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You’ll fi nd more than 50 of the best brands here, including one you can’t find anywhere else. Adidas • Peter Millar • Sport Haley • Tail • Tehama • Puma • Titleist • Tommy Bahama • Under Armour • FootJoy • Straight Down Pinehurst Collection • SDI • Zero • Maui Jim • Oakley • Brighton • Dooney & Burke • Putterboy Collection • Vera Bradley • Isda Cole Haan • Lilly Pulitzer • Iliac • Aveda • La Bella Donna • J. Lindeberg • Ashworth • Oxford • Polo • Ashworth • Adidas • Ahead American Needle • Bobby Jones • Callaway • Cutter & Buck • EP Pro • Fairway & Greene Gear • Greg Norman • Imperial • Nike

The Pinehurst Shops are full of shirts, shoes, jackets, spa products, bags, gifts and accessories from brands like Vera Bradley, Adidas, Nike, Peter Millar and Cole Haan. So come in and find your favorites. Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910. 235.8154 • pinehurst.com


September 2012

Volume 7, No . 9

DEPARTMENTS

7 10 15 17 21 23 25 29 31 35 37 39 43 47 48 84 101 111 112

Sweet Tea Jim Dodson

PinePitch Cos and Effect Cos Barnes The Omnivorous Reader Stephen E. Smith Bookshelf Hitting Home Dale Nixon The Kitchen Garden Jan Leitschuh Vine Wisdom Robyn James The Pleasures of Life Dept. Mary Elle Hunter Out of the Blue Deborah Salomon Birdwatch Susan Campbell The Sporting Life Tom Bryant Golftown Journal Lee Pace The Perfect Mismatch Deborah Salomon Hunt and Gather Kira Schoenfelder, Cassie Butler Calendar SandhillSeen PineNeedler Mart Dickerson SouthWords Laurie Birdsong

FEATURES

55 Legs

Poem by Loreleigh Nagy

56 Where the Wild Things Come From By Maureen Clark

Artist and nature son Patrick Dougherty’s wonderfully wild take on nature and home

62 The Beauty of a Secret Door By Cassie Butler

A door is a door — unless it’s something more

68 The Butler Did It By Deborah Salomon

What’s new becomes old — and a perfect fit — for a growing family

76 The Healing Garden By Jim Dodson

A splendid place of retreat and recovery grown in the Sandhills

83 September Almanac By Noah Salt

Green men and a new autumn sky

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY ADAM RODRIGUEZ PHOTOGRAPH THIS PAGE BY CASSIE BUTLER 2

September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The DUXŽ Bed can deliver the best night’s sleep you will ever experience. Each DUX Bed contains thousands of springs that dynamically support your body, contouring to its natural curves while still maintaining firm support. You wake up refreshed and relaxed. Our artisans have hand crafted each DUX Bed from the finest materials since 1926. Your comfort, our pleasure.

DUXIANA at The Mews Downtown Southern Pines 910.725.1577


PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Cassie Butler, Photographer/Graphic Designer/Writer 910.693.2464 • cassie@pinestrawmag.com

Kira Schoenfelder, Graphic Designer 910.693.2508 • kira@pinestrawmag.com

Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Ashley Wahl, Editorial Assistant Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Contributing Photographers

John Gessner

Contributors

APPAREL CoolSweats Gentlemen’s Corner The Faded Rose The Village Fox Boutique

Cos Barnes, Laurie Birdsong, Tom Bryant, Susan Campbell, Maureen Clark, Mart Dickerson, Mary Elle Hunter, Robyn James, Pamela Powers January, Jan Leitschuh, Loreleigh Nagy, Dale Nixon, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Noah Salt

PS David Woronoff, Publisher

BOUTIQUES Eye Max Optical Boutique Green Gate Gourmet Green Gate Olive Oils The Potpourri Old Sport & Gallery Tesoro Home Decor & Gifts

Michelle Palladino, Sales Representative 910.691.9657 • mpalladino@pinestrawmag.com

SALONS & SPAS

Pat Taylor, Advertising Director

Elaine’s Hairdressers Glam Salon & Boutique

Advertising Graphic Design

RESTAURANTS & INNS Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour & Gift Shoppe Tenya Japanese Cuisine and Sushi Darling House Pub/Restaurant

SERVICES

Village of Pinehurst Rentals & Golf

4

Advertising Sales

Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2508 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510

Stacey Yongue, 910.693.2509 Mechelle Butler, Clay Culberson, Scott Yancey Circulation & Subscriptions

Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine

910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2012. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ABERDEEN

FAIRWOODS ON 7

WHISPERING PINES

The charmingly restored Page-Seymour House offers both the charm and history of a turn of the century home and the expensive updates that make life easy today done for you! Within easy walking distance of historic downtown Aberdeen with access to shops and dining. Hardwood floors, high ceilings, bead board, crown molding, wrap-around porch, and fenced yard.

Stunning custom home situated on the 10th green of Pinehurst #4. Designed by Stagaard and Chao and built by Billy Breeden, this home offers all the upscale features the discriminating buyer could want. The current owners recently upgraded the entire property at a cost of over $250,000. It's just like new and absolutely pristine. There is a beautifully designed swimming pool and outdoor area.

www.309EMainStreet.com

www.170InverraryRoad.com

Great home in popular Whispering Pines neighborhood! Beautifully maintained with nice upgrades - crown molding, hardwood floors, stone front gas fireplace, big screened porch. Kitchen is open to an open keeping room area. Circular driveway and large fenced back yard. 4 BR / 3.5 BA $310,000

3 BR / 3 BA

$225,000

5 BR / 4 FULL & 2 HALF BA

$1,295,000

www.45SunsetDrive.com

WHISPERING PINES

PINEHURST

NATIONAL

Gorgeous custom built lake front home on Whisper Lake! Three floors offer wonderful privacy for enjoyable family living. Beautiful views of Whisper Lake from the screened porch, the spacious deck and from almost all the rooms. High ceilings, light filled rooms and an open floor plan make this a very inviting home.

Best buy in Cotswold! This charming English cottage has been immaculately kept and it's move-in ready! This one has all the extras heavy crown molding, hardwood and designer tile throughout, plantation shutters, walk-in shower in the master bath, extra cabinets and granite in the kitchen. Bright and open with a split bedroom plan! 3 BR / 3 BA $349,000

Gorgeous custom home overlooking the 1st green with a view of the 2nd green and Doon pond. Custom features include fabulous crown moldings, gourmet kitchen with Kitchen Aid stainless steel appliances, builtin entertainment center and more! Professionally landscaped.

7 LAKES WEST

SOUTHERN PINES

7 LAKES WEST

This all brick golf front has a pond & stream view. Living area has hardwoods, cathedral ceiling, fireplace & access to deck. Kitchen has a bay window nook & is open to keeping room w/lots of windows & access to deck. Master has access to deck & private bath w/tile flooring,whirlpool tub, step-in shower. 4 BR / 3.5 BA $299,000

Lovely home in well-established neighborhood. Beautifully maintained! The brick exterior exudes Southern charm with its large front porch with columns. A full sun porch across the rear of the home overlooks the large, well-established yard w/great landscaping.Large, well-established yard with great landscaping. Full sunporch across the rear of the home. This is a great house! 3 BR / 2.5 BA $195,000

This gorgeous all brick custom home is located in a quiet, wide cove with beautiful long views of Lake Auman. Built by Harris and Son, the home offers a light and open floor plan with hardwood floors, crown molding, solid surface counter tops, split bedrooms, sunny Carolina room, and many great upgrades and features. 3 BR / 4.5 BA $655,000

PINEHURST

FOXFIRE

7 LAKES WEST

Great house in a great area. Large rooms, open and airy atmosphere. The well designed kitchen has hardwood floors, a center island, and a skylight. The wooded lot offers privacy for enjoying the back deck and yard - great for relaxing or entertaining! 3 BR / 2 BA $269,000

Fabulous house on 1.2 acres! Completely renovated - new roof, new heat pump, new windows, updated electrical system and updated plumbing system, new lights and mirrors. Large deck, great closet space, hardwood floors thoughout - elegant and tasteful. A super buy! 3 BR / 3 BA $159,000

Gorgeous home on Lake Auman with beautiful wide lake views. Built by Harris and Son, one of the area's finest builders, this one is really special with outstanding curb appeal, lovely well landscaped yard, upscale gourmet kitchen, oversized screened porch, generous master bedroom, and so many special 4 BR / 3.5 BA

4 BR / 2 FULL & 2 HALF BATHS

www.23GoldenrodDrive.com

$475,000

www.105BanbridgeDrive.com

www.40PinyonCircle.com

www.6StantonCircle.com

www.1051InvernessRoad.com

www.2896HoffmanRoad.com

4 BR / 3.5 BA

$600,000

www.121StMellions.com

www.135AndrewsDrive.com

www.123VanoreRoad.com

View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at 6

WWW.MARTHAGENTRY.COM

September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SWEET TEA CHRONICLES

The Settling-In Season BY JIM DODSON

For the first time in five years I don’t

have a child of mine settling into college this September.

I’m both exhilarated and already feeling a little nostalgic for a time that passed much quicker than I could have anticipated. The good news is that I now have lunch money in my pocket most working days — the bad is that I miss the long journeys up to Vermont and impromptu back country rambles to Elon that peppered the school months of my last half decade. Also, technically speaking, we’re only halfway through doing our patriotic part to keep several fine colleges and universities financially afloat. One of my wife’s two sons from her first marriage is halfway through his school up in Rochester and another is on the way next fall to some ivy-walled ghetto. So hold that declaration on the lunch money a bit longer. It too may already be spoken for. On a brighter note, friends who are sending their goslings off to college for the first time this month have asked what to expect from this signature moment in the life of the modern American family. My first inclination is to reply, in no particular order of importance: general domestic poverty, sudden emotional drama, unforeseen academic crises, late-night phone calls, overdrawn bank accounts, ridiculous unmentioned fees, rude administrative clerks, communication only by text, exotic foreign travel, pesky alumni solicitation calls, peculiar boyfriends and/or a stream of lovely girlfriends you shouldn’t get too attached to, topped off by a growing independence that will leave you feeling at times like the bachelor uncle left at the bus station during the holidays. Instead I smile and reply, “Oh, it’s wonderful. Cherish it. The parents’ weekends. The football games. All these new influences and watching your progeny find their way to adulthood and personal responsibility — the last time, in some ways, they’ll need you as much as you need them.” Funny thing is, I mean every single word of this bittersweet September song. And even if they appear to suddenly need us less, amid the larger scheme of things, as we appear to fade into the background of their lives, we in truth will always need them more than they can ever possibly know until and unless they become a parent. Though we have resisted the distinctly modern social phenomenon, it’s easy to understand why some loving parents become helicopter pilots and hover indefinitely. “A parent’s ordinary joys and sorrows are private,” Lord Francis Bacon supposedly observed — probably when his precious teenage daughter chose Cambridge over Oxford, the widely acknowledged party school of Elizabethan England. “We cannot speak of one. We will not speak of the other.” We just never let on either way. We just go on keeping a stoic face and a ready checkbook.

I remember the startling contrast from my own passage to college when several families converged five years ago on Burlington, Vermont, the day after Labor Day to install our No. 1 child in her new dormitory. One of the new roommate’s mothers was busy decorating the room to Martha Stewart standards, insisting on matching bedspreads, dust ruffles and curtains while another was having an emotional breakdown out in the hall. One of the fathers was hammering together some kind of storage contraption that took up half the available space while another pulled me aside and offered me a cold tall boy from the cooler full of brews he brought along from Rhode Island to mark the occasion. “I give mine two weeks before she heads straight back to Fall River,” he confided. “This college idea is her mother’s idea.” Daughter Maggie’s mom and I merely brought along her clothes and a few personal items from her bedroom back home, including a bicycle that had to be left outside. Facing a 17-hour drive back to Southern Pines, I merely hoped for a quiet family farewell dinner, but it never quite came off. We wound up wandering around a busy downtown in search of an eating place that suited the tastes of the picky new roommates, who were already squabbling. We settled, as I recall, on an ice cream parlor and a fairly quick parting. I kissed my anxious daughter goodbye, held her for a moment in the cool Indian summer evening — close enough to feel her fluttering heartbeat and nervous tension — assured her she was meant for college life and slipped her an extra hundred. As I walked away, I remember looking back and seeing her standing with her mom for their final private goodbyes. She glanced at me and lifted a hand. I waved back and grinned and drove all night back to the Sandhills with the car windows open, remembering my own September drop-off 30 years before, listening to Bonnie Raitt sing the blues. Somewhere around Richmond the next morning I got a text that simply read: “Thank you, Dad. I love you, M.” By contrast but not all that differently, my folks left me on my assigned dorm steps at East Carolina with a $50 bill, a Sears window fan, two suitcases and one bicycle. My normally doting mom insisted that I make my own bed and put my clothes away — “Training for grown-up life,” as she tearfully put it, giving me a succession of hugs. Truthfully, my nose was a little out of joint because I’d not planned to attend college that September, hadn’t even officially applied until late in May, had hoped to actually delay college for a year or two while I — lover of all things Hemingway and a recent winner of Greensboro’s O.Henry award for short story writing — wandered off to Paris to find a stringer’s job with the International Herald-Tribune and a probably beautiful French girlfriend who had lots of interesting opinions and underarm hair. Only when my dad pointed out that Nixon had re-introduced the draft lottery system and I’d better apply anywhere that would take me ASAP for at least a year — time enough

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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SWEET TEA CHRONICLES

for the war to perhaps wind down — did I reluctantly join the college migration. That was the deal we made and how I wound up a very late entry at ECU over his alma mater Chapel Hill. On my first full day of college I rode the bike all the way to the Pamlico Sound and back to find my roommate had stacked half a dozen cases of Budweiser in the foot of my dorm closet, officially kicking off the party until he flunked out halfway through the year, giving my GPA a substantial boost as I finally settled into — and unexpectedly fell in love with — college life and East Carolina. This pattern of change and adjustment still seems to be the rule come sweet September — the Settling-in Season, as I long ago came to think of it. For what it’s worth, my wife reports I’m a noticeably happier fellow after Labor Day. During the years we lived on the coast of Maine, this marked the welcome end to the summer tourist occupation season, a neat halving of shore dinner prices in local eateries, and the start of a wonderful time when I settled back into familiar rhythms of life, venturing back into town after months of never showing my face there to lunch with friends and maybe even play a little golf with my pals Terry and Sid and Tom. As the rains returned and the best weather of the year briefly revived my summer-slumbering lawn and garden, I spent many afternoons hours blissfully working the earth, digging things up and moving them about, rebuilding stone walls and planting bulbs, even getting a jump on my winter wood pile. Crazy as it sounds, I dearly loved mowing my lawn in September and working in the deep woodland silence and beautiful afternoon light among a final burst of blooms, a valedictory salute as summer’s lease officially ran out. Down here, having resumed a Southern life once so familiar, it’s cooler weather and college football that makes these shortening September days so sweet. Sometimes I’m surprised by how giddy I feel on game day Saturdays when my bride and I rise early and don silly home-team colors and head off in the Roadmaster for a full lavish day being blissfully out of reach and off the clock. If they saw us, our worldly kids, I suspect, would be equally mortified and amused by such giddy freshman behavior. Or maybe it’s classic Old Fart Alumni. In either case, we — well, I — think of this as a kind of revitalized courtship, our middle-aged dating days when we talk of our far-flung children and small things we still intend to do, the places we hope to see before the clock runs out, the lavish gardens we — well, I — hope to someday have again, the deeply private things two people talk about when they are bound by love and time, and the ordinary joys and sorrows of a shared life they can only speak of to each other. PS

8

September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Floor Plans to FitAny Lifestyle New Construction homes by

Shepherds Ridge Subdivision- Aberdeen

1,400 + sq. ft. starting at $151,900 • 1 Pending, 2 Sold · Spacious garages · Professional landscaping package · Appliance package with black smooth top range, dishwasher and microwave · Smooth ceilings · Security system · New home closing orientation

www.ShepherdSridgeSubdiviSion.com

Sinclair - Vass 2,195 sq. ft. starting at $197,900 • 3 Pending, 74 Sold • 9’ ceilings • 200 rolling acres with a community pond • Lots of open space in a picturesque rural setting • Moore County schools • 15 minutes to Ft. Bragg • 15 minutes to quaint shops of Southern Pines • 15 Minutes to Moore Regional and historic Pinehurst

www.SinclairSubdiviSion.com

Forest Hills Pointe - Aberdeen 2,727 sq. ft. starting at $233,900 • 3 Pending, 6 Sold • Functional, family friendly floor plans • Spacious lots • Granite kitchen countertops • Soaring ceilings • Feels like country living, but is conveniently located in Aberdeen • Easy drive to Ft. Bragg

www.ForeSthillSpointe.com

Birkdale Village at Mid South 3,041 SQ. FT. STARTING AT $299,900 • 4 Pending, 12 Sold • TWO country club memberships included in purchase price • Gourmet kitchen • HardiPlank ColorPlus siding • Coffered, vaulted and cathedral ceilings • Energy efficient, security systems, pest defense system & more • Golf front lots available

Birkdale Agents are currently located in the Camden Villas Clubhouse

www.birkdalevillageatmidSouth.com

CALL TODAY for a private tour and see for yourself the awesome amenities when you visit one of these outstanding communities by H&H Homes!

190 Turner Street, Suite D | Southern Pines, NC 28387 9 910.693.3300 | Sales@LaroseandCompany.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

Larose & Company Independently Owned & Operated


Quilt, Show, Love

A lot of love goes into the quilts made by the Sandhills Quilters Guild. And each year, most of those made-with-love-quilts are donated to childcare centers, nursing homes and outreach programs like Habitat for Humanity, Friend to Friend and Quilts of Valor. The Guild will host its fifth biannual quilt show on September 28 and 29 at the historic Fair Barn in Pinehurst. See what’s new in fabric art, including pictorial and studio art quilts, on Friday from noon until 8 p.m., and Saturday from 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. Tickets: $5/daily; $8/both days. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. For more information about the Sandhills Quilters Guild and its upcoming show, visit www.quiltinginthepines.org.

Gill Would Go

Vince Gill, who has twice performed at the Pinehurst Arboretum, sure has a lot of fans in the Sandhills. Those who trust his taste in music won’t want to miss First Friday on September 7, when a Nashville-based band that Gill plays on his iPod takes the stage from 5 to 8:30 p.m. The SteelDrivers braid bluegrass roots with new threads of their own design, creating an unapologetic hybrid that is old as the hills, yet fresh as the morning dew. Hear them play at the grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, 250 Northwest Broad Street, Southern Pines. Free admission with food donation. Info: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com. Listen: www.steeldrivers.net/music.html

Playing in the Park

Bring a blanket or chair to Downtown Park (145 Southeast Broad Street, Southern Pines) on Friday, September 14, for a 7 p.m. showing of The Pirates! Band of Misfits, an animated, PG-rated film starring the voices of Hugh Grant, Salma Hayek and Jeremy Piven. The show is free; concessions will be for sale on-site. Information: (910) 692-7376.

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September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Cycling: A Classic Choice

On Monday, September 3, the Sandhills Cycling Club will host its 23rd annual Tour de Moore Classic. Sign up for the 28-, 50- or 100-mile route, all of which start and finish at The Train House at 482 East Connecticut Avenue in Southern Pines. Plan to stay for a post-ride festival featuring live music by Tony Barnes and food by Elliott’s on Linden. Event benefits the Moore County Chapter of Habitat for Humanity. To register, visit www. sandhillscyclingclub.org.

