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Retirement Living

Redefined

At Quail Haven Village there is a new face for retirement living. A face that is active, desires adventure, is vibrant and never dull. You might say we have redefined retirement living. Our central location within Pinehurst, wealth of activities, spacious apartment homes and access to a full continuum of care are just a few reasons so many choose to call Quail Haven home. Life is full of

Schedule a Visit of Our Garden Apartment Homes Call 910-684-4205 or visit our website

opportunity and our residents do not take a moment for granted. Schedule a visit today to see how you can redefine the way you live.

www.QuailHavenOfPinehurst.com Hours: Monday - Friday 9:00am to 5:00pm 155 Blake Boulevard, Pinehurst, NC 28374

A PART OF THE LIBERTY FAMILY OF SERVICES


Breezy Pines Farm offers a beautiful six stall barn.

Come enjoy the Southern charm and relaxed sophistication of Pinehurst & Southern Pines

Jamie McDevitt, Broker/Owner 910.724.4455 JamieMcDevitt.com Jamie@JamieMcDevitt.com

Breezy Pines Farm, circa 1900. Truly a dream farm with 19 acres located on 1351 Dowd Rd. Only $699,000.

107 NE Broad Street Southern Pines, NC

Foster


Resident Melva Johnston Skydiving for the the first time.

IT'S NOT ABOUT AGE, ? IT'S ABOUT ATTITUDE! A Faith-Based Not For Profit Continuing Care Retirement Community 500 East Rhode Island Ave. Southern Pines, NC www.penickvillage.org (910)692-0300


Shop Local & Show Your SUPPORT November 1st -November 11th Purchase a Tempur-pedic November 1st-November 11th and $50-$100 will be donated to the Duskin & Stephens Foundation to honor Veterans Day! temPur-Pedic® Queen SetS Starting at

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TEMPUR-ERGO® PEMIER ADJUSTABLE BASE

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PLEASE JOIN US AT SWEET DREAMS MATTRESSES & MORE ON NOVEMBER 11TH FOR A FREE COOKOUT TO ALL VETERANS, SERVICE MEMBERS, & THEIR FAMILIES!

Disclaimer info. Sale Period is October 28-December 1st. Any free items are “as is” with the sale price and no additional discounts or promotions are to be used. Any New Tempurpedic Set sold between November 1st -November 11th $50 & Tempurpedic Adjustable Set $100 will be donated to the Duskin & Stephens Foundation. Please see store for additional details. ©Tempur-Pedic Management, LLC. All rights reserved.

Call (910)246-2233 150 Commerce Ave. Southern Pines, NC 28387 Hours: Mon-Sat 9AM-6PM Sunday 1PM-5pm www.mysweetdreamsmattress.com

Duskin Stephens Mission Statement: To support the families of fallen members of Special Operations Forces and the educational needs of children of active duty Special Operations Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen and Marines through community outreach events, scholarships, interactive educational/recreational programs, and related activities.


Dreaming of a new kitchen? Let Reico Kitchen & Bath help.

Knowledgeable People. Professional Design. Expert Installation. Since 1952. Come see how easily Reico can make your dream come true. Download our ‘Getting Started’ guide at www.reico.com.

265 Pinehurst Ave., Suite B, Southern Pines, NC 28387 (910) 693-0162

Reico KITCHEN & BATH

www.reico.com


November 2015

86 Pulling Strings

Features 73 Reminder

By Melissa Goslin

Poetry by Sarah Edwards

74 The Great Harvest Meal Challenge By Deborah Salomon

Five Chefs, Five Ingredients — the Sandhills’ own version of Chopped

84 Stew U

18 21 23 25

PinePitch Doodad Instagram Winners Cos and Effect By Cos Barnes

27 The Omnivorous Reader By Brian Lampkin

31 The Evolving Species By Nancy Oakley

33 Proper English By Serena Brown

35 Papadaddy’s Mindfield By Clyde Edgerton

37 Vine Wisdom By Robyn James

39 The Kitchen Garden By Jan Leitschuh

45 Out of the Blue

By Deborah Salomon

47 Hometown By Bill Fields

By Deborah Salomon

New York, Paris, Washington, Pinehurst

A spellbinding garden, food for fall and some old fashioned recipes

Departments

88 Power House

By Rosetta Fawley

Without a cast-iron pot to cook it in, Brunswick stew is simply b.s.

By Jim Dodson

A remarkable ensemble of harpists and their angelic music

103 Almanac

By Harry Blair

15 Simple Life

Volume 11, No. 11

49 Horse Sense

By Toby Raymond

53 Birdwatch

By Susan Campbell

55 A Novel Year By Wiley Cash

59 Pleasures of Life

61 Sandhills Journal

65 Sporting Life

By Tom Allen

By Melissa Goslin By Tom Bryant

69 Golftown Journal By Lee Pace

104 November Calendar 129 SandhillSeen 139 Thoughts from the Manshed By Geoff Cutler

141 PineNeedler

By Mart Dickerson

143 The Accidental Astrologer By Astrid Stellanova

144 SouthWords By Sam Walker

Cover Photograph by Tim Sayer 6

November 2015 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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at Cameron Village, 400 Daniels Street, Raleigh, NC 919.467.1781

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Serving the Carolinas & More for 18 Years — Financing Available

ON A SAGGING BED THE DUX® THE BED SPINE IS CURVED. THE DUX® BED

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ON A FIRM BED THE SPINE IS CURVED. ON A SAGGING BED THE IS CURVED. ON SPINE A SAGGING BED THE SPINE IS CURVED.

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SOUTHERN PINES | 280 NW BROAD ST. | SOUTHERN PINES, NC 28387 | 910-725-1577 RALEIGH | 400 DANIELS ST. | RALEIGH, NC 27605 | 919-467-1781

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The first round after a great round starts here. The Ryder Cup Lounge Just off the porch of the historic Carolina Hotel, the Ryder Cup offers a generous selection of draft beers, scotch and bourbon as well as a mouth-watering menu with everything from Carolina Burgers to Broiled Atlantic Salmon. So after your last putt drops, pick up a glass at the Ryder Cup.

Li v e Mu s i c Bob Redding

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910.235.8415 • pinehurst.com

©2015 Pinehurst, LLC

Friday & Saturday Nights • Sunday Brunch


PINEHURST

$959,000

Stunning custom home on Lake Pinewild in Pinewild Country Club with spectacular views of the lake. Open floor plan with 10 -12 foot ceilings and fabulous light throughout the home with an abundance of window walls. The home has three fireplaces. There is a bulkhead and dock for lake usage. Built by Blackman Builders, this was the 2003 Home of the Year. This home does have it all! 3 BR / 5 BA 24 Loch Lomond Court

SEVEN LAKES WEST

$381,800

PINEHURST

$304,900

$1,300,000

“Talent, Technology & TEAMWORK” Moore County’s Most Trusted Real Estate Team

Gorgeous new construction in desirable Pinehurst #6. The open floor plan has vaulted ceilings, gas fireplace, wood floors, custom cabinets, granite and stainless steel appliances. Main level has split bedroom plan with 2.5 baths. Upstairs is more than just a bonus space for multiple possibilities, but also has a bedroom and bath High end extra features throughout with a beautiful screened in porch. 4 BR / 3.5 BA 240 Kingswood Circle

PINEHURST

$1,099,000

$258.000 $179,000 Southern Pines Pinehurst $199,900 Foxfire Lovely and pristine in Longleaf CC Lovely updated golf-front home Cute cottage w/nice renovations 3 BR / 2 BA 3 BR / 2 BA 4 BR / 4.5 BA www.205HunterTrail.com www.4DogwoodCourt.com www.17ChestnutLane.com Enjoy water views from the front porch of this beautiful two story home! The foyer and living room both feature two-story ceiling height and hardwood floors. The living room also features a gas log fireplace flanked by built-in bookcases. The kitchen offers is a chefs dream , with all high end finishes. Upstairs has three bedrooms and 2 baths and a spacious bonus room. This home is immaculate and shows beautifully! 4 BR / 3.5 BA Pinehurst $75,000 Pinehurst 150 Morris Drive

PINEHURST

This stunning custom home in Fairwoods on Seven is located on an oversized, private lot overlooking the 15th fairway of the #7 course. Built by Pinehurst Homes, there are so many upscale features. The floor plan is very open and light with high ceilings. Gourmet kitchen. spacious pantry and screened porch to name a few, too many too mention. Seller to provide PCC membership ( including #7 & #9) and 1 year of dues. 5 BR / 5.5 BA 145 Brookhaven Road

PINEHURST

$259,000

$585,000 Aberdeen $145,500 Pinehurst Fantastic, all-brick golf front home Cute home on large corner lot 4 BR / 3.5 BA 3 BR / 2 BA www.80LakewoodDrive.com www.110RavenswoodRoad.com

Incredible golf front home in Fairwoods on 7. This beautiful home features top of the line finishes, mouldings ,marble, hard- wood and slate flooring. Guests will love the gourmet kitchen, 2 story ceilings in living and great rooms. Wine cellar and custom wood bar. Spacious backyard overlooking the 15th green. Can be purchased furnished. You must see this home!!! 4 BR / 5.5 BA 80 Braemar Road

Lovely home in Pinehurst #6 has a great open floorplan with high ceilings, hardwood floors and lots of light. The master suite opens to an outside deck with two other bedrooms on main level. Bonus room upstairs is a plus for office or hobby room. Great backyard with outdoor fireplace – ready for immediate occupancy. 3 BR / 2.5 BA 7 Timuquana Trail

$329,000 $890,000 Longleaf CC $449,000 Pinehurst $239,000 CCNC Custom Built Villa Overlooking Water Custom built all brick golf-front home Brick single story w/view of 17th green Covered porch & large fenced lot Updated Immaculate Golf View Condo 2 BA 4 BR / 4 Full & 2SEVEN Half BathsLAKES NORTH 3 BR / $249,900 3 BR / 2.5 BA PINEHURST1 BR / 1 BA $384,000 PINEHURST 3 BR / 2.5 BA $899,000 www.16SteeplechaseWay.com www.110HearthstoneRoad.com www.8RoyalDornoch.com www.210StAndrewsCondo.com www.1340BurningTreeRoad.com

$1,295,000 $189,000 Pinehurst $269,000 Pinehurst $475,000 Pinebluff 7 Lakes West $635,000 Pinehurst Stunning custom home in Fairwoods on 7 Charming brick ranch home GorgeoustownhomeintheheartoftheVillage Open plan, gourmet kitchen, pool & more! Stunning All Brick Water Front 4 BR / 4 BA & 2 Half BA 3 BR / 2 BA BR / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 2.5 BAMagnificent custom built home located 3 3 BR / 4.5 BA Stunning brick and hardiplank home located in Clarendon Gardens with on the 11th tee with views of the 7th, 8th and 9th Gorgeous custom home built by Harris and Sons in Seven Lakes North. Solid brick, this immaculate manicured yard. Two tiered back deck creates atmosphere fairways of Pinehurst coursewww.105MastersWay.com # 4. The home possesses timeless golf front beauty and is dehome offers a spacious great room with cathedral ceilings, full transom windows, split www.170InverraryRoad.com www.145SugarPineDrive.com www.6HollyHouse.com www.135AndrewsDrive.com

of privacy. Large great room, great gourmet kitchen, spacious master and office on first floor. Beautiful loft and a bonus room upstairs and much more! 5 BR / 3.5 BA 65 Quail Run

PINEHURST

$595,000

signed for grand scale entertaining. Meticulous attention to detail is showcased with custom moldings, unique built-ins, expansive patio areas, a custom stone raised hearth fireplace and graciously open living space. 5 BR / 5.5 BA 30 Spring Valley Court

PINEHURST

$649,000

bedrooms and a beautiful Carolina Room. Spacious master suite with huge master bath. Private backyard with large deck. Truly one of a kind. 3 BR / 2 BA 104 Scarlet Oak Drive

PINEHURST

$429,000

$269,900 $187,900 Pinehurst $185,000 Southern Pines $225,000 Pinebluff Pinehurst $375,000 Foxfire Great home in family- friendly neighborhood Stunning new construction condo Golf front new construction in The Pines Immaculate all-brick w/golf views Elegant & luxurious w/spacious rooms 5 BR / 3 BA 3 BR / 2.5 BA 3 BR / 2 BA 2 BR / 2 BA 4 BR / 3 BA www.23BerylCircle.com www.100CypressCircle.com www.153LaurelOakLane.com www.18ShamrockDrive.com www.10StantonCircle.com

Located across the road from the famous #2 course at Pinehurst Country Club, site of the Gorgeous two story colonial home overlooks a magnificent terraced garden. Elegant and A Pinehurst classic! This elegant, spacious one story brick home has a wonderful flow for 2014 US Open, this charming historic cottage, appropriately named Fairview Cottage, historic “Lansmyr” is located on almost 2 secluded acres on Linden Road in Old Town. family and guests. Cathedral ceilings and brick gas fireplace grace the family room. Master was owned by Donald himself from 1935 until 1941. Beautifully updated and well Connected by a barrel vaulted hallway with oversized Palladian door the expansive living moldings, and plantation hobby/study room with built in Sevenshutters. Lakes A South $279,500 Seven Lakes Westsuite has crown $298,000 Pinehurst $895,000 Pinehurst $241,000 Seven LakesRoss South $199,000 maintained, this lovely home has wonderful curb appeal and an impeccable location. The room and dining room offer floor to ceiling triple bowed windows. Master suite & bookcases is a plus! Enjoy the private, fenced backyard from the brick patio. Wonderful 2-story home on cul-de-sac Completely Gorgeous home inSee! the Old Town Great family home Charming front view setting spacious and private golf back yard andw/panoramic patio area is the perfect for the full sized in- w/private back yard great attic. Must 3 BR / 3 BA renovated golf front home pool.BA Very special property 94 BRBR / 9.5 BA BA 80 Dalrymple Road3 BR / 3.5 BA 4 BR / 3BA / 3.5 4 BR / 3 BA 3ground BR / 2.5 3 BR / 3 BA 175 Linden Rd. www.117OxfordCourt.com www.108Rector.com www.50OrangeRoad.com www.11GraysonLane.com www.122DevonshireAvenue.com 280 Cherokee Road

View Floor Plans and Tours of ALL OurMoore Listings and Seeand ALL MooreInformation County at View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Virtual Our Listings and See County Listings Community Listings and Community Information at

www.MarthaGentry.com www.MarthaGentry.coM

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007

Military?!Check out our Military Advantage Program at www.MarthaGentry.com

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007


Waterfont at CCNC: 270’ of Lake Watson water front ~ views from each room! 4BR/5.5BA, Living Rm & Lake Rm, Chef’s Kitchen, Dining Rm, Master w/his&her baths/dressing rooms, guest apt. 4-car garage. $1,995,000 Carolyn Hallett 910.986.2319

Lakota Farm a Magnificent Estate: For the Golf or Horse

Old Town Pinehurst: Extensive renovations & upgrades

enthusiast, this property has it all! Turn-of-the-Century elegance with modern conveniences give this one-of-a-kind property its unique character. 5BR/5.5BA. $1,950,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193 Jerry Townley 910.690.7080

to this circa 1905 home, providing today’s comforts while showcasing the original character & architectural design of yesterday’s grandeur. 5BR/5Full&3Half Baths. $1,600,000 Linda Criswell 910.783.7374

“Homewood” in Knollwood Heights: Stunning estate and

Weymouth Heights: Delightful Colonial Revival designed by Aymar Embury II for the Boyd family in the 1920’s. Expanded & Updated in ‘05 with a sunroom addition in ‘12. Charming Guest House. 3BR/3Full&2Half Baths. $895,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

15 Acre Horse Farm: Excellent Horse Facilities! Adjacent to

Old Town Pinehurst: Breathtaking estate! Comfortable elegance abounds in this fine home featuring 5 bedrooms, 3.5 baths, a chefs kitchen, formal areas, cozy study, Carolina Room, & Guest Apartment a w/bdrm, living area, frplc & ktchn. $795,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

National Pinehurst #9: Stunning home & views! Premier loca-

CCNC: Beautifully renovated home on the 9th fairway of Dogwood Course with 418’ of golf frontage. Renovated with attention to detail, and of the highest quality. Open design overlooks gardens & golf course. 4BR/4BA. $699,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

CCNC Golf Front: Great view of Dogwood’s 2nd tee, 4BR/5.5BA, single level home; Carolina Rm, pool table, office. Totally renovated by owners. Walk to practice range & Clubhouse! On CCNC’s rental program. $595,000 Carolyn Hallett 910.986.2319

Stunning Pinewild Home: 3-Master Suites, 3.5 Baths,

described as one of North Carolina’s finest residence. Rich history with magnificent architectural detail. Extensive gardens designed by E.S. Draper. 7BR/6.5BA. $1,590,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

Pinewild Country Club: All brick, golf front home featuring an Office, Bonus Room, and more than 4,500 sq.ft. of living space. 3BR/3.5BA. $650,000 See more at: 34LasswadeDrive.com Frank Sessoms 910.639.3099

tion on 3rd hole of Nicklaus Course & Lakefont overlooking water to the 2nd hole. 10’ & 12’ ceilings, wide plank Bolivian cherry floors, gourmet kitchen & much more. 4BR/4.5BA. $775,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

text “BHHSNC305” to 87778

Walthour Moss Foundation! 3BR/3BA Cottage with separate upstairs apartment. 8-Stall Barn, 2-Run-in Stalls, 10 Paddocks, Pond, Riding Ring! $845,000 Pamela O’Hara 910.315.3093

Golf Views, Park-like Setting! Hardwoods, Many Upgrades! $550,000 Mrie O’Brien 910.528.5669

Download our free mobile app!

Southern Pines: 910.692.2635 • 105 W. Illinois Avenue • Southern Pines, NC 28387 ©2015 BHH Affiliates, LLC. An independently operated subsidiary of HomeServices of American, Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate, and a franchisee of BHH Affiliates, LLC.


Foxfire: Elegance resounds throughout this Southern Plantation inspired residence. Endless tasteful details, each room a feast for the senses.In-ground salt water pool. Unfinished Bonus Room. Stunning! 3BR/2.5BA. $539,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193

Pinewild Country Club: Majestic golf & water views abound in

this charming home. Beautifully appointed & designed for expansive views. High ceilings, oversized windows, and wonderful details. Upstairs are 2 ensuite bedrooms. 3BR/2BA. $495,000 Kay Beran 910.315.3322

Old Town Pinehurst: Charming cottage, circa 1920, 2 blocks from the heart of the village. Beautiful gardens, pool with waterfall. Beautifully maintained & updated. Pinehurst Country Club membership available for transfer. 3BR/3BA. $495,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

Pine Needles: Complete perfection inside & out on the 17th fairway of Pine Needles golf course. Exquisite detail! Updated & remodeled in ‘06. Garden features include formal gardens, a bocci court, and potting shed. 3BR/2.5BA. $465,000 Maureen Clark 910.315.1080

Pinewild Country Club: Designed to caputure magnificent views to the 15th Fairway of Holly Course. Great upgrades! The multi use dining & great room offers flexibility of use. Hardwoods, custom builtins, screened porch & patio with water feature. 3BR/3BA. $452,000 Kay Beran 910.315.3322

Hunt Country: Privacy abounds in this unique property offering majestic views and a short hack to the 4,000acre Moss Foundation. Ski Lodge home overlooks 4-fenced pastures. 3BR/2BA. $449,000 www.422HorsepenLane.isforsale.com Bill Smith 910.528.4090

New Price - Pinehurst: Spacious, all brick, low maintenance home! Pristine Condition! Office & a separate Recreation Room. 4 Bedrooms. Pinehurst Country Club Membership is available for transfer. $355,000 Frank Sessoms 910.639.3099

Seven Lakes West: ONE-OF-A-KIND OFFERING! One of the last few water front lots available on Lake Auman with 180 degree views - Build Your Dream Home! Bulk-head, 2-Docks w/boat lift & swim ladder in place. $350,000 Linda Criswell 910.783.7374

Waterfront - Whispering Pines: 2,200+SF, 3BRs

(split plan), 2 Baths, Updated & “Move-In” ready. Beautiful Fly Rod Lake is perfect for boating, swimming and fishing. $338,000 Eva Toney 910.638.0972

Knollwood Heights: Charming Cottage on large lot across from the golf course. Remodeled & added to in the last 4 years. Kitchen has Stainless Appliances & Granite. Living Room w/ cathedral ceiling & natural gas-log frplc. 3BR/2BA. $325,000 Emily Hewson 910.315.3324

Old Town Pinehurst: Reduced for Quick Sale - $30,000 Reduction! Great Investment Opportunity! 2,600 sq.ft. home is move-in ready! Priced BELOW tax value! PCC membership available at 50% discount! 3BR/3BA. $295,000 Bill Smith 910.528.4090

Aronimink: Fabulous condo with distant views of 10th fairway of Course #5. Full PCC Membership Available for transfer. Tranquil view! Beautifully maintained! Great full or part-time residence. 2BR/2BA. $229,000 Debbie Darby 910.783.5193

www.BHHSPRG.com We open Moore doors. Pinehurst: 910.295.5504 • 42 Chinquapin Road • Pinehurst, NC 28374 Berkshire Hathaway HomeSercies and the Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices symbol are registered service marks of HomeServices of America, Inc.® Equal Housing Opportunity.Housing Opportunity.


“Woodstock” • Weymouth Woods

M A G A Z I N E

1920’s Architectural Gem

Jim Dodson, Editor 910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com Serena Brown, Senior Editor 910.693.2464 • serena@pinestrawmag.com Lauren Shumaker, Graphic Designer 910.693.2469 • lauren@pinestrawmag.com Alyssa Rocherolle, Graphic Designer 910.693.2508 • alyssa@pinestrawmag.com Contributing Editors Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Sara King, Proofreader Contributing Photographers John Gessner, Laura L. Gingerich, Tim Sayer Contributors Tom Allen, Cos Barnes, Harry Blair, Tom Bryant, Susan Campbell, Wiley Cash, Geoff Cutler, Al Daniels, Annette Daniels, Mart Dickerson, Clyde Edgerton, Rosetta Fawley, Bill Fields, London Gessner, Robyn James, Brian Lampkin, Jan Leitschuh, Meridith Martens, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Toby Raymond, Astrid Stellanova, Sam Walker, Janet Wheaton

PS David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Pat Taylor, Advertising Director

120 Highland Road • Southern Pines This handsome Colonial Revival was designed by Aymar Embury II for the Boyd family in 1929. The slate roof, fan detail above the doorways, and symmetry are typical of Embry’s style. On 1.14 acres, the house was expanded adding a paneled den and powder room in 2005 and a lovely sunroom in 2012. Additional features include a kitchen that opens to a keeping room with fireplace and beamed ceiling, a charming 448 sq.ft. guest house, enlarged master bath, extended front terrace and a reflecting pool in the backyard. A stunning hunt mural is hand painted on the dining room walls. There are 3 bedrooms, 2 baths and 2 powder rooms with 5 fireplaces and original hardwood floors throughout. $895,000

To view more photos, take a virtual tour or schedule a showing, go to:

www.clarkpropertiesnc.com

Maureen Clark when experience matters

Pinehurst • Southern Pines BHHS Pinehurst Realty Group • 910.315.1080

12

Ginny Trigg, PineStraw Sales Coordinator 910.693.2481 • ginny@thepilot.com Deborah Fernsell, 910.693.2516 Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2489 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Advertising Graphic Design

Kathryn Galloway 910.693.2509 • kathryn@thepilot.com Kirsten Benson, Mechelle Butler, Scott Yancey Subscriptions & Circulation

Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine 145 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com www.pinestrawmag.com

©Copyright 2015. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

November 2015 P�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


910-684-1010

10910 US Highway 15-501 • Southern Pines NC 28387

www.pinehurstnissanonline.com


simple life

Into the Unknown By Jim Dodson

This month, quite

rightly, we celebrate Veterans Day and gather round a harvest table to enjoy the fruits of the Earth and give thanks for our many blessings.

Something about the soulful days of November invites reflection on the sweet mystery of human life and the brevity of our own shortening days — why we came and where we may be headed on an unknown journey that has fueled the imagination of sages and poets across the millennia. Not surprisingly, the topic also deeply fascinated my dear friend and mentor John Jasper Derr, who passed away on a beautiful summer evening this year. Some of us who knew him well called him the Ageless One-Derr. Near the end of his days, Ben Franklin remarked that a long life might not be good enough, but a good life is long enough. My friend John enjoyed the good fortune of both — a long and remarkably productive life. He was just past his 97th birthday the summer evening he watched American Pharoah gallop home to win the 147th Belmont Stakes and claim the first Triple Crown in thirty-eight years, then slumped in his armchair at home in the Tennis Club of North Carolina. Whatever else is true, this seems a divinely orchestrated exit for a man who as the first head of CBS Sports helped lure the Kentucky Derby to the small screen in the early 1950s and went on to convince his network bosses in New York to broadcast the first college football game — the Rose Bowl — on TV a short time later. Eventually, he even wooed a reluctant Cliff Roberts and Bobby Jones into televising professional golf when both were convinced it would never work. Dirty Derr, as I liked to call him, was a pioneer of broadcasting who shaped the way our games are played and enjoyed by millions across the planet today. Dirty Derr was something of an inside joke between us, the nickname this dapper son of a Gastonia postman used as a Golden Gloves bantam weight boxer prior to service during the Second World War. This was about the time he and my dad met at the Greensboro Daily News, where John was the assistant sports editor and my father was the aviation writer and ad salesman. My dad was a Golden Gloves boxer as well — “Battling Brax” was his ringside handle. They became friends before going their separate ways to serve a nation going to war. John wound up working for a general in the Pacific theater and returned home to become a sidekick of Arthur Godfrey and colleague of Red Barber on CBS Radio. My old man became a glider pilot for the 8th Army Air Corps and came home after the liberation of France to work at the Washington Star before he set off on a newspaperman’s odyssey that carried him through the deep South and eventually brought my family home to North Carolina.

