__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1


Fine Homes XXXQSVEFOUJBMQSPQFSUJFTDPN

Great golf views! Over 2400sf in this 3BR/3BA villa. Screened porch. $349,000

National Golf Club

Charming in every detail! Overlooks the 13th Fairway. 3Bdrms, 3Baths. Lovely features! $359,000

National Golf Club

Brick, 3/3 + bonus, superior craftsmanship for the discerning Buyer. $389,000

Carolyn Hallett 910.986.2319

Maureen Clark 910-315-1080

Donna Chapman 910-783-6061

Fabulous kitchen & lovely updates! 4BR, 3.5BA, 2,230 sq.ft., a serene wooded location. $389,000

Pinewild Country Club

Charming brick ranch on a peaceful wooded lot. 3090 sq.ft., 3BR, 3.5BA, Carolina room. $390,000

CCN C

Phenomenal tee to green views! Bonus room/4th bdrm, 3.5BAs. www.15Dungarvan.com $399,900

Mav Hankey 910-603-3589

Joel Rich 910-315-4009

Jim Saunders 910-315-1000

Well appointed home! Fireplace in the kitchen/family room combo, sunroom, 3BR, 3BA. $425,000

Donald Ross Area

Gracious 3BR, 4BA home with Formals. Kitchen opens to Morning Room. Covered terrace. $450,000

CCN C Southern Charm

Gracious family home w/hrdwd floors, 4 bedrooms, 3.5 baths. A beautiful .72 acre lot. $487,500

Mary Joe Worth 910-695-5430

Bonnie Baker 910-690-4705

Carolyn Hallett 910-986-2319

Warm & inviting interior! 2 bonus rooms, wonderful master, hrdwd & granite. Beautiful! $500,000

Rountree

Gracious brick home & fine interior features. Sunny Carolina Room. 3BR/2+BA. Lovely! $525,000

Fairwoods on 7

MOVE-IN READY! Beautiful 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath home with screened porch and a deck. $575,000

Kay Beran 910-315-3322

Kay Beran 910-315-3322

Carolyn Hallett 910-986-2319

PRU8K6Z7

PRU7B3R2

PRU3W2Q5

PRU5P5Q3

PRU4N2L3

PRU8V9T8

PRU6T7N6

PRU8A9Y2

Gorgeous New Construction PRU5Z9Q4

National Golf Club PRU2Q8V7

Pine Grove Village PRU7M4B5

CCN C

PRU5C8R6


-PHPOUPXXXQSVEFOUJBMQSPQFSUJFTDPN &OUFSUIF136*%GPSPVS&BTZ4FBSDIPS4OBQ4FBSDIXJUIPVS '3&&"11POZPVS4NBSU1IPOF

Get the free mobile app at http://gettag. mobi

1JOFIVSTU]4PVUIFSO1JOFT ©2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Designed for enjoyment of pond & golf course views. Family Room connects with ktchn. $595,000

CCN C

Spectacular waterfront views from all rooms! Bulkhead & Dock. Upper/Lower screen porch. 3BR, 3.5BA. $599,000

Lake Pinehurst

Stunning Plantation Style, Lakefront Home sited on the highest point. Magnificent Lake Views! 3BR/3.5BA.

Joel Rich 910-315-4009

Emily Hewson 910-315-3324

Maureen Clark 910-315-1080

Elegant 4 bedroom home on 2.12 acres of lush grounds. 3-Fireplaces, Deep Mouldings, Granite & More!

“Buttonwood�

Circa 1897 - Renovated in 2006 with exquisite detail and taste. French doors open to brick terrace & pool.

“Tremont Cottage�

Stunning Transitional home! Golf front and a private pool. 3 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths. $1,195,000

Emily Hewson 910-315-3324

Emily Hewson 910-315-3324

Carolyn Hallett 910-986-2319

Palatial residence on 5+acres with pine canopy and privacy. More than 6,000 sq.ft. of elegant space.

CCN C

Historic circa 1896 home in Old Town Pinehurst on lush landscaped 1/2 acre lot. Fine architectural details.

“Wisteria Cottage�

Magnificent golf views of Cardinal Course! Exceptional quality throughout this Camina Design home.

Maureen Clark 910-315-1080

Eva Toney 910-638-0972

Jim Saunders 910-315-1000

Golf front home with breathtaking views! 3BR, 3.5BA. See: www.89AbbottsfordDrive.com $1,295,000

Pinewild Country Club

Designed for comfort and entertaining. Views of Course #2 across the street. www.10MidlandRoad.com $1,395,000

Old Town Pinehurst

One of the finest estates in Old Town Pinehurst. Very private with over 1.5acres of lush grounds. Marvelous craftsmanship.

Marie O’Brien 910-528-5669

Beverly Valutis 910-916-1313

Emily Hewson 910-315-3324

PRU5D8E9

PRU2E7E7

PRU2Q6N7

PRU2F7J2

PRU8D5A7

PRU6V9N3

PRU2N7C6

PRU8B4B6

Woodlake PRU7E2F4

CCN C

PRU8H8N4

CCN C

PRU3H4N8

“Shadowlawn� PRU2G8V6


October 2011 Volume 6, No. 10 Departments

7

Features

Sweet Tea Chronicles Jim Dodson

11 19

PinePitch Postcard from Nicaragua

21 23

Cos and Effect Cos Barnes The Omnivorous Reader

Cassie Butler

Stephen E. Smith

27 31 33 37 39 41 43 45 49 49

Bookshelf Hitting Home Dale Nixon The Kitchen Garden Jan Leitschuh Vine Wisdom Robyn James Spirits Frank Daniels III Out of the Blue Deborah Salomon Birdwatch Susan Campbell The Sporting Life Tom Bryant Golftown Journal Lee Pace The Hot Ticket

59 Gone With The Wind (Take Two) Our fashion homage to the classic Southern saga

70 Coffee With Birch Can a coffee mug kill? New fiction by Mary Von Canon Sisk

72 Bleeding Pines By Ray Owen

74 PS Traveler By Maria Johnson

76 Story of a House By Deborah Salomon

The story of turpentine in the Sandhills does an encore This charming Star inn haunts with hospitality Arnold slept here — and many others

83 Garden Almanac: October The skinny on cider-making season

Ashley Wahl

86 99 107

Calendar SandhillSeen Thoughts From The Manshed

Geoff Cutler

109

The Accidental Astrologer

Astrid Stellanova

111

PineNeedler 112 SouthWords

Mart Dickerson Steve Bouser

Cover Photograph by Tim Sayer Our models are Kimberly Daniels and John Taws Hair by K athe Taylor of Taylor David Salon. Makeup by Molly Parsons of Beaute Apothecarie 2

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


4

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Kathryn Galloway, Associate Art Director Ashley Wahl, Editorial Assistant Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Photographers

Tim Sayer John Gessner Laura L. Gingerich Hannah Sharpe

Contributors

Cos Barnes, Steve Bouser, Tom Bryant, Cassie Butler, Susan Campbell, Geoff Cutler, Frank Daniels III, Kimberly Daniels, Mart Dickerson, Robyn James, Pamela Powers January, Maria Johnson, Jan Leitschuh, Dale Nixon, Ray Owen, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Lisa Sauder, Mary Von Canon Sisk, Astrid Stellanova, Angie Tally

David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Darlene Stark, Advertising Manager 910.693.2488 • dstark@pinestrawmag.com Ginny Kelly, 910.693.2481 • ginnykelly@pinestrawmag.com Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Marty Hefner, 910.693.2508 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510 Pat Taylor, Advertising Director 910.693.2505 • pat@thepilot.com Advertising Graphic Design

Kathryn Galloway, B.J. Hill Mechelle Wood, Scott Yancey, Kristen Clark Circulation & Subscriptions

910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine

910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2011. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

6

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


sweet tea chronicles

Eat, Drink, and Be

By Jim Dodson ast Halloween a lone trick-ortreater thumped on our door, a cute little girl dressed like a Bob the Builder, complete with a work belt, electric drill and construction hardhat. “Happy Halloween,” she chirped, artfully presenting her proud papa’s business card. He was standing just off the porch, owner of a home improvement firm based in Vass, using the country’s second most popular commercial holiday to scare up a little foot trade. Tough times demand creative solutions, even if it means turning your tyke into a walking billboard. My wife was so charmed she took their card and placed it on the refrigerator. I was so excited to see an actual trick-or-treater on our doorstep I dumped half a punch bowl of candy into her bag — my reaction, as it were, to being in the midst of an apparent Great Halloween Recession. Though our pleasant old house sits a mere block from the Weymouth estate on one of the prettier streets of the neighborhood, we’re several blocks from where the real Halloween action takes place over on Indiana and Massachusetts avenues. Over yonder — so close but so far away — groups of ghosties and Princess Leias and Lion Kings, I’m told, traipse across yards and driveways while their parents tag along with flashlights and Thermoses, chatting with clusters of neighbors and keeping watch like mobile sentries. Astounding as it may seem, over the five years I’ve lived in Southern Pines, Bob the Builder notwithstanding, I have yet to see a live costumed soul afoot on Halloween. Yet every year it’s the same routine, an exercise in sentimental Halloweening. As the third week of October hovers into view, I optimistically set off down the aisles of Harris Teeter in a fog of happy self-delusion, unable to stop myself from snapping up bags of mini-Butterfingers and Baby Ruths in anticipation of a night of the living dead at our door, recalling my own happy Halloween adventures as man and boy, parent and prankster. As you may have guessed, I dearly love Halloween, everything about it — the crazy costumes, the flood of candy I’d never eat any other time, the lighted jack o’lanterns, and the feeling of something deliciously spooky in the air. But alas, in these parts at least, the holiday has turned out to be more