Safety First

Moore County is one of the first counties in North Carolina to introduce the Yellow Dot program, which gives participants a way to provide vital information to First Responders in the event of a vehicle crash or other roadside medical emergency when they are unable to speak for themselves. Free program kicks off at five local fire stations on Tuesday, September 11, from 1 until 4 p.m., but sign-ups continue each week on Wednesdays, Thursdays and Fridays, same time. It’s simple: complete an information form with your medical and emergency contact information, put it in your glove compartment, then stick a Yellow Dot decal on your rear window. Fire Station locations include Aberdeen, Carthage, Pinehurst, Seven Lakes and Southern Pines. Bring the family.

After the Fire

At Weymouth Woods, autumnal wildflowers, butterflies and other insects flourish. Last spring, the land was burned. Meet on Sunday, September 23, at 3 p.m. at the Visitor’s Center and embark on a one-mile hike to discover how fire benefits plants and animals in our pine forest. Free event. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Ft. Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

Warm and Fuzzies Sweet Sounds of Weymouth

Locate your lawn chairs and blankets. Paul Murphy and family return for a jazz concert in the meadow at Weymouth Center on Friday, September 14, from 7 to 9 p.m. If it rains, the Murphys will make their sweet music the following evening, same time and place. Speaking of the same place, North Carolina Symphony Concertmaster Brian Reagin will be at Weymouth — although you won’t find him in the meadow — on September 30 with a violin performance to kick off the 2012-2013 Chamber Music Concert Season, which features five concerts scheduled through April 7, Sundays at 3 p.m. Tickets for both events cost $15. Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities, 555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. For more information, call (910) 692-6261 or visit www.weymouthcenter.org.

Find love at The Country Bookshop on September 28, 6:30 p.m., at a pet adoption event where you can meet the Animal Center of Moore County’s most eligible bachelors and bachelorettes, most of whom don’t mind kissing on the first date. Dog speed dating, as the event has been pegged, lets potential foster parents test their chemistry with each pooch and chat with “Pet Counselors” about Spot or Fluffy’s most endearing qualities. A pet adoption fee of $85 includes spay or neuter, rabies vaccination and a microchip. Location: 140 Northwest Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 315-0333 or www.mcprc.org.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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Please visit one of these great properties managed by Kuester

Fairway Village

Central Park South

Fratello’s

Jos A Bank

Hickory Tavern

Hot Asana Yoga & Boutique

2Q Nails

The Market Place Restaurant

9735 US 15/501, Southern Pines, NC 28374

246 Olmstead Blvd., Pinehurst, NC 28374

Kuester Companies

For information on our available Commercial units,

please contact Holly Bell 910.690.1065 | holly.bell@kuester.com & George Manley 910.603.8395 | george.manley@kuester.com

www.kuester.com

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How do you want to retire?

Summer Wedding, Anyone?

Ideally, the Village Heritage Foundation would like to break ground this fall. Come spring, they hope, an open-air Pavilion will grace the Meadow at the Village Arboretum. Stagaard & Chao Architects can see it, and their renderings of the 30- by 60-foot covered structure, which is open on three sides and complete with patio, fireplace and ceiling fans, makes it easy for the public to fill in the blanks: picnics, parties and receptions. For those interested in donating to the Timmel Pavilion project, checks can be made payable to the Village Heritage Foundation and sent to P.O. Box 398, Pinehurst, NC, 28370.

The Golden Bear

As part of the 2012 Ruth Pauley Lecture Series, Jack Nicklaus and Jaime Diaz, Editor-inChief of Golf World Magazine, will talk golf together onstage at Owens Auditorium on Wednesday, September 19, from 7:30 to 9 p.m. If you can score a golden ticket from Boyd Library (SCC), The Country Bookshop in Southern Pines or Given Memorial Library in Pinehurst, then admission is free. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. For more information, call (910) 245-3132 or visit www.sandhills.edu/about/ ruthpauley.

Stay young in mind, body and spirit by becoming a part of The Village at Brookwood. Whether you are playing corn hole toss with the neighbors, traveling with friends or participating in lifelong learning at Elon University, programs at The Village focus on extending your years of wellness. The Village at Brookwood — This is how we do retirement.

Expo Marks the Spot

Meet the nonprofits that service our community at the Pinehurst Expo on September 13. With live music provided by The Rooster’s Wife, an antique car show, and food and beverages available for purchase, you can make a day out of it. Be there, at the Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst, from 2:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information and a complete list of participating organizations, visit www.pinehurstcivicgroup.net.

1860 Brookwood Avenue, Burlington, NC Sponsored by Alamance Regional Medical Center

Life Care & Fee-forService Plans

800-282-2053 www.VillageAtBrookwood.org

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

13


Three Neighborhoods wiTh aN easy commuTe To ForT bragg

Pick your Plan Pick your lot Pick your

customizable home features! the carolina

Starting at $245,000

• new homes on 1/2 acre lots

• interior and Golf front lots • farmlife school district • walk to southern Pines reservoir Park

Pinelands Preserve • new homes on 1 acre lots

Starting at $245,000

• swimminG Pool and 50 acre Park available • west Pine school district

Grande Pines

Starting at $325,000

• 750 acre Gated community

• new homes on 2 acre lots & larGer • miles of trails and community cabin • swimminG Pool and 50 acre Park available • west Pine school district • Please visit www.GrandePinesnc.com

seveN Lakes wesT membership oNLy LoT avaiLabLe For $9,500. * graNTs access To 1000 acre Lake aumaN.

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monica hawke debbie bowman Pete mace 910.639.2882 910.639.3808 910.695.5196

September 2012 P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills The NEW HOMES Specialist “Only the Pines Cover the Sandhills better!”


COS And eFFeCT

From Twinkle to Wrinkle

reading is fundamental, and so is civic involvement

BY COS BARNES

S

ometimes it is difficult for people of my vintage to admit it, but from my viewpoint, the younger generation is to be admired, and the future of business is in good hands. It is easy for the old guard to criticize incorrect grammar, questionable attire or improper conduct — because it is foreign to what we were taught and experienced. Today’s vocabulary is a little different, each hand holds a phone or some attention-getting device, and communication is by tweet, post and blog. But they get the job done. Recently I had the opportunity to view dynamos Lynn Thompson, Southern Pines Public Library director, and Caroline Eddy, director of the Boys and Girls Club of the Sandhills, at close range when I attended the Reading Network Conference, sponsored by the National Civic League in Denver. I saw the hard work, dedication and attention each give to the job at hand. Aided by other devoted organizations, Moore County Schools, Literacy Council of Moore County, United Way, the Chamber, Citizens Pet Responsibility Committee, The Country Bookshop, Rotary clubs, W. Southern Pines Citizens for Change, Friends of the Library and members of the Southern Pines fire, police and library departments, they came home with an All America designation. They came home with something more precious: the promise and proof that our children will read and read well. After three days of intensive workshops, which are now called plenaries, the 600 attendees from all over the United States were reminded to “Preserve Your Pearls.” They were urged to “write down your thoughts, takeaways, eurekas and ahas.” That’s good advice for all of us. And

the youth do have their humor. One comment about the value of reading was “From Cradle to Career”; another, “From Twinkle to Wrinkle.” While scanning my notes, I was caught off-guard by an ad in the meeting’s brochure. It read “Congratulations, from Aurora, Colorado, to all 2012 All America City Finalists.” During the session, Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper spoke of his struggle with dyslexia as a child and how good teachers helped him overcome the problem. Later I read of him speaking at the funeral of one of the victims of the theater shooting who loved the color purple. The governor wore a purple tie. This summer I witnessed the determination of Sandra Florell, librarian at Aberdeen Elementary School, to establish a summer reading program and acquire transportation to the school so more children could attend. And my friend Kathy Baron, whose motto is something like “A Vegetable In Every Pot, A Garden In Every School Plot,” is a winner and a worker. Our friendship was cemented years ago in the library, and we still meet there for her to teach me about proper planting, cooking and serving. I also have been invited to participate in the bimonthly meetings of the Inter Agency Council, where local agency heads discuss what they are doing and share ideas, information and breakfast. Taking part are Judy Wiggins of Habitat, Cynthia Curtis of Bethany House, Barrett Walker of the Coalition, Anne Friesen of Friend to Friend, Bill Baker of First Tee, among others. Things are happening in Moore County. I’m ready, Freddy, are you? PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com.

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The OmnivOrOuS reAder

The American maupassant On his 150th birthday, OPhenry’s many biographers are still searching for the essential man

BY STEPHEN E. SMITH

“if henry James, Edith Wharton and

William Dean Howells were planning a cocktail party, O.Henry would not be on the guest list.” That’s how a brash American literature professor explained the absence of William Sydney Porter’s name from the syllabus for his graduate course in the American short story.

When I heard this bit of sophistic snobbery, I wasn’t the least surprised. I didn’t think of O.Henry as an important American writer — or, for that matter, as an essential North Carolina writer. I’d read “The Ransom of Red Chief” in high school, and I’d seen O.Henry’s Full House, a film anthology of five O.Henry stories, which starred Marilyn Monroe, Charles Laughton and Richard Widmark to no good effect. Even an introduction by a chain-smoking John Steinbeck did little to enhance the Hollywoodized vignettes. When I finally got around to purchasing David Stuart’s biography of O.Henry, a dust jacket blurb from Kirkus Review only reinforced my initial opinion: “O.Henry’s actual experiences may have been more interesting than his fictions,” the reviewer wrote. So here’s the question: Is William Sydney Porter the American Maupassant or simply a trickster whose formulaic fiction has only cheapened the short story form? Whatever the answer, there’s no denying that O.Henry was a force in American popular culture during the first half of the 20th century. His stories were widely published in magazines and newspapers, and five collections of his work appeared during his lifetime. After the First World War, O.Henry’s literary reputation was commensurate with that of James, Conrad, and Wharton, and in 1919 the Society of Arts and Sciences began awarding the annual O.Henry Prize (now the PEN/O.Henry Prize) to a writer who has made a major contribution to the art of the short story. But as reading audiences grew more sophisticated, O.Henry’s stock began to plummet. He was accused of being “insincere,” a literary charlatan who manipu-

lated his audience, a writer who cared more about money than art for art’s sake. Anyone who’s had the patience to read O.Henry’s collected stories will acknowledge that plot patterns and themes are repeated and that his characters tend to be two-dimensional. And O.Henry didn’t help his case when he wrote: “Writing is my business, it is my way of getting money to pay room rent, to buy food and clothes and Pilsner. I write for no other purpose.” The key to understanding O.Henry and the stories he produced in such profusion can be found in the biographies, which focus on the negative forces at work in his life — his unhappy childhood in Greensboro, the death of his wife Athol in 1897, and especially his February 1898 conviction for embezzlement. The first published biography, O.Henry Biography, was written by Dr. C. Alphonso Smith, a literary critic and Porter’s childhood friend. Published in 1916, most of Smith’s conclusions are based on primary source material, and the majority of the later biographies draw heavily on Smith’s research. O.Henry Biography, which is available in reprint, is required reading for all O.Henry admirers. The events of O.Henry’s life are generally agreed upon in the biographies, although Gerald Langford’s Alias O.Henry and Richard O’Connor’s O.Henry are reluctant to accept Porter’s claim of innocence regarding the charges of embezzlement. Smith’s 1916 biography maintains that Porter’s conviction was partly based on an error in the dating of the indictment which “has remained to this moment unnoticed,” and the majority of later biographies repeat Smith’s assertion. Generally, the biographies present Porter as a shy, gentle, likeable fellow who surely had his vices, although embezzlement wasn’t among them, and they maintain that he would not have been convicted had he not fled to Honduras to avoid prosecution. North Carolina readers may find themselves a trifle dismayed by Langford’s assertion that the blame for Porter’s troubles, including his embezzlement, stem from his upbringing in Greensboro: “In short, Will felt himself to be an alien in Greensboro. He was the talented poor boy, pitiable on account of a family situation which deprived him of the advantages and opportunities enjoyed by his less gifted comrades.” According to Langford, young Porter retreated within himself and “This disinclination to face reality was to be intensified by several later experiences, and was to become a lifelong handicap both in his life and in his writing.”

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The Omnivorous Reader

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David Stuart’s O.Henry provides slightly less biographical material than the Langford volume but includes extensive endnotes and a useful selected bibliography. Stuart also acknowledges that Porter’s time in Greensboro was difficult: “Long after Will Porter had cast the dust of Greensboro off his shoes and had become O.Henry, he confided to a friend that his childhood years were not very happy. . . .” For a more positive view of Porter’s Greensboro connection, Cathleen Pike’s 1957 monograph O.Henry in North Carolina presents Porter’s formative years in a more sympathetic light. She also documents O.Henry’s occasional use of North Carolina settings in his stories. Trueman O’Quinn and Jenny Porter’s A Time To Write details O.Henry’s trial and vaguely concludes that “the final judgment on Will Porter of Austin was written by O.Henry in his story ‘The Roads We Take’. . . . O’Quinn and Porter pad their cursory biography with the 12 stories O.Henry wrote during his confinement. Although most of the O.Henry biographies published after 1950 are out of print, used copies are readily available from online book dealers and by way of interlibrary loan. The Complete Works O.Henry Authorized Edition is available in 12 volumes, new and used, and O.Henry: A Study of His Fiction by Eugene Current-Garcia is useful in understanding O.Henry’s esthetic, such as it is. If the available biographies leave you dissatisfied, the Greensboro Public Library online portal directs readers to the Greensboro Historical Museum and the Greensboro News and Record. Other items such as O.Henry’s published stories, as well as finding aids and/or artifacts in collections from other institutions, including UNC, Duke and UVA, can be accessed on the website. The Portal to Texas History offers an online collection of published materials and contains digital reproductions of handwritten letters, photographs, legal documents, newspaper articles, artifacts and maps drawn and signed by Porter. North Carolinians will be amused to read in the portal’s introduction that “O.Henry was born in Greensborough, South Carolina. . . .” Although O.Henry’s writing doesn’t draw heavily on his North Carolina roots, there’s no denying that he’s a Tar Heel by birth and upbringing. His formative and most impressionable years were spent in the state, and he’s buried in Asheville’s Riverside Cemetery. In the old State Supreme Court building in Raleigh, a bronze tablet bears a quotation from O.Henry’s story “Brickdust Row”: “He saw no longer the rabble but his brothers seeking the ideal” — a twist that Will Porter, convicted felon, would have appreciated. PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry is A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths. He can be reached at travisses@ hotmail.com.

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BOOKSheLF

Books for Your home BY THE COUNTRY BOOKSHOP

In this PineStraw Home and Garden issue, we have chosen to showcase some fantastic coffee table books and celebrate the role that books can have in home décor. Coffee table books serve many functions — my father had many in a stack that served as a coffee table. They range from inspirational tools to those frustrating books that won’t fit on the shelf. Coffee table books, usually by virtue of their size, tend to occupy a different spot in our homes than their smaller or digital brethren. Coffee table books tend to complement their owners. They can be examples of subjects or hobbies that we hold dear, a segue into cocktail conversation or pictures of inspiration to flip through on a rainy day. The Appalachian Trail: Celebrating America’s Hiking Trail by Appalachian Trail Conservancy, Brian King and foreword by Bill Bryson. The trail is celebrating its 75th anniversary and this book will let each one of us who walked for an hour, a day, a few months, or just dreamed about going wild on the Appalachian Trail, celebrate this legendary footpath. The Appalachian Trail Conservancy has backed this book and it is filled with contemporary images as well as historical photos, documents and maps from the archives. It is always time to celebrate this treasure. Charlotte Moss: A Flair For Living by Charlotte Moss. Charlotte Moss, Southern Decorator of fame (she does live in New York), has written two coffee table books that grace the tables of high-minded interiors of the South. Her new book is a departure from her previous books that include (among others) Charlotte Decorates and Charlotte Moss: a Flair for Living. The new book, Charlotte Moss, A Visual Life, Scrapbooks, Collages and Inspirations is a creative collection that looks inward, not outward, at the finished rooms of fame. This book steps into her creative conception of ideas and schemes, a must have for the creative interior. (On sale in October.) Rose Cumming by Sarah Cumming Cecil and Jeffery Simpson. Cumming founded her mold-breaking interior design business in New York City in 1917 and her stylish influence persists to this day. Jeffery Simpson, longtime writer for Architectural Digest, joins his granddaughter, Sarah Cumming Cecil, for the book, and they have gathered photos, quotes and stories regaling Rose Cumming.

Ann Getty: Interior Style by Diane Dorran Saeks and Lisa Romerein. Working closely with Getty family curators, Saeks has written a dazzling book that looks at the interiors of the philanthropist and designer Ann Getty. Scrumptious images and ornate photography by Lisa Romerein delivers you right into these decadent interiors. (On sale in October.) Hello Nature by William Wegman. Published this past July, Hello Nature shows the dog and nature photographs Wegman is famous for, but also brings in his creative work incorporating photographs with paintings, travel, poetry, and campsite recipes written and painted in his own hand. This book is a treasure with a ’60s feel that will suprise you. A great book for a creative outdoorsman. Larousse Wine: The World’s Greatest Vines, Estates, and Regions by Librairie Larousse. From the creator of Larousse Gastronomique, this compilation of the top minds in the wine field should become the Bible for wine lovers. The book incorporates both established and emerging wine regions across the globe, details the grape varieties and estates. A wealth of information. The Hamptons: Food, Family, and History by Ricky Lauren. This book is beautiful and fun. More than a cookbook or a Ralph Lauren promotional piece, this book has character. Ricky Lauren showcases the Hamptons and her family’s idyllic life, but also shares tried and true recipes that she has fed her family for years. She divides the book up by the beach houses she has had over the years and shares some of her go-to recipes during each time in each house, from kid friendly menus when her children were young to adults. She celebrates the character of the Hamptons with asides and plenty of writing and pictures. A joy to flip through and a great addition to any kitchen. Sporting Dog and Retriever Training: The Wildrose Way: Raising a Gentleman’s Gundog for Home and Field by Mike Stewart and Paul Fersen, foreword by John Newman. With a foreword by the Ducks Unlimited President John Newman, this beautiful book is enlightening. Mike Stewart is renowned for his training, using methods that tailor themselves to each dog’s personality. If you have a bird dog, want a bird dog or just wish your dog could be a bird dog . . . this book is for you. PS

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h i tt i n g h o m e

Mamaw in Waiting Lessons learned from the perfect grandparents

By Dale Nixon

I am lucky in many ways, but I am not

lucky enough yet to be a grandparent. Most of my friends have beautiful grandchildren, but I am still waiting my turn. As I wait my turn, I think about my grandparents on my father’s side, and I know that when and if I do get lucky, they are the kind of grandparent that I want to be. Her name was Minnie Jewel; his name was Oscar Theodore. Mamaw and Papaw to me. They moved from my hometown of Concord to Bessemer City when I was very young. The only good thing about their moving was it meant I got to visit them for two weeks every summer and have them all to myself. She was the kind of grandmother who sat in the dirt with me and made mud pies, iced them with a flour-and-water mixture, and then decorated them with flower blossoms picked from her garden. He would take me for walks in the woods where we would cut twigs from birch trees. He’d pull out his pocket knife and whittle “brushes” on each end of the sticks, and later in the evening we’d sit together on the porch swing and chew on our “toothbrushes.” Papaw always seemed to enjoy chewing on his more than I did. In later years, I was to find out he had been dipping his brush in a brown powder called snuff. No wonder he enjoyed chewing more than I did. Every time I think of my grandparents, I think about their hands.