The funny thing is, I never knew these two remarkable fellows knew each other until I stopped off in my old boyhood haunt of Pinehurst fifteen years ago to ask John about golf legend Ben Hogan, a reluctant star he knew better than probably any other reporter. After helping Arnold Palmer write his memoirs, I’d been asked by the estate of Hogan — the most elusive sports star in American history — to write the first authorized biography of a little man who fantaically shielded his life from view. Truthfully, I felt that I was a far better match with Arnold Palmer than the cold and forbidding Ben Hogan. But I knew John Derr would have a good opinion on that. Needless to say, during our dinner at the beloved Pine Crest Inn, John urged me to take on the daunting biography and treated me to a host of un-heard Hogan stories, the first of probably thirty hours of conversations I would have with the great One-Derr over the next fifteen years. He provided me invaluable insight that shaped three of my six golf books, two of which won Book of the Year honors. At one point that first evening at the Pine Crest, he also casually mentioned that he fondly remembered my father, who’d recently passed on and was the subject of my recent book, Final Rounds. He told me, with a roguish twinkle, that they shared a love of baseball and amateur boxing and “extremely good tastes in women,” not to mention that both were sharp dressers. I remember listening and thinking how similar, in fact, they truly were, these dapper gents — self-made sons of rural Carolina who ventured into an unknown world with brimming spirits and strong curiosity and the kind of endless optimism they believed were the engine fuels of human success. They even physically resembled each other, bald and dapper fellows who loved to spin stories and drew a crowd wherever they happened to be. Both loved to write doggerel verse and fancied a mildly blue joke. Also that night, after I casually mentioned that I hoped to move home to Greensboro someday in the future, Dirty Derr suggested that I consider moving home to Pinehurst first. I asked him why. “Because, dear boy, old golf writers never really die,” he provided with that same roguish smile. “They just move to Pinehurst and lose their balls. Save Greensboro for your funeral!” After my wife and I moved to Southern Pines, One-Derr became a regular Sunday night supper guest at our house, regaling our grown children and other lucky guests with his rich and varied tales of fascinating people he’d known in the 20th century, a human tapestry that ranged from Gandhi in India to Grace Kelly in Philly, Ted Williams, Sammy Snead, Bing Crosby, Bobby Jones, Ed Murrow and just about every important figure in the news across six decades of his working life. My favorite was the night he met Albert Einstein walking the Yale golf course in the dusk. Derr asked him if he played golf and the wild-haired genius fairly shouted at him, “Heavens, no! It’s much too difficult!” You can read these lovely tales in John’s book called My Place At the Table.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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simple life

Among his many tributes, Augusta National presented him a lifetime achievement award for the sixty-two years he manned the tower on the 15th hole and covered golf’s greatest boutique gathering in print or on radio and TV. As the years passed and John’s health faltered, his spirit never did. On the last night I drove him home to the Tennis Club, he remarked, “James my boy, it’s been a grand and sweeping journey! But I fear I’m about to turn in my press credentials for good and head into the Great Unknown! I have some things I wish to give you.” “That’s nonsense, John,” I told him. “You can’t go anywhere soon. My wife adores you.” He smiled. “And I adore her. By the way, if you happen to predecease me, I have a plan to begin courting Wendy if she’ll have me. Thought I’d just get that out of the way.” “No problem,” I assured him. That evening he gave me a batch of letters from his old colleagues and told me a hilarious joke about a dying man and chocolate chip cookies I now tell on the dinner speech circuit. “I miss writing letters,” he confessed. “Very few things give you as much pleasure as writing and reading a genuine letter, you know.” A few weeks later, John was moved to write one last letter to all of us. It seems one of the positives of life — from the beginning to the end — is that we embark on a journey into the Unknown On that morning of October in 1917, while the world was still rumbling from the cannons and howitzers of the Great War, World War I, that was to bring serenity and peace to the divergent men of different backgrounds, different views of life and different plans for humanity, I was about to descend from the sanctity and peacefulness of my mother’s womb. I was about to go into the Unknown. That was 1917, a long time ago. Each day is another opportunity to grow. Each day [is] an experience new to me but old to the world. I welcomed the adventures of walking, of talking, of being happy and

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living. I went into the Unknown. Always something new. Learning life was a major goal — uncertain but anxiously awaited. Then, with the confidence and bravado acquired in youth, curious of the world around me, I knew it was a big world and I was but a small part of it. Life took on a new meaning and I enjoyed telling others what I saw, how I felt, what I knew and sharing this new role. Everything fascinated me and I enjoyed sharing with others who were also going along into the Unknown. There was a reason I was not athletic and an avid participant in sports. My Unknown was observing and reporting what I saw. My stage grew larger but the mystery remained. Then I learned I could describe events for others, those not able to be with me at each stop I spirited from those who preceded me. They, too, gave me the curiosity and ability to do my job and move on, the strength and desire to move on into the Unknown. One day I was called by my government to serve our military forces. It was a major change of life but an adventure I had not planned. Who could? There was pride in that uniform. Not bravery so much as pride. But when the bugle sounded I was in a new scenario, uncertain but eager again to head into the Unknown. India. CBS. PGA. Broadcasting. The snow on Mt. Everest. The Crown of Taj Mahal. The float down the Nile River. Lost in the Pyramids. Olympics. Masters. Life. Into the Great Unknown. The great One-Derr jotted these grateful words on a scrap of paper as he sat outside waiting for a ride from a friend taking him to a radio interview, his final reporter’s entry — two days before he passed away. PS Contact editor Jim Dodson at jim@pinestrawmag.com.

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PinePitch (Christmas Tree) Forests and Gingerbread Houses

Getting excited about Christmas? Indulge yourself at the Nineteenth annual Festival of Trees from November 18 to 22. More than 200 trees will grace the Carolina Hotel, decked in splendor, as well as gingerbread houses, garlands and gift baskets. There will be five days of festive tree fun. Here’s the schedule: November 18 at 10:15 a.m. Festival Tree Lighting November 18 from 6 – 8 p.m. Girls’ Night Out November 20 from 6 – 8 p.m. Jingle Bell Jam November 21 from 6 – 8 p.m. Bacco Selections wine tasting ($10 donation) November 22 from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Festival Marketplace The Carolina Hotel, 80 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Admission is by any monetary donation. All proceeds benefit children with disabilities in the Sandhills. Festival Marketplace is free admission. For more information, visit sandhillschildrenscenter.org/trees.

Cocktails and Laughter

Don a feathered headband, motor to the Holly Inn and be part of the Golden Age of Pinehurst. It’s the Tufts Archives’ Holly and Ivy Dinner at 6:30 p.m. on December 8 and this year the theme is the 1920s. After cocktails there will be dinner with a recreated Pinehurst menu from the era, and “’20s Trivia: Here and There.” You don’t have to wear 1920s outfits, but it’s a lot more fun if you do. The Holly Inn, 155 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Tickets are available at www.shoppinehurst.com. Early birds catch their tickets at $125. After November 19 all tickets are $150. For more information, call (910) 295-3642. Proceeds benefit the Given Memorial Library and Tufts Archives.

Trot To It

Do turkeys strut or trot? They trot, of course, so lace up your running shoes. It’s the thirtyfifth annual Turkey Trot on Saturday, November 21. There’s a race for everyone: There’s a half marathon, 10k, 5k, and 1 Mile. The course is stroller-friendly too. The proceedings begin with the 1-mile Fun Run at 8:30 a.m. Cannon Park, 90 Woods Road, Pinehurst. Proceeds from the races benefit the Foundation of FirstHealth. Registration is online and on-site. For more information, visit sandhillsraceseries.com

Classical Comfits

Water, Water, Everywhere…

Alex Prud’homme needs little introduction – he has written on a wide range of subjects for The New York Times, Vanity Fair and Time, to name but a few. On November 12 at 7:30 p.m. he will be taking part in the Ruth Pauley Lecture Series at Sandhills Community College, talking on the subject of “The Ripple Effect, Why Fresh Water Will Be the Defining Resource of this Century.” We all need water. This is something we all need to hear about. Don’t miss it. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Free and open to the public. For more information, call (910) 245-3132.

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Feeling the dark November nights drawing in? Embrace them with some familiar classics at 8 p.m. on November 14. The North Carolina Symphony will delight and thrill audiences with favorite light classical music, including Rossini’s Overture to William Tell, Humperdinck’s Prelude to Hänsel and Gretel, Zimmer’s Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, and highlights from John Williams’ Jurassic Park. Hum along quietly. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, Southern Pines. Tickets are available online and at the door. Visit ncsymphony.org or call (877) 627-6724 for further details.

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Feeling Young Again

Be part of the youthful mood created by the Golf Capital Chorus as it presents “Songs for the Young at Heart,” its 35th annual show for charities. Enjoy music sung in four-part harmony from the Great American Songbook — Irving Berlin, Cole Porter, Sammy Cahn, Ira Gershwin and Mack Gordon. Storm Front, an international gold medal quartet known for humor and entertainment, adds its musical talents as special guests. Tickets available at The Country Bookshop, Given Outpost and Heavenly Pines. All proceeds benefit local charities. On November 7 at 7 p.m. Cost: $15. Robert E. Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School, Southern Pines. For more information, call (910) 295-3529.

Cockades and Cupcakes

American Beauty

Deep Americana this month at the Rooster’s Wife. Silver-voiced April Verch will sing and play the fiddle before she sets off for a European tour. There’ll be blues music with favorites Matuto and hot jazz and Western swing with Western Swing Group of the Year Hot Club of Cowtown. Americana duo Moores and McCumber will round off the month with their extraordinary musical ability, playing more instruments than we have room to list. November 1 April Verch

Red-cockaded woodpeckers, a scavenger hunt for the children, cupcakes, time in the woods at the Walthour-Moss Foundation: a recipe for a blissful fall afternoon out for one and all. On November 7 from 1 to 4 p.m., celebrate the twentieth anniversary of Safe Harbor, a voluntary program encouraging landowners to provide safe habitat for endangered plants and animals. The Walthour-Moss Foundation, Southern Pines. Park along Equestrian Road. From Southern Pines: on the right just before intersection with US Highway 1. From US 1 South: Turn left on Equestrian Road just before the May Street exit to Southern Pines. Park at the far end of Equestrian Road. For more information, contact Caroline George at 919-812-2954 or caroline_george@fws.gov.

November 8 Matuto November 15 Hot Club of Cowtown November 22 Moores and McCumber The Rooster’s Wife, Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Doors open at 6 p.m., shows begin at 6:46 p.m. For tickets and more information call (910) 944-7502 or visit theroosterswife.org

Tractor Progression

This year sees the tenth Annual Train and Tractor Show on November 6, 7 and 8. There will be more tractors, trains and machinery than you can shake a stick shift at. Three days of tractor time with Money in the Haystack for kids, demonstrations, a tractor pull and an antiques auction, as well as music, food and lots of family fun. 100+ Years of Progress, 644 Niagara-Carthage Road, Carthage. Tickets, $10 for one day, $18 for two days or $25 for a three-day pass. For more information, visit www.edervillenc.com or call Patti on (919) 708-8665.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

November 2015

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Doodad

Wolves Are Trumps A good bridge to golf

By Serena Brown

Try as they might, the Tin Whistles

couldn’t be on the golf course all the time. Things like the sun setting make it possible for natural obstacles to inhabit a green 24/7. What better way to fill those nongolfing hours than a game of bridge? Tin Whistle golf in the morning, bridge in the afternoon.

In December 1932, C.M. Rudel, Don Parson, Charlie Waterhouse and Ed Blodgett put together a foursome in the card room of the Berkshire Hotel, which was just south of where the Magnolia Inn now stands. Soon that four became a club of twenty. Described by a kibitzer as “a pack of hungry wolves,” the Berkshire Card Room became known as The Wolves’ Den, and so the group became the Wolves. Strong competitive play and social camaraderie were the pillars of the club, and they remain so today. The Wolves held their first formal dinner ‚— now an annual tradition — in 1934. Through the decades the Wolves have occupied a variety of premises. In 1973 they found their home on Woods Road, just east of Cannon Park, and “drop in” play continues there to this day. Monday through Friday, from 12:30 to 4 p.m., members show up for play. When four members appear, the game begins. Each round of four hands (a “chucker”) allows players who are waiting to enter the game. The clubhouse accommodates up to four tables, or sixteen players. On most days there are generally two active tables. This way of proceeding means that members have the advantage of being able to play whenever they want for as long as they want. The last Friday of the month sees the Wheaton Kitteridge Tournament, named for a late member. Lunch is served before afternoon play. PS To learn more about the Wolves, their bridge and their banter, call Bill Seidensticker, membership chairman, at (910) 725-1072.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Instagram Winners

Congratulations to our November Instagram winners!

Theme:

Orange!

#pinestrawcontest

Next month’s theme:

“TBC”

Throw back Christmas! Submit your photo on Instagram using the hashtag #pinestrawcontest (submissions needed by Monday, November 16th)

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Cos and Effect

Remembering Ed A neighbor whose beautiful sculptures live on

By Cos Barnes

In 1983 Irene and Ed Martin established Sand-

hills Little Theater. They were neighbors of mine, and I became their public relations director. Two professionals, they both acted. Ed also designed sets, served as treasurer and conducted seasonal fundraising campaigns. He did the lighting, sound and the construction for sets. In his spare time, he was a marvelous sculptor. “It was so easy for him,” Irene said, calling his “a God-given talent.” She has marvelous scrapbooks detailing their dramatic careers, which I hope will someday be contributed to the Sunrise Theater archives. But she was quick to add, “And he was an insurance man.” I was just launching my newspaper career when Ed told me he was going to sell his photographic equipment to the highest bidder. I was determined I would get it. When I acquired it, I said, “This is probably Cos’s folly.” He said, “Perhaps you will find you have a knack for it.” I have since quoted that line to other amateurs and beginners. What a positive thing to say to encourage a novice. Ed had his poetic side. When my husband celebrated a birthday, I invited them to a party. Ed wrote a note, “Roses are red, violets are blue, I wish I were 52.” A man of many talents, Ed also taught at Sandhills Community College, but his greatest legacy was the beautiful sculptures he left behind. His subjects are people, animals and birds, and their depiction ranges from fantasy to realism. PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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The Omnivorous Reader

Bland Simpson Country

With Little Rivers and Waterway Tales, the little-known waters of Eastern North Carolina come alive with beauty and danger

By Brian Lampkin

It’s all about the journey. Point-

less paddles up and down nearly forgotten creeks, idle picnics on a triangle of land at the place where the river begins to taste of the sea, sightings of osprey and alligator for no purpose other than the joy of seeing osprey and alligator in their North Carolina digs. We all have reasons for moving; Bland Simpson moves through these muddy waters for no better reason than to feel alive. Simpson’s new book (with photography by his wife and paddling companion Ann Cary Simpson), Little Rivers and Waterway Tales: A Carolinian’s Eastern Streams (UNC Press, 2015, $30), explores territory that matters to very few of us anymore, territory that may in fact disappear altogether as the sea begins its climactic invasion of the North Carolina coast. He begins in the Upper Pasquotank River of his childhood, moves down the coast through various years and many separate trips, and spends individual chapters on each river encountered, including the Cashie, Scuppernong (yeah!), Milltail Creek, White Oak, Black, Lumber and many others. Eastern North Carolina — like Edward Abbey’s southern Utah or Wendell Berry’s central Kentucky — has become Bland Simpson country. The land and water of the coastal plain have been described and inscribed by Simpson to the point that any trip through the terrain brings him to mind. He’s everywhere in the east: His haunting song plays at the Estuarium in Little Washington; his books sit haphazardly on a community table at Blackbeard’s Inn on Ocracoke; he’s the recent recipient of the East

Carolina University Roberts Award for literary inspiration. He’s written books on the Great Dismal Swamp, the great Sounds of the coast and Inner Banks, and a history of the area pre-Civil War. With Simpson as a tour guide through these blackwaters and swamps, you know you’re in good, knowledgeable company. The journey will be worthwhile. Edward Abbey tirelessly bemoaned the “discovery” of Southern Utah by hikers and nature lovers; it was better off without humans. Simpson is much less misanthropic — he likes the company of people and has great respect for the working lives these rivers once supported. He’ll periodically drop in on a still working fish house or marvel at the human craft apparent in a well-made boat. And he’s always glad for the companionship of a fellow traveler. At times, reading Little Rivers allows you to share reveries like this: “If anyone were ever wanting for the loveliness of a little river defined, here it was: a dark stream drifting down out of a great swamp, an antique port town set like a dream at the river’s last narrows, an estuarine bay aborning right there where we floated, one man, one woman, one boat full of romance and the knowingness of a wondrous place from over a lifetime, and this vivid warm gray autumn afternoon just as the cypress eternal were once again beginning to turn gold.” But the book is not all so idyllic. Hurricane Floyd’s trip up the eastern plain in 1999 is repeatedly referenced in Little Rivers. The aftermath of the flood made clear just how isolated these parts of Eastern North Carolina are. For days, no one outside the devastated towns and communities knew of the disaster underway. Towns like Tarboro, Conetoe, and Chocowinity. were cut off from the outside world and it was like no one cared. When the Raleigh TV stations finally started covering the flood, they mispronounced many of the town names because they had never heard of them before. Simpson chronicles the eroded life of these river towns without ever conde-

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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scending to judge the lives of people who still live among poverty. Often we’ll be wandering downstream with the Simpsons and before you know it we’re immersed in the history of the bridge under which they’re now drifting. There is no overarching narrative to carry us along so Simpson meanders through histories of place, which he handles deftly and lightly so you’re hardly aware you’re learning plenty about the Tuscarora Wars or the engineering feat of an eighth-mile loading platform. For me, the best chapter is “Sweetheart Stream,” which chronicles the misnamed Lumber River (it was once the Lumbee River). Simpson intersects with General Sherman’s crossing of the Lumber in 1865, but goes on to describe the Robin Hood like adventures of the Lowrie Gang — an outlaw band of the Lumbee tribe wreaking havoc against “Confederates and ex-Confederates, against the white slavocracy that had abused the Lumbee.” What’s missing from this book? Why, the river so mighty they had to name it twice: the Tar/ Pamlico. But that’s a personal quibble. There’s a really useful “Selected Sources” at the back of the book and I found myself turning to the maps over and over again as I tried to position the exact location of this whirlpool or that riverside cemetery. It’s unlikely, of course, that UNC Press has a bestseller on its hands. There’s not much sex, and while there’s plenty of historical violence of the worst kind, the only real present-tense threat is from a six-foot alligator willing to protect its watery ground. There’s also no first-person drama that will resolve in the redemptive change of the heroic narrator. Simpson’s too old for that nonsense. But this is why the best university presses exist. Projects like Bland and Ann Cary Simpson’s probably have no place in the big publishing world, but surely quiet beauty and resurrected histories of neglected places need voice. Ann’s photos (along with some archival images) add to a sense of a place out of time and perhaps out of step with the times. In his “Coda,” Simpson makes one more claim for the necessity of this book: It is a call to arms in the fight to “keep our little rivers healthy, and holy, and hold them close in the deepest chambers of our hearts.” Sea level rise threatens all that Simpson holds dear, but solutions to this looming crisis must first acknowledge the value of what needs saving. Little Rivers and Waterway Tales stakes a claim for Eastern North Carolina’s worth, and very little of it is monetary. We need this book to argue on the behalf of beauty as reason enough, a beauty our children and grandchildren deserve as well. PS Brian Lampkin is one of the owners of Scuppernong Books in Greensboro.

November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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T h e e v o l v i n g sp e c i e s

Duly Noted

The art of the written note endures, thank you very much By Nancy Oakley

“Heres A Little Note For You . . .”

it reads in pencil printed at the top of an 8 1/2- x 11-inch piece of white paper, covered with stickers of stars, clown faces, leaves, musical notes, handprints, fruits and a VW Beetle. It is stapled in three places down the left-hand margin to another piece of paper containing sloping lines, also printed in pencil:

I really just want to thank you for giving me the sparkaly neacklas that you gave me and I really like the computer game you gave me I play with it all the time senc I got it, Your Neas Elizabeth

I don’t recall how old my niece (or “neas”) was when she wrote the note — likely 6 or 7 — and I don’t recall giving her either a necklace or a computer game or why. But I can say, with absolute certainty, she wouldn’t have taken such pains as stationer or scribe had my elder sister, Margaret, not stood watch over her at the kitchen table until the note was finished . . . just as our mother saw to it that we and our eldest sister, Katherine, pen thank-you notes after every Christmas and birthday, or any occasion in which gifts were exchanged or invitations accepted. “Did you remember to say ‘thank-you’?” she’d cross-examine us after birthday parties or sleepovers. “Umm. I don’t remember. I think so. Maybe?” “Goodness gracious, [insert first and middle name of offending child], I sure hope you did. I don’t want all the other mothers in the neighborhood going around saying ‘Those Oakley girls don’t have any manners.’” Poor Mom, she comes by conscientiousness genetically, as do most Southerners. But over time, her message began to sink in, and my sisters and I got the hang of making every gift ever received sound like the Star of India — even the unwanted ones, such as books we had already read or clothes that didn’t fit, or the hideous, roadrunner-themed costume jewelry that a cousin who lived in the Southwest gave us every Christmas . . . perhaps because we penned notes that were a little too effusive that often went something like this: The splendid silver roadrunner pin [in actuality, painted plastic] will go perfectly with my entire wardrobe [Not really.] It fairly shimmers in the light, [where the paint hasn’t chipped off] which gives its brilliant turquoise eye [a plastic bead] a mischievious glint. [It’s creepy!] Is it a Hopi design? [I’m politely ignoring the ‘Made in Hong Kong’ stamp imprinted on the back of it.] The Hopi believed roadrunners protected them from evil spirits, so I will cherish this talisman and wear it proudly [It’s still sitting in the box it came in]. OK. So we were less than honest with Cousin Betty and yes, as kids so often do, we looked our gift horse in the mouth. But Mom explained (and explained and explained), that the point of a thank-you note has less to do with the gift or the occasion — and everything to do with the giver. “If Betty took the time to think of you and buy a present, you can take the time to

thank Betty,” she’d say. “And besides, it’ll hurt her feelings if you don’t.” Did I mention my mother’s genetic propensity for guilt trips, also common among Southerners? Which brings me to my teenage nephew, Jack, sometimes prone to lapses of memory when it comes to expressing his gratitude in writing. Admittedly, his occasional sin of omission stings a little. But when he does remember to write, he exhibits a remarkable and touching attention to detail, as exhibited during his rock hound phase at around age 10 or 11: I LOVE the agates! I think the blue one looks like a water drop. I also think the tannish one looks kind of like a pear. Maybe for some, thank-you notes are about the stuff. One of my brothers-inlaw, an avid sailor, once thanked me for a jokey present — a toy sailboat. What a great idea! I’ve been boatless for too long. It’s assumed a position on the mantle and will no doubt be cruising in the bathtub the next time I’ve overindulged. For others, thank-you notes are about the notepaper. A college friend recently thanked me for “the lovely Christmas presents,” adding, “I thought of you immediately when I saw this.” She was referring to the illustration on the card: an old-fashioned ladies’ tea party with the caption, “I take my tea in a wine glass filled with wine.” Guilty, as charged. Another friend prefers monogrammed paper, even using it to thank her handyman for a repair job. My sister Katherine has a penchant for artistic cards, often from museum shops, and fills them with newsy bits about the weather, her golf game and any recent travels, before her scholarly tendencies come to the fore, such as the time she thanked me for a DVD I’d given her: I’m thrilled to have the Zeffirelli Romeo and Juliet. It’s a longtime favorite — so beautiful — even if he does play a little fast and loose with the text! My sister Margaret, the mom and schoolteacher in the family, shows a more pragmatic side: If you knew how ratty my kitchen towels were (thanks to the dogs playing tug-o- war with them), you’d know how welcome the new one is! Perhaps we’re anachronisms, in this day and age of mass-mailings from politicians and charities looking for a handout (“Thank you for your continued support”); the push toward quick, easy electronic communication (“Tx 4 my b’day gift!” a friend once texted); or ridicule of the hipper-than-thou who deem heartfelt thanks so uncool (see: Jimmy Fallon). But there’s something about writing out the words, “thank you” that gives the reader affirmation. He or she has done the right thing, whether giving a gift, or doing a good deed. The social contract has come full circle. So, when a friend’s daughter recently completed a summer internship, the first words out of my mouth were, “Did she write her boss a thank-you note?” “I’m going to stay on her, and make sure she does,” my friend replied (Did I mention she is a Southerner?). And then we looked at one another and burst into giggles, hearing our mothers’ voices resounding in our own. PS Nancy Oakley thanks her lucky stars that she’s a frequent contributor.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015P�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


P r op e r E n g l i s h

Beautiful Ewe And the magic of a good Sunday walk (with or without wool)

By Serena Brown

A colleague at

PineStraw recently brought in some paintings that he had just acquired. Among them was a charming landscape with some sheep in the foreground. Apparently my colleague’s wife had fallen for the painting before it was completed. And the finishing touch? The sheep, of course.

