sunrooms, 2 guest bedrooms, a second full bath, 2 car garage & large deck! $195,000 Code 680

Beautiful solid brick home located on the 3rd green of Beacon Ridge. The main level features a spacious kitchen, formal dining room, living room with golf views, a bonus room, a master suite along with 2 guest bedrooms. The home also features a full lower level walk-out that can be finished to drastically increase living area at minimal cost. Additional features of this home include a covered front entry, gutter system, oversized two car garage and much more! $319,000 Code 708

www.44DeerwoodLane.com

www.135LancashireLane.com

www.142BanbridgeDrive.com

MID SOUTH CLUB

PINEHURST

PINEHURST

28 Plantation Drive – 4 BR / 4.5 BA / Golf Front

135 Wild Turkey Run – 4 BR / 3.5 BA / Swimming Pool

60 Pinewild Drive – 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Golf Front

Absolutely pristine and ready to move in featuring beautiful custom details throughout. The living room takes full advantage of the golf view while the gourmet kitchen is a cooks dream. The master bedroom is generous in size and features a private bath. The upper level features an office, two additional guest bedrooms each with private baths and a hobby or craft room. This is a must see home! $534,900 Code 788

A beautiful and spacious home located in a wonderful neighborhood. The main level features a large gourmet kitchen, formal dining room, office, spacious family room with fireplace and a master suite with private bath perfect for relaxing. The upper level features 3 bedrooms with 2 full baths and a bonus room. Enjoy the privacy in the backyard while you take a dip in the pool! $489,000 Code 734

A private winding driveway leads to this unique contemporary home which has a great location and panoramic views of the 13th hole of the Magnolia course in Pinewild. This home has a cozy fireplace, hardwood flooring, a well designed kitchen and a master suite on the main level. The upper level has 2 guest bedrooms, a full bath, bonus room and landing area. This home is immaculate and well kept! $397,700 Code 725

www.28PlantationDrive.com

www.135WildTurkeyRun.com

www.60PinewildDrive.com

PINEHURST

FOXFIRE

ABERDEEN

1425 Monticello Drive – 3 BR / 3 BA / Very Private

This lovely cottage has been beautifully renovated and it sure to please. The dining room has built-ins while the living room features a gas fireplace with built-in cabinets and shelving. The kitchen offers an eating area while the master bedroom features a private bath. Also included in this wonderful home 2 guest bedrooms, 2 car garage, irrigation system and easy access to both Pinehurst and Southern Pines! $209,000 Code 730

www.1425MonticelloDrive.com

5 Buckhorn Road – 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Golf Front

105 Silverburn Place – 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Glen Laurel

Best buy in Moore County! Enjoy the great split floor plan and expansive golf views. This home features a large screened porch, formal dining room, bright kitchen, private master suite, 2 guest bedrooms, covered front & rear porches and a 2 car garage. Special touches include crown molding, chair rail, chandelier lighting and vaulted living room ceiling! $196,000 Code 793

This 2 level split plan home is just waiting for you! It’s located in a great neighborhood on a quiet cul-de-sac. It features a super floor plan. Guests can enjoy themselves on the upper level while the master suite on the lower level offers privacy. You’ll also find an inviting kitchen, formal dining room, living room with fireplace, fenced backyard, storage shed and a large back deck! $260,000 Code 796

www.5BuckhornRoad.com

www.105SilverburnPlace.com

View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at

www.MarthaGentry.com


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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SWEET TEA CHRoNiCLES

September Song By JiM DODsON

T

he house suddenly feels a little too big again. September’s come and the boys have gone back to school. Two are in college — one just starting, the other just finishing — and one waits in the wings, counting the days until his freedom arrives. Their big sister, meanwhile, who finished last spring, has her new apartment and new boyfriend and new job in Vermont — and promises to come visit but probably won’t until Christmas, with or without the boyfriend in tow. That giant sigh of relief you hear is coming from me as I sit in one of the ancient wooden Adirondack chairs that grace our back stone terrace, the same chairs that sat on our lawn up in Maine for decades, through hard winters and surprisingly hot summers. Made from Northern hemlock, crafted by a woodworking poet, they survived long enough to make the journey home to Carolina five years ago, and are still going strong. Perhaps, to paraphrase Proust on cake, memory lies in the wood — the memory of all those fine Northern summers and stunning Yankee autumns. Every year, you see, I whine about the rigors of Sandhills summer — the unrelenting heat, the sudden absence of friends, the loss of desire to do anything but sit like a potted plant on my shaded terrace — and every year I think it can’t get worse, but this year really did get worse, with a record heat wave that pulverized my terrace garden despite a string of thunderstorms and my faithful evening watering sessions. Following a brilliant explosion of fuchsia blooms, a newly planted clematis dutifully scaled the old birdfeeder post I relocated to a new perennial bed, then seemed to wilt from the elements. The hostas and daylilies bravely put forth blooms but seemed to shrivel and give up the ghost in record time. Even the hardy geraniums seemed worn out by intense heat and storms by early August. The terrace of our old house in Weymouth has been my personal retreat, my cure for the assorted agonies of July and August, where I can sit beneath a pair of large arching Savannah holly trees that form a dense protective canopy that makes the stone oval at least ten degrees cooler than the sun-mused yard. In a normal summer, that’s where you’ll find me in late afternoons and early weekend

mornings: reading the newspaper or a book, doing a spot of selective weeding, catching a brief snooze, watching the light come up our little hill in the morning and the shadows go down it in the evening, bats soaring in the dusk. This year, sadly, I spent precious little time out there, squirreled away instead in my upstairs study, in air-conditioned exile, which may explain my extreme grumpiness for most of August. Though September is a summer month — and statistically can even be the fiery match of August in these parts — I find the simple presence of autumn’s arrival at month’s end a reason to celebrate the resumption of life, to shake off my doldrums and surly moods. Whether imagined or real, I feel lifted by the shorter days, the cooler nights, the dewier mornings, and all this seems to herald. Young Ajax seems to agree. He’s the golden retriever pup who arrived in mid-summer and now has the energy and size of a small horse, galloping around the house with reckless, headlong joy, slamming into furniture, rearranging whole rooms, stealing mama’s shoes, chewing my books at the corners. Like his master, he seems to have a passion for gardening and a taste for historical fiction, evidenced by the giant holes I’ve found in my perennial beds and the chewed edges of three novels. Then there’s college football. For reasons I’m a little loath to analyze too deeply, as another fall looms, college football is the only sport I care to follow on anything resembling a regular basis anymore. Professional sports seem crass and too commercial for this fallen-away sports junkie, an artificial spectacle that turns on paid endorsement deals and contract negotiations and mobile millionaire heroes who’d actually need to stop and consult their BlackBerrys in order to determine where they’re playing this year. I grew up worshipping the Baltimore Orioles and Arnold Palmer, more or less in that order, following them both through summer, and the Redskins through the fall. Sports seemed simpler then, yet more intimate and meaningful. In truth, these days college athletics is probably only slightly less ignoble than professional sports, a training ground for free agents, but I can’t stop myself from craving clear Indian summer evenings in a sea of purple-clad

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

7


   

    Carolyn Ragone

Janice Storrs

910.315.9577 Storrs & Co. Real Estate, LLC

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www.janicestorrs.com

910.603.4114 Carolyn Ragone Real Estate, LLC

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www.ragonerealestatenc.com

910.315.5622 Paula Espe Properties











 

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Paula Espe

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www.paulaespe.com

910.992.6272 Kathy Hawks Resort Properties, LLC

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www.kathyhawks.com



   





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Binky Albright 910.315.2622 Binky Albright Properties, LLC

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www.binkyalbright.com

910.639.0695 Area Real Estate Partners, Inc.

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www.arearealestatepartners.com



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Mary Ellen Josephson 910.315.7754 MEJ Properties

Linda Covington $$/$(0-''30/5#3#"3&.0%&-&%  #&-"*3%3 / 

mejosephson@embarqmail.com

910.695.0352 Covington Investment Properties

'09'*3&"3&"$6450. #3 #"  "$3&4 (6&45$055"(&

www.CovingtonNC.com

Each Firm Independently Owned & Operated 8

September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . .A . . Top . . . . .producing . . . . . . . . . . Network . . . . . . . . . of . . .Firms . . . . . .Serving . . . . . . . .the . . . Moore . . . . . . . County . . . . . . . . Area . . . . PineStraw of NC - : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

Sharing Ideas, Techonology, Marketing and Sales Support


SWEET TEA CHRoNiCLES

crazies screaming their leather lungs out for the home team, booing the evil referees, doing the lusty cheers and singing the fight song. This will be the third year in a row we have a pair of season tickets on the fifty-yard line of my alma mater, something I swore I’d never do. But life is full of unexpected pleasures and oh, how I now live for those Saturday mornings of game days, cruising out early for the road trip down east, just the two of us sneaking away from our busy lives, listening to the radio, singing oldies from the seventies, talking about our kids, who somehow grew up before we noticed. At last year’s opening game, our team was five points down with 45 yards to go and six seconds on the clock. I suggested to my wife that we get a jump on the foot traffic and head for the exits. “No,” she came back. “We have to wait for the last play. They’re going to win, I just know it!” I laughed and nudged her out of the row into the aisle, looking forward to the long drive home beneath a serene September moon. “Honey, they’d have to pull off a successful Hail Mary pass,” I pointed out to her. “Do you know the odds on that happening?” “You’ve just got to have faith!” she chided me. Moments later, wouldn’t you know, our guy lofted a perfect spinning football sixty yards through the sweet September air right into the outstretched fingers of a 6’10” freshman tight end, who fell to earth with no seconds left on the clock, winning the game by a point and producing absolute pandemonium. It was the most thrilling moment I’ve ever experienced at a live sporting event, almost enough to make a guy who’d all but given up on sports believe in the magic of a game again. We drove home singing with the windows cranked down on the cool September night. This year marks our second annual PineStraw Home and Garden issue — or PHG, as we affectionately know it. If I may be permitted to do so, I’d like

to sing a bit about its charms. Home is where most of us spend our happiest hours, or wish we did, and September strikes us as the ideal time for a variety of home improvements large and small, a great time to tackle a large renovation project or plant a new garden before the chill of winter sets in. Last year’s inaugural issue, featuring a helpful guide to selected local homerelated products and services that we call the PHG Registry — was such a big hit with readers, the magazine was out of the racks in a matter of days. This year we’ve incorporated the home and garden features into a broader thematic approach to the subject of home and garden, and think you’ll find a great deal in these pages to both delight and inspire. Among other things, you’ll step inside a pair of treasured ancestral homes — one in the heart of horse country, the other anchoring the region’s most celebrated private golf club — and see the living room handiwork of four amazingly talented interior designers, all with strong local ties. You’ll also read about a legendary hotelier who ran the fabled Highland Pines Inn and take a stroll through a pair of remarkably unique and different kinds of gardens, not to mention read about the pleasures of real linens, real fences, screech-owls and a golf legend with impeccable Sandhills connections — the late Julius Boros, a true superstar homebody. On the while, we think, this year’s Home and Garden issue makes for a magazine you’ll want to keep around for the entire month of September, and perhaps even to dispatch to your distant friends just to give them a vivid glimpse of why you call this place home. Speaking of which, with a little luck and the advance of cooler days, I’ll be back out on my own back terrace reading, dozing, dreaming of purple football Saturdays or trying to train the incorrigible Ajax the wonder dog — who won’t stop growing or digging in my perennial beds — already thinking about what a splendid thing my garden will be next year. PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Mixed Accompany

’Tis the season for an eclectic mix of musical performers to grace the stage at Poplar Knight Spot as part of The Rooster’s Wife 2011 fall concert series. The lineup: 9/1 - James Maddock (Americana phenom) and The Rick Olivarez Trio, Gypsy jazz artists with Eastern European flair. 9/11 - Jeff and Vida, an acoustic duo true to their bluegrass roots. 9/18 - Jonathan Byrd (deemed a young Doc Watson) and folk singer Grace Pettis. 9/25 - Little Windows, Mark Weems and Julee Glaub blend traditional Irish music with Appalachian influence.

To Everything There is a Season On Sept. 7, the Sandhills Woman’s Exchange, located in a historic log cabin in the village of Pinehurst, opens its doors again for a new season. Unique merchandise includes arts and crafts, knitted items, baby gifts and Pinehurst memorabilia. Store hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lunchroom serves homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and desserts from 11:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Information: (910) 295-4677.

9/29 - Casey Dreissen, funkadelic 5-string fiddler, and the Color Fools. All shows begin at 6:45 p.m. at The Rooster’s Wife at Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Tickets/Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

For Better, For Worse

Sept. 7 - 11, Moore OnStage opens its 7th season with “I Do! I Do!,” a timeless musical about the trials and tribulations, laughter and sorrows, and hopes and disappointments experienced by Agnes and Michael Snow throughout their 50 years of wedded bli—, er, marriage. Time: 7:30 p.m.; 2 p.m. (Sunday matinee). Cost: $23; $15 (special pricing night, Wednesday). The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Reservations: (910) 692-7118.

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Classics Rock

The North Carolina Symphony presents Schubert’s Great Symphony on Thursday, Sept. 15, 8 p.m., at Pinecrest’s Robert E. Lee Auditorium. Program features Mussorgsky’s Night on Bald Mountain, Grieg’s Suite from Peer Gynt and Schubert’s Symphony No. 9, “The Great.” Tickets/Information: (877) 6276724 or www.ncsymphony.org.

Stomping Ground

Celebrate autumn — and the fruits of the season — at Cypress Bend Vineyards in Wagram at the 7th Annual Fall Harvest Festival and Grape Stomp on Saturday, Sept. 10, from 12 to 6 p.m. Festivities include music, vendors and wine tasting. Free admission. Information: (910) 369-0411.

September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sneak Preview

The 6th annual Penick Village Art Show and Preview Party, to be held in the new Grand Hall of Penick Village on Sept. 30 from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m., features original works from regional artists, plus cocktails, festive music, a live auction and culinary excellence. Show opening occurs October 1 - 2, 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. (Sat.); 12 to 3 p.m. (Sun.) Proceeds benefit Penick Village Benevolent Assistance Fund. Information: (910) 692-0300.

Juicy Fruit (and Veggies)

Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative’s eight-week fall Produce Box season begins Sept. 7 and runs until Oct. 26. Seasonal, local produce includes a variety of fresh fruits and veggies from some 35 local producers. For membership fees, Produce Box subscriptions and more information: www. Sandhillsfarm2Table.com; (910) 949-2142.

Feeling Blue? Glass Menagerie

Hundreds and hundreds of handblown glass pumpkins will be ripe for the picking on October 1 at 9 a.m. at STARworks Center for Creative Enterprise, 100 Russell Drive, Star. Choose from a dazzling array of all shapes, sizes and colors at the STARworks Glass Pumpkin Patch. Proceeds benefit High School Glass Program. Information: (910) 428-9001 or www.starworksnc.org.

All That Ruckus

First Fridays continue with Frontier Ruckus on Sept. 2 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. on the grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Southern Pines. Live music/entertainment; family-friendly. Information: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com.

Tradition meets family fun at the 42nd annual Malcolm Blue Historical Craft and Farm Skills Festival held Sept. 23 through 25 at the historic 100-acre farm on old Bethesda Road. Friday is School Children’s Day from 8:30 to 4:30 p.m. On Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m., festivities include craft demos, storytelling, wagon and pony rides, a petting farm, folk and country music, dancing, a Civil War Camp and more. The fun repeats on Sunday from noon until 5 p.m. Cost: $5 (adults); $3 (children 12 and under). Malcolm Blue Farm, 1177 Bethesda Rd., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7558.

Spinning Rims

On Labor Day (Sept. 5), the Sandhills Cycling Club will host the 22nd Annual Tour de Moore Classic featuring 28-, 50- and 100-mile rides. Games and entertainment will follow, featuring music by the McKenzie Bros; food by Elliott’s on Linden. Event benefits the Moore County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Schedule, information and registration: www.tourdemoore.org.

Straw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

11


You’ll find more than 50 of the best brands here, including one you can’t fi nd anywhere else. Adidas • Peter Millar • Sport Haley • Tail • Tehama • Puma • Titleist • Tommy Bahama • Under Armour • FootJoy • Straight Down Pinehurst Collection • SDI • Zero • Maui Jim • Oakley • Brighton • Dooney & Burke • Putterboy Collection • Vera Bradley • Isda Cole Haan • Lilly Pulitzer • Iliac • Aveda • La Bella Donna • J. Lindeberg • Ashworth • Oxford • Polo • Ashworth • Adidas • Ahead American Needle • Bobby Jones • Callaway • Cutter & Buck • EP Pro • Fairway & Greene Gear • Greg Norman • Imperial • Nike

The Pinehurst Shops are full of shirts, shoes, jackets, spa products, bags, gifts and accessories from brands like Vera Bradley, Adidas, Nike, Peter Millar and Cole Haan. So come in and find your favorites. Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina s 910. 235.8154 s pinehurst.com

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


A Family Affair

Three’s a Charm

September marks the start of a new season for visual art shows and openings. On Sept. 1, an opening reception will be held for “Four Friends: Abstract to Realism” at Sandhills Community College’s Hasting Gallery, featuring the works of noted local artists Marie Travisano, Sharon Ferguson, Marilyn Vandemia and Lauri Deleot. Day after (Sept. 2), Artists League of the Sandhills presents oil paintings by Linda Bruening at the Exchange Street Gallery, and the Campbell House Galleries will host an opening reception on Sept. 9 featuring the works of watercolor artist Amy Hautman. Information: Hastings Gallery, Boyd Library, Sandhills Community College, (910) 695-3879. Exchange Street Gallery, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen, (910) 944-3979. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines (910) 692-2787.

Locally Made

Rick Smith, Dean of Institutional Advancement at Sandhills Community College, is likewise a musician. His introspective new CD presents 11 easy-going musical tales of life, love and cowboys and one rousing tune from “Camelot,” and features collaborations with a host of local musicians, including Danny Infantino.

On September 9, “An Evening of Jazz with the Murphy Family” will kick off the Weymouth Arts & Humanities’ programs for the 2011-2012 season. Paul Murphy (saxophone and clarinet), a prominent local figure in the jazz music scene, will be joined by daughter Anna Murphy (vocals) and nephew Gary Brown (jazz piano and bass) at the Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines, 7 p.m. Lawn reception to follow. Tickets: $10 (advance); $12 (at door). Tickets available at The Country Bookshop in Southern Pines, Given Library Book Store in Olmsted Village, and Weymouth Center. Information: (910) 692-6261.

T H E A R T S C O U N C I L’ S

I N T E R NAT I O NA L

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F E S T I VA L

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Goin’ to the Chapel

Native Fun Tuft Love

Gather ’round longtime Pinehurst resident Eldora Wood on Sept. 8 at 3:30 p.m. for stories and memories of the late Tufts era and the Diamondhead days. Reception follows. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022.

North America’s finest brass quintet, Empire Brass, returns to Pinehurst’s Village Chapel on Sept. 19, 8 p.m., joined by internationally recognized organist Douglas Major as part of the Arts Council of Moore County’s Classical Concert Series. Tickets and information: (910) 692-2787 or www. mooreart.org.

Sing, dance, drum, make crafts and celebrate Native American culture at Town Creek Indian Mound’s annual heritage festival held on Sept. 17-18, noon to 5 p.m. Cost: $4 (adults); $1 (ages 4 - 12); children 3/under free. Town Creek Indian Mound, 509 Town Creek Mound Rd., Mt. Gilead. Information: (910) 439-6802.

Whisked Away

The “Kitchens… and Moore” tour on Sept. 8 features six area kitchens plus local chefs on-site to whip up and serve some of their favorite dishes. Tour begins at 10 a.m. Cost: $20 (day of tour); $15 (advance); available at The Faded Rose, Daphne’s Hallmark, Seagrove Candle Company, Phoenix Fashions, and the Cooperative Extension Office. Information: (910) 947-3188. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Postcard From Nicaragua

What Matters Most

By Cassie Butler

I

am looking at a quote on the desk I sit at every day, though it is my first time reading it. “We make a living by what we get; we make a life by what we give,” by Winston Churchill. Well put, Winston, but I already knew that. It’s easy for me to give my talents because photography and videography bring me such joy. My trouble is being generous with things, though Nicaragua is teaching me to think about things differently. I went on a weekend trip to learn how to surf; the only problem was that I had to return sola. I made it back safely, well casi, the epitome of my name. Casi in Spanish means almost. I made it to Managua, with only one block to walk and only one more bus to take, when I heard running from behind. In 6.6 seconds, I was stripped of everything I owned right down to the cross necklace I was wearing. Despite my bright coral dress, I felt naked as I watched the robber run away with my two bags in broad daylight through a crowd of witnesses. I hadn’t seen his face; my eyes were on the machete. But you know what, I wasn’t sad. I wasn’t upset. Things are merely things, and the things don’t matter in life. Things that matter are love, joy and forgiveness. That weekend, I subconsciously foreshadowed my camera and journal’s fate, the two most valuable things that were taken from me. Taking pictures of rocks on the beach that caught my eye, I must have known I would never see those pictures, rocks or camera again because I asked Genevieve to take a photo with the rocks and me. “With your camera?” she asked. “No, with your camera. I want my camera to be in the picture with me. We’ve traveled so many places together and my camera never gets to be in the pictures with me.” That’s the last picture I have with my small child. Minutes before my robbery on the bus to Managua, I journaled every detail of my weekend surf trip. I almost ended my entry with a too-personal life development, but had a strange feeling. Instead of spilling the beans completely, I refrained. Instead I wrote, “Shame on you whose eyes are reading this without my permission.” If only I had written it in Spanish, and then had included my return address. The camera was insured, but my written memories were not; I can only hope to hold on tight to my experiences and to let go of the meaningless things that clutter my life. PS Cassie Butler was recently PineStraw’s intern. Please don’t wake her. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


CoS AND effeCT

Memoir in Progress have triangle, will work cheap

BY COS BARNES

T

he late Bob dutton was the manager of the movie theaters in southern Pines for many years. i would not hesitate to call him and say, “there’s a misspelled word on the marquee.” recently i told this in the company of Bob’s son, Bill. “and i had to go out on stilts and make the corrections,” Bill groaned. “Have you written your memoir?” i asked the tall, lanky man who didn’t look like he needed height extension. “who else do you know who has changed a marquee on stilts?” Because we live in such a fractured society with families living miles apart, gone are the days of rocking on the porch and telling tales about forebears and family happenings. television took care of that. we should all write our memoirs. it is not a pretentious thing; we simply need to leave a record of ourselves. for a woman’s project at my church some years back, i started writing an account of my life and was amazed at how things i had not thought about in years came back to me. even though my life has been pretty tame, it has been sprinkled with some classic characters. my aunt sarah was what there is no such thing as anymore — an old maid. she was my surrogate mother as my mother, worked outside the home and needed help with child care. she was one of those who got so tickled when she was telling a joke that tears fell down her cheeks, and you had to wait for her to get herself collected before she could get her breath and continue. she was also the self-proclaimed historian of the family. after her death, i said to my mother, “i let aunt sarah die before i could write down her tales.” “Pshaw,” my mother said. “she made most of them up anyway.” “oh, but they made a heck of a good story,” i

pointed out, correctly. i remember my first-grade teacher, miss mccoy, who always pronounced my name incorrectly. what a send-off for a frightened sixyear-old beginning her education career. along with my buddy, Polly, i played the triangle in the first-grade band. i have told david seiberling of my prowess with the triangle but he has not yet invited me to play in his band. in second grade it was miss nolan, who gave us the word “extinguisher” on a spelling test. i still think that is rather difficult for an early scholar, but isn’t the memoir getting exciting? in third grade, there was the redheaded miss russell with temper to match. she made me and my partner in crime, Polly, and a guy named Buddy stand in the coat closet for misbehaving. my children say these punishments would now be considered child abuse. the coup de grâce was cassandra Harmon, who was my teacher for first-year algebra. with no care for our psyche, she divided the classroom down the middle with the bright students on one side and the not-so-brights on the other — and we never had any doubt about which category we were in. remember, i grew up in an era where children were seen and not heard — and we were spanked. in fifth grade the principal, whose name ironically was mr. Hurt, whipped a boy in front of the class as an example to him and to us, i suppose. you may forget all the geography you learned that year, but you never forget that boy’s humiliation. when i confided to a friend i was writing the memoir, she said, “and the title will be, ‘there’s a misspelled word on the marquee.’” PS

The long hot summer is officially on its last legs. So long to the beach, the long days, and the beautiful summer produce yielded by the bountiful Sandhills farmland. Hello football, crisp deep blue skies, and myriad new seasonal fare at The Sly Fox! At The Fox, we’ll continue our tradition of sourcing local produce and producing dishes that are seasonal and delightful. We’ll definitely miss summer, but we can’t wait to start turning out fabulous autumnal food!

Cos Barnes, we’re thrilled to say, lives and writes in Southern Pines. She is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine.