hollow than hallow. “Where the heck are all the neighborhood kids?” I asked a friend with small children on the heels of another dispiriting evening of Halloween no-shows. In its wake, I put on five pounds from the Baby Ruths alone. “I think they all go to parties at the country club and churches now,” she pertly explained. “You know how protective parents are these days. They prefer organized events where they can control food intake — I mean, peanut allergies are everywhere — and everybody stays safe. I understand some malls and stores even hold their own Halloween parties so kids can party while parents shop.” She added a touch wistfully, “I do miss the trick or treaters that used to come to our door. It was always such fun to see the different costumes. As a kid, I remember staying out till ten o’clock even on a school night. But now we just turn in early.” I couldn’t believe what I was hearing. Is nothing scary sacred anymore? Early to bed on Halloween night? Perish the thought and pass the Snickers bars! Read my caramel-apple-coated lips, people: We who grew up worshipping this cheap painted ghoul of a holiday like miniature pagans-in-training simply cannot permit Halloween to be taken hostage by Walmart partyplanners and nervous helicopter parents! True, this world’s an uncertain and sometimes frightening proposition, though I can’t help but wonder if we aren’t depriving our children the opportunity to grow up learning how to discern real danger — even evil — by allowing them to venture forth on their own into the darkened streets rather than scaring ourselves (and them) to death with media-fanned horror stories of child abductions, distant murders and plagues of pedophiles. The obscene public frenzy surrounding the Casey Anthony murder trial says as much about our insatiable appetite for quick vengeance as it does justice, a real-life Circus Maximus that made the hokey horror films of the 1960s look like child’s play. Given a choice between facing the Bride of Frankenstein or an indignantly frothing Nancy Grace, swearing vengeance on an acquitted mother, I’d take my chances with the spooky bride any old day. A little fright quickens the blood and is good for the soul, but a quick glimpse of the typical movie fare aimed at impressionable teenage minds at your local cinemaplex these days provides a stronger clue why paranoia weighs so fiercely on the average suburban parent’s mind. Ironically, the 1978 release of the movie Halloween — in which escaped mental patient

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

7


sweet tea chronicles

The Area’s Top Selling Real Estate Firm! NEW ELITE HOME BUILDERS INC. CONSTRUCTION IN FOREST RIDGE SUBDIVISION WWW.FORESTRIDGENC.INFO

29 SPEARHEAD DR, Arrowstone in Whispering Pines 3/4BR 3BA Craftsman $339,900.00

ANGELA CUMMINGS THOMPSON angelathompson.yourworkagent.com. (910)695-6461

Dianne G. Forsberg

“YOU TALK – I LISTEN�

together we can make your dreams a REALity Accredited Buyer’s Representative (ABR)Ž To view local properties visit: www.dianneforsberg.com email: dgforsberg@gmail.com 910-315-5073

Located on Union Church Rd between New Century Middle & Union Pines High School. Individual or bundled lots available for purchase. New construction 4bd/3ba, bonus room, open floor plan w/ screened porch. Hardwood, tile and carpet floors, granite countertops, vaulted smooth ceilings, wainscotting in dining room, fireplace. $265,000. Completed end of August.

MARGRET ENDRIGAT • 910-690-8025 KIMBERLY STOUT • 910-528-2008 WWW.INTERNATIONALREALTYSPECIALISTS.COM

To learn more about me and my company go to: www.TammyLyne.com

www.WhyILoveMyCompany.com

TAMMY LYNE, REALTOR 910-235-0208 1260 E. INDIANA AVE. • SOUTHERN PINES

5PCVZ TFMMPS MFBTFSFTJEFOUJBM PSDPNNFSDJBM QSPQFSUJFT $BMMNF DAVE BERGER

www.DaveBergerBroker.com davebergerbroker@gmail.com

8

Four bedroom home on 2.5 acres near downtown Southern Pines. Gourmet kitchen, spacious Carolina room, each bedroom has its own bath, extra large garage, fenced back yard and plenty of space and privacy. See it soon! $695,000

CALL PEGGY FLOYD 910-639-1197

WWW.PINEHURSTLUXURYPROPERTIES.COM

Michael Myers stalks his hometown killing people on Halloween — produced a megafranchise of ten so-called “slasherâ€? films that were more graphic and violent than anything that preceded them, launching a new genre of horror films that aim to be more ghastly and mind-numbing than the one before it. A foreign movie that shows a woman’s bare breasts or two people making love earns absolute censure from the movie ratings nitwits, yet a teen horror pic with heads exploding like piĂąatas or someone decapitating his victims with a chain saw is, well, just clean good fun. Not to put too fine a point on the fine line between fun and fright, the one story in my journalism vita I regret writing concerned a troubled young man in western Massachusetts who, holed up in his bedroom and besotted with the “Halloweenâ€? canon, donned a hockey mask and set forth to be Michael Myers one Halloween, stabbing a young girl to death. The police blamed the parents. The parents blamed the kid’s shrink, who assured them the movie was harmless fantasy. And I blame Hollywood for ruining an otherwise innocent night of fun. The ancient origins of All Hallows Eve, after all, have little or nothing to do with violence of any kind — just a few spooky pranks at worst. The Celtic tribes of Druidic Ireland made bonfires of their harvest remains to celebrate the end of the growing season and offer prayers for the beginning of the “long nightâ€? of winter, dancing and feasting and paying grateful homage to ancestors on a night when the veil between the living and dead was believed to be at its thinnest, allowing spirits both kindly and mischievous to return briefly to earth. The celebration of “Samheinâ€? was merely one of four seasonal “fireâ€? observances meant to seek guidance from departed ancestors. To avoid being recognized by certain less charitable spirits on the eve of what eventualy became All Hallows Day, however, people donned masks and elaborate costumes made from animal skins and plants. They also placed bowls of food outside their doors to discourage frisky spirits from unhinging gates and removing livestock to other pastures, overturning buckets and other “tricks.â€? The actual origins of trick or treating may also date to All Souls parades in 18th century England when poor families would beg food from wealthy landowners, many of whom provided “soul cakesâ€? in exchange for prayers for their departed relatives. Ireland’s potato famine in 1864 helped send the observance of Halloween to the United States in the form of spontaneous celebrations where young people dressed up and went house to house begging for food and treats. By the 1900s, the holiday had been shorn of its religious connotations and broadly adopted by mainstream Americans,

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SweeT TeA chrOnicleS

largely becoming a secular celebration meant for children, an occasion for parades, fall festivals and apple-bobbing parties. Newspapers editorialized about the wholesomeness of community-wide Halloween events. Public campaigns against vandalism effectively wiped out much of the tricks associated with the holiday. Is it a coincidence that after Hollywood hijacked Halloween and made it into one big slasher film, public perceptions of the holiday spawned daylight observances and even resulted in canceled trick or treating in some towns? The town where we lived in Maine for two decades, on the other hand, had a completely charming annual Halloween celebration that began around five o’clock on Halloween evening when costumed kids and parents from surrounding villages and towns gathered to march through the center of town, making noise and delighting the hundreds who turned out to watch. Local merchants joined in by inviting grade schoolers to paint up their shop windows �— competing for prizes — and local high school band members made up a “scary” marching band that rivaled anything you’d see in New Orleans at Mardi Gras. The whole thing ended at a local community center, where punch and cake were served and a small mountain of candy freely distributed. Talk about a fun fright night. I still have a photo of my two as a princess and lion in their debut hike through town, and another taken some years later of my daughter and me in Halloween mufti as “Dracula and Daughter.” That’s why I had high Halloween hopes when we moved to a beautiful neighborhood in Southern Pines five years ago, believing this town — rightfully admired for its many other seasonal events — would do the holiday up right. Alas, it’s not to be. American spend an estimated $7 billion on its second-favorite, and more than a third of all candy purchased happens during Halloween week, but you wouldn’t know it from the ghost town that’s our street on Halloween night. For a time this autumn, I considered dressing up like a grumpy old Dracula and stalking the streets to offer five dollar bills and free candy to any roaming souls I happened to encounter, though my wife assured me this would only result in her having to come up with bail money along with the Butterfingers. Instead, we’re having two sets of friends over to pass a quiet evening at the supper table. She’s planning to serve Mummy Meatloaf and Pumpkin Chicken Pot Pie, with “Dirt” cake and bat cookies for dessert. If you and your tyke happen to find your way to our lonesome door, with or without the business card, don’t be surprised if I make you come in and have a bite. PS

Best Dish NC Winner, 2011 The Best Dish NC is a statewide regional contest of the best menu items created by chefs that use local products and ingredients. The Best Dish focuses on the creativity and ingenuity of how local ingredients are used in the preparation and presentation of each dish. Join us for lunch or dinner and experience why Elliotts on Linden is a regional favorite... 905 Linden Rd, Pinehurst

(910) 215.0775

www.elliottsonlinden.com



Support Local Food: Celebrate Food Day As part of our mission, in October, Elliott’s Provision Company will join hands with thousands of farmers, producers, non-profits, communities, and ordinary citizens to highlight the need to change the way Americans eat and think about food. On October 24th, be a part of Food Day and join us at EPC for samples from local farms, a special cooking demo, farmer meet & greets and much more! 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst

(910) 255-0665

www.elliottsprovisionco.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

9


10

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


look what’s cooking

eat, Play, run…

…Just not necessarily in that order. On Saturday, Oct. 1, the fun begins at 9 a.m. (and lasts ’til 4 p.m.) at Downtown Park in Southern Pines with the annual Autumnfest. Arts and crafts, live entertainment, great foods, fun rides, a One-Mile Fun Run/Walk, a 5K Road Race and more promise something for everyone. Info: (910) 692-2463. The show goes on from 4 to 8 p.m. on the corner of New York and Bennett Sts. with an outdoor music festival featuring young area musicians including Baxter Clement and his students. Proceeds benefit the Junior League of Moore County and their efforts to support women at risk in our communities. Tickets: $5/advance; $7/at door. Food provided by Hickory Tavern available for purchase. Info: www.jlmc.org.