Hers were so tiny and gnarled with arthritis; his so large and tan. They were busy hands. Hers were in dough, making biscuits or crust for a cobbler. His were hoeing in the garden and tending his vegetables. She played the piano beautifully, but never had a music lesson. He sang along with her, but never really stayed in tune. She didn’t read me bedtime stories. She made them up. I’d lie awake in the bed night after night — “Just one more story, Mamaw, and I promise I’ll go to sleep.” She always obliged. He built me a platform in a large tree outside their den window. I’d climb up there every day of my vacation and spend hours reading, The Bobbsey Twins and Nancy Drew. She let me drink cream straight out of the cream pitcher, and when she’d bake a cake, she’d leave me extra batter to lick from the bowl. They took me “to ride’ through the country, on outings to pick blackberries or fish off creek banks, and we spent a lot of time at church. The only money we spent on entertainment was when we rode to “Gastonie” to buy homemade ice cream at a parlor that used a wooden paddle to dip it onto the cone. The best and most memorable times I ever had were with my grandparents. I only hope that one day someone will say that about me. To all of you lucky ones, happy Grandparents’ Day — Sunday, September 9th, 2012. PS Columnist Dale Nixon may be contacted at dalenixon@ carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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The kitchen garden

Produce to Go

How to build the perfect smoothie

By Jan Leitschuh

We’ve enjoyed

Photograph by cassie butler

the taste and abundance of fresh food through the summer months. Healthy little rosebuds bloom in our cheeks. We know we’re supposed to ingest our “five to nine” fruits and vegetables a day, but still, we struggle. Five is doable, with some thought; nine can seem daunting, especially for those making an effort to inject more produce into their diet in the first place.

We’ve chopped and roasted and canned and frozen and jammed and jellied and sautéed and slawed our little green thumbs to the bone. And the garden keeps producing! The farmers markets are just hitting their fall stride. The neighbors keep coming over with cucumbers, tomatoes and zucchini from their late plantings. And if you admit to it, staring down yet another pile of tomatoes or squash that needs “putting by,” you’ve got a wee bit of produce fatigue. The taste and the health improvements of adding fresh fruits and vegetables to our diets are not to blame, no. It’s the tedious prep and cooking that it would be nice to take a break from. It’s time for a “Meal in a Glass.” All you need is fresh washed produce, a good blender — and a glass. You get minimum prep and cleanup, and a great big shot of minerals, vitamins and anti-aging antioxidants. If you break a healthy meal down into its macronutrients, you get protein, carbohydrates and healthy fats. Bear that in mind as you begin tossing things into your blender. Start simple, and then build in creativity and daring. Everyone likes a fruit smoothie. Let’s start there. It’s a great vacation breakfast for the youth itching to hit the water or the courts, and keeps them hydrated and sated for most of the morning. I put a little liquid in the bottom of the blender to get things started. It might be some iced tea I have around, or a little bit of orange juice or even plain water if hydration is a goal. Now start tossing in fruit. My summer favorite was a handful of fresh (or frozen) blueberries, a Sandhills peach, a third to a half an organic lemon (peel and all), maybe a chunk of banana for creaminess. A pinch of sea salt for summertime sweating, and to enhance the sweetness of the fruit, and is optional for those on low-sodium diets. For protein, I would add a little yogurt, sometimes some walnuts or a dab of almond nut butter. I don’t really taste the nuts, although one could add more to get that flavor, if desired. Some folks may prefer expensive processed protein powders or hemp seeds, but I have healthy proteins right in the kitchen — why

pay more, and no genetically modified soy included. The only exotic addition here sometimes is a little chia seed, because of its hydrophilic ability to take up water and help hydrate a body setting out to do strenuous work under sweaty circumstances, such as an athletic event or run. Yes, the same chia seed that made the chia pets of the ’70s. It’s a healthy and nutritious seed, too. Do an Internet search to learn more. It can thicken a thin drink into a sure-enough shake. Because of the citric sparkle of the lemon in this smoothie, a little sweetener is desirable. Our household is hooked on stevia, which sweetens fruits nicely without bitterness, carbs or calories. So that’s my base smoothie. Then I start adding items. If it’s hot and I want more hydration, I’ll toss in some ice cubes. A little raw apple is nice, adds fiber and blends in well. Often, I’ll add in a little chunk of peppery ginger for a potent, anti-inflammatory (and tasty!) kick. It will clear your sinuses and is good for the old joints too! I would work up to this with children, although adults seem to love the spicy taste. Fresh ginger gets addictive. I like to add frozen chunks of whatever is in season — melons, strawberries, muscadines (seeds and all), blackberries, whatever you have on hand. Speaking of the young ones, the above smoothie is an excellent way to avoid wrangling over vegetable consumption. With a good blender, you could sneak in a chunk of carrot, grind it to a pulp and no one would be the wiser — it looks like a peach smoothie and tastes like lemon. In a berry smoothie, I have sometimes tossed in a chunk of beet. Start small if you do this because, in large quantities, the iron taste of beets can sometimes bleed through. But the smoothie turns a gorgeous shade of purple-pink, enhances the berries and gives the old liver a vegetable boost. Another excellent vegetable to slip into a fruit smoothie is a cucumber. The watery and neutral flavor blends in unnoticed with the fruit. I’ve found that if the cukes are young and not bitter, you can blend quite a bit in without changing the fruit flavor. Invisible vegetables! Perfect for the veggie-averse. In fact, cukes can form a base for a number of lovely vegetable-only drinks, answering that question every gardener asks: “What do I do with all these cukes?” Take several and partially peel and seed. Also peel a few tomatoes, and toss all in the blender. Add in a cup or two of yogurt or buttermilk, perhaps a teaspoon of good extra virgin olive oil, a little garlic and lemon juice, salt and pepper, perhaps a little dill or paprika, and blend. Pour into a glass and drink — or if you prefer, serve as a chilled soup. Some onion or some green pepper would be a nice addition too. Speaking of green pepper, it was a treat for us kids in the ’50s and ’60s to have Mom make a “Denver omelet” in the blender. Yes, you can do the “foldover” omelet with identifiable veggies for adults, but what kid is going to

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The kitchen garden

stare down a plate full of scrambled eggs with green peppers, mushrooms and onions? But throw it all in a blender with a couple of eggs and a little ham, pulse a few times, cook it up and this homogenous, fluffy mass of innocent scrambled eggs appears perfectly harmless to the sternest young vegetable editor. Another friend, Velta, makes a raw spaghetti sauce when she has an abundance of tomatoes. In a blender or food processor, throw in three or four large, washed tomatoes. Add a couple of smashed garlic cloves, a little olive oil and fresh basil, salt and black pepper to taste. Transfer to a bowl while you cook the pasta, pour it on, and sprinkle with Parmesan cheese. The heat of the pasta will warm up the sauce nicely. I could see adding a little green pepper and onion to the mix too, maybe a can of mushrooms. Not quite “in a glass,” but a fast meal. When a friend of mine was ill, she went to a naturopathic physician who put her on an elimination diet of blended vegetables for four days, to calm her gut and reduce her high blood pressure and other health issues. Her husband had heart-related health problems. For four days, they ate nothing but a bland green soup of blended okra, green beans, zucchini and cucumber. Sounds grim, eh? But it did the trick, the blood pressure came down like a stone, and several other health issues diminished. Other friends of mine enjoy a green smoothie for breakfast, to knock out at least “nine” of the “nine” right off the bat. This is the “Glowing Green” smoothie off the Vitamix blender site — the herbs add a special flavor and benefits: 1 1/2–2 cups water 3/4 pound organic romaine lettuce, rough chopped, about 1 head 1/2 head large bunch or 3/4 small bunch organic spinach 3-4 organic celery stalks, halved 1 organic apple, cored, quartered 1 organic pear, cored, quartered 1 organic banana, peeled 1/2 fresh organic lemon, peeled, seeded 1/3 bunch organic cilantro, stems (optional) 1/3 bunch organic parsley, stems (optional) Dump items in blender in the order listed, and power-blend away. I need my protein, so I’d probably add a few nuts. Drink up, feeling virtuous all day — it’s a bit like having the sock drawer sorted out. So if you just can’t roast or sauté one more veggie, chunk a bunch of stuff — your favorite tastes — and toss right into the blender. Give it a whirl, and see how many of your “five to nine” you can knock down in a glass.PS Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Vine Wisdom

Is Your Wine in the Best Shape? Believe it or not, you can sometimes judge the wine by its bottle

By Robyn James

Does the shape

of your wine bottle tell you anything about the content of the bottle?

Photograph by cassie butler

Absolutely. It can tell you quite a bit about the wine inside. Of course, when it comes to wine, you can’t use the words “always” and “never.” There are no hard and fast rules about shapes, but generally speaking, they do tell a story. European wine producers are much more likely to stick to tradition when it comes to the production and bottling of wine; it is the U.S. producers that may travel off the beaten path. But here are the typical shapes of bottles and what they can tell you: THE BORDEAUX BOTTLE Straight sides, high shoulders, dark green glass for the red wines and light green or clear for the whites. Bordeaux producers are so religious about their bottle shape they would NEVER vary from it. If you spot a red wine from Bordeaux in this bottle, you are about to consume a blend of two or more of the five legal varietals in Bordeaux: cabernet sauvignon, merlot, cabernet franc, petit verdot and malbec. These are very tannic grapes and the high shoulders assist in collecting the tannins during the aging process. A white wine in the Bordeaux bottle? It is likely sauvignon blanc with perhaps some semillon blended in, the only two white grapes permitted in Bordeaux. Serious U.S. winemakers closely follow suit on matching this shape to their cab and meritage blends, as well as their sauvignon blancs. THE BURGUNDY BOTTLE Gently sloping shoulders, with both red and white wines in similar green glass. A red wine in this bottle shape from Burgundy is definitely pinot noir and the white is always chardonnay. Again, U.S. producers in California and Oregon stay close to this bottle tradition to draw a quality correlation to their wines. What can get a little bit confusing is that the Loire Valley region of France follows this bottle shape tradition for their sauvignon blancs, unlike Bordeaux.

Robert Mondavi baffled everyone in California when he introduced his “Fumé’ Blanc” in a slope shouldered bottle. It was a 100 percent sauvignon blanc, but he likened the style to the Loire wines of Pouilly Fumé and made up a name to suit it. THE RHONE BOTTLE This bottle is almost identical to the Burgundy bottle, lacking just slightly in the girth. If the wine is from Chateauneuf du Pape it traditionally has a coat of arms imbedded in the glass on the neck of the bottle. Since the syrah grape is king of the northern Rhone region, Australia will frequently copy this shape for their New World shiraz. THE CHAMPAGNE BOTTLE Born as much out of necessity as style, this has thick glass, gently sloping shoulders and a deep punt (indentation under the bottle). This is necessary because the pressure inside the bottle is three times that of a car tire. ALSACE, MOSEL & RHINE BOTTLES This can be a little tricky. Usually a tall skinny bottle signals sweetness. One might believe it’s going to be a riesling or gerwurztraminer. However, in the Alsace region of France, they put all their wines in this bottle, including their pinot gris, not a particularly sweet wine at all. If it’s light green glass, the wine is from Alsace or Mosel. You will know it’s from Rhine if the glass is brown. Weird exception: Bone-dry muscadet from Loire Valley is bottled in the tall, skinny green bottle. Here’s my beef about wine bottles that pertains primarily to the weight rather than the shape. Quite a few New World winemakers who take great pride in organic and biodynamic farming practices continue to bottle their “reserve” wines in these ridiculously heavy bottles. I have found some that are literally twice the weight of a regular bottle. Not only does this custom bottle add quite a bit to the price tag, but the shipping cost really stomps out their carbon footprint. Don’t believe the illusion they are trying to convey: the heavier, the better! PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@pinehurst.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e P l e as u r e s o f L i f e D e pt.

Remembering Marc

Friendship with Marc Chagall turned Vivian Jacobson into a world authority on the beloved Russian painter

By Mary Elle Hunter

Vivian Jacobson had no idea about

Photograph by Cassie Butler

the power of the Internet when she wrote her memoir about 20th century artist Marc Chagall two years ago. When it was suggested that she, as a self-published author, might want to include a website in her marketing efforts, she didn’t understand how it would help her sell books. However, the Pinehurst resident was willing to give it a try, choosing a simple website designation of www.vivianjacobson.com. A close friend of Chagall’s during the last eleven years of his life, Vivian Jacobson worked diligently as a founding member and president of the American Friends of Chagall’s Biblical Message Museum in Nice, France. Chagall, through the association of American friends, was seeking additional financial support for the museum’s exhibitions, concerts and library. Her enthusiasm and camaraderie with the Russian-born artist, who lived in France the latter part of his life, led to the successful completion of several major international projects on his behalf, such as the campaign for the purchase of a replica of an 18th century harpsichord for the museum, on the inside cover of which Chagall painted an interpretation of the biblical figures of Rebecca and Isaac. Believing that the legacy of Chagall is not only evident in the hundreds of works of art he created during his lifetime, but also in his lasting message of love, hope, peace and reconciliation, Vivian Jacobson began a lecture series on the various facets of the life of the artist, which ultimately resulted in her writing Sharing Chagall: A Memoir. Although many books had been written about Chagall, the artist, she has devoted herself through years of study and research and her own personal reminiscences of time spent with Chagall to portraying

the individual qualities of the man, who was quick-witted, with a wry sense of humor, a lover of music and a writer of poetry. A Google search for “Chagall experts” lists Vivian Jacobson on its first page, and between this category and her own website, new doors have been opened to her Chagallian world. Now in her seventies, she says, “This could be a gloomy time of life with old friends and contemporaries becoming ill, or passing away. However, the website has brought me wonderful new friends from all over the country and even abroad, who are twenty to thirty years younger than I am, and share my passion for Chagall, like Robert Davis of Saratoga Springs, New York.” Davis found Vivian through an Internet search. “I had come across an oil painting that seemed like a plausible Chagall, and I wanted to get some guidance about it. She expressed an interest, told me stories of her time with the artist, and put me in touch with the French Comité Chagall, the organization charged with authentication. Vivian has come to be a friend, a supporter, an inspiration and a tireless advocate for the works of Chagall that are still surfacing . . . ” Website contacts include Californian Richard Young, who has a painting that he believes was created by Chagall of Virginia Haggard, the woman who was Chagall’s companion after the death of his first wife. “Vivian has been key to giving me insight into the world of Chagall, but also in helping me to appreciate that time will tell the true nature of the painting.” When Gary Ferdman in High Falls, New York, discovered that Chagall and Virginia Haggard had lived across the street from his summer home in this small community in 1946-1948, he began research on the artist and Virginia Haggard. At first, his Internet searches produced very little on Chagall’s companion of seven years. When Ferdman found Vivian Jacobson and learned that she lectured on Chagall and his women, including Virginia, “the contact proved to be helpful beyond the wildest expectations. Not only did she have a great deal of information, but she offered to come to upstate New York to lecture at the State University of New York at New Paltz.” At the event, which drew an eager audience, Vivian persuaded her listeners to think big, and together with Rik Rydant, a local retired history teacher, and other attendees, Ferdman formed the Chagall in High Falls

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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worked untiringly with Chagall and artist Yvette Committee. Vivian recalls, “It was a dynamite Cauquil-Prince, the weaver of the tapestry, as well experience for me to be involved in putting as with the executives of the Institute is outlined in together a new group of Chagall devotees.” two chapters of Sharing Chagall: A Memoir. She had Last year the Committee presented an exassumed the gouache had been placed in the vault hibit at the D&H Canal Museum, two miles from of the Chagall Museum in Nice, France, but has Chagall’s former home and studio, and a move is since traced the drawing as it made its way from its under way for a major Chagall in High Falls exhibit possession by Chagall’s widow to a relative, whose at the Dorsky Museum at SUNY New Paltz. “As estate sold it to a New York dealer, to California, we plan year two of our exhibitions, we still turn to back to New York, and then to Chicago for ten Vivian for her valuable advice and endless encouryears. It eventually turned up in the New York galagement,” says Ferdman. Among other website lery where it caught the eye of Dr. Bulard. connections was a Texas artist, Craig Irvin, with Originally, Dr. Bulard bought the gouache as an an interest in Vava Brodsky Chagall, his second investment. However, he says, “After what I learned wife. He wondered if Vivian, through her extensive from Vivian about the piece knowledge and networks, it has great meaning to me had any information about . . . and reminds me daily the influence of Vava’s to have Hope and Faith presumed conversion to and with God’s blessing, all Christianity before their things are possible.” marriage or on his art.  Vivian was very excited Irvin was intrigued by to learn of Dr. Bulard’s purChagall’s open positive use chase, but was disappointed of Christian symbols on his to discover that the date characters and scenes.  “He Left - right: Vivian Jacobson, Melissa Kish and inscribed on the certificate didn’t seem to have some of Doron Lindner. The Chagall print was created furnished by the gallery the prejudices you’d expect upon his first visit to Israel. was incorrect, as well as the title of the work. So she from a Jewish man growing up in Russia.” Irvin started to put the information together to have the reports that Vivian made numerous contacts on his certificate corrected — a Herculean task. After going behalf and “the evidence, while inconclusive, is still through boxes of correspondence dating back thirty coming in and is quite interesting.” years, she found a photograph of Chagall looking The list grows daily as Vivian Jacobson adds at the drawing for the tapestry, and more importo her Internet contacts. One of the first ones was tantly, unearthed a letter from Vava Chagall dated Maurice Mahler, a professor of art and art history at September of 1983, stating that on Vivian’s next Rutgers University, who has become an esteemed visit to France Chagall would have completed the colleague through computer technology. Vivian obdrawing for the tapestry. serves, “All my long-standing and new friends have A summary of the history of the gouache with made me more knowledgeable about Chagall.  Their accompanying exhibits was sent to the Comité questions motivate me to continue to do research Chagall, requesting that a corrected certificate be iswork on this amazing and brilliant artist.” sued. After several weeks of waiting, a new certificate Late this spring, Vivian was able to solve a was prepared, signed and presented to Dr. Bulard. problem brought to her attention by an Internet Vivian breathed a sigh of relief, “What a victory!” inquiry from Dr. Ronald Bulard of Ardmore, According to Dr. Bulard and others, one of the Oklahoma. A dentist by profession, on one of his reasons so many people have sought out Vivian trips to Manhattan, he visited a gallery and was Jacobson on her website is that, unlike many moved to purchase a gouache done by Chagall. He experts in the artistic field, her accessibility and her had the provenance of ownership provided by the willingness to provide answers to questions about gallery, together with a certificate that gave the date Chagall is unmatched. She freely offers advice about of its creation as 1981, and the title of the work as how to secure authentication of a piece of Chagall’s “Autour de Job.” art, whether it has been handed down from one Vivian says, “Neither Dr. Bulard, nor to his generation to another, or picked up at a thrift sale. knowledge, any of the former owners of the drawing Her days often start at 5 a.m. in order to make had been aware of its history. It is the gouache that transatlantic phone calls, and can stretch into the Chagall created for the Job tapestry that hangs in the evenings as she connects with West Coast resilobby of the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago.” dents. However, her natural inquisitiveness and her “The idea for the tapestry was mine, and I fervor for her subject are boundless. Best of all, she approached Chagall in his 95th year to create this says. “I no longer worry about who will continue work of art. People told me that I was foolish to exto spread the word about Chagall and his message pect Chagall at his age to be able to complete such a with so many new allies who are true enthusiasts commission, but I had faith in Chagall’s willingness and disciples.” PS to undertake the project, and he did indeed finish it just before his death.” Mary Elle Hunter is a frequent contributor to The story of how Vivian raised the funds and PineStraw. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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o u t o f t h e bl u e

Engraved in Stone

By Deborah Salomon

Next time your

teenage son puts a dent in the fender, kiss that dent because it is a sign of life. When your 12-year-old daughter begs to wear lip gloss, humor her because this, too, signals vitality.