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The oMNIVoRoUS ReADeR

Amazing Rumblers

A fi ne coming of age odyssey in flawless Southernese

BY STEPHEN E. SMITH

Midway through

clyde edgerton’s ninth novel, The Night Train, dwayne Hallston, the white 17-yearold protagonist, is rehearsing his newly formed rock band, the amazing rumblers, in a furniture refinishing shop in the small town of starke, n.c. the year is 1963, and segregation is the social dictate of the day. But dwayne is a trifle rebellious. He’s become friends with Larry Lime (full name: Larry Lime Beacon of time reckoning Breathe on me nolan), a black teenager who has introduced him to James Brown’s recording Live at the apollo. dwayne is determined that his band replicate every nuance of Brown’s “bong-bong race music”: “the amazing rumblers memorizing the songs and spoken words on the LP, getting everything exactly like it was on the record. exactly. no breaks between songs. constant music for over a half hour. and he’d dance like James Brown. it would be electric. it would be an explosion.”

getting it exactly right is what edgerton does best. from his first novel Raney to his recent The Bible Salesman, he has entertained his audience by creating characters who inhabit a gentle southern landscape. He’s avoided the gothic milieu, choosing instead to create aunts, uncles, grandmothers, good ole boys and girls, etc., who beguile us with their quaint eccentricities. as always, edgerton’s ear for southernese is flawless, his narrative is

clearly grounded in time and place, and the tenets of southern literature apply throughout (no reason here to enumerate clichés that explicate clichés). if the obligatory bigot is present in the person of flash acres, a middle-aged southerner who lives with his mother and works at the refinishing shop, edgerton has wisely chosen to humanize the character. flash isn’t overtly mean spirited, and when his mother dies — all right, there’s a smidgen of southern weirdness here — he lovingly moves the body to the kitchen and lays it out on the countertop with the intention of washing the corpse’s hair: “flash said, it took her all night to die. she died about a hour ago, and i just got her up here like this. she don’t weigh all that much no more. flash braced himself with his hand against the sink and leaned forward and started dropping down, crying. Her toes is all curled up, he said. Look.” readers who long for the deadpan humor that propelled them through edgerton’s previous novels will find The Night Train lacking the usual belly laughs. there is no fish hook caught in a child’s nostril and no ersatz Jesus speaking to a sinner through the rectory wall. But there are scenes that are particularly memorable, as when dwayne and an accomplice sneak a rooster into the local theater with the intention of dropping it from the balcony during a screening of alfred Hitchcock’s The Birds. it’s a wonderful idea for a youthful prank, but dwayne accidentally smothers the rooster before he drops it. “the chicken, like a partially inflated basketball, landed in the far aisle, bounced, lay still.” in a later scene, the strictures of segregation dictate that dwayne hide Larry Lime and his girlfriend olive in the trunk of his car so he can sneak them into the drive-in to see The Bermuda Triangle. dwayne stops his car beyond the ticket booth and then backs into the front bumper of the car waiting behind him, trapping Larry Lime and olive in the trunk. the police arrive and a humiliating photograph of the culprits appears the following sunday in the local newspaper, a nightmare for any small-town southern teenager, then and now. as with most of edgerton’s novels, the plot of The Night Train meanders. along the way, readers will receive a short course in music theory and a trip through early-60s detritus — a mishmash of American Bandstand, Hair Spray, and American Graffiti set in the south. there’s a

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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The oMNIVoRoUS ReADeR

Kay acoustic guitar, Pat Boone attempts at singing a-wop-bop-a-loo-bop-a-lop-bop-bop, numerous period song titles, a skating rink, fords and Buicks, the KKK, sonny terry and Brownie mcghee, the lost art of southern wall-sitting, ernest tubb and Little Jimmy dickens, the greensboro sit-ins, thelonious monk, noodling, weejuns, converse all stars, and a smattering of old-time religiosity, all of it intended to establish time and place. edgerton pulls all of these diverse elements together through the use of various narrative techniques — shifts in tense, changes in points of view, the occasional authorial intrusion, jumps in time, the use of jokes, tall tales, anecdotes, and interviews, even a chapter that’s a trifle academic. despite the use of these contemporary literary devices, edgerton remains a storyteller in the grand tradition. wherever he is headed, the reader is compelled to follow, and as usual, he gets it just right, weaving the essentials of narrative threads together in an ending that’s thought-provoking, upbeat, and immensely satisfying. PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry, A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths, is available at The Country Bookshop. Contact him at travisses@hotmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Bookshelf

New Releases For September Hard Cover non Fiction Hemingway’s Boat: Everything He Loved in Life, and Lost 1934-1961 by Paul Hendrickson. A look at Hemmingway’s life from the perspective of “Pilar,” the boat that was the constant in his life from 1934 to his death. Throughout his life, he always returns to “Pilar.” We get Hemingway stories exulting in the sea, to fighting the biggest fish he could find, drinking and entertaining celebrities, friends, seducing women and playing with his children. Grand Pursuit: The History of Economic Genius by Sylvia Nasar. Nasar, author of “A Beautiful Mind,” has written a stunning narrative that shows how the insights of activist thinkers transformed the world. In Nasar’s dramatic account of these discoverers we witness men and women responding to personal crises, world wars, revolutions, economic upheavals, and each other’s ideas to turn back Malthus and transform the dismal science into a triumph over mankind’s hitherto age-old destiny of misery and early death. Rin Tin Tin: The Life and The legend by Susan Orlean. From the moment in 1918 when Corporal Lee Duncan discovers Rin Tin Tin on a World War I battlefield, he recognizes something in the pup that he needs to share with the world. Rin Tin Tin’s improbable introduction to Hollywood leads to the dog’s first blockbuster film and over time, the many radio programs, movies, and television shows that followed. Both an exploration of the enduring bond between humans and animals and a richly textured history of twentieth-century entertainment and entrepreneurship, and the changing role of dogs in the American family and society, this book is sure to delight. Your Medical Mind: How to Decide What is Right for You by Jerome Groopman, MD, and Pamela Hartzband, MD. This book contains the essential tools for making our own best medical decisions, cutting through the confusion caused by the health-care system, the media, and gaps in our own reasoning. When conflicting information pulls us back and forth between options, when we feel pressured by doctors or loved ones to make a particular choice, or when we have no previous experience to guide us through a crisis, “Your Medical Mind” will prove an essential companion.

Paperback Non fiction Farm Anatomy by Julia Rothman. This book is much much more than it first appears. Illustrator Julia Rothman has brought her drawings to the country. Simple yet compelling illustrations with labels explain the terminology of farm life to those who may not know it or will bring a smile to those who do. From drawings of tomatoes labeled by species to the parts of a rooster or the different names for tractors, these illustrations are sure to delight. The Smartest Woman I Know: An

Illustrated Memoir by Ilene Beckerman. Nearly 60 years old when Beckerman began her writing career, she returns with an illustrated treasure that brings the irrepressible Ettie Goldberg to life. It’s been said there’s nobody as smart as an old woman. That’s Gingy’s grandmother, Ettie, though she has no more than a third-grade education. Clever about life and love, food and men, Ettie had advice for everyone, and it didn’t hurt that she got some of her best ideas from talking things over with God, out loud. The Gun by C.J. Chivers. Now in paperback is the powerful book that chronicles the history of the assault rifle. It follows the miniaturization of rapid-fire arms from the American Civil War through WWI, Vietnam to present day Afghanistan, when Kalashnikovs and their knock-offs number as many as 100 million. Reclaiming our Food by Tanya Denckla Cobb. An in-depth analysis of how communities across the United States are creating sustainable ways to provide local food. Whole communities are participating in farming, gardening, and networking initiatives to help more people access fresh, healthful food that doesn’t arrive on a train, plane, or tractor-trailer. This book chronicles the innovative work across the country and serves as a practical handbook that will empower community activists and planners, schools, small farmers, and the leaders of other food-related initiatives.

Hardcover Fiction Feast Day of Fools by James Lee Burke. Sheriff Hackberry Holland and his deputy, young and beautiful Pam Tibbs, find a witness to a brutal tortured killing by bandits in a lawless southwest Texas border town and hunt down the killers leading to a mysterious and beautiful Chinese woman. The novel plumbs the depths of man’s inhumanity to man, from killers-forhire, to the U.S. government, to the misguided souls in search of a better life across the border. Birds of Paradise, by Diana Abu-Jaber. A stunning portrayal of a damaged family. Five years before, at 13, beautiful Felice Muir ran away from home and her mother, Avis, father, Brian, and older brother, Stanley, to live on the streets of Miami. Avis relies on sporadic meetings with her daughter, although Felice often fails to appear. Abu-Jaber’s effortless prose, fully fleshed characters, and a setting that reflects the adversity in her protagonists’ lives come together in a satisfying and timely story. The Barbarian Nurseries by Hector Tobar. Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and author of “The Tattooed Soldier,” writes a great panoramic social novel of Los Angeles, a twentyfirst century, West Coast “Bonfire of the Vanities.” The financial pressure of the Recession is causing the kind of fights that even Araceli, the live-in maid, knows the children shouldn’t hear. One morning, Araceli awakens to an empty house — except for the two sons of her employers. She heads to the bus stop to seek out their grandfather and begins an adventure across Los Angeles and its vast, sunshiny sprawl of classes, languages, dreams, and ambitions.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Bookshelf

Yankee Doodle Dixie by Lisa Patton. Whether in Vermont snow or in Memphis heat, Dixie heroine Leelee Satterfield is never too far from misadventure, calamity, and ultimately, love. Having watched her life turn into a nor’easter, 34-year-old Leelee Satterfield is back home in the South, ready to pick back up where she left off.

Paperback fiction The Lost Wife by Alyson Richman. In pre-war Prague, the dreams of two young lovers are shattered when they are separated by the Nazi invasion. From the glamorous ease of life in Prague before the Occupation, to the horrors of Nazi Europe, “The Lost Wife” explores the power of first love, the resilience of the human spirit — the strength of memory and the power of art.

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Nairobi Heat by Mukoma Wa Ngugi. In Madison, Wisconsin, a Rwandan genocide hero has accepted a university post when a girl is left dead on his doorstep. A local police detective travels to Africa to unravel the case and understand African history and its spillover consequences. This is an international crime thriller that takes the reader to the slums of Nairobi, a place where knowing the truth about history can kill you. That Used to Be Us: How America Fell Behind in the World It Invented and How We Can Come Back by Thomas Friedman and Michael Mandelbaum. The New York Times columnist joins forces with a leading foreign policy thinker in an exploration of the American condition today and create a rousing manifesto for American renewal. They explain how the end of the Cold War blinded the nation to the need to address these issues. They show how our history, when properly understood, provides the key to addressing them, and explain how the paralysis of our political system and the erosion of key American values have made it impossible for us to carry out the policies the country needs. The Taste of Salt by Martha Southgate. A book about the ties of family and an inquiry into the

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BookShelf

bonds we make and break with others, this novel is narrated by an oceanographer who is haunted by her middle class upbringing in cleveland. the voice of the narrator is strong, and she uses nontraditional transitions to explain the history of her parents.

CHiLdren’S moo by matthew van fleet. from the author of the beloved “fuzzy yellow ducklings,” comes this fabulous interactive touch-and-feel board book featuring the habits, quirks and voices of seven favorite barnyard animals. the perfect gift for a new baby or any curious toddler, two- or three-year-old. Pete tHe cat: rocKing in my scHooL sHoes by eric Litwin. fabulously cool Pete the cat, star of “i Love my white shoes,” is back and sporting more new shoes just in time for school to start. strolling down the street, sitting in his desk, checking out things in the library or being loud and busy in the lunchroom, it’s all good, because Pete is rocKing in his new shoes. includes a digital download of the story performed by the author.



Support Local Food: Celebrate Food Day As part of our mission, in October, Elliott’s Provision Company will join hands with thousands of farmers, producers, non-profits, communities, and ordinary citizens to highlight the need to change the way Americans eat and think about food. On October 24th, be a part of Food Day and join us at EPC for samples from local farms, a special cooking demo, farmer meet & greets and much more! 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst

(910) 255-0665

www.elliottsprovisionco.com

Pirates go to scHooL by corinne demas. september is back-to-school time for everyone … including pirates. with parrots in tow, scholarly sea scoundrels hang up swords and settle in for studying, snacks, storytime and the most interesting show-andtell ever! wonderstrucK by Brian selznik. following on the heels of the innovative caldecott winning title, the adventures of Hugo cabret, selznik once again tempts young readers to join him on an uncharted journey through 460 pages of text and original drawings following two young adventurers, both alone on desperate quests to find something they are missing. traPPed: How tHe worLd rescued 33 miners from 2, 000 feet BeLow tHe cHiLean desert by marc aronson. in august 2010, the world remained glued to television screens, anxious to follow the minute-by-minute coverage of the chilean miners’ plight. this new title for readers 8-12 chronicles the combined efforts of the chilean rescue teams, nasa scientists and even argentinean soccer players, who hoped to raise morale, which resulted in the miraculous successful rescue of all 33 miners 68 long days later. PS

A fresh philosophy... Come experience the fruit of Southern farmers’ labors. Every plate and every recipe is crafted with the freshest cuts of meat, the most delightful artisan dairy products, and a careful selection of the tastiest, most honest delights available in the region.

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(910) 215.0775

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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h i tt i n g h o m e

By Any Other Name

What’s in a name? A great deal, especially if you can’t get it right

By Dale Nixon

We can forgive almost anybody anything, except for botching up our names.

A name is all we have. We want to see it spelled correctly, and we want to hear it pronounced correctly. We are impressed when someone remembers our name and a little miffed when they forget. And we want to be called what we want to be called. Now my husband, Bob, doesn’t mind me writing about him and his antics. I ask his permission before any material bearing his name is published. It’s his name we have some problems with. He wants me to call him Bob instead of Bobby. I have to live with this man, so I call him Bob in my column. But at home, he is Bobby to me. My younger daughter, Hollis, pranced into the kitchen years ago and announced to me that she didn’t like her name and that she would appreciate it if, from now on, I would call her Nicole. And there are friends of my childhood that I still call by their maiden names. They have been married for years and years, but their “new” last names will not form on my lips. Any mother who has had more than one child will almost always refer to her last-born as her “baby.” The offspring may be 40 years old, but the mother still will use this endearing term. I only have two children, but I have trouble keeping their names straight. I call Hollis “Edie,” and Edie “Hollis,” and they don’t like it. That’s just tough luck. My mother has been calling me by my sister’s name for years, and my grandparents used to call me by their daughter’s name. Connie, Blake, Dale — I’ll answer to anything, and my children can learn to do the same. Nicknames can be a touchy subject, too. There is a respectable businessman in town that I knew all through elementary and high school as “Pee Wee.” When I see him down the street, I always throw up my hand

and say, “Hi, Pee Wee.” He always gives me a dirty look and mutters under his breath, “Don’t call me that anymore.” But I can’t help myself. He will always be “Pee Wee” to me. Initials can be intimidating, too. You show me a man who goes by his initials, and I’ll show you a man who has a funny name to hide. But there is no hiding from a mother. When she calls you by your full name, it usually spells trouble. “Hollis Marie Nixon, get in here right this minute” used to spell trouble at my house with a capital “T.” And since I’m delving into names today, I’ll ask this: Have you ever tried to introduce several people to one another? Do you find that names of people that you know and love will fly right out of the top of your head? Now, you would think with a name as simple as mine that I would never have any problems. Well, have you ever heard Johnny Cash’s hit record “A Boy Named Sue?” I am a girl named Dale. People who don’t know me assume I’m a boy. I had an algebra teacher in high school who taught me for one whole year and never got my gender straight. She divided her class in half and sat all of the girls on one side and the boys on the other. When she called the boys up front to work problems on the blackboard, she asked for John, Paul and Dale. It was enough to give a teenage girl a complex. To this day, when I receive mail addressed to Mr. Dale Nixon, it brings back the humiliation of my algebra days. And to the person who called last week and asked to speak to Nell Dixon, my first name starts with a “D” as in dang and my last with an “N” as in name. It’s my dang name — OK? PS Columnist Dale Nixon resides in Concord but enjoys a slice of heaven (disguised as a condominium) in the village of Pinehurst. You may contact her by e-mail at dalenixon@carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The kitchen garden

Eat Your Greens!

Now’s the time to plant your great fall garden, providing incomparable greens all the way through winter

By Jan Leitschuh

Deep in your junk-food-

loving heart of hearts, you know Mama had it exactly right when she’d admonish: “Eat your greens, child!”

Greens are wicked healthy. That’s one of those facts we know in our bones; literally, in point of fact, as the minerals and vitamins in greens DO build strong bones. And while conventional wisdom might suggest solar panels, Energy Star refrigerators or carpooling, the ultimate in “going green” might be to simply grow your own in pots or in a patch of nearby ground. It’s really quite easy once you know the tricks, with much bang for the produce buck. One other thing — if you go to the effort of growing them, you know you’ll eat them! Greens are that one thing we all know we should consume more of. But we maybe don’t develop a taste for them until 1). we’re dieting or 2). our health begins to look less as a given and more as an undertaking worthy of wise stewardship. The good news is, fall vegetable gardens are among the most successful — fewer bugs, less oppressive heat and sunburn, better water. Fall is when the pleasure comes back into gardening. Let’s get the motivational health stuff out of the way first, shall we? Greens provide us with significant amounts of the mysterious, bone-vital vitamin K, vitamin A, vitamin C, magnesium, manganese, potassium, iron, vitamin E, dietary fiber, copper, calcium, vitamin B2, vitamin B6, phosphorus, vitamin B1, zinc, folate, biotin, niacin and pantothenic acid. They have cholesterol lowering and cardiac benefits. They build strong bones. They’ve demonstrated risk-lowering benefits for at least five types of cancer. There are those magical omega 3 fatty acids in them — who knew? — at a price far cheaper than wild Alaskan salmon. They also help our bodies detox from this mad, mad, mad, mad world. And, if you eat them long enough, you get to liking them. In fact, you crave them. What greens to plant this fall? What greens do you like? Fresh salad greens like gourmet leaf lettuces, red, speckled or green? Spinach? Cooking greens like chard, kale, collards, Asian greens, mustard? Picked young, the cooking greens are doubly good in fresh salad. This is a good time to grow

a little cool-weather-loving dill too. To grow any of these, you’ll need some fresh seed. Classic Southern collards are nice, but you can readily buy infant plants around these parts. The same goes for cabbage (red and green) and great fall garden veggies like broccoli, cabbage and cauliflower. But spinach, chard, lettuce, Asian greens like tatsoi, mizuna and yukina savoy, mustard or the kales (like the rich, dark Tuscan/dino, curly kale, Siberian red) are best planted from seed. First problem: Being spring-loving plants, greens would prefer to germinate in chilly, spring-like conditions. Second problem: It’s still hot out! If you plant directly in the garden, germination will be spotty, delayed and possibly dried out if you don’t stay atop the daily watering. Here’s where a couple of tricks help out. First, I shake out the amount of seed I want to sow into a cup, mark it (important step — memory is not what it once was) and let the seeds soak a few hours, even up to overnight, but no longer. I like to split a seed packet into two, or even three successive sowings, so all my greens don’t come in at once. A nice, steady flow of dinner greens is just right. Every two weeks, sow some seed. After the seeds have hydrated a few hours, I sprinkle them evenly on a damp paper towel and roll it up. I stick this back in the cup I used to soak the seeds, then stick the whole project in the refrigerator for a couple of days. Fall greens are very hardy creatures, and can withstand temperatures as cold as 20 degrees for short periods. So it ought not to be surprising that they germinate readily at 38-42 degrees, and germinate pretty well when soil temps are in the 50-60 degree range. (Note, that’s soil temps, not air temps.) Who knew the Frigidaire would become a favorite fall gardening tool? Then, quickly, as soon as you see the majority of seed coats cracking and new life swelling out, and before the germinating shoots become tangled in the fabric of the paper towel, sow them thinly in your prepared soil, cover gently to avoid breaking off any of the shoots, and water in deeply. Make your rows 12 to 24 inches apart. The seed should be placed 1/2-inch deep and planted to have one plant every 3 to 4 inches after thinning. One packet of seed will plant roughly 25 feet of row. One ounce of seed will plant about 100 feet of row. Keep the area moist over the next few weeks, and gently pluck out any germinating weeds. Soil? What can be said that hasn’t been said here before? Few enjoy gardening in the summer heat, but just dig deep (har!), go out early one morning in August and whack down the weeds. Just do it. Turn the soil over. Work in some rich compost and dolomitic lime, if your soil tests show you

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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need lime. (Hint: If we’re growing greens for their minerals, you might want to be sure your soil has minerals.) Potassium is another useful mineral that leaches readily from our soils and of course, all green growing things need nitrogen. A good compost should cover a multitude of sins, so if it’s not, get a soil test done for free through your county Cooperative Extension office. Call ours at 947-3188. If growing in pots, a balanced potting mix is probably the simplest thing to do. The nice thing about pots is that on very hot days, you can bring your young pots in to a sunny window and cooler inside temps. They will pay back this love with luxuriant, bug-free foliage. Even in fall, there will be a few bugs, but don’t worry about them. Soon it will be cool, and the best defense is to provide good growing conditions and keep the plants healthy. Harvest your greens when you want some. Tiny greens are delicious; of course, you must plant more frequently and buy more seed. Tough, older greens are usually still good for cooking, especially when the tough central stalk is stripped out, and chopped up. Best harvest is when the tender leaves are 3 to 6 inches long. Pick the outer leaves first, then the newer leaves as they reach the desired size. If you don’t need all of it, leave it in the field unless a hard freeze is forecast. Fall greens are especially sweet when nipped by frost. If you need to store picked greens, place them in the refrigerator and keep moist but not sealed. It can last for a week or so. After washing the leaves, cook them in a covered non-aluminum pan using only the water clinging to the leaves. After cooking, add just a little salt and butter, vinegar, or mustard for added flavor. Fresh tender spinach leaves make excellent salads. Steaming, braising in a little chicken broth, sauteed with eggs and a little salsa in the morning — all good ways to eat greens. My favorite, by far:

Kale chips

More addictive than potato chips. Simply rinse and drain greens, strip out tough central stalk, toss in a very little bit of olive oil, season with sea salt and perhaps a pinch of cayenne. Lay out on a cookie sheet and bake carefully for 15-20 minutes at 350. Watch carefully — they like to burn. Sometimes I turn the oven off after 15 minutes and let them dehydrate for another 5 minutes. This is a surefire recipe to get nongreens eaters loving their greens. Mama would be proud. PS Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative.

September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011


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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


V i n e W i sd o m

Misunderstood Muscadet A great wine that needs a name makeover

By Robyn James

Poor Muscadet,

straight out of the box it has two strikes against it: its name and its bottle.

The saying “A little bit of knowledge is a dangerous thing” certainly hits the mark with wine. For the average wine consumer, encountering a selection of Muscadet is going to trigger two thoughts: “Muscadet. Sounds like Muscadine or Muscatel. It must be sweet and gooey. Look at the bottle, tall and thin like a Riesling or Gewurztraminer bottle. Yep, I want a dry wine, so I’ll pass on that.” Muscadet is what we call a “hand sell,” meaning you have to stuff it in your customer’s hand, fall to your knees and convincingly lecture them on how dry the wine is in spite of all conflicting evidence. A lot of work to gain a convert, but well worth the effort. I have seen this huge swell of popularity for New Zealand Sauvignon Blanc and Oregon Pinot Gris and I think, Muscadet falls in the same flavor profile; what’s the problem? I guess Muscadet needs a makeover. From the charming and historical Loire Valley in France, Muscadet is made from the Melon De Bourgogne grape, the most widely planted grape in the valley. This is another strike against it, since some of the most diehard ABC’ers (anything but chardonnay) are not familiar with this grape. To add to the confusion, part of the grape name refers to a different wine region: Burgundy, implying that it may be chardonnay. The grape was thought to have originally been planted in Burgundy and then moved to Loire, where it flourished as a grape for making brandy. Situated in the western part of the valley, this area has a serious maritime influence from the Atlantic Ocean. There is an undeniable synergy between Melon De Bourgogne and the sea, right down to the pronounced saline note that is present in many Muscadets and can leave you feeling as if you just sucked an oyster shell dry.

It’s no coincidence that Muscadet is a classic seafood wine given the location of the Nantais region, where the Loire River tumbles into the cold Atlantic. The local cuisine takes advantage of the river and the sea’s bounty of both freshwater and saltwater seafood and fish, and the local wine has evolved to match. The best of Muscadet’s assets may very well be the price. You may see some bottles simply labeled “Muscadet,” but the best ones come from Muscadet de Sevre et Main, named after two tributaries of the Loire. They are insanely cheap. The best ones are around $20 and you can easily find a great selection under $15. Finally, many Muscadets are made in a somewhat unusual way that involves leaving the young wine to age on its yeast sediment (called “lees”), a process that adds flavor and complexity to the wine. The yeasty flavors combined with the natural stony minerality are mouthwatering, and the texture of the wine leaves your tongue begging for more. Oysters and Muscadet are glorious together, the briny, mineral-laden quality of one enhancing the other. Two of my favorites that are readily available at the bargain price of around $12 are Domaine de la Quilla and L’Oiseau D’Or L’Oiseliniere. If you love Chardonnay because it’s soft, low in acid, tropically aromatic and lush with butter and spicy oak, you may find that you hate Muscadet. But if your idea of a great white wine is lean, minerally austerity with a tart, almost searing acidity that sings with food, you may want to give Muscadet a try. Now that you understand it. PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@pinehurst.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

35


The Ryder Cup Lounge D r i n k I n Th e G a me

N

estled in the historic Carolina Hotel lies one

of the area’s most distinctive eateries. The Ryder Cup features a huge selection of draft beers, scotch and bourbon as well as the hearty, mouth-watering American fare you crave after a long round.