As I admired the picture it occurred to me that I don’t give sheep nearly enough thought these days. As a bookish child I thought of little else. It started with The Sheep-Pig, which I read and re-read, and that paved the way for devotion to One Man and His Dog (I urge you to look up “Johnny Wilson — Spot” on YouTube for a shining example of television broadcasting at its finest). How I longed for a border collie. My parents ignored this longing for the sensible — if boringly grown-up — reason that none of us would have known how to train such an animal. Furthermore, we lived in dairy country, and even if we had been experienced shepherds there would have been nothing for it to do. Sheep are a rare sight around here, and I have to say that I’m very glad. I can’t bear to think of how the poor things would fare during our steamcooker summers. Maybe there are Mediterranean or African breeds more suited to hot weather, but all in all I don’t think wool and humidity mix. And of course when I think of a sheep it’s those heavy-coated, sinewy-legged grey tangles that dot the landscape across the Pennines, through Wales and Scotland and the West Country. “Put on another jumper,” is the cry of frugal parents across the British Isles as autumn takes hold around the middle of July and the nation’s teeth start chattering. And really, wool is the only thing that works. Yes, there are all sorts of clever man-made fibres that will keep you warm in a sweaty, modern sort of way, but none of them will ensure that you and your dog smell exactly alike as you return from the rainy Sunday afternoon walk. The Sunday afternoon walk is an important thing in the U.K., especially

as autumn draws in. Sunday lie-in, Sunday roast, Sunday walk, Sunday papers. Walking in here the States, one walks for the walk, for the beauty of the landscape, the possibility of some wildlife, for the exercise. I’m afraid that in England the walk is generally more of a sociable ramble than a hike, and we take the carrot and stick approach. Well, actually, just the carrot. Which is the pub. Of course we love the walk, but we like to take in the scenery knowing that there’s a destination. And that there’s a pint or two at that destination. With any luck there might be further refreshment along the way. We just don’t see the point in walking without it. We are fortunate to have miles of footpaths and bridlepaths, ancient ways between towns and villages that have been trodden for centuries. Sometimes they’ll take you over the motorway or through a city centre, at others you could walk hundreds of unbroken miles of coastline, mountain and moorland. But totter far enough and you’ll be sure of a glowing hearth, an ale and a host of people similarly clad in wellies and faintly whiffy damp wool, trusty hounds at their sides. When we lived in England I’m not sure I ever quite convinced my Southern husband about the wool. He was converted to the Sunday ramble and the pint long before I met him. Now that we’re home in the South, I’ve ditched the wool. It isn’t quite right in the dry, bitter cold of the winters here, and it’s a shade too toasty in the air-heated indoors. Thick cotton seems to be more the thing, and I’m glad. It makes sense ecologically. Cotton thrives here. Sheep, not so much. Once the day’s high starts to drop below eighty degrees, my husband commences serious consideration of the fall and winter fuel supply. By midSeptember a nice man from Carthage will have dropped off a small forest of firewood. This makes the hunter-gatherer-caveman side of my husband calm and contented. I am not one to advocate the cutting down of trees — quite the opposite — but there is something fantastically cosy about hunkering down at the fireside. And whether the Sunday walk takes us round the reservoir or into the Red Lion, past the ewes or through the Uwharrie, it’s good to return to the hearth at home. No need to count sheep in that toasty fug. PS Serena Brown is somewhat allergic to wool. She wears it anyway and itches. She doesn’t knit but has been known to count sheep from time to time.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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papa d a d d y ’ s M i n d f i e l d

Technical Complications In the fast-breaking info world, I’m a little lost in space

By Clyde Edgerton

Tech Day One:

For the first time I am talking an essay into a cellphone, and it is writing down the essay on the screen as I speak.

Illustration by harry Blair

Do dictation apps, chips in our heads, invisible microphones, podcasts, etc., mean writing and reading are on the way out? You say, “We’ll still need to read the word ‘Stop’ on a stop sign.” A car can be programmed to stop at all the right places. “What about exit signs in crowded theaters — in case of fire?” A round green light could replace exit signs. Like at a stop light. Go — green. Stop — red. Tech Day Two: This morning I find that I can’t open my car door with the unlock button (indicated by symbol, not word) on the key fob. My battery is dead. I try to remember which interior lights I might have left on. With the doors locked and no battery power, I wonder how I am going to open the truck door to release the hood latch so that I can recharge the battery. Hummm. I call my buddies at Advanced Auto. “Hello,” someone says. “Is this Mike?” “This is Wes.” “Wes, I got a little problem. My car’s locked and the battery’s dead so the fob won’t open a door. Is there some kind of secret way to get the hood open to recharge the battery?” “Do you have the, ah, car key?” “The car key? Oh . . . Yes . . . Yes, I do. Thanks, Wes. And would you please not tell any of the boys about this phone call?” Tech Day Three: Today, at an estate sale, my 10-year-old son buys a 1980s solar-run calculator. He delights in this simple tool (no recharging needed). It occurs to me that if we circle back and go no further than the tech advances

of the 80s, we’ll be reading paper and cloth books, sitting outside, talking to each other, looking at each other, and we’ll also have time to sit in a chair in the yard and lean back and look into the sky and talk about what we see way up there — day or night. Flashback: Recently, a friend of mine sat with me and friend No. 2 on the deck of No. 2’s mountain cabin. On occasional nights, Friend No. 1 names constellations, spouts Greek mythology and recalls star names while pointing into the sky. He repels technology like a magnet turned backward. He had found me the day before with a topographic map and a compass. He shuns GPS and cellphone. There on the deck, friend No. 2 pointed his iPhone toward the sky, demonstrating how a new app enabled his phone to show and name constellations. I feared I was witnessing the prelude to a homicide. Non-tech Day One: Cause for pause: Without written fiction, poetry and nonfiction, we’d have to hear someone’s idea of speaking voices — tone, accent, emphasis. Our imaginations would have their legs cut from beneath them. Tech Bedtime: I find and read my 12-year-old son a short paper letter I’d handwritten to him when he was 2 months old (2003). When I finish, he says, “That was before touch screen.” “Right,” I say. “When I’m real old,” he says, “I can say [he uses his old person voice], ‘I was a kid back before touch screen, when you had to punch a bunch of buttons to do anything.’ And they’ll say, ‘Oh, your fingers must have gotten tired,’ and I’ll say, ‘They certainly did.’” I say, “We need to scan and save those old letters I wrote to you, so they will last forever.” PS Clyde Edgerton is the author of ten novels, a memoir and a new work, Papadaddy’s Book for New Fathers. He is the Thomas S. Kenan III Distinguished Professor of Creative Writing at UNCW.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Vine Wisdom

Thanksgiving With Foodies A grateful celebration of good friends, great cooking and the perfect wines for your table

By Robyn James

This country is obsessed

with food. Seeking food, preparing food, consuming food. There are shows, competitions and social media postings of exotic dishes on an hourly basis.

I wondered what it would be like to have Thanksgiving dinner with a true dyed-in-the-wool foodie. Only one way to find out. I called on my friends Willie and Kate Hendricks, who share an obsession not only for finding and preparing different dishes, but also — most importantly — matching those foods with a diverse selection of wines. To suggest going to a restaurant with this couple is to rain on their parade. They want to do it themselves. The Hendricks firmly believe Thanksgiving is the most important food day of the year. “We have incredible food and spices that have not been available throughout history. We share it with family and friends. Therefore, to us it is also the most special wine day. We usually have fifteen to twenty friends over and we serve five to seven different varieties of wine, always a mix of both red and white.” Since Willie is the Meatmaster, I asked him about selections for turkey and whether the cooking method altered their wine choices. “I know of three main ways people in the South serve turkey: roasted (various flavors), smoked and deep fried. For any style of cooking I would recommend these white wines: Nice German riesling that is not too sweet, such as Dr. Loosen L Riesling. Also, a spicy French white from the

Alsace region such as Maison Cattin gewürztraminer or a fresh and fruity pinot blanc. For bold people, a high quality Greek wine such as Boutari Moschofilero with citrus and melon flavors.” Based on the traditional side dishes such as sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce and gravy, the Hendricks believe that more fruit-forward reds are appropriate. “We have tasted and tried several red wines with roasted turkey and think they are good unless the seasoning is a little different, like Cajun sauces, Indian style, etc. An Oregon pinot noir such as Roco is a great match, and this also goes well with honey baked ham that some folks like to serve. A fruity Australian shiraz such as Jim Barry Lodge Hill from Clare Valley matches well.” Great fans of the smoked or grilled turkey, Kate and Willie lean toward reds on the peppery side such as Moillard Les Violettes Côtes Du Rhône from France, Honora Vera Garnacha and Juan Gill Mourvèdre, both earthy selections from Spain. Deep-frying your Thanksgiving turkey is seriously in vogue these days, and although the Hendricks have never tried this method, there are some wine pairings that they suggest. “The taste that pops in mind is a good quality chardonnay with a hint of oak such as Sanford. Also, a tasting Tempranillo such as Hecula or an authentic German beer.” At the close of dinner, Kate, in charge of the traditional pumpkin pie, believes that a sweet German riesling such as Klosterdoktor Auslese is the perfect complement. If possible, latch onto your local foodie for Thanksgiving; it should be an awesome experience! PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at robynajames@gmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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T h e k i tc h e n g a r d e n

Rebirth of a Kitchen Gardener After a long hot summer that, for the first time ever, killed my enthusiasm to garden, came the healing rains of autumn — and a bounty of winter vegetables

By Jan Leitschuh

By the time you read this, we hope to be

eating fresh organic collards, romaine, kale, cabbage and more from our garden. Perhaps even Brussels sprouts — who knows about these things; it was worth experimenting.

To me, this is a minor miracle, an autumn rebirth of something I had thought might actually be gone. Gone, gone. Forever gone. A lifelong gardener, I planted tomatoes and spinach alongside my parents, admired zinnias and cucumbers in the gardens of grandmothers, pulled rhubarb and watched lettuce germinate alongside great-aunts. Yet this summer I had a serious, soul-searing crisis of faith. From mid-July through September, I gave up on Sandhills gardening. Yep. Turned off the irrigation taps and put the hoe away. Stopped weeding. Could hardly bear to look at the garden. Dry, overgrown with grass, seed heads drooping to plant more weed seed, the mid-to-late summer garden was a sad tangle of trash. Little looks as sorrowful as a neglected garden. It wasn’t always this way. The spring garden thrived. We ate abundantly of greens, mint, fresh Sandhills strawberries, asparagus and raspberries. We threw extra collards to the chickens. Weather was cool, sunny and pleasant. Blackberries followed in June, then blueberry season was a whopper, and the freezer filled. So far, so good. The stalling of enthusiasm began when I got a few bales of straw to mulch some expensive new raspberries that had taken hold that spring and

were doing fine. Summer’s baking heat was coming, though, and mulch helps prevent new roots from drying out. Straw breaks down easily, and adds valuable organic matter to the soil. Mulching is one of the most important ways to maintain healthy plants in the Sandhills, either in the garden or landscape. I knew the raspberry roots would appreciate the extra coolness and damp the mulch provided, especially since we are pushing the zone — they favor cooler weather, but they do pretty well in a site we have with afternoon shade and plenty of water. Mulch prevents water loss from evaporating. It keeps the surface temperature more even. It reduces the abundance of weeds. I spread the straw thinly and . . . the raspberries promptly declined, then died. I suspected I had purchased some toxic straw. If you happen to get straw (or hay, which I don’t favor due to weed seeds) that came from a field treated with broadleaf herbicides such as Grazon to control weed growth in pasture areas, the herbicides stay in the materials a LONG time and basically poison the material and the ground it decomposes into. The broadleaf herbicide is so persistent that if a grazing field is treated, and a maternal horse or cow grazes it, and their offspring nurses them, the offspring’s manure remains toxic enough to kill garden plants. It’s a popular herbicide in this area of beautiful pastures, which is one reason I now also avoid horse manure. And that’s a sad disgrace, because our sand could use every bit of organic matter we can add to it, and horse manure is abundant. Well, that setback kicked a little heart out of me right then and there. I’m proud of our home-grown organic raspberries, which shouldn’t thrive as they do in our Sandhills’ Zone 8a garden. And I lost an entire row of garden, as the toxins are taken up by new plants. Who wants to eat persistent herbicides? Healthy soil is currency to an organic gardener. That particular garden row is

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November Author Events THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 5 AT 5:30 PM – 7:30 PM

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 13 AT 10:30 AM

PLAY READING. Playwright June Guralnick and company read her new play Birds of a Feather: A Comedy About De-Extinction. Listen to a tale about a time-travelling geneticist who journeys one hundred years into the past. It’s New York City, 1912— His mission? —To save the passenger pigeon. Add a smidgen of social satire, some slapstick humor and an eccentric family of women to the mix and you have a comedic love story that is sure to keep you grinning. Event is free and open to the public. Info: The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 16 AT 3:30 PM

JUNE GURALNICK: BIRDS OF A FEATHER: A COMEDY ABOUT DE-EXTINCTION

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 AT 10:30 AM

PRE-SCHOOL STORY TIME

DEBORAH DIESEN: THE NOT VERY MERRY POUT POUT FISH

MEET THE AUTHOR. Children’s book author Deborah Diesen discusses her book The Not Very Merry Pout Pout Fish. This gathering is most enjoyable for children ages 2 to 6. Event is free and open to the public. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

PRE-SCHOOL STORY TIME

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 20 AT 10:30 AM

STORYTELLING. Most enjoyable for children ages 2 to 6.

PRE-SCHOOL STORY TIME

FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 6 AT 5:00 PM

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 26

JULIAN PLEASANTS: THE POLITICAL CAREER OF W. KERR SCOTT: THE SQUIRE FROM HAW RIVER

MEET THE AUTHOR. Julian Pleasants, Professor Emeritus of History at the University of Florida and author of The Political Career of W. Kerr Scott: The Squire From Haw River, leads a history discussion about this plainspoken farmer from Alamance County who was both the governor (1949-1953) and a U.S. Senator (1954-1958) of our great state. Event is free and open to the public. Info: The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 10 AT 5 PM

DIANE CHAMBERLAIN: PRETENDING TO DANCE

MEET THE AUTHOR. International bestselling author Diane Chamberlain discusses her new novel Pretending To Dance, an exploration about the complexities of family and lies. Event is free and open to the public. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

CLOSED FOR THANKSGIVING FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 27 AT 10:30 AM

KATHY MCGOUGAN & BUDDY THE DOG (OR LILY): BUDDY BOOKS PRE-SCHOOL STORY TIME

STORYTELLING. Author and retired teacher, Kathy McGougan, shares the adventures of her Russell Terrier, Buddy, with young children.McGougan is a reading interventionist with 18 years of Reading Recovery experience. Her books contain high-frequency words with lots of repetition in order to aid the developing reader; they also promote fluency through rhyme.This gathering is enjoyable for children ages 3 to 6. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

The Country Bookshop 40

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140 NW Broad St, Southern Pines, NC • 910.692.3211 • thecountrybookshop.biz


T h e k i tc h e n g a r d e n

now only good for flowers — if they grow. But such is gardening life. We shrug off the losses and go on. Then came the deer. I’ll write about deer in a future column, but you may have noticed there are an increasing number in our area. Pinehurst has even set up a Deer Management Task Force to respond to growing concerns. We live adjacent to lovely Weymouth Woods and, with some strategies, have coexisted with our ruminant neighbors peaceably for years. One lovely eve in early July, a doe came in and grazed the strawberry plants, the tomatoes and even the bell pepper plants down to leafless nubs. It’s heartbreaking to see months of careful work removed in one fell swoop. We do have a fence around the garden but, despite extensions to raise it, it’s not high enough. That was probably the death knell for my 2015 enthusiasms. It was too late to plant again in the searing summer heat. But wait . . . there’s more. The summer of 2015 was hot and dry. From July through early October, we had very little rain. Our sandy soils baked themselves sterile in the glare of a hot sun. When a rare rain did fall, it came in great, heavy bucketing bursts, not the polite “inch-per-week” of my childhood Midwestern summers. It drained away just as quickly and the soil was dry again in three days. The hot sun scalded my nubbed plants. No matter how much I irrigated, they faded away. The earth dried up. Microbial life and worms, the drivers of an organic garden, powered down. I was not alone in this desiccation. Local farmers, who rely on farm pond irrigation for storage of our fickle rains, began to watch pond levels fall quickly. They put important crops on a water budget, and some had to choose which crops to irrigate at all. Some went six weeks or more without sky water. I myself gave up. My mental whine: Sandhills summers are tough! This summer’s heat and dryness drove me out of the garden. It was the last straw, if you will. I simply didn’t want to go out there. I shut off the irrigation, and left it to the weeds which, naturally, thrived. The garden looked a disgrace — and I didn’t care. My work kept me busy, and there is only so much energy to go around. Was it over? I wondered. My love of gardening? I’ve seen it happen before, even if I don’t welcome it. Strong enthusiasms, even passions, do leave us in life. Even as we sense that ship has sailed, we can still cling to the mooring lines. Often, we let our enthusiasms define us — if we’re not this, who, then are we? Not knowing the answer to that, we clutch and repeat, bound to old habits by a hint of fear, life-giving enthusiasm now gone. To live creatively, with juicy enthusiasm, somePineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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T h e k i tc h e n g a r d e n

times we need to let go of the old and pass into the “next” — ­ whatever that is. So I was ready, if required, to let go of gardening, a pleasure of a lifetime; I’d done it before with other mad enthusiasms — some of lifetime duration — that had also inexplicably gone stale. It just didn’t happen. First, the fig tree started bearing in August, and poured out buckets of sweet fruit, with no effort on my part. Then the muscadines, both the cultivated varieties on the arbor and the wild fruits, threw down more buckets of sweet treats. Apples, scarred and scabbed but delicious, ripened and became spicy apple sauce to accompany roasted sweet potatoes and smoked pork. Then came the rains of October. At first just a gentle drizzle, perfect for opening the earth to receive the bounty of above ­— even sandy soils benefit from meteorological foreplay — the soft moisture was followed by torrents of rain, courtesy of a clash between Hurricane Joaquin and another loaded weather system in the west. It rained and rained and rained. We scarcely saw the sun for ten days, and it rained on each of those days. I found myself ordering a flat of flowering kales and planting them about the property for winter color. Then I bought some vegetable sets, mostly greens like collards, cabbage, kale, yukina and — yes, why not? — even Brussels sprouts. I potted them up into containers. I began looking at pansies and thinking, “Why not a flat? I’ll plant them in planters and the backyard, where the dog keeps the deer away.” I got dirt under my nails again. In fact, I couldn’t keep away from the moist earth. So now there are pots in the backyard filled with more greens. A few collards and kales are even planted in the main garden, a strip of fence wire over the top. I’ll have to come up with a better idea before too long, because nothing has changed with the deer situation. Perhaps next year I’ll skip July and August gardening, and focus on the cooler spring and fall months — or just try again. As I dig in the soft ground, soil clinging to my hands, I am aware of the contrast between my resignation, my willingness to let go, and the swift return of the gift I thought I had lost. Hope, as they say, springs eternal. Plants too. Whether they shape themselves into a kitchen garden depends on the enthusiasms within. And thus far, it seems, they still inspire. PS

Brimfield Fall Kathleen Earthrowl

Secrets Jeanne Bessette

Snow White Rose Ailene Fields

Blue Image Bruce Dorfman

Broadhurst

Art Gallery 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst, NC 28374 910.295.4817

judy@broadhurstgallery.com |www.broadhurstgallery.com Open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, Friday 11 am to 5 pm Saturdays 1pm to 4 pm Wednesdays and Sundays by appointment

Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative.

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November 2015 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Out of the Blue

Boring No More Presidential candidates used to be a cure for insomnia. Now they’re the most addictive thing on TV By Deborah Salomon

PineStraw covers the arts, history,

lifestyles, personalities, fashion, entertainment, opinions. Sounds like politics, which has thrived under those headings since ancient Egypt at least. Pyramids and sphinxes didn’t immortalize the village baker. Cleopatra’s bangs were the rage. The Medicis hired Michelangelo. Gilbert Stuart painted George Washington and Jacques-Louis David immortalized Napoleon. Whither Shakespeare without the Richards and the Henrys? Besides, as the Bard suggests, if all the world’s a stage then the double feature now playing is a blockbuster tragicomedy.

I grew up thinking politics was the incredibly boring stuff my parents and their friends argued about while sitting on the roof of our apartment building on hot summer nights. The politicians they discussed — foreign and local — were paunchy old men who smoked cigars. Their wives specialized in sensible shoes and hats with veils covering fresh perms. Policy was haggled in smoke-filled back rooms, not on Steven Colbert. The electorate knew only what the politicians wanted them to know as published in serious newspapers. Neither Eleanor Roosevelt’s significant other nor Ike’s mistress made the evening news. Only now have we learned of Warren Harding’s love child. Politics is once again a force in lifestyles, fashion, personalities, romance and drama. The Borgias would be so proud. I am no longer bored, only horrified and definitely addicted. Start with personalities, namely Ronald Dump — er, Donald Trump, who on better days reminds me of the wacky characters Red Skelton created. Oh, if Philip Seymour Hoffman had only lived to portray him. When he speaks I expect a laugh-track, then commercials for Capital One, with the Trumpster asking, “Wanna see what’s in my wallet?” He travels like a movie star in a customized Boeing 757 with gold-plated bathroom faucets and seat-belt buckles. If elected, will President Dump make do with Air Force One? Fashion: Everything changed when Jack, Jackie and Givenchy ascended the presidential throne. The First Lady’s capris, pillbox hats, headscarves and size 9 ½ Italian calfskin pumps diverted attention from the Bay of Pigs. With the exception of Nancy (trained in Hollywood), Lady Bird, Patricia, Betty, Rosalynn, Barbara, Hillary and Laura gave fashion a bye. Michelle has certainly invigorated wardrobe-watching. And now, with two women candidates, couture is again an item since half the electorate is female and 100 percent of them notice clothes. Hillary is taking this very seriously. No more frumpy Secretary of State in Kermit-

green boucle, clunky jewelry, ponytails with gray roots. Her fashion consultant, hair stylist and make-up artist created what Billy Crystal calls “. . . MAH--VELOUS!” But Carly Fiorina cops the Sarah Jessica Parker award (I’m not the first to notice the resemblance to the Sex and the City diva) for her svelte silhouette clad in simplebut-elegant sheaths, abbreviated jackets and thigh-hugging boot-cut jeans, which accentuate the posture of a Russian ballerina. Sorry we didn’t get to see more of Rick Perry’s cowboy boots or Scott Walker’s biker gear, but look, stuff happens. I suspect Jeb’s dressed by Maine outfitters L.L. Bean; the others, by Men’s Wearhouse, with the exception of Brooklynite Bernie Sanders, the Green Mountain gringo who ought to wear flannel shirts from Orvis. Ties? Snorin’ borin’ on both sides of the aisle. Chris Christie often appears surveying storm damage in voluminous hiplength wind jackets — a wise decision. Advice to The Donald: lose the shiny suits, no matter how expensive. A hostile take-over of Brooks Brothers might solve your dilemma. Surely, after more than a year of comedy, pathos, drama and wardrobe malfunctions the losers, accustomed to cameras and spotlights, will consider show biz careers. I’m sure there’s a place on Big Bang Theory for Rand Paul. Carly, with longish legs, high cheekbones, tight smile and an OK voice (when she warbles about her Yorkies) might lip-sync Celine Dion, in Vegas. I can picture Jeb playing the Jimmy Stewart role in Harvey, while La Martha’s got an apron with Hillary’s name on it. Ted Cruz is a perfect late-night pitchman for Do-or-Dye, a men’s hair product, while Melissa McCarthy waits, arms open, for Chris Christie to join Mike & Molly. Rubio — no prosthetic ears required to play Spock on a Trek sequel. Mike Huckabee perked up when he heard that Garrison Keillor’s leaving Prairie Home Companion. Joe Biden of the million-dollar smile can write his own ticket on the game show circuit, if the price is right. Rick Santorum . . . give that father of seven a sweater and dig out Mister Rogers’ set. Even Dr. Ben Carson’s name sounds perfect for chief of staff on Grey’s Anatomy. Remember M*A*S*H*? Bobby Jindal seems born to recreate the role of Corporal Klinger, who cross-dressed his way into the hearts and minds of American viewers. In the meantime, watch for his “Jindal Bells” holiday CD. What about Bernie? I daresay, in the right costume, he’d bring down the house in a SNL Game of Thrones spoof. Finally, The Donald, tricked out in top hat, high boots and whip, tweets that he’s eyeing center ring at Ringling Bros. Barnum & Bailey. Poor lions. Until then . . . the show goes on. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and The Pilot. She may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Ho m e tow n

Talking Turkey From the frozen food aisle at Big Star to the tavern on the edge of town

By Bill Fields

When it comes to vivid memories of

Thanksgivings past, I see one of my parents pausing in the Big Star, grocery list in hand and a big question on their mind.