And where there’s life, there’s hope. Because hope ends at their names chiseled into a weathered stone covered with daffodils, autumn leaves and snow. July 30 would have been my son Danny’s 48th birthday. On August 7 my daughter Wendy would have turned 50. What would she look like? Would her long, strawberry blonde hair still ripple in the wind? Would her skin be fine and fair? Would she call me Mamalucci and mail me crinkled manila envelopes stuffed with funny T-shirts on my birthday? Would she still run through the airport — perhaps with her children in tow — hug me tight and whisper into my ear: “Mmmm. You smell like Mommy.” Mental health professionals say that losing a child is the most traumatic event a person can face. I have faced it twice. Wendy was diagnosed bipolar at 16. Nevertheless, she graduated from Duke a semester early, with excellent grades and more friends than kernels on a corncob. She was a free spirit who played guitar at a coffee house, spoke French lyrically, adopted stray animals. Ocracoke was her favorite destination. “We run with the dogs on the beach and lie behind the dunes,” her journal reads. “Life is a good place when I’m here.” Otherwise, despite the best intervention money could buy, life darkened. Manic episodes became terrifying, depression even worse. Medications never took hold. After three suicide attempts, she finally succeeded in 1991, at age 28. When I went through her purse I found the receipt for a gun. Pacifist Wendy — the petite ski racer nicknamed Papillon (butterfly) for the way she flitted between the slalom gates — died violently. Nobody realized that Danny had picked up the gun at the police station.

Danny was a handsome, tender-hearted tough guy — a babe magnet. He played football and hockey, rowed crew, loved cars. Cars became his business. He did well. Dan (you can’t call a serious grown-up Danny) married and had two precious little boys. I don’t know when my son first experienced bipolar symptoms because he concealed them.

Nobody knew, until after he died. His final depression was triggered by divorce and a change in employment status. Dan and I spent a lot of time together that last summer. We were so alike in temperament and tastes. I adored his little boys, my only grandchildren. “Ask Nanny — she knows everything,” he told them. The older one resembled him for a while but grew to look like his mother until recently. Now I hear the tall, lanky teenager speak in my son’s rich baritone. Then, on a gorgeous September afternoon in 2004, two police cars pulled into my driveway. “Your son has died of a self-inflicted gunshot wound,” the young officer said, eyes downcast. Dan had just turned 40. He used Wendy’s gun. One gun killed my two children. Who would sell a handgun to a beautiful young woman with long, strawberry blonde hair? What police officer would hand the gun over to her brother? I know . . . guns didn’t kill Wendy and Danny. Bipolar illness did. I respect the U.S. Constitution and laws of the land. Just please don’t read me the Second Amendment as I trace with my finger the weathered letters engraved on granite, spelling names I sewed into camp shirts and wrote on lunchboxes. Because I’m not listening. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and The Piolt, she may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B IRD WA T CH

Eastern Towhee

A prodigious singer with a historic legacy

By Susan Campbell

“Drink your tea, drink your tea,” the

Photograph By Michael McCloy

loud, emphatic call comes from dense shrubbery right outside our front door. It is the voice of a common, but frequently overlooked, Eastern towhee. It is hard to imagine that such a persistent songster could keep so well hidden. But towhees’ larger size makes them a target for predators, so keeping hidden is the survival strategy they employ. They belong to the sparrow family given that they are short-billed birds found in brushy or grassy habitat. The bird’s name originates from its typical “tow-hee” call. Many backyard birdwatchers here in the Sandhills are rather confused when they finally catch their first glimpse of a towhee. Is it some kind of oriole? Perhaps it’s a young rose-breasted grosbeak? Males are quite colorful with rufous or chestnut flanks set against a white belly with a black hood, back and wings as well as a long black and white tail. The bill, too, is jet black. Females sport brown feathers instead of black but still have rufous sides. Their legs are long and powerful: good for kicking around debris in search of insects and seeds. Their eyes, which are usually dark red, may be orangey here in the Sandhills. Given that the birds of the coastal population have a light yellow iris, our birds are considered to be an intermediate form. Eastern towhees are found, as their name implies, throughout the eastern

United States. Here in the Southeast, they are year-round residents, although we do have some wintering individuals that breed farther north. Their diet is variable, consisting of a variety of invertebrates (insects, spiders, millipedes) during the breeding season. However, in colder months, towhees can also be found scratching for seeds dropped by other birds from feeders. Their heavy bill allows them to take advantage of a variety of seeds. The powerful jaw muscles associated with such a strong bill make it a formidable weapon. If attacked, a towhee can inflict quite a bite. Males will viciously attack each other during territorial disputes and may inflict mortal wounds from grabbing the body or head of an opponent. Conflict is not infrequent where food is abundant, so the potential for fights is frequent throughout the year in our area. It is not uncommon for Eastern towhees to raise three broods in a summer. Each brood involves three to five young. Nests are simple affairs, in short shrubbery or even directly on the ground. As a result, nestlings often do not remain in the nest long after their eyes open and downy feathers cover their bodies. They will move around noisily begging from the adults. Young towhees will instinctively run for cover if their parents sound the alarm. A little known fact about this species is that it was first described by some of the earliest Europeans to arrive in the New World. The artist-cartographer John White noticed towhees during his visit to the English colony on Roanoke Island (1685-86). It was this trip that documented the colony’s disappearance (the Lost Colony). White’s unpublished drawings of both males and females predated the famous work by Catesby of the birds of Colonial America from the late 1700s by over a hundred years. PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, by phone at (910) 949-3207 or by mail at 144 Pine Ridge Drive, Whispering Pines, NC 28327.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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Complimentary Consultations • Interest Free Financing • Gift Cards Visit us ONLINE for additional specials & to shop our boutique: WWW.PInehursTLAser.cOm

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T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

Reclaimed by Nature Abandoned houses have a beauty, and mystery, all their own

By Tom Bryant

The old house stands like a lonely

sentinel on a narrow two-lane road that runs from Nebraska, an ancient deserted ghost town that was once a bustling fishing and agriculture center. The road passes Whistling Wings hunting lodge at White Plains and forks at Middletown, a sleepy little fishing village located on a canal that drains into the Pamlico. From there, the highway meanders on to Engelhard, the shopping mecca of Hyde County and the place to which we venture when we run low on groceries.

We don’t run short that often, especially when the full contingent of duck hunters is at the lodge. Our crowd never travels light. A stop at Whole Foods in Durham is always on the list of things to do, so our larder is usually full. On this trip, though, I was hunting alone and needed some essentials. Since the duck hunting that morning had been slow, I decided to make a run to the Red and White in Engelhard and then take the drive around Lake Mattamuskeet to check out the waterfowl there. As I passed the ruins of the old house, I pulled over to make a photo. I thought that later that afternoon, I’d walk around the place and check it out. No telling what’s inside that ramshackle old structure. I had been driving past it for years, always meaning to stop but never taking the opportunity. Today is going to be the day, I thought. I put the camera in the back seat and took one more look before climbing into the Cruiser. I could’ve sworn I saw the shutter on the attic window move. I watched more closely and decided it was just the wind. A front was scheduled to come through that evening and gusts were blowing every now

and then from the north. One of the benefits of being an outdoorsman is that I get to see things off the beaten path. Over the years, I’ve made quite a mental collection of abandoned houses that seem to be full of mystery. I’ve always wondered why people leave these homes to decay. Was there some great calamity, or did they just move on to another life forgetting everything in the past, including a lonely fallen-in house? An abandoned farmstead located close to Black Creek and not too far from my grandfather’s plantation was one of my first mysteries. I used to squirrel hunt in the cypress swamp that almost surrounded the ancient place. In the afternoons, I would even take a rest on the broken-down back porch of the house and make up stories about the inhabitants and where they had gone. The Black Creek house was in good shape, not rotted, even though the roof had holes the size of washtubs. It hadn’t decayed because it was built from rare black cypress, a wood that can last for centuries. My uncle Tommy eventually bought the house from a timber company that had acquired the land in an estate sale. He bought it expressly for the lumber. I hated to see the old place come down but was glad that the wood and ancient timbers would be recycled. It was eventually used in the restoration of an antebellum home right outside Charleston. Another homestead that I ran across was located in a most unusual spot, right in the middle of the Okefenokee Swamp in southern Georgia. Now I must say this house wasn’t actually abandoned; it was inhabited by about a million mice. I discovered it during a canoe paddle through the swamp. The night I was there, the mice took over and I pitched my tent in the yard. The house perches right in the middle of a small island, one of the few solid pieces of ground in the whole area. It has about six rooms with a front porch and little side back porch. There was a well and a hand pump from which I was able to get drinking water. The house is made entirely from cedar and has window sashes but no glass panes. The lumber company timbering cypress from the area had a small-gauge railroad running through

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

the island back to high ground. Supposedly, they built the little cabin for the foremen of the railroad to use. Now the park service keeps up the island for canoe parties. Paddlers can camp in the house if they wish and if they don’t mind furry company. I later found out the reason there were no glass panes in the windows was because of mosquitoes. An early way of controlling them was to light pine boughs and walk thorough the rooms. This would run out the miserable bugs. Some choice, being eaten alive by mosquitoes or asphyxiated by smoke. I remember the cedar smell in that old place and hope it’s still there. The loop around Lake Mattamuskeet from Engelhard to Fairfield across the causeway and back is about thirty miles or so. I came back by the hunting lodge to put on boots so I could walk through the field to the old farmhouse. By the time I pulled up in front of the old place, dusk was rapidly approaching. I’d better get a move on, I thought. I pulled the Cruiser off the road as much as I possibly could and started my hike. The house looks as if it doesn’t belong in this part of the country. As a matter of fact, it looks like a Siamese construction of a house. Each side could stand alone, and I wondered, as I trudged through the muddy field, if it wasn’t actually an early version of a duplex. I could tell from the shutters and the withered shake roof that the structure had been well built. Now, however, it was falling in on itself. The windows were gone and the roof was rotting away on the corners. I approached from the front and wasn’t too afraid of snakes that one usually finds around an abandoned house. It had been pretty cold lately and, hopefully, they were still in their dens. As I started to climb up on what was left of the front porch, the attic window shutter opened and closed with a slap, hard enough to loosen a couple of slats that came tumbling down beside me. Hmm, I thought, I don’t believe there is enough wind to open and close a shutter like that. But you know, I’m technically trespassing, and it is getting dark right quick. Maybe I should just head back for supper and try this visit tomorrow when it’s good and light. And that’s just what I did. I got back to the Cruiser and took one final look at the old house before I left for White Plains. I could swear I saw a shadow move across the porch and it didn’t look like an animal. I thought I might come back tomorrow, or then again, I might not. It is supposed to be blowing and ducks should be moving. We’ll see. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art Enjoy & Soul ofResponsibly the Sandhills ® © 2012 Shock Top Brewing Co., Shock Top Belgian-Style Wheat Ale, St. Louis, MO


G o l f t o w n J o u r n al

Old North State Club

Set in the wilds of Montgomery County, this timeless Tom Fazio gem on Badin Lake never fails to delight

By Lee Pace

Twenty-five years

Photograph by McConnell Golf

ago the golf business in the Carolinas was like a firecracker, popping hither and yon with new club and resort courses in every mountain nook and seaside cranny. After a brief interlude for the 1990-91 Gulf War and attendant recession, the developers, architects and dozer operators were back in full force.

It was a good time to be a golf writer located an hour from Pinehurst and three to four from other important enclaves, particularly as magazines like Links, Golfweek and Golf expanded their news hole and would feed an eager contributor a steady diet of assignments if he knew a semicolon from a 5-iron and could wend his way through 18 holes with his shirttail tucked in and his blood alcohol level under point-oh-six. I developed in those days a particular fancy for following Tom Fazio around the state, for one reason because he now lived in my hometown in the mountains, Hendersonville. I met him in his office once in the late 1980s and told him I couldn’t bolt the backwoods fast enough to get to Chapel Hill. He smiled and countered that he couldn’t move there fast enough from the rat race of South Florida after discovering the wonders of mountain life while building a new golf course over in Cashiers in the mid-1980s. “Main Street with a view,” Fazio said. “What more could you want?” I agreed that my slant on the town had softened considerably with age, and I’ve made a point to visit his office on the top floor of a 1923 brownstone at the corner of Fourth and Main whenever I venture back. They’re not as busy in the offices of Fazio Golf Course Designers as they were 20 years ago, when the daily work flow built to a crescendo to get blueprints and drawings into the Fed-Ex man’s hands by 6 p.m. and off to design outposts in Florida, California, Montana, Michigan and every corner of the nation. Today Fazio is semi-retired, his son Logan now running the business largely on restorations, renovations and new projects in China, Korea and Brazil.

“For the young people who want to stay in the golf design business, that’s where they have to go,” Fazio says wistfully. “It’s sad, but it’s the reality. Who would have dreamed 20 years ago that we’d have a housing, real estate and golf contraction in 2008 that would last for at least four years? And after those four years, you’d still have at least four more years of uncertainty ahead? No one. No one could have called that.” Fazio was also worth following because of the quality of work he produced — playable, intricate, gorgeous, obsessive in design detail. Some work was utterly natural, riding the crests and curves of the mountains, the Sandhills and the Intracoastal Waterway. Some far from home were totally contrived; witness the magic wand he waved over the Las Vegas desert and — presto — there you have Shadow Creek! “There’s nothing loud — just soft, rolling, curving lines,” says William McKee, a Fazio client and developer of Wade Hampton Club, one of Fazio’s most acclaimed designs. “Tom simply has this uncanny ability to create courses that have an evolved appearance, courses with instant patina.” Links was my favorite outlet at the time, given its early predilection for the Carolinas — it remains headquartered in Hilton Head and was originally named Southern Links — as well as its glossy paper stock, svelte use of sexy photography and enough leg room to let a story saunter 2,000 words and up. I profiled Fazio’s courses at Treyburn in Durham, Porter’s Neck in Wilmington and Champion Hills in Hendersonville through the early 1990s, each borne of the same bolt of cloth — gated community, white-glove service, stick-built custom homes and a golf course with the finest views, digestive underpinnings and agronomy. One of the more interesting projects and story assignments of that early 1990s thrust of work was a community built on a 2.5-mile peninsula on Badin Lake in the middle of a triangle formed by connecting Charlotte, Winston-Salem and Raleigh. It wasn’t mountains, coast, Sandhills or cityside. Instead, it was lakeside in the middle of the Montgomery County wilds, a one-hour drive northwest of Pinehurst. The concept was to marry a Fazio golf course, the lake, boating activities and urban markets within two hours on every compass post to create a viable second-home community. The Old North State Club was special when it opened in 1992, as Golf

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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g o L f T oW n J o u r nA L

Digest pegged it No. 2 among Best New Private Courses in America. Today Uwharrie Point, as the development around the golf course is known, is mature and active and the golf course remains a special draw. “This is a great opportunity site-wise,” Fazio said one day during construction. “You look at that lake and know you have the property beside it. You can get excited over that.” Fazio routed the course back and forth across the peninsula several times, nearly every hole having either a view of the lake if on the edge or using the topographical flow of the ground if more toward the interior — high ground in the middle playing to lower ground on the perimeters. The second hole flirts with a sliver of lake to the west, the fourth and seventh holes flow downhill toward the eastern edge of the lake. Nine falls downhill with an enticing nook of lake framing the green in the distance, then ten offers a tough uphill approach to well-bunkered green. The back nine wanders the interior of the land, building to the crescendo of sixteen, seventeen and eighteen, three holes indelibly etched in the memory bank of anyone who’s set foot on the property. Sixteen is a downhill par-4, the lake to the left and a slice of wetlands fronting the green. Seventeen is a 200-yard par-3, the back tees traversing the lake and the water guarding the green left and rear. And eighteen is a 540-yard par-5 in a “cape” configuration, wending right-to-left in a big bend around the water. There’s plenty of room to drive the ball and then a lot of options to play around or across the corner. The finish has been pegged the Tar Heel state’s answer to the Monterey Peninsula. “That view has never gotten old,” says Tom Ducey, the club’s director of golf since its inception. “It’s the best picture we have — the helicopter view of sixteen, seventeen and eighteen. No one forgets that finish. They’ve been voted the best three finishing holes in the state, and they’ve hung onto that over challenges from a lot of different golf courses that have come along.” The golf course today falls under the auspices of McConnell Golf, the Raleigh-based concern that owns and operates eight premier courses across North and South Carolina. The greens are a little smaller in places after twenty years of encroachment, and some corridors of trees have been opened up during severe wind storms. The course plays a little shorter given the advent of longer clubs and longer balls since 1992. Old North State Club has been the host since 1995 to the ACC Men’s Golf Championships, and the club’s members enjoy every spring watching promising young players like Bill Haas, Webb Simpson, Lucas Glover, Kyle Stanley, Mark Wilson and Matt Kuchar before they graduate to

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September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


G o l f t o w n J o u r n al

the PGA Tour. Some of the members congregate on their boats in flotillas beside sixteen, seventeen and eighteen. Included in Old North State’s roster of club champions is 2011 winner Bubba Watson, who joined when he wanted a viable club to play when he and his wife, Angie, travel to their 3,386-square foot home at High Rock Lake, which they bought in 2009. “Bubba wrote his check and asked, ‘OK, I can play in the club championship, right?’” Ducey says. “He won and I told him, ‘That’s your first major.’” Since then, of course, Watson has won the Masters and has adopted an infant son. He and his wife have put their lake house on the market and plan to live permanently in Florida, so you’re not as likely to see the flop-haired lefty wielding his pink-shafted driver around the premises at Old North State Club. Still, there are many sights to behold along Tom Fazio’s lakeside treasure, no matter the decade, the Dow or all the competitors in Carolina’s fertile golf landscape. PS Lee Pace provides a behind-the-scenes look at the restoration of Pinehurst No. 2 in his new book, The Golden Age of Pinehurst, available early this fall.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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&

PAUL BLAKE A S S O C I AT E S Estate Liquidation & Tag Sale Services

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September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e P e r f e c T m i S m AT c h

dishing it out

rummage sales and secondhand shops can help you set the perfectly unforgettable table By DeBoRah salomoN

A matched set of dishes suits

people with little time, less imagination. How much more interesting when dinner plates are all alike — but different from the salad plates. When soup is served in sturdy café-au-lait cups and cheesecake on electrifying cobalt blue glass.