Me n u Fe a t u r e s beef sliders

• Southern

mac’n cheese

• Deconstructed • BBQ

nachos

pork two ways

• Sweet

potato fries

Dr i n k Fe a t u r e s • Wines • Eight

from the TOUR

Bob Redding Friday & Saturday nights

.

Sunday brunch

beers on tap

• Twenty

bottled beers

• Specialty • Premium

martinis scotch and bourbon

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910.235.8415 • pinehurst.com

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

©2011 Pinehurst, LLC

• Kobe

Li v e Mu s i c


S p i r i ts

Drink a Peach

Not quite my dad’s famous daiquiri — but maybe even better

By Frank Daniels III

A few years ago

I was introduced to the wonderful vistas and people of western Canada, and their superb, but incredibly short, summers by my soon-to-be wife, Carol. As we were sharing stories of summer, I asked her if she’d ever had a peach. She laughed and said, “We don’t live in igloos, you know!” Not to be deterred, I said, “Sure, but I mean fresh peaches, not canned…” She forgave me my ignorance, and I came to know the very good and tasty peaches of the Okanagan Valley in British Columbia, and the excellent peaches from the Niagara region of Ontario when we lived in Toronto, but as good as those peaches are, they don’t represent the kind of tradition I grew up with. Road stand peaches. There are many things that symbolize summer in the South, but few are as vivid to me as stopping at a Carolina roadside stand on the way to the beach and picking up vegetables, tomatoes and peaches. I loved the way my father relished these stops, chatting with the farmers and their kids like he was their neighbor, and letting a little of his inner redneck come out. He’d put the baskets in the back of the VistaCruiser and we’d eat like kings every evening. But the real treat were the sliced peaches, sprinkled with a little sugar and served at every meal, on cereal or pancakes at breakfast, on the side at lunch, and for dessert nearly every night. And best of all were the times Dad would pull out the churn and make fresh peach ice cream — to this day I choose peach ice cream as my favorite food! As we got older, the adult version of peach ice cream became a summer staple, the peach daiquiri! And as good as Dad’s peach ice cream was, his peach daiquiris were even better. Over the years we’ve experimented with recipes and worn out a lot of blenders as we learned to make the perfect peach daiquiri. One of the lessons learned is that we still must strive for that perfection. Darn! We’ve all contributed to the recipe and our tastes have changed a bit during the years, ebbing and flowing on sweetness, and how to improve the texture. We tried banana to make a creamier texture, but have settled on mango as the best complement for taste and texture. More recently we’ve

done away with adding extra sugar and started using a variety of liqueurs to augment the natural sweetness of the peach. We started with peach schnapps, but more recently have been using Canton Ginger Liqueur and St. Elizabeth’s Allspice Dram as sweeteners and flavor enhancers. Most daiquiri recipes call for white rum, and if you can find a decent one (Bacardi definitely should be avoided unless you like the lighter fluid taste it imparts to the drink) use it. One of things I miss about living in Canada was the excellent Cuban rum, but we’ve found a decent Virgin Islands white rum from St. Croix, Cruzan Aged Rum, and Prichard’s Crystal Rum from Tennessee has a clean taste that works. I like to mix the white rum with Gosling’s Black Seal dark rum for its rich color and excellent aroma. We love our Waring Pro blender, and it is still the best made blender you can buy but I confess that the Margaritaville Frozen Concoction blender is fantastic. Discovering the frozen fruit section at Harris Teeter has been a wonderful way to extend summer to anytime the weather warms, but there is no substitute for the warm road stand peaches we still pick up on the way to the beach, often well into September. Enjoy.

Peach Daiquiri

Makes six indoor cocktails or three outdoor cocktails. 4 oz White rum (Cruzan Aged or Prichard’s Crystal) 4 oz Dark rum (Gosling’s Black Seal) 1 oz Fresh lime juice ½1/2 oz Liqueur (or 1 Tbs sugar) 1 cup Frozen peaches (fresh roadside peaches when available) 1 cup Frozen mango (fresh mango when available) 1½ 1/2 cups ice Fresh peach slices In a good blender pour the rums, lime juice and liqueur, add the fruit and blend. Add the ice and blend until smooth. For indoor serving: Pour into chilled cocktail glasses and garnish with fresh peach slices. For serving outdoors: Pour into insulated glasses (and start preparing the next batch!). PS Frank Daniels III is an editor and writer living in Nashville, Tenn. His cocktail book, Frank’s Little Black Bar Book, Wakestone Press, is available at The Country Bookshop. fdanielsiii@mac.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


out of the blue

Off and Running

Welcome to the party. Will that be cream or sugar?

By Deborah Salomon

As a citizen concerned with the sorry state of our nation, today I filed papers as a candidate for president of the United States. I shall run on the Dinner Party ticket. Our logo: a red-white-and-blue star-spangled chef’s hat. Our battle cry: Fed up!

My birth certificate is vetted, framed and ready for inspection. An FBI background check unearthed only one suspicious predilection: hummus. I’ve hired Sarah Palin’s optometrist, Michele Bachmann’s couturier and Cindy Cain’s plastic surgeon. My platform: Reform America’s Eating Habits. I will hold coffee klatches (not tea parties) in mom-and-pop diners across this great nation, where my constituents may dunk whole-grain bagels into decaf foamed with skim milk. I will accept no campaign contributions from stuffed-crust pizza vendors or any establishment owning a five-gallon deep-fryer. Adios macerated chicken blobs, oxymoronic boneless ribs, popcorn shrimp and bloomin’ onions. As though shrimp popped and onions bloomed. French fries get a pass because they are my weakness — but they must be beta carotene-rich julienned North Carolina sweet potatoes, excusable compared with G.W. Bush’s pork rinds and Bill Clinton’s Krispy Kremes. I will prosecute super-sizers to the full extent of the law. Regulators will lean heavily on manufactured foods like Cheetos and Pringles listing greater than ten chemical components. Furthermore, if elected I will slap a skull and crossbones on a multitude of items, beginning with Dairy Queen Chocolate Malt (880 calories, 22 grams of fat), Taco Bell Taco Salad (850 calories, 2,250 mg. sodium) and all pastel crittershaped cereals because they are vile, vile, vile! I’m with Marie Antoinette: “Let ’em eat Cheerios!” As commander-in-chief (does that uniform come with capris?) I will deploy the National Guard to remove sugary fruit drinks, pepperoni pizza, canned corn, Tater Tots and grilled-in-fat burgers from school cafeterias. Kids get enough pizza on their TV trays, for God’s sake. Once they realize Lassie isn’t coming home they’ll surrender to green beans, lettuce, celery, beets, maybe even broccoli. In fact, I will petition Congress for funds to develop brocco-burgers. I will appoint Judge Judy (Sheindlin) to the Supreme Count not because she’s a woman but because she’s in fantastic shape for a 68-year-old and because she

hones her tongue on a knife sharpener. Prospects for my kitchen cabinet prove more difficult since I cannot, with good conscience, appoint Sara Lee, Marie Callender (who just filed Chapter 11), Aunt Jemima, Betty Crocker, Mrs. Fields, Wolfgang Puck or Rachael Ray. Uncle Ben … maybe. Martha Stewart, lest we forget, wears the striped apron of a convicted felon. On a more serious note, my Farm Bill will mandate federal subsidies for market gardeners so regular folks, not just wealthy elitists, can buy at farmers’ markets. Price ceilings are included in said Bill: 99 cents a pound for tomatoes. Ditto for beans, squash, potatoes, a loaf of artisanal bread. In fact, I’ll turn the whole darn farmers’ market into a dollar store. Additional proposals include allowing each soda brand only two varieties: regular and diet. As I recall, the budget for Crystal Pepsi, ridiculed and withdrawn after a year, was enough to feed a million Somalian children for 18 months. Similarly, I will clamp down on Oreo’s 50 permutations — enough waste there to pay inner-city teachers royally, ad infinitum. Trafficking in bottled tea, which impugns the American can-do reputation, will be prosecuted in federal court. Likewise, huge tax credits will be offered to homeowners who drink tap water. I will bestow PG and R (pretty good and ridiculous) ratings on cooking shows. It ain’t that easy, kids, unless you have prep and clean-up people. And do-overs. During my administration, in return for a Tar Heel landslide, the menu for White House state dinners will include barbecue, okra pickles, corn bread, grits and slaw. If foreign dignitaries don’t like it, stay home. My Kampane Kamper is all tricked out and I’m on a, uh, roll. Instead of corny catchers’ Mitts I’ll be handing out aprons announcing “a free-range chicken in every pot.” Hey, it worked for Herbert Hoover in 1928 when the economy was almost as bad. I know my chances are slim — but so am I. As for resorting to dirty politics, I will stoop only to handing out brownies at each and every presidential debate, and letting the sugar take its toll. In closing: The office of President is a dirty job, but somebody’s got to do it. Who better than a salt-of-the-earth gal ready to table the nonsense, butter up contributors, milk sources, slice through the pork, egg on reformers, spot the red herrings and make mincemeat of the opposition. Thank you, fellow citizens. Much is at steak in this election. Your support will be greatly appreciated. Onward! PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and can be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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B IR D WA T CH

Eastern Screech-owl

Smaller and more common than its famous cousin, this adaptable little owl with the terrifying sound is at home in almost every tree

By Susan Campbell

Photograph by Dick Daniels

Although many

are familiar with our large owls such as the great horned or barred owl, their much smaller cousin, the screech-owl, is actually more common. This pintsized raptor is far more likely to be encountered in the cooler months here in the Piedmont of North Carolina. Our Eastern screech-owl is more boldly patterned than the Western screech-owl found beyond the Rocky Mountains. Typical individuals are gray with dark vertical streaks and long ear tufts, which make them virtually invisible when roosting in the trees during the daytime. However, there is a rufous form which is not that uncommon in Eastern populations. Some North American owls are migratory, but this species is not. Some screech-owls will wander in search of more concentrated prey in the fall. They have a very broad diet, feeding not only on small rodents but also on large insects as well as small birds. Even though these birds can see during daylight, they prefer to hunt at night. Eastern screech-owls are known to frequently feed along roadways where mice are more active in shorter vegetation and where moths gather, attracted to the lights of passing cars.

Unfortunately, these birds are often struck by vehicles while they are swooping for a meal, too close to the asphalt. Also, given their diet, they are affected by pesticide use, especially in agricultural areas. These birds do mate for life so will travel in pairs year-round. Eastern screech-owls can be found in any habitat that includes trees. They historically have used cavities in trees for nesting but will use larger nest boxes too. It is not usual to find birds using a wood duck box in the winter months. But given that screech-owls have a long nesting period, they may even raise young in a vacant duck or squirrel box. The fact that they can nest several times a year and produce up to six nestlings at a time means populations are strong throughout their range. And male screech-owls have been known to mate with two females in a season, enhancing their productivity. The owl gets its name from the screeching vocalization that it produces when aggressively defending its territory. It is a loud, blood-curdling noise that is actually not the most common sound in its repertoire. Both males and females use a combination of trills to maintain contact. A descending whinny is employed by males to advertise territory and attract the attention of a mate. And trilling and whinnying are often used in combination. As with so many birds, screech-owls give themselves away far more through their calling than other behaviors. So, listen closely — you just may encounter one of these small birds sounding off this fall! PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, by phone at (910) 949-3207 or by mail at 144 Pine Ridge Drive, Whispering Pines, NC 28327.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

Bubba’s Place

With a new name and owner, the spirit of a gathering spot beloved by hunters and fishermen remains unchanged

By Tom Bryant

The invitation came

on a Saturday in midsummer, typical Bubba style. It was written in longhand and said: “Cooter, I’ve decided to step back in time. I’m no longer using a computer or a cell phone. Most of our youngsters are growing up to be hunched-over gnomes without vision or purpose, thinking of nothing but constant communication with other little gnomes and texting themselves to death. I’m hoping I’ll be an inspiration to like-minded folks who will follow me back to a time when people could actually read and write. Anyhow, I want you to come up to Slim’s place next Saturday. I bought the old store from Leroy and am going to have a grand reopening. Leroy is gonna continue to run it, and I’ll just show up now and then like the old days to have a cup of coffee and talk about my prowess in the field. Some of it will be true.”

Bubba and I go way back, hunting, fishing and loving the outdoors for more than thirty years. In those days, after many an outing in the field, we would rendezvous at an ancient general store in the country known simply as Slim’s Place. Slim, a character in his own right, rebuilt his grandfather’s store after making a bucketful of money out West. He retired, came home to live out his remaining years, run the store and, as he put it, give reprobates and ne’er-do-wells a place to go. After many years of running the business, a must-stop for hunters and fishermen from all over the county, Slim came down with a debilitating disease that eventually took his life. Leroy, his cousin, inherited the property and tried to keep the store up and going, only to discover that Slim really didn’t make money in the venture. It was more a hobby for him. Since Leroy

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needed to make a living, he sold it to the only person with pockets deep enough to make it work, and that was Bubba. It would take me a couple hours to drive up to Bubba’s new venture; and to celebrate, I decided to drive my old Bronco. It’s a ’77 model that I bought new about the time Bubba and I started hunting together. I love the old truck, and it has become part of the family. The ancient vehicle, sort of like its owner, has seen its best days. No air conditioning, slow on the road, geared for the back woods, and in general not very comfortable. Bubba and I joke lately that the Bronco is a lot like us. “We might not be as good as we once were, but we’re as good once as we ever were.” I think somebody even coined a country song along those lines. I traveled the back roads most of the way, cruising along with all the side windows down and the window of the tailgate up. Tommy, our son, had installed an updated CD player under the dash back when he used the Bronco for his lawn mowing business during summer vacations from high school and college. I had inserted my favorite disk, “The Highwaymen,” that Bubba and I would play on our road trips to the Eastern Shore of Maryland for Canada goose hunting. This was back when a Canada goose was a noble bird, migrating to the South in the winter and returning home to his breeding grounds in the spring. Eventually, not being dumb birds, the geese figured out that they didn’t have to spend all that effort going back and forth. They took up permanent residence here, eventually becoming a real nuisance, wreaking havoc on golf courses and backyards. Bubba and I still like to remember the good times, though, when we would spend two or three days headquartering in the venerable Tidewater Inn in Easton, while hunting Canadas in the morning on Bill Meyer’s plantation and sea ducking in the afternoon on the Chesapeake. Like a lot of places that provided great outdoor experiences for us, Easton and that area of the Eastern Shore have been taken over by developers. Bill Meyer’s plantation has been split up and covered with condominiums and is now infested with weekend warriors from Washington. According to a friend and an old regular at Slim’s place, The Tidewater no longer allows dogs. (The place was always loaded with water fowlers and their retrievers during duck and goose season.) I hoped Jim, the friend who passed along that information, would be at Bubba’s big event. I hadn’t seen him in a while. When Jim told us about the change in The Tidewater, he looked crestfallen. “Tom, I wish I hadn’t gone up there. I walked into the lobby with Tide,

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T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

my golden retriever, and the desk clerk told me that I would have to take him outside. The place has gone to hell in a hand basket.” I remembered the days when Jim would go with Bubba and me, bringing along his first golden, Sandy. We would hunt all day, then come back to the hotel at night and have a brandy in front of the great old fireplace before dinner. Sandy would snooze as close to the fire as he could get, legs stretched out, twitching every now and then as he dreamed about the day and the geese he retrieved. The parking lot was filled with pickup trucks and SUVs when I arrived at Slim’s Place, now Bubba’s. There was a spot close to the side door of the building just big enough for the Bronco, and I pulled in and shut down. The pole light in the back of the lot had come on and the parking lot was illuminated with lights from the porch. I sat in the truck for a minute remembering the good times we had had in the old store with Slim. Through the big side window I could see numerous old friends milling about, and in the middle was Bubba holding forth in all his glory. All the ceiling fans were going full force as the waning day was still warm. Time to confront the crowd, I thought, as I headed to the side door. I eased the screen door shut behind me and motioned for silence to a few of the good old boys as I sneaked up behind Bubba. “Yeah, you should have seen Cooter that day at Currituck. He had one foot on the dock and one foot on the boat and the boat was slowly drifting away. Talk about indecision. ‘Do I jump to the dock or try for the boat?’ I wish you boys could have seen Cooter’s face.” Bubba was in the middle of the story of when I fell into Currituck Bay. It took days for him to quit laughing, and it was one of his favorite tales. “I remember that you were the one in the boat with the paddle. You didn’t help any, you just watched me fall in the drink,” I said, laughing as I pounded Bubba on his back. The cavernous room full of people erupted as we all began shouting greetings to one another. I saw friends I had not seen in years. We remembered, reminisced and made plans for another rendezvous at Slim’s Place, now morphed into Bubba’s. The evening went by fast. I was one of the last to leave, and Bubba walked out to the Bronco with me. Leroy was inside preparing to close for the day. I climbed into the truck and Bubba said, “Cooter, Thomas Wolfe might have been right. Maybe you can’t go home again but, by God, you can come close. Good to see you, old friend.” PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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G o l f t ow n J o u r na l

Old Man River “Swing easy, hit hard” was Julius Boros’ philosophy of golf — and life

By Lee Pace

The classic Geor-

gian architecture of the Mid Pines Inn and the timeless patina of its superb Donald Ross golf course are just two of the important links to the past evident today at the 90-year-old resort off Midland Road. Walk through the pro shop and lounge and you’ll find another — the photographs of Julius Nicholas Boros petting his dog, casting his fishing pole and swinging a golf club during his intimate connection with the club and town more than half a century ago. “Julius Boros was a big deal in golf many years ago and is in the Hall of Fame today,” says Kelly Miller, president of the sister resorts Mid Pines and Pine Needles. “But he’s a little under the radar around here. He’s a neat story.” Miller’s mother-in-law, Peggy Kirk Bell, was a partner with Boros and his inlaws, Frank and Maisie Cosgrove, in owning the Pine Needles golf course back in the early 1950s. Eventually Peggy and her husband, “Bullet,” bought their partners out and let Boros and the Cosgroves concentrate on Mid Pines, which they had purchased in 1955 after serving as property managers since 1944. Eventually the Cosgroves and Boros sold the resort in 1973 and that owner, in turn, sold it to the Bell family and partners in 1994. “Jay was a wonderful guy,” says Peggy, referencing Boros by one of several nicknames he acquired over the years, “Moose,” “Big Jules” and “Bear” among the others. “He was quiet and reserved, but boy, could he play golf. You know, he almost didn’t turn pro. He came to Southern Pines as an accountant. His mother told him to stick to his accounting, that he’d starve playing golf for a living.” Boros was born in 1920 and was one of six children of Hungarian immigrants. Julius was athletically gifted, having played high school golf, basketball and boxing while growing up in Fairfield, Conn. He learned golf by following his older brothers over the fence and onto the fairways of Greenfield Hills Country Club, and later he got a job as a caddie. He developed an ability to play with dispatch as a youngster; there was no time to dilly-dally when you’d get

thrown off the course if you were caught. Boros received a degree in accounting from Bridgeport University and went to work for Roger Sherman Transfer Company in Hartford, which was owned and operated by a friend, Mike Sherman. Among the Sherman family’s other holdings was Southern Pines Country Club, a 27-hole facility that originally was owned by the town of Southern Pines and first opened with a Donald Ross course in 1923. The club was a money-loser for the town, and it sold the course and buildings to Sherman in 1946; he owned it for five years until selling to the Southern Pines Elks Lodge in 1951. The Elks Lodge remains the owner today. Boros chafed in the cold northeastern winters and longed for a warmer climate for year-round golf. Coincidentally, Sherman needed some accounting help at Southern Pines, so he sent Julius south, knowing that Boros could hone his golf game in his spare time and also give golf lessons to Sherman’s wife, who spent much of the winter in Southern Pines. Boros pored over his books and ledgers in the morning and played golf in the afternoon, getting better and better by the month. He shot 64 in a pro-am at Mid Pines and, in March 1948, tied Sam Snead for second in the North and South Open at Pinehurst. At Mid Pines he met the club managers’ daughter, Ann “Buttons” Cosgrove, an excellent golfer herself on the ladies amateur circuit. Buttons was friends with Peggy Kirk (before she married Warren Bell) from their collegiate days in Florida, and Peggy spent lots of time at Mid Pines playing and practicing her golf. “We were all into golf and it wasn’t exactly a big town,” Peggy remembers. “Jay was very shy, he said very little. But Buttons was crazy about him. She’d say, ‘Let’s go over to Southern Pines Country Club and see Jay.’ “Buttons was the one who pushed him into turning pro,” Peggy says. “Snead was at Mid Pines one time, and she said, ‘Sam, you’ve got to talk Jay into turning pro. He’s good, he can play, he ought to turn pro.’ Skip Alexander was the pro at Mid Pines at the time. She got Skip to talk to Jay.” Boros listened to his girlfriend and turned pro in December 1949, and he and Buttons were married five months later. He won around $2,000 in prize money that year (a respectable sum in 1950) and made a splash in the U.S. Open at Merion, shooting a 68 in the first round, leading it after 54 holes and finishing ninth behind Ben Hogan. Boros improved to 34th in money winnings with nearly $5,000 in 1951 and finished fourth in the Open at Oakland Hills.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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G o l f t ow n J o u r na l

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Then Boros’ world turned upside down. Buttons died at the age of 23 on Sept. 9, 1951, just a day after giving birth to a son, Nick. Jay was devastated but had to go on with his life. He immersed himself in his golf game and, while the Cosgroves looked after the baby, he took off at the beginning of the 1952 season to conquer the pro golf tour. Boros staked his claim to future golfing greatness by winning the Open that year at Northwood Country Club in Dallas and went on to become PGA “Golfer of the Year” and money leader with $34,000. Dugan Aycock, president of the Carolinas PGA Section, subsequently teamed with the Cosgroves to organize the “Julius Boros Open” to be held at Mid Pines in mid-November. Snead shot rounds of 68-67-70 to win the 54-hole tournament. That year was a good one for golfers with North Carolina ties, as Boros won the Open, Harvie Ward of Tarboro won the British Amateur, Johnny Palmer of Badin won the Canadian Open, and Dick Chapman of Pinehurst won the French Amateur. Richard Tufts, the owner of Pinehurst and vice president of the USGA, presented an award from the State of North Carolina honoring the quartet. From there Boros enjoyed two decades of relatively quiet stardom in professional golf. He was 43 when he won the 1963 Open at The Country Club in Brookline, winning a playoff over Arnold Palmer and Jacky Cupit. Boros was a four-time member of the U.S. Ryder Cup team and capped his career by winning the 1968 PGA Championship at Pecan Valley Country Club in San Antonio. He was inducted into the World Golf Hall of Fame in 1982, having won 18 professional tournaments. He is remembered for his catch phrase “swing easy, hit hard” and his laconic style of approaching a shot, giving a quick waggle and hitting the ball — “a kind of golf-polo: up to the ball, into position, wham,” John Underwood once noted in Sports Illustrated. He walked slowly, always looking about into water hazards for potential fishing opportunities, and played well into life, generating another nickname, “Old Man River.” Boros was also one of the first golfers to successfully employ the flop shot — a high, soft lob from high grass near the green.“Rhythm, that’s Boros’ secret,” Claude Harmon once said. Tony Lema said it was “all hands and wrists, like a man dusting the furniture.” “He was the most relaxed guy,” said Herbert Warren Wind, the author and golf historian. “He seemed to have no nerves, and that made him very dangerous. I also remember that Julius was one of the few players who could stand up to Hogan. He was never scared by him, and at that time, that was pretty hard not to be.” Boros remarried in 1955 and moved to Fort Lauderdale, and he and wife, Armen, produced six children, with one of them, Guy, having some success on the PGA Tour in the 1990s. Boros main-

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g o l f T oW n J o u r nA l

tained some connection with Mid Pines through the 1960s and ’70s by staying there each spring and commuting to Greensboro for the GGO. He spent his idle hours those weeks hitting practice shots down the first fairway and pursuing another of his passions — fishing in the pond on the fifth hole. Boros once responded to a question about quitting the golf tour by asking, “Retire from what? All I do is play golf and fish.” He died of a heart attack in 1994, but the vestiges of his days in the Sandhills remain visible on the walls at Mid Pines. The club was given one of Boros’ leather golf bags by a man who’d had it in his garage for decades, and Miller and Mid Pines pro Bob Esworthy regularly check eBay for Boros collectibles. Esworthy bought a set of vintage Julius Boros Wilson irons to complement the bag, and they sit in his office just off the main pro shop. “People are always wondering, ‘What’s the connection with Julius Boros?’” Esworthy says. “You tell them and they say, ‘No kidding? Wow.’” The historical dialogue never seems to end around Sandhills golf. PS Lee Pace will write about hickory golf and other vintage topics in his forthcoming book, “The Golden Age of Pinehurst,” due out in spring 2012.