The debate of early November, about Democrats and Republicans, would have given way later that month to another kind of important choice: Butterball or House of Raeford. Deciding which brand of turkey to purchase for the holiday meal took place in the open aisle of the cold-foods section rather than in a curtained voting booth. Nonetheless this was serious business. It was a more simple food time, but deciding between two candidates can be as challenging as picking among half a dozen. Butterball was established, the New York Yankees of frozen fowl. House of Raeford was sort of local, like a favorite Atlantic Coast Conference team. Labels were read, price per pound mulled, and eventually the decision would be made. With a shopping cart that weighed twelve to fifteen pounds more than it had — the bird riding with the apple rings, olives, pimento cheese, celery, cranberry sauce and other essentials — we would make our way to a checkout line. The menu would be complete after a stop at the A&P for a couple of Jane Parker pies. By the time the broadcast of the Macy’s parade from New York was winding down late on Thanksgiving morning, the turkey would have been prepped and the oven preheated. By then the only lingering question was whether to use what seemed to be half a roll of foil to tent the turkey or let it bake uncovered, like a girl greedy for the sun at Ocean Drive. While there was an occasional vegetable experiment, we never waffled about the stuffing beyond the proper amount of sage. We were a dressing-in-the-pan clan, and that was that. Because our relatively small family was spread out, mostly around the South, our Thanksgiving gatherings didn’t require an extra table leaf or

chairs brought up from the basement. Come four o’clock or so, when we sat down to eat, we were glad to be there. The turkey, regardless of brand, whether carved with an electric knife or the old-fashioned way, was tasty. One plus of not having a holiday overflowing with folks is that there would always be leftovers. I will listen patiently to an anti-turkey person who insists it is bland and dry fare, but my allegiance remains strong. Of course, my taste buds are no doubt influenced by tradition — loitering in the kitchen as my mother cooked, throwing a football with my father, spending time with my older sisters who had already had left home. In the lazy hours after dinner, when you were doing nothing, you were doing a lot. Thanksgivings didn’t tend to distinguish themselves one from the other, the way Christmases could, the sadness wrought on Washington — and its fans — by the Cowboys’ Clint Longley in the televised 1974 game being a huge exception. I recall that 24-23 outcome with the sting of my lowly score on the math SAT. A few years stand out for better reasons, the Thanksgiving weeks during college, especially freshman year, when Wednesday night was more anticipated than Thursday afternoon because of the opportunity to reconnect with friends. The late-1970s were prehistoric when compared with today’s ease of communication. After three months away at our respective schools — Carolina, Duke, Appalachian State, East Carolina — my buddies and I had plenty of catching up to do. On Thanksgiving Eve, at a tavern in town or a disco out on the highway, we would compare notes on our new worlds — classes we liked, roommates we didn’t, meal-plan cafeteria food that, like the weather, we could do nothing about and had us longing for a full-size Frigidaire to raid. That night, and over the long weekend during which we would meet again for lunch, to hit a bucket of golf balls or play nighttime tennis at the park if the weather was good, we relished being among those familiar faces. Whatever our small talk, being home was a big deal. PS Southern Pines native Bill Fields never lived on Connecticut Avenue but has lived in the actual Connecticut for a long time.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Ho r s e S e n s e

Our Beloved Seniors A pair of local farms where caring for an aging horse is second nature

By Toby R aymond

After I finished brushing Classy the

other day, I stood back and marveled at how young he looks. Although there are a few telltale signs that Father Time has come calling — the star that is no longer well defined, but rather indistinct and roan-like, and the clump of white hair on his tailhead — his legs are still as clean as the proverbial whistle, he’s in good weight, his coat is shiny, and his eyes are bright and beautiful. At this rate, he could go on for a very long time. Needless to say, I hope so. But it got me to thinking: What if life changed for me before it changed for him? What if I had a chance to sail around the world? Move to Sardinia? Zig instead of zag? What would happen to my beloved Classy? We all know how easy it is to acquire a horse, but it’s not necessarily all that easy to rehome it, particularly the pensioners. With advanced health care technologies that can forestall the inevitable, horses are living longer than ever, potentially putting many of us in the same boat. There’s the possibility that someone will need a pasture mate, but those opportunities are pretty rare. There’s the non-horse person who wants a lawn ornament, but that’s really reaching, and can be a little scary too, since someone without experience can end up doing more harm than good. Euthanasia is always an option, and in some circles considered a mercy in the event there is no other safe alternative. Then there is the equine retirement facility, the best choice of all — for a price. My own horse Coco stayed for a time at such a facility. I can attest from personal experience that horses there were given the same high standard of care my mother received when she moved to an assisted living community. Michele Lahr, who runs Magnolia Gate Farm in Robbins with her parents, is truly amazing. Under her watchful eye, not even the tiniest change in behavior escapes her. She’s on top of each horse’s wants and needs, to which she caters without hesitation. Special feeds, blankets, meds, topical applica-

tions, hoof trimming, available for vet and farrier appointments — she’s right there. And then some. Furthermore, the setting couldn’t be lovelier. Situated a good distance from the road and flanked on either side by gently rolling pastures, the house sits on top of a knoll, ideally positioned to overlook the picturesque scene below. Those rolling pastures are immaculate — Lahr’s dad is constantly on patrol, able to handle anything before it happens. But some of the inhabitants are so sweet and gentle they are allowed to wander about unrestricted until evening, when they are tucked into their large, airy stalls. Indeed, all the animals on the farm are sweet and gentle, including the mule and goats, and the most adorable donkeys, Laverne and Shirley and baby Dixie, who became Coco’s herd, and who I gave fair warning to Lahr that I might have to steal. But it’s not a job for the faint of heart; it takes a special kind of person to look after our elder statesmen. While we all know that life, especially life with horses, is not linear. You can count on the fact that the attrition rate is 100 percent when it comes to taking care of seniors. The slightest nick, or a few mouthfuls of feed left over in the bucket, if not quickly detected, can spell serious trouble. Or, it just might be time. Whatever the situation, having to bear the anguish of losing a member of the family — that’s who they are, after all — over and over again, is a heartbreak that only gets harder with each passing. I believe this to be true because I know another guardian angel: my great friend, Carole Landoll. We met my first Christmas in Horse Country at the annual gala sponsored by the Driving Club. We were seated together, and as to be expected, we started talking about . . . what else? Landoll’s eyes quite literally lit up as she recounted the most delightful stories about her “treasures.” That she looks like an angel — or even a sprite — added to her charm, and filled the already lovely evening with a special glow. But, there also was a tinge of sadness, as she listed the horses she has buried since she began doing this remarkable work. So, as I found myself pondering the “what ifs” for Classy and me, I decided to call Landoll, and take her up on her long-standing invitation to visit By and By Farm. As soon as I passed through the gate, I felt an immediate sense of calm. Maybe it was because I could see right away that the original

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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40-acre farmstead had not been altered so much as lovingly preserved. Thanks to Landoll’s husband, Tom, it’s almost as if the clock stopped in the 1800s when times were slow, simple and gracious. I’m sure that same intrinsic tranquility was shared by my compatriot four-legged companions the instant they stepped off the trailer too. Expansive and graceful pastures house happily contented residents, two of whom we came upon dozing in their oversized shelter. It was apparent from the moment they opened their eyes that Landoll was much loved. And, in turn, they know the feeling is mutual. Moving quietly from one to another, she assured each horse that while she loves them all, he is really her favorite. She gave peppermints to 30 plus year old Wolfgang and to Elliot, who is doing well at 36. Landoll also is Mom to 30-something Asner, in his own pasture; her youngest charge, Max at 19 and his 35-year-old mare Lida in theirs, and EPM survivor Wylie next door. After wandering along the path to the pond, a gentle breeze followed us up the hill to the hay fields that looked more like Vermont than Carthage. We made our way back to the house, where we kicked off our shoes and settled down on the wraparound porch, cross-legged in Landoll’s cushy overstuffed chairs. We sipped ginger honey tea and talked. With seven horses on the farm, including her cute Connemara driving pony, Landoll confesses that she is no longer is adding to that number. After spending sixteen years dedicated to her darlings, she acknowledges that, as time goes by, it’s becoming just too hard. It’s plain to see this is more than a job for Landoll; it’s a way of life, a calling. And, even though she takes comfort in knowing that no stone is left unturned when it comes to the horses’ care, and that their passing will be gentle and kind, it doesn’t change the fact that eventually she will have to make that dreaded call: to the owner, to the vet, to the person who digs the hole. But until then, we both agreed, each day at By and By Farm is truly a gift. With that, we said our good-byes, and as I made my way down the road, I was heartened to know people like Lahr and Carole are out there to care so unselfishly for our beloved retirees. At the same time, I still can’t say I’ve come up with a “one size fits all” solution to the dilemma. Fortunately, however, for the moment Classy’s fate is not an issue, so I’ll continue to do what I’ve been doing all along: taking it one day at a time. PS Toby Raymond is a rider and writer specializing in equine branding. Toby can be reached a (802) 3532215 tlraymond2@gmail.com

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B I R D WA T C H

Rubycrowned Kinglet

It takes a dedicated bird-watcher to spot this small but brilliant songbird By Susan Campbell

It is that time of year: The

mercury has begun to drop and one cannot help but notice our finest feathered friends are coming back to spend the winter with us. Birds of many shapes, colors and sizes will spend the next several months here in the Piedmont, making the most of what our ponds, streams, fields and forests have to offer. One of the smallest, second only to the occasional wintering hummingbird, is the ruby-crowned kinglet.

Although they are by no means scarce, it takes a dedicated bird-watcher to spot this diminutive and elusive songbird. Their distinctive behavior — almost constantly flitting from branch to branch, making nervous wing flicks every couple of seconds — signals their presence. If one will stay still long enough so you can get a good look, the ruby-crowned kinglet is distinguished by an olive-brown hue over most of its body, accented with white wing bars and a pale eye ring. Despite its colorful name, only males sport the ruby crown. And don’t blink, because the crown consists of just a couple of small feathers. The red is apparent only when the bird is especially agitated. However, if you know what to listen for, you’ll discover that these little birds are all over the place during a good part of the year. The two-part harmony of their scolding call provides a soundtrack in thick evergreen vegetation in a variety of habitats: from the tall pines to brushy tangles at the water’s edge. Ruby-crowneds are masters at bug-hunting, not only able

to grab small insects from thin air but also good at plucking them from the undersides of leaves or excavating for them in the nooks and crannies of tree bark. They are not afraid to take advantage of morsels hanging in spider webs, and they will even forage at ground level when they spot the right sized meal. Although they’re shy birds, you can encourage ruby-crowned kinglets to become regulars at your feeders and birdbaths by making sure there’s some cover nearby. Given their size, these nervous little birds need good protection from rain and wind as well as predators. But they do like suet. And they will also drink sugar water from oriole feeders equipped with smaller openings to accommodate their small, short bills. You may also see kinglets feeding on dogwood or other berries that have been opened by larger birds or squirrels. It is amazing that this tiny species not only survives our winters but breeds across the boreal forests way up north where summer temperatures tend not to be all that warm. And counterintuitively, their nest sites tend to be high up in the tallest of the mature trees. Apparently ruby-crowneds’ bodies are very energy-efficient. Studies of their metabolism have found that regardless of the season, they use only about ten calories per day. So it’s not surprising that male birds sometimes use song exclusively to advertise their breeding territory instead of fighting, which is dangerous and wastes energy. The ruby-crowned has a close cousin that is also here with us in winter: the golden-crowned kinglet. This bird is a bit larger but even more likely to be overlooked. I think we will save that bird for discussion next month. PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, or by calling (910) 585-0574.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Pinehurst Medical Clinic Offering Internal Medicine and Primary Care to the Sandhills Region with Five locations

Heather Glen

15 Regional Drive Pinehurst | (910) 295-5511

Sanford Medical Group 555 Carthage Street Sanford | (919) 774-6518

Primary Care of Sanford 1413 Greenway Court Sanford | (919) 292-1878

PMC South Clinic

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Neese Clinic

102 Gossman Drive Southern Pines | (910) 246-4140

Welcome Dr. Marri Brackman November 2015 New Patient Appointments Please call our New Patient Department (910) 235-2664 or (800) 272-5682 For more information about our services and providers go to www.pinehurstmedical.com

Advanced Medicine | Genuine Compassion 54

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A N o v e l Y e ar

Mountains to the Sea And back again

By Wiley Cash

In the summer of 2013, my wife and I

decided it was time to leave West Virginia and return home to North Carolina. The only problem was deciding where to live. We spent hours listing the pros and cons of two cities we both know and love: Asheville and Wilmington.

Asheville: My first introduction to the city came in 1993, when my older sister took a job as a nurse at one of the big hospitals in town. She lived in a century-old inn. It was elegant and haunting, and so many of my feelings about Asheville are still tied to my first impressions of her apartment. I was in tenth grade, doing what I thought all young poets did: smoking cigarettes, listening to The Doors, and taking myself way too seriously. At the time, there was a dive bar on Lexington Avenue in downtown Asheville called Vincent’s Ear, and if you were 16, smoking cigarettes, listening to The Doors, and taking yourself way too seriously, it was exactly where you wanted to be. It was there that I learned that UNC Asheville had a degree in creative writing. By the time my freshman year rolled around in 1996, I’d cut my hair and given up both cigarettes and Jim Morrison. I’d also realized that I was a terrible poet but a not-too-terrible fiction writer. Over the next four years at UNC Asheville I threw myself into learning how to be a reader first and a writer second. I also learned how to be a citizen who

was active both on campus and in the community, and I spent valuable time with a sister who was eight years older than me but finally beginning to feel like a peer. My senior year, my younger brother was in the freshman class, and it was a thrill for all of us to be in the same city for the first time in many years. I graduated in 2000, received a master’s degree in English at another university, and in 2002 I returned to join the small adjunct faculty at my alma mater. From the time I moved to Asheville in 1996 until I left for good to attend graduate school in Louisiana in 2003, the city had experienced incredible growth and change. A downtown that had been largely vacant was now as much a tourist attraction as the Biltmore House. The craft beer movement had just begun, and people from around the world were beginning to know Asheville as “The Paris of the South.” I wasn’t in Louisiana for a full day before I felt the inexplicable pull of the mountains. Wilmington: My first introduction to the city came in 1997, when my younger brother and I joined my parents for a weekend in Southport. My mom and dad were considering a move to the coast after spending nearly three decades in Gastonia. On a Saturday morning while my parents house-hunted, my brother and I followed Highway 133 North, stopping to snoop around Orton Plantation and later pulling off the road and walking into the pine woods, where we stumbled upon a centuries-old graveyard that I’ve never again been able to locate. We arrived in Wilmington and found a charming downtown complete with cobblestone streets and a used bookstore where I purchased my first copy of Thomas Wolfe’s Look Homeward, Angel (a novel written about Asheville). My parents relocated to Oak Island in 1998, and in the spring of 2005 my brother left the mountains and moved to Wilmington. I came “home” to the

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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coast that summer and helped my brother renovate a house near Figure Eight. One night, he and I went downtown seven years after we visited it for the first time. That night I met the woman who would become my wife. We were married in Wilmington over a snowy weekend in February 2010. This was the woman with whom I was making the pro and con list, Asheville on one side and Wilmington on the other. We settled on Wilmington. We love the city; we always have. It didn’t hurt that the majority of our family lives within a forty-five minute drive. In the past two years we’ve made a home here, and we started a family. Our daughter was born in Wilmington a year after we returned to North Carolina. But, to quote Thomas Wolfe, “Something has spoken to me in the night,” and that something is the mountains of North Carolina. That’s where I found myself this past May when I was invited to give the commencement address at UNC Asheville. At one point over the weekend, the university’s provost and I were talking, and he asked if I’d ever consider a position as writer-inresidence at UNC Asheville. I told him that two years ago that would’ve been an incredibly exciting opportunity, but we live in Wilmington. We have a life in Wilmington. He said, “The thing about being writer-in-residence is that you wouldn’t have to be in residence all the time.” A formal offer came a few weeks later. We’d live in Asheville in the fall and I’d teach two courses at the university while curating a reading series of visiting writers. We’d come home to Wilmington in December, and I’d correspond with writing students from my desk in the Port City. Once again, my wife and I spent weeks going over the pros and cons, and finally we decided that it was an opportunity that we couldn’t pass up, but that didn’t keep us from being incredibly nervous about such a huge transition. A few weeks ago, we traveled to a literary festival in the mountains outside Asheville. We rented a little cabin on the South Toe River. After arriving, we unloaded the car and took our daughter down to the river just as the sun was setting. She stared at the slow-moving water without blinking, her mouth moving in a near-silent babble that resembled the quiet sound of the water rolling over the rocks. My wife and I witnessed the wide-eyed wonder that only the very young can express, the same wonder with which she approached the ocean the first time she saw it just minutes from our home in Wilmington. We could do this. We could have a life in two places. A foot in the mountain stream. A foot in the Atlantic surf. Pieces of our heart in both. PS Wiley Cash is a New York Times best-selling author whose second novel, This Dark Road to Mercy, was released last year. He lives in Wilmington.

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p l e as u r e s o f l i f e

Grace and Gratitude A personal offering at Thanksgiving

By Tom Allen

November opens a season

of gratitude, a celebration of food, family and football. To lessen the guilt that comes with overeating dressing and pumpkin pie, neuroscientists, who study brain matter, suggest that giving thanks supports good health. Their research concludes that identifying things we’re thankful for boosts levels of dopamine and serotonin, the “happy” neurotransmitters. So between now and Thanksgiving Day, give it a try.

Me first: In addition to a great family and friends, a good job, and a faith that keeps me grounded, I have a roof over my head, grub on the table and a dog who jumps into my lap when no one else will. In addition, here are ten off-the-top-of-my-head gratitudes: Eggplant. Growing the purple orbs makes me smile. I’ve nursed one plant with one bloom just so I could harvest that one aubergine, as the French call it. A recipe for eggplant Parmesan, from an old Prevention magazine, advises the cook to bake the fruit instead of frying it. This dish is a family favorite, whether the eggplant comes from my garden or Harris Teeter. O.K. Keene. My high school business teacher taught me how to type. This teddy bear of a guy had a Southern drawl and a pot belly that hung over his belt. He’d walk the aisles between desks, watching us tap away on manual Coronas, occasionally raising the basement classroom window to spit tobacco juice. Thanks, Mr. Keene. I’m typing this column because of you. If only I’d taken auto mechanics as well. Think of the money I could’ve saved changing my own oil. Morten Lauridsen. This American composer’s choral settings are mesmerizing, inspirational and healing. Check out YouTube clips of “Sure on This Shining Night,” his setting of poet James Agee’s mystical words. One need not understand Latin or comprehend the mystery conveyed in “O Magnum Mysterium,” ancient words about the birth of Christ. Listen to Lauridsen’s radiant works after a long day at the office or when insomnia strikes at 2 a.m.  Ronnie’s Chuckwagon. If you haven’t been to Ronnie’s on the main drag in Carthage, you’ve missed a treat. Nice folks, good food and great prices. I grew up across from a hole-in-the-wall grill that served the best hamburgers and fries. Ronnie’s menu is more extensive but his burger, “all the way,” with fries and a Coke, conjures memories of younger days, which sure boosts my serotonin levels. The Book of Ruth. The Old Testament book has all the characteristics of great literature. In four brief chapters, the writer recalls the story of Ruth,

a foreigner who returns to Israel with her Jewish mother-inlaw after both women are widowed. Providence intervenes and Ruth catches the eye of Boaz, a wealthy old bachelor who owns the barley field where she gleans. Grief, intrigue and romance inform the plot. Open a Bible. This tender story takes all of fifteen minutes to read. The ending will leave you hopeful and inspired. A Pocketknife. Specifically, my dad’s W.R. Case XX USA 6623 with dual folding blades. These penknives retail for $32.95 but this one, passed on to me by Dad a few years ago, is priceless. My father died in July, but for most of his 93 years he carried a penknife in his right front pocket. I have two others, but the Case XX remains my favorite. Small and slim, the knife disappears into my pocket, but when I reach for some coins and feel that cool smoothness, I think of Dad. Blenheim Ginger Ale. The iconic beverage is bottled in Hamer, S.C., on the same grounds as South of the Border. Alan Schaffer, the mastermind behind the I-95 tourist attraction, claimed the fiery kick in Blenheim No. 3 was his secret to longevity. He liked the Palmetto state’s only native soda so much that in 1993, when Blenheim was facing extinction, Shaffer purchased the business, moving production under Pedro’s sombrero. I was introduced to Blenheim at a South Carolina crawfish festival, in the spring of 1985. No. 3 was too spicy, but No. 1, the Original, has a clean, crisp bite. Buy at Fresh Market. Drink chilled, iced down in a cooler or — even better — an old washtub. Cornbread. My mama’s cornbread — fried, not baked — in an iron skillet. Mom fried up what she called “lacey cornbread,” thin, crisp pones with just enough char to add flavor. When home from college in the fall or winter, I anticipated lacey cornbread, a hefty helping of collards (hold the chow-chow and vinegar) and a glass of sweet tea to satisfy those longings. I’ll eat the fluffy stuff, but thin and crisp takes the blue ribbon. Rick Bragg. This Southern writer knows the South — the South of my childhood, the South of tobacco barns and fried okra and sweet stories. Bragg, a Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist, brought the sweet and dark side of the South to light in his 1999 autobiography All Over But the Shoutin’. I’ll bet Bragg, a good ol’ boy from Possum Trot, Alabama, would love an icecold bottle of Blenheim. And I’d sure like the chance to share one with him. You. Looks like you’ve taken time to read this column. For this, I’m grateful. May your Thanksgiving table be filled with bounty, the edible kind as well as the long-lasting. Whether your menu includes cornbread and collards or eggplant Parm washed down with Blenheim, I hope it’s the best holiday ever. Enjoy, be glad, be grateful. PS Tom Allen, a frequent contributor to PineStraw, is minister of education at First Baptist Church, Southern Pines.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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‘‘Do one thing, and do it well.’’

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S andhi l l s j o u rna l

The Army Ground Forces Band With a proud history that dates from 1845 and a broad repertoire that incorporates everything from John Philip Sousa to Ella Fitzgerald, the band’s mission is to tell the stories of the U.S. Army with style

By Melissa Goslin

Photographs by john gessner

The first notes of “Black Coffee” transform the sterile practice space of The Army Ground Forces Band into Harlem’s historic Savoy Ballroom. The swing of Specialist Pearl Scott’s voice is reminiscent of Ella Fitzgerald, complete with haunting low notes. The words spill effortlessly from Scott.

I’ll never know a Sunday in this weekday room. They float through the air like smoke, it’s hard to believe they’re coming from the 23-year-old dressed in camouflage, regulation hair and bloused boots at the front of the room. Jazz Guardians director Staff Sergeant David Winslow earned the nickname “Tommy Dorsey” for being something of a throwback. He has the manner of a big band leader. Winslow played tuba as a Marine, but picked up the trombone at the University of Texas Jazz Studies program before enlisting in the Army. He offers notes to the band, telling them where to make the quarter notes fat and how to blow through the fall.