The Grand Ole Finale

The National Theatre Live in HD from London presents The Kitchen on Oct. 6 at 2 and 7 p.m. at the Sunrise Theater in Southern Pines. The scene is 1950s London, in the kitchen of an enormous West End restaurant where an eclectic mix of chefs, waitresses and porters (actors preparing and handling real food onstage) paint a blackly funny and furious depiction of life lived at breakneck speed. Tickets: $20. Info: (910) 692-8501; www.sunrisetheater.org.

Don’t miss the last First Friday of the season Oct. 7 from 5 to 8:30 p.m. featuring live music from the punchy, folk-jam trio Dangermuffin. Free admission; family-friendly. Festivities take place on the grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Southern Pines. Info: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com

classic Beauty

The Classical Concert Series brings teen sensation Caroline Goulding (violinist) to Southern Pines on Monday, Oct. 24, 8 p.m. Among her musical achievements, Grammy-nominated Goulding, who began studying violin at three-and-a-half, debuted at Carnegie Hall. See her at the Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St. Tickets: $25. Info: (910) 692-2787.

Fear Factor(y)

As if abandoned factory warehouses weren’t naturally spooky enough, the old Doxey Furniture Building on N.C. Hwy 211 has been converted into the bloodcurdling, spine-chilling and otherwise unearthly Aberdeen Fear Factory. Open 6:30 p.m. until midnight on Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays starting Sept. 29, and the entire week before Halloween (Oct. 24 through Oct. 31). Admission: $15. Info: (910) 944-0908; www. aberdeenfearfactory.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

11


PINEHURST

405 Burning Tree Road – 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Great Features

SEVEN LAKES NORTH

110 Running Brook Lane – 3 BR / 3 BA / Water Front

SOUTHERN PINES

529 Edinboro Drive – 4 BR / 3 BA / Highland Trails

Lovely all brick home with Pinehurst membership! This home is warm and inviting from the moment you step inside and offers beautiful features throughout. The living room shares a see through fireplace with the family room. The generous master bedroom includes private bath w/ corner whirlpool tub. Additional features include a formal dining room, kitchen with bayed breakfast nook, 2 guest bedrooms and attached two car garage. $249,000 Code 749

This spacious water front home is located on a quiet cul-de-sac. Enjoy the spectacular lake views from this peninsula lot with bulk head and private dock on Lake Sequoia. There is plenty of living space for the whole family with a formal dining room, Carolina room, a well planned kitchen, family room, master suite with a den and two guest bedrooms. The yard is beautifully landscaped and ideal for entertaining! $435,000 Code 735

www.405BurningTreeRoad.com

www.110RunningBrookLane.com

www.529EdinboroDrive.com

PINEHURST

SEVEN LAKES NORTH

SEVEN LAKES WEST

3 Sherwood Court – 3 BR / 3.5 BA / Water Front

This beautiful home is tucked away at the end of a quiet cul-de-sac overlooking Lake Pinehurst. The living room features shinning hardwood floors, a stone fireplace, builtin wet bar and a wall of windows. The beautifully renovated kitchen includes custom cabinets, granite counter tops, tile backsplash, oversized island and eating area. The master suite features a private deck, a large walk-in closet and private bath with tile flooring, double sinks, garden tub and step-in shower! $575,000 Code 752

212 Firetree Lane – 3 BR / 2.5 BA / Water View

Wow! This lovely custom built home offers wide water views of Lake Sequoia. Great details through out include a skylight, chair railing, chandelier lighting, a gas fireplace, built-in bookshelves and a super floor plan. Don’t forget the covered front porch, nicely landscaped yard, attic storage and the 2 car garage! $229,500 Code 768

www.3SherwoodCourt.com

www.212FiretreeLane.com

SOUTHERN PINES

PINEWILD

171 Starland Lane – 3 BR / 3 BA / Townhome

This welcoming townhome has many desirable features. The main level features a great kitchen with granite counters, a living room with clerestory windows for maximum light, an office, formal dining space, laundry room and a luxurious master suite with private bath. The upper level has more living area including a large loft, a walk-in hall closet, a 2nd full bath and 2 guest bedrooms. This townhome is a must see to appreciate! $249,000 Code 704

14 Abbottsford Drive – 3 BR / 3.5 BA / Golf Front

Tucked away in it’s private setting, this elegant golf front home offers expansive views of the 6th and 7th fairway and green of the Magnolia course. It has a generously spaced floor plan that has plenty of room for everyone. You’ll find special touches, lots of storage and an airy feel through out. Don’t miss this one! $495,000 Code 772

www.171StarlandLane.com

www.14AbbottsfordDrive.com

PINEHURST

FOXFIRE

80 Ridgewood Road – 4 BR / 3.5 BA / Golf Front

Truly one of the best views in Pinehurst! This beautifully renovated golf front home overlooks the 9th hole of Pinehurst course #3. The house and grounds have been meticulously redone and the result is beautiful. A few features this home has are hardwood floors, crown molding, generous sized rooms and chandelier lighting. Must see to appreciate! $375,000 Code 771

www.80RidgewoodRoad.com

42 Woodland Circle – 5 BR / 4.5 BA / Golf Front

Gorgeous family that is warm and inviting and features a wonderful open floor plan, spacious rooms and huge private backyard. The living room includes hardwood flooring, crown molding, gas fireplace, built-in shelving & French door access to covered back porch. The kitchen offers custom cabinets, granite counters & large center island. The master bedroom is located on the main level along w/two guest rooms. The upper level offers a guest suite w/private bath. $336,000 Code 819

167 Longleaf Drive – 3 BR / 2 BA / Split Plan

You will feel welcomed from the moment you step inside this immaculate home. The kitchen is the heart of the home with ample counter and cabinet space. Enjoy special gatherings in the dining and living rooms. There is lots of space and privacy in the master suite with a private bath. Along with 2 guest bedrooms, 2 car garage and screened porch, this home also offers lots of storage! $199,900 Code 723

www.167LongleafDrive.com

PINEHURST

8 Tull Lane – 3 BR / 2 BA / Split Plan

This beautiful all brick home is located on a quiet cul-de-sac. The well thought out floor plan provides privacy for everyone. The living room has a cozy fireplace and the kitchen is inviting with lots of cabinet space. The master suite has a spa like bath perfect for relaxing. Enjoy a screened porch, 2 guest bedrooms, formal dining room and a partial basement with lots of storage. $229,900 Code 758

www.8TullLane.com

ABERDEEN

245 Woodgreen Drive – 3 BR / 2 BA / Immaculate Home

Gorgeous golf front brick home with great curb appeal, super floor plan and beautiful long golf views. The well designed kitchen offers a pretty workspace with granite counters, tile backsplash, pantry, breakfast bar and sunny breakfast nook. The split bedroom floor plan offers privacy for the master suite which has a spa like bath. The lower level is sure to please with the spacious family room which features a sliding glass door to the patio and backyard! $379,000 Code 688

This super cute home is located in popular Woodgreen and has really great features including beautiful hardwood floors, spacious covered porch, completely fenced backyard, attractive landscaping and more! The spacious living room has access to the covered deck. The kitchen offers a breakfast nook with bayed window and access to the formal dining room. The split bedroom floor plan allows privacy for the master bedroom. $144,000 Code 815

www.42WoodlandCir.com

www.245WoodgreenDrive.com

View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at 12

www.MarthaGentry.com

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Animal Affairs

Oans, Zwoa – G’suffa!

Bust out the dirndl and lederhosen for Pinehurst’s annual Oktoberfest from 2 to 7 p.m. on Oct. 8 at the Village Arboretum. Featuring music from the Bavarian Brass Band (starting at 2:30 p.m.), interactive contests, games, and a children’s area with bouncers, face painting and more. Free admission; food and beverages available for purchase. Info: (910) 295-0166.

Chalk Gawkers

The Arts Council of Moore County presents the opening reception for the NC Pastel Society on Oct. 7 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Exhibit on display through Oct. 28. Info: (910) 692-2787.

Shadow and Light (oils) with Diane Kraudelt October 4th and 11th 9:00 - 4:00 -$100 Abstract Intuition (acrylics) with JJ Love October 5th , 12th and 19th 9:00 - 2:00 - $100 Watercolor and Charcoal Portraits with Irene Dobson October 20th, 10:00 - 4:00 - $45

In The Studio with June (watercolor) with June Rollins October 21st, 9:00 - 4:00 - $50 Introduction to Chinese Brush Painting with Loretta Moskal October 22nd, 9:00 - 4:00 $75 (includes supply fee) “Drawing the Figure A Step-By-Step Class” with Betty DiBartolomeo Oct 24th -26th 1:00 – 4:00 pm $110 (includes supplies and model fees)

Eat, drink and be merry on Oct. 29 at the sixth annual Spooktakular Halloween Gala to benefit the Companion Animal Clinic Foundation and their efforts to solve animal overpopulation by providing low-cost spay/neuter in Moore County. Festivities begin at 7 p.m. and include dinner, dancing, live music from Rebecca & The Hi-Tones, silent auctions and costume contests. Location: Pinehurst Fair Barn. Tickets: $45/pre-event; $55/at door. Tickets/Info: (855) 439-3498 or companionanimalclinic.org.

Living Legend

The Pinecrest Choral Program will host world-renowned composer and conductor Eric Whitacre for a three-day residency beginning Oct. 24, culminating in a final concert at Pinecrest’s Robert E. Lee Auditorium on Oct. 26, 7 p.m. Singers from across the region will join Pinecrest choral students for intensive workshops, clinics, lectures, and the opportunity to work with this living legend. Concert will feature participating ensembles; Whitacre will conduct. Tickets may be purchased from the Arts Council of Moore County, (910) 692-2787, or at Pinecrest High School. General Admission: $15/advance; $20/at door. Dress Circle: $25. Info: Erin Plisco at (910) 692-6554x7103.

Exchange Street Gallery Opening

“Escapes: City and Country Landscapes”

by Tommy B. McDonell and Karen Walker Opening reception: October 2nd from 2 to 5 pm Show Run: October 2nd through 31st Gallery open Mon – Sat 12 – 3pm

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

13


14

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Run, Doggone it!