Such is the accomplishment of the rummage sale shopper, the haunter of Goodwill, Habitat for Humanity and bazaars where bread-and-butter plates, berry bowls, fruit nappies and odd pieces from granny’s Sunday china cost a pittance. If dishes catch your eye — and you have shelf room — buy. Opportunity to use happens. This idea originated with family owned bistros and B&Bs where no two dishes or pieces of cutlery are alike — a charming mishmash. The server might announce their provenance: “Lamb noisettes with new potatoes and baby peas plated on Villeroy & Boch belonging to Chef Jason’s great-aunt.” Has a nice ring, eh? Start by collecting white in many shapes, styles and weights because everything except filet of sole, rice and cauliflower looks great on white. (For that combo, a glistening black plate garnished with shredded carrots and summer squash.) Square, rectangular or octagonal white is currently table-chic. Lighterweight dishes are generally better quality with the exception of artisan stoneware. Aim for at least four of a kind. That way, if the guest list numbers eight, you can alternate two whites or a white and something else. Juxtapose traditional against modern: a yellow ceramic service plate under a blue Chinese motif dinner plate. Break some rules: Present shrimp cocktail in an oversized martini glass, iced tea in a heavy beer mug, melon balls in a champagne flute or pilsner glass with a long-handled spoon. Pairing a print with a solid is safe. Be brave, like the well-dressed man in striped shirt with paisley tie. Flowery dishes look grand against geometrics. Be quirky: A set of oblong Melamine plates ($3 at a church rummage sale) representing playing cards pairs with burgers, wieners or subs. Fit half a ripe unpeeled kiwi into an egg cup; scoop out with a demitasse spoon. Remember those roundish glass plates with indentation for punch cups? Every garage sale has a few. Fill the cup with gazpacho or a cold fruit soup; pile the plate with salad and open-face cucumber/whipped cream cheese sandwiches. Another blast from the past — oval metal steak platters — are born again at brunch. Heat them in the oven, cover with scrambled eggs, sizzling bacon, sausage and home fries. Today’s food is colorful, surprising, fun. Frame it accordingly. PS

M.J. Long’s quilts shown, sold at At Home. Photographs by Cassie Butler

Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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a

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h u n T & g AT h e r

The Seat of Pleasure We sent our intrepid hunter and gatherer on a mission to fi nd the perfect chair . Just look what they came back with

a b c d d

By KiRa schoeNFelDeR photoGRaphs By cassie ButleR

Lyne’s Furniture Gallery

105 Magnolia Ave., Pinehurst. A vintage chair adorned with a needlepoint cover and carved wooden arms and legs. $2,500.

Lyne’s Furniture Gallery

c

A quality leather chair surrounds the seated with its rich scent. This wingback leather chair with brass nailheads will not disappoint. $395.

O ld H ardware Antiques

485 Carthage St., Cameron. A wonderfully fire-engine red Chinese chair. From the turn of the century the original lacquer still holds its beauty. $215.

Midstate Furniture 403 Monroe St., Carthage. A wonderful desk chair, with a tight leather seat and mahogany finish. $595.


e Renee’s

109 W. Main St., Aberdeen. The fabric by Design Legacy makes this chair really stand out, and is aptly named “Blue Heron.” $395.

f

Pa g e F ur n i t ur e

130 Illinois St., Southern Pines. Turn of the century folding English stadium chair, ready to cheer-on from the sidelines. Bentwood and fabric. $295.

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On e E l e ve n M a i n , A be r d e e n

Made by Twigs and Rags, this one-of-a-kind wicker chair gives its vintage style a fresh new edge. $265.

e

g

f

h

Ol d Hardware Anti q ue s

This victorian Gendron ron wheel rocking chair is an essential part to every Southern home. $150.

h

i

O ld H ardware Ant iques

Refurbished Victorian corner chair with a brilliantly colorful seat cushion. $245.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


a b

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Architect Sam Narayan spends his free time making furniture, but not just any furniture. The furniture Narayan makes is fully recyclable — it’s made out of cardboard and laminated with wood glue. The first cardboard chair he made was a gift for his wife in 1999. Now he is taking on clients such as Honda, and the Pinehurst Resort. Narayan builds chairs from the side profile, then he gives them thickness. “The design part is extremely fun; it can be whatever I want it to be.” Cardboard is a very pliable material, and indestructible at the same time. “It’s not so much hippie as it is retro-accptable. You just have to see it to understand it,” Narayan says. Samples of his unique green furniture are for sale at Green Goods in Southern Pines and Plan B in Aberdeen. Meet with Narayan and the owner of Plan B, De Vault Clevenger, to design your own.

b d c e Renee’s

An all neon, no mess chair with outdoor acrylic fabric aand nd a lot of style. $395.

Plan B Furniture

109 N. Poplar St., Aberdeen. Steven Shell chair with a funky fabric and casual posture. $349.

e

Page Furniture

An instant favorite, a 1940’s Knoll-dyed yellow leather and iron butterfly chair. $500.

Plan B Furniture

Designer Peter Danko re-purposed seat belts to bring b ring this chair to life. $329.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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“Iorik”

Carolina Dog

colored pencil

Pamela Powers January FINE

ART

PORTRAITS

OF

PETS

www.pamelapowersjanuary.com

910.692.0505

We have TONS of NEW ITEMS! Pergolas • Statuary • Planters • Fountains Garden Art • Aluminum Fencing

Windridge

Gardens

1650 Valley View Road • Southern Pines, NC Adjacent to Hyland Golf Course on US 1

www.WindridgeGardens.com

Wednesday - Saturday: 10am-6pm; Sunday: 1pm-6pm

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Vincent van Gogh

Artist,

Sienna Courie

Henry Moore

Artist,

Sarah Spurgeon

Gustav Klimt

Artist,

Class Assignment: Three-Dimensional Design, Sandhills Community College Spring 2012 The challenge: Design and build a chair to match the aesthetics of a famous artist. Students may use any type of material but design must conform to style and functionality of a traditional chair.

Amanda Crawford

Henri Matisse

Artist,

Alyssa Rocherolle

Walt Disney

Artist,

Candace Kelly

Jim Davis, Garfield

Artist,

Vanessa Lennon

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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©2012 Pinehurst, LLC

We don’t typically make people wait for their appointments, but sometimes they insist.

When you come to The Spa at Pinehurst for a therapy, you can enjoy a full day of relaxation. With spacious lounge areas, saunas, whirlpools, a swimming pool plus healthy snacks and smoothies, you can continue to unwind long after your appointment ends. So arrive early. Stay late. And we’ll make sure your appointment is right on time.

Receive 20% off therapies Sunday-Thursday.

Located next to The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 888.435.6957 • pinehurst.com


September 2012

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P September 2012

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Internationally acclaimed sculptor Patrick Dougherty grew up in Southern Pines. Over the past thirty years, Dougherty has built more than 230 stick installations worldwide — from Scotland to Japan to Brussels, and all over the United States. He builds his larger-than-life sculptures on site and calls Chapel Hill home, where he has lived since the ’70s. Portrait by Cassie Butler

September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Wild Things Come From

Where the

Nature becomes the text in Southern Pinesborn sculptor Patrick Dougherty’s magic doorways to another world

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“Disorderly Conduct” Guilford College, Greensboro, NC (2011). Photo by Cassie Butler

“Uff Da Palace” Minnesota Landscape Arboretum, Chaska, MN (2010). Photo by Todd Mulvihill

By Maureen Clark

nternationally renowned sculptor Patrick Dougherty travels the world to create his magical, swirling, stick-work structures. But once a month, he circles back to a house in the woods outside Chapel Hill that is a durable version of his art incorporating the texture, pattern and soul of trees. Tall and boyish with a shock of white hair, Dougherty enjoys the company of his son Sam, the comfort of a home he built at the start of his career, and talking for a while about his work. The stick work forms created by Dougherty speak to the imagination of childhood in the viewer. Some are swirls of saplings winding up an indoor staircase. Others seem like inhabitable huts gathered under a grove of trees. Another clutch of branches clings to the side of a building. One weaves through a row of classic Doric columns. “There is a certain amount of magic,” the sculptor observes, “that occurs in the process of creating (the works). People make lots of personal associations. They talk about bird’s nests, or when they played in the woods. I heard one woman say to her husband, “‘Honey, we could live there.’” A friend’s reaction to a photograph of Na Hale “Eo Waiawi” created for The Contemporary Museum in Honolulu was an enthusiastic, “I know what that is. That is where the wild things live.” Dougherty grew up in Southern Pines and credits a childhood spent in the pines as inspiration for his art.

“Standby” Raleigh-Durham International Airport (2000). Photo by Jerry Blow

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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“Childhood Dreams” Desert Botanic Gardens, Phoenix, AZ (2007). Photo by Adam Rodriguez “Toad Hall” Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara, CA (2005). Photo by Nell Campbell

“Pomp and Circumstance”. Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR (2011). Photo by Frank Miller

“Call of the Wild” Museum of Glass: International Center for Contemporary Art, Tacoma, WA (2002). Photo by Duncan Price

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“It is very clear that growing up in Southern Pines made it easier to have vision and be part of a world of ideas. We lived on Grove Road near the Pine Needles golf course. I don’t know if it is still there, but I had a favorite little hollow in the woods. That was when there was a different approach to childhood play. We would go outside and not come back until dinner. We climbed trees and messed with things. Kids see sticks and know how to use them. We built forts on the pine needle carpets of the woods. That was a real baseline for me as I look for a way to express what beauty is in a certain way.” Dougherty’s sister, Kate Farrell, a writer and poet, also remembers a childhood spent in the woods, in an essay written about her brother published in the British magazine Resurgence: “Patrick Dougherty often remarks that his trek toward art began in the pine woods around his childhood home in Southern Pines, North Carolina. I know it’s so because, as his sister, I was there. Patrick, the eldest of five and a born outdoorsman, led the rest of us on countless forest expeditions. Even back then he brought to his wanderings a love of nature and a knack for “‘dwelling in possibility’” – an aptitude that would prove as useful for creating art as for exploring a forest — and his urge to build left a long trail of forts, tree houses, lean-tos, and hideouts. Later on he would build the mystery and freedom of the woods into these outsized, nestlike structures he is now known for.” Farrell calls them dream shelters. After graduating from East Southern Pines High School in the early sixties, Dougherty went on to Chapel Hill and afterward earned a graduate degree in hospital and health administration from the University of Iowa. During the Vietnam War he worked as a hospital administrator at an Air Force base in Germany. After the war, he returned to Chapel Hill to study sculpture and begin building his house in the woods. Farrell, again, quotes her brother’s moment of “stick conversion.”

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“Out of the Box” North Carolina Museum of Art, Raleigh, NC (2009). “I saw waves of saplings along my drive and thought, ‘I could use these.’ Plentiful and renewable, they were just what I needed. But I first had to learn what birds and beavers and other natural shelter builders knew already: sticks have an inherent method of joining. Drag one through the woods to see what I mean; it entangles with everything.” At the time Dougherty recalls, “I was a no account student. We had a student show and I had to come up with something.” He produced his first piece: “A sort of body wrap made out of maple saplings. It was very lacy, about human sized, like an open-ended mummy.” The entry caught the attention of the show’s juror from Los Angeles. He considered it the “best piece he had seen all year.” A representative of SECCA, the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, was also enthusiastic about the work. He offered to give Dougherty a show. “I told him I didn’t have any other work,” Dougherty remembers. He was informed that he had three months and was pressed to come up with something. “I made some figurative pieces that sat in chairs. But after that, I started going large.” Next, Dougherty was given a stipend by the North Carolina Arts Council to do a show in Salisbury. He has not looked back. Today there are 238 works that Dougherty has created in museums, parks, woodlands and buildings throughout the United States and around the world. Denmark, Italy, Ireland, Austria, Scotland, Mexico and Japan are among the hosts. Dougherty is traveling to Korea and Belgrade, Serbia, this year. He is booked through 2014. “I have been gone three weeks a month for almost 30 years,” the artist explained. He creates eight to ten works a year for which he is paid $20-30,000 apiece depending on the travel and location. Over the years, Dougherty has developed a process. He learned that it wasn’t necessary to transport materials. He relies on being able to locate saplings in every geographic area. Standing in his studio examining a row of leather work gloves clipped to a line, he explained the participatory process. Each glove is covered with signatures of the workers who helped on a particular piece. He cannot work alone and requires assistants in each location, many

of whom volunteer. A planned preliminary visit to the site for each sculpture allows Dougherty an opportunity to locate the source of saplings for gathering, order scaffolding and begin to envision the work. He makes sketches. A key to the process links to the skills he developed in hospital administration. “I am organized,” Dougherty states emphatically. When he returns to a location, the actual construction phase begins and generally lasts three weeks. And herein lies the art. Dougherty is not building monuments like heavy stones of Henry Moore or the generals on horseback that have endured a century of winters in Washington and Richmond. The swirling masses of saplings, more reminiscent of the emotional brushwork of a Van Gogh, are temporary structures. “They stay up two years and need to come down while they still look great,” Dougherty says. “The line between trash and treasure is very thin in the sticks.” Art critic John Perreault understands the medium: “Dougherty’s sculptures are festive. They are events rather than monuments, holding their own by virtue of their manner of construction and inflection of the site, revealing the site through surprise. They are signatory rather than a species of unwarranted, unwanted, incomprehensible oratory. They are about what they are. And just as important, they are about where they are. They do not preach. Through them, the artist signs the site. Nature is the text. The sculptures are about what one artist can do. They are as much performance art as they are sculptural forms.”

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“Close Ties” Scottish Basketmakers Circle, Dingwall, Scotland (2006). Photo by Fin Macrae

Savannah College of Art and Design, Savannah, GA (1998). Photo by Wayne Moore “Double or Nothing” Washington University, St Louis, MO (2011). Photo by Chandler Curlee

“Na Hale ‘Eo Waiawi” The Contemporary Art Museum, Honolulu, HI (2003). Photo by Paul Kodama

“Ain’t Misbehavin’” Winthrop University, Rock Hill, SC (2010). Photo by Zan Maddox


Dougherty counts on making connections to people throughout the process. The traditional separation between art and observer is removed. He relates to every person who has signed the work gloves and those who have watched him create. They are a part of the process. He wants to talk with bystanders about what he is doing, answer questions, hear reactions and even accept invitations to dinner. The work is open and participatory from the beginning through the twoyear life of the sculpture. Each one is what Dougherty calls “a doorway into another world.” In those worlds, the artist has learned how to problem-solve. Among the more challenging locations was a Shinto shrine in Japan. The priest told Dougherty that there were snakes where he would be living and working. After requesting that his wife, Linda, be given a call if he was bitten, Dougherty stayed awake for three nights in a bed that was much too short for his lanky frame. Finally, he was too tired to care and became resigned to the conditions. “I figured they could go ahead and bite me.” They didn’t. In Austria, France and Germany there were language barriers, but the works still evolved. Problem-solving is inherent in each venture. “I work with stick,” Dougherty explains. “That is the only constant. Nothing else is.” The artist was home recently, leaving a work under way in New England, to spend time with Sam and his wife, Linda, a chief Curator at the North Carolina Museum of Art. An older son, Arthur, is in Asheville and daughter Eilene lives in Charleston with her husband, Dan. The grounds surrounding his home outside Chapel Hill are a testament to the sticks. A number of sheds hold carefully sorted and divided stacks of wood. The doors to his studio are an enchanting design of twigs, as is son Sam’s playhouse, the garden gates and fence around the vigorous vegetable garden. Dougherty’s world is a celebration of saplings, their potential to have curve and what the interaction will produce. For all of this, he credits a childhood well spent in the woods near Pine Needles. His words in an excerpt from sister Kate’s essay: “Sometimes,” he says, “when I’m working on a sapling sculpture, repeating the same motion over and over, I’m overtaken by a feeling of serenity and freedom. In those times, I have the longest view. I feel not only the pleasure of my childhood and its building phase, but I sense the presence of the forests of long ago and feel myself to be part of the largest conversation.” Dougherty currently has a sculpture titled “Outside the Box,” on display at the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh. Interested readers can visit the artist’s website: www.stickwork.net and enjoy the many fascinating photographs of the Patrick Dougherty’s works. PS Maureen Clark is a frequent contributor to PineStraw Magazine.

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The Beauty of a

Secret Door PHOTOGRAPHS BY CASSIE BUTLER A door is just a door unless, well, it’s something else. You pass through two dozen a day and probably never give them a faintest thought. Yet they are the portals that lead us from one small world to the next — from steaming August pavement, say, to cool and quiet retreat from hot and madding world. Through the ages, doors have been irresistible symbols to poets and sages, artists and writers. We go through a door and shut it to find sanctuary, privacy, the calmer heartbeat of home. We go out the door to find new opportunity, a fresh start, or just to check the morning’s weather. Unwanted babies and newspapers appear on the doorstep. Something always unexpected happens when you open a door and step out. A closed and formidable door, on the other hand, is tantalizing human mystery, a powerful symbol of change and transformation that lies within. Knock and ye shall find. Enter at your own risk. Door is open, please come in. From the inside, it’s a fine symbol of liberation, a way to vault oneself into a brand new day and an unknown adventure – or simply let in the cat from his nighttime perambulations. Around our place, Old Rufus waits patiently by our back door every morning, sure as a Sandhills sunrise, usually bearing the gift of a small mouse in exchange for his breakfast. “Not knowing when the dawn will come,” wrote the splendid recluse Emily Dickinson, “I open every door.” Our dogs, on the other hand, have learned to bump the back door hard when they seek entry. “A door,” wrote Ogden Nash, PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P September 2012

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“is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of.” A back door leads to a secret garden, or a yard where you can be yourself — unless the neighbors are such Nosy Parkers. A front door, on the other hand, is the face we show to the passing world, the gateway to our modern castle. We hew it from oak to stand against time, weather, intruders. Or we paint in festive colors to suggest the life within. In other words, a door speaks. Just look and listen. Whatever else it means, a windowed door is a glimpse into the soul of a home. A red door on a church symbolizes the shed blood of Christ — and a weary traveler’s welcome. A blue door in Scandinavia means warmth and hospitality awaits. Ancients placed boughs of evergreen above their doors to invoke a little cheer in the coldest darkest season, and American Colonials festooned their doors with harvested fruit and vegetables to welcome strangers to their hearths — the origin of the modern wreath on the door. Take a stroll though our Sandhills towns and villages as we did recently and you’ll see stunning doors, doors of every shape, color and configuration. If you see one you simply can’t resist, go up and give a gentle rap. The right door can change your life. Or just provide a smile. What would a cottage in the wood or a knock, knock joke be without a decent door? Just knock and see who or what you find. That’s the real beauty of a door. PS —Jim Dodson

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Ryder, 17 months, surveys the old-but-new environment created by Dad Sean Butler.

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Story of a house

The Butler Did It New mirrors old for young Southern Pines family By Deborah Salomon • Photographs By John Gessner

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othing makes Sean Butler happier than hearing “Wow — great old house, fantastic renovation.” Because in a bold back-to-the-future move, in 2007 Sean — a cute, single guy in his mid-twenties — designed a house similar to classics built along the streets bordering downtown Southern Pines during the 1930s: tall, narrow, with tin roof and pale green clapboards, a wide porch with brick trim, fieldstone stoop, tongue-and-grove pine ceiling, swing, exposed rafter tails and Craftsman-style columns — perfect for whiling away a rainy afternoon. Inside, the open kitchen, dining and living areas, bathroom and sunroom appear to have been created by removing walls. No way. Sean knew exactly what he wanted and how to get it. His was a house waiting to happen. First, the desire. Sean — from a deeply rooted Southern Pines family — grew up in a happy house, similar to the one he built except deep in the woods overlooking a lake, on 250 acres. Design was in his blood; as a boy he decorated his bedroom on themes, like fishing. Later, Sean studied architecture and landscape design at N.C. State University and then started his own landscaping business, Butler Constructs. Next, the realization. After graduation, an internship in his hometown became a job. Itching for his own bachelor digs, Sean searched for an affordable lot. “My mom saw a for sale sign — I called that day. It wasn’t a buildable lot (by current ordinances) — too small, but it was grandfathered in.” The lot was a mess. Nevertheless, Sean spent evenings there, sketching possibilities. In the end he adapted a plan by an architect featured in Southern Living magazine. “Everybody said it wouldn’t work, but I had studied urban design. I knew things were going smaller,” Sean says. His adaptation provides 1,522 square feet of carefully planned space on two floors with two bedrooms, two full bathrooms, a dressing room-office but no attic, basement or garage for storage. Still, roomy enough for a single guy. Except “I built it to live in with a wife. My mom and dad have a great marriage. I knew some girl would come around.”

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Gardens, deck, fence, speak to Sean Butler’s landscape design skills, while plants are Claries’s domain.