“You want it long and nasty?” the soprano saxophonist asks. Winslow answers with a sly grin and a nod. “Not loud, but aggressive. There’s a difference.” The Jazz Guardians are one of two large ensembles within The Army Ground Forces Band, composed of fifty-four active duty soldiers. Their commander, Captain Dae Kim, is one of only twenty-five commissioned bandleaders in the Army. “We have a unique mission, telling the Army story and connecting with the American public,” Dae says. The Jazz Guardians celebrate a specifically indigenous American music style, whereas the smaller ensembles perform everything from rock and country to orchestral transcriptions and marches. The Ceremonial Band also performs in community parades and military events. Their history stretches back to 1845, when the band was first organized as the Fourth Infantry Regiment Band in New Orleans. During the Battle of Monterey in the Mexican-American War, on September 21, 1846, members of the band captured an enemy artillery battery and turned it against the Mexican army, earning them a combat distinction. In commemoration, President Zachary Taylor authorized the band to wear the red piping that still appears on their dress uniforms today.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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After service in the Civil War, the SpanishAmerican War, the Philippine insurrection and both world wars, their name changed to the 214th Army Band. In 1985, the unit was designated as The Army Ground Forces Band, serving since that time as the community outreach arm for U.S. Army Forces Command (FORSCOM). In the summer of 2011, the band relocated along with FORSCOM to Fort Bragg and moved into their brand new facility. Instrument lockers line the walls, with acoustically designed rehearsal rooms at the far end of the building. The music library is tucked behind glass windows, all of the sheet music arranged onto shelves and connected to a database holding thousands of titles, from Carrie Underwood songs to out-of-print selections from the late 1800s. Their set of “The Stars and Stripes Forever” is over 90 years old. Each soldier is cross-trained in another job, allowing the band to be completely autonomous. The flautist doubles as a resource manager, managing inventory and orders. The trombonist is also the lighting designer. Soldiers manage all aspects of public relations and promotions, from developing posters to printing tickets. “As one of three top unit bands, we have to bring our A game every day,” Kim says. The recruitment process is highly selective. After passing preliminary auditions as well as the physical requirements of Basic Combat, soldiers attend the Army School of Music at Little Creek in Virginia. There, each soldier receives Advanced Individual Training (AIT) and learns to march as an Army unit. Only the highest scores from AIT earn a spot in The Army Ground Forces Band. For Kim, the decision to join the Army came after meeting an Army band conductor at a music conference. His family was from Korea, where military service was mandatory, and his uncle had served on staff for General William Westmoreland in Vietnam. “I’m so grateful to do what I love and also serve my adoptive country at the same time,” Kim says. Responsible for over 225 performances plus the military training for each of his soldiers, Kim stays busy. Bulletin boards filled with memos, policies and job sheets line the hallways. Each job sheet details an upcoming performance, listing the date, location and show time — as well as which uniform to wear. “We’re always at risk of performing ten to fifteen days in a row, especially during the holidays. We try to stay on top of it and give everyone the time off they need,” Kim says. As crazy as their schedules can get, most of the soldiers feel blessed to balance a professional music career with the stability of the military. For Sergeant Jonathan Johnson, it’s a refreshing

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change. As a professional musician in Chicago, Johnson managed every aspect of his own career. “There was a lot of hustling. I was my own ops guy, so there was a lot of juggling to make gigs happen. I was in need of a fresh start,” Johnson says. The Army provided just that. “The hours are definitely different,” Johnson laughs. “And no one asks you to take a PT test outside the Army.” Johnson says the Army’s high standards and expectations have made him a better player. He’s also grown from collaborations with the other musicians in the band. Still, he considers himself a soldier first. “We have to find the right mix of talent and desire to serve,” Kim says. That blend of skill and service is evident in Scott, whose strong and versatile vocals recently landed her with The Army Ground Forces Band for her first duty assignment. “I love to scat. I love the spontaneity of it. But the voice is capable of anything. You don’t have to limit yourself to one style,” Scott says. At the age of 21, Scott was offered a contract with a recording label. After looking closely at the fine print, she realized the label would have total control over her sound and her image. She wasn’t willing to compromise her artistic integrity. Oddly enough, the Army was able to offer her a stable place where she could be free to explore. “We’re reaching through history, but we’re also innovating,” Scott says. Her AIT instructors pushed her out of her

comfort zone. As a result, she is just as comfortable singing Carrie Underwood as she is improvising a jazz melody. Versatility is an important part of the band’s mission as they reach out to every generation of America. “The Army was everything I needed to fulfill my music. I wasn’t willing to compromise who I am. This was a way I could use my music to honor my family as well as my country,” Scott says. Between big ensembles in the morning and small ensemble practice each afternoon, soldiers practice five hours on an instrument each day. And no duty day is ever quite the same, as demonstrated by the smoke machines and costumes strewn around the sides of the main practice area. That kind of freedom to play music and collaborate with other musicians doesn’t typically come with a steady paycheck in the civilian world. “We say it’s the best job in the Army,” Kim says. Scott adds, “Anywhere, really. I think it’s just the best job.” PS The Arts Council of Moore County is bringing The Army Ground Forces Band to Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School for two free events: Veterans Day Concert, November 11, 2015, at 4 p.m. Holiday Concert, December 5, 2015, at 7:00 p.m. Melissa Goslin is a freelance writer who wishes her mother had made her stick with piano lessons. She can be reached at mg@melissagoslin.com.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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S p o rting Li f e

A Reunion of Friends A chance to observe the passing years and honor those who’ve gone ahead

By Tom Bryant

Oh, Lord, I thought. It’s

going to be one of those nights. Sleepless in Southern Pines. I worked late to get some writing done on a column that was due; and in an effort not to wake Linda, my bride, I decided to grab some shuteye in the guest bedroom. I have a problem going to bed with a story on my mind, so it took a while to doze, but doze I did. And then the dreams started. I dreamed that the phone was ringing off the hook and I couldn’t find it to answer the blasted thing. I woke bleary-eyed, sat up on the side of the bed and realized that the phone was ringing, not the landline but my cellphone. Somehow I had set the ringer to ring and vibrate at the same time, so what I heard from the kitchen was a buzzing noise that sounded like angry bees caught in a wine bottle.

I stumped my toe on a chair in the den as I was trying to get to the phone, cussing all the time while promising to eviscerate whoever was calling me at one o’clock in the morning. I found my cellphone. The minute I picked it up, it stopped buzzing. I immediately hit redial and heard a familiar voice: “Coot, is that you?” It was Bubba, my old hunting buddy. Bubba had given me the moniker Coot early in our friendship, and it stuck. “Yeah, it’s me. Good grief, Bubba. It’s one o’clock in the morning.” “I know. You sleeping?’

“Not anymore. What are you doing up at this hour, and better yet, why are you calling me?” “It’s not late in this part of the country. I just finished the best antelope stew I ever had, topped off with a snifter of good brandy and a Cuban cigar. It’s only ten o’clock out here.” “Are you in Montana? And I thought you had quit drinking.” “Yep, I’m shooting some sharp-tail and we decided to call it a day and come back to the ranch for some good eats and lively conversation. And hey, brandy ain’t drinking, it’s medicinal. You need to be here.” “I wish I could, Bubba, but you know I’m up to my eyeballs.” “That’s not my fault. I tried to teach you better. But the reason I called was to catch you while I had it on my mind. We’re gonna have a reunion at Slim’s Store. You know, some of the old crowd. Johnson is supposed to be there along with Shaw, Rowland, Patterson and Mott. That’s just for a starter, more will surely sign up. Put it on your calendar.” “This year?” I said facetiously, yanking Bubba’s chain a little bit. “You haven’t told me when.” “Coot, you’re a crotchety old thing when you just wake up. It’s gonna be a couple of weeks before Thanksgiving. We’re gonna fry up a couple of turkeys, and Johnson has plenty of venison sausage. It’s gonna be big doings and I’ll let you know the exact date when I get home. Leroy is looking into the particulars. Now you go back and get your beauty sleep. You need it.” Bubba rang off, laughing. Bubba and I have been experiencing the great outdoors for over forty years, and every time we get together there’s no telling what’s going to happen. Slim’s store was our major hangout spot way up in the northern part of the county, far enough from civilization to keep us out of trouble. The old country place belonged to Slim’s grandfather, who ran it for years. Eventually he closed the store due to declining health. After Slim made a fortune in real estate out west, he retired and came home, reopened the venerable landmark so, as he put it, “All my rowdy friends would have a place to go.” Unfortunately, after a brief terminal illness, Slim followed his grandfa-

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


S p o rting Li f e

ther into the great beyond and left the business to his cousin Leroy. The store foundered after that, never being designed to make money. Slim had run the place more as a hobby than anything. The country store was put up for sale. Bubba bought it and kept Leroy on to handle the day-today operation. When I asked Bubba what in the world he was going to do with a store, he replied, “I’m used to the place. My favorite coffee mug is hanging by the pot, my good chair is beside the old potbelly stove to keep me warm in the winter, and my favorite rocker is on the porch to enjoy in the summer. I’m not about to let that go.” So Leroy took over the business and Bubba came and went as he pleased. As the population grew and houses closed in on the store’s location, the place became more and more successful. It irritated Bubba. He called me one day not long ago, complaining about all the people getting in his way at the store. “I went in there the other day and some stranger was sitting in my chair on the porch. I had Leroy make me a reserved sign to put on it.” Only Bubba would complain about making money. After Bubba’s impromptu early morning call, I went back to bed thinking about how fast the years have moved and about old friends and reunions in general. Johnny Burns and a committee of other Aberdeen High School graduates had recently hosted a reunion to top all reunions. The event was for everyone who had ever attended the school. Held over two days, the first night at Aberdeen Lake and the second at the Member’s Club at Pinehurst, it was a gathering not likely to be repeated. The youngest person at the huge, successful dinner Saturday evening was 61, the oldest 97. I’m glad I had the opportunity to participate. My brother Guery, who attended grammar school at Aberdeen (the family moved to Florida when he was in the third grade), went with Linda and me. We had a grand time. As I settled down again for hopefully a few hours of uninterrupted sleep, I mused over the popularity of these get-togethers. Churches have them, along with high schools, colleges, the military, and of course, families. Mine still talks about reunions held long ago. I guess it’s a need for us, as we get older, to touch base with others who came along during the same time of life. Maybe it’s a reality check to make sure there are some of us left and, more importantly, to pay homage to those who have passed on. Sleep came and I dreamed of Slim’s store. We were all sitting on the porch, laughing at Bubba. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist.

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November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


G o l f t o wn J o u rna l

The Specter of Donald Ross And now, a tournament worthy of the man

By Lee Pace

Photographs Courtesy of Tufts Archives

Throughout the Sandhills the vestiges

of Donald James Ross are plentiful and pervasive. Six golf courses bear his design imprint and two of them, Pinehurst No. 2 and Mid Pines, have been restored in the last five years to recapture their essence in playability and appearance as Ross left them upon his death in 1948: wide fairways, native hardpan on the edges and greens surrounded by testy swales and hollows.

There are two statues of Ross, the native of Dornoch, Scotland, who immigrated to the States in 1899 — one in the center of the Village of Pinehurst and another beside the 18th green of No. 2. There are portraits prominently displayed here and there — above the fireplace at the Pine Crest Inn, and on the walls of the lobby at Pine Needles and the grill room named for Mr. Ross at the Pinehurst Resort clubhouse. There are the Ross tees on the golf course and the eight-room Ross Lodge

at Pine Needles, and employees at Pine Needles and sister property Mid Pines have “rossresorts” in their email addresses. A junior tournament held each December at Pinehurst bearing Ross’s name has been held since 1947 and won by the likes of Leonard Thompson, David Eger and Chip Beck. Donald Ross Drive winds its way between Linden Road and McDonald Road just to the west of the Carolina Hotel, and streets, families and businesses with names like Dunrovin and McCaskill and Aberdeen hearken to Ross’s Scottish heritage. At the Old Sport & Gallery in Pinehurst, you can purchase one of the few 150 limited edition portraits of Ross by artist Paul Milosevich still in circulation or an antique print of ancient Dutch golfers on ice with a hand-written “property of Donald J. Ross” signature on the back. You can hire an actor named Rodney Harter to impersonate Ross at your next outing and he’ll come complete with Scottish brogue and tweed attire. The Dornoch Cottage, which Ross built in 1925 and lived in until his death in 1948, sits to the left of the third green of No. 2 and has been faithfully restored by owner Bob Hansen. Assorted groups of hickory-shafted club aficionados gather frequently and play with clubs bearing Ross’s signature. Many golf shops in the Sandhills carry clothing from the Donald Ross Sportswear line. And the Tufts Archives in the Village is the repository of thousands of pieces of Ross memorabilia — photos, notes, course maps, drawings and

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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letters. Hanging on the wall are golf pin flags from nearly 250 courses designed by Ross from around the nation. “We’re running out of wall space,” says Archives curator Audrey Moriarty. “People come in and ask why we don’t have a certain flag and volunteer to find it for us.” It’s appropriate, then, that the third weekend in November will mark the inauguration of a tournament conceived to honor and further the Donald Ross legacy in the Sandhills and beyond. The Donald Ross Memorial Invitational will be held the third weekend in November at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club, with practice rounds on Friday the 21st, the first round on No. 1 on Saturday and the second round on Sunday on No. 2. “Donald Ross left such a lasting legacy on so many areas of the game — architecture, green keeping, course operations, club-making,” says Rob Pilewski, a staff professional at Pinehurst. “There’s so much appreciation for what he meant to golf. It’s a good way to honor his legacy. “This could be fun. We’re just getting started. Who knows where it might go?” Pinehurst member Peter DeYoung is helping Pilewski organize the event. DeYoung has spent a lifetime in golf administration and grew up playing golf at Monroe Golf Club, a Ross-designed course in Rochester, New York. “On the same street were five Donald Ross golf courses,” says DeYoung, who then lists Oak Hill East and West, Irondequoit and the Country Club of Rochester all sitting just to the east of Monroe Avenue. “I grew up playing Monroe and I caddied at Oak Hill, including during the ’68 U.S. Open. Then my folks moved to Pinehurst and I got a job at the club, so we were surrounded by Donald Ross. Then I moved to Chicago, and there’s a great Ross course everywhere you turn there. “There’s nothing quite like one of these old Ross courses. There’s a kinship from one club to another and I think it will be neat to have members from Wannamoisett sitting at a dinner with guys from Aronimink.” One important element of the event will be a silent auction in which participating clubs will put up a round of golf for a foursome, with the proceeds to benefit the Donald Ross Preservation Foundation. The foundation works in concert with the Tufts Archives and Given Memorial Library to raise funds to one day expand the Archives facility and properly store the delicate film and paper artifacts that are currently housed in the basement of the building. Eventually the idea is to display Ross’s maps and drawings in a museum-quality setting. “The Archives are a treasure,” Pilewski says.

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G o l f t o wn J o u rna l

“We hope to create more awareness of the library and all it’s done to maintain all of Ross’s work. One day it would be neat to have a place to display some of those plans and artifacts.” The story of Ross finding his way to Pinehurst in 1900 and having such a profound effect on the community is one of pure coincidences. Ross first went to Boston because a visitor to his shop in Dornoch suggested he do so. Ross then came to Pinehurst after his first brutal New England winter because a member at his club, Oakley Country Club, just happened to be founder of the resort, James Tufts. And Ross took a shine to the area because the sandy soil reminded him of Scotland. “My friends laughed at me,” Ross said in 1930. “They said it was folly to try to make a winter golf colony down in the jack pines and sand of Carolina.” Ross knew and understood every element of the game, from managing the caddies to building clubs to growing grass to taking Tufts’ rudimentary eighteen holes and creating in time “The St. Andrews of American Golf,” with seventy-two holes by 1919. “He knew how to select the proper piece of hickory to give you the kind of shaft you wanted and how to shape the shaft to give the kind of ‘whip’ which best suited your swing,” Richard Tufts, grandson of James, commented years later. “I don’t believe the world of golf has ever seen a course architect that was his equal. He was a gentleman with the very highest standards, he knew the game of golf very well, loved it and served it to the best of his ability. His career was as a professional, but he was a true amateur at heart. We badly need his spirit in golf today.” To Ross, the principles of life were the same as those in golf: tell the truth, take things as they come, assume total responsibility. There was no better metaphor for life than playing eighteen holes and posting a score, as Ross noted over the years in various comments: “If you want to know a man, take him out on the golf course.” “I believe wholeheartedly in golf. I consider it a game of honor. It does more to bring out the finer points in a man’s character than any other sport.” “A country which gets golf-minded need not worry about the honor, the integrity and the honesty of its people.” “Every golfer is on his honor. As long as we keep golf a game of honor, we’re on the right road.” Words to live by, for sure, and a spirit to maintain and nourish. PS Lee Pace has written about golf in Pinehurst for 30 years and his most recent book: The Golden Age of Pinehurst— The Story of Rebirth of No. 2.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015 Reminder

One wine-red leaf quivers in the freeing breeze. Guided by the new slant of the sun, finally released from summer’s tether, it settles, a solitary ruby at my feet. I celebrate it like a jewel I cannot own, but know its sheen and claret skin initiate the rite of passage into fall for all the fading season’s emeralds. – Sarah Edwards

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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The Great Harvest

Meal Challenge Five chefs, five ingredients — the Sandhills’ own version of Chopped By Deborah Salomon

A

plate is the canvas — ingredients, the palette. Will the oeuvre resemble da Vinci? Van Gogh? Warhol? Rockwell? PineStraw’s culinary muse asked five local chefs to create a dish from five autumn staples: pork sausage, butternut squash, apples, kale and scuppernong jam, plus whatever else seemed appropriate. Mon dieu! What will they do?

The Zen of Warren Photographs by Tim Sayer HAIKU Squash, jam, kale, sausage Chefíssimo weds to quail But chocolate sauce? Chef Warren Lewis, the karma behind Chef Warren’s, admits: “I had to stop and think — figure out how to put together the ingredients cohesively, for a dish that was more than a sum of its parts.” He wouldn’t dream of exposing the locally sourced sausage naked on a plate, when tucking tiny sausage balls inside a brace of quail, along with diced apples, is an option. The squash appears as part of a scuppernong gastrique, all positioned on a risotto of baby kale. Quite a succulent mouthful. Yet still missing, that flourish with which Maestro Warren signs his works: a sauce, composed of molten muscadine jelly and something quite brown. “Chocolate, the finest, from Venezuela,” Warren grins. Molé? No way.

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November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Rock ’n’ Rolled Photographs by John Gessner Curt Shelvey, of Curt’s Cucina, selects hearty over arty, although his dish comes out pretty as a pinwheel. “These ingredients represent North Carolina,” says Vermont-born Curt — hog farming, autumn squash, apple, scuppernong and kale (or greens, according to old timers). In less than 30 seconds, Curt had a plan: “Carolina Sweet Sausage & Kale Braciola!” he exclaims, with no drawl whatsoever. In Italian, braciola means stuffed meat. Curt lays the sausage, tingling with red pepper and fresh thyme, between two cloths and rolls/compacts the meat into a square. He removes the top cloth, spreads finely chopped kale and parsley, mushrooms, pecorino-Romano cheese and heaven knows what else on the sausage, then rolls it up, sushi-style. This roll is seared, then roasted, then rested and sliced crosswise, exposing the deep green stuffing surrounded by a ring of meat. Curt positions each slice on a bed of apple-squash compote before streaming on tart, liquefied scuppernong wine jam. “When I put a dish together I want balanced flavors, umami,” otherwise known as that indescribable taste sensation which blends sweet, salty and sour, he explains. Uma-mission accomplished.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


High Marks Photographs by Tim Sayer Mark Elliott’s culinary reputation rests on riffs, those unexpected little zingers that breathe life into ordinary ingredients. But even Elliott-groupies somersault over paper-thin raw squash slices pickled by an infusion method that leaves them crisp and partakers breathless. “A vinegar brine, actually, that gives them a kraut quality,” he explains. “I like to twist things around.” Sometimes, this means juxtaposing shocking pickled squash against familiar sausage links. Mark makes his own, of course, enriched with sage, nutmeg, diced apples and cream. Wait a minute — he’s off to the garden to pick slender kale leaves, which are in the sauté pan seconds later. Fresh and young, they look more like dandelion greens than tough, curling supermarket kale. Mark hadn’t worked with scuppernongs, which didn’t stop him from concocting a sweet-savory jam condiment Italians call mostarda di frutta, or fruit mustard. Complex but not complicated, he judges the result. A still life portrait on a shaded charcoal plate. The writing on this chef’s heart reads: “Presentation is the first taste bud.”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Walk the Plank Photographs by Tim Sayer Bold, dashing, exotic chef Orlando Jinzo’s atelier is Stack’s Cheddar Truck, specializing in grilled cheese modified by caramelized broccoli, pickled green tomatoes, gochujang ketchup and other wild stuff. Orlando’s forté is Asian-Southern. He’s absolutely pig-headed about the scratch thing, which is why he made the pasta for sausagefilled agnolotti, a ravioli relative. Beside them, a creamy (but cream-less) kale purée, wafting shallots and brown butter, stares down a purée of roast squash and maple garnished with pickled green apple medallions — all drizzled with sweet scuppernong sauce and sprinkled with pine nuts and potent gray salt crystals. The result, abetted by co-conspirator Sonja Lee McCarrell and arranged on a bourbon barrel stave plank, passes for a 3-D printout of Byzantine mosaics — dazzling bits of colors and textures, with flavors that sparkle, then linger.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Photograp by Don McKenzie / Sandhills Community College Foundation

Twofer Photographs by John gessner Give professional baker and Sandhills Community College chef/instructor Fiona McKenzie five ingredients and she’ll turn out two courses. “I tossed around some ideas . . . what do November and December say about food?” Holiday parties, she decided. Fiona, mindful that her choices should be “approachable for the home cook with minimal techniques,” chose a savory hors d’oeuvre: sausage meatballs glazed with muscadine jam, roasted and speared with a fork. A little Cheese Louise chevre from Paradox Farm couldn’t hurt. Green garnish, a must. Here, kale chips. “Kale is a superfood,” Fiona notes. It is especially palatable shredded and roasted until crispy. For her second course, Fiona conceives mini-tart shells filled with squash (à la pumpkin pie), seasoned with ginger, baked and served topped with cinnamon mascarpone. Or, for New Year’s Eve fireworks, apples sautéed with brown sugar and pecans, flambéed with bourbon. “Visually stunning,” per Fiona’s description. Better get to work on those minimal techniques. And ask Santa for a fire extinguisher.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Stew U

Without a cast-iron pot to cook it in, Brunswick stew is simply b.s.

Story & Illustrations by Harry Blair

“Brunswick stew,”

says humorist Roy Blount Jr., “happens when small mammals carrying ears of corn fall into barbecue pits.” Whether it occurs accidentally or on purpose, it’s a big part of fall in most of North Carolina.

Twenty-five years ago, I got my recipe for Brunswick stew from a dear friend, Fran Walters, who got it from an older lady, who got it from another older lady, and so on. It’s pretty old. And it’s basically an Eastern North Carolina style that has been perfected over generations here in the Piedmont. There are as many variations on Brunswick stew as there are Brunswick stew cooks. Both Stamey’s and Country Barbecue put peas in theirs. Go figure. You can’t fake genuine Brunswick stew. You can’t make it in a crockpot. You can’t make it in a couple of hours on the stove. It has to cook all day — outdoors — over a hardwood fire. It has to be stirred constantly and the fire has to be kept hot. Like I said, all day. This recipe cooks for ten hours. It’s hard work, but the result is Lord-have-mercy worth it. This year, my grandson Hudson will start to take it over. He’ll be involved in the whole process, from shopping for ingredients to serving. I wrote this up to serve as his instructions — or yours, if you want to start a new tradition at your house, church or fire station. So let’s get on with it. As my friend Bob Garner would say, “Mmm-mmm!”

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Equipment First thing: Treasure the pot. I found mine in a dark corner of an antique store outside Stuart, Virginia. It’s the perfect size, 15-gallon. It just fits in one open end of a 55-gallon drum, which becomes the stove. It will make enough stew for fifty or sixty people. The stove will eventually rust and fall apart every few years. D.H. Griffin will sell you a new drum and cut out the holes on the top and side of it for you. Then, you need to find yourself a paddle-like stirrer with a rounded end. You will also need two 1/2-inch-thick pieces of rebar cut to 4 feet, which you will use to carry the pot and hang utensils on. You’re going to also need two or three large stockpots in which to boil the meat. That should do it as far as equipment goes. Go ahead and put the pot in the open end of the unlit stove. The stove should be sitting on a bed of gravel far away from dry leaves or anything flammable. And keep a fire extinguisher nearby. OK. Let’s get on with it!

The Recipe Harry Blair’s No-Longer-Secret, Smack Yo’ Granny Brunswick Stew / Serves 60 Ingredients: 10 pounds deboned and skinned chicken breasts (remove fat) 5 pounds deboned and skinned chicken thighs (remove fat) 4 pounds lean pork (Boston butt or a fresh picnic ham will work if you cut off the fat. Or get your butcher to trim and cut the meat for you.) 4 pounds lean beef (Use stew beef or get chuck roast or round, but remove the fat. Venison, rabbit, squirrel, possum, snake or bear gives the stew a good backstory. Heck, I even added reindeer one year.) 1/2 pound country ham (chopped) 8 pounds peeled Yukon Gold potatoes, cut into quarters 2 extra large yellow onions, chopped 1 bunch celery, chopped 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped 5 28-ounce cans of crushed tomato 2 29-ounce cans of tomato sauce 4 15-ounce cans of chicken broth 1/3 box Bell’s Seasoning Dash crushed red pepper 1 tablespoon ground black pepper 1/4 cup salt Six hours into cooking, add: 5 15-ounce cans of whole kernel corn (and liquid) 5 15-ounce cans of Lima beans (and liquid) 1 stick salted butter

Preparation: Cut the meat into 2-inch or so chunks. Fill the stockpots 2/3 full of water. (I use two, one 12-quart and one 18-quart.) Add meat and boil for 15 minutes on your kitchen stove. Skim off the foam that comes to the top and discard. Put the meat into a large bowl. Carry the remaining stock outside and pour it into the pot. Build the fire by putting five or six bricks into the bottom of the stove. Place a small bag of Kingsford Match Light charcoal on the bricks. Make a teepee of wood sticks around the bag. Light the bag. To keep a good, hot fire going all day, you’ll need a fair amount of nicely split oak, hickory or other firewood (no pine). I get mine from Harris Teeter. Go back inside to the meat. Shred the meat in a food processor or cut it up by hand, but not too fine. Dump it into the pot outside, making sure your fire is good and hot. Stir. Add everything else EXCEPT corn, beans and butter. The mixture should come to within 2 inches of the top of the pot. If it doesn’t, add some water. Throughout the cooking process, you’ll see it come to a boil. That’s good, just keep stirring. Cook seven hours over a very hot fire, stirring every 10 minutes so it doesn’t scorch on the bottom. Add the corn lima beans, butter and juice. If the stew needs more liquid, now’s the time to add chicken broth to help fill the pot. Cook and stir over a very hot fire another two hours. If you started at 7 a.m., it’s now 4 p.m. and you can start serving. But if you can wait until around 5 or 5:30 p.m. the stew should be really good — and thick PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Pulling Strings A remarkable ensemble of harpists and their angelic music By Melissa Goslin • Photographs by John Gessner

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erry Briggs pulls her minivan into the semicircle at Belle Meade and starts the arduous process of unloading. One of the residents watches from a bench as she pulls out her harp and steadies it on a rolling cart. “Bet you wish you played the harmonica,” he chuckles. Briggs smiles graciously as though it’s the first time she’s heard this flavor of comment. True, the harp isn’t the most convenient instrument. After wrestling the awkward weight of a slipcovered harp onto its trolley, she has to steer it inside. As an active musician, this isn’t her first rodeo. Still, to Briggs and the other members of the Sandhills Harp Ensemble, it is well worth the effort. For gigs, she sometimes gets her husband to do the heavy lifting. “My husband makes a great roadie,” Briggs laughs. “He can’t find middle C,

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but he sure can move a harp.” Her husband recently built a ramp outside their house so Briggs could get her instrument in and out more easily. Briggs makes her way into the meeting room where the ensemble regularly meets for practices. Inside, Laurie Muirhead and Allison McLean are resting, having just lugged their own instruments inside. Like Briggs, Muirhead and McLean play the pedal harp. It’s a versatile instrument, and a necessity for anyone looking to play in the symphony world. With over 2,000 moving parts, it’s an intimidating sight for beginners — part guitar, part piano. Irene Warthman, the senior member of the group, is out today. Sometimes, even the harp takes a backseat to life. Sabina Blue, the youngest member of the ensemble, arrives last with her lever harp in tow. One advantage of the lever harp is immediately obvious — its size. Sometimes called a Celtic harp, it is significantly smaller than its pedaled counterpart.