Runners, walkers and doggies (costumed or not!) are invited to participate in the Miles for Mira 5K Fun Run and Dog Walk on Oct. 29, 9 a.m. to benefit the MIRA Foundation USA and their efforts to provide free guide dogs to visually impaired children. Costume contest and party to follow. Race begins at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: www.milesformira.com

Heaven Sent

Child’s Play

Games, activities, Moon Bounce, face painting, trick-or-treating, prizes and more will be available to children 10 and under at Aberdeen’s Fall-o-Ween Carnival on Oct. 22, 3 to 5 p.m. Costumes encouraged. Cost: $3/Aberdeen residents; $5/Non-residents. Aberdeen Lake Park, U.S. Hwy. 1. Info: (910) 944-7275.

Pinky Promise?

On Oct. 6, the doors of The Fair Barn open at 6 p.m. for Harvest the Promise — dinner, silent and live auctions to benefit Family Promise in their efforts to feed, shelter and assist homeless children and their families in Moore County. Event features favorite dishes from area chefs and restaurants. Tickets: $50/individual; $80/couple. Info: Susan at (910) 944-7149; susan.familypromise@gmail.com

Retire

The Our Savior Lutheran Church Concert Series presents Paul and Sophia on two pianos and organ on Saturday, Oct. 7, 7 p.m. Program includes Purvis, Bach, Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff. Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1517 Luther Way, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2662.

Bluegrass in the Pines

Bring a blanket or chair to the Downtown Park in Southern Pines on Oct. 21 for a free public concert featuring the South Ridge Bluegrass Band. Concert starts at 6:30 p.m.; concessions will be available for purchase. Info: (910) 692-7376; www.southernpines.net/recreation

Brilliantly...

Live Resiliently

Are you finding it harder to maintain a connection with friends? Choose to live with resilience at The Village at Brookwood where you’ll find a community of active retirement. Clubs, committee meetings, travel opportunities, fine dining and fitness are all right outside your door — making it easy to stay connected, active and engaged with friends and neighbors. Experience The Village lifestyle and see for yourself the positive effects on your physical and mental well-being. Now is the time to invest in a longer, healthier, happier life. Come explore The Village at Brookwood today.

Lif

re e Ca

ice

Fe

e-F

 800-282-2053 

or-S er v

Sponsored by Alamance Regional Medical Center

£nÈäÊ ÀœœŽÜœœ`ÊÛi°]Ê ÕÀˆ˜}̜˜]Ê ÊÊUÊÊwww.VillageAtBrookwood.org

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

15


16

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sounds of Music

The Rooster’s Wife Concert Series continues to bring live music to the Sandhills, most Sundays at 6:46 p.m. The lineup: 10/2 - Nashville guitarist Mark Stuart.

History Channel

The Shaw House Fair of vintage collectibles and antiques is Saturday, Oct. 8 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at the Shaw House, corner of Morganton Rd. and Broad St. in Southern Pines, rain or shine. Highlights: live traditional music, guided tours, gifts and books about local and regional history, silent auction. Free admission. Info: (910) 692-2051.

A Whiff of Wonderful

Join family, friends and neighbors for sardines, crackers, colas and moonpies — plus the crowning of the 2011 Sardine Queen — at the 19th annual International Sardine Festival on Oct. 14, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. at Aberdeen Lake Park, U.S. Hwy. 1. No need to dress up. Info: (910) 944-7275.

10/9 - Philadelphia-based Americana trio Angel Band. 10/16 - Dehlia Low, a five-piece Appalachiagrassicana (yep, that’s right) band straight from Asheville. 10/20 - Mick McCauley and Winifred Horan of Solas with their duet project, Serenade. 10/23 - Joe, an all-Joe band (Craven, DeJamette, Newberry and Walsh) convenes to celebrate The Rooster’s Wife’s two-year mark at Poplar Knight Spot. 10/30 - The Jon Shain Trio delivers the Piedmont Blues. (Come dressed for Halloween.) The Rooster’s Wife at Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

Different Strokes

From now through Oct. 28, Hastings Gallery features the works of artists Sharon Ferguson, Marilyn Vendemia, Marie Travisano and Laurie Deleot on display in Four Friends: Abstract to Realism. Exhibit title says it all. Upwards of 80 pieces in oil, watercolor, acrylic and ink offer an eclectic batch of goodies from this talented group of gal pals. Gallery Hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:45 a.m. until 9 p.m.; Friday from 7:45 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Saturday from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Boyd Library, Sandhills Community College. Info: (910) 695-3819.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

17


Live the Lifeyou want

Enjoy golf privileges at 8 premier courses!

Call today and reserve your private tour of our spacious homes, quaint cottages and beautiful apartments. Discover all Pine Knoll and Belle Meade have to offer as two

Nationally Accredited Continuing Care Retirement Communities.

Call

910-246-1008 today for lunch and a tour!

St. Joseph of the Pines is the leading provider of senior living and healthcare serving the Sandhills region since 1948.

18

www.sjp.org

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Postcard From Nicarag ua

Better Than Green Bean Casserole

By Cassie Butler

I

’ve been in Nicaragua for more than 90 days and apparently, that is a bad thing. Every three months non-nationals are required to leave the country to renew their visas. I haven’t done that yet although it is on my to-do list. Good thing I speak Spanish. That way when I am hassled at the Costa Rican border, I can hopefully talk my way out of whatever trouble I’m in. Indeed a trip to Costa Rica is in order, whether it will be a lengthy, leisurely stay or a mere border cross. I plan to have my passport stamped to reset for another 90 days. Meanwhile, I have been enjoying the Nicaraguan sights, people and food. I went as far north as I could go before crossing into Honduras and did a floating tour of Cañón de Somoto. I cannot imagine floating down the Colorado River in a life preserver vest looking up at the Grand Canyon, but this smaller-scale canyon may have been one of the most beautiful landmarks I’ve seen in Nicaragua. Unfortunately, I don’t have a single picture from the trip. That’s what happens when you depend on your boyfriend to charge his waterproof camera, I guess. Much to Jim Dodson’s dismay, I am not dating a Sandinista soldier named Raul. My college sweetheart is back in my life and back in Nicaragua. We are combining forces until December, which is our deadline for the massive undertaking of creating a new website and all the media content for AMOS Health and Hope. I have no doubt the job will get done on time. What I do doubt is if I will ever perfect the art of making gallo pinto, the Nicaraguan national dish.

Gallo pinto is simply red kidney beans mixed with white rice, but with a precise mixture of garlic, onion, bean juice and oil. When gallo pinto is served with a salted avocado, tortilla and sour milk, it could potentially replace my lifelong favorite food, green bean casserole. Like every experience I have while working in the rural communities, I was eating gallo pinto and avocado for every meal while photographing community empowerment, which is how AMOS Health and Hope functions. By training already existing local leaders in remote, under-served communities, AMOS provides ongoing medical services to the Nicaraguans who need it the most. After a video interview with Cumaica Norte’s health promoter Catalino, I realized how much AMOS changes the health promoters’ lives and improves their communities. The sun dropped behind a mountain, and a blue fog was blanketing the grassy field where I had just shot a colorful interview with the jokester Catalino. But now that the sun had set, Catalino got serious. He told me how his dreams have come true; how he was finally the man he wanted to be. Before he was health promoter for his community, he was timid and had no self-confidence. “I never would have been able to talk to someone like you,” he said. Despite his insecurities, everyone believed he could do the job and after his community elected him, he went to Managua to be trained by AMOS. Years later, Catalino is a different person — the person he has always hoped to be. I thought about his image of me, how he considered I was superior to him when he is the one saving lives and changing the course of his entire community. “Catalino, I am the nobody,” I told him, “That’s why I’m documenting your story, not mine. Perhaps one day my visual stories will change lives, too.” PS

The long hot summer is officially on its last legs. So long to the beach, the long days, and the beautiful summer produce yielded by the bountiful Sandhills farmland. Hello football, crisp deep blue skies, and myriad new seasonal fare at The Sly Fox! At The Fox, we’ll continue our tradition of sourcing local produce and producing dishes that are seasonal and delightful. We’ll definitely miss summer, but we can’t wait to start turning out fabulous autumnal food!

Cassie Butler was recently PineStraw’s intern.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

19


20

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


C os a n d E f f ect

Just An Expression

By Cos Barnes

I

have lots of comments, explanations, and expressions stored in my head. I take them out occasionally, think about them, agree or disagree with them, shove them back in, or act on them. A favorite is something Joe Sulli, a former resident of Southern Pines, told me some years back. He was explaining that he was going to an out-of-town business that helped him frame and add matting to pictures. I asked him how he knew how to do that and he answered, “If you look pitiful enough, they will do it for you.” About that time I began traveling by myself. I learned early to park myself beside the biggest man waiting for the luggage carousel. And believe me, I did look pitiful trying to retrieve my bag. I was always helped. When we were very young and bemoaning the fact we could not accompany richer friends on a holiday because we could not spare the cash for a babysitter, my husband and I were told by my wise father-in-law, “There are two things you should never be ashamed to say, ‘I can’t afford it,’ and ‘I don’t drink.’” The late Ed Martin, a neighbor, decided to sell his photography equipment some years ago. He put it out for bid, and I was determined to get it. When I purchased it, he said, “Perhaps you will find you have a knack for photography.” What a sendoff. I was determined to prove him right and spent many delightful hours in the darkroom. Homilies and homespun expressions are part of everyone’s background, I suppose. “Pretty is as pretty does,” and “Beauty is only skin-deep,” I was told and repeated to my daughters so often, they now say it to their daughters. “Don’t let your mouth speak before you get your brain in gear.” Were you told that? “Ugly as a mud fence” is descriptive — the opposite of “friendly as a speckled pup.” I can remember my husband used that term to describe a girl he had grown up with, and when I met the smiling, freckled-faced woman he was talking about, I heartily agreed. It has been many years, but in my mind’s eye I can still see her cute, friendly face. “The squeaky wheel gets the grease,” we all know, but have you heard, “as nervous as a long-tailed cat in a room full of rocking chairs” ? And as the late Minnie Pearl said, “No matter where country folks go, they’re still country folks. PS Cos Barnes, we’re thrilled to say, lives and writes in Southern Pines. She is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

21


The Ryder Cup Lounge D r i n k I n Th e G a me

N

estled in the historic Carolina Hotel lies one

of the area’s most distinctive eateries. The Ryder Cup features a huge selection of draft beers, scotch and bourbon as well as the hearty, mouth-watering American fare you crave after a long round.