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500 US Highway #1 South Aberdeen, NC 28315 910.944.7469 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


p l e as u r e s o f l i f e

Please Fence Me In The mystery of a beautiful fence tugs at my soul every time

By Nicole White

For most people the beauty of a coun-

try landscape is the big white farmhouse, the inevitably red, even bigger barn or the picturesque rolling hills. What most people simply skip right over, I fixate on.

I don’t remember exactly when my love affair with fences began. Perhaps it started while surveying our handiwork after an afternoon building fences on my parents’ property in rural Montana. Perhaps it was watching all those rotten cedar posts pulled out, not once but twice, to eventually make way for vinyl. Perhaps it started while watching scores of animals brush against, rub against, and lean against all types of fencing, noticing which ones withstood the wear and which ones caved. Whatever prompted my fascination, the fact remains: All it takes is the sight of a straight, good-looking white fence to make me swoon about a property ... and for my husband to say with his wry grin, “Oh, you and your fences.” If eyes are the windows to one’s soul, then fences, for me, are the windows to one’s home. We are taught not to judge a book by its cover, but I routinely and with no remorse judge a property by its fence line. And I have to admit that my Brad Pitt of all fencing is definitely white vinyl against a backdrop of lush green pastures. I can’t help it; I’m a goner. I grew up in the sticks, also known as Big Sky, so nine times out of ten I choose the natural, rustic, authentic option. The only explanation for my vinyl fetish are those scores of hours spent as a child replacing rotten “authentic” posts, painting, repainting, and painting again those planks that just never wanted to stay white. Don’t get me wrong, a strong clean line of cedar or nicely hewed pine will definitely elicit an approving murmur. But it’s a fact: That perfectly white,

perfectly straight vinyl gets a complete sentence. Every time. As a young couple recently moved to the area, my husband and I have logged innumerable hours driving around the Sandhills in search of our own slice of heaven. Although we both appreciate the same kind of rustic beauty in the old farmhouses sprinkled liberally around the area, for me, it is always the fencing that prompts me to either crane my head for one lingering look or dismiss the property as “just OK.” I’ve come to realize, it isn’t so much the fence’s purpose that intrigues me. Instead, it is the invitation a fence can offer. It is the invitation to imagine what lies beyond in all its mystery and its potential. A good fence beckons me; it pulls me in and makes me imagine — visions of Wonder, my quarter horse filly I sold in high school to finance my year studying abroad; dreams of galloping bareback through the thick pasture grass knowing the only thing to harness either of our abandoned elation would be the corner property line; dreams of big red barns and shadowed stalls filled with the aroma I once told my mother I wanted to use as perfume. Although nothing beats the crisp lines and contrast of white vinyl, other fencing makes my head spin with a slew of images and possibilities too. Dark wood rail fencing invites dreams of a sprawling ranch home, of a John Deere tractor under the lean-to and a big chocolate Lab on the front porch. Long stretches of pipe fencing invites thoughts of vast acreage, of hidden ponds, grazing herds and wallows thick with brush and wildlife. Even barbed wire can be inviting in the right setting. I think of calves with crooked little tails and cowboys with wide-brimmed hats. I think of life 100 years ago and wonder — yet again — if perhaps I was mistakenly born in the wrong century. But then again, vinyl wasn’t around 100 years ago. PS Nicole White is the marketing and event coordinator for Carolina Horse Park.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011

Let Us Suppose

that a man goes into a bookstore and buys a volume of poems for a beloved friend. And let us

suppose also that a woman goes into a bookstore and buys a volume of poetry for a beloved friend. This is, indeed, a lovely supposition, is it not? And let us call the man A and the woman B to be perfectly clear and, dear reader, you may have leaped to the supposition that A is buying the book for B and B the book for A. Silly reader. How naĂŻvely romantic. How blissfully naĂŻve. You are quite wrong. Because, you see, A is buying the book for C and B is buying the book for D. You see, A loves C and B loves D, but C and D

they will be embarrassed because the poems they have read were in fact the wrong poems and A and B, hearing about these strange poems, will be puzzled and will begin to wonder whether or not their memories are wrong and they will think, perhaps, that they did indeed give C and D the books which C and D now possess, and later C and D will sit together mooning over the poems they have received from one another, relieved that A and B now seems satisfied that their gifts were deeply appreciated. — Tony Abbott

do not love A and B, respectively, in return. No secretly, unknown to all except me, the writer, C and D love each other, and C will give the book she received from A to D, and D will give the book he received from B to C, and when A and B at some point inquire of C and D how they liked the poems which they had received so graciously from A and B

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Story of a house

Horse Haven

Fox Lake Farm was anything but luxurious until the Bakers, Sugar and Jim, took possession

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By Deborah Salomon • Photographs By John Gessner

ichard III offered his kingdom for a horse. At Fox Lake Farm, Sugar Baker’s kingdom is horses. “The horses are fed and cared for first, then the people,” Sugar says. For better or for worse, in sickness and in health, horses are her passion, her business, her sport, her recreation. She shares this vocation with husband Jim Baker and their adult children, who have been riding since toddlerhood. Then, after spending 12 hours a day, seven days a week with their own six horses, seven boarders, four rescued dogs, three barn cats and a passel of chickens, Sugar retreats from the stable to a residence that is luxurious but comfortable, with features unusual even for Southern Pines horse country: a six-acre pond hopping with fish; an indoor arena, dressage and jumping rings; a pool built by a previous owner to train competitive divers; and the house itself — more than 5,000

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square feet divided into only six major rooms: living room, dining room, kitchen/great room on the ground floor, three bedrooms upstairs. Here as well, horses rule by artifact and art. Near the front door hangs a portrait of Sarah, the Bakers’ daughter, at four, with her Welsh pony Freckles. Photographs line the kitchen counter. Plants grow from engraved silver trophies. Equine, canine and vulpine paintings dominate walls. The overall effect, however, is more genteel than horsey. A baby grand piano anchors the living room, comfy with tasseled footstools and thick upholstery. Jim’s assemblage of tiny lead equestrian figurines occupies a shelf in the built-in bookcases, while Sugar’s collection of 19th century Chinese export cabbage leaf and butterfly porcelain fills a corner cupboard in the dining room. “I started with a cup we got as a wedding present,” Sugar

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From the back, the Baker house looks out onto pasture, pool, gardens and pond.


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Left: A great room in three parts divided by beams: Kitchen, living and dining room provide a seamless overview of the pool area. The little foxes — prey, in ceramic, atop an antique farmhouse table. Above: Dry sink — now a bar.

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says. She learned that this export was used as ballast, in merchant vessels. Her collection, which spills out onto side tables, contains rare serving pieces. Screened porches flank the great room. Federalist-style furnishings in dark woods, some inherited, suggest a Southern manor house while others, like a rough-hewn dry sink, speak simple country living. The master bedroom, at least 20-by-30 feet, has a seating area with fireplace bigger than most living rooms. Beside the window wall stands a telescope to view birds’ nests and horses. “I like to see what Elsa (her favorite) is up to,” Sugar says. The bedroom is separated from the hallway by glass French doors to convey light into the windowless hallway, with an ornamental screen for privacy. The couple opted for oversize his and her bathrooms at opposite ends of the master suite. Some walls have a textured Venetian finish. Although no single color predominates, Sugar favors a greenish sea blue, which offsets crimson Oriental carpets. The Bakers’ great room has three distinct areas: a kitchen with an island/bar where son Jamie cooks for guests on old-fashioned electric burners, not the restaurant-model gas-fired Viking or Wolff present in most high-end kitchens. The living area, with natural wood beams, feels like a mountain lodge; the family dining table overlooks pool, gardens and pond. Fabrics run to traditional prints and soft pastels. Sugar, after all, is from Mobile, daughter of a Steel Magnolia. “It’s what I grew up with,” she says, minus any drawl which was “educated out.” But “Sugar” stuck. Her mother, anesthetized after giving birth, did not participate in finalizing the decision. Her father chose Adele, a family name. The housekeeper immediately dubbed the sweet baby girl Sugar, and Sugar she remains.

F Top: Jim Baker has collected lead hunt figurines since boyhood — now displayed on living room shelf. Above: The prized door piece — and original door — was relocated during renovation.

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ox Lake Farm was anything but luxurious, comfortable or genteel when Sugar and Jim found it, in 2005. “More like a rabbit warren of small rooms with Sears paneling and shag carpet,” Jim recalls. They lived in Raleigh for 20 years while Jim built his business. “Raleigh’s no places for horses,” Sugar learned. Urban sprawl drove them out. They were drawn to Fox Lake by the stable (good bones but, like the house, in dire need) and 50 secluded acres. No neighbors, no need for window blinds, Sugar maintains. Fox Lake Farm was built in the 1960s by Katz Leib as a stable for show horses with an attached hunt box for her. Infrastructure was in place. The very idea of transforming this into a working horse farm alongside a custom-designed home challenged the engineer in Jim. An architect drew plans; construction commenced with daily input from Sugar and Jim, who had sold their Raleigh home and moved to a

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Southern and gracious, the living room, with music area, reflects Sugar’s background. Portrait is of daughter Sarah with her first pony.

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The formal dining room backdrops Sugar’s collection of Chinese cabbage leaf and butterfly porcelain, in corner cupboard and side table. The portrait is of the Baker’s son Jamie — an equestrian, as is daughter Sarah.

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


nearby cabin so small that the Christmas tree landed on the porch. Sugar compares the collaboration to an ice cream sandwich: “Jim and the architect were the crunchy cookies, and I was the soft filling.” The stable, naturally, came first. Plywood was ripped off stalls revealing tongue-and-groove heart pine boards, which needed refinishing. “We underestimated the amount of work to be done,” Jim says. They gutted the house down to the cinderblock core and built out in three directions, leaving only the wall between house and stable intact. Skylights were installed in second-story dormers to illuminate the children’s rooms, each the size of a loft apartment with sleeping alcoves. Everywhere, oversized paned windows frame views suitable for Chamber of Commerce brochures. The project was completed in 2008. Jim commutes daily to Raleigh. Weekends, they travel with horses to eventing competitions.

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ommitment on this level begins in childhood. Jim, a surgeon’s son, grew up in horse-country Virginia in a series of rented homes, one with a Civil War cannonball lodged in a wall. “That’s where I learned breeding and training,” he says, modestly. “If you wanted a job, that’s what you did, farm work or horses.” PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Above all, Fox Lake is a farm for up to 13 horses. Heart pine boards were revealed during renovation. Four rescued dogs and three rescue cats complete the family.

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After that, Jim “did” mechanical and bio-medical engineering, eventually founding The Lundy Group, a real estate brokerage, management and development firm. “Jim has a math brain. He can fix anything,” Sugar adds. He admits, “I’m on a first-name basis with every check-out person at Lowe’s.” Sugar was born to ride in a family that didn’t. The first-grader’s Christmas list included a horse, a horse farm, a bridle and a saddle. Santa brought Trigger, an old polo pony, with basic equipment. Sugar rode until she was 14 before switching to extracurricular activities to enhance her college applications. Sugar and Jim met at the University of Virginia. They both played polo. The bond was strong. “And he was really cute,” Sugar grins. They married right out of college. Jim bought Sugar a horse after their first child was born. “I learned there were people who took care of horses properly and those who didn’t,” she says. “The proper way is to set standards and do it yourself.” This passion for excellence has been fulfilled in Southern Pines. The Bakers hire help but manage the farm themselves. From a horsewoman’s perspective, “There are things in Southern Pines you can’t find anyplace in the world. The lifestyle is better. We found a community (of horse people). It’s lovely to go to the bank in breeches and not have people stare.” The Bakers are too busy, or tired, to miss cable TV and cell service. Instead, they have a hammock in the yard leading down to a small dock on the pond edged with lily pads. Jim’s daily commute is tedious but, he reasons, “I get to come home here.” Bedtime falls early for people who work outdoors with animals. Yet the Bakers find time to appreciate their property, often taking an evening swim or dining on the screened porch after the heat has subsided. “Jim says, ‘Listen … what do you hear? Nothing. Just the whippoorwills and bull frogs.’” And, perhaps, soft whinnying from the stable — a lullaby to their ears, because, as Jim reprises Winston Churchill: “There’s nothing so good for the inside of a man as the outside of a horse.” PS

Left: The stable dominates the front of the house, which was built as a modest hunt box. Above: Sugar Baker — equestrian, breeder, trainer — and Stormy. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Top: C. Louis Meyer’s stables, now unused, formed the outer edge of the three-building compound. Above: An 18th century cabin was disassembled and brought here from western North Carolina. Children played — and parties happened — here. Right: The main house is sheltered by 100-year-old trees.

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Story of a house

The Brown Compound

Surprises abound in this spectacular, restored family homeplace By Deborah Salomon • Photographs By Maureen Clark

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usan Clift Brown likes small rooms. Lots of them. Terry and Susan Brown’s Pinehurst compound, the C. Louis Meyer Farm, encompasses a main house, guest house and what they call the Garage-Mahal: in all, ten bedrooms, ten bathrooms, four kitchens, eight fireplaces, a fully equipped gym, numerous patios and sitting rooms, three laundry rooms, a 12-footdeep pool and one great room. Total: 13,000 square feet. Some spaces defy classification: a passageway lined with antique bottles; a bar pantry plastered with archival golf and equestrian photos; a ballroom should the need arise; a wine cellar (3,500 bottle capacity) dominated by a round copper-topped table where guests sip and sample enchiladas prepared in the adjacent kitchen by Susan’s Mexican cook. Stroll down a dirt path to a log cabin, circa 1700s, disassembled and

brought from western North Carolina, then reassembled with pegs. The cabin overlooks a lily pond stocked with fish, where Terry and friends hung out as children. His daughter was married beside the well. In the distance, a fallow stable. The Kennedys of Hyannisport live no better. Oops. Wrong party. The compound is dotted with photographs and personal messages for the Meyer family, Terry’s grandparents, from Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon. Beyond being a dazzling showcase of architecture and interior design, the compound stands as a repository to artifacts in use since the Meyers occupied their seasonal retreat. Everywhere are indications of not only wealth, but substance: The sporting life, the social life of the roaring 50s, a life of philanthropy. Sandhills Community College and the O’Neal School are built, in part, on land donated by the Meyer family.

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C.

Louis Meyer flourished during the early 20th century era that produced Mellon, Carnegie and Rockefeller fortunes. Meyer’s product was concrete. His company, the Concrete Engineering Company (CECO), founded in 1912, manufactured reusable steel forms used to construct concrete skyscrapers and stadiums. C. Louis Meyer was a horseman and fox hunter. His wife, Mary, played golf. Neither was possible during inclement Midwestern winters. In 1946, they purchased 120 acres of pine forest and a 10-room house built about 1895 by a Bell Telephone executive. The house survived multiple expansions and renovations before Susan and Terry moved down from Chicago. The decision was business-driven, Terry says: “In the early 1990s we decided to build Forest Creek (golf club). I ended up being president. I needed to be here.”

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Left: The bottle room — one of several main-floor parlors — displays Mary Meyer’s collection of antique bottles. Above: Heart pine paneling warms the original sitting room. Below: The family eats here, in a sun-drenched breakfast area facing the Browns’ country kitchen.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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The Browns use terraces and gardens around the graceful brick-bordered pool for pre-dinner cocktails when entertaining large crowds.

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A great great room welcomes guests with distressed leather seating, warm earth colors and portrait of Carson (left), the Browns’ beloved black dog. His grandparents’ estate was a likely residence. When Susan and Terry walked into their chosen home, cards were still on the table from Mary Meyer’s last game of bridge. “I’m a country boy,” Terry says of his childhood in a formidable house on a bluff overlooking Lake Michigan. Holidays were spent in Pinehurst. “This house is close to my heart.” “I’m a city girl,” Susan counters. She grew up in a typical 1960s family home in Ann Arbor, Mich. “My mother wasn’t creative. I was the decorator.” Susan studied art, photography, graphic design and business — specifically how to rebrand companies. Two decades ago she met Terry in a boardroom. The move was more dramatic for Susan than for Terry. “Life changed. It was shocking,” she says. Besides undertaking the renovation, she opened Clift Commercial Real Estate Services in Southern Pines. Susan attacked the project with focused zeal: “I never dreamt about owning a house like this. I would have chosen something more contemporary, not as rambling,” Susan says. “But Terry said this was where he wanted to be. So I decided to honor his family’s history with my own style.” To this end, she used every piece of furniture — spectacular antiques, refinished and reupholstered — from the Meyer homestead, adding an equal amount of her own selection. “I call it recycling.” At first, she supervised from Chicago, flying down with her

interior designer. The 15-month renovation/expansion of the main house and guest house was completed in 1999. The Garage-Mahal crowned the project in 2008. Floor plans of the three installations beg a map. The Browns’ art collection begs a curator, or an audio guide, at least. The wow factor soars off the charts.

The Main House

In the entrance hall, tone is set by a portrait of C. Louis Meyer, dressed in red hunt coat, astride his horse. The house core, dating from the early 1900s, has modest but elegant proportions. Native heart pine wide-board floors add patina. Susan sourced matching lumber for custom-made cabinets in the kitchen-breakfast area with bay window. An island was designed around a 19th century English butcher block. Despite the requisite Viking and Sub-Zero, the kitchen feels more farmhouse than magazine. The formal dining room with exquisite hand-painted wallpaper from the 1920s in a Garden of Eden motif is illuminated by light pouring through six tall, paned windows with bamboo shades, in contrast to the formality. A narrow staircase leads to the original bedrooms, which have been reconfigured to accommodate large, sunny bathrooms, the trademark of a house built before indoor plumbing. Surprises abound. In one bedroom Susan mixes a massive leatherupholstered head- and footboard with delicate Asian prints, a Chinese

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Handpainted wallpaper in a fanciful garden motif imparts richness to the formal dining room presided over by portraits of C. Louis and Mary Meyer. lady lamp and another with a ceramic pug base. The original sitting room is paneled to the ceiling — a clubby little parlor with fireplace and bar. Moving into the renovated section, Susan has allocated a transition area for the piano and Mary Meyer’s collection of 60 antique bottles, from apothecary to liquor, shelved against glass to catch the light. “We needed a great room,” Susan says. “None of the other (sitting rooms) holds more than six people.” Terry has three children and three grandchildren. The couple entertains up to 100 guests who flow from poolside cocktails to indoor buffets. The great room addition feels like an Aspen ski lodge, with massive distressed leather sofas, a stone fireplace wall, geometric carpet echoing the 5-foot square coffee table and another table made from reclaimed pine, suitable for food or games. Carson, the Browns’ recently deceased black dog, is honored here with life-sized portraits. “My proudest feature is the master suite,” Susan says. Its cathedral ceiling is emphasized by a 10-foot armoire from France, via Chicago. Enter the suite through a sitting room with built-in shelves and yet another wall of family photos and documents Susan rescued from boxes. The master bath overlooks the pool. Here, as elsewhere in the compound, hang paintings of nudes in contemporary, classic and impressionist styles. Susan appreciates the genre. “That’s the way we were born,” she says. Throughout the main house she has selected earth tones, from pale wheat through taupe to rich mahogany. Every curtain rod, every lamp, tabletop accessory, carpet — even books speak flair and character.

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Master suite is Susan Brown’s pride, done in soft neutrals and nudes above bed and in bathrooms.

Guest bedroom in core house was reconfigured around the fireplace.

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The Guest House

The guesthouse — with whimsical “tiny chair room” and toothpick torso sculpture — is brightly colored and less formal than the main house.

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A Cape Cod B&B. A retreat in Provence. A village love nest. The Meyers would not recognize the revamped cottage they called The Hideaway. Four bedrooms, as many full bathrooms, country furnishings, bright colors — this two-story, 2,200-square-foot haven a few steps from the main house has the proportions of a family home. The kitchen is fully equipped, “so the grandkids can have their hot dogs,” Susan says. “The guest house is me confirmed — it’s light and fun. I evolved my own style here,” she continues. Fun means a tiny room under the eaves hung with her collection of children’s chairs, including an ancient potty seat. One bathroom displays a mannequin torso composed of 1,400 toothpicks. A framed abstract was done by grandson James, at 22 months. Other art is child-friendly but definitely not cartoonish. For this venue Susan chose blues, yellows and primary colors — a digression from her palette of earth tones. “I could live here,” she says.

The Garage-Mahal

“A little overkill,” Terry chuckles. Susan took some ribbing about installing crown moldings in a garage. Indeed, the new structure stands monument to largesse. The four-bay L-shaped garage and courtyard harbor yet another complete residence with added benefits: a gym, complete with a hardwood floor for yoga, surround sound and wall-mounted TV. And Terry’s basement wine cellar, dark as a speakeasy, cool as a cave, with a splashy bar scene painting by Argentina’s answer to Picasso. September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The Garage-Mahal — grand and sophisticated, with an apartment like an urban condo and basement wine cellar (below). In the stairwell hangs another spectacular piece: a vase of flowers as Jackson Pollock might have seen it. Upstairs, the two-bedroom, two-bathroom apartment with, again, a full kitchen appears Upper East Side urbane, spare, compared with the historic main house and sprightly guest quarters. Yet Susan was able to incorporate an antique pie cupboard with clean, classic lines into the mix. Susan’s relationship to the compound is complicated. As chatelaine she footnotes her guided tour with chronology and provenance. She calls the décor initiative recycling: every furnishing left over from the Meyer years, including metal poolside tables and chairs, was preserved for reuse. “It’s difficult to move into your husband’s space,” Susan admits. “But I brought my heart and my passion to it.” For such an endeavor one needs confidence, patience, time and funds. The project cost well into seven figures, not that Susan claims completion. But this showplace is more than show. The compound sleeps 15-20. Terry and Susan host business functions. Friends find them. The separate residences and grounds offer much for grandchildren to explore. Otherwise, Terry and Susan live mostly in the smallish rooms of the core residence within sight of a 150-year-old magnolia tree. Terry seems content surrounded by family history. “Everything melds together well,” he says. Susan, a tightly wound bundle of energy, views her home as “…a place that’s been here forever, where you want to sit down and read a book.” But, with a quick grin, she concedes, “This is a lotta house.” PS

Architects designed the Garage-Mahal with columns in the mode of the main house, built at the turn of the 20th century.

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Last of His Breed

Horseman Charlie Stitzer was the final owner of the Highland Pines Inn before it vanished like a Southern Brigadoon By John H. Wilson

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t was a cool sunny day in late May 2007, and I was headed east on Montauk Highway on Long Island to meet Charles Stitzer, Jr., the last owner of the Highland Pines Inn. Designed by renowned New York architect Aymar Embury II, the grand and elegant inn overlooked the east side of Southern Pines, North Carolina, for decades, until it was tragically consumed by fire in the early hours of January 20, 1957. The exit sign to Southampton appeared just ahead. Three or four turns later, I pulled into a small parking lot dominated by a large H&R Block sign bearing Stitzer’s street address. I inched my car to the back of the frame building, easing to a stop when I spotted the white wooden staircase, spiraled up to a small landing on the second floor. A 1988 Mercedes and vintage BMW were parked in the far corner. My mind drifted back for a moment to Phoebe Walsh Robertson’s recollection of Stitzer when she was a young girl living in Southern Pines. “I remember him dropping by our farm at Stoneybrook one day and offering my parents a set of beautiful champagne glasses, each donning bright green and gray ribbons that matched the racing colors of CharKitt, the stable started by Charles Stitzer and my mother, Kitty.” Phoebe, the youngest daughter of legendary horseman and founder of the Stoneybrook Steeplechase Mickey Walsh, said she thought Stitzer was the most handsome and dashing man she had ever met. The second story door opened and Stitzer began his descent at a pace remarkably agile for a man of 88 years. With his six-foot robust frame and prominent nose, he bore a striking resemblance to General De Gaulle. Stitzer

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Opened in 1912, the elegant Highland Pines Inn offered tennis, golf, riding and entertainment from famous orchestras. For decades it served as the cultural center for Southern Pines. The cottage, seen in the foreground, originally part of the property, today belongs to the author of this article.

View of Southern Pines from the Highland Pines Inn on Massachusetts Avenue.