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Blue is one of Muirhead’s students. At the age of 7, her parents asked her which instrument she would like to learn. “I chose the harp, because, well, angels play harps,” Blue says. She started off with a small lap harp. Three years ago she traveled to the Virginia Harp Center to pick out her lever harp. Size was a factor, but also price. Her parents wanted to be sure before investing the time and energy in something larger. After diligently practicing and playing — so much so that she often got in trouble for playing her harp instead of cleaning her room — Blue made another trip to the Harp Center to pick out her first pedal harp. Blue recounts the story of selecting her instrument as the other women nod in recognition and wrestle their harps into a circle to start practice. During a performance, they play facing the audience. During practice, though, it helps their timing to watch each other. “I played every single harp in the showroom,” Blue says. Some had a buzz. On others, the sound wasn’t distinct enough. She was looking for a bright sound, similar to the one she loves from her lever harp. “We went sightseeing in DC, then came back. On the third day I decided I would rather go home without one than go home with a harp that wasn’t right for me,” Blue says. As she describes playing the final harp on the showroom floor, her face lights up. It was the one. Hardly an impulse purchase, every harp has a story. They take nine months to craft. Briggs and McLean both traveled to the famed Lyon & Healy harpmakers in Chicago to purchase their harps. Each instrument has its own quirks and peculiarities of sound, and the selection process is highly individual. Muirhead, however, inherited her mother’s harp; it has the tone and feel she grew up hearing. McLean kicks off the tuning process by opening up the Peterson strobe tuner app on her phone. There are three sounds on each of the forty-seven strings. The bass strings toward the back are thick and wire-wrapped. Gut strings fill the octaves in the middle register, and the top of the harp is strung in nylon. Each woman plays solo gigs. The main benefit of the ensemble is having a place to share tips and tricks, as well as a genuine passion for their instruments. Every two years, they also bring in someone to regulate their harps. “It’s like going to the doctor for a physical. You have to keep your harp healthy,” Briggs says. After the others tune their harps to McLean’s, they are ready to play. They tilt the columns onto their shoulders and glance at their sheet music. Immediately, Muirhead takes charge. With forty-three years of experience under her belt, she is a natural leader. “Let’s start with triads up the scale starting on C just to see how in tune we are,” Muirhead says. As they walk up and down the harp strings, music floats out into the lobby. To the untrained ear, it already sounds like a song. Residents slow down by the doorway and linger. A few bars into their first piece, Muirhead stops. “Start softer. Remember, we’ve got to take this someplace,” Muirhead says. Blue begins playing, then McLean and Muirhead join in with playful plucks. Briggs is last, pulling broader strokes that add depth to the overall sound. It is a dialogue between instruments, and it becomes clear that each harp adds something slightly different to the conversation.

To the passersby, it sounds heavenly. To the musicians, it is off tempo. They start at the top, and this time Muirhead calls out, “One-two-three, one-twothree, don’t-go-fast.” With each movement across the strings, the women get a little more lost in the music. It is obvious that these instruments are more of a calling than a conscious choice. “On days when I don’t get to play due to the business of life, that room just keeps pulling me in,” Briggs says. “There’s not a more beautiful instrument in the world. It’s beautiful to look at. It’s beautiful to listen to,” McLean says. She recalls a day when she was gardening in the yard with her husband. Like many other times, she passed by her music room with no intention of playing. She was on a mission to grab something and head back outside. Instead, the room called to her. It had been too long. She gave in to the pull of her harp and disappeared, her husband wandering past a while later to soak in the sounds. When she goes missing, he knows where to find her. The group is always pushing themselves to do more with their harps, to learn new sounds and techniques. Recently, McLean took an online course to learn the unique methods incorporated in a new piece of music, Baroque Flamenco. The group decided to try it out as an ensemble piece, with McLean performing the largest solo. It begins with a sliding glissando, creating an instant dream-like effect. With a few more plucks, the patterned carpet and tan walls of the Belle Meade meeting room disappear, and the room is transported to a back patio somewhere exotic, twinkle lights dangling from pergolas. The four harpists play different notes simultaneously. As their fingers move in and out of strings, the result is mesmerizing. It’s as if each harp contains its own band and troupe of dancers. McLean has the longest solo, and she knocks the soundboard like the hard click of heels on a dance floor. Her hand plucks the strings, then moves sharply away, resting flat in the air. Her entire body moves in concert with her harp, rocking back and forth with the rise and fall of the music. There is drama in this song, a balance of technique and storytelling. The others mark time until they join back in with McLean. Each of them gets a little lost in the notes, and it is easy to see how they disappear into their respective music rooms. This number draws the largest group of onlookers yet, all standing transfixed and slightly bemused that these sounds are pouring out of four harps. While the women play, there is little distinction between their hands and their harps. Cradled in the crooks of their necks, the harps are natural extensions of their arms. As the song winds down, they look up and make eye contact around the circle as if to remind themselves that they are playing. The final note is like a finger snap jarring everyone out of a communal dream — one the harpists as well as their audience can’t wait to fall into again. PS Check out the Sandhills Harp Ensemble at one of their upcoming free public concerts: Belle Meade Resort Retirement Center, Southern Pines, Saturday, November 7, 2015 at 4 p.m. (Requires reservations and includes a wine and cheese reception with the performance starting at 4:15.) Brownson Memorial Presbyterian Church in downtown Southern Pines, Sunday, November 8, 2015 at 4 p.m. Melissa Goslin is a freelance writer with a new appreciation for the harp. She can be reached at mg@melissagoslin.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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S t o r y o f a h o use

Power House

New York, Paris, Washington, Pinehurst — A couple’s journey from The Hill to the Sandhills By Deborah Salomon Photographs by John Gessner

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hey live among us, just like other golfers, dog walkers, coffee-shop habitués, Given Library supporters, farmers’ market attendees. At the doors of renovated cottages built in the Roaring Twenties to attract the likeminded, they shed their titles. Now, as then, these modest residents represent a distinct demographic that enhances Pinehurst: The power people. M.J. (Mary Joy) and Pat (Patrick) Pizzella bring a string of abbreviations to Willow Oaks Cottage, a handsome white shingle, clapboard and brick cottage set crosswise on a prime corner of Old Town. For openers, M.J. began her government career during the Reagan administration as a special assistant to the U.S. Ambassador to France, whose palatial residence once housed the

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Rothschild family. Her four years in Paris yielded not only experience in foreign relations but also a short course in interior design benefiting the political science major who grew up in an old house with a porch swing on Main Street, Ridgeland, South Carolina — population less than 2,000. M.J. returned stateside laden with French antiques. She continued high-level government service in the communications field, heading up public affairs at the U.S. Department of Energy and rising to Associate Administrator for the Office of Communications and Citizen Services at the General Services Administration. Then, Google lured her away to develop products for the government. “It had that good feeling of working with small groups of young, smart people,” M.J. says. Pat owns a paragraphs-long CV, including Assistant Secretary of Labor, Chief of Staff, U.S. Office of Personnel and currently, member of the Labor Relations Authority. He drives back and forth to Washington several times a month, listening to audio books, mostly biographies of world leaders. Retirement — not yet.

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Beltway power couple needs a power house, n’est-ce pas? Golf, predictably, influenced their choice. Besides, M.J. found, “There are so many people with rich experiences here, just fascinating.” M.J. — a true daughter of the South and fourth generation Clemson graduate — wanted a classic cottage from Pinehurst’s Golden Age. Pat, who grew up in a New York City suburb split-level, insisted on “bago’-doughnuts” proximity to the village: unless guests are

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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coming, they walk to dinner most evenings. After looking at houses for five years, researching the area, even renting historic (but unrestored) Rose Cottage, M.J. and Pat found Willow Oaks Cottage on land sold by Leonard Tufts to the Stutts family in 1919. In 1922, Mr. Stutts built what documents call “a handsome rental bungalow” which became his home for several decades. It appears to have been enlarged and adapted several times — once as a duplex. Famed golf writer Bob Drum lived here for a time. The Pizzellas’ patience was rewarded, in 2012, with the 4,000-square-foot cottage last remodeled 1980s style. “I walked in and said, ‘I can make this ours,’” M.J. recalls. She retired soon after. “I didn’t miss a beat. I left Washington in the rear view mirror.” The purchase meant upsizing from a 2,000-squarefoot colonial in Alexandria, not the usual progression for a couple. But this house offered space for long-stored furnishings to be used and appreciated. “My plumber said I’m the only customer who ever asked him to remove a tub to make room for an armoire,” M.J. laughs. What an armoire it is. Structural changes included enclosing a side deck deemed impractical during summer heat and pollen; adding a columned porch, a circular drive and a stunning open kitchen which became the hub, whether cooked in or not.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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“I didn’t miss a beat. I left Washington in the rear view mirror.”

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ow, the main floor divides into three areas: A formal sitting room with tray ceiling is filled, but not crowded, with art and antiques from Europe, Algeria and elsewhere. Across the entrance hall, the dining room accommodates an enormous (and quite unusual, in Southern décor vernacular) round table with skirted chairs, a built-in glass display cupboard designed around antique side tables, a fireplace backdrop for M.J.’s portrait and a Phantom-worthy crystal chandelier. M.J. felt the walls needed wainscot moldings — and added them. The compact kitchen and butler’s pantry, in refreshing white with ceramic brick backsplash and marble island, branches off into a sunroom (formerly the deck) with chairs upholstered in an Asian pagoda design, one reserved for Dixie, a gentle foxhound adopted out because she was too small for hunting. Opposite the island, a TV nook — although six other rooms have wall-mounted screens, so everybody sees their game. A 10-foot length of driftwood hangs from the sunroom ceiling; oyster shells fill a lamp base; flamingos, palmettos, ceiling fans, plantation shutters — talismans, all, of M.J.’s enduring attachment to the Low Country. “I South Carolina-ized it,” she smiles, pointing to a Clemson football signed by coach Dabo Swinney and giant orange paws painted on the garage wall. Pat, a University of South Carolina graduate, gets equal time with a Gamecocks mural. Amid the casual opulence hangs a key for M.J.’s grandfather’s tobacco barn, another reminder of her roots, as are seascapes painted by her cousin, noted Carolina artist William Jameson.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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The third area, a master-suite wing with dressing room, two bedrooms and office, might have been added by a previous owner. M.J. saved her favorite color, blue, for the bedrooms, executed in spiraling four-posters and fabrics printed with crewel motifs. She weaves raffia rugs and grasscloth wall coverings into both formal and less-formal settings. One show-stopper: a bathroom papered in hummingbirds by the thousand. This White House was planned for entertaining. “We had a waiting list during the U.S. Open,” M.J. says. That every bedroom already had a bathroom was a plus. The three upstairs bedrooms (one with a graceful fruitwood sleigh bed from France) are equipped with white-noise “sleep machines” and open onto the largest common area in the house — a living room with sectional sofa and, of course, the required TV. A life-size cardboard figure of President George W. Bush welcomes guests. Throughout, walls display autographed photos of M.J. and Pat with presidents and dignitaries. M.J. found places for an old Roy Rogers radio, a bookcase from her grandfather’s office, archival photos of both families and bonito fishing on the South Carolina coast. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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enovations took about a year. One day, M.J. looked around, said “It’s done” and announced they were moving in. She has joined a garden club and a Republican women’s organization. Even with monthly trips to their Washington pied-à-terre, she finds time to entertain — most recently a baby shower for a friend — and play golf. M.J. serves on the Clemson Foundation board, visits her 96-year-old mother in South Carolina, attends Clemson games, even a ladies’ summer football clinic, where the rah-rah gals meet coaches and players.

Life beyond the fast lane is good, M.J. says — busy and sometimes complicated but good. Neither minds the five-hour commute once or twice a month, which won’t last forever. “The house gives us a sense of permanence,” Pat says. “When we get older at least we can walk to the Carolina for dinner,” M.J. adds, then waxes philosophical about her Pinehurst homesteading experience: “We’re all stewards, just passing through. You can rent something for life, but you can’t take it with you.” PS

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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By Rosetta Fawley

“If it is true that one of the greatest pleasures of gardening lies in looking forward, then the planning of next year’s beds and borders must be one of the most agreeable occupations in the gardener’s calendar. This should make October and November particularly pleasant months, for then we may begin to clear our borders, to cut down those sodden and untidy stalks, to dig up and increase our plants, and to move them to other positions where they will show up to greater effect.  People who are not gardeners always say that the bare beds of winter are uninteresting; gardeners know better, and take even a certain pleasure in the neatness of the newly dug, bare, brown earth.” — Vita Sackville-West

For a Spellbinding Garden If you haven’t done it already, it’s time to pull the winter gardening regalia out of the attic. Patch up holes, test your boots and make sure the moths haven’t gotten hold of your hats and scarves. Put anything that needs replacing on your list for Santa, along with seeds for winter planting and bulb orders for spring. This is a good time to reflect on the garden of the summer just past, and to plan for the forthcoming seasons. Seek inspiration in the natural world. It may seem as though everything’s going into winter hibernation, but you don’t have to resort to the hothouse. Take a walk in the woods. Something magical may happen. Across those wide wintry vistas, all bare branches and foxy leaf carpets, you may come across the yellow flowers of the witch hazel. Breathe in their spicy fragrance. Yes, the American Witch Hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) blooms in fall and early winter. The shrub is said to have been named by European settlers, who saw Native Americans using its branches to divine for water. The “witch” may be a corruption of “wych,” from the Anglo-Saxon meaning to bend, as the branch was said to do near water. To the Almanac, there’s something witchy about finding flowers so late in the year. It’s as though the tree has been enchanted. If you want to add fall-flowering witch hazel to your garden the birds will thank you; they love the fruit that pops from the shrub in the winter months. Witch hazel prefers partial shade and moist, rich soil – keep in mind its natural woodsy environment. This is where your mulch comes in. But it is tolerant of poorer soils and even pollution, as long as it doesn’t get too dry. Best planted in late winter to spring, it will grow to around 8 by 12 feet. The topical astringent extracted from the bark and leaves of the tree can be used to treat poison oak and poison ivy rashes, bruises and varicose veins, among a host of other ills. It is antioxidant and antiinflammatory. Some use it to clean their dogs’ ears and cool hot spots. You see, it really is magic.

Rose hip November Autumn I’ll remember Gold landing at our door Catch one leaf and fortune will surround you evermore From Rose Hip November by Vashti Bunyan

(Very) Old-Fashioned Gingerbread “To make Gingerbread: Take Claret-wine, and put in sugar, and set it to the fire; then take wheat bread finely grafted and sifted, and Liquorice, Aniseeds, Ginger and Cinnamon beaten very small into powder. Mix your bread and your spice together, put them into the wine, and boil it, and stir it until it be very thick. Then mould it and print it at your pleasure, and let it stand in a place neither too moist nor too warm.” From The English Housewife, by Gervase Markham, 1615

Food for Fall Take a look at what’s growing in the vegetable garden this month. It’s a perfect seasonal salad. Beets, spinach, turnips, late lettuce and snow peas will be clean and crunchy, the beets giving just a hint of sweetness. Thinly slice the raw turnips for some peppery heat. Pecans are coming in now too. Chop them finely and scatter over the top for a richer flavor. Crumbled blue cheese may not go amiss either, but that might be too much. You decide. Dress with vinaigrette and a little salt and black pepper. And if that salad sounds just a tiny bit too virtuous for winter, leave out the pecans. Save them for a big ol’ pie instead.

And an Old-Fashioned Cocktail For a holiday apéritif, here’s an oldfashioned recipe for an Old Fashioned: 1 lump of sugar 2 dashes Angostura bitters 2 oz rye whiskey 1 slice of lemon peel 1 slice of orange Dissolve the sugar in the Angostura, pour the solution into an Old Fashioned glass over large ice cubes. Add the rye whiskey, garnish with the lemon peel and orange slice. Stir well and drink with good cheer, thinking of Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Arts Entertainment C a l e n da r

Artists’ League Fall Show and Sale 11/

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Sunday, November 1 CHAMBER MUSIC CONCERT SERIES. 3 – 4 p.m. “Baroque & Beyond.” Harpsichord, baroque flute, gamba (cello), and theorbo. Cost: $10/member; $20/ non-member. Tickets by subscription or at the door. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6926261 or weymouthcenter.org. LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. April Verch performs. Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

Sunday, November 1 – 14 ART EXHIBIT. “Diversified Clay: An Invitational.” Gallery hours. Continuing from last month, this exhibit of Piedmont potters is presented by The David McCune International Art Gallery. Exhibit is free

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Weymouth Tag Sale

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and open to the public. William F. Bethune Center for Visual Arts, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Silvana Foti at (910) 425-5379 or davidmccunegallery.org.

Monday, November 2 NATURE EVENT. 5 p.m. “Run with a Ranger.” Come out and take a casual, 2.5-mile jog along the trails with a park ranger. The jog should take about 30 minutes and will include uphill sections as well as loose sand. Please be sure you’re up for the task and bring running shoes! Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Tuesday, November 3 NATURE TALES. 10 – 11 a.m. for ages 2 to 4, and 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. for ages 5 and 6. “Thankful Harvest.” Preschool story and nature time. No cost for program, but

Floral Design Class

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please pre-register 2 business days in advance. (Admission to garden is not included in program.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 20) or capefearbg.org. YOGA CLASS (ADV BEGINNER). 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. (Tuesdays through Dec 8) Experienced yoga practitioner Carol Wallace leads this course for individuals who have a basic understanding of yoga and wish to advance their skills. Cost: $35/resident; $70/ non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Rec, @ Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2951900 or pinehurstrec.org. BALLROOM DANCE CLASSES: BEGINNER. 6:30 – 7:30 p.m. (first of four weekly sessions) Instructor Sharon Nichols will teach you ballroom dancing steps, timing, and leading and following skills. Singles and couples welcome. Cost: $30/ resident; $60/non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Recreation, Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or pinehurstrec.org.

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Meet Deborah Diesen

All Choirs Concert

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BALLROOM DANCE CLASSES: INTERMEDIATE. 7:30 – 8:30 p.m. (first of four weekly sessions) Instructor Sharon Nichols will teach you the steps, timing, leading and following skills. Singles and couples are welcome. Cost: $30/resident; $60/non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Recreation, Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or pinehurstrec.org.

Wednesday, November 4 LUNCH N’ LEARN. 10:30 a.m. Helen Von Salzen:

They’re back!

Discovery Hike 11/

“Tea Time in the Sandhills.” Cost: $25. Reservations required. Sandhills Women’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677. LITERARY EVENT. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Writers in Residence Monthly Reading. Lois Holt. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org. NATURE EVENT. 5 p.m. “Run with a Ranger.” Come out and take a casual, 2.5-mile jog along the JEWELS SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 15TH 1:00 THE LADY OF THE CAMELLIAS SATURDAY, DECEMBER 6 1:00 TH

BERG’S LULU SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 21ST 12:30

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trails with a park ranger. The jog should take about 30 minutes and will include uphill sections as well as loose sand. Please be sure you’re up for the task and bring running shoes! Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Thursday, November 5 SAFE HARBOR PROGRAM. 1 – 4 p.m. Celebration of the 20th anniversary of the “Safe Harbor Program.” The Sandhills Conservation

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at the

Located in Beautiful Downtown Southern Pines

250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, NC • 910-692-8501

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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ca l e n d a r Partnership will host a family-friendly party, complete with a scavenger hunt and refreshments, along with presentations from naturalists about the longleaf pine forest. The public is invited. The Walthour-Moss Foundation, Equestrian Road Entrance, Southern Pines. Info: For directions to locale, call (910) 6957811 or visit walthour-moss.org. HOLIDAY DECORATING IDEAS. 3:30 and 7 p.m. Matt Hollyfield will demonstrate ideas for holiday decorating. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library (3:30 p.m.), 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst; and the Given Outpost (7 p.m.), 95 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022.

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Kim Stout 910-528-2008

PLAY READING. 5:30 – 7:30 p.m. Playwright June Guralnick reads from her new play, Birds of A Feather: A Comedy about De-Extinction, about a time-travelling geneticist who journeys one hundred years into the past. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

Friday, November 6 MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Julian Pleasants, professor emeritus of history at the University of Florida and author of The Political Career of W. Kerr Scott: The Squire from Haw River, leads a history discussion about this plainspoken farmer from Alamance County who was the governor of North Carolina from 1949 to 1953 and a U.S. senator from 1954 to 1958. Event is free and open to the public. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211. VETERANS BLUEVASS FESTIVAL. 5 p.m. Cars Under the Stars Cruise-In, followed by bluegrass bands and cloggers. Sponsored by Vass American Legion Post 296. Admission is free, but donations welcome. Proceeds benefit Moore County Veterans Support Fund. Alcohol and coolers prohibited. Sandy Ramey Keith Park, 3600 US 1, Vass. Info: townofvassnc.gov. VOCALIST IN CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. The Friends of Music presents Kaitlyn Lusk, world-renown vocalist best known for her live and recorded performances on the Lord of the Rings Symphony and Gladiator Live for Hans Zimmer. Free and open to the public. Hensdale Chapel, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Linda Voleman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@methodist.edu.

Friday, November 6–8 ART SHOW AND SALE. 6 – 8 p.m. Friday (opening reception), 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Saturday, and 12 – 3 p.m. Sunday. The Artists League of the Sandhills Annual Fall Show and Sale includes approximately 200 new works of art and over 300 pieces in the studios, including oils, watercolors, pastels, and other media. Exhibit and sale continue until Friday, December 18 during gallery hours (12 – 3 p.m. Mon – Sat). Exchange Street Gallery of Fine Art, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-3979. BEACH MUSIC CONCERT. 3 – 6 p.m. Music by the North Tower Band, hosted by The Pinehurst Civic Group and Village of Pinehurst. Come mix and mingle with your neighbors and meet the newly elected Village Council and Mayor. Water, soda, and

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beer available for purchase to benefit local charities. Tufts Memorial Park, 1 Village Green Road W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or vopnc.org. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while Cool Heat entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/person. Reservations and pre-payment required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

Saturday, November 7 NATURE TALES. 10 – 11 a.m. for ages 2 to 4, and 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. for ages 5 and 6. “Thankful Harvest.” Preschool story and nature time. Cost and registration: No cost for program, but please pre-register 2 business days in advance. (Admission to garden is not included in program.) Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 (ext 20) or capefearbg.org. TAG SALE. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Items include antiques, furniture, crystal, and more. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org. SENIOR ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Pottery, pine-needle baskets, woodwork, paintings, jewelry, ornaments, baked goods, knitting, crochet work, quilted items, flower arrangements, and more. Coffee, cinnamon rolls, chicken & dumplings, and pumpkin pie; hot dogs, hamburgers, chips, and soda will be available for purchase. Moore County Department of Aging, 8040 US 15-501, West End. Info: (910) 215-0900. WAR HORSE EVENT SERIES. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Schooling Day. Open to all riders, this is an opportunity to school any or all phases for the Sunday competition. Cost: for Open Schooling (XC, Show, Jumping, & Dressage) $125/Regular; $70/Friend of The Park. Call or visit website for costs for individual phases. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or carolinahorsepark.com. CHILI COOK OFF AND FREEDOM 5K RACE. 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. Race starts at 11:30. Costs for cook off: $5 tastings, $50 to enter. Cost for race: $25, includes tee shirt and entrance to tastings and 1 free beer. O’Donnell’s Pub, 133 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Register at O’Donnell’s Pub or Southern Pines Crossfit. Info: (910) 695-1915. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Jane Casnellie and learn about her techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2550665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom. MAKER SATURDAY. 11 a.m. “Explore Brush Bots.” Maker Saturdays allow students to explore technology in a relaxed environment. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. FALL FESTIVAL. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Lots of crafts, food, silent auction, spaghetti lunch, and more. First Presbyterian Church, 110 S Ray St., Carthage. Info: (910) 947-2924. GOLF CAPITAL CHORUS SHOW. 7 p.m. “Songs

November 2015i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r for the Young at Heart.” Songs from the Great American Songbook. The quartet Storm Front opens the second act. Cost: $15. Tickets available at The Country Bookshop, Given Outpost, and Heavenly Pines. All proceeds benefit local charities. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: 910-295-3529. WHITE ELEPHANT SALE AND RAFFLE. 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Sponsored by the Women of Sacred Heart. Come shop for bargains and delicious home-baked goodies. Also, dozens of raffle prizes. Proceeds benefit Moore County charitable organizations. Sacred Heart Church Founders Hall, NC 211/Dundee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 695-0886 or sacredheartpinehurst.org. VETERANS PARADE AND RIDE. 9:45 a.m. – 1 p.m. Veterans Texas Hold ‘em Poker/Flag Run. Sponsored by Sandhills American Legion Riders Chapter 72, Aberdeen. After the parade, riders go on a scenic tour of Moore County. Entry fee: $15/ single riders; $25/doubles. Ride sponsors welcome. Registration is at 8 a.m. at American Legion Post 177, 1650 W New York Ave., Southern Pines. LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. The Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066.