Me n u Fe a t u r e s beef sliders

• Southern

mac’n cheese

• Deconstructed • BBQ

nachos

pork two ways

• Sweet

potato fries

Dr i n k Fe a t u r e s • Wines • Eight

from the TOUR

Bob Redding Friday & Saturday nights

.

Sunday brunch

beers on tap

• Twenty

bottled beers

• Specialty • Premium

martinis scotch and bourbon

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910.235.8415 • pinehurst.com

©2011 Pinehurst, LLC

• Kobe

Li v e Mu s i c


ThE OmnIvOrOuS rEAdEr

Blues man

A classic jazz masters life story is a clear window into American race relations

By sTePHen e. sMITH

If you’re looking for a

clichéd, white-bread definition for the blues rendered in the vernacular — “if there weren’t no womens there weren’t be no blues” — you aren’t going to find it in Bob Riesman’s I Feel So Good: The Life and Times of Big Bill Broonzy.. What you will find is something approximating the truth about African-American secular music marked by a strong 4/4 rhythm, flat sevenths and thirds and a 12-bar structure. More importantly, you’ll follow the career of one of the great bluesmen, Big Bill Broonzy (born Lee conley Bradley in August, 1903, in Jefferson county, Arkansas; died in chicago on August 15, 1958), from his musical beginnings with a corn-stalk fiddle to the moment he was made famous by Derek and the Dominos’ cover of “key to the Highway” and Eric clapton’s rendition of “Hey Hey.” Even if you aren’t a fan of the blues, you’ll likely find Broonzy’s story an informative journey that reflects and details the temper of the times in which he lived. Riesman had at his disposal what every biographer longs for and dreads — an autobiography written by the subject he’s studying. Big Bill

Blues: William Broonzy’s Story is the only autobiography by a bluesman of the period and in 170 pages, Broonzy tells the truth as he wants the reader to see it, which is, of course, a much distorted history (books by musicians tend to contain many falsehoods). Broonzy discourses on life in the Jim crow South and his 30-plus years in the music business, most of it spent in chicago. He’s also very generous to his contemporaries — Lonnie Johnson, Sleepy John Estes, Memphis Slim, Sonny Boy Williamson, Lil green, Memphis Minnie, Washboard Sam and many others — and he includes plausible descriptions of how he composed his songs and the sources and significance of his lyrics. Working from Broonzy’s autobiography, Riesman sets the record straight. Broonzy’s date of birth is corrected from 1883 to 1903, and the invented events of his youth are researched, as much as possible, for accuracy. His service in World War I and his move to Little Rock and then to chicago are given adequate treatment. More importantly, Broonzy’s discography — 220 songs recorded between 1924 and 1940, many of which are available on youTube — is reviewed and the dates of those recordings are listed along with the blues artists that accompanied him — and in many cases, the artists Broonzy backed on recordings and in live performances. For most of his career, Broonzy’s music was confined to “race records” on the Paramount, Blue Bird, Meloton, Vocalion, and other specialized labels, and he performed primarily for black audiences. In the late ’20s and ’30s, he made little money from his music. A $25 payday was exceptional, and for many years he held other jobs, most notably as a Pullman Porter. He began to attract a white audience with his appearance in People’s Songs in 1946. These hootenannies were often organized by Pete Seeger and featured “field hollers, work songs, hymns, and spirituals [that] were presented as black contributions to American culture.” Broonzy, Lead Belly, Josh White, and Sonny Terry and Brownie Mcghee were included in these “hoots,” thus increasing their acceptance among mixed audiences. Broonzy’s performances received attention of

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

23


PINEHURST VILLAGE COUNCIL ELECTION A Review by the Village Action Team* The Village of Pinehurst has hit a major turning point. The economy is down. We have empty stores in the heart of the Village. Corporate outings at the Resort are down, affecting business in the Village.

THE FALL ELECTION IS A CRITICAL ONE

We need strong leadership, good organization, and wise decision making.

VILLAGE COUNCIL LEADERSHIP

The Village Council is elected to represent the voters by creating the policies that govern the Village. The Village staff is hired to carry out the Council’s policies. Strong leadership is needed to follow through with established goals. Organizationally, it would be helpful if each of the five council members would assume responsibility for one particular area of concern: • Economic development • Infrastructure (water, sewer, roads) • Design elements (streetscape) • Government services (planning, zoning, police, fire) Focused leadership in each area would lead to better proposals for Council action. Focused leadership is particularly needed in the area of economic development where one single person should be responsible for coordinating all aspects of development. Increasing complaints about Pinehurst’s development review process caused the Council to hire The Lawrence Group last year. This consultant came to the following conclusion: “In general, Pinehurst’s development review process is broken…” Part of the problem is the proliferation of committees and commissions appointed by the Council. The duties of each are sometimes unclear and overlapping, and the committees are not given sufficient direction by the Council. The Village has been the subject of a great deal of litigation, which has been very costly. Although some litigation is inevitable, other litigation could be avoided if governing procedures were operating more efficiently. Many detailed suggestions have been made to the Council through the Lawrence Group’s DIAGNOSIS REPORT dated May 10, 2011 - suggestions such as the pursuit of a regional water system, preservation of open spaces, strong design control of the historic landscape, and protection of the Longleaf Pine ecosystem. The Council should act on these suggestions without delay. We are at a critical turning point in our history. We must elect a combination of people who have the capacity to act decisively in order to create sound policies for the future of the Village of Pinehurst.

Please Vote! We urge you to vote for these well qualified candidates. -RKQ

&$6+,21 1DQF\5R\

),25,//2 MAYOR Village of Pinehurst

VILLAGE COUNCIL Village of Pinehurst

0DUN

3$5621

VILLAGE COUNCIL Village of Pinehurst

Paid for by the Village Action Team, Robert Hayter, Treasurer Team Members: Joyce Franke, Buck Kernan, Susie Leader, Wayne Peterson.

All candidates are running their own independent campaigns. *Village Action Team is a registered political action committee. Correspondence may be addressed to P.O. Box 4762, Pinehurst, NC 28374. 24

For additional information visit our website: villageactionteam.org

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e O m n i v o r o u s Rea d e r

composer and music critic Virgil Thomson. In his review in the New York Herald Tribune, he singled out Broonzy as one of “the most masterful of the performers.” The focus of People’s Music was on unionization and eradication of racial injustice, and many of Broonzy songs, such as “Just a Dream,” played to those themes: “I dreamed I was in the White House, sitting in the President’s chair/I dreamed he shaked my hand, said ‘Bill, I’m glad you’re here.’/But that was a dream, Lord, a dream I had on my mind./And when I woke up, not a chair could I find.” Broonzy’s “Black, Brown, and White” became an anthem to equality, “an unmistakable indictment of discrimination on the basis of the color of one’s skin”: “Me and a man was workin’ side by side/This is what it meant/They was paying him a dollar an hour,/And they was paying me fifty cent/They said, ‘If you’s white, you’s all right,/ If you’s brown, could stick around,/But as you’s black, hmm, boy, get back, get back, get back.’” Following World War II, changes in musical tastes and the elimination of race records by the big record labels resulted in a decline in Broonzy’s recording career in the United States. Moreover, he began to lose favor with his black audience. But Broonzy was nothing if not adaptable. Over the years, he had changed his playing style to accommodate shifts in musical taste, and with the disappearance of race records, he began to tour Europe, attracting large audiences and crafting his persona to take advantage of the changing musical environment. “The real old time singers who worked in the fields,” he told a ’50s audience, “there’s almost none of them left now. I’m 58 and caretaker of a college now.” In May, 1952, Broonzy sat down with folklorist Alan Lomax to tape an interview in a Paris hotel room and expounded on his views concerning race relations in the United States: “I think a man should be what he is. Regardless to what you are, or who you are, or where you come from. And that don’t just go for a Negro. That go for every nationality in the world.” Riesman offers much of the Lomax interview verbatim, and it’s apparent that Broonzy’s art is simply a reflection of race relations in the United States during the early to mid-20th century. Riesman notes, with a smidgen of sentimentality, that if Big Bill Broonzy had been at Barack Obama’s inauguration, he would have recognized his words in Joseph Lowery’s benediction: “…for the day when black will not be asked to get back, when brown can stick around … when white will embrace what is right.” PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry, A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths, is available at The Country Bookshop. Contact him at travisses@hotmail.com. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

25


26

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B oo k s h e l f

New Releases For October Fiction Hardcover When She Woke: A Novel by Hillary Jordan. A modern day The Scarlet Letter, Hannah Payne wakes up after having been injected with a virus to turn her skin red, the punishment for having an abortion in a world where many women are now infertile. The novel follows Hannah as she ventures out alone into a world increasingly more dangerous for women. The Maid: A Novel of Joan of Arc by Kimberly Cutter. Joan of Arc leads her countrymen in the quest to retake her country from the English. This new novel tells the story of the young and passionate martyr. The Litigators by John Grisham. The partners at Finley and Figg have come up with a scheme to make a lot of money without having to practice very much law, but things don’t go quite as planned. The Dovekeepers: A Novel by Alice Hoffman. This novel tells the tale of four dovekeepers who come to Masada by different paths, each with secrets about who they are and where they come from. The Cat’s Table: A Novel by Michael Ondaatje. The book follows eleven-year-old Colombo as he boards a ship set for England, making friends with his fellow passengers, who each have something to teach him. Moving into Colombo’s adulthood, we discover a lot about the magic of childhood. Reamde: A Novel by Neal Stephenson. Zulu Forthrast has unfortunate taste in men, which is exactly what gets her kidnapped by the Russian Mafia and then known terrorist Abdallah Jones. This thriller is a real page-turner that will keep you on your toes. The Best of Me by Nicholas Sparks. Former lovers Amanda and Dawson are forced to face each other, and painful memories of their once passionate love, when they are summoned back to their hometown for a funeral. The Scrapbook of Frankie Pratt: A Novel in Pictures by Caroline Preston. Set in the 1920s, this novel tells the story of aspiring writer Frankie’s travels through postcards, letters, magazine ads, ticket stubs, candy wrappers, and more.