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sported a light brown checkered blazer over his broad but slightly arched shoulders, a worn blue oxford shirt, khaki pants, and leather boat shoes — no socks. His thinning white hair was on the longish side, making him look all the part of an Ivy League English professor. He greeted me with a beaming smile and suggested we dine later in the day at his favorite watering hole, the American Hotel, which I soon learned was stocked with one of the finest collections of imported wines on the East Coast. We stepped into the historical tavern in the old whaling town of Sag Harbor around six o’clock that evening. Stitzer forged ahead to claim two empty seats at the bar, a long plank of solid oak imported from England a century and a half ago. Along the way, he was greeted by a cacophony of “How ah ya Charlie?” by the regulars. Vinny, dressed smartly in a white apron and black necktie, slapped down two cocktail napkins in front of us, and reached for a bottle from the pantry behind the bar, a modified antique apothecary cabinet with dark panels and beveled mirrors. He poured Stitzer the usual, a martini, dry gin, no vermouth. Henry and John sat to our left. I spent three consecutive evenings at Stitzer’s posh digs in Sag Harbor, discussing his rich life as a hotelier and horseman, chatting intermittently with his eclectic band of friends, and marveling at the flurry of invitations he received from doting women. Charles W. Stitzer, Jr., was born on April 8, 1919, in College Station, Pennsylvania, at a time when his entrepreneurial father was wrapping up a government contract to house and feed U.S. military troops training at Penn State. Charles, Sr. would later move his family to a nearby farm, where young Charles worked the cattle, taking them out to pasture on his horse before school and bringing them back at night. Stitzer’s father came from hardscrabble beginnings, leaving home in western Pennsylvania in his mid teens to dig trenches in the Mohave Desert for the ambitious Los Angeles Aqueduct, and later enlisting in the Navy, where he was charged with feeding troops on battleships, a skill that helped him land the job in College Station. In 1935, he bought the Holmhurst Hotel at a rock bottom price, and moved his family to Atlantic City, New Jersey. “I was 16 and my first job at the Holmhurst was to clean out cabinets that hadn’t been touched in 50 years,” recalled Stitzer. I then worked on the dish machine. Those were the days when hotels had the American plan — three meals a day — and we had 330 people in the hotel.” Stitzer later enrolled in the Hotel Management School at Cornell University and pursued his love for polo, but he would never graduate. The year was 1942 and Stitzer returned to Atlantic City to enlist in the Army Air Corps. After medical administration training in Abilene, Texas, he was assigned to the 66th Field Hospital in Europe. His portable medical unit, staffed with surgeons, medics and litter bearers, followed American fighting troops across France and into southern Germany, setting up hospital tents and cots dangerously close to frontline combat and witnessing unspeakable tragedy and loss. “The soldiers who were really shot up and couldn’t stand the trip back to the evacuation hospital came to us, and they all died, every last one of them,” reflected Stitzer quietly. He returned to Atlantic City after the war to help his father at the Holmhurst. Hotels were his calling, but an imperturbable carpe diem mindset, shaped by too many haunting memories of young soldiers perishing with unanswered hopes and dreams, created an uneasy restlessness in Stitzer. The hotel business was changing, and he did not want to miss out on new opportunities. He convinced his father to expand his business south to accommodate guests not only in the summer months, but in the “off season” months as well. The Stitzer Hotel Company was formed and Stitzer took to the road, first to Florida and then to the Bahamas, in search of a hotel to buy. “I didn’t like Florida, but saw opportunities in Nassau. But it was too wild and wooly down there. A big shot from Canada was brutally murdered while I

Charles Stitzer on the hunt on Temper Red.

Stitzer at the bar of the American Hotel in Sag Harbor, May 2007 — savoring his favorite drink, a dry martini.

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The Highland Pines Inn as depicted in a 1914 hand-tinted postcard.

Guests on the front porch.

“It was love at first sight”, said Stitzer, when he first laid eyes on the Highland Pines Inn in the spring of 1947...

Historical Postcards from the Moore County Historical Association 74

was in Nassau. I decided then and there to narrow my search to the Carolinas since I also wanted to be around horses. “ A chance meeting with Vernon G. Cardy at the National Horse Show in Madison Square Garden changed Stitzer’s life. Cardy, a wealthy Canadian hotelier and renowned horseman had recently purchased a farm in Southern Pines, Vernon Valley Farms. He suggested Stitzer consider buying the Highland Pines Inn, 107-room hotel adjacent to some of the best fox hunting country in the United States. “It was love at first sight,” said Stitzer, when he first laid eyes on the Highland Pines Inn in the spring of 1947, perched on a knoll above East Massachusetts Avenue amid acres of rolling fields and longleaf pines. Papers were soon signed and the inn opened with bachelor Charles Stitzer, Jr. at the helm for its 35th season on November 1, 1947, a day, described by a local reporter, “when the sun was brilliant and the lobby was full of pine fragrance, mixed with the clean odor of new varnish and the slightest hovering touch of moth balls.” Stitzer was charismatic and brought style and elegance back to the Highland Pines Inn. When not at the hotel, he could be seen dashing around town in his Mark 4 Jaguar or his MG, or riding his mount, Temper Red, a mare he purchased from Mickey Walsh shortly after his arrival. Under Stitzer’s direction, the Highland Pines Inn became the hub of equestrian entertainment, a Southern Brigadoon, hosting gala events for the Moore County Hounds and lavish parties thrown by horsemen, who came to Southern Pines from the North with their wives, children and steeds to fox hunt and enjoy the mild pine-scented winters. “Joe Stern and his band would come down from Philadelphia and play until two or three in the morning for guests who came down to fox hunt. I was always busy, but the guests insisted I ease up. I did and had a wonderful time,” said Stitzer with a smile. “Barry Leithead, the president of Cluett and Peabody, manufacturer of Arrow shirts, came down with his wife from New York each winter and rented a suite at the end of the hotel for six weeks or so. He would often fly in his business associates for meetings. We became great friends, along with Malcolm Graham, the Joint Master of the Rombout Hunt in Poughkeepsie, New York, who always coordinated his visit with Barry’s. “There was also Wilson Mills, the top attorney for the Ford Motor Company, and his wife from Detroit, both of whom were avid hunters and riders. And Vernon Cardy would come down with his family in his Rolls Royce, followed by a column of horse trailers. They were fabulous times,” reminisced Stitzer. Mickey Walsh came to Southern Pines in 1941 to train show horses for Audrey Kennedy of Seven Star Stables. Five years later, he built a track on his farm at Stoneybrook Stables and hosted a one-day flat and hurdle meeting as a charity event. The race was such a hit that local enthusiasts encouraged Walsh to expand the race to a much larger scale. “I watched Mickey build the hurdles,” recalled Stitzer. “He was highly respected up and down the East Coast. When he built his Steeplechase, everybody wanted to participate.” In the Stoneybrook race of 1949, Stitzer was the timer for all five races. He later served as Mickey’s secretary for race meetings, and was an avid participant as well, hurdling over the timber and brush fences on Temper Red. Dick Webb, Joint Master of the Moore County Hounds since 1962, first came to Southern Pines in 1947 when he was

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a freshman at Duke University. Webb and his wife, Anne, remember Stitzer well. “He was a keen fox hunter, and he loved to entertain,” says Anne with a smile. Dick and Anne Webb divided their time between Southern Pines and Massachusetts. The fifties dawned, and the era of the Highland Pines Inn as a private hotel was coming to an end. Winds of war again drifted across the Pacific, with the escalation of the civil war in Korea. Stitzer, an officer in the Army Reserves, was on call for active duty and the U.S. Air Force was seeking a new location for an Air-Ground Operations School. This, coupled with the sudden death of Stitzer’s father in May 1950, led Stitzer to lease his hotel to the U.S. military after the close of the 1950-51 season. “But then we went out in style,” remembered Stitzer with a wistful smile. The last Hunt Ball at the inn was held on February 24, 1951, following a magnificent day of Hunter Trials at the old Scotts Corner Course off Youngs Road. The cast of riders was impressive. Mickey Walsh took a first on Bright Light from Audrey Kennedy’s Seven Star Stables. Three of Walsh’s daughters (Joan, Kathleen, and Maureen) participated, as did Charlie Stitzer on Temper Red. Vernon Cardy took a second on his mount, Times Square, of Vernon Valley Farms; Stitzer’s friends, Barry Leithead and Malcolm Graham, participated, as did Mrs. Wilson Mills. Over 40 hunters and jumpers competed that day. The page finally turned on June 18, 1951, when the first group of officers bunked down at the Highland Pines Inn to undergo training in the joint operation of Air Force and ground troops. In the first year, about 10,000 Army and Air Force officers were trained by a permanent staff of forty, under the direction of Colonel Samuel T. Moore. The Highland Pines Inn was leased for the next six years by the U.S. Military. Stitzer spent a considerable amount of time in Southern Pines during that period, helping Mickey Walsh with his Steeplechase, fox hunting with the Moore County Hounds, and competing in Steeplechases with his mares Temper Red and The Cork. He was also busy overseeing his new business venture, Charkitt, whereby Charles and Kitty Walsh would buy horses and Mickey would stable and train them to compete in elite race meetings up and down the East Coast. Stitzer’s life in Southern Pines as he knew it came to a sudden end on Sunday morning, January 20, 1957, when a towering inferno, sparked by an electrical short in the hotel’s attic, leveled the inn to the ground in less than three hours. Airman Boswell, who was on duty that night, sounded the alarm at 3:31 in the morning, in time for all the occupants to evacuate safely. Stitzer was in New York City at the time and heard about the fire later that day when he placed a routine call to his resident manager, Jim Hartshorne. His Southern Brigadoon was gone. “I was devastated. All that was left was the ballroom. It had a light blue domed ceiling, and was surrounded by beautiful windows,” said Stitzer quietly. “I should never have had it bulldozed. I should have kept it and turned it into some sort of house.” Stitzer had the debris removed from the property, and divided the land into eight one-acre lots for sale. Later that year, he bought the Madison Hotel in Atlantic City, with some of the proceeds he and his younger brother Norman received from the sale of his father’s hotel, the Holmhurst. With a year-round hotel to manage, Stitzer eventually lost touch with his friends in Southern Pines. He kept the Madison for several years, but sold it in the late 1960s. “Atlantic City was going down the drain at that time, with many hotels boarded up, so there wasn’t much sense in staying around,” said Stitzer.

Foxhunters (Katharine Boyd third from the right) pass in front of the Highland Pines Inn.

Designed by Aymar Embury II, the Inn was a Colonial revival design, completed in 1912 on upper Massachusetts Avenue in Southern Pines.

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Stitzer later moved to New York City, where he started a successful laundry equipment business, supplying major hotels in North America and Europe with washers, dryers, ironers, folders and detergent at a time when hotels were just beginning to provide in-house laundry services. Stitzer is still in business, but has scaled down a bit. Based on my three enjoyable and entertaining days with Charlie, I have come to the conclusion that his robust health is attributed to an occasional

Urbane and heartbroken to the end, Stitzer’s one wish was that he might have saved the Inn’s famous blue ballroom martini, a daily glass of red wine, and lots of blueberries and friends. As I was strolling down Main Street in Southampton on my last day, I chatted with a few of the shopkeepers along the way. One told me that he sees Stitzer nearly every day, roaring down Main Street in his old BMW or Mercedes. Some things never change. He was the last of a rare American breed of hoteliers. A Postscript: My last phone call with Charlie was on April 10 of this year, just two days after his 92nd birthday. His diction — clear and crisp, his mind — keen and inquisitive, we chatted our usual 30-40 minutes, ending up, as always, discussing cars, one of Charlie’s many passions. He told me of his plans to rebuild the engine of his 1984 Mercedes. A little more than a month after the call, Charlie quietly passed away on May 21. He led a remarkable life and will be remembered by his friends at the American Hotel in Sag Harbor, New York for his humor and intelligence and by those in Southern Pines for his stewardship of the Highland Pines Inn during its final years as a grand hotel and his involvement in the community. PS John Wilson spent most of his career abroad with the U.S. Foreign Agricultural Service and lives in Southern Pines.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Small is Beautiful

How an overgrown entry became an elegant oasis of beauty and nature’s music By Noah Salt • Photographs By L aura Gingerich

G

ood things, as the saying goes, often come in small packages. It’s true of gardens, too. That was certainly behind the thinking of Lorraine and Bob Tweed last year when they traded their spacious home on Lake Pinehurst’s western shore for a cozier villa home on the east side of the lake. “We had more than a third of an acre to take care of at our old house,” explains Lorraine, “and it was beautifully landscaped but frankly getting to be too much to keep up with. So we simply made the decision to down-size our living space and our garden.” They began by hiring builder Billy Breeden to gut and renovate the 2,200-sq.-ft town home, and followed up by having their longtime landscape guru Bart Connor of the Design Company create a vest-pocketsized garden for the home’s entry area.

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Small gardens are perhaps the ultimate challenge to the fertile mind of a landscape architect. In the case of the Tweeds, a pair of overgrown and weedy rectangles fronting the house and filling a fairly modest space between their front door and garage constituted a major challenge for Connor and his father, Bart Sr. The elder Conner, who did the design work on the Tweeds’ original home almost twenty years ago — among other things creating one of the area’s first major water features with the extensive use of boulders — also tackled the new scaled-down job, designing a novel four-level pondless waterfall feature to fill the cloistered end of the space and a mounded rock garden to occupy the trellis-covered main entry area. “The objective was to create a small garden balanced by the water feature on one side of the door and the stone garden on the other, but also to create a garden that would provide points of interest throughout

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the three primary growing seasons,” says Bart Jr., whose job it was to bring his father’s cozy design to life. After the existing shrubs and weeds were cleared out, four tons of Tennessee stone and a bed of new topsoil were brought in to elevate the garden and create the foundation for the mounded rock garden and the waterfall. A concretebased Wonder board was used to seal the garden’s borders and prevent moisture from penetrating the wooden exterior of the house. Basic construction of the bones of the garden, including the waterfall that recirculates roughly 300 gallons of water every day, took about a month to complete. To provide the multi-seasonal effect he desired, Bart Jr. used a coral bark Japanese maple as the anchoring plant of the entry garden, framed by Gold Mop cypress plants and loropetalum shrubs at the base of the house’s foundation, a ruby-leafed Chinese shrub that produces gorgeous pink blooms in spring. The mounded rock garden is highlighted by annual plantings of begonia and dramatic caladium plants from Bart Jr.’s own collection — plants he digs up at the end of every growing season, strips of soil and wraps in paper for storage in his basement. “By the end of the hibernation season,” quips Bart Sr., “he often has puppies — new little plants for next year’s garden.” Carolina jasmine plants, which will put forth spectacular yellow blooms come next spring, scale the trellis wall and provide an exotic finishing touch to the entry garden space. Limelight ground cover, scaevola and Wave petunias are also used to dazzling effect. The commanding attention-getter, however, is the ever-musical water feature that moves fresh water down four levels to a shallow pool that is designed to be nearly maintenance-free and operate at the flip of a switch. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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“We had a pool with koi fish at our other house,” explains Lorraine, “but this one doesn’t require daily feeding and maintenance because there are no fish — just beautiful plants and the wonderful sound of that tumbling water. Every time I step out here,” she adds, “I’m soothed by the sound of that water, especially knowing we have to do very little to maintain it.” According to the elder Conner, who has installed more than 600 gardens during his two decades in the Sandhills, zero-maintenance water gardens are one of the most in-demand garden features at present. “People have busy lives but in many cases don’t have the time or energy to devote to keeping up with a pond, yet they want the magical effect of moving water. These kinds of features are an answer to that challenge and can transform a small space into something really special.” The garden’s waterfall is likewise framed by ruby loropetalum and Gold Mop cypress but provides plenty of interesting nooks and crannies of color, balance and texture owing to Wave petunias, ajuga ground cover, scaevola, begonias and a spectacular red lace Japanese maple. The final touch was the installation of soft outdoor lighting fixtures that illuminate the garden. “When I step out my door now, whatever the hour, I’m greeted by nature’s music,” says Lorraine. “But the beauty of this simple little garden is what never fails to impress me. It was the final touch that made our downsizing the right thing to do — a small garden that made all the difference.” PS


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Emily’s Garden I HAVE NOT told my garden yet, Lest that should conquer me; I have not quite the strength now To break it to the bee. I will not name it in the street, For shops would stare, that I, So shy, so very ignorant, Should have the face to die. The hillsides must not know it, Where I have rambled so. Nor tell the loving forests The day that I shall go. Emily Dickinson, from “Time and Eternity.”

By noah Salt • PhotograPhS By tim Sayer

“You know,” muses Alexandra Carter

with a shy smile, standing on a stone footpath in her beautiful garden a hour or so before twilight on a recent late summer evening, “I think all gardens are magical and this one particularly so. Emily Dickinson’s spirit resides here. I have no doubt about that because her spirit resides in me.” The smile widens. “In another life I might have even been her.” It’s not at all hard to give credence to such a notion to a visitor to 50 Short Road in Pinehurst, for there is something quietly enchanted — and unquestionably Dickinsian — about the beautiful house and grounds that occupy the formerly overgrown corner of Page and Short roads where Alexandra Carter created her house and garden eight years ago. A divorced mother of two grown children, an award-winning community theater actress and stage director with more than 75 productions on her drama vita (“Shakespeare to Neil Simon”), including a lengthy and popular run as the “Belle of Amherst,” Carter came to the Sandhills on something of a lark in 1999, moved by the unseen hand of providence following the breakup of her marriage and a resettlement in an apartment she owns in New York. “I love New York — my daughter was there in production at the time — but I saw an ad in

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a home magazine for a development in Sanford and something just told me to get in my car and drive down here to investigate. I was looking for a new place to start a new chapter of life, hoping to find someplace that really felt like home,” she says. “Sanford wasn’t what I hoped for, and I decided to go check out Asheville when the realtor told me Pinehurst was only a short distance away. “I’d heard the name, of course, but I knew nothing about it. But I’m always up for an adventure.” She came, she saw, she fell hard. “It was like stepping back into another time in America, slower and more graceful. The cottages were timeless and beautiful, and I knew I had to somehow be here.” She pauses and adds with a laugh, “You might say my inner Emily Dickinson demanded it.” Before leaving town, Carter purchased a one-acre lot on Short Road, and within a year she began construction of a classic two-story house with unmistakable New England lines, handsome gray clapboards and a proper white apron of a wraparound porch. The construction took more than two years, with Carter shuttling between Manhattan and Pinehurst. Once the house was finished, she moved her baby grand piano and a lifetime’s collection of original art and books into the bright, open rooms, each of which, by design, open to the garden space outside. At that time, the landscaping around her dream home was fairly rudimentary and included a small water feature, typical of many Pinehurst cottages and designed for easy care. “From the beginning, though, I wanted a garden that gave this house a sense of being a spiritual sanctuary, a safe retreat from the noise of the world. I also wanted a garden that attracted your eye and drew you out into nature.” Enter designer Jennifer Riley of the Southern Landscape Group. The hand of providence, some might say, guided the Sandhills native to Alexandra’s doorstep. A 1995 graduate of Unions Pines High, she entered

Sandhills Community College planning to become a pediatric nurse until a powerful female spirit of her own took control and shaped her destiny. In Riley’s case, the influence came from her grandmother, Melba Cameron Hicks, a Scottish countrywoman who oversaw several generations on the Lobelia Road in Vass. “I grew up in a house next door to her, and she was the greatest influence in my life. She seemed to live out of doors and always had beautiful gardens — gorgeous flowers and vegetable gardens, a grape vine that dated to the late 1800s, and a wildflower garden you wouldn’t have believed. She was fiercely independent, and I suddenly found her spirit coming out in me.” With the encouragement of her husband, Zachary, relishing a career out of doors rather than one in, Riley swapped a life in the pediatric ward for one in a client’s garden, landing a coveted designer’s job with the Southern Landscape Group in summer 2004. “I could picture my grandmother somewhere smiling because it was my ideal job, the thing I’ve always loved most doing and the legacy she left me.” After a couple of hundred designs ranging from simple enhancements to comprehensive design jobs, Riley found her way to 50 Short Road. What began as a simple maintenance account on Alexandra Carter’s yard eventually developed into an extensive reworking of the garden landscape of a modern-day Emily Dickinson. “My first impression of the house was that it was a very special place, built by someone who obviously loved it. The landscaping was fairly basic but a good starting point for expanding and creating an even more intimate garden that Mrs. Carter wanted.” To begin with, the designer chose to leave mature miscanthus plants defining the driveway and shaped up a large juniper hedge that provided some screening from an adjoining road by augmenting it with Nellie Stevens hollies. An expansive crape myrtle dominates the front walk, rising from a thick bed of waxwing begonias. Shaded by a Japanese maple and mature Kwanzan cherry, an existing front border area of Virginia sweet spire was given greater texture and color contrast by the additions of baby shasta daisy, catnip, various ornamental grasses,

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and foundation plantings of Indian azalea and oakleaf hydrangea. Dwarf Burfield holly girdles the majestic white porches, and transplanted butterfly bushes and even a formerly languishing peony are thriving in the new planting scheme. On the west side of the house, the designer oversaw the thinning of native pines and oaks and several shrubs, enabling her to create a new perennial bed that uses native plants that guide a visitor along a serpentine path to a flagstone terrace and a screened gazebo, softly framed by dwarf holly. “I’m a great believer in trying to create a natural flow through a garden that connects things, in this case the house via the garden path to the gazebo,” Riley explains, pausing to indicate how lorapetalum ground cover, May night salvia, moonshine yarrow, Walker’s low catnip and red knockout roses produce a steady stream of interesting seasonal color that flows from spring into fall. As summer waned, autumn joy sedum was just approaching the first stage of bloom. The back garden is highlighted by a discreet water feature embowered by wax myrtles, a dominant weeping cherry tree whose boughs resemble something from a fairy tale, and several mature rhododendron specimens, creating a serene grotto of water and foliage, the opening act for a former formal rose garden just beyond whose finicky tea roses gave way to more reliable knockout roses in a variety of sympathetic hues. A screen of Nellie Stevens hollies fronted by winter star camellias will produce light pink blooms come Thanksgiving, adding a splash of color to a cloistered retreat where a wooden bench and a pair of small stone angels invite a body to linger and reflect on nature. The eastern flank of the house is highlighted by an artfully transplanted rose of sharon and a wall of wax myrtles that will also produce a bounty of fragrant blue bayberries come the close of the long Sandhills growing season. “I felt it was important for both balance and beauty to have plants that require little or no spraying,” says Jennifer Riley, completing the circumnavigation of the garden and winding up back in front by the signature crape myrtle. “The aim was to create a surprise wherever the garden path leads you — to attract wildlife and human beings alike.” According to the garden’s deeply pleased owner, this splendid garden accomplishes all of that and more — and is, in fact, a magnet to birds and humans and

even more elusive life forms perhaps only visible to a poetic sensibility. Its transcendental charm extends to a family of stone ducks waddling across the front yard as if returning from a day out in the village while a pair of ornamental sheep graze in the dusk. St. Francis keeps watch over this peaceable kingdom of the seen and unseen, a menagerie that includes tiny carved birds and live bird houses galore, whimsical iron frogs, an ancient sun dial, and the aforementioned angels. “It’s uncanny how many people see the garden and just stop to take a closer look,” says the gentlewoman who believes a spark of the famous Amherst poet resides in her. “They come and knock on the door just asking to have a look around, which I’m always happy for them to do. I’ve even had people come to my door wondering if I might wish to sell the place. They sense or see something special here, perhaps the same thing I do. Building this house and garden has been one of the great pleasures of my life. The fact that I can see the garden from every room of the house makes it especially pleasing. I never turn into my driveway having been away without feeling a powerful serenity.” She smiles and adds, almost coyly: “I think that’s why the fairies like it so much, too.” Come again. The fairies? “Oh, yes. They’re here, too. You can laugh if you want, but you can see them if you’re paying close attention, especially in the twilight.” Victorian gardeners, it’s well worth remembering — including those who designed places like Pinehurst — believed passionately in fairies and helpful nature spirits. But time and eternity wait for no one. For reasons that have to do with life’s brevity and her desire to be near family, Alexandra Carter is contemplating a move to Austin, Texas, where he daughter now resides and works. One difference between herself and the Belle of Amherst — who once confided to a famous fellow transcendental poet that kindly spirits inhabited her garden — Emily Dickinson rarely traveled more than twenty miles from her New England village, yet found an entire universe to write about waiting in her garden. “That’s how I feel about this place,” allows the well-traveled mistress of 50 Short Road. “If and when I do ever leave this house and garden, a piece of my heart — my inner Emily Dickinson, if you will — will stay behind. This is both our gardens, after all.” PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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To Do List

Starwatch The month of September is a time of change, both in sky and on earth. For skywatchers, it marks the passing of the famed “Summer Triangle” of stars and the arrival of autumn constellations, most notably mythical Pegasus. Venus and Jupiter are also here on earth, the autumn equinox on September 21 marks the equalizing of day and night, observed in ancient times with bonfires and harvest festivals. The Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox. Without question, September is one of the gardener’s busiest months. Now is the time to harvest the last of summer’s bounty and augment the soil with compost and mulch.

Grapes and apples also ripen in September, and are among the best harvested fruits for winter storage or dried for later use. The best cider is made at this time of year. Now’s the time to overseed your Bermuda lawn with rye seed to produce a burst of winter green. To repair centipede grass, make an application of potash. September is also the time to wash soiled pots, clean garden tools, organize sheds and store things out of the elements. This is the ideal month to begin planting trees and shrubs, allowing time young plants time to establish good root systems. Do not prune trees and shrubs until cold weather arrives. A killing frost indicates the time to trim back herb and perennial beds. Hardy herbs that do well planted in the fall include catmint, comfrey, sage and lavender.