Sunday, November 8 WAR HORSE EVENT SERIES. All day. Horse Trials, Combined Test, and Dressage. Cost: $135 for horse trial, $75 for Combined Test, and $40 for Dressage. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or carolinahorsepark.com. TAG SALE. 1 – 3 p.m. Items include antiques, furniture, crystal, and more. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org. EXPLORATIONS SERIES FOR ADULTS. 3 – 4 p.m. Author and storyteller Sylvia Payne will present We Have Stories to Tell: Family and Personal Stories. This presentation is made possible by a grant from the North Carolina Humanities Council, a nonprofit foundation and a state affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Matuto performs. Cost: $15 in advance, $20 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org. VETERANS CONCERT. 5 p.m. A popular band with a No. 1 hit teams up with Moore County music “veterans” and a newcomer in this high-energy concert. Cost: $15 general admission, $25 reserved seating. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: sandhillsmoaa.com.

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Monday, November 9 VETERANS PUTTING CHALLENGE. 1:30 p.m. Nine teams will participate on the 9-hole course. Teams include four veterans, representing WW II, Korea, Vietnam, and Operation Iraq/Enduring Freedom. Admission is free; donations accepted. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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ca l e n d a r Pinehurst Resort Putting Green, 1 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst. Info: sandhillsmoaa.com. SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Program: Naturalist Mike Dunn. Guests are always welcome. Hannah Theater Center at The O’Neal School, 3300 Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6920 or www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

We treat yoaulrty!pets like Roy

Tuesday, November 10 BULB-PLANTING. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Dirty Gardener’s Bulb-Planting Party. Bring a shovel and Weymouth will supply the bulbs. Refreshments to follow. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: Sue Huston (910) 420-2039. FLORAL DESIGN CLASS. 1 p.m. Pumpkin centerpiece. Cost $45, includes materials. Pre-registration required. King & Hollyfield Design, Inc.,
130 E Illinois Ave.,
Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7243. MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. International bestselling author Diane Chamberlain discusses her new novel, Pretending To Dance, an exploration into the complexities of family and lies. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

Wednesday, November 11 HIKE WITH OUR VETERANS. 8 a.m. Take an easy, 1-mile hike along the trails and enjoy light refreshments and socialize with local veterans afterwards. All veterans, non-veterans, and the general public are welcome. Sponsored by Team Red, White, & Blue (teamrwb.org). Visitors’ Center, Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167. VETERANS DAY CONCERT. 4 p.m. The Army Ground Forces Band performs. Admission free, but tickets are required and can be obtained (first-come, first-served basis) at the Arts Council of Moore County, 482 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Concert at Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or visit mooreart.org.

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Thursday, November 12 RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. “The Ripple Effect: Why Fresh Water will be the Defining Resource of This Century,” with Alex Prud’homme, author of five books (most notably as co-writer of Julia Child’s memoir, My Life in France). Lecture is free and open to the public. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-6185.

Friday, November 13 COOKING CLASS. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Colombian– South American Night. Join professional chef Sonia Middleton as she brings a little international culture to cooking. Cost: $40/resident; $80/non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Recreation, Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or pinehurstrec.org.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Encore

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Antiques Collectibles Fine Furniture Old Dolls Old Toys & Trains Glassware China Civil War Militaria US Coins Located in Town & Country Antique Mall • Hwy. 1 Aberdeen (across from Aberdeen Lake/Park) 910-944-3359 • 910-638-4542 • apbrill@earthlink.net

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ca l e n d a r

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Buying Vintage

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JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while Summer Daze entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/ person. Reservations and pre-payment required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com. NATURE EVENT. 10 – 10:45 a.m. Animal Charades (for Wee Ones!). Learn about the great variety in animals’ behaviors as we read a book, do some activities, and make a craft. All activities will take place outdoors as much as possible and will be geared towards children ages 3 to 5. Parent participation is expected. Visitors’ Center, Weymouth WoodsSandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Friday, November 13–15 GIFT SHOP HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Tasty samples and special pricing on select items. Purchase holiday gifts packed in a signature gift bag. Members receive 10 percent discount in the Garden Gift Shop. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or capefearbg.org.

Saturday, November 14 MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Jane Casnellie and learn about her techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2550665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom. AUTUMN CRAFT DAY. All day. This is a self-led activity for kids of all ages. Take home some cool seasonal creations! Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. ARTS & CRAFTS FAIR. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Whispers’ festive shopping experience features handcrafted holiday décor, jewelry, art work, many craft works, bath and body products, yummy bake sale edibles, and more—all sold by local artists! All profits donated to Moore County Charities. Admission is FREE and includes a ticket to enter the door-prize drawing. Food and beverages available for purchase. Free parking & shuttle service. The Country Club of Whispering Pines, 2 Country Club Blvd., Whispering Pines. Info: Linda at (910) 949-4290. LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. Becca Rae performs at the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066. NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. 8 p.m. “Favorite Light Classics.” David Glover conducts this Family Youth Concert, which will include the “Overture to William Tell,” “Prelude to Hänsel and Gretel,” “Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End,” and highlights from “Jurassic Park.” Call for prices. Tickets available through TicketMaster or at the door 1 hr before performance. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. 7:00 p.m.: Meet the Artists, Pinecrest HS Band Room. Info: (877) 627-6724 or ncsymphony.org.

November 2015i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Fabulous Finds in Fayetteville

ca l e n d a r

Sunday, November 15 SUNDAY KIDS MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. In this film, emotions run wild in the mind of a little girl who is uprooted from her peaceful life in the Midwest and forced to move to San Francisco. Free to the public. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net.

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BOLSHOI BALLET SERIES. 1 p.m. Jewels, performed by the Bolshoi Ballet. Cost: $25. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or sunrisetheater.com. LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Hot Club of Cowtown performs. Cost: $20 in advance, $25 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

Monday, November 16 SIP & PAINT WITH JANE. 5 – 7 p.m. Join resident artist Jane Casnellie for an evening of sipping and painting and take home your own masterpiece! No experience necessary. All materials provided, including a glass of wine. Cost: $35. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info and registration: (910) 255-0665.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 3:30 p.m. Children’s book author Deborah Diesen discusses her book The Not Very Merry Pout-Pout Fish. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

2800-4 Raeford Rd., Fayetteville, NC 28303 Follow Us on Facebook

© Silhouette

WOMEN OF WEYMOUTH MEETING. 9:30 a.m., coffee, followed by meeting at 10 a.m. Speaker: Patricia Dunlavy Valenti, Professor Emerita, UNC-Pembroke. Topic: “Letter Writing and Sophia Peabody Hawthorne.” Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org.

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Tuesday, November 17 LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS OF MOORE COUNTY MEETING AND LUNCHEON. 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Guest speaker Glenda Clendenin, Director, Moore County Board of Elections, will talk about the up-coming election cycle and current voter guidelines. The public is welcome to attend, but reservations are required. Cost: $13, payable by check to LWVMC. Table on the Green Restaurant, 2205 Midland Drive, Pinehurst. Info and reservations: Charlotte at (910) 944-9611. JAMES BOYD BOOK CLUB. 2 p.m. Short stories by O. Henry. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org.

Wednesday, November 18–22 The 19th Annual Festival of Trees. 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Wed – Sat, and 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Sun. A sparkling winter wonderland of 200 decorated trees as well as wreaths, gingerbread houses, and gift baskets available through on-line auction site (https://www.32auctions.com/ FOT2015). Admission to the festival is by any monetary donation at the door. All proceeds benefit Sandhills

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Dining Guide

TRADITIONAL ITALIAN DINING

195

Now Accepting Reservations for Holiday Parties!

Thank you for shopping at the

MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET in 2015 Winter Season

November thru mid-April Thursdays: 604 W. Morganton Road- Armory 9:00 am - 1:00 pm “Open on Wednesday Thanksgiving Week” Greenhouse and in-season produce will be available plus meats, goat cheese, baked goods, and crafts

american fusion cuisine supporting local farmers

lunch tues-sat 11-3 dinner wed-sat 5:30-9:30 chef prem nath

195 bell avenue southern pines 910.692.7110 www.195americanfusion.com

Visit us for Daily Specials Extensive Gluten Free Menu Including Gluten Free Pizza Call for Reservations.

(910) 215-9800

9735 US 15-501 • Fairway Village, Pinehurst, NC Mon - Thurs 5pm-9pm Fri - Sat 5pm-10pm

FirstHealth & Downtown Southern Pines closed for the Season at the end of October and will re-open the middle of April 2016 Facilities Courtesy of FirstHealth & Town of Southern Pines

Call 947-3752 or 690-9520 for more info.

hwwebster@embarqmail.com Web search Moore County Farmers Market Local Harvest www.facebook.com/moorecountyfarmersmarket SNAP welcomed here

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Dinner

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ca l e n d a r Children’s Center. The Carolina Hotel in Pinehurst. Info: Get details about special Festival events (Girls’ Night Out, Wine Tasting, Festival Marketplace) at the website, www.FestivalofTrees.org or call (910) 692-3323.

Thursday, November 19 FAMILY FUN NIGHT. 5:30 p.m. Meet the characters from the book Toys Go Out by Emily Jenkins. Bring your copy of the book to be signed by the characters, and participate in other fun activities. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net . BOOK CLUB. 10:30 a.m. The Douglass Book Club will meet at the Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. JAZZ CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. Methodist University Jazz Monarchs Concert. This event is free and open to the public. Huff Concert Hall, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Linda Volman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@methodist.edu.

Friday, November 20 PAINTING CLASS (OIL). 1 – 4 p.m. Fridays through Jan 15, 2016. (No class Nov 27, Dec 25, or Jan 1) For all levels of experience, artist Eileen Strickland covers basic information on materials,

techniques, color theory, and composition. Cost: $35/resident; $70/non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Rec, Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Info and pre-registration: (910) 295-1900 or 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while Midnight Allie entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/ person. Reservations and pre-payment required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com. CHOIR IN CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. Methodist University All Choirs Concert, Huff Concert Hall, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Linda Volman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@ methodist.edu.

Saturday, November 21 MAKER SATURDAY. 2 p.m. “Explore Makey Makey.” Maker Saturdays allow students to explore technology in a relaxed environment. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. MET OPERA HD LIVE. 12:30 p.m. Berg’s Lulu performed by the Metropolitan Opera. Soprano Marlis Peterson performs the title role in this wild journey

of love, obsession, and death. Cost: $27. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or sunrisetheater.com. MARATHON/FUN RUN. All day. 35th Annual Turkey Trot. 1-Mile Fun Run, 5K, 10K, and Half Marathon, through the streets and neighborhoods of the Village of Pinehurst. This event benefits the Foundation of FirstHealth. Pre-registration required. Cost: Registration pricing varies. Course begins and ends at Cannon Park, 90 Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info and registration: (910) 295-1900 setupevents.com. MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Charlie Roberts and learn about his techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2550665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom. LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. Tim Wilson performs at the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066.

Saturday, November 21– December 31 PARADE OF TREES. Local businesses decorate Christmas trees that line the downtown blocks and compete to win Best in Show! Downtown Southern Pines. Info: Southern Pines Business Association.

Dining Guide

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November 2015 i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r

Sunday, November 22 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. Downtown Southern Pines shops will be open for holiday shopping with special treats and the opportunity to win cash prizes! Drawing for three prizes at 4 p.m. at the Train Station. Must be present to win. Info: Southern Pines Business Association. SUNDAY FILM SERIES. 2:30 p.m. In this film, the lead character, Adaline, has kept to herself for decades in order to keep secret the fact that she has remained 29 years old for nearly a century. Free to the public. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6928235 or sppl.net. LIVE MUSIC AT THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Moores and McCumber performs. Cost: $12 in advance, $15 at the door. Doors open at 6:16 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or theroosterswife.org.

Tuesday, November 24 YOUNG AFFILIATES MEETING. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org. JAM SESSION. 7 – 9 p.m. Acoustical Musicians Group. Acoustical musicians welcome to bring instruments and join in. Casual. Bring something to drink and enjoy the music. Public is welcome. Weymouth

Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

Wednesday, November 25 PAINTING CLASS (ALL MEDIA). 1 – 4 p.m. Wednesdays, Nov 23 through Jan 13, 2016 (No class on Dec 23 or Dec 30). For all levels of experience. Artist Eileen Strickland, covers basic information on materials, techniques, color theory, and composition. Cost: $35/resident; $70/non-resident. Pinehurst Parks and Recreation, Recreation Room, 300 Kelly Road, Pinehurst. Please pre-register. Info: (910) 295-2817 or pinehurstrec.org.

Thursday, November 26 THANKSGIVING DAY DISCOVERY HIKE. 10 a.m. Before Thanksgiving dinner, get out of the kitchen and into the woods. Join a park ranger for a 2-mile hike to see what’s happening in nature on this holiday. Wear comfortable shoes, bring a water bottle, and dress for the weather. Weymouth WoodsSandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Friday, November 27 PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. Special guest author Kathy McGougan and Lily the Dog (or Buddy) will be at Storytime. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 6 p.m. Enjoy a bottle of wine and dancing with friends under the tent while The Sand Band entertains you with live jazz music. Cost: $10/ person. Reservations and pre-payment required for parties of 8 or more. Food vendors on site. Cypress Bend Vineyards, 21904 Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411 or cypressbendvineyards.com.

Saturday, November 28 MEET THE ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Visit with artist Jane Casnellie and learn about her techniques and background in art. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2550665 or hollyhocksartgallerycom. LIVE MUSIC. 7 – 10 p.m. Pete O’Dae performs at the Wine Cellar & Tasting Room, 241-A NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Free to the public. Info: (910) 692-3066.

WEEKLY HAPPENINGS Note: Some weekly events may not be offered each week during the holiday season.

Mondays BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

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ca l e n d a r NATURE STUDY. 8 a.m. –12 p.m. Migration bird banding has begun at Weymouth Woods! Warblers, vireos, flycatchers, thrushes, and more. Spectators are welcome at the banding station along James Creek. Note: Migration season can end without notice— please call before coming to this event. Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

Tuesdays–Saturdays SANDHILLS WOMAN’S EXCHANGE. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Lunch served from 11:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Gift shop features local artisans’ crafts. (Note: Volunteers needed. If interested, call (910) 783-5169.) Sandhills Woman’s Exchange, 15 Azalea Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-4677.

Tuesdays BABY BUNNIES STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. November 3, 10, & 17 only. This storytime, reserved for babies from birth to 18 months, will engage parents and children in early literary practices. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net. BROWN BAG LUNCH/GAME DAY. 11:30 a.m. Bring your lunch and enjoy fellowship and activities, including card games, board games, and the Wii. The Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

TAI CHI FOR HEALTH. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Practice this flowing Eastern exercise with instructor Rich Martin at the Cape Fear Botanical Garden. Cost: Single class: $15/member; $17/non-member. Monthly rates available. No refunds or transfer for these classes. Cape Fear Botanical Garden, 536 N Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info and registration: (910) 486-0221.

Wednesdays NATURE STUDY. 8 a.m. –12 p.m. Migration bird banding has begun at Weymouth Woods! Warblers, vireos, flycatchers, thrushes, and more. Spectators are welcome at the banding station along James Creek. Note: Migration season can end without notice— please call before coming to this event. Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167. BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. (November 4 & 18 only) The focus of these storytimes, for all children through age 5 will be stories, songs, fun, and activities to build skills necessary for kindergarten. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or sppl.net.

Thursdays STORY HOUR! 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. For ages 3 to 5. Givens Memorial Library. 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022. MOORE COUNTY FARMERS MARKET. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. Produce only, fresh and locally grown. Armory Sports Complex, 604 W Morganton Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 947-3752 or moorecountync.gov or localharvest.org. MAHJONG (Chinese version). 1 – 3 p.m. A game played by 4 people involving skill, strategy, and calculation. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

Fridays PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 10:30 a.m. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211. BRIDGE. 1 – 4 p.m. A card game played by four people in two partnerships, in which “trump” is determined by bidding. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W Pennsylvania, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 p.m. A great way to start off the weekend and get scrumptious ideas. No reservations needed. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or theflavorexchange.com.

“Eat, Kiss & Smile Better” Open Wednesday through Saturday 200 Westgate Dr, Suite C, Pinehurst

www.sandhillsweekenddental.com

910-687-4423 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Protect your investment this fall

With our fully stocked truck and trailer, we come to you for all your detailing needs!

Justin Mace, Owner

Get Your Shine On

• Luxury Car Care Quality. Convenience. Ever y Time. • Fleet Management • Headlight Restoration

910-603-5379 | www.jsmobiledetailing.com

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• Full Details • Hand Wax • Wax

• Polish • Scratch Removal • And More!

November 2015i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r COOKING CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Chef Maria DiGiovanni leads hands-on preparation of menu items (gnocci, Thai, ravioli, Moroccan, Lebanese, connolis, or pasta). Reservations and pre-payment required. Call for prices and specific menu. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or the flavorexchange.com.

Saturdays NATURE STUDY. 8 a.m. –12 p.m. Migration bird banding has begun at Weymouth Woods! Warblers, vireos, flycatchers, thrushes, and more. Spectators are welcome at the banding station along James Creek. Note: Migration season can end without notice— please call before coming to this event. Weymouth Woods-Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167. STORYTIME! 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. (No Storytime Oct 10) Givens Memorial Library. 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022. COOKING CLASS. 6:30 p.m. Chef Maria DiGiovanni leads hands-on preparation of menu items (gnocci, Thai, ravioli, Moroccan, Lebanese, connolis, or pasta). Reservations and pre-payment required. Call for prices and specific menu. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345 or the flavorexchange.com.

LOOKING AHEAD TO THE HOLIDAYS! Tuesday, December 1 LIVE CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. Fayetteville Band and Methodist University Concert Band. This event is free and open to the public. Huff Concert Hall, Methodist University, 5400 Ramsey St., Fayetteville. Info: Linda Volman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@ methodist.edu.

Wednesday, December 2 WEYMOUTH GALA PREVIEW PARTY. 6 – 9 p.m. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Reservations required. Info: (910) 692-6261.

Thursday, December 3–6 CHRISTMAS OPEN HOUSE. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Weymouth Christmas House decorated to the theme of “In A One-Horse Open Sleigh.” Cost: $15 in advance; $20 at the door. Tickets available at Weymouth Center, Country Bookshop, Given Library, Lady Bedford’s Tea House, and Sandhills Winery. Weymouth Center for Arts & Humanities, 555 E Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or weymouthcenter.org.

Friday, December 4 PINEHURST CHRISTMAS TREE LIGHTING. 5 – 7:30 p.m. The evening will include photos with Santa, hayrides, Santa’s elves, and musical entertainment. Tufts Memorial Park, 1 Village Green Road W, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1900 or pinehurstrec.org.

Friday, December 4–5 YULETIDE FEASTE. 7:30 p.m. Ticket required. Hay Street United Methodist Church, 320 Hay St., Fayetteville. Info and tickets: Linda Volman at (910) 630-7100 or lvolman@methodist.edu.

Saturday, December 5 CHILDREN’S CHORUS HOLIDAY CONCERT. 5 p.m. The Moore County Children’s Chorus will present their holiday concert at Brownson Memorial Presbyterian Church in Southern Pines. Admission is free.

Sunday, Dec. 6 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. 1 – 4 p.m. Moore County Historical Association’s Yuletide Open House at the (1820s) Bryant House and the on-site McLendon Cabin (1760s) next door in Carthage. Free to public. Info: For details and directions call (910) 692-2051 weekdays 1 – 4 p.m., visit info@moorehistory.com, or go to facebook.com/moorehistorical.

Holiday Outfits as cute as they are!

CUTLER TREE

belli bambini 165 NE Broad Street •Southern Pines (910) 692-6926

Tree Pruning Removal Plant Site Consulting Stump Grinding Shrub Care Tree Conservation for New Home Sites Free Estimates GEOFFREY CUTLER 910-692-7769 • 910-690-7657 Fully Insured

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November PineNeedler Answers

ca l e n d a r

from page 141

Thursday, December 10–12 TEEN CHALLENGE CHRISTMAS BANQUET. 6:30 p.m. The 29th Annual Sandhills Teen Challenge Christmas Banquet will be held at the Sandhills Teen Challenge Center, 444 Farm Life School Road, Carthage. Cost: $75/table or $10/ person. Adults only please. Info and reservations: (910) 947–2944. Please send checks to Sandhills Teen Challenge, PO Box 1701, Southern Pines, NC 28388.

Friday, Dec. 11–13 HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE. 1 – 4 p.m. Moore County Historical Association’s Yuletide Open House at the Shaw Homestead, corner of Morganton Road and Broad St., Southern Pines.

Sunday, December 13 WINTER CONCERT. 7 p.m. Moore County Choral Society will present the “Holiday Spirit” concert at Sandhills Community College. Cost: $15/adult; $7.50/student. Tickets available now at the Country Bookshop, Kirk Tours of Pinehurst, the Sandhills Winery in Seven Lakes, and the Campbell House.

I S A A C

L E T G O

P C O S L T O O P A L

B A L I

L A T E R

S T Y

F O L I A G E

U N I T

S C A T

P N E E E F I C K R E C K E M O S H P U N U S S R D N A E Y C L I R I S A R I N E M O E G E A N

S E R E D U A D L U M P O T M A A B L L T E

C H I L A A R O B L A S O N T S S E J O A F O R L I E K I N S L E U R K E X I R F L A C O S A S E

I N T O Y E S Y E N T A

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7 8 4 2 9 3 5 6 1

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5 2 3 4 1 8 9 7 6

9 7 8 3 2 6 1 4 5

8 5 2 7 6 4 3 1 9

4 9 1 5 3 2 6 8 7

3 6 7 1 8 9 2 5 4

NOT ALL ENERGY TAX CREDITS ARE GONE. CALL US FOR DETAILS. 101 MAPLE ST. • ABERDEEN

910-944-2526 • www.AIR-SPECIALTIES.com ©2015 Lennox Industries Inc. Lennox dealers include independently owned and operated businesses. May be available with the installation of qualifying high-efficiency products. To find out more about tax credits, ask your tax adviser.

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Arts & Culture

ADVANCE TICKETS ONLY*

Lights

Music

Santa

Refreshments

2015

*Tickets will sell out

presents

Superheroes Each EvenIng!

Holiday

Dates: Nov.27&28, Dec. 4-6, 10-13, 16-22

www.AIRLIEGARDENS.org

300 Airlie Road, Wilmington, NC

Holiday

Tickets: Edible Arrangements, Pinecrest Plaza or tututix.com or call 910-695-7898 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Arts & Culture

T he S ouThern P ineS B uSineSS A SSociATion & T he T own o f S ouThern P ineS inviTe you To

Christmas SUN, DEC 6 | 7:30PM LEE AUDITORIUM, PINECREST HIGH SCHOOL, SOUTHERN PINES

North Carolina Master Chorale

Campbell House | 482 E. Connecticut Avenue The Country Bookshop | 140 NW Broad Street

Tickets start at just $24! ncsymphony.org | 877.627.6724

for The hoLiDAyS

st P

Be

Tickets can be purchased locally at:

Southern Pines ed Vot

Your holiday will be uplifted by the beautiful music of Handel and Bach. Enjoy the Hallelujah Chorus from Messiah, Brandenburg Concerto No. 4 and much more.

DownTown

nG ue s ts

A Baroque

viSiT

lac

e to

w To f o Bring Out Tree Lighting

Saturday, November 28, 4:30pm

Southern Pines Train Station The annual lighting of the Holly tree with holiday musical performances.

Parade of Trees

November 21 - December 31

Decorated Christmas trees light up downtown Broad Street for a festive ambience for the holiday season.

Christmas Parade

December 5, 11:00am

Downtown Southern Pines Marching bands, loads of floats, Santa, street musicians & more!

Downtown Open House Sunday, November 22, 12:00 - 4:00pm

Enjoy holiday shopping and treats at the downtown retailers.

First Eve

December 31, 6:00 - 8:00pm

Downtown Broad Street Family-friendly festival with the dropping of the Pine Cone at 8 p.m.

The mission of the Southern Pines Business Association is to encourage and enhance thecommercial well-being of Southern Pines and improve the quality of its common life.