Fiction Paperback A Lily of the Field: A Novel by John Lawton. In the seventh Inspector Troy novel, we follow Meret Voytek and Dr. Karel Szabo as they are both taken far away from home and across battlefields before their paths unexpectedly converge. The Oracle of Stamboul: A Novel by Michael David Lukas. Eight-year-old Eleonora faces a new life of mystery and intrigue in the city of Stamboul when she stows away in one of her father’s trunks when he goes off on business.

Nonfiction Hardcover The Birding Life: A Passion for Birds at Home and Afield. A series of short stories written by birders, artists, collectors, and conservationists that outline the joy to be gained from birding at home, in the country, in the city, and out in the field. Moonlight on Linoleum by Terry Helwig. In this new memoir by Terry Helwig, we follow a little girl forced to take care of her siblings because of an unstable mother and come out having learned much about the importance of family and the persistence of love. The Orchard: A Memoir by Theresa Weir. Theresa Weir left city life behind when she married an apple farmer. Living on the farm, her husband’s family used all means necessary to fight the dreaded codling moth — unsuccessfully and at a great cost. Rin Tin Tin: The Life and Legend by Susan Orlean. This biography follows the life of once-orphaned pup Rin Tin Tin from the time he is found by Corporal Lee Duncan on a WWI battlefield to his time as a Hollywood movie star and international icon. The Kitchen Counter Cooking School by Kathleen Flinn. After graduating from Le Cordon Bleu in Paris, chef Kathleen Flinn had no idea what she wanted to do with her life until she was inspired by a trip to the grocery store to go out and teach others how to make simple, healthy meals. Boomerang: Travels in the New Third World by Michael Lewis. This new book by Michael Lewis takes a look at the cultural effect that cheap credit had on creating bubbles in foreign countries before he then turns

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

27


B oo k s h e l f

back and looks at the effect that it had on our own shores. Basic to Brilliant, Y’all: 150 Refined Southern Recipes by Virginia Willis. Virginia Willis gives us a new cookbook that shows how to take elegant French dishes and put a down-home Southern spin on them.

Nonfiction Paperback

APPAREL CoolSweats Gentlemen's Corner The Faded Rose Dazzle The Village Fox Boutique

BOUTIQUES Eye Max Optical Boutique Green Gate Olive Oils The Potpourri Old Sport & Gallery Le Feme Chateau

Bird Cloud: A Memoir of Place by Annie Proulx. “Bird Cloud” is the story of Annie Proulx designing and building her dream home in Wyoming. It includes the story of how she came to live there and the rich history of the land that she made her home. At Home: A Short History of Private Life by Bill Bryson. Bill Bryson takes us on a room by room tour of his home, pausing to illustrate the history of modern conveniences and domestic artifacts that we take for granted.

children and young adult

SALONS & SPAS Elaine's Hairdressers Glam Salon & Spa Taylor David Salon

RESTAURANTS & INNS Lady Bedford's Tea Parlour & Gift Shoppe Pine Crest Inn Restaurant & Pub Tenya Japanese Cuisine and Sushi

SERVICES Brenner Real Estate Village of Pinehurst Rentals & Golf

28

BABY Einstein Halloween. The youngest of trick-or-treaters will love this adorable touch-and-feel board book with both cartoon drawings and actual photographs of fun fall sights. Ages birth -2 Pumpkin Cat by Anne Mortimer. One morning in May, Cat asked Mouse, “How do pumpkins grow?” Together, Mouse and Cat select seeds, add soi,l then water and nurture the tiny seedlings through spring and summer. Finally, when fall arrives, Mouse has a big surprise for Cat. This classically illustrated story of friendship is perfect for ages 4-7.

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B oo k s h e l f

The Haunted Hamburger and other Ghostly Stories by David La Rochelle. Everybody loves a scary story at Halloween, and ghostlings Frankie and Frannie are no exception. With tales of “The Scary Baby,” “The Haunted Hamburger,” and “The Big Bad Granny,” Father Ghost aims to tell the scariest stories of all … tales about people! Hilariously frightening fun for ages 5-8. Night of the Pumpkinheads by Michael J Rosen, with pumpkin carvings by Hugh McMahon. Master pumpkin carver McMahon’s creations bring to life the story of the Pumpkinheads’ contest to crown the scariest face of Halloween. Carved sabertooth tigers, cobras, brontosaurus, zombie mimes, skeletons and even a miniature pumpkin bee swarm are no match for … the vegetables! Complete with instructions on how to carve your own pumpkinhead creations, this beautiful picture book will be a Halloween hit with ages 6-10. Secrets at Sea by Richard Peck. From Newbery-winning author Richard Peck comes this irresistible adventure story in the tradition of The Miraculous Journey of Edward Tulane and The Borrowers in which the nouveau riche Cranston family decides to journey to England in 1887 to search for a husband for their daughter and unknowingly take along an adventurous family of mice. Filled with history, laughs and idioms galore, this wonderful new travelogue for ages 9-12 proves that even something as small as a tiny mouse can make big things happen. PS PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

29


You’ll find more than 50 of the best brands here, including one you can’t fi nd anywhere else. Adidas • Peter Millar • Sport Haley • Tail • Tehama • Puma • Titleist • Tommy Bahama • Under Armour • FootJoy • Straight Down Pinehurst Collection • SDI • Zero • Maui Jim • Oakley • Brighton • Dooney & Burke • Putterboy Collection • Vera Bradley • Isda Cole Haan • Lilly Pulitzer • Iliac • Aveda • La Bella Donna • J. Lindeberg • Ashworth • Oxford • Polo • Ashworth • Adidas • Ahead American Needle • Bobby Jones • Callaway • Cutter & Buck • EP Pro • Fairway & Greene Gear • Greg Norman • Imperial • Nike

The Pinehurst Shops are full of shirts, shoes, jackets, spa products, bags, gifts and accessories from brands like Vera Bradley, Adidas, Nike, Peter Millar and Cole Haan. So come in and find your favorites. Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina s 910. 235.8154 s pinehurst.com

30

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


hiTTing hOme

me, Too

Small random acts of kindness make us all the same

By DaLe niXon

This is one of those stories that just has to be told.

It’s really not quite long enough for a column, and it won’t take you very long to read. But the content is so meaningful to me that I don’t want to fill this space with anything else. I’ve even given a title to this story. I call it “Me, Too.” This story took place at the post office near my home, but in my heart, I know it could happen in any post office in any town. It was one of those days when you go to the post office and wish you had stayed home. To start off, all the good parking spaces out front were taken. And you knew that when you pulled out to leave, you would be taking your life in your own hands. It seems like everybody tries to leave at the same time. Inside, things weren’t much better. The line was out to the front door. Everyone had filled the ropedoff maze that bears signs reading, “Please enter here,” “Please wait here for next available clerk,” and “Exit here.” You could tell that everyone in the line was busy and in a hurry. They stood first on one foot and then the other. Everyone stared straight ahead, and an occasional cough was the only sound. I was waiting in the line. Impatient. Checking my watch every now and then. Willing the line to move along so I could get on with my day. It was then that I noticed a little old lady in the doorway.

She used a cane and slumped sideways each time she took a step. She was oblivious to the waiting line, too. She hobbled straight by us to the counter and reached for her change purse. Quietly, the postal clerk said, “Ma’am, I’m sorry, but I can’t wait on you now. You’ll have to go to the back of the line and wait your turn. She shrugged her shoulders and painstakingly made her way to the end of the line. I heard from behind me, “You can get in front of me.” The next person said, “Me, too.” And on up the line… . “Me, too.” “Me, too.” “Me, too.” Over and over, the same words were repeated. Some even taking her arm to guide her on her way. By this time, I was first in line. The woman stopped beside me, leaned on her cane, looked me straight in the eyes, and I said, “Me, too.” She placed her hand on mine and said, “I only need a couple of stamps, and I have the correct change. I won’t take long.” She made her way over to the postal clerk. I turned and looked down the line of waiting customers. They were all smiling. Me, too. PS Columnist Dale Nixon resides in Concord but enjoys a slice of heaven (disguised as a condominium) in the village of Pinehurst. You may contact her by e-mail at dalenixon@carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

31


32

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The kitchen garden

Local Apples

The pleasure of eating them is only equaled by growing them By Jan Leitschuh

Tart, crisp and sweetly acidic

Photograph by Hannah Sharpe.

apples gone feral made for some of the best memories of my Wisconsin youth. Nothing like crunching on juicy, free food in the woods when a snack attack hits during an outdoor ramble.