The Gardening Saint September 22 marks the Feast of Saint Phocas, the patron saint of Gardeners. This Third Century monk spent his life in prayer and gardening. The story goes that when Roman soldiers were dispatched to execute him for his Christian faith, he put them up in his modest garden cottage, unaware of their mission. Learning of their intent, he went out to his summer garden and dug his own grave. With great reluctance, the soldiers did their duty and buried him amid his own fading flowers. Legend holds that as his soul flew to Heaven, his decaying remains sweetened the earth. The Feast of St. Michael’s comes on September 29. This Medieval feast honors the famous archangel Michaelmas who is often depicted with wielding a mighty sword. Across western Europe, he was still associated with the forecast of rain and replenishing the parched earth of summer. From earliest times, asters have been associated with the changing stars, including the Michaelmas daisy, which blooms abundantly in the early autumn — a final blaze of dark violet glory before the curtain of winter falls.

In Bloom

Strong late summer and early autumn bloomers include Autumn Sedum, Goldenrod and many varieties of Big Leaf Hydrangeas. Dahlias are also at their peak. Many roses offer a final burst of blooms. Spring bulbs go on sale everywhere, and should be planted as soon as possible. With the first frost, which rarely comes in , more fragile bulbs must be dug up and stored in a cool dry place for the winter.

From the Experts “In my experience, September is the best month for planting daffodils, though most gardeners get them in late in October. They can be planted up till Thanksgiving, and in a pinch up till Christmas. I have planted them in February. None of which changes my view that September is best. But you know how gardeners are — ‚ a day late and a dollar short — so I try not to scold.” — from One Man’s Garden, by Henry Mitchell.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Designed For Life By Ashley Wahl • Photographs By John Gessner These distinctive Sandhills living rooms support the timeless notion that home is where the heart is — and the family always gathers.

details Designer: Vickie Auman Architect: Marcel Goneau Home Location: Forest Creek

The Perfect Balance For Dian Dean, color means happiness. The same is true for Adrian Dean. If his wife is happy, he is, too. When the Deans caught wind that color happens to be designer Vickie Auman’s forte, they knew they had picked the perfect match for their stately home among the pines. Built in 2008 by local architect Marcel Goneau, the canvas was blank: high ceilings and open spaces with transom windows and ample natural light. Dian and Auman had their fun. Primary colors — however subtle — now bring the rooms to life. “It’s the perfect balance,” Auman says of the muted yellow, red and navy hues that, together, achieve harmony throughout the Deans’ open living spaces. In the main living area, pale yellow paint colors the walls and high ceiling. Couch, love seat, chair and accent pillows complement, in various hues of yellow-gold. The adjoining dining area and library, both in red, boast architectural quirks to boot: crisp white columns and high ceilings that evoke a sense of depth. To furnish, Auman used local merchants whenever possible. Ornate rugs came from Capel Rugs; furniture from Mid-State Furniture in Carthage. Sentiments also fill the space. Artwork mounted above the mantel, a Faye Terry original, reminds the Deans of their daughter, Dede, and of a young Dian. “Chester,” a ceramic dog that sits by the foot of the fireplace, was named after a street the Deans once lived on — a recurring motif throughout the house. Although the living space is small, Auman helped the Deans achieve optimal use. “It’s extremely comfortable,” says Dian. “I love the colors — they make me happy every time I enter the room.”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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details Designer: Sue Hammer, Village Design Group Home Location: Village of Pinehurst

A New Light As sunlight streams through the bay windows, dancing across cheerful floral prints and golden-yellow walls (done in Benjamin Moore’s Hawthorne Yellow), the living room of this 1922 Tudor home in the Village of Pinehurst simply glows. “It was very dark,” says Sue Hammer of Village Design Group, who worked with homeowner Linda Whitfield to transform the space formerly used as an entertainment room for a corporate home into an airy, traditional spread alive with personality and playful splashes of ornate whimsy. “Our strategy was to lighten the room as much as possible while aiming to keep a sense of authenticity about the place,” Hammer says. Mission accomplished. Original molding and radiators (though nonfunctional) evoke the charming, comfortable feel of a bygone era. Dark wood also “keeps in context with the house,” says Hammer, while complementing traditional fabrics and providing the perfect contrast to sunny walls and modern flair. Above the mantel, a foxhunt painting puts a genuine Sandhills stamp on Whitfield’s living space. The ornate birds displayed on either side just seemed to beckon. “I like pretty things,” says Whitfield. Traces of gold — found on light fixtures, candlesticks and various decorative objects — are woven throughout the room. And symmetry abounds. A pair of floral accent chairs, balanced on either side of the fireplace, required a simple, neutral rug. A Chikering piano and an old altar table (displayed in the large bay window) satisfy the homeowner’s taste for antiques. Ditto the extensive book collections — the complete works of Charles Dickens, W.M. Thackeray and John L. Stoddard. They likewise fit the traditional feel of the room. “The room is very warm and inviting now,” says Hammer, “and what’s best, it’s just filled with personal touches.”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


details Designer: Susan Lapato Architect: David Nichols Builder: Pinehurst Homes Home Location: CCNC

Simply Wonderful “They wanted simple,” says interior designer Susan Lapato of the vision Sid and Wanda Warner had for the living room of their Pinehurst home. “Simple, but also comfortable.” Designed by architect David Nichols, the Warners’ house was built by Pinehurst Homes in 2006. Lapato began designing and conceptualizing the interior in conjunction with the home’s construction. “They wanted contemporary,” says Lapato. So she delivered. Soft, plush furniture in neutral beige fabrics proved both inviting and elegant. But something needed to “pop.” “Reds,” says Lapato, “and black accents,” many of which are found in Wanda’s paintings and in the bold pattern of an Ultrasuede accent chair. “She’s an artist,” Lapato says of Wanda. “She has an artist’s eye, and puts a lot of thought into details.” Hone in on the flush molding around the windows. Note the black wooden trim that frames the fireplace, or the marble inset in the foyer. Wanda’s artwork, displayed throughout, provides color against a neutral palette. A black area rug complements neutral tones. Everything stands out on its own. The view from the expansive floor-to-ceiling windows, overlooking the nearby golf course, is a favorite feature for the homeowners. Plus, natural light abounds. “The room is very comfortable, but it’s also very eye-catching,” says Lapato. “I have no problem designing contemporary spaces, but my personal love is for this soft contemporary style. This was truly such a wonderful, fun project.”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Hunt & Gather

Harvest Home Photographs by Hannah Sharpe

Autumn in the Sandhills brings cooler temperatures and inspired creativity. On a lark, we dispatched two of our most artistic staffers to see what caught their fancy in area shops this Autumn. Their “harvest” for home and garden, we think, is a real bounty.

Pillows from Framer’s Cottage, Southern Pines.

Oversized wooden matches from Shops at Fairway, Southern Pines; “Harvest Time” scented candle from Seagrove Candle Company, Southern Pines.

Bear Mirror from Mockingbird, Southern Pines.

Pinecone Lamp from Framer’s Cottage, Southern Pines. Floral Upholstered Chair from Shops at Fairway, Southern Pines. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Hunt & Gather

Harvest Home Birdhouse pottery from Seagrove Candle Company, Southern Pines.

Birdfeeder from Framer’s Cottage, Southern Pines.

Birdhouse Shovel from Seagrove Candle Company, Southern Pines.

Birdcage from Mockingbird, Southern Pines.

Birdcage fabric upholstered chair, One Eleven Main, Aberdeen. Recycled Metal Watering Can from Green Goods, Southern Pines.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Custom Homes • Renovation • Real Estate

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Wake-Up Call Dreamy sheets for a good night’s sleep

T

By Deborah Salomon he month was December — the place, a tundra so far north of the Mason-Dixon Line that okra doesn’t grow and biscuits don’t rise. No matter. I had a 30-foot pulley clothesline from the back porch to the power pole and by damn, I was going to hang those sheets to flap in the wind, absorbing a scent more glorious than Chanel ever decanted. Of course I had to spin them in the dryer first. Hung wet they would’ve frozen stiff. And then I had to press them. But crawling between fragrant white all-cotton sheets was pure Ambien. “Linens” have traveled far since they were linen. No fabric outlasts tightly woven flax-derived linen. Wrap me up, said King Tut to his mummifiers. Pharaoh shriveled and blackened; his coverings remained intact. Keep me cool, added Lawrence of Arabia, streaking across the desert. Pre-Shroud of Turin, the Phoenicians brought flax to what is now Ireland; for millennia Irish linens (sheets, tablecloths and such) were practically one word. Durability enabled these linen bedclothes to be passed down three generations before commanding top dollar at the antique shop. Cotton, just as ancient but lacking the élan, changed that. One hundred percent white cotton sheets, mangle-ironed at the local laundry (which picked up and delivered) were the norm into the 1950s when synthetics, colors, patterns transformed sheets, many woven in North Carolina by Cannon and Fieldcrest, into home fashion. The patina of fine old linen linens was usurped by the convenience of no-iron. I cringe remembering the wild sheets I have owned. One set — white polka dots on black with red borders — provoked many a nightmare. Sheets became gender-specific: tiger prints and houndstooth checks for guys, tulips for gals. The kids wanted Charlie Brown sheets, then tie-dyes, which were made into curtains and throw pillows. Sure, “permanent pressed” sheets exited the dryer smooth but something was missing. The scent? With proliferation came permutation. The higher the thread count, the richer the bed. Anything below 300 was scratchy-cheap. In the last decade

pure cotton has reappeared in commercial brands, to the consternation of bedmakers unaccustomed to wrinkles. Whites and pastels have replaced Monet gardens and Mondrian geometrics. Now we have cotton jersey for folks who want T-shirt comfort. Velvety organic cotton is pricy but so righteous. Microfiber and sateen are luxurious but slithery, never crisp. Bed-in-a-bag (a.k.a. pig-in-a-poke) solves match-ups What else? So much. Tanda Jarest, sommelier of fine bedding at Opulence in Southern Pines, has the answers: “We sell linen sheets from Italy and Ireland to younger customers who want a rumpled look,” Jarest says of the soft, pre-washed fabric. Queen sets run $350-$800. Jarest much prefers long-staple Egyptian cotton grown in the Nile Valley and finished in Italy. “(My customers) want great cotton percale that sleeps cool and crisp.” Or microfiber, made from a wood product, not flax or cotton. Sateen-finish cotton sleeps warmer, Jarest adds. Thread count means less than finishing techniques, including an expensive singeing process to prevent pilling. “Feel this,” Jarest says, offering a scandalously low 200-thread count — a real smoothie until compared with the ultimate 800. Her pricing formula: “If you’re not paying one dollar per thread for a set there’s something wrong with those sheets.” Jarest damns with faint praise the ensembles on display at department and housewares stores. “The cotton used in print sheets is not as fine.” Yet the few prints she stocks are art forms. Such quality deserves the ministrations of a specially formulated “linen wash” ($28 for 32 loads, in every scent but line-dried) and “linen water,” a freshening between-wash spray. Divine, like Godiva is to Hershey — an echelon I shall aspire but never achieve. Just give me sunshine, a brisk wind, a high-flying clothesline and my white flags of surrender. Thus will I rest in peace. PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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S taging

The Fine Art of a House

By Mary Elle Hunter Photographs By John Gessner

A local expert shares her secrets to showing a house in its best light

Designer Becky Fox Baldwin made the quilt with leftover fabric

Cushions were recovered with fabrics in shades of tan, greens, watermelon

Wicker furniture, old hutch and coffee table were all painted

A new stained glass shade was made for the antique lamp featuring butterflies and dragonflies

Birdcage was painted

Custom cut and bordered sisal rug was placed to define the seating space

s our economy and a flattened housing market sputter along, the concept of home “staging” has gained significant appeal across the country, a phenomenon that has not only inspired reality TV shows, but attracted enthusiastic designers and real estate brokers who understand that a well-staged property can shorten the time it’s on the market. Moore County has an abundance of talented home stagers. Local interior designers and decorators have been contacted by members of the real estate community who seek their expertise on behalf of their clients to dramatize a home’s advantages, or downplay its less attractive elements. One I recently enjoyed connecting with — and picking her brain on the art of staging — is Becky Fox Baldwin, otherwise known as The Southern Fox, a true Southerner with roots reaching back for generations. Growing up in Chatham County, she spent hours in her childhood playhouse, arranging tea parties for her dolls and wearing dress-up clothes. As she matured, she discovered an innate creativity that led her to taking old objects and making them into something useful and beautiful. She still does that today as an avocation — with clothes, jewelry, furniture, accessories and artwork. Sometimes all it takes is a

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touch-up paint job, or a thorough scrubbing or sanding and refinishing. Or in the case of jewelry it might mean a re-setting, or a turned up or down hem or new buttons for an outfit. She firmly believes in the mantra used on television shows and in the innumerable entries on the Internet dealing with “Home Staging” that dictates the most important thing one can do to prepare a home for sale in this highly competitive real estate market is to de-clutter. She remembers a woman that she assisted not so long ago in a home staging who had lived in a three level home for many years. “She had so much stuff! In her case, she desperately needed help sorting through the treasures and acquisitions of years of living in the same home, before we could even go on to the next step in the staging process. After her daughters had picked out furnishings and accessories that they wanted, in order to get rid of the rest of what she no longer wished to keep, I organized and ran a yard sale for her. Then we gave away a pile of items to Goodwill, and we also put some things on consignment.” One of the major contributors to a cluttered look is too much furniture. Some professional stagers, when taking on a home being prepped for market, recommend removing up to half of the owner’s original furnishings. While this treatment of keepsakes and favorite pieces seems a

September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


little radical, the removal of a few pieces of non-essential furnishings can make a room look much larger and give a feeling of spaciousness. The de-cluttering process requires tact and sensitivity, says Baldwin. She respects the homeowner’s most precious possessions and appreciates the fact that some items carry with them cherished memories. However, she advises an overabundance of family photographs are best minimized and some put away for the period when the house is on the market, because they may offer a distraction from the living areas of the home itself Other common home-staging suggestions include the rejuvenation and cleaning of all the fabrics, such as draperies, upholstered furniture and carpets, as well as the surfaces and appliances in bathrooms and kitchens. Another traditional home-stager method is to rearrange the furniture to create a flow from one room to the next or to take advantage of an exceptional view. Baldwin also recommends realigning and repositioning artwork in a home in order to capitalize on the eye-catching features of a print or painting, or to position the piece into a more compatible color scheme, if necessary. If the walls need freshening, a coat of neutral tone paint in the living areas and cool shades of blue and green in the bedrooms and baths can make a real difference. Working alone, she creates a clean, clutter-free and ready-to-show environment that attracts many prospective home buyers. However, she uses outside resources if she has a job that requires additional people-power. First impressions are always important in any home staging effort. Real estate agents stress “curb appeal” as one of the key factors in drawing potential buyers.

Baldwin always includes a tour of the property in her initial visit so that the homeowners can get a fresh perspective and see the exterior of the house as others see it, to facilitate deciding what improvements are necessary. In the early days of her career. Baldwin worked for a concern in Harnett County, specializing in paint, wallpaper and floor coverings. The owner regularly sent her to seminars and workshops on decorating, and also arranged for her to take advanced design courses at Wake Technical College. Her natural talents, enhanced by the knowledge gained through those first few years, helped her advance the company’s growth into new product lines such as blinds, shutters, draperies and accessories. She notes, “After fifteen years with that one company, and the death of the owner, I decided it was time for a change. I had had a bout with cancer, went through a divorce, and had finally seen my two wonderful daughters educated and married. “In the spring of 2002, I accepted an invitation from a friend who lived in Pinehurst to come for a visit. Everything was in bloom, the golf courses were at their manicured best, and I decided then and there that this is where I wanted to live.” For the next five years, she worked as a decorator in the Sandhills, until her daughters prevailed on her to move closer to them, in Cary. However, urban living isn’t really her style, and so she returned to Moore County and started The Southern Fox. Eager to share her decorating talents and energy with those who face the challenge of relocation to a smaller residence, or getting a home ready to put on the market, Baldwin views herself not only as part of a growing trend, but an expert in the fine art of staging a house and making it shine. PS

First impressions are always important in any home staging effort. Real estate agents stress “curb appeal” as one of the key factors in drawing potential buyers.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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My Favor ite Room

u

By k athryn galloWay • PhotograPhS By hannah SharPe pon entering the nursery in the Shore home, a sense of family abounds — right down to the linens. Megan, who decorated the room with the help of her mom while her husband, Rick, was deployed overseas, wanted the space to embody the hopes she has for her son’s life. “I want him to embrace art, color and creativity. I want him to always feel surrounded by love and to be comfortable,” she explains. The nursery she created certainly accomplishes this, and more. The bed linens, pillows and stuffed animals were handmade by Megan’s mom, while her dad’s woodworking skills are displayed in a hand-crafted airplane that hangs from the ceiling and a toy box he made for Megan when she was a child. The furniture was handed down from Rick’s sister, and the mobile and graphics on the wall were custom designed by a local artist. An overstuffed chair sits invitingly next to a window in the room. It is now where memories are made during storytime at night, but in its past life was a place of tranquillity for the couple when they were newlyweds. Fittingly, Megan was sitting in the chair when she went into labor. “When I felt the contractions starting, I immediately sought that chair,” she recalls. “I wanted to be somewhere that made me feel comfortable and relaxed, and it’s the first place I thought of. I stayed there until the paramedics arrived.” The temptation to spend a small fortune decorating a nursery is strong for many moms-to-be, but as the unmistakable bond between Megan and baby Eli proves, strong family ties and a lot of homegrown creativity can transform the ordinary into something magical. PS

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September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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HomeStyles


HomeStyles

LYNETTE WILLLIAMS Broker

Specializing in all of Moore County

910.295.6056

lynettwllms@aol.com www.foxcreekre.com


Registry

The PHG Architects Anderson Architects PLLC Southern Pines • (910) 692-7316 Clark Robert E AIA Architect Pinehurst • (910) 295-4683 Matthew R Mills AIA Architect Pinehurst • (910) 246-2787 Seven Sails Architects West End · (910) 400-5309 Stagaard & Chao Architects PLLC Pinehurst • (910) 295-4800 James C Thomson Architect Southern Pines • (910) 246-9909

Home Design Anderson Nichols Design LLC Aberdeen • (910) 215-9901 Mark Wesley Parson, Inc Southern Pines • (910) 692-8550

Building Contractors A W Builders Inc. Pinebluff • (910) 281-3731 Anderson Construction & Development Co LLC Southern Pines • (910) 692-7316 Architexz Builders West End • (910) 603-2141

Your Buying Source for the Best in Home and Garden Products and Services

Bartlett Construction Co LLC West End • (910) 673-1511

Cavalier Home Builders Robbins • (910) 948-4400

Huntley Design Build Raleigh • (919) 783-5229

Baxley Custom Homes Pinehurst • (910) 692-8100

Chandler Co LLC Pinehurst • (910) 692-9205

Husk Home Builders (910) 315-1975

Bennett Building Co Lakeview • (910) 949-2692

Daniel Adams Construction Pinehurst • (910) 295-1504

Integrity Builders of the Sandhills, (910) 690-9088

Big Sky Construction, LLC (910) 673-2106

Danley Construction Company Carthage • (910) 695-8738

J Brent Smith Construction Inc. (910) 295-1976

Bill Reaves Construction Co Inc West End (910) 673-0004

Dennis Regan Construction Southern Pines • (910) 693-1530

JP Builders (910) 691-2940

Blackman Builders Inc Aberdeen • (910) 944-5658

Demyan James Roofing Company Southern Pines • (910) 692-8599

Jarrett Deerwester (910) 528-5025

Bolton Builders Seven Lakes • (910) 673-3603

Dimension Design & Construction (910) 315-2453

Jusco (910) 944-2211

Bonville Construction Co Inc Pinehurst • (910) 295-0462

Dooley’s Contractors LLC Whispering Pines • (910) 215-6996

Justin White Inc (910) 783-6205

Bowness Custom Homes Pinehurst • (910) 692-3782

Elite Roofing LLC (910) 783-4800

KP Quality Builders LLC (910) 673-5772

Brown & Son Construction Vass • (910) 245-3346

Eric Payne Builders (910) 603-2093

Kanoy Architecture, P.A. West End • (910) 215-5884

Bundy Construction Inc (910) 692-9004

Estate Builders of Pinehurst (910) 295-6498

Burns Building Co West End • (910) 673-5504

Goneau-Bryant, LLC (910) 585-1114

Camina Design & Construction Inc. Pinehurst • (910) 695-4271

Harris & Son Construction Co Inc West End • (910) 673-3387

Carter & Co Construction and Design (910) 783-7775

Hickman Construction Co Pinehurst • (910) 215-0497

For Cabinetry 207-B Pinehurst Avenue

MEMBER

Southern Pines, NC 28387

910.693.0777 Showroom 910.695.0286 Fax designstudioforcabinetry.com 108 September 2011

closetsnc.com

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Kirby Construction Group LLC Southern Pines • (910)692-2731

Seldomridge Construction Services (910) 673-2590

Lakeview Construction Seven Lakes • (910) 673-4800

Stewart Construction West End • (910) 673-1929

Landmark Homes West End • (910)673-2567

Terry L Michael Construction Pinehurst • (910) 295-9538

Longstreet Construction LLC Southern Pines • (910)692-0855

WG Construction & Renovation Inc Southern Pines • (910) 693-1455

Mark Lally Construction Carthage • (910) 638-8236

Yates Hussey Construction, INC Seven Lakes • (910) 673-4170

McCaskill Construction Co Seven Lakes • (910) 673-8111

Home Improvement

Michael Construction Seven Lakes • (910) 695-5593

A Affordable Home Improvement (910) 783-6205

Mingin Enterprises Construction West End • (910) 673-0909

A-1 Quality Home (910) 315-6011

Moore Co. Home Builder’s Association (910) 944-2992

Andy On Call (910) 695-9988

Moore County Roofing (910) 916-7809

Architexz Builders West End • (910) 603-2141

Myrick Construction Inc (910) 428-2106

Burney’s Hardware Aberdeen • (910) 944-1516

New South Construction (910) 949-3070

C & G Home Repair (910) 690-6049

Norris & Norris Builders Inc Aberdeen (910) 783-7977

Carpenter’s Construction, Inc. (910) 639-4627

O’Connor Company Aberdeen • (910) 944-0600

Coyle Construction LLC (910) 281-4928

Pattan Construction Inc (910) 692-9116

Creed & Garner Roofing (910) 944-0520

Payne Construction Southern Pines • (910) 692-9429

Despain’s Home Improvements (910) 783-5524

Pinehurst Homes Inc Pinehurst (910) 295-5400

Doug Smith’s Plumbing & Repair (910) 944-8129

Precision Builders & Real Estate Inc Pinehurst • (910) 295-2800

Gary’s Home Improvement (910) 692-4144

Premier Properties of the Sandhills LLC Southern Pines • (910) 725-1540

Handwerk Shop (910) 638-8370

Primax Construction Inc Pinehurst (910) 295-1846

Home Remedies Carthage • (910) 783-6040

Red Brand Southern Pines • (910) 894-0831

Home RX LLC Pinehurst (910) 215-8023

Sandhills Refuse Southern Pines • (910) 695-7299

J & L Home Services (910) 673-3927

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Registry

The PHG L & J Renovations Vass • (910) 245-3169

Le Claire Construction, Inc Seven Lakes (910) 673-3917 Lowe’s Southern Pines • (910) 693-1010 Make A Deal Handy-Man Service (910) 528-2978 Mark’s Painting & Remodeling (910) 944-0496 Meares Construction (910) 639-0693 Nail Down Construction (910) 639-5022 Pinehurst Rehomes (910) 295-5400 Sandhills Siding Co. Aberdeen • (910) 944-7300 Sandhills Seamless Gutter Southern Pines • (910) 693-3790 Sylantech Construction (910) 992-6105 Tunstall Builders, LLC Carthage • (910) 949-3386

Interior Designers Vickie Auman Interiors Pinehurst • (910) 295-6590 Carter & Co. Construction & Design Pinehurst • (910) 603-1943 Closets and So Much More Vicki Brown, Designer. (910) 603-7123 Cottage Chic & Co. Aberdeen • (910) 944-0501 Denis Coll McCullough, ASID Southern Pines • (910) 692-9121 The Design Studio Sanford • (919) 774-7575 Inside Out Interiors (910) 295-4012

Interior Peace Design, LLC. (910) 585-2585

R S S Total Home Solutions, LLC Southern Pines • (910) 692-4556

Joan Nelson Designs Pinehurst • (910) 692-7575

Sandhills Staging & Design LLC (910) 603-5770

Johnsye White Interior Design Inc (910) 255-3005 Lapato id Pinehurst • (910) 783-7380

Artistic Kitchen & Baths Southern Pines • (910) 692-4000

Nancy Olson Interiors Pinehurst • (910) 585-2674 Sandhills Staging & Design LLC (910) 603-5770 Southern Chic Pinehurst • (910) 255-0455 Southern Fox Southern Pines • (919) 418-7272 Sparrows Southern Pines • (910) 692-1088 Total Design Solutions, Inc. Southern Pines • (910) 246-8046 Village Design Group Southern Pines • (910) 692-1000

Interior Decorators Alice Fenner Decorator Pinehurst • (910) 295-6859 Carolina Interiors Pinehurst • (910) 295-5222