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Arts & Culture

Exchange Street Gallery of Fine Art

21ST ANNUAL

ART EXHIBIT & SALE NOVEMBER 6 – DECEMBER 17, 2015 Opening Weekend Festivities

Opening Reception: Friday, November 6, 6pm – 8pm Saturday, November 7, 10am – 4pm • Sunday, November 8, Noon – 3pm Regular Gallery Hours Monday – Saturday Noon to 3pm

“Nature’s Music” by Linda Bruening

“Black Beauty” by Adele Buytenhuys

Looking for that special present? Don’t miss the Artists League’s

HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE Friday, December 4 and Saturday, December 5 from 11am – 3pm

“In a One Horse Open Sleigh”

Weymouth Christmas House December 3rd-6th 2015

Do some shopping while watching artists at work and enjoying holiday refreshments. Beautiful Art Work • Note Cards Gift Certificates for Classes And Much More…

Preview Gala: December 2, 6pm-9pm Carols at Weymouth: December 3, 5:30pm Candlelight Tour: December 5, 7pm-9pm

Visit our website for details: www.artistleague.org 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen 944-3979

Daily Tour: Thurs., Fri., Sat. 10am-3pm Sunday 1pm-4pm Tickets and Information: 910.692.6261

555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, a 501 (c)(3) not for profit organization.

Follow us on

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Chuck & Mary Bolton

Custom Homes

Design • Build • Remodel

910-673-3603 • 4317 Seven Lakes Plaza

www.BoltonBuildersInc.com boltonbldrs@boltonbuildersinc.com

BLACK ROCK

VINEYARDS & WINERY Come taste our Mid-Atlantic Southeastern Wine Competition Silver Award Winning Sangiovese, Chambourcin & Viognier.

Local NC & Moore County Cheeses • Creamed Honey Custom Gift Baskets Thurs, Fri & Sat 11-6 & Sun 1-6 • Call to book private events

910-295-9511

6652 US Hwy 15-501 Carthage

Call or visit our website for our November Wine & Design Night

www.blackrockvineyard.com

ay Great Holtisd! Presen l! Shop Loca

Mon-Sat, 10am - 5pm 910-246-0387

J&B

TRADING

Scooters ATV’s Mini-Bikes Accessories Professional Repair

1515 US Hwy 1 South Southern Pines Cranial Scarring Alopecia Areata Trichotillomania Menopausal Disorder Men’s Hair Loss

CALL FOR FREE CONSULTATION!

TESLA

HAIR REPLACEMENT CLINIC

Anna Rodriguez 125 Fox Hollow Road, Suite 103 Pinehurst, NC 28374

BEFORE 124

AFTER

910-684-8808 | 919-418-3078 teslahrc@gmail.com Confidentiality is ensured.

November 2015i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sandhills Photography Club “Farm Animals” Competition Winners

CLASS A WINNERS 1

2

3

6

4

5 7

CLASS A WINNERS 1 1st Place – Donna Ford – Stella 2 2nd Place – Gene Lentz – Kaylie 3 3rd Place – Debra Regula – Ruling The Roost

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Honorable Mention – Jim Davis – Hee Haw Honorable Mention – Neva Kittrelll – Does My Nose Look Big Honorable Mention – Neva Kittrelll – I’m Ready For My Close Up Honorable Mention – Debra Regula – Here’s Winking At You Kid Honorable Mention – Grace Hill – Sisters PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015 125 4 5 6 7 8


Brilliant

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Bold as You Are!

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lavender

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T-F 10:30-5:30, S 10:30-4:30 157 NE Broad Street, SP (910) 315-1280

Christma s Cards

Featuring

ELLIOTT LAUREN JOSEPH RIBKOFF MING WANG TRIBAL SPORTSWEAR

Invita tions

ze Personali p m Sta s

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AND MANY MORE!

Stationery

Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays from our family to yours Aldena Frye Floral & Event Design

120 W Main St • Aberdeen, NC • 910.944.1071

Aldena’s on South A Four Seasons Store 107 South St • Aberdeen, NC • 910.944.1580

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Casual to Dressy

CELEBRATING WOMEN OF ALL AGES!

and Gifts

2160 Midland Rd, Pinehurst 910-295-4333

Labels

the

CLOTHES HORSE LADIES CLOTHING & ACCESSORIES • Beside The Fresh Market • 163 Beverly Lane, Southern Pines, NC 28387

910.693.2111

Monday-Friday 10am-6pm • Saturday 10am-5pm facebook.com/ClothesHorseofSPines

mmed Monogra Glasses

Ribbon and Wrap

Stationer y

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CLASS B WINNERS

1

2 3

4

5

CLASS B WINNERS 1 1st Place – Pat Anderson – Baaa!!! 2 2nd Place – Pat Anderson – Hauling a Load 3 3rd Place – Beth Bennington – Donkey Needs a Dentist

6

4 Honorable Mention – Steve Hoadley – Peek-a-Boo 5 Honorable Mention – Joanne Lentz – Red Cap 6 Honorable Mention – Wendell Dance – Sheep with Handler

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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The 2015 Holly & Ivy Dinner

20’s Trivia: Pinehurst Then and Now

The Holly Inn

Tuesday, December 8, 2015

Explore the history and traditions that make Pinehurst wonderful and unique, with a recreated Pinehurst menu from the era.

1920’s outfits are encouraged, but optional.

Cocktails at 6:30 pm • Dinner at 7:30 pm $125 Per Person (before Nov. 19) $150 Per Person (after Nov. 19)

Make your reservations at www.shoppinehurst.com For more information, please call (910)295-3642

A Special Benefit for the Given Memorial Library & Tufts Archives 128

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SandhillSeen

Jim & Elizabeth Fisher

Pinehurst Woman’s Exchange Fashion Show Carolina Hotel Monday, September 21, 2015 Photographs by Al and Annette Daniels

Kay Goulet, Thea Pitasy, Jo Nicholas

Victoria Adkins, Dolly Brown, Melinda Crader Jim & Char Rohr, Elizabeth & Jim Fisher Jill Johnson

Scotti McGowan

Marj Dwyer

Audrey Moriarty

Kay Lund

Lucinda Carpenter

Eileen Mahan

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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FACTORY SAMPLES & WHOLESALE PRICING

CHARLOTTE’S

FURNISHINGS & FINDS

273 W. Morganton Rd.,Southern Pines, NC

(910) 690-7922

110 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387 910-692-2388

Follow me on Facebook and Instagram

mad me Ho

e Ice Cream

s• Burger Sandwich es •

s • Daily Specials p u o •S •S ha s ke p ra

s•

W

CLASSIC AMERICAN FOOD AND DRINKS!

176 NW Broad St, Southern Pines, NC 28387 (910) 692-7273 Monday-Saturday 10:30am-9:00pm Sunday 10:30am-8:00pm

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SandhillSeen

Bonnie & Tom Bradley

Dick Devoss, Betty Tarr

Moore Area Shag Society’s Fundraiser Saturday, September 5, 2015 Photographs by Al and Annette Daniels

Michele & Terry Julius

Carole Wunderlin, Mic MacCoy

Gene Day, Venetia Batten

Dianne Cole-Hall, Alan Hall, Carol Higgins

Sandra Blake, Earl Grant

Guests enjoying a line dance Leo & Jane Garcia

Rick Locklear, Susan Baxley, Tommy Currie

Joey Lassiter, Cassandra Craven, Shaw Short

SandhillSeen

Kathee Sladkus, Jan Carey, Christel Rohde, Carol Dunbar

Helen Simms, Susan Smart, Bonnie Matthews, Margie LaVoie

Tennis ’n’ Tartes Pinehurst Country Club Tennis Center Tuesday, September 15, 2015 Photographs by Al and Annette Daniels

Sherry Price

Reggie Reed

Terry Rudziensky, Dawn Shapiro, Kathee Sladkus, JoAnn Duncan

Kathy Benarick, Nancy Hasbrouck Diane Jones, Hollie Ivester, Nina Edmonson, Mary Carter

Anita Gordon, Nancy Costantini Bernadine Fowler, Kelly Elliott

Helen Brissette, Caren Broadwell

Mary Collier, Rosemary Corcoran

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Using Dikson Italian Hair color technology for less damage, zero fade, complete gray coverage and no carcinogens. OFFERING A VARIETY OF ORGANIC STYLING PRODUCTS.

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(910)692-2825

www.thehaircottage.com Please visit our website for location and directions.

THE SANDHILLS AREA’S

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KNOLLWOOD FAIRWAYS

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NEEDLE ARTS IN THE SANDHILLS!

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Most test options for better fit, greater accuracy, more distance and overall improved performance.

Our PGA Staff is here for YOU. Fitting and teaching go hand in hand and we provide you with BOTH at Knollwood Fairways. Fitting • Customization • Simple Repairs

Largest PING Selection In Stock Located for your convenience at 1470 Midland Road, Southern Pines.

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SandhillSeen

Joe & Kay Warren

Southern Pines High School Reunion Classes 1932–1956 Friday and Saturday, September 25–26, 2015 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Anne & Jim Collins, Bobbie Roberts, Bill Warner

Faye & James Humphrey, Carol Sue Roycroft Jerry & Carol Daeke, Dorothy Shankle, D.P. Black J.C. & Betty Jo Lane, Abby & Jo McDonald

Joyce Stutts, Jimmy & Doris Hunsucker

Betty Jean Creed, Doris Andrews, Shirley Cox

Morgan Matthews, Grace Johnson, Jo Anne Daniels

Gene Bowen, Louise Howard, David & Judy Page

Peter & Mary Anne Winkelman

Bobby & David Craft, Bobby Tew

Mary Lou & D.P. Black

Jack & Jody Barron

Al & Nancy Adams

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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Sam Brasel, Karen McGhee

SandhillSeen

Billy Norman, Debbie Wilson

Cycle North Carolina Wednesday, September 30, 2015 Photographs by London Gessner

John & Kathryn Kinney

Phyl & Mike Salerno

Alice Noland, Jimmy Parkerson

Bill Egan, James Hayden Cassie White, Bill Mitchell, Cindy Miller

Shannon Hudson, Cassidy Benjamin, Davis Smith

Kelly Miller, Keith Harris & Dylan Harris

SandhillSeen

Christian Daubert, Rindy Bronson, Lauren Haggett

Adrian Allred, Kay Moss, Dan Allred

23rd Annual Sardine Festival Friday, October 9, 2015 Photographs by London Gessner

Scott & Buff Dawson George & Pat Mincer

Ruth & Jim Frazier

Carol Gelfo

Mayor Farrell, Joe Vaughan, Mac Ongall

Mary Lou Vaughan, Hannah Claire Nesbit

Agnes Covington, Carolyn Allen, Ben Bulloch

Shirley Cox, Barbara Kiser

Cathy & James Mcdowell

Bill Parke, Peggy Jones

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Parker Minchin, Mary Schwab

Andrea & Dick Moore

Ginnie Bell, Germaine & Phil Elkins

Sassy & Paolo Pellizzari

Horse Country Social Walthour-Moss Fountation Sunday, October 4, 2015

Photographs by Diane Stephens Ryan Smith, Mary Ellen Bailey, Audrey Wiggins

Bridget MacNair, Angie & Dennis Tally

XXX

The Paint Hill Holdouts

Phil & Joyce Giles

Stephen Later, Katie Walsh

Valerie Rodriguez, Kenyon & Grayson Logan, Summer Compton, Harper Scott Logan

Priscilla & John Sabol

Jim Hamilton, Holly Matt

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November 2015i��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h o u g h ts F r o m T h e Ma n s h e d

It’s a Dog’s Life

By Geoff Cutler

I’m just a dog, but I’ve got it pretty good.

Illustration by Brooke Cutler

I was thinking about this the other day at the insurance company. My dad goes down there every month to pay his bill, and this lady comes out and gives me biscuits. Not one or two, mind you; she stands outside our pickup and hands them in to me one after the other. I get a dozen of them, at least. And they’re good biscuits, too. Like I say, I’ve got it pretty good. Here’s a typical day for me. My mom wakes up at about five o’clock to get ready for school. She’s a teacher. Anyway, she putters about a bit, tidying up the kitchen and so forth, and then she feeds us breakfast. That’s me and the two cats. There used to be three cats, but one of them died. My mom was real sad when that cat died. I don’t know why. It was mean as hell. My first day at the house, back when I was a puppy, I went over to say hello to that cat. I didn’t even know what a cat was back then. I thought it might play with me but instead, the thing lashed out at me with this razor-sharp claw and slashed me across the nose with it. You can bet I stayed away from that cat from then on. The other cats are ok. The female is actually pretty nice to me and every once in a while, especially in winter when it’s cold, she’ll come under the table and get on my bed and snuggle up to me. She likes to stay warm that way. The big male, I think he’s more like the cat who died, and I always keep my eye on him when he’s close by, ’cause I have an idea he’d rip my whole face off if he thought he could get away with it. He’s sneaky, that one. . . wait . . . I see I’m getting off track. Dogs do that. We’re always thinking about a million things at once. So my mom feeds us and I get the leftover cat food with my kibble. And when I finish, here comes my dad, and I start spinning in circles and stepping on his toes because I’m so excited that when he’s done with his paper and coffee, we’re off to the farm for our walk. I run free there, and there’s birds and moles and squirrels and turtles and I chase them all. Why, just this morning there was a flock of geese on the edge of the pond, and I snuck up on them real quiet, and when I got close enough, I charged them as fast

as I could. They got up before I could catch them, but I don’t care, it’s all about the chase. I run through the corn, the wheat, the sunflowers and the woods, and the other dog who walks with us, little Mack, he tries to catch me. But I’m too fast for him. I’m tired after the walk but that’s okay because that’s when I get back in my truck and go to work. My dad goes to the jobs he’s working on and then for the rest of the day we drive around and look at the new jobs. Sometimes I get out of the truck and make new friends with the dogs who live at those houses, but mostly I stay in the back of my truck. It’s like a cave back there, and you know dogs love caves. It’s damp and dirty and my shed hair flies around when the windows are down. It’s a mess, really, and my family says it stinks, but it smells like me, and I love it. Most days, my dad stops back at the house for lunch, and I won’t even get out of my truck because I know he’s going to go out again and I wouldn’t miss it for the world. So I just stay and wait till we head off again. In the late afternoon, we come home and my dad works in his manshed. I take a nap on the cool bricks behind the stove or, when it’s cold, I sleep on my bed. Then I hear my mom’s car coming home from school and I want to go see her. She likes to walk around our neighborhood after work, and sometimes, when she’s not walking with her friends, she takes me along. I have to go on a leash in the neighborhood, which I don’t care for, but I get to smell the marks of all the other dogs. When we come upon some of those other dogs, we jump and bump and sniff at each other, and that’s great fun. My dad feeds me my dinner and I eat every last bit of it and then lick the bowl clean. He puts a little hamburger and beans in with my kibble and stirs it all up with warm water. It’s so good! After dinner, I lie underneath my dad while my family watches the television. At bedtime, I go into the bedroom and get on my bed and go to sleep. Most nights I dream about chasing birds or squirrels. It’s a dog’s life, and I’ve got a good one. I think it’s because I’m rarely left alone. Ooh! Hold on a second! We’re at the bank and they’ve got really good treats here. All I’ve got to do is get up and stick my head out the window, and hope the teller sees me. Yup. . . she sees me. How could she not, my truck is so big and we’re so close to the window I could stick my tongue out and lick her face if there wasn’t a window between us. Here she comes. . . and she’s got my biscuit. . . aw. . . this is the dog’s life! PS Geoff can be reached at geoffcutler@embarqmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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November PineNeedler Fall for it! Fall for it! By Mart Dickerson

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ACROSS

42 splash Fill in the grid so 44 Fall staple Vegetable every row, every 1 evils 47 large weight unit column and every 5 Fret 48 russia Initials 3x3 box contain the 9 Fall staple dish 50 bullfight cheer numbers 1–9. 14 act as usher 51 Genetic code 15 __ upon a time 52 Fall staple entree 16 baseball player hank __ 56 Comply 17 lawyer (abbr.) 59 Culminate 18 Fibber 63 Wrath 19 Great time 64 Capital of France 20 ripen 66 Middle east dweller 21 Pocked 67 spanish dessert 23 upon 68 dress style 24 eye part 69 Gangster's girlfriend 26 ship initials 70 Purchase amount 28 electroencephalograph (abbr.) 71 Feudal superior Puzzle answers on page 120 29 lose color 72 Poker Wager Mart Dickerson lives in Southern Pines and would afloat 31 Gladness welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle73 masters. fish She34canWalleye be reached at gdickerson@nc.rr.com. 37 before DOWN 39 rooster 40 Flightless bird 1 abraham's son 41 tall tales 2 unhand (2 wds.)

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Dress style Gangster’s girlfriend Purchase amount Feudal superior Poker wager Afloat

DOWN 1 Abraham’s son 2 Unhand (2 wds.) 3 Further in time 4 Eye infection 5 Fall staple attraction 6 Subdivision 7 Beat it, cat! 8 Withered 9 Fare’s ride 10 Auras 11 Iraq’s neighbor 12 Not found 13 Not out of 21 Sneak a look 22 Flop 25 Parts of a bottle 27 Body of water 29 Longest bone 30 Astringent 31 Unite 32 Mined metals 33 Affirmative 34 Horse and mallet game 35 Computer picture button 36 Gym sequences 38 Aviator 39 Time zone 43 Attila the ___ 45 Drinkable 46 Part of the KKK 49 Pouch 51 Expiring 53 Metric weights 54 Rub out 55 Gossiper 56 Opaque gem 57 Indonesian island 58 Canal 60 Dalai __ 61 Take the wrinkles out 62 Soda shop offering 65 Behold 67 Farm credit administration (abbr.)

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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T h e A c c i d e n tal A st r o l o g e r

Thankful to My Dark Roots November slides onto the star chart before you can say Butterball

By Astrid Stellanova

Let’s hear it for the letter T, Star Children and lovers of Sesame Street: tailgating, touchdowns, Thermos bottles filled with hot buttered rum — YUM! — and I’m just describing the refereed action in the backseat of my boyfriend Beau’s muscle car. Thanksgiving is family time, and family is a blessing. You never know when you might need a kidney. Enjoy your T-Day – Ad Astra

Scorpio (October 23–November 21) If you want something specific, Honey, why can’t you just say so? The very idea of giving the hairy eyeball as a firm directive just ain’t cutting it. This is a month that marks the anniversary of an event you don’t always mention. Some close to you know your age, but not all. If you can disclose more, and reserve less, you will find yourself irresistible to the opposite sex and impossible to ignore. I don’t mean everybody is eager to know where you buy your collard greens or your dental cream; I mean your admirers want to know what makes unique little you tick. Don’t gum up the works on your big day. For once, just relax and enjoy it. You’ve come a very long way, and I ought to know because my Mama is a Scorpio. Sagittarius (November 22–December 21) Somebody close to you must think they can interpret dreams. Darling, you have got to stop keeping your mind so open your brains are likely to fall out, as the cards say. OK, maybe I am the card. Listen here, you are way too vulnerable right now to let others tell you what you think. Only you know. Push back against Miss Pushy Galore. Capricorn (December 22–January 19) Bet you want to bait you a hook and get fishing. Nothing wrong with dropping out for a few days and seeing what bites. Dangle that hook in your favorite spot and let all your cares slip away. A little time with your hook in the water is just what the doctor ordered, as you have spent the year trying your best just to keep all your bait in the bucket. Who knows what bait is going to work till you try it? You know what I am talking about, Sweetheart; don’t make me spell it out. Aquarius (January 20–February 18) There were at least two times lately that somebody you look up to looked down on you. Well, actually, they aren’t any deeper than a bathtub. And some pretty shallow emotions ran through those waters, Honey. It is time for you to drain the tub and move on, which is not what you want to hear. They just think their farts in the bathtub make rainbows, but they absolutely do not. Towel off, take your rubber ducky, and move on. Pisces (February 19–March 20) I’d wager new folding money that a lost cause you have chased for a very long time is suddenly not lost at all. There are lots of reasons for you to celebrate, because you have held on when nobody with good sense or more to do would have given up. Take yourself to the movies and buy a tub of buttered popcorn and have yourself a big time. It was not the outcome you expected; it is much better than that, Sugar, and you kept the faith. Aries (March 21–April 19) Sometimes, you get all frozen up with fear like you are a shelter dog, which is conduct that does not become a Ram at all. Fear is not your friend — well, not unless we are talking about your personal finances, Honey. The holidays excite you, and you are very prone to max your cards out footing the bills for parties, gifts and good times. There’s a whole lot to do this month, and so few to do it for you.

Taurus (April 20–May 20) Are you out of your natural mind? You have a nice offer. I don’t like to give advice, Honey, but OK, this time I will. Take it. Then, look up at the stars in the night sky and draw in a very deep, cleansing breath. Something is waiting for you, and you know it, and if you loosen up one teensy tiny bit, it will change your life. You may be just one collar button away from liberating yourself. Gemini (May 21–June 20) Honey, I bet you feel like you are wearing the road out going back and forth between Normal and Crazy Town. You are not the one making all the drama. Get still enough to realize there is a crazy-maker in your life. Love them but don’t let them direct the traffic. Cancer (June 21–July 22) A little bit of you can go a long way, which is just telling you the honest truth. Your friends aren’t going to tell you because when you are at your best it is all worth it. It ain’t a show of personal mystique to just be a crackpot. Here’s a little something to think about: God gave you two ears and one mouth. Perhaps a sign to listen more than you talk. Leo (July 23–August 22) Sugar, when things get this scary for you, there are two impulses that get a hold of you, and you know they are Benedict and Arnold. You never met a man you couldn’t blame, right? If you betray others, it only isolates you more from the star you could be. It is going to be tempting to throw somebody under the bus, but don’t. Remember, it’s the holiday season, so practice self-control. Virgo (August 23–September 22) Makes my nerves act up just thinking about all the possibilities for you this month. You are at a junction that could be pretty significant. I believe if you can tamp back your fears about moving forward, and also listen to someone close to you, whose counsel matters, this convergence of events is going to set the stage for a life-changing possibility. Hint: It won’t be an alien abduction. Libra (September 23–October 22) You could have been a spoiled, miserable person but, you opted to be the person everyone goes to with their problems. Stressed is just desserts spelled backward, Honey. Banana pudding won’t cure the common cold, but it might make you feel like you can have it all and top it with whipped cream. Do something to cure the feeling you need a little TLC. PS

For years, Astrid Stellanova owned and operated Curl Up and Dye Beauty Salon in the boondocks of North Carolina until arthritic fingers and her popular astrological readings provoked a new career path.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 2015

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southwords

By Sam Walker

First I read

these words, then spoke them, and they have become part of me:

Life is rich. Beauty is everywhere. Every personal connection has meaning. Laughter is life’s sweetest creation. They come from a hummingbird legend. The following story is one of those connections. The boy rode his bike the short distance to the house and parked it alongside one of the square stone pillars on the front porch. Built of Pennsylvania fieldstone, the old place was quiet, unlike his first visit there when he was much younger. He recalled his grandfather’s hand guiding him up the walk. The light of the windows smiled a welcome to him that evening. The thick front door invited him into a sea of laughter with warm embraces. For the boy that meant enduring head-patting and cheek-pinching as he made his way to the kitchen and the safe loving arms that awaited him on that Thanksgiving night. Today he would not stretch on tiptoes to bang the big brass door knocker. He was already late to get his required haircut a few blocks up to the main street. Besides, he didn’t know if she was home or maybe taking her usual afternoon nap. He would see about that after the haircut, which he really didn’t want because the barber always used clippers and smelled of cooking oil. The boy detested clippers. Sure enough, on his return the lights from the front window signaled she was there. He just barely reached the knocker to a feeble “clunk” as the door opened and her love welcomed him once again. The living room looked sparse compared with those gatherings on Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve, when trails of tables stretched from the stone fireplace all the way to the end of the dining room. A horsehair love seat, wide-armed easy chairs and always the rocker where she sat. A glass of milk and a modest piece of her apple pie appeared, and they visited. It was the best part of his day. Her name was Mary Beaver Clevenger, but everyone called her Polly.

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She’d grown up on a large working farm several hours north and west of the city. From childhood she loved gardens of vegetables and flowers, fruits from the small orchard and reading. In later years she added movies (especially love stories) and bridge — always bridge. Polly was smart, careful with money, practical and with a work ethic that put some folks to shame. Her abiding faith was nurtured from childhood and found a home at the First Baptist Church when she and her new husband moved closer to the city for his work. Polly lived the creed of hospitality. All were welcome at their table, either at the old stone house or the expansive cottage on a harbor at the Jersey shore. That’s where she and the boy first met, when he was just 3 years old. Polly remained a constant in the boy’s life as high school and college came and went. For a while even graduate school and the introduction of the boy’s new bride followed the ritual of Polly’s for Thanksgiving and Christmas Eve. As years passed those same lighted windows would smile their welcome to their children coming up that walk and through that front door into the sea of laughter and warm embraces. Near the end he came and sat by her bedside. No milk this time or apple pie. Just the quiet talk of times and people gone by. Along with his wife and children he would journey to her church to speak at the service of her memory, surrounded by the perceived presence of those who had sat at her table all those years. Words came from him later that day at the old country burial ground. Earth to earth. In this season of special times it is good to recall those who have showed us how to live a fuller life — one of openness, courage and hospitality. The deeper way of the soul. The ones to whom we offer a deep bow of gratitude. For I believe that, before anything else, Thanksgiving is a celebration of place and people, stranger to friend, in the practice of sacred welcome. In the unbridled nature of love. May it be so for you. PS Sam Walker is the former rector of Emmanuel Episcopal Church and always welcome at PineStraw.

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Illustration by Meridith Martens

The Gift of Welcome


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Profile for PineStraw Magazine

November PineStraw 2015  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

November PineStraw 2015  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

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