The apple trees had once been planted along the paths and parkways, abandoned farms and scrubby fields around the edge of town where I kept my knobby old horse (who, in my teenage mind, was a Pegasus). No one sprayed and pruned these abandoned old trees any longer. The city was moving in, and the old farms were moving out, but not quite yet, leaving a unsupervised paradise, a fertile “edge” suspended in time. Yet the Winesaps, Jonathans, Wolf Rivers and Gravensteins still bore heavy crops — sometimes so heavy the branches would break under the load when the fall winds blew. The tasty fruit was often small, twisted or scabby, yet enough remained edible enough for four or five truly delicious frost-kissed bites, after which ol’ Pegasus was happy to polish off the rest. The odd worm never slowed him down. He would let me stand on his stout, tolerant rump and reach farther into the trees, higher than the deer could reach, up where the best apples hung. It’s an Indian-summer memory that begs recreation on our little patch of sand here in the pines. Yet I’d hear the discouragements and assurances that “You can’t grow apples around here. You have to go to the mountains.” For a good while, naturally, that made me stubborn. I would see neglected old apple trees in traffic-stopping, glorious spring bloom on aging homesteads around the county. Later, these same trees would bear yellow and green fall fruits. Many of the untended fruits were wormy, yet made outstanding applesauce and stewed apples once the bad spots were cut out. Clearly, some apples grew here, and with little assistance, especially if you could get past the supermarket ideal of perfection. And when I ran across a vendor at the farmers’ market, John Ferguson, selling beautiful unwormy “Ginger Gold” apples, I knew. I knew it could be done. Edible landscaping has always appealed to me. When a little three-bush island is needed to screen off an unsightly view, why not a blueberry trio? When a larger screening mass is needed for summer privacy, why not a fig? And why plant a flowering ornamental crab apple, I reasoned, when I could plant an apple tree and have flowers and fruit? I got some heritage apples on semi-dwarf roostock from Century Farm Orchards in Reidsville, NC, enriched the ground with lime and other other minerals, and commenced to plant them in our sand. Local farmer Ken Chappell is stubborn too. Back in the early ’80s, before laterbearing peach varieties were developed, local peaches ran out in mid-August. Ken thought apples might take up the slack at his farm stand on Hwy. 211, despite the fact that “they told me at school you can’t grow apples here. You know how it is when people tell you you can’t do something,” he laughs.

Yes, I do know. Ken started going to state meetings in Asheville for apple growers. He noticed that the Ag Research station here in nearby Windblow, NC, kept a small orchard of Golden Delicious apples happy and healthy. In fact, during bitter early freezes in 1982, ’83 and ’85, right at blossom time, the peach growers experienced complete wipeouts of their peach crops. Ken noticed those Golden Delicious apples nearby kept on putting out a full crop, despite the early cold. He planted some Goldens of his own, and then Romes, as he puts it, the “rage apple of the ’80s,” the green Granny Smith apple out of New Zealand. It was a good move. “The Grannies really liked this area,” he says. Red Delicious followed, and then a number of varieties to spread out the harvest season: the early Ozark Golden that ripen in early July, the prolific August Galas, the rock-hard and good-storing heirloom Arkansas Blacks of late September, the fireblight-resistant Gold Rush and the popular, late-bearing Pink Lady. I asked Ken which varieties homeowners might plant. We want easy, tasty and disease resistant — heavy crops are secondary, unlike a farmer who must pay the bills. “Golden Delicious is a good pollinator for other varieties,” he said, and “does well here because we don’t really have the altitude to color an apple. In order to get the red in a Red Delicious, you need some mornings around 60 degrees or lower — that crisp, cool morning like they have every morning in the mountains.” Yet there are advantages to growing apples here, Ken says: “What the sand does for a peach, it does for an apple. That’s what some people who buy from me tell me. Over-fertilize a peach, and it’s bland. Same with the apple. The light land gives the flavor. Take the nitrogen away from the apple before it ripens, and it gives it a better taste.” Apples also hate wet feet, as do peaches, something our well-drained sand eliminates. As an organic gardener, it was a revelation to me that one could still have delicious fruit without spraying, albeit imperfect and probably unsaleable fruit. As an avid cook, that’s just not a problem to me, as it was never a problem for our grandmothers either — just cut out the bad spots same as one would on a tomato from the garden. The last few years, I’ve experimented with a plain, non-toxic kaolin clay barrier product called “Surround.” It washes off, and even helps the trees improve photosynthesis in our intense sun. The product gives improved fruit quality, fewer worms, but beyond an annual pruning in late February, that’s about it for the care I give. Squirrels and deer are our biggest headaches, often running off with choice fruits the day before you intend to pick them, or defoliat-

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

33


The kitchen garden

ing lower branches. A simple wire corral seems to help that. So back to the critical question of variety selection. For a homeowner wanting unsprayed fruit, “a variety like Red Delicious never seems to get fireblight, but Pink Lady and Gala are susceptible. You’ll see bad fireblight every four to five years.” For those who choose to use a simple orchard spray, Chappell warns that one must watch out for the bees. “They are pollinating the bloom, which goes on for 10 days or more, depending on the weather.” A home orchardist could spray on cloudy days when fewer bees are foraging, or in the evening, when bees are returning to the hive. “Enterprise” and “Liberty” are two other diseaseresistant, low-management apples that homeowners might consider. They don’t yield well enough for farmers — Ken says he pushed up half his Liberties because he couldn’t get that bog size consumers like, “But they taste good, nice and tart, and I have people returning and asking for them every year.” For home enthusiasts, he says, “I believe they could grow Granny Smith, Golden Delicious, Enterprise, Priscilla, Sir Prize, Arkansas Black, Liberty.” After choosing varieties, a homeowner must also choose the size to order: big tree, medium tree, small tree. Like me, Ken also prefers semi-dwarf rootstock, a grafting technique that keeps tree size manageable. “The standard size takes too long to bear, the minis have too low of a yield.” Most folks will prefer to frequent fruit stands and farmers markets for their apples. If curious, Ken Chappell Peaches and Apples farm stand sits right on Hwy. 211 between Eagle Springs and Candor, at Samarcand Crossroads. Stand number 910-6731878, and the website is www.chappellpeaches.com. Tree fruit growing is for plant nuts, admittedly — nuts like yours truly. My Pegasus steed is long gone, along with my free-rambling youth, but the Arkansas Black in the backyard glows with fruit. How sweet it is.

Simple Stewed Apples Peel, cut out the bad spots, core and chop into a pan. Add a little water, cinnamon, perhaps ginger and/or nutmeg, a little sweetener of choice. Include a little butter if you prefer. Don’t let the pan boil dry; add a bit of water as needed. Makes a delicious breakfast side, top a baked sweet potato for a hot lunch, or serve at supper with fall meats like pork chops or duck. A splash of apple brandy makes it a wickedly simple dessert, especially topped with a dab of homemade whipped cream. PS

Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative.

34 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

35


36

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Vine Wisdom

Is That a Pumpkin in Your Beer? Surprisingly popular, surprisingly good

By Robyn James

It’s been an

eye-opening experience to realize the incredible popularity of flavored beers. We have seen customers rapture over malt beverages infused with blueberries, cherries, banana bread, peaches, honey, coffee and chocolate.

But I was not prepared for the No. 1 hands-down favorite flavor of all: pumpkin. That’s right, come October, it could be the cute, young, preppy little dress shop owner or the manly man construction worker all looking for the same thing: What have you got in pumpkin beer? Often released as a fall seasonal, Pumpkin Ales are quite varied. Some brewers opt to add hand-cut pumpkins and drop them in the mash, while others use puree or pumpkin flavoring. These beers also tend to be spiced with pumpkin pie spices, like ground ginger, nutmeg, cloves, cinnamon, and allspice. Pumpkin Ales are typically mild, with little to no bitterness, a malty backbone, with some spice often taking the lead. Many will contain a starchy, slightly thickish mouthfeel too. In my opinion, the best versions use real pumpkin, while roasting the pumpkin can also add tremendous depth of character for even better results, though both methods are time consuming and tend to drive brewmasters insane. Whatever your walk of life, obviously Pumpkin Beer is going to be an enjoyable fall libation. Here are our four faves for fall: ICHABOD PUMPKIN ALE, NEW HOLLAND BREWING COMPANY, MICHIGAN Ichabod combines malted barley and real pumpkin with cinnamon and nutmeg in a delicious and inviting brew. A rewarding complement to many dishes, Ichabod pairs well with autumnal foods such as poultry

and root vegetables. After dinner, try it with your favorite dessert! BROOKLYN POST ROAD PUMPKIN ALE, NEW YORK Early American colonists, seeking natural ingredients for brewing ales, turned to pumpkins, available from August through November, which were plentiful, flavorful and nutritious. The beer has a really nice mix of cinnamon, sugar, and pumpkin and it is not overwhelming at all. I can’t imagine anyone being disappointed drinking this on a chilly October evening. BIG BOSS HARVEST TIME PUMPKIN ALE, NORTH CAROLINA A subtly spiced fall ale brewed with real pumpkin that will evoke memories of holidays and family. It is brewed with their own proprietary blend of spices that will make this one of the most-well-received pumpkin ales available. Goes great with Zombie rituals, vampire hunting, walks in a graveyard after midnight. 4.5 percent alcohol. DOGFISH HEAD PUNKIN ALE, DELAWARE A full-bodied brown ale with smooth hints of pumpkin and brown sugar. They brew Punkin Ale with pumpkin meat, organic brown sugar and spices. This is the perfect beer to warm up with, as the season cools. Punkin Ale is named after a locally famous and seriously off-centered event in southern Delaware — Punkin Chunkin (check out some of the Discovery Channel videos of Punkin Chunkin; you gotta see it to believe it!). In fact, Punkin Ale made its debut as it claimed first prize in the 1994 Punkin Chunkin Recipe Contest. Punkin Chunkin has grown in size and scale with pumpkins now being hurled more than 4,000 feet through the air! PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@pinehurst.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

37


Subscribe today and have PineStraw delivered to your mail box!