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Enter Claire, after the house had been completed. She also graduated from N.C. State and was teaching in Cary. Fortuitously, Claire grew up in renovated historic homes in Sanford. She and Sean were acquainted through a cousin and had attended events together. “I got the itch to Facebook him, ‘Would you like to grab dinner?’” Claire recalls. “I wasn’t used to beautiful women asking me out,” Sean adds. A computer glitch prevented him from getting the message for two weeks. “I was taking a break from dating, but I did it as a favor,” Sean continues. That was April 2009. They married six months later.

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Sean and Ryder mess it up in the sand and water tables.

ow Sean had a wife, and his wife had a house. “I was blown away the first time he had me over,” Claire says. “I couldn’t believe a guy could do this, make it look like an old home.” Sean waxes modest. “I didn’t want to flaunt (the house). I wanted her to like me for me.” Flaunting not necessary. This house speaks for itself. The main floor, other than a stunning bathroom with clear glass sink bowl, is open. Ceilings, accented by beams, soar. Space is anchored by a kitchen (rather elaborate for a bachelor) done in rich maple cabinetry with etched glass doors, granite countertops in café-au-lait spatters, brushed stainless appliances and beadboard accents. Two columns from a Vermont architectural salvage company appear to support the bar. Green is the prevailing color in shades from spring chives to guacamole. In all, Sean used twenty-seven paint colors. Floors are unusual mismatched lengths of dark Hawaiian koa wood. The area fronting the kitchen is devoted to hanging out and dining. Claire contributed subtle touches to the completed house, including artwork. Most furnishings, some refinished or painted, came from family sources. Sean’s grandfather made the dining room table. “I’m a minimalist. Before Claire, there was nothing on the walls, only Edward Hopper’s diner scene (“Nighthawks”) propped on a chair rail,” Sean says. “Claire moved in and made it a home. She likes collections of little things.” He points to a small corner cabinet filled with demi-tasse cups, beyond the reach of their toddler son, Ryder. But why is a framed mirror hung above eye level? “We break all the rules,” Sean grins. Built-in bookcases beside the fireplace contain Ryder’s toys. A rug and coffee table were removed for his safety. Upholstery in the living room and sunroom across the back of the house continues organic neutrals and Earth tones illustrating Sean’s taste. “He’s very particular,” Claire says. “He’s into researching the exact thing. I can’t just go to T.J. Maxx and buy a bedspread.” Upstairs looks more tomorrow than yesterday except for transoms over each door, which convey light from room to room beginning at sunrise. Sean splurged on an oversize multi-station bathroom with a contemporary claw foot tub for a reason. Growing up, he shared one bathroom with two sisters. Another space splurge is the walk-in closet/dressing room with window, where Sean keeps a desk. Ryder’s room with vaulted ceiling bows to no cartoon character. Instead, Claire chose a barnyard theme. Ryder’s changing table is an antique farmhouse table while his maple big-boy bed belonged to Claire’s grandfather. “This is Ryder’s kingdom,” Claire says, of the backyard, with sandbox and water bin. Maybe, but the remainder of the V-shaped yard — from step-down

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Beadboard, built-ins, windows and mirrors at odd heights add texture and personality to the design.

“I built it to live in with a wife. My mom and dad have a great marriage. I knew some girl would come around.” The Butler family: Claire, Ryder, Louie and Sean beneath Claire’s arrangement of plates.

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Details like the magnet board made from an automotive oil tray — are reclaimed posts — carry the old tune into Sean’s magazine kitchen.

Sun-play room is furnished in refinish/reupholstered family pieces. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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deck shaded by a maple tree to manicured grass and beds of hydrangeas, zinnias, Lady Banks roses, and dogwood trees, irises from Claire’s greatgrandmother’s garden — showcases Sean’s landscape design skills. Here, Claire weeds the beds while Ryder plays. Their throwback driveway is composed of brick and grass strips. A tiny fountain bubbles near the front steps. Enchanting, as in a storybook. In fact, the entire property seems to have been whisked off a long-ago Saturday Evening Post page. Only the Lexus SUV in the driveway and the central AC unit suggest otherwise. “We can hear the train,” Sean says, as they sit on the porch with Louie, a sweet Maltese-Yorkie, and wave to passing neighbors. “Sean is amazing,” Claire discovered. “Any house we live in he can turn into something cool.” Cool — but warm. “Do you want a house from Architectural Digest or a house for a warm, loving family . . . a livable house? That’s more important than the design.” PS

Beams, furnishings. Ryder’s bed comes from family’s home while bathroom (left) is stunning “now.”

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T h e G a r d e n pat h

The Healing Garden

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Healing, someone once said, isn’t about forgetting — but remembering

By Jim Dodson • Photographs By Cassie Butler

hen the beautiful Healing Garden at Clara McLean House at FirstHealth opened last May, there was no doubt in the minds of co-creators Cassie Willis and Lynda Acker that it would quickly find a special place in the lives of those with a loved one in medical crisis — remembering, if you will, our own sweet beginnings in the garden of life. “Since ancient times, gardens have been places of refuge and healing because they take us back to something fundamental — contemplation and prayer,” Willis reflected on a recent late summer afternoon while walking a visitor through the dozen botanical “rooms” of the oneacre gem she and garden co-founder Lynda Acker spent seven years designing, raising funds for and leading a team of 30 volunteers to create. “For the longest time, modern medicine chose to overlook or simply forget the powerful healing properties of nature. Fortunately science has come full circle on the subject, and most caregivers fully recognize the positive effects a garden can have on the healing and well-being of people in crisis.” Clara McLean House at FirstHealth, which officially welcomed its first guests last April 30, serves as a supportive home-like environment for patients and family members undergoing treatment at Moore Regional Hospital, more than half of whom travel from outside the county for care. From its inception, which is a saga in its own right, Willis and Acker aimed to create a garden with something special for everyone, a dozen spaces that would provide both a natural retreat and a haven for all ages, a place apart that unfolds with whimsy and beauty. “The proj-

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T h e G a r d e n pat h

ect really began many years ago when Cassie and I decided we wanted to design and build a healing garden in the Sandhills,” says Lynda Acker, a Master Gardener and Ph.D. in molecular biology physiology who owns a clinical documentation firm. “At age 42 I was assigned to bed rest for my first pregnancy, and Cassie and I began thinking about what elements would be important to a healing garden. Over the next six years there were a number of starts and mis-starts but it finally came together with the passionate support of Rebecca Ainslie, then of The Foundation of FirstHealth. What you see today is a true labor of love for a number of dedicated people.” Through a dramatic white moongate, visitors find themselves introduced to a classical kitchen garden where espaliered apples are trained beautifully to a fence, and guests of the house are free to take a handful of herbs and sample a sun-warmed homegrown tomato. “It’s designed to help people feel at home with their first step into the garden,” explains Willis, a Realtor and official of the Sandhills Natural History Society with a remarkable vita that includes everything from buying and selling fine European antiques to running an upscale B&B and designing her own home in Southern Pines down to the smallest detail — almost all seasoned by her extensive world travels and love of gardens. A classical cottage garden with its beautiful Lutyens’ bench and copper-roofed birdhouse invites guests to pause and reflect on drift roses, mophead hydrangeas and over 30 different perennials that will soon make the space a riot of color and texture. Just beyond the small boxwood hedge lies the whimsy of childhood, a swath of dense zoysia lawn donated by Sandhills Turf with a magical toadstool table set for tea and checkerboard

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online: www.companionanimalclinic.org or at Artistic Kitchen & Baths 279 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines or Call 855.439.3498 Benefit for Spay Neuter Veterinary Clinic 80

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T h e G A r D e N PAT h

worthy of Lewis Carroll. Beyond this the winding path leads to a magnificent dovecote Willis designed from her own photographs of a 500-yearold dovecote she encountered in the Oxfordshire countryside on her travels through rural England. “It’s really the centerpiece of the garden,” she notes, pointing out that local craftsman Ken Howell made the replica — which serves as the garden’s work shed — from Tennessee fieldstone, perfectly recreating the look of aged honey-colored Cotswold stone. In its shadow yards away sits an oversized life-sized chess set whose teak pieces require an equal commitment of brain and brawn. A lovely stone cat crouches nearby, amused by the scene. The Serpentine Wall, a feature common to all English gardens, is made from the same Tennessee stone and leads the garden traveler past a weep-

ing redbud and quickly maturing Morning and Wildlife Gardens where several bird feeders and heirloom perennials and classic tree-forms like the Harry Lauder’s Walking Stick add a touch of formality and frame a broader lawn for the house’s library. On the library patio stands a splendid bronze statue of Cupid — a gift from Clara McLean’s longtime caregiver — swarmed on this day near the end of the garden’s first official growing season by robust mounds of purple angelonia, lantana and more dreamy drift roses. Just beyond, the Garden Terrace features a magnificent stone outdoor fireplace and sitting area where guests may enjoy evening functions and the romance of an open fire. The terrace yields to a splendid formal rose garden created by master Sandhills rosarian Bill Shore from his own rose stock, and a special “hidden” cutting garden just beyond that provides a bounty of fresh cut flowers — zinnias, dahlias, hollyhocks and cosmos — for the house’s staff and residents. Owing to the medical nature of the garden, Willis stresses, there are no

pesticides ever used. “Our aim was to make this as natural a place as possible.” Part of the garden’s charm is the sense of intimacy and seclusion its various room impart. A rose path where New Dawn roses climb classic hoops overhead in a manner that will soon recall Monet’s garden at Giverny leads to a sequence of splendid concluding destinations. The first is LaBreeza’s Bower, a stunning pergola highlighted by a sculpture of a young girl that came from Clara McLean’s own collection and graced the east wing of the Carolina Hotel for two decades. Drawn by the music of tumbling water, to your left lies a budding Woodland Garden and a pondless stream that tumbles over three levels of stone, ending at your feet, a magical effect created by Joe Granato of Star Ridge Aquatics. In seasons to come, drifts of evergreen clematis and akebia will transform the pergola into a true bower. An ideal introduction, if you will, to a true Secret Garden — the showstopper in this visitor’s opinion — that features a real apple tree transplanted from the Ackers’ farm, a stunning box hedge and classic “knot” garden sheltering one from the world with Osmanthus fragrans, robust tea olives that will dazzle when in bloom. Soon to fill a gap in the shrubs will be a rustic wooden door with iron fretting being custom built by local woodworking guru Bob Schlicht, a final brilliant touch

that leads a visitor back to an embowered area of the Children’s Garden and thus, one hopes, a true sense of returning serenity. “You know,” reflected Cassie Willis as our tour wound up on this verdant rise, “we all will have to go through some kind of medical crisis in our lives. I’ve been through my share with both parents and Lynda has as well — this garden, in fact, reflects our own experience that people in need of healing can find it in nature. At such times, for whatever reason, it’s important to withdraw from the drama of life and find perspective in a place like this that asks nothing but offers an opportunity for rest and recovery of the soul.” Echoes Acker: “This garden was a gift to the community, and the idea that it will provide comfort and pleasure for generations to come is really a gift to all of us who created it. In every true sense of the word, it is a community garden.” “And that was our main objective when Lynda and I set out years ago to create this garden — to make it a place of deep beauty and peace,” adds Cassie Willis, “where anyone going through a difficult time can rediscover the healing qualities of nature.” PS Funds from the Moore Regional Hospital Auxiliary allowed initial funding for the Healing Garden, which now relies on the philanthropic support of the community through the Foundation of FirstHealth.

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“By all these lovely tokens, September days are here. With Summer’s best of Weather. And Autumn’s best of cheer.” �

— Helen Hunt Jackson

By noah Salt

Meanwhile, out In The Garden As September’s air cools and days shorten, it’s time to get a jump on your autumn cleanup, trimming off dead foliage and raking the refuse of summer into piles for bonfires or to use in compost piles. Apples ripen and reach their peak. Russian sage and chrysanthemums are often at peak of flower in early September, and many forms of roses enjoy a lush second bloom. One of our perennial favorites is hyssop, particular anise hyssop, a great medium border plant that produces rich brush-like flowers on woody stalks well into the new season, an ancient star of the autumn garden mentioned in the Book of Exodus for its purgative and cleansing properties. We also love Centaurea atropurpurea or “knapweed,” which features bright ruby red thistle-like flowers that often endure till first frost. Ditto Japanese anemone. Beyond the omnipresent mums, container gardens thrive come Indian summer with mounds of verbena (another plant long associated with the divine, supposedly used to staunch Jesus’ wounds from the cross), Heuchera (coral bells) and various ornamental grasses that will produce vibrant color and texture until the coming of cold weather.

Writer In The Garden “But now in September the garden has cooled, and with it my possessiveness. The sun warms my back instead of beating on my head. . . the harvest has dwindled, and I have grown apart from the intense Midsummer relationships that brought it on.” Robert Finch, nature writer and essayist

Green Man rules

September’s Sky In the afterglow of a summer sky teeming with exciting activity — lunar eclipses and the historic Transit of Venus — the night sky settles into a comfortable pattern of change as the sun tracks southward toward the celestial equinox on the 22nd, heralding the official arrival of autumn. As the pace of shortening days accelerates, the Milky Way arches high overhead, offering a celestial zoo of animals. One effect of this change is to produce longer sunsets and a vibrant early night sky where the Summer Triangle of constellations and several bright planets still dominate. Jupiter, rising in the east, is the dominant player in the early autumn sky, but Saturn eases away as the fall shifts into gear. For early risers, September offers prime time for telescoping planets. Views of Jupiter and Venus are particularly striking.

With the stubble of threshed grain, cooler evenings and tang of fallen apples in the air, ancient Druids — those wily keepers of the forest — annually mounted a late harvest celebration called Maybon to honor the mystical Green Man, the god of the forest, offering homemade spirits, wine and beer to the trees as a form of liquid fertilizer as the dark season looms. (We’ve seen the same bizarre behavior at UNC keg parties on the lawn.) The 14th marks the beginning of Nutting Season, an excellent time for making medicines, when, according to the English Husbandman, 1635, fallen hazelnuts contain magical properties and are ideal for fattening fowls for the coming Michaelmas observance. The man or woman born under the House of Libra — entering September 24 — will be praised for his service though inclined to wander and poor at keeping his marriage vows, whereas woman under this sign is amiable and rejoiced by her husband. (Kalendar of Shepherds, 1604.) The summer’s last blackberries must be picked by the 25th to prevent the devil from fouling them.

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SUNRISE FILM. 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. “The Intouchables.” Sunrise Theater. Info: www.sunrisetheater.com. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Wildlife Pantry.” Info: www.ncparks.gov. CULINARY SHOWCASE. 6 – 8:30 p.m. Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort. Info: www. moorecountychamber.com.

TOUR DE MOORE CENTURY RIDE. 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. The Sandhills Cycle Club hosts the Tour de Moore Classic with a variety of routes up to the 100 mile Century Ride. Start is at the Train House, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-4494 or www.sandhillscyclingclub.org.

FIVE POINTS HORSE TRIALS. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Carolina Horse Park. FLATWOODS FESTIVAL. DR. SEUSS CLASSIC MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. Info: (910) 692-8235. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Miniature marvels.” Info: (910) 692-2167.

DEDICATION DAY AT THE LIBRARY. All day. Kick off to a year-long series: Home Grown in Southern Pines. Southern Pines Public Library. (910) 692-8235. SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Program: Gene Furr, on nature and wildlife. Fellowship Church on Midland Road at Pee Dee. Info: www. sandhillsphotoclub.org.

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Moore County Kennel Club all-breed dog shows. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Fall Wildflower Hike.” LOCAL FOODS FORUM. 3 – 4 p.m. S.P.P.L. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6 – 9 p.m. The Hot Club of Cowtown.

BOOK CLUB BASH. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Get resources for starting a book club. Southern Pines Public Library. Info: (910) 692-8235.

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “After the fire.” Fall flowers, butterflies, and other insects flourish in areas that were burned in the spring. Info: (910) 692-2167.

FALL DRESSAGE SHOW. CRAFTS & FARM SKILLS FESTIVAL. 12 – 5 p.m. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. WEYMOUTH CONCERT SERIES. 3 p.m.

LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst. 90th ANNIVERSARY. The Sandhills Women’s Exchange will open for its 90th year. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. GUEST CHEF AT RUE 32.

GALLERY OPENING & RECEPTION. 4 – 6 p.m. Featuring Kevin Bass. Exhibit runs through October 15. Hastings Gallery. GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Tom Stewart discusses “Golf Around the World.” Given Memorial Library.

SANDHILLS FARM TO TABLE CO-OP SEASON BEGINS. Info: (910) 949-2142 or www.sandhillsfarm2table.com. ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 6 – 8 p.m. Campbell House Galleries. ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 2 – 5 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills. FIRST FRIDAY. 5 – 8:30 p.m. The grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater. FLATWOODS FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Hussey Farm.

TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 7 p.m. A battle of wits. The Sly Fox Pub. Info: (910) 725-1621. PIZZA & PIZZAZ AT THE LIBRARY. 5 – 6 p.m. The Library is looking for some lads and lassies in grades 6-8 to spread the Pirate word. Southern Pines Public Library. Info: (910) 6928235 or www.sppl.net.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 11 a.m. Barbara Claypole White will discuss her book, The Unfinished Garden. The Country Bookshop, Info: (910) 692-3211. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Preschoolers ages birth-5 and their parents or caregivers are invited to story time at the library. Southern Pines Public Library. Info: (910) 692-8235.

SENIOR EVENT. 10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Info: (910) 692-7376. SHAKESPEAREAN FILM. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. PINEHURST EXPO. 2:30 – 7:30 p.m. The Fair Barn. NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. 8 – 10 p.m. Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody.

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Central Carolina Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club specialty, and the Carolina Terrier Association specialties. The Harness Track. Info: themckc.com. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Music by Mike Wallace Quartert. Cypress Bend Vineyeards. Info: (910) 369-0411. MOVIE IN THE PINES. 7 p.m. Watch Band of Misfits at the Downtown Park. Info: (910) 692-7376. JAZZ SHOW. 7 – 9 p.m. Paul Murphy. Weymouth Center. Info: (910) 692-6261.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:45 a.m. Moore County’s Fall kick-off luncheon. Table on the Green, Reservations: (910) 944-9611. LADIES NIGHT AT RUE 32. Three courses paired with three wines. Live music. Info: (910) 725-1910.

COLORADO BEER DINNER. 6 p.m. Elliott’s on Linden. Info: (910) 215-0775. RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 – 9 p.m. Jack Nicklaus will have “A Golf Conversation” with Jaime Diaz, Editor-in-Chief of Golf World Magazine. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Info: (910) 245-3132.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10 a.m. Vass Area Library. Info: (910) 245-2200. SENIOR EVENT. 12:30 p.m. Douglass Community Center. Info: (910) 692-7376. PICNIC IN THE GARDENS. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. Info: (910) 695-3882.

CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISE-IN. 5 – 8 p.m. Ledo Pizza. Info: (910) 639-1494. SUMMER PICNIC CONCERT SERIES. 7 – 10 p.m. Live music. Cypress Bend Vineyards. Info: (910) 369-0411.