Blarney Stoneworks (910) 944-1380 Barron Tile (910) 673-3884 Brock Cabinets West End • (910) 215-8724 Builder Products, Inc. Southern Pines • (910) 693-0162 Cabinets, etc. Aberdeen • (910) 235-5233 Creative Edge Inc. Southern Pines • (910) 692-4178 Creative Kitchens Pinehurst • (910) 295-1712 Design Studio for Cabinetry Southern Pines • (910) 693-0777 Granite Transformations for Kitchens & Bath (888) 248-9613 Heritage Cabinet Co. of Pinehurst Pinehurst • (910) 420-2559

Fashionable Finishes (910) 639-7303 Lyne’s Furniture Gallery Pinehurst • (910) 295-1888 Southern Pines • (910) 692-1888

110 September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Kitchen Design and Cabinetry

Kitchen & Bath Galleries Southern Pines • (910) 692-3984

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


L A Cabinets Seven Lakes • (910) 673-2768 Locklear Cabinets Aberdeen • (910) 521-4463 Perfect Design Cabinet Works Aberdeen • 910-944-0922 S & D Granite and Marble Inc. Aberdeen • (910) 944-3270 Set In Stone Aberdeen • (910) 944-3062 Southern Floorcovering & Interiors Inc. Aberdeen •(910) 944-3250 Travis Alfrey Wood Working (910) 639-3553

Plumbing & Electrical Ben Franklin Plumbing (910) 246-0442 Fields Plumbing & Heating Co, Inc (910) 949-3232 HD Supply Pinehurst • (910) 295-5541 Hubbard Pipe & Supply Southern Pines • (910) 6922210 David McDaniel Electrical (910) 693-2955 Premier Plumbing & Repair (910) 673-5291 Ray’s Plumbing Service Inc (910) 944-7076 Stackhouse Plumbing (910) 673-6732

Heating & Air Conditioning 72 Degrees Heating & Air Conditioning (910) 944-9777 Advanced Mechanial Systems Carthage • (910) 949-2114 Air Specialties Aberdeen • (910) 944-2526 AirRich Heating & Cooling Inc Cameron • (910) 245-3301 Buie’s Heating & AC Cameron • (910) 245-4958 Cameron Heating & Air Conditioning Cameron • (910) 245-2865 Carolina Air, Inc. Carthage • (910) 947-7707 Carolina Climate Control Carthage • (910) 947-2823 Comfort Heating & Air (910) 695-0200 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Registry

The PHG

Comfort Services, Inc. Aberdeen • (910) 695-2665

Curtis Hart Heating & Air Vass • (910) 245-1583 Fields Plumbing & Heating Co, Inc (910) 949-3232 Four Seasons Heating & Air Conditioning West End • (910) 235-0606 Grimm Heating & Air Conditioning Carthage • (910) 947-2948 Hinesley’s Heating & Air Conditioning Carthage • (910) 947-5823 Scott’s Mechanical Aberdeen • (910) 281-3628 Seven Lakes Heating & Air Seven Lakes • (910) 295-1441 Southmoore Heating & Cooling Pinebluff • (910) 281-4567 Southern Air & Refrigeration (910) 692-7519 Stancil & Son Heating & Air Conditioning, LLC Aberdeen • (910) 944-1940 Sunbelt Mechanical, LLC Aberdeen • (910) 944-2044 Temperature Control Pinehurst • (910) 295-8367

Household Appliances Aaron’s Sales & Lease Owndership Aberdeen •(910) 944-2543 Badcock Home Furniture and More Aberdeen • (910) 944-9500 Kees Appliance Center Aberdeen • (910) 944-8887 Keith Home Appliances Aberdeen • (910) 944-9200 Lowe’s Southern Pines • (910) 693-1010 Sears Hometown Store Aberdeen • (910) 944-2313

Floor and Carpeting Aberdeen Carpet & Textiles Aberdeen • (910) 944-6204 Flooring America of Pinehurst Pinehurst • (910) 295-2293 G.T.J. Installations Pinehurst • (910) 528-5365 House of Carpets & Oriental Rugs Vass • (910) 693-3343

112 September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Richardson’s Wallpapering Service (910) 281-4264

JB Short Carpet One (910) 692-6411 Moore Floors Southern Pines • (910) 692-7744 Prime Time Flooring (910) 949-4281 Rug Solutions (910) 691-2968 Southern Carpets & Interiors Sanford • (919) 775-3557 Southern Floorcovering & Interiors Inc. Aberdeen • (910) 944-3250 Tracy’s Carpets Seven Lakes • (910) 673-5888 Village Design Group Southern Pines • (910) 692-1000

Paint Aberdeen Paint & Wallpaper, Inc Southern Pines • (910) 692-4451 NSP Specialty Products West End • (910) 235-0468

Classic Sun Control (910) 603-0048

Landscape Designers American Landscapes (910) 295-1252

Sandhills Paint Center Southern Pines • (910) 692-7000

Pella Window Store Southern Pines • (910) 692-3399

Sherwin-William Co Southern Pines • (910) 692-6450

Vinyl Windows & Doors Corp Aberdeen • (910) 944-2100

Superlative Stenciling (910) 992-1989

Win-King (910) 295-6094

Fabric Shops

Blinds

Linderella’s Quilt Works Pinehurst • (910) 215-5981

AAA Colony Shade, Inc. Aberdeen • (910) 944-0880

Not Just Linens Vass • (910) 695-1803

Aberdeen Paint & Wallpaper Southern Pines • (910) 692-4451

Lighting

Aberdeen Window Works Aberdeen • (910) 944-3443

Joe’s Landscaping & Irrigation (910) 295-1251

A Light Source Aberdeen • (910) 944-9100

Comfort Made Blinds Southern Pines • (910) 692-5500

Scott’s Lawn Service (910) 944-1322

Living In Lighting (910) 949-2458

Larry’s Window Designs, Inc. (910) 949-2077

Sequoia Design & Build (910) 639-1671

Premier Lighting Pinehurst • (910) 295-5602

Les’s Blinds & Shutters Etc. (910) 281-4884

The Southern Landscape Group Aberdeen • (910) 944-2361

Glass

On-Site Drapery Cleaning & Installation (910) 673-3639

Stilworks, LLC (910) 986-0609

Artistic Impressions Aberdeen • (910) 944-1930

Swiss Tech Awnings (910) 673-5237

Landscape Lighting

Sandhills Designer Glass LLC (910) 783-6442

The Windowbox Southern Pines • (910) 757-0380

Chisholm Electrical Contractors Inc. (910) 673-5646

Stained Glass Originals (910) 673-5590

Landscape Architects

Clark Electrical Contractors, Inc. (910) 295-3415

The Glass Doctor (910) 944-2924

The Hayter Firm Pinehurst • (910) 295-2232

Design Company Landscaping (910) 215-9303

Windows

Vince Zucchino Associates Southern Pines • (910) 695-1077

Dramatic Garden Lighting (910) 690-9997

CA Screens (910) 603-1636

Gardens By Design Southern Pines • (910) 692-9558

Rainbow Irrigation & Lighting (910) 949-3889

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

1 4 5 6 7 8 11 12 13 14 15 18 19 20 2122 25 26 2728 29

Friday

2 9 16 23 30

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. James Maddock and Rick Olivares Trio. Poplar Knight Spot. (910) 944-7502.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Green Gate Gourmet. (910) 986-2367. FIRST FRIDAY. 5 - 8:30 p.m. Live music from Frontier Ruckus. Free admission. The grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com.

CULINARY SHOWCASE. 6 - 8 p.m. Annual showcase moves to Pinehurst Resort this year due to its increasing popularity. The Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst. www.moorecountychamber.com.

TOUR DE MOORE. Event benefits the Moore County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Schedule, information and registration: www. tourdemoore.org.

AUTHOR EVENT. 6 p.m. Mia Berk, Joyride: Pedaling Toward a Healthier Planet. Pinecrest High School, Robert E. Lee Auditorium. (910) 6923211.

LIVE THEATER. 7:30 p.m. (Wed. - Sat.); 2 p.m. (Sun.) Moore OnStage presents “I Do! I Do!,” Sunrise Theater, Southern Pines. www.mooreonstage.com.

KITCHENS… AND MOORE TOUR. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Information: Moore County Cooperative Extension Office at (910) 947-3188.

ART EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION. 6 - 8 p.m. Watercolor artist Amy Hautman at Campbell House Galleries. (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

SUNDAY AFTERNOON MOVIE. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid.” 2:30 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. (910) 692-8235 or www. sppl.net.

SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Mixed mediums guru Tom Grubb. Guests welcome. Christ Fellowship Church, www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

SUPPER ON THE GROUNDS. 5 p.m. Social followed by dinner at the Wemouth Center. Reservations/ Information: (910) 692-6261.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022.

LIVE THEATER BROADCAST. 2 p.m. Sunrise Theater presents “One Man, Two Guvnors,” Live in HD from the National Theatre in London. (910) 692-8501 or www. sunrisetheater.com.

CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISEIN. 5 - 8 p.m. Ledo Pizza. (910) 639-1494.

AUTHOR EVENT. 2 p.m. Innovative and prize-winning NC author, Keith Flynn, Colony Collapse Disorder. The Country Bookshop, (910) 692-3211 or www. thecountrybookshop.biz.

BENEFIT GOLF TOURNAMENT. Moore County Kennel Club annual tournament. Cost: $80. Little River Golf Club. Bill Pace at (910) 528-6265.

FRESH MARKET WINE GALA. 7:30 9:30 p.m. Cost: $25/ person. Tickets and Information: 910692-2787 or www. mooreart.org.

PINEHURST CROQUET CLUB INVITATIONAL. Pinehurst Lawn & Tennis Club. Free for spectators. Information: (910) 255-6368.

WINE SALE. Big Fall Wine Sale at The Wine Cellar & Tasting Room. 1 p.m. (Thursday); 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (Friday - Saturday); 1 - 5 p.m. (Sunday). (910) 692-3066.

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. In The Studio With June (watercolor). Artists League of the Sandhills. (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org.

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. Featuring Little Windows. Poplar Knight Spot. (910) 944-7502 or www. theroosterswife.org.

MOORE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GOLF CLASSIC. 9:30 a.m. National Golf Club. (910) 692-3926 or dbunch@moorecountychamber.com

AUTHOR EVENT. 6 p.m. Sandra Gutierrez, The New Southern-Latino Table. The Country Bookshop. (910) 6923211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022.

FIDDLER’S WORKSHOP. 3:30 - 5 p.m. Fiddler’s workshop with Casey Dreissen at The Rooster’s Wife, Poplar Knight Spot. (910) 944-7502.

AFTERNOON TEA WITH BRUCE RICHARDSON. 2 - 4 p.m. Bruce Richardson will speak on NC Colonial Tea History. Cost: $40. Reservations Required. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 21 Chinquapin Road, Pinehurst, North Carolina, 28374. Information/Registration: (910) 255-0100 or tea@ladybedfords.com.

JAZZ WITH THE MURPHY FAMILY. 7 p.m. Paul Murphy on saxophone and clarinet; vocals by Anna Murphy; Gary Brown on piano.Weymouth Center. (910) 692-6261.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Green Gate Gourmet. (910) 986-2367.


Arts & Entertainment Calendar

Saturday

3 10 17 24

COOKING DEMO: Tailgating Food. 12 & 2 p.m. Score big at your next tailgating party with choice game-day goodies. Free event. Elliott’s Provision Company. (910) 215-0775. SUNRISE FILM: The Tree of Life. Weekdays at 7:30 p.m.; Weekends at 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501. BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Bring furry companions along to the annual Blessing of the Animals. The Good Shepherd Pet Crematory and Cemetery. (910) 673-2200. RALLY FOR THE CURE. 8 a.m. 8K Run/ Walk and 1K Fun Run/Walk to benefit the Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Information: John at (910) 295-4400. TOWN CREEK HERTITAGE FESTIVAL. 12 - 5 p.m. Town Creek Indian Mound. Cost: $4 (adults); $1 (ages 4 - 12); children 3/under free. Information: (910) 439-6802. MOORE COUNTY MEN’S AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT. 70th annual event to be held at Hyland Golf Club. www.golfchamps. thepilot.com or Dick Wilson at 910-949-4675. ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Pinehurst Harness Track. (910) 235-8456. ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Featuring magic by Fish the Magish, face painting and play at Camelot Playground in Cannon Park. (910) 295-2817; (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

September 1

September 3 - 5

HASTING GALLERY OPENING RECEPTION. 6 - 8 p.m. Four Friends: Abstract to Realism. The works of noted local artists Marie Travisano, Sharon Ferguson, Marilyn Vandemia and Lauri Deleot at Hastings Gallery, Boyd Library, Sandhills Community College. Mixed media exhibit features works on paper, canvas and wood; runs through October 31. Information: (910) 695-3879.

SUNRISE FILM: The Tree of Life. An impressionistic story of a Texas family in the 1950s. Starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Jessica Chastain. Weekdays at 7:30 p.m.; Weekends at 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501.

SUNRISE FILM: The Tree of Life. 7:30 p.m. An impressionistic story of a Texas family in the 1950s. Starring Brad Pitt, Sean Penn and Jessica Chastain. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. James Maddock and Rick Olivares Trio. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www. theroosterswife.org.

September 2 CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free & open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. FIRST FRIDAY. 5 - 8:30 p.m. Family friendly community event featuring food, beverages, entertainment and live music from Frontier Ruckus. Free admission. The grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411

September 2-4 FIVE POINTS HORSE TRIALS. Horses and riders compete in a three-phase competition including dressage, cross-country and show jumping. Free for spectators. Carolina Horse Park, just off Hwy 211, between Aberdeen and Raeford. Information: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com. LABOR DAY WINE FESTIVAL. Annual celebration of fine wine, gourmet food and pure southern hospitality. Pinehurst Resort, Village of Pinehurst. Information: www.pinehurst.com.

September 2-30 ART EXHIBIT. Artists League of the Sandhills presents From My Perspective, featuring the artwork of Linda Bruening, Exchange Street Gallery, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www. artistleague.org.

September 3 WINE TASTING: Malbec. 12 - 4 p.m. Fashionable red from Argentina. Free event. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. COOKING DEMO: Tailgating Food. 12 & 2 p.m. Score big at your next tailgating party with choice gameday goodies. Free event. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

September 4 CULINARY SHOWCASE. 6 - 8 p.m. More than a dozen eateries present their top gastronomic creations; eat exceptional food and sample wine from 25 vineyards. Annual showcase moves to Pinehurst Resort this year due to its increasing popularity. Tickets: $50/person. The Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort, Pinehurst. Information: www.moorecountychamber.com. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Wildlife Pantry. 3 p.m. Join the Park Ranger for a short slide presentation followed by a hike along the trails to examine seeds, fruits, nuts, and other plant parts that are utilized by native wildlife. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167.

September 5 TOUR DE MOORE. Annual bike festival includes three distances: 28 mile cruise; 50 mile ramble; classic Tour de Moore Century (100 miles). Entertainment, food (Elliott’s on Linden) and music (Mckenzie Bros.) provided. Event benefits the Moore County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. Schedule, information and registration: www.tourdemoore.org.

September 6 SENIOR ACTIVITY: National Cheese Pizza Day. 1 p.m. Make homemade cheese pizza using English muffins, pizza sauce and cheese. Drinks provided. Cost (includes pizza ingredients): $2/residents; $4/nonresidents. Sign up by Sept. 2. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376. MOORE COUNTY CHORAL SOCIETY: Registration and Rehearsal. New season begins under the direction of Anne Dorsey. Registration begins at 6:30 p.m.; rehearsal begins at 7:30 p.m. All voice parts needed, no auditions required. Registration for new members continues through September 13. Cost: $45 (includes music). Brownson Memorial Presbyterian Church, 330 S. May St., Southern Pines. Information: Mary Ann Young at (910) 692-8306. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Good Bites. 6:30 p.m. A Sinfully Healthy Balance Series includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage/spirits. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367. AUTHOR EVENT. 6 p.m. Mia Berk will discuss her book, Joyride: Pedaling Toward a Healthier Planet, the dramatic and enlightening behind-the-scenes story of how a group of determined visionaries transformed Portland, Oregon into a cycling mecca and inspired the nation. Pinecrest High School, Robert E. Lee Auditorium. Information: (910) 6923211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

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ca l e n da r the Diamondhead days. Reception to follow. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022.

September 6 - 9

September 7-11

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. Deconstructing the Face. Drawing with JJ Love. Cost: $105/members; $135/nonmembers. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 9443979 or www.artistleague.org.

LIVE THEATER. 7:30 p.m. (Wed. - Sat.); 2 p.m. (Sun.) Moore OnStage presents “I Do! I Do!,” Sunrise Theater, Southern Pines. Tickets and information: www.mooreonstage.com.

September 7

FARM TO TABLE CO-OP SEASON. Eight-week fall produce box season featuring seasonal, local produce from 35 local producers. Information and subscriptions: www.Sandhillsfarm2Table.com; (910) 949-2142.

AUTHOR EVENT. 7 p.m. In her latest book, The Eighty-Dollar Champion: Snowman, the Horse that Inspired a Nation, Elizabeth Letts tells the true story of a horse that became a champion, and captured the heart of the Cold War World desparate for a symbol of second chances, big dreams and unstoppable hope. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

September 8

September 9

September 7 - October 27

SANDHILLS WOMAN’S EXCHANGE OPENING. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Located in the historic log cabin in the Village of Pinehurst, the Woman’s Exchange features arts and crafts, knitted items, baby gifts and Pinehurst memorabilia. Lunchroom serves homemade soups, salads, sandwiches and desserts. Store hours: 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (Tues. - Sat.) Information: (910) 295-4677. CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 - 4 p.m. Bring infants and toddlers (birth through 5 years) for stories, songs and fun. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sspl.net. TEEN ADVISORY BOARD MEETING. 6 p.m. High school students are invited to meet other teens and learn how to gain service and volunteer hours. Free pizza. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

KITCHENS…AND MOORE TOUR. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Tour 6 kitchens in the Pinehurst, Southern Pines, Aberdeen Area. Area chefs will be on-site at the homes preparing and serving favorite recipes. Tickets: $20 (day of the tour); $15 (advance; can be purchased at The Faded Rose, Daphne’s Hallmark, Seagrove Candle Company, Phoenix Fashions, and the Cooperative Extension Office). Information: Moore County Cooperative Extension Office at (910) 947-3188. OLDIES & GOODIES FILM SERIES. 2:30 - 4:30 p.m. Enjoy a cup of tea and a 1940 comedy starring Jimmy Stewart and Margaret Sullavan. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Longtime Pinehurst resident and owner of the Potourri, Eldora Wood, will share memories of the late Tufts era and

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free & open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. ART EXHIBIT OPENING RECEPTION. 6 - 8 p.m. Watercolor artist Amy Hautman at Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Exhibit runs through September 30; weekdays from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Information: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org. JAZZ WITH THE MURPHY FAMILY. 7 p.m. Paul Murphy on saxophone and clarinet; vocals by Anna Murphy; Gary Brown on piano. Concert followed by a reception on the lawn. A lively kickoff to the Weymouth Arts & Humanities’ programs for 2011-2012 season. Tickets: $10/advance; $12/ at door. Tickets available at the Country Bookshop, Given Library and the Weymouth Center, 555 East Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-6261.

Sports

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September 10 ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Featuring storyteller Donna Washinton, face painting and play at Camelot Playground in Cannon Park, Pinehurst. (Rainsite: Pinehurst Village Hall.) Free and open to the public. Information: (910) 295-2817; (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Saturday Sampler. 12 p.m. The Gourmet Tailgater inclues demo (30 min.), recipe, tasting and beverage. Cost: $20. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367. FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL & GRAPE STOMP. 12 - 6 p.m. Featuring music, vendors, wine tastings and a popular Grape Stomp. Free Admission. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411. COOKING DEMO: Apples for Dinner. 12 & 2 p.m. A perfect companion for savory dishes, appetizer to entrée. Free event. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Garnacha. 12 - 4 p.m. Smoky, sultry, raspberry red from Spain. Free event. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. LIBRARY DEDICATION. 12 p.m. The Southern Pines Public Library was dedicated in 1995. Celebrate its “Sweet 16” and find out what it has to offer. Free event. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. BLESSING OF THE ANIMALS. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Bring furry companions along to the annual Blessing of the Animals. Personal blessings, snacks, raffles, goody bags and best trick contest. The Good Shepherd Pet Crematory and Cemetery, 5198 NC Hwy 211, West End. Information: Emily at (910) 673-2200. RALLY FOR THE CURE. 8 a.m. 8K Run/Walk and 1K Fun Run/Walk to benefit the Susan G. Komen for the Cure. Combination of road and trail running through the Village of Pinehurst. Cost: $25. Registration: active.com or http://1in8k.org. Information: John at (910) 295-4400. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Birdwalk. 8 a.m. Bring binoculars and bugspray and join the Park Ranger for a 2-mile morning hike to look for Southbound fall migrant birds. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. CHARITY MOTORCYCLE RIDE. Ride to End Alzheimer’s sponsored and hosted by St. Joseph of the Pines. Biker registration begins at 8:30 a.m. Kickstands go up at 10:30 a.m. Cost: $20/rider; $10/ passenger. Rain date: Sept. 17. Lunch, music, cash door prizes and a 50/50 raffle await participants upon returning to Belle Meade, 100 Waters Drive, Southern Pines. Information: www.sjp.org.

September 11 SUNDAY AFTERNOON MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. “Diary of a Wimpy Kid.” A film for the whole family based on the bestselling book by Jeff Kinney that follows the misadventures of “wimp” Greg Heffley and his older brother Rodrick. Refreshments included. Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Film Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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ca l e n da r Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. Featuring Jeff and Vida. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www. theroosterswife.org.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Good Bites. 6:30 p.m. A Sinfully Healthy Balance Series includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage/spirits. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367.

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Winged Gems. 3 p.m. Bring binoculars and bug spray and learn about the butterflies found in the Sandhills. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167.

September 12 SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Mixed mediums guru Tom Grubb presents his “North Pole Voyager” and discusses how he uses photographs and Photoshop techniques to design this sculpture project. Guests welcome. Christ Fellowship Church, Midland Rd. at Pee Dee. Information: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

September 12 - 14 ART CLASS. 1 - 4 p.m. Drawing the Figure with Betty DiBartolomeo. A step-by-step class. Cost: $90/ members; $110/nonmembers. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org.

September 13 PIZZA WITH PIZZAZZ. 5 - 6 p.m. Kids grades 6-8 are invited to craft “Angry Birds” character pompoms, make them “fly” with rubber band launchers, and enjoy free pizza with friends. Southern Pines

Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

Theater presents “One Man, Two Guvnors,” Live in HD from the National Theatre in London. Tickets and information: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.com. NC SYMPHONY. 8 p.m. Schubert’s “Great” Symphony, featuring resident conductor William Henry Curry, R.E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School. Tickets and information: (877) 627-6724 or www.ncsymphony.org.

SUPPER ON THE GROUNDS. 5 p.m. Social followed by dinner at the Wemouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Music by the Fred Brush Trio; catering by Cape Fear Barbecue. Cost: $20. Reservations/Information: (910) 692-6261.

September 15 - October 2

BUSINESS NETWORKING MIXER. 5 - 8 p.m. Connect and network with like-minded business owners and professionals. Free event. Le Coffee & Moore, 9735-D Hwy 15-501, Southern Pines. Information: zaleski@marketingsolutionsnc.com.

September 16

September 14

CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISE-IN. 5 - 8 p.m. Inclues door prizes, 50/50 drawing and music. In case of inclement weather, Cruise-In will be cancelled. Ledo Pizza, 1480 US Hwy 1 South, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 639-1494.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022.

September 15 ART CLASS. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Post-Impressionist Small Works and Miniatures with Jean Brylowe. Cost: $40/members; $50/nonmembers. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. LIVE THEATER BROADCAST. 2 p.m. Sunrise Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

LIVE THEATER. Guys and Dolls. Temple Theatre, 120 Carthage St., Sanford. Tickets and information: (919) 774-4155 or www.templeshows.com. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free & open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411.

September 17 ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Featuring the Grey Seal Puppets performing Tangle of Tales,

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r Donna Washington, face painting and play at Camelot Playground in Cannon Park. (Rainsite: Pinehurst Village Hall.) Free and open to the public. Information: (910) 295-2817; (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

Tee of the Sandhills. Information: www.golfchamps. thepilot.com or Dick Wilson at 910-949-4675.

cart, lunch, range balls and prizes). Little River Golf Club. Information: Bill Pace at (910) 528-6265.

September 18

COOKING DEMO: NC Sweet Potatoes. 12 & 2 p.m. Easy and delicious recipes that showcase the versatility of the official vegetable of NC. Free event. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775.

AUTHOR EVENT. 2 p.m. Innovative and prize-winning NC author, poet and musician Keith Flynn will read from his latest book, Colony Collapse Disorder, to be released early next year. He will also discuss his latest album, “Live at Diana Wortham Theater,” with The Holy Men. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

CLASSICAL CONCERT SERIES. 8 p.m. Presenting North America’s finest brass quintet, Empire Brass with internationally recognized organist Douglas Major, Village Chapel, Pinehurst. Tickets and information: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

WINE TASTING: White Bordeaux. 12 - 4 p.m. French white made from the same grapes as Chateau d’Yguem. Free event. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775.