SENIOR EVENT. 1 p.m. Autumn Bingo. Douglass Community Center. Info: (910) 692-7376. MAGIC SHOW & DINNER. 6:30 p.m. Featuring Brandon Williams. The Sly Fox Pub. WINE GALA. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. Listen to 1940s music while touring the wine-tasting stations. Fresh Market. Info: (910) 692-2787.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. Info: (910) 692-8235. HARVEST MOON COOKOUT. 6 p.m. Elliott’s on Linden. Info: (910) 215-0775. A NIGHT IN ASIA AT RUE 32. A four-course dinner, each representing a different Asian country. Info: (910) 725-1910.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 6 p.m. Woody Durham and Adam Lucas will discuss their book, Woody Durham. The Country Bookshop. Info: (910) 692-3211.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. SPEED DATING FOR DOGS. The Country Bookshop. MOVIE IN THE PINES. 7 p.m. Watch The Lorax at the Downtown Park. FALL DRESSAGE SHOW. 8 a.m. Pinehurst Harness Track. Info: (910) 692-1788. CRAFTS & FARM SKILLS FESTIVAL. 8:30 a.m. 43rd Annual festival. QUILTING IN THE PINES. Friday 12 – 8 p.m. The Fair Barn at Pinehurst Harness Track.


CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. 1 p.m. The Sly Fox Pub. Info: (910) 725-1621. COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Elliot’s Provision Company. Info: (910) 215-0775. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Diane Kraudelt. Hollyhocks Art Gallery. SUNRISE FILM. 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. “The Intouchables.” Sunrise Theater. Info: www.sunrisetheater.com. FLATWOODS FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. TOUCH A TRUCK. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK. 10 a.m. ART IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL & GRAPE STOMP. 12 – 6 p.m. FIVE POINTS HORSE TRIALS. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. ART IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. GRAND OPENING. 1 – 5 p.m. MADDEN TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. CRYSTAL LAKE CHARITY EVENT. 7 p.m. DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.

Arts & entertainment cA l e n dA r

September 1

CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. 1 p.m. Burgers, wings, beer and live music. Entry fee: $30/ team of two. All fees to the prize pot. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Labor Day Burgers. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Diane Kraudelt. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie. com.

September 1-2

SUNRISE FILM. 2:30 & 7:30 p.m. The Intouchables. A foreign comedy. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: www.sunrisetheater.com.

September 2 WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 8 a.m. “Bird walk.” ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Magic by Chaz. Camelot Playground at Canon Park. KUUMBA FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. “A Slice of Heritage.” Market Park, Laurinburg. COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Pasta at Home. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Oktoberfest. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. BARK FOR LIFE. 2 – 5 p.m. American Cancer Society. Cannon Park, Village of Pinehurst. FALL DRESSAGE SHOW. 12 – 5 p.m. Pinehurst Harness Track. CRAFTS & FARM SKILLS FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 6 p.m. Malcolm Blue Farm. QUILTING IN THE PINES. 10 a.m. ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. : 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Pinehurst Harness Track. WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 10 a.m. COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Fall flavored Cocktails. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m.

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Wildlife Pantry.” Local examples of seeds, fruits, nuts and other plant parts which are utilized by native wildlife will be examined during a short slide presentation and a trail walk. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods,

1024 Ft. Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

CULINARY SHOWCASE. 6 – 8:30 p.m. Eateries will present their top gastronomic creations at the showcase which caps off Pinehurst Resort’s annual food and wine festival. Tickets: $50/person. The Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-3926 or www.moorecountychamber.com.

September 3

TOUR DE MOORE CENTURY RIDE. 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. The Sandhills Cycle Club hosts the Tour de Moore Classic with a variety of routes up to the 100-mile Century Ride. Music by Tony Barnes and food provided by Elliott’s on Linden following the race. Start is at the Train House, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-4494 or www.sandhillscyclingclub.org.

STREET DANCE AT PINEBLUFF. 6 – 10 p.m. A street festival featuring live music from the Sand Band, a twist contest hosted by DJ King Curtis, a bouncey, and more. A fundraiser benefiting Friends of Pinebluff Lake, and Pinebluff Veterans Committee. Hotdogs and hamburgers for sale. Cost: $5; $8/couple; 12 & under/free. Pecan Street, Pinebluff.


ca l e n da r

September 5

LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Topic: Dermaplaning, Is This a Good Option for Me? Includes lunch, gift bags and specials. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst, 80 Aviemore Court, Suite A, Pinehurst. Info/RSVP: (910) 295-1130.

90th ANNIVERSARY. The Sandhills Woman’s Exchange will open for its 90th year. The Sales Room will open at 10 a.m. and the Dining Room at 11:30 a.m. Woman’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Preschoolers ages birth-5 and their parents or caregivers are invited to storytime at the library. Enjoy stories, songs and fun, and stay for playtime after the stories are over. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

GUEST CHEF AT RUE 32. Three-course menu that has been designed by one of our guests. Ten percent of the evenings profits to go to the charity of the guest chefs choice. Cost: $30+. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1910.

September 6

GALLERY OPENING & RECEPTION. 4 – 6 p.m. Featuring Kevin Bass, a former alumni of the SCC Art Department. Exhibit runs through October 15. Hastings Gallery, 166 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3050.

Fresh fashion meets classic style at The Cupola.

GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Tom Stewart discusses “Golf Around the World.” Question/answer period and refreshments afterward. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022 or givenmemoriallibrary.org.

September 7

SANDHILLS FARM TO TABLE CO-OP SEASON BEGINS. An enterprise organized around farms and food. 35+ local producers grow a variety of fresh fruits and vegetables.Season runs through October 26-27. Cost per box: $21/week standard – $50/week family size. Info: (910) 9492142 or www.sandhillsfarm2table.com.

ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 6 – 8 p.m. Featuring artist Frank Pierce. Show runs through September 28, 9 a.m. ­– 5 p.m., weekdays. Free and open to the public. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. • 2 – 5 p.m. Home and Hearth. Features Harry Neely. Show will run through September 28th. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www. artistsleague.org.

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst • 910. 235.8474 • pinehurst.com

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Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

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Dance/Theater Fun History

September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r

FIRST FRIDAY. 5 – 8:30 p.m. Family friendly community event featuring live music from the Steel Drivers. Food and beverages available for purchase. Free admission. The grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com.

September 7-9

FLATWOODS FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. The festival is packed with family fun, music, a parade with vintage cars, trucks and tractors, crafts and pony rides. Food vendors. Admission: Friday/ free; Saturday, adults/$5, children under 12/free. Hussey Farm, 451 Peach Tree Road, Bennett. Info: (919) 548-5192 or visitpittsboro.com.

September 8

TOUCH A TRUCK. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Touch, climb on and ask questions about your favorite truck. For all ages. $5 suggested donation; all proceeds to benefit the Moore District Boy Scouts. Free hard hats to the first 100 kids. Hot dogs and ice cream available. Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: www.moorescouting.org.

ALZHEIMER’S ASSOCIATION WALK. 10 a.m. This is a short walk around the college to show your support and honor in memory of those with Alzheimer’s. Registration is at 9 a.m. If you would like to join/create a team of walkers or donate, please visit act.alz.org/mc2012. Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (704) 532-7390.

September 8-9

FIVE POINTS HORSE TRIALS. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Horses and riders compete in a three-phase competition including dressage, cross-country and show jumping. Free for spectators. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com.

September 9

DR. SEUSS CLASSIC MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. A tale with an environmental theme tells the story of a young boy who encounters an unreasonable forest creature while venturing outside of his city. Bring the family. Refreshments provided. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Miniature marvels.” Learn about some of the amazing aspects of nature we don’t always pay attention to. Slide show in auditorium, then head outside on the trails to look for some tiny treasures. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

September 10

DEDICATION DAY AT THE LIBRARY. All day. “Home Grown in Southern Pines.” Displays and special activities to celebrate the many “home grown” talents, treasures, history and resources that make our town a great community.

Refreshments available. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Program: Gene Furr, former chief photographer and award winning photojournalist for the Raleigh News & Observer, on nature and wildlife. Guests welcome. Fellowship Church on Midland Road at Pee Dee. Info: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

September 11

TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 7 p.m. A battle of wits. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

PIZZA & PIZZAZ AT THE LIBRARY. 5 – 6 p.m. The library is looking for some lads and lassies in grades 6-8 to spread the pirate word! Aspiring pirates will be putting together “pirate kits,” so they can overtake the town on September 18th for International “Talk Like a Pirate Day.” Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

September 12

MEET THE AUTHOR. 11 a.m. Barbara Claypole White will discuss her book, The Unfinished Garden. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

ART IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. The Alberti Flea Circus. Face-painting and playtime in the park to follow. Refreshments for sale. Admission is free and open to the public. Camelot Playground at Cannon Park, 90 Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Meatless Monday. Reduce meat consumption to improve personal health and the health of the planet. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Caroline Love. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www. janecasnellie.com.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. American Cabernets Coast to Coast. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

FALL HARVEST FESTIVAL & GRAPE STOMP. 12 – 6 p.m. Includes music, vendors, and wine tastings. Free admission. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or www.cypressbendvineyards.com

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Preschoolers ages birth-5 and their parents or caregivers are invited to story time at the library. Enjoy stories, songs and fun, and stay for playtime after the stories are over. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

September 13

SENIOR EVENT. 10:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Travel to Sanford for lunch at Cracker Barrel and then to a matinee showing of Sweet Charity at the Temple Theatre. The van will depart from the Campbell House parking lot. Sign up and pay by September 1. Cost: $30/resident; $60/non-resident. Space is limited. Campbell House, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. 8 – 10 p.m. Rachmaninoff ’s Rhapsody. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: (919) 7332750 or www.ncsymphony.org.

September 14

September 15

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Central Carolina Cavalier King Charles Spaniel Club specialty, and the Carolina Terrier Association specialties. The Harness Track, 200 Beulah Hill Road South, Pinehurst. Info: themckc.com.

ART IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Bright Star Theatre performing “Sadie’s Spectacular Saturday,” Refreshments for sale. Admission is free and open to the public. Camelot Playground at Cannon Park, 90 Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www. mooreart.org.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Event held rain or shine. Live jazz music by Mike Wallace Quartet. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyeards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411.

PINEHURST EXPO. 2:30 – 7:30 p.m. Meet the nonprofits, organizations and agencies that service our community. Food and beverages

JAZZ SHOW. 7 – 9 p.m. Paul Murphy family showcasing his vocalist daughter, Anna Murphy. In case of rain, the performance will be held the following evening, Saturday, September 15. Tickets: $15; and can be purchased at Weymouth Center, Given Library’s Book Store, The Country Bookshop and at the Arts Council of Moore County. East Patio at Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave. in Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or www.weymouthcenter.org.

SHAKESPEAREAN FILM. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. Enjoy a classic film and a cup of tea. Oldies & Goodies film series presents a 1935 adaptation of one of Shakespeare’s most popular plays. This romantic comedy stars James Cagney and Mickey Rooney. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6928235 or www.sppl.net.

MOVIE IN THE PINES. 7 p.m. Watch Band of Misfits at the Downtown Park. Concessions for sale on site. Bring a blanket or a chair and enjoy a free movie night. In case of inclement weather, the movie will be moved to a later date. Downtown Park, 145 SE Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: Rynet Oxendine at (910) 692-7376. 

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. • Morgen Kilbourn. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie.com.

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Dance/Theater

Film

Literature/Speakers

• •

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Cooking with Maple View Milk Company’s cream to produce a multitude of desserts. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

• •

Music/Concerts

• •

Key:

Art

available for purchase provided by First Tee and the VFW. Activities include live music provided by The Rooster’s Wife, and an antique car show. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. Info: www.pinehurstcivicgroup.net.

Fun

History

Sports


ca l e n da r

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. New Zealand sauvignon blancs. Discover the not so subtle flavors of these world-class wines. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

GRAND OPENING. 1 – 5 p.m. Gail’s Music Studio, Inc., is a nonprofit music educational organization that will be opening its doors to musicians of all levels. Gail’s Music Studio, 10327 N.C. 211 East, Aberdeen. Info: (910) 783-8863 or pianist-gail. tripod.com/gailsmusicstudio.

• • MADDEN TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. 2 p.m. Must be 21+. Cost: $30. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

September 16

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “Fall Wildflower Hike.” Hues of red and gold are found on the trees in the Sandhills, but take a closer look at the ground, and you’ll discover blues, purples, and pinks on the wildflowers. Hike to discover these fall beauties. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Ft. Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

LOCAL FOODS FORUM. 3 – 4 p.m. Find out about your local food options and meet local farmers and distributors. Part of the “HomeGrown in Southern Pines” Forum. Refreshments provided. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

• • CRYSTAL LAKE CHARITY EVENT. 7 • ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6 – 9 p.m. p.m. The award winning Keith Henderson as Elvis The Hot Club of Cowtown. A jazz/western swing impersonator. $15/general admission; $25/gold seats; $20/day of show. Proceeds to benefit repairs to dam of historic Crystal Lake. Tickets available at Seagrove Candle Co. & Store, Southern Pines. Union Pines High School, 1981 Union Church Road, Cameron Info: (910) 245-7231.

trio, who also sing in three-part harmony. Tickets: $12-$15 (children under 12 free). Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 9447502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

September 15-16

BOOK CLUB BASH. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Check out the library’s new Book Club Kits, get resources for starting a book club, and enjoy refreshments and trivia games. Open to anyone in an adult book club or those interested in joining one. Southern Pines

September 17

DOG SHOW. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. The Moore County Kennel Club all-breed dog show. The Harness Track, 200 Beulah Hill Road South, Pinehurst. Info: themckc.com. Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

September 18

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:45 a.m. Moore County’s Fall kick-off luncheon. All are welcome. Cost: $12. Table on the Green, 2205 Midland Drive,
Pinehurst. Reservations: Charlotte Gallagher, (910) 944-9611.

LADIES NIGHT AT RUE 32. Three courses paired with three wines. Live music. Cost: $35. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1910.

September 19

COLORADO BEER DINNER. 6 p.m. A four-course dinner serving roasts with Mexican and native flavors. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 – 9 p.m. Jack Nicklaus will have “A Golf Conversation” with Jaime Diaz, Editor-in-Chief of Golf World Magazine. Admission is free, but tickets are required. Tickets may be picked up at the Sandhills Community College Boyd Library, The Country Bookshop, and Given Memorial Library. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 245-3132 or www.sandhills.edu.

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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ca l e n da r

September 20

• PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10 a.m. Vass Area Library, 128 Seaboard St. Info: (910) 245-2200.

SENIOR EVENT. 12:30 p.m. A representative from Carolina Eye will stop by to discuss different types of diseases that affect our eyes and eyesight for National Sight Saving Month. Space is limited to the first 15 people to sign up. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

PICNIC IN THE GARDENS. 5:30 – 8:30 p.m. A picnic supper catered by the Pik N Pig with music by Glen Davis for your listening and dancing pleasure. Cost: $30/ members; $35/ non-members. Sandhills Horticultural Gardens, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 695-3882 or sandhillshorticulturalgardens.com.

September 21

CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISE-IN. 5 – 8 p.m. Door prizes, 50/50 drawing, music. In case of inclement weather Cruise-In will be canceled. Ledo Pizza, 1480 US 1 South, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 639-1494.

SUMMER PICNIC CONCERT SERIES. 7 – 10 p.m. Live music. Admission: $20/car. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411.

September 22

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 8 a.m. “Bird walk.” Fall migration is under way. A 2-mile hike to look for these winged wonders. Learn to I.D. birds by sight and sound. Bring binoculars, tick repellent, sunscreen and field guides. Meet at the park office. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6922167 or www.ncparks.gov.

ARTS IN THE PARK. 10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m. Magic by Chaz. Chaz’s show includes a broad variety of sleight-ofhand tricks, mind reading feats, and small-scale illusions for all audiences. Face-painting and playtime in the park to follow. Refreshments for sale. Admission is free and open to the public. Camelot Playground at Cannon Park, 90 Woods Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

• ••• •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Fun History Sports

• • KUUMBA FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. “A Slice of Heritage.” African-

American cultural festival featuring dancing, drumming, storytelling and socializing, as well as music from gospel to jazz. Market Park, 17100 Lees Mill Road, Laurinburg. Info: (910) 276-4345 or www.kuumbafestnc.com.

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Pasta at Home. Learn to make great pasta using only flour, eggs and olive oil. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Oktoberfest. Have a Hefeweizen, try a Weizenbock. Grab your partner and polka the night away. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Diane Kraudelt. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie.com.

BARK FOR LIFE. 2 – 5 p.m. A walk for dogs and their owners to raise funds and awareness for the American Cancer Society’s fight against cancer. Cannon Park, village of Pinehurst. Info: (910) 603-5577 or www.relayforlife.org/barkmoorenc.

September 23

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “After the fire.” Fall flowers, butterflies and other insects flourish in areas that were burned in the spring. A hike to discover how fire benefits plants and animals that live in the longleaf pine forest. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

September 25

SENIOR EVENT. 1 p.m. Autumn Bingo. All words are related to autumn/fall and everyone is a winner. Space limited to the first 15 people to sign up. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

MAGIC SHOW & DINNER. 6:30 p.m. Featuring Brandon Williams, Sleight of Hand extraordinaire. Cost: $39+. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Reservations: (910) 725-1621.

Dance/Theater

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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WINE GALA. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. Listen to 1940s music while touring the wine-tasting stations. Tickets may be purchased at the Arts Council’s offices at the Campbell House. Fresh Market, 155 Beverly Lane, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www. mooreart.org.

September 26

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Preschoolers ages birth-5 and their parents or caregivers are invited to story time at the library. Enjoy stories, songs and fun, and stay for playtime after the stories are over. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

HARVEST MOON COOKOUT. 6 p.m. The chefs bring the summer kitchen garden season to a close. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

A NIGHT IN ASIA AT RUE 32. A four-course dinner, each representing a different Asian country. Cost: $35. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1910.

September 27

MEET THE AUTHOR. 6 p.m. Woody Durham and Adam Lucas will discuss their book, Woody Durham. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

September 28

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Event held rain or shine. Live jazz music by Mike Wallace Quartet. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyeards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411.

SPEED DATING FOR DOGS. 6:30 – 9 p.m. Meet eligible canine bachelors and bachelorettes. Adoption event organized for people to ask questions about, and check out the chemistry with lovable animals in a string of one-on-one interactive sessions lasting five minutes each. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 315-0333 or mcprc.org.

MOVIE IN THE PINES. 7 p.m. Watch The Lorax at the Downtown Park. Concessions for sell on site. Bring a blanket or a chair and enjoy a free movie night. In case of inclement weather, the movie will be moved to a later date. Downtown Park, 145 SE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: Rynet Oxendine at (910) 692-7376. 

September 28-30

FALL DRESSAGE SHOW. Friday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Saturday & Sunday 12 – 5 p.m. Pinehurst Harness Track, 200 Beulah Hill Road South, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-1788.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

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• • •

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cA l e n dA r

CRAFTS & FARM SKILLS FESTIVAL. Friday 8:30 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m.; Sunday 12 – 5 p.m. 43rd annual festival includes traditional crafts, barnyard animals, and more. Cost: $5/adult; $3/children (5-12); children under 5 and military free. Malcolm Blue Farm, 1177 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. Info: (910) 9447558 or www.malcolmbluefarm.com.

September 28-29

QUILTING IN THE PINES. Friday 12 – 8 p.m.; Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Quilt Show and Exhibit. Admission: $5/daily; $8/two-day. The Fair Barn at Pinehurst Harness Track, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-6191 or quiltinginthepines.org.

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 10 a.m. “Play at the park.” Celebrate the end of “Take-AChild-Outside Week” by joining a ranger for some trail games. Roam the woods, play games, and learn some fun facts along the way. Bring the whole family and be prepared with close-toed shoes, water and bug spray. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167 or www.ncparks.gov.

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Fall-flavored Cocktails. See what autumn concoctions our bartenders can come up with. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

• MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Caroline Love. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie.com.

• FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Spanish tempranillo. These grapes thrive where the summer is hot, dry and long. The evening meals are sumptuous and the wines delicious. Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

September 30

WEYMOUTH WOODS EVENT. 3 p.m. “The illustrious longleaf.” Spend some time learning about North Carolina’s state tree, the longleaf pine. Take a short hike around the trails, discuss the natural history of this marvelous tree, and learn about its history in terms of human use. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6922167 or www.ncparks.gov.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

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ANTIQUE CAR SHOW. : 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sponsored by AACA Sandhills Chapter. Free for spectators. Pinehurst Harness Track, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 235-8456.

September 29

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WEYMOUTH CONCERT SERIES. 3 p.m. Violinist Brian Reagin, concertmaster of the North Carolina Symphony. Tickets: free/members and people 18 and younger; $15/non-members. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or www.weymouthcenter.org.

Weekly Happenings Tuesdays

FREE YOGA FOR PTSD VETS. 6 p.m. Yoga for retired veterans who suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. No previous yoga experience necessary. Yoga Massage in the Sandhills, 5374 NiagaraCarthage Road, Southern Pines. Info: Mary Ann at (910) 949-2162.

Wednesdays

CHILDREN’S STORYTIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022.

CLASSIC MOVIE WEDNESDAY. 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or www. sunrisetheater.com. Winston-Salem, North Carolina

Thursdays

STORY/ACTIVITY TIME. 10:30 a.m. Stories and activities at The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10 a.m. Robbins Area Library, 161 Magnolia Drive. Info: (910) 948-4000.

Fridays

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. Stories with crafts, and activities to follow. Moore County Library, 101 Saunders St., Carthage. Info: (910) 947-5335.

Art Galleries ABOUT ART GALLERY inside The Market Place Midland Bistro Building, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst. The gallery features local artists Deane Billings, Irene Dobson, Michelle Satterfield, Pamela Swarbrick, Nancy Yanchus and Joan Williams. Open Monday-Friday 11 a.m. — 2 p.m. (910) 215-596. ART NUTZ AND RAVEN POTTERY, 125 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Come see the potter at work. Features art, pottery from local potters, handmade jewelry, glass and more. MondaySaturday 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. (910) 695-1555, www. ravenpottery.com. Artist GAlleRy OF SOUTHERN PINES, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Features art and

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

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• • •

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September 2012 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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fine crafts from more than 60 North Carolina artists. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon — 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst. Showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meet-the-artist opportunities available. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. — 5 p.m., Saturday, 1—4 p.m. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. and every third weekend of the month from 2-4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org.

Saturday 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Features artwork by local artists Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter, Morgen Kilbourn, Deane Billings, Jane Casnellie and artist/owner Caroline Love. Monday-Saturday 10:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. Meet the artists on Saturdays, 12 p.m. - 3 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www.hollyhocksartgallery.com. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 25 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst. Features local artist Nancy Campbell’s original oil and watercolor paintings. Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 2550100, www.ladybedfords.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St.,

Aberdeen. Specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Monday, ThursdaySaturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines. Showcases art of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Monday, WednesdaySaturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., (910) 695-0029. SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Drive, Aberdeen. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery.com. Studio 590 by the pond in Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle, Pinehurst. This historic log cabin is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo

The Downtown Gallery inside Flynne’s Coffee Bar, 115 NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Everchanging array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999. The Gallery at Seven Lakes at the St. Mary Magdalene building, 1145 Seven Lakes Drive. Just nine miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211, this gallery is dedicated to local artists. Wednesday-Thursday 1 — ­ 4 p.m. Hastings Gallery in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. - 9 p.m., Friday 7:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. and

September 14th & 28th

Fall FESTival

SEPTEMBER 8th

from Noon until 6:00 PM

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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MOORE COUNTY

FARMERS MARKET

Food Demonstration by Elliott’s on Linden Saturday, September 15th 9:30 – 11:30 Tomatoes, Corn, Cantaloupes, Peaches, Watermelons, Baked Goods, Jams, Meats, Flowers & Plants Mondays - FirstHealth

(Fitness Center) Facility courtesy of First Health 170 Memorial Drive • Pinehurst 2pm-5:30pm

Thursdays - Morganton Rd

(Armory Sports Complex) Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Southern Pines 9am-1pm

Saturdays - Downtown Southern Pines Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Broad St & New York Ave 8am-Noon

Call 947-3752 or 690-9520 for more info Websearch: Moore County Farmers Market Local Harvest

facebook.com/moorecountyfarmersmarket

10:05 AM

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and Harry Neely. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. (910) 639-9404.

2-5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331.

WHITE HILL GALLERY, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100.

HOUSE IN THE HORSESHOE. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051.

Nature Centers

MALCOLM BLUE FARM AND MUSEUM. 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739.

SANDHILLS HORTICULTURAL GARDENS (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882.

NORTH CAROLINA LITERARY HALL OF FAME. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261.

WEYMOUTH WOODS SANDHILLS NATURE PRESERVE (898 acres). 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

SHAW HOUSE PROPERTY. Open 1-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday. (910) 692-2051. TUFTS ARCHIVES. 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., MondayFriday, and 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642.

Historical Sites BETHESDA CHURCH AND CEMETERY. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319.

UNION STATION. Open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902.

BRYANT HOUSE AND MCLENDON CABIN. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908.

SANDHILLS WOMAN’S EXCHANGE LOG CABIN Open 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677 To add an event, email us at kira@pinestrawmag.com by the first of the month prior to the event.

CARTHAGE HISTORICAL MUSEUM. Sundays, Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

D

• • Fun

i n i n g

History

gui

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Sports

Pineneedler Answers From page 111

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4 6 1 8 9 3 2 7 5

5 8 3 2 7 4 6 9 1

9 4 8 7 2 1 3 5 6

1 5 6 4 3 9 8 2 7

3 2 7 6 8 5 1 4 9

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6 9 2 3 5 8 7 1 4

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September 2012 i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Jessica Jenney, Gabe Rode

First Friday Downtown Southern Pines August 3, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Gina Gellert, Katrina Fuller

Amelia, Kate & Scott Hollrah, Roy Schneiderman, Corinne Cochran, Ben Hollrah, Ethan & Sam Schneiderman

Tracy Misero, Gavin Powers, Milda Goeriz

Juliet Banks, Sean, Jody & Reilly Smith

Bonnie & Vernon Elhart

Kayleigh Ruggiero, Amaya Turner

“Ruthie Belle,” OvaJean Siemens, Julia Henderson

Mia McDermott

Rylee Bowman

Cornelia Morris, Fredanel Story, Janeen Driscoll

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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ladies apparel • accessories • home furnishings LOCATED IN THE THEATER BUILDING 90 CHEROKEE RD. 1-A - PINEHURST, NC 910-255-VFOX (8369) WWW.THEVILLAGEFOX.COM

If your legs could talk... ...they would tell you that you no longer have to suffer from the unsightly appearance of spider and varicose veins. ...they would tell you that varicose veins are not just unsightly; that they are progressive and may worsen unless treated.

Tammy Joyner, RN-BC, RTR Certified Sclerotherapist Call our office for a complimentary consultation. Prompt referrals to board certified Vascular Surgeons.

910-295-0212

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September 2012 i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen Tuesday Night at Maness Music Barn Tuesday, August 7, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Thomas Lethco, Roy Hardy, Joe Brewer

Whitney & Dave Komenas

Clyde Maness

Donnie Martidall

Back: David Overby, Virginia Brock; Front: Richard Rayle, Clarence Morgan, “Little” Lloyd Williams

Matt Hooper

Paula Conley, Alicia Stone

Russell Thompson

Richard Darlymple, Phil Mayo, Ray Burks

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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TRI-CITY AUTOMOTIVE service center

FREE A/C System Inspection Additional Charge for Freon

Purchase 4 tires and receive a FREE Alignment Check & FREE Tire Rotation for the life of the tires Tires at Great Prices, Best in Wheel Alignments, Excellent in Transmissions

Oil Changes • Tune-Ups • Timing Belts • Brakes • Flushes A/C Service • Struts • Shocks • Batteries and much more

910-638-6826 120 Sandy Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387

TRI-CITY AUTO GlAss CRYsTAl ClEAR VIsIBIlITY FOR A ClEAR VIEW OF THE ROAD • Automotive Glass Replacements • Headlight Restoration • Chip Repair

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September 2012 i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Sid Newman, Eileen Malan, Ed Barchard

Flyers & Tires at Moore County Airport Saturday, August 11, 2012 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Wade Young, Richard Aragon

Wase, Elisa, Elias & Maj. Damion Holtzclaw

Ed Cottrell, Mike Elliott

Byron Gaddy, Dakota Hicks, James & Tyler Southern

Melissa Moseley Ed Cottrell

SSGT Kelsiann Echavaria, SSGT April Brown, SRA Rossmery Aragon

FREE ESTIMATES

BuyiNg goLD & SiLVer HigHeST PriCeS PAiD!

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• Gold & Silver Jewelry • Scrap Gold & Silver

• Sterling Flatware • U.S. Paper Money & Notes

Free Appraisals • Buy/Sell rare Coins & Bullion Locally owned & operated • Full Time experienced Professional

Pinehurst Coins 1420 Highway 5 | Pinehurst, NC

& GREAT RATES! Clearing • grading Ponds • demolition driveways William T. Shader

910.235.CoiN (2646)

SHADER & SON, LLC

910-635-7105 • 910-947-2407

WE SELL

dirt • mulCh toPsoil • sand stone

&

BUTLER ASSOCIATES PERSONAL PROPERTY APPRAISALS and ESTATE SERVICES Appraisals: Insurance, Charitable Donations, Equitable Distribution

CHAPEL HILL, NC 919-968-3573

GREENSBORO, NC 336-299-6509

www.butlerandassociates.org PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i September 2012

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Guaranteed growth. There’s a word you don’t hear often in these uncertain economic times — guaranteed. But what if there were fixed financial product solutions that give you a guarantee? Want to learn more? Make an appointment today. Patrick D. Molamphy, CLU, ChFC 121 Emerald Necklace Ln., Pinehurst 687-4899 molampp@nationwide.com

Guarantees are subject to the claims-paying ability of the issuing insurance company. Insurance products are issued by Nationwide Life Insurance Compay and other companies. Nationwide, the Nationwide framemark and On Your Side are service marks of Nationwide Mutual Insurance Company. © 2012, Nationwide Financial Services, Inc. All rights reserved. NFV-0561AO-PV.2 (09/10)

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September 2012 i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Lisa Thompson, Gigi Manigault

Pinehurst Summer Classic Horse Show Saturday, July 7, 2012 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Brenda Terry, Emma Phillips, Sara Garbowski, Grace Carew

Elaine Zelch, Mel Wyatt, Janie Boland, Cassie Spencer

Jordan Burton, Kristina Harmon

Gail Monroe, Wendy Beaver, Patty Heuckeroth

Blair Spencer Kristen McDermott, Kellie Bass, Elizabeth Ashcraft

Parker Peacock

Elise Tyner, Madison Coley

CUTLER TREE

Tree Pruning • Removal Plant Site Consulting Stump Grinding • Shrub Care Tree Conservation for New Home Sites Free Estimates Geoffrey Cutler Fully Insured 910-692-7769 910-690-7657

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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Support S upport tthese hese llocally ocally owned owned reputable reputable businesses businesses for for all all of of your your home home improvement improvement needs! needs! HOUSE & HOME SERVICES

GO GREEN Energy Saving VISTA Window Film

910-281-5216 dontsquint.com

Concie rge & Prope rty Ma nagem ent Service s “At home - when you can't be...”

Mary Lou Vecchione 910-639-1387 Joey Vecchione 910-639-0385 houseandhomeservices@mindspring.com

West End, NC

(910) 295-2541 pinehurstpatio@nc.rr.com pinehurstpatio.com

KITCHENS BATHS CUSTOM CLOSETS

195 – F Pinehurst Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387

910.693.0777

designstudioforcabinetry.com closetsnc.com

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www.house2home-nc.com

Countertops Granite • Quartz Marble

910-944-1380 blarney-stoneworks.com

ContactUs@House2Home-NC.com

September 2012 i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Margaret Dunbar Cutright Book Signing, Author of A Case For Solomon, at The Country Bookshop Saturday, August 18, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Margaret Dunbar Cutright Marie Dunbar Cummings, Margaret Dunbar Cutright

Ron Sunderland, Sheila Woods, Bob Dunbar Jr.

Janie Utley Perrin, Margaret Dunbar Cutright

Kimberly Daniels

John Cummings, Wayne Cutright, Kris Pusser, Imelda Dunbar, Charlotte Gaddy

For more infomation or to join, call 910.944.2641 or email julie@casnc.com

www.legacylakestennis.com PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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PineServices

No Stress

pet grooming

Dog & Cat Grooming

Pet Gifts Walk-ins and Appointments Welcome!

Aunt Tessie’s Pet Boutique

1300 E. Broad Avenue, Suite 25 Rockingham, NC • 910-461-0415

PROFESSIONAL PRIVATE GUITAR INSTRUCTION

Master Of Music Degree in guitar performance Over 30 years Experience All levels and styles taught

Call Danny Infantino (910) 692-6346

missing Is something

from your life?

Community Bible Study is a great opportunity to meet & fellowship with believers of Jesus Christ through in-depth weekly study.

SERVANTS OF GOD

Exploring Books of Joshua, Judges, Ruth and I & II Samuel. 30 week course.

CBS is a national, non-denominational Bible Study and welcomes all people from all backgrounds & levels of Bible knowledge. Contact Merle Lewis for more information:

910-255-6179 or 605-321-6353 mlewis27330@nc.rr.com u

ed & Ins

DOUG SMITH PLUMBING New Homes • Remodels • Small Repairs Emergency after hours & Weekends Licens red

Call 910-992-6025


September PineNeedler

BY MART DICKERSON

Read a Good Book!

ACROSS 1 One of many in downtown So. Pines or Pinehurst 5 Daytime TV show 9 FirstHealth, for one (abbr.) 13 London subway 14 A September checkout, and puzzle clue 15 Put the car in neutral 16 Little Mermaid’s love 17 Saying, like a proverb 18 Borrowed money 19 Begs 21 September Observance Part 1 23 Space administration 25 Cook quickly, as steak 26 Farm credit administration (abbr.) 29 September Observance Part 2 31 Pole for walking tall 34 Furniture wood 35 Snack made from chick-peas, (alt. spelling) 37 Cake layer 39 One-celled water animal

7

4

41 Government agency for air quality (abbr.) 42 Laughing animal 43 Ogle 44 Greek ‘D’ 46 St. Representative 47 City in Nebraska 50 Hindu dress 51 Vane direction 52 _____oxide, on your nose at the beach 54 Computer input 56 Capital of Libya 59 September Observance Part 3 (2 wds.) 63 Footwear 64 September Observance last part 66 For fear that 67 Successor to the throne 68 Annoying, like poison ivy 69 Mined metals 70 Snaky fish 71 Like a used fireplace 72 Part of a sentence

8 3

6 4 8 2 7 4 1 9 2 4 9 5 2 1 5 7 9 3 9 2

 Sanford

DOWN 1 One of babies’ firsts 2 Throw 3 Off-Broadway award 4 Pie nut 5 Grass turf 6 Egg-shaped 7 Armor breast plate 8 Military academy trainees 9 Mirth, convulsive laughter 10 Smell 11 Kill 12 Writing tool 14 Capital of the Bahamas 20 Russian country house 22 Lab animal 24 Weaponed 26 Baby on Young’s Road 27 Gem carved in relief 28 Prince played by Eddie Murphy in “Coming to America” 30 Fools 32 Vassal 33 Wooden projection for a mortise joint 36 Lettuce and toppings 38 Rant and _____ 40 Brass workers 42 West Indies island nation 45 Unkept and messy with debris 48 ___hip hooray 49 Inability to recognize objects 53 Clumps 55 Shining 56 Biblical “you” 57 Churn 58 Type of worm 60 Roman emperor 61 Drug doer 62 Post-traumatic stress disorder 63 That girl 65 Scriptural your

Sudoku:

Fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3x3 box contain the numbers 1-9. Puzzle answers on page 99

Mart Dickerson lives in Southern Pines and would welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle masters. She can be reached at martaroonie@gmail.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . September 2012

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SOUTHWORDS

Know Thy Foursquare ... and Steer Clear of the Orange Trifoliate

BY L AURIE BIRDSONG

When my hus-

band and I moved to Aberdeen in 2009, any commentary on residential real estate revolved around our mutual distaste for the kind of McMansion culture that had overtaken our old neighborhood in Atlanta, one ranchhome tear-down at a time. A universe apart from this Pac-Man attitude toward old homes, the restoration culture of Aberdeen gave us reason to secure a 1912-built home along its downtown corridor.

Like Aberdeen’s preserve-and-restore, National-Register mentality, we became similarly endeared to the century-rich character of our home. Three years later, when my husband and I said goodbye to that house and moved up the road, we’d learned to describe the historical framework of where we live and to name — and treasure — what grows out the back door. We’ll miss the persona of our old home as much as the people we’ve grown close to in our few short years in town. The signature features of our Arts and Crafts-era home — top-center dormer and brick chimney, wide-eaved roof, columned front porch, and square two-and-a-half story shape — made an easy exercise of Webhunting for look-alikes. I found quick and convincing proof that our house was an American Foursquare, a style that maximized its interior square footage and suited the times during which it came along. Learning that one of our house’s former owners came from a greenhouse-owning family also compelled us to get a better grip on the botanical unknowns growing out back. A handful of elsewhere’s

112

alien flora had rooted at our residence before we arrived, and we owed these misplaced botanicals the respect of getting to know “their kind.” The trifoliate orange tree in our backyard made its presence known like an unfriendly-but-fenced-in dog who makes one maintain a respectful distance. Likely in its ancestral Chinese or Korean tongues, this prickly plant began teasing us like B’rer Rabbit from the briar patch once its citrus-growing months kicked into gear. My husband and I made one foolhardy attempt apiece to reach past its ouchy, inch-long thorns and bare-handedly grab its ornamental, colorful fruit. We’ve learned to appreciate our trifoliate orange’s contributions to backyard beautification and have dispensed with the handshakes. Our agave, on the other hand, has earnestly awaited a highfive to its spiny, upturned palms as we’ve passed by it through the backyard gate. Still, its steadfastness amid a yard full of come’n’go deciduousness stands for all that’s settled about our home now that we’ve run the four-season calendar several times through. When that first summer’s boiling temperatures began wilting the will of our Southwestern stalwart, determining online the temps our agave could withstand resulted in a little more subspecies recognition as well. Though I could conclude no more definitively that either an Agave scabra or an Agave americana grows in our backyard, our dear succulent at least acquired the dignity of having a first AND last name. For three years, we’ve been charmed by the backyard plants that bloomed their unique personalities before we then took root and the framework that’s held fast to its look for a century before we moved in. If the plants out back were merely vegetation to fill out the yard, or the historic framework just the roof over our heads, we would think of our home more in terms of resale and less in terms of attachment. Yet as my husband and I leave behind a home whose character has earned our deep affections, we’re reminded of how personified a dwelling can feel to an occupant when it’s time to move on. PS Laurie Birdsong is a regular contributer to PineStraw magazine. ILLUSTRATION BY PAMELA POWERS JANUARY

September 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


presents

An afternoon with Jan Brett, the author of Mossy

Tuesday, October 9TH, 5 – 7 p.m. at the Sunrise Theater The purchase of Mossy from The Country Bookshop admits one to this once in a lifetime event, and Jan Brett’s only event in North Carolina

For more details, please contact:

140 NW Broad St • Southern Pines • (910) 692-3211 • thecountrybookshop.biz


Our reputation is building...green!

910-673-1929

mark@stewartcdc.com

www.StewartConstructionDevelopment.com


September 2012 PineStraw