September 17 - 18 DOG SHOWS. Moore County Kennel Club allbreed shows. Presenters for Best In Show include Mr. and Mrs. Henri McClees (Saturday), and Pinehurst Mayor Virginia Fallon (Sunday). Pinehurst Harness Track. Information: Karolynne at (914) 772-7873. TOWN CREEK HERTITAGE FESTIVAL. 12 - 5 p.m. Singing, dancing, drumming and crafting at Town Creek Indian Mound, 509 Town Creek Mound Rd., Mt. Gilead. Cost: $4 (adults); $1 (ages 4 - 12); children 3/under free. Information: (910) 439-6802. MOORE COUNTY MEN’S AMATEUR GOLF TOURNAMENT. 70th annual event to be held at Hyland Golf Club. Featuring three divisions: Open (16 and older); Senior (55 and older); Super Senior (65 and older). Tournament open to all amateur men; no residency requirement. Net proceeds to benefit The First Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. Featuring Jonathan Byrd and Grace Pettis. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 9447502 or www.theroosterswife.org. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Senses Hike. 3 p.m. Discover what nature has to offer through all five senses — touch, smell, sight, sound, and taste — during a walk along some of the trails in Weymouth Woods. Hike 1 ½ miles (approx). Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167.

September 19 ART CLASS. 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. Follow the Leader (oils) with Joan Williams. Cost: $70. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. BENEFIT GOLF TOURNAMENT. Moore County Kennel Club annual tournament to benefit veterinary tech scholarship at Central Carolina Community College. Cost: $80 (includes green fee, Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

September 20 LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS LUNCHEON: Uncle Sam, Yogi and the Sleeping Giant. 11:45 a.m. Retired diplomatic editor of Reuters will talk on international relations at the League’s fall kickoff luncheon at Table on the Green. Cost: $12. Everyone welcome. Reservations required. Information: Charlotte at (910) 944-9611. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Good Bites. 6:30 p.m. A Sinfully Healthy Balance Series includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage/spirits. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367. FRESH MARKET WINE GALA. 7:30 - 9:30 p.m. Hosted by The Fresh Market of Southern Pines. Cost: $25/person; party limited to 300 guests. Tickets and Information: 910-692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

September 20 - 22 ART CLASS. 9:30 a.m. - 4 p.m. Painting Local Scenes (oil or acrylic) with Harry Neely. Cost: $100/ members; $130/nonmembers. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org.

Sports

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ca l e n da r ART CLASS. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. In The Studio With June (watercolor). Cost: $40/members; $50/nonmembers. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org.

September 21 CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 - 4 p.m. Bring infants and toddlers (birth through 5 years) for stories, songs and fun. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sspl.net.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free & open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367.

September 21 - 25

MALCOLM BLUE HISTORICAL CRAFT & FARM SKILLS FESTIVAL. Featuring craft demos, gas and steam engine demos, petting farm, food, folk and country music, dancing and a Civil War Camp; all authentic historic activities at this 42nd annual event. Cost: $5 (adults); $3 (children 12 and under); preschoolers - free. Information: (910) 944-7558 or www.malcolmbluefarm.com.

PINEHURST CROQUET CLUB INVITATIONAL. Pinehurst Lawn & Tennis Club, 2 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Free for spectators. Information: (910) 2556368 or email halliburton_2@msn.com.

September 22 - 25 WINE SALE. Big Fall Wine Sale at The Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241 A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. 1 p.m. (Thursday); 10 a.m. - 7 p.m. (Friday - Saturday); 1 - 5 p.m. (Sunday). Information: (910) 692-3066.

September 23 SENIOR ACTIVITY: Better Breakfast Month. 9 a.m. Fieldtrip to Cracker Barrel. Cost (covers transportation only): $1/residents; $2/nonresidents. Sign up by Sept. 21. Depart from Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

September 23-25

September 24 ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Free admission. Food vendors, handicap parking. Sandhills Chapter AACA and Village of Pinehurst Parks and Recreation. Pinehurst Harness Track, NC 5, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 235-8456. ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Featuring magic by Fish the Magish, face painting and play at Camelot Playground in Cannon Park. (Rainsite: Pinehurst Village Hall.) Free and open to the public. Information: (910) 295-2817; (910) 6922787 or www.mooreart.org. Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Saturday Sampler. 12 p.m. Chili Autumn includes demo (30 min.), recipe, tasting and beverage. Cost: $20. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367. BEER TASTING: New Autumn Brews. 12 & 2 p.m. Sample a vast selection of autumn ales and hard ciders. Free event. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Shiraz. 12 - 4 p.m. Exotic red from Australia surprises with a hint of the Orient. Free event. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. HORSE SHOW. Fall Classic: NCHJA “C” Hunter/Jumper at Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd., Raeford. Information: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com. ASTRONOMY NIGHT AT TOWN CREEK: Uranus at Opposition. The blue-green planet will be at its closest approach to Earth and its face will be fully illuminated by the Sun. Binoculars and telescopes encouraged; site telescope available. Town Creek Indian Mound, 509 Town Creek Mound Rd., Mt. Gilead. Information and registration: (910) 439-6802. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Night Hike. 7 - 8 p.m. Discover the kinds of wildlife that appear in Weymouth Woods after dark. Bring one flashlight per family. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167.

Sports

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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Home Remodeling • Handyman Service

September 24-25 PINEHURST FALL DRESSAGE SHOW. 8 a.m. 5 p.m. Pinehurst Harness Track, Route 5, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 692-1788.

September 25 THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. Featuring Little Windows. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www. theroosterswife.org. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT: Nature Bingo at Paint Hill. 3 p.m. Carpool to our Paint Hill property for a guided exploration featuring a BINGO scavenger hunt and discussions of the interesting things we find along the way. Meet at Weymouth Woods Visitor Center, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167.

September 26 QIGONG AND TAI CHI IN THE GARDENS. 9 a.m. Lee Holbrook instructs two disciplines that benefit the mind and body at Ball Visitors Center, Sandhills Community College. Cost: Horticultural Society members/free; non-members/$5. Information and registration: Tricia Mabe at (910) 695-3882. MOORE COUNTY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE GOLF CLASSIC. 9:30 a.m. (Registration); 5 p.m. (Dinner & Awards Presentation). Network with fellow business leaders and colleagues while enjoying a fantastic round of golf, food and fellowship. To be held at National Golf Club. Information: Moore County Chamber at (910) 692-3926 or dbunch@moorecountychamber.com

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September 26 - 30 ART WORKSHOP: Concept Development. 9:30 a.m. - 4: 30 p.m. How to Create Unique and Meaningful Art with Katharine A. Cartwright. Develop the analytical skills necessary for selfcritique; develop mature and systematic method for creating art; produce great paintings. Cost: $425/ members; $495/non-members. Artist League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Artist website: www.kacartwright.com; Information: www. artistleague.org.

September 27 AUTHOR EVENT. 6 p.m. Sandra Gutierrez will discuss her new cookbook, The New Southern-Latino Table, which reveals how the food of the new south is being influenced by the culinary accents of Latin America. She will also bring samples for tasting. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Good Bites. 6:30 p.m. A Sinfully Healthy Balance Series includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage/spirits. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information and registration: (910) 986-2367.

September 28 Children’s Story Time. 1:30 p.m. Given Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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ca l e n da r Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 - 4 p.m. Bring infants and toddlers (birth through 5 years) for stories, songs and fun. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 692-8235 or www.sspl.net.

September 29 ARTour. See the musical, “Come Fly Away,” at DPAC, Durham. Information and availability: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org. FIDDLER’S WORKSHOP. 3:30 - 5 p.m. Fiddler’s workshop with Casey Dreissen at The Rooster’s Wife, Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Registration: (910) 944-7502. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:45 p.m. Featuring Casey Dreissen and Color Fools. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 9447502 or www.theroosterswife.org AUTHOR EVENT. 12 p.m. Jenny Wingfield will discuss her debut novel, The Homecoming of Samuel Lake, a powerfully constructed account of good and evil in 1950’s Arkansas. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

September 30 CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free & open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. SENIOR ACTIVITY: Movie Night. 5:30 p.m. Marry Poppins debuted 47 years ago. Sign up by Sept. 26 to enjoy refreshments and watch Mary Poppins in the auditorium of Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376. PENICK VILLAGE ART SHOW & PREVIEW PARTY. 6:30 - 9:30 p.m. Sixth annual event to be held in the brand new Grand Hall of Penick Village. Evening includes cocktails, festive music, original works from regional artists, an unparalleled live auction and culinary excellence. Penick Village, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-0300. Afternoon Tea with Bruce Richardson. 2 - 4 p.m. Bruce Richardson, a leading expert in America’s tea renaissance, will speak on NC Colonial Tea History. Cost: $40. Includes talk with question and answer session, cream tea, choice of one of three books written or co-authored by Richardson. Book signing and photo session with Bruce and his wife Shelley. Reservations Required. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 21 Chinquapin Road, Pinehurst, North Carolina, 28374. Information/ Registration: (910) 255-0100 or tea@ladybedfords.com.

October 1 GLASS PUMPKIN PATCH. 9 a.m. Choose from nearly a thousand dazzling, handblown glass pumpkins to benefit a high school glass program at STARworks Center for Creative Enterprise, 100 Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

122 September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r Russell Drive, Star. Information: (910) 428-9001 or www.starworksnc.org.

�Deercroft � the best kept secret in the Sandhillls�

October 1 - 2 PENICK VILLAGE ART SHOW OPENING. Proceeds to benefit Penick Village Benevolent Assistance Fund. Saturday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Sunday from 12 - 3 p.m. Penick Village, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-0300. Art Galleries Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Rd., Pinehurst, showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meetthe-artist opportunities are available. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., and Saturday, 1-4 p.m. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. Art Gallery at the Market Place, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst, features original art by local artists Joan Williams, Deane Billings, Jeanette Sheehan, Mike D’Andrea, Janet Burdick, Nancy Yanchus, and Cele Bryant. Meet one of the artists Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. (910) 215-5963. Artist Alley features juried art and fine crafts from local and regional artists, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077. Artists League of the Sandhills, located at 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon - 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979.

16580 RABBIT RUN COURT-DEERCROFT ENTERTAINING IS PART OF THE REAL JOY OF OWNING THIS HOME. With a touch of class and lots of glass to see the beautiful golf frontage of the 8th green. Welcome Fall and all the seasons. Elegance and comfort in Deercroft.

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The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines, is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and every third weekend of the month from 2-4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. The Gallery at Seven Lakes, a gallery dedicated to local artists. The Gallery is open on Wednesday and Thursday each week from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 1145 Seven Lakes Drive, The St. Mary Magdalen building. Just 9 miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211. Hastings Gallery is located in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are 7:45 a.m. - 9 p.m., MondayThursday; 7:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday; and 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst, features original artwork by local artists Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter, Mary Frey, Jean Frost, Sandy Scott and artist/owner Jane Casnellie. Open MondaySaturday 10:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www. hollyhocksartgallery.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Open Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines, showcases the arts and crafts of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday, Wednesday-Saturday. (910) 695-0029. SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Dr., Aberdeen, is open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery.com.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Resale Retail

ca l e n da r Studio 590, located in a historic log cabin, is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Studio 590 offers fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. Studio 590 is located by the pond in the Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle in Pinehurst South. (910) 639-9404. White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100. The Downtown Gallery (inside Flynne’s Coffee Bar) is located at 115 NE Broad St. in downtown Southern Pines. Ever-changing array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, located at 25 Chinquapin Road in Pinehurst, is featuring local artist Nancy Campbell. Original oil and watercolor paintings are on display inside the tea shop. Open Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www.ladybedfords.com.

Nature Centers Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve (898 acres). 1024 Ft. Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

Historical Sites Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908. Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2-5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331. House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051. Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739. North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261. Shaw House Property. Open 1-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday. (910) 692-2051. Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642. Union Station. Open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin Open 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677 To add an event, send us an e-mail at pinestraw@thepilot. com by the first of the month prior to the event.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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SandhillSeen

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Marcy & Scott Lincicome and Kathie & Mark Parson Mary Joe & Tom Worth

Culinary Showcase Culinary Masterpieces from Moore County’s Finest Chefs competing for the prized

Culinary Cup Dick and Katie Walsh

Sarah Twilla and Jim Buck Clarence & Linda Lindsey, Randall & Sandra Phillips and Suzanne Daughtridge

Awards in several categories including People’s Choice! Proceeds benefit culinary students at SCC Wine tasting with over 25 wineries represented Silent Auction

Beth and Jay St. John Marilyn & Bob Hughes

Connie & Bob Lovell

Mike Haney, Mary Schwab and Marianne Mebane

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Elaine & Ronnie Crow and Gray Covington

SandhillSeen Foxtrack Schooling Show June 18, 2011 and July 9, 2011 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Bailey Mitchell, Kayela smith and Savannah Russell Charlie & Terry Cook and Stephanie Gibson

Liz Rose, Jean Pedrick and Mel Wyatt

Campbell Jourdain Kim and Liz Phelps

Kayela Smith

Betsy Rainoff

Lani Hester, Tom Loy, Kathy Doyle and Taniya Smith

Taylor and Emma Decker

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Introducing new eyewear from Tom Ford and Swarovski! Designer Eyewear & Sunwear from Armani, Jimmy Choo, Gucci, Fendi, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Hugo Boss, Oakley & many others

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Nancy Schmidt, Janet and Bob Varro

SandhillSeen

OSU Sandhills Buckeyes Scholarship Send-Off and General Meetings Photographs by Nancy Phelps

Sam Robeano, Matt Becker and Karen & Mike Robeano Emily, Susan, Jonathan and Patrick Gribben

Diana Sanders and Ann Bilobrowka

Brad and Amy Albert

Lisa and Will Sauder Karen and Hogan Triplett

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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SandhillSeen 10th Annual Blues Crawl July 16, 2011

Rosemary Barker and Pete Munster

Photographs by Lisa Sauder

Dixie Simpson, Kristy Arey, Anthony Parks

Jarred and Nikki Baldwin

Jesse Wimberly, John Amato, and Sam Amato David and Beth Carpenter

Al and Annette Daniels

James Malloy, Susan Carbone, Samuel Toomer, and Chon Bryan

Pat Wallace and Craig Pryor

Matt Carriker, Deidre Locklear, and Sarah Presley

Bill and Jennifer Lawson, Jim and Dawn DeKornfeld

Rhonda and Brett Langley

Pam Partis and Tom Fioretti

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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SandhillSeen Solas at The Rooster’s Wife July 31, 2011 Photographs byLisa Sauder

Martha and Ron Liner

Cecilia Stanford and Benjamin Allgood

Solas

Al and Linda Geiger, Dan and Sharon Maloney Kim Kirkpatrick and Eric Swenson Raye Hensdell, Joyce Reehling, Tony Elms, and Dick Hensdell

Dick and Mary ann McCrary, Anne and Richard Agnew

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Michelle W.C.Morgan, Morgan, Rodriguez Adrienne andMontesanti William Montesanti Sullivan andJanet JanetParks Parks W.C. Adrienne and

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SandhillSeen Summer Hound Walking Moore County Hounds - June 25th, 2011 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Jody Murtagh and Babs Minery Janie Boland and Babs Minery

Cindy Pagnotta, Janie Boland, Jody Murtagh, Kerrie Hayes and Babs Minery

Angela Royal, Grace Mae and Renay PrattBozick and Cameron Sadler

Cindy Pagnotta, Jody Murtagh

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2011

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Virgo

(Aug . 24 - Sept . 23 well, Lordy be . darned if you aren’t in for a month that’s hairier than Aunt Martha’s butternut pie — and twice as tough to stomach, if you ask me . when Jupiter has you feeling cheekier than robin Goodfellow on the 2nd, for Pete’s sake, don’t let that gumption go to waste . You know what they say, when life gives you lemons, fry ’em up . on the 18th, Pluto will plumb jerk a knot in your butt that’ll leave you madder than a Baptist in a bawdyhouse . Changes loom, Sweet Cheeks, there’s no getting around it . The good news is you’re full of gas . Too bad you’ve nowhere to go .

Libra (Sept. 24 - Oct. 23) For the love of Milk Duds. Hate to break it to you, Child, but you’ve got just about the same sense the good Lord gave a billy goat. (That ain’t exactly complimentary, Hon, but it sure is free.) When Mercury has you feeling mushier than creamed corn on the 8th, try not to fall too hard too fast. Like it or not, beauty fades. (Dumb, on the other hand, now that’s eternal.) If you play your cards right, Venus will offer you a breath of fresh air on the 23rd. Just remember: He who pays the piper calls the tune. Scorpio (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22) Shut the front door! By the looks of the stars, you’re in for a month that’ll just about knock you flat! Although you’d sooner eat glue than initiate change on the 2nd, you’d certainly better. I’ll tell you what, Sugar Buns, when an opportunity comes knocking, hop to it like beef curry on fried rice. After all, variety is the spice of life. (Dill’s a close second, of course.) Bridle your tongue on the 23rd unless you’re willing to practice what you preach. I declare, J’ai besoin d’utiliser les toilettes. Pardon my French. Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 21) Cinnamon peach! A word to the wise ain’t necessary — it’s the stupid ones who need the advice. That said, shut your pie hole on the 11th. For better or worse, you’re as bold as a bantam rooster sometimes. And when Venus has you itchier than a mohair sweater to jump into something new, consider the cost. As Momma always said: If you’re in for a penny, you’re in for a pound. Oh, and proceed with caution on the 25th, would you, Toots? I swear. You’re liable to find yourself in a situation that’s stickier than peanut brittle. Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20) Well I’ll be pruned. This month looks about as appealing as a darned squawking duck. Although life seems as tasteless as wheat paste in the beginning of the month, Venus will have you feeling spicier than curried lentils before long. Just remember, Doll, you can’t make bricks without straw. Save some gusto for the 27th when Uranus has you as ornery as an Italian at a breadless buffet. I s’pose I’ll put it to you straight: There’s no sense tearin’ up Jake. Forget love, Cupcake. Wouldn’t you rather fall in chocolate? Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19) For the love of flank steak, Cakeface. Darned if you’re not a tall glass of Southern sass. (I would say snap out of it, but I’m too cotton-picking tickled with you, Hon.) Although Jupiter will have you feeling spicier than Grandma’s home videos on the 2nd, remember, good things come to those who wait. You’re greener than a moldy biscuit if you think otherwise, Dumpling. And on the 23rd, be prepared to leave old cabbage for the wolves. You know what they say: The squeaky wheel gets the grease. Pisces (Feb. 20 - March 20) Well I’ll be buggered. You’d better take advantage of a quiet spell in the beginning of the month, Hon. Stale as an old church wafer or not, you’ll appreciate a little piddling time — especially when Neptune has you busier than a cat covering crap on a hot tin roof. Hang on to your hat on the 12th, Child — and your dreams, too. Though you’re nervous as a cow with a bucktooth calf to expose your vulnerability, the new moon on the 27th may just provide the nudge you need to express your wants. Look, I know from time to time I’m crass — but where there’s muck, there’s always brass.

Aries (March 21 - April 20) Darned if this won’t chaff your shorts: Less ain’t necessarily more. As they say, sometimes enough is as good as a feast — especially if you’re as gassy as I am. When Mars has you itchier than a night in a cheap motel to do some heavy investing, consider the risks. (For Pete’s sake if not your own!) Nonetheless, once you’re able to cut the mustard on the 18th, you’ll be happy as a pig in a peach orchard to share the love. Do be mindful not to gloat. Truly, Hon. You’re about as appealing as a plane ride with a squalling infant. Bless your heart. Taurus (April 21 - May 21) Oh, la vache! I’ll tell you what — you’re one spicy little meatball, Hon. Although you’re stubborn as an old tomcat when it comes down to your gumption, you’re liable to find yourself in a situation that’s hairier than a wooly torch cactus if you’re not able to entertain a new perspective. (Too many cooks can spoil the broth, but yours could use a little peppering, Sweetie. No offense.) Oh, and don’t let love get the best of you on the 18th either, Toots. Course, you can’t much help that you’re tender as Laotian steak. Gemini (May 22 - June 21) Mercy me! Sugarcoating things will be about as useless as a chocolate teapot. (Of course, seeing as you’ve got the intuition of a tube of sausage, you probably couldn’t have taken the hint in the first place.) So here you go: What you reap so shall you sow. When Mercury has you feeling more stressed than a Shakespearean sonnet on the 9th, your best bet’s to grin and bear it. Excuses are like backsides. Everyone’s got one and they all stink. Besides, if ifs and buts were pots and pans, there’d be no work for tinkers. Lord, love a duck. Cancer (June 22 – July 23) What the dickens! Looks like change is heading your way faster than you can say Tony Perkins. Welcome it with open arms, Sweetheart. As they say, when the cat’s away the mice will play. Although the 8th may seem drier than day-old grits, seek pleasure in life’s little gifts — chamomile, cheap cologne and bacon bits. On the 25th, when Uranus leads you into a situation that’s stickier than Chinese duck sauce, consider it a warning and move on. It’s a long walk to Pottsville, Bean Stalk. Pick a tune and start whistling. Leo (July 23 – Aug. 23) Heavens to Betsy Ross! I’d sooner gargle aftershave than flare your ego, Quinoa. (Course, by the looks of the stars, I hardly have a choice.) On the 2nd, Jupiter will have you feeling spicier than Pad Thai — and slicker than snot on a brass doorknob. Use that gumption to change something that’s been picking at you like a toddler to beer battered Brussels sprouts. Certainly the month will have a few blemishes, particularly on the 18th, but nothing more than you can say grace over. While you’re at it, ask for a little humility, would you? I swan. PS

Astrid Stellanova, 58, owned and operated Curl Up and Dye Beauty Salon in Windblow, NC, for many years until arthritic fingers and her popular astrological readings opened up a new career path. Feel free to contact Astrid for insights on your personal stars or hair advice for any occasion at astridstellanova@rocketmail.com.

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southwords

The Grateful Apprentice

By Kelly Ann Miller

Since I was a

little girl, I’ve been obsessed with cameras. I like the different shapes and sizes that they come in, I like to hear that little click when the person behind the camera pushes that round button on the top right, and most of all, I like how a little black box captures a moment that one may never get back.

To some people, a camera is just a tool to help remember certain events that occur in life, but to me a camera is much more. A camera not only gives you the opportunity to capture moments, but also gives you the chance to express yourself. Whenever I was able to see the final images that came from the intriguing black clicking boxes, all I wanted to do was stare at them. I would look at the pictures as if I’d seen magic. I was mesmerized by pictures of great quality and creativity, and so I realized I wanted to be behind the camera. I wanted to be the creator of this magic, and I wanted to be the person that captivates people with images, but not just any image. I wanted people to stare, to gaze, to observe, to focus, and to admire my images just as I did other photographers’ images. I knew I had to be involved with photography in some form or another. To do that, I needed to learn from a professional photographer — but not just any photographer. I wanted to learn from Tim Sayer, whose work in PineStraw magazine always seemed to catch my eye. I particularly enjoyed his ads. Every ad for every month was always different, but in every picture he managed to capture the beauty of an exact second in time and did so in an uncommon and uncharacteristic way that not many others could accomplish. He created a spark for people with his work, and I wanted to do the same. Luckily, my godmother was his neighbor and told him about my budding interest in photography. It wasn’t long before I talked to Tim, and we arranged to meet up and talk about the opportunity to intern with him. That next week, I went to his studio, and he asked me questions

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about my knowledge of photography. Eager to impress, I pretended to know much about the terminology and techniques he referenced in order to absorb as much as possible, but honestly, I had no idea what he was referring to half the time. I think Tim knew I was clueless, but he quickly gathered that I was motivated and willing to do whatever he asked me to do. Somehow, I got the internship. I can still never figure out exactly why Tim gave me the amazing opportunity that he did, but I’m sure glad he did. He challenged me. One day he brought me to his studio and gave me a crash session on how to work “the clicking boxes.” Though I would never get it right at first, with time I understood what he was telling me to do. The more I worked with Tim, the more I learned about the craft. Not only was he teaching me aspects about photography that would have taken years to learn, but he also made every experience fun and memorable. For example, when we would photograph weddings, we were often across the room from one another when the ceremony was taking place. The disadvantage was that I could never quite hear his intructions, so he devised clever little hand signals to tell me what to do. Later we would laugh about how everyone in the church had teary eyes of happiness while staring at the bride and groom, and in the meantime, we looked like we were doing interpretive dance. This fall, I will be attending Belmont University in Nashville, Tennessee, where I will be majoring in Studio Art for Photography. The arts program at this university is excellent, and I feel that none of this would have been possible were it not for my mentor, Tim Sayer. He has inspired me and passed down aspects that I hope one day other people will see in me like I see in him. He gave me the chance to learn from him and his “little black boxes” and to become my own photographer. He is one of the main reasons why I know what I want to do with my life. I want to take pictures. I want to be the photographer who produces a photograph that captivates people and brings a smile to their face every time they glance at it over the years. So, thank you, Tim Sayer, for giving me the chance to create my own little “magic” with every single click. PS Kelly Ann Miller is the daughter of Kelly and Peggy Ann Miller of Southern Pines. Illustration by Pamela Powers January

September 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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