$35/ yr • In State

$45/ yr • Out of State

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

PHONE

E-MAIL ADDRESS

PAYMENT ENCLOSED

BILL ME LATER

3 ways to subscribe Fill out and return Call 910.693.2490 or E-mail dstark@thepilot.com

M A G A Z I N E

P.O. BOX 58 Southern Pines, NC 28388

TRI-CITY AUTOMOTIVE SERVICE CENTER

FREE A/C System Inspection Additional Charge for Freon

Purchase 4 tires and receive a FREE Alignment Check & FREE Tire Rotation for the life of the tires Tires at Great Prices, Best in Wheel Alignments, Excellent in Transmissions

Oil Changes • Tune-Ups • Timing Belts • Brakes • Flushes A/C Service • Struts • Shocks • Batteries and much more

910-638-6826 120 Sandy Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387

TRI-CITY AUTO GLASS CRYSTAL CLEAR VISIBILITY FOR A CLEAR VIEW OF THE ROAD • Automotive Glass Replacements • Headlight Restoration • Chip Repair

$25 OFF

Windshield Replacement

910-724-3109 • 910-692-9007 38 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


S p i r i ts

The Perfect Martini Which is better — shaken or stirred? Actually both

By Frank Daniels III

“When I’m...er...concentrating,”

[Bond] explained, “I never have more than one drink before dinner. But I do like that one to be large and very strong and very cold, and very well-made. I hate small portions of anything, particularly when they taste bad. This drink’s my own invention. I’m going to patent it when I think of a good name.” Casino Royale, Chapter 7: Rouge et Noir On the ordering of a Vesper More than a few of us were introduced to the art of living well by Ian Fleming and his fantasy alter ego, James Bond. Raymond Chandler described Fleming’s anti-hero as “what every man would like to be and what every woman would like to have between her sheets.” For better or worse, I’m fairly sure that it was not reading Fleming, but rather watching Sean Connery’s rendition in the theater that fired my imagination. Bond had a definite view and none more lasting than “shaken and not stirred,” as he ordered his vodka martini in the 1958 novel Dr. No. That the “controversy” inspired by this phrase persists today must put a smile on Mr. Fleming’s face as he sips his evening cocktail in the great bar in the sky. Google the phrase and you’ll find an incredible volume of writing, serious and frivolous, about the merits of shaken versus stirred. Fascinating reading with points scored on both sides. Bond sets up his argument as he orders, telling the bartender that he prefers vodka made from grain rather than potatoes. The wisdom was that before the 1960s, potato vodka was a bit oily, and shaking the martini dispersed the oiliness and made the cocktail ice-cold, which also dampened any unpleasant flavor. I also ran across a reference to scientific research on the merits of shaken versus stirred. Researchers at the University of Western Ontario (have to love those Canadians; they understand what’s really important) found that shaken martinis contain more anti-oxidants than stirred ones and are therefore more likely to help prevent cardiovascular disease. A martini a day… . But others decry the shaken martini. In NBC’s West Wing President Josiah Bartlet scoffs at the Bond martini in this exchange with his aide Charlie Young. Bartlet: Can I tell you what’s messed up about James Bond? Young: Nothing. Bartlet: Shaken, not stirred, will get you cold water with a dash of gin and dry vermouth. The reason you stir it with a special spoon is so not to chip the ice. James is ordering a weak martini and being snooty about it. That exchange embodies the controversy. Vodka martinis are best shaken. Gin martinis are best stirred.

The argument for stirring a gin martini was made for me as I watched a bartender at the Patterson House stir my Plymouth Gin martini. He said that gin, like whiskey, opens up with a bit of water, like the amount you get from melting ice, not by adding water; you want to smell the gin, the botanicals that give it character. “Too cold,” he told me, “and you’re wasting the gin.” After much experimentation I have come to agree with this sage advisor and enjoy my vodka martini ice-cold, shaken, and my gin martinis chilled, aromatic, stirred. Enjoy.

Martini

I like both vodka and gin martinis and generally will alternate between them each Sunday.

Shaken

2 1/2 ½ oz. Stolichnaya Elit Vodka (from the freezer) 3/4¾ oz. Dry Vermouth (Dolin Dry) Olive Pour the vermouth into an ice cube-filled martini glass and swirl until the glass is wellchilled. Dump the ice and vermouth into a cocktail shaker and drain the liquid from the shaker. Add the cold vodka to the cocktail shaker and shake vigorously. Place an olive in the bottom of your chilled glass and pour in the vodka.

Stirred

2 1/2 ½ oz. Plymouth Gin ¾3/4oz. Dry Vermouth (Dolin Dry) Lemon twist Pour the vermouth into an ice cube-filled martini glass and swirl until the glass is well-chilled. Dump the ice and vermouth into a stirring glass and drain the liquid but leaving the ice. Add the gin to the glass and stir until well-chilled. Pour the gin into your chilled martini glass. Express a bit of oil from the lemon twist, and float the twist atop your martini. PS Frank Daniels III is an editor and writer living in Nashville, Tenn. His cocktail book, Frank’s Little Black Bar Book, Wakestone Press, is available at The Country Bookshop. fdanielsiii@mac.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

39


David I. Klumpar, MD

at Carolina Skin Care The science behind beauty

Duke-Trained Dermatologist & Medical Director

Stephanie Blake, LMBT

Lic. Massage & Body Therapist

Mia Piazza, LE

235-SPA1 (7721) • 125 Fox Hollow Rd • Pinehurst, NC

Lic. Esthetician

Botox • Restylane • Laser Hair Removal • Face & Body Rejuvenation• Massage FEATURING

Botox • Facials • Restylane • Perlane Cosmetic & General Dermatology Body Treatments • Anti-Aging Peels Waxing • Laser Hair Removal Microdermabrasion • Massage Laser Vein Treatment • Laser Facial Rejuvenation Steam Treatments • Vichy Rain Shower

Great Smiles Are Always In Style! • Smile Makeovers • Porcelain Veneers & Bonding • Cosmetic Fillings (Front and Back Teeth) • Non-Mercury Fillings • Crowns & Fixed Bridges • Bleaching (Whitening) • Root Canal Therapy • General Cleanings & Preventative Care • Non-Surgical Periodontal Therapy • Digital Imaging (90% less Radiation) • Partials and Dentures • Cerec Single Visit Onlays & Crowns

G.R. Horton 295-5980 3 Regional Circle Suite C • Pinehurst DDS, PA www.carolinasmiles.com General and Cosmetic Dentistry

40

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


o u t o f t h e bl u e

Signs of the Times

Honey, please go take off those stilettos before you hurt yourself. And you? Go shave, or no dessert!

By Deborah Salomon

I can no longer be silent on two topics: platform stiletto shoes and three/four-day beards.

Of themselves, they are silly fashions. But from a wider perspective I believe they reflect the human condition. Shoes, for me, are a subject fraught with Freud. My mother had “bad” feet, requiring orthopedic shoes which were uglier than platypus paws. Hardly had I begun to walk when she prophesied mine “bad.” I endured brown oxfords when other children had penny loafers, sneakers and mary janes. My sweet sixteen party pumps were attained with blood, sweat and lies. Actually, much to my mother’s chagrin, I grew up to have good, strong feet despite low arches. Women who follow shoes know that designers manipulate them with styles which, viewed objectively, are ridiculous. Stiletto heels and dagger toes, I’m embarrassed for womanhood to say, have lasted many seasons. Instead of the usual radical change that creates instant obsolescence, Jimmy Choo et al. has rounded the toes and perched them on 2-inch platforms of the most horrific colors, even polka dots. This raises heels to seven or eight inches. The physics involved are way beyond my pay grade. Broken ankle? Been there, done that. Teetering is the link. Like shoe-slaves, we are teetering on the brink of global disasters. One false move, one slip and over the brink we go financially, ecologically, humanitarianly. Don’t the women who wear these shoes get it? Can’t they see their resemblance to clowns in Fellini’s “La Strada?” That road ended badly, as I recall. B Forty years of women’s rights, women’s liberation, women’s intrusion into the medical, legal and financial professions have, undoubtedly, left men scratching their heads. In desperation they wail, “What can we do that women still can’t?”

Grow just enough facial hair to shout “I am manchild … hear me roar!” This unshaven scruff started decades ago with British pop star George Michael, whose demi-beard served as a “beard” until he announced his sexual preference. Armani and other models followed suit because, uh, face it — men are limited in ways to alter their appearance. Now, a four-day shadow isn’t just for ripped construction workers anymore. Scratchy chins are showing up at conference and operating tables, on the stadium and judicial benches and on every Hollywood red carpet. Only Congress seems immune. Hmmm. I see fewer commercials for shaving products on ESPN — an ominous sign. Oh, don’t give me that stuff about the convenience. Maintaining an even stubble of the correct length is difficult, best achieved by a professional. That costs money. Then, pity the poor guys with spotty or thin growth. Not all fellas have the Jon Hamm (of Mad Men) advantage. Will they resort to transplants? Spray-on stubble? Does Rogaine work on the jawline? OK, George Clooney and Jake Gyllenhaal look pretty cute unshaven. But most gentlemen just appear uncomfortable, messy. At best, this trend suggests that men, dominant since the dawn of uncivilization, are feeling the crunch. They may be responding to the hypersexualization of everything from beer to banking. They aren’t into mustaches and beards — too soft and kinda old. But they like the idea of marking their territory by scratching a lady’s cheek. You know how territorial males can be. Worth noting, also: the toughest men — the men’s men of the armed forces — shave. Only in battle circumstances do they sprout growth which, I admit, is rather appealing. So on the behalf of every son’s mother let me shout, “Get back into that bathroom and shave off those whiskers or no dessert for you!” Then, when I see pretty little meteorologists teetering around on stilts like baby giraffes I’ll whisper, soothingly, it’s OK, honey. The recession will recede. Summers will cool down and winters warm up. Terrorists will call a truce and Social Security is safe. Step back from the brink and for heaven’s sake, forget Lady GaGa and put on your flip-flops. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and can be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

41


(PU#FBVKPMBJT .PE0%PD 5SVF(SJU )BSE5BJM *"N#˒POE $ISJTUPQIFS#MVF #FUI;JOL źF-BVOESFҝ źF

6ILLAGEOF0INEHURST  2ALEIGHAT.ORTH(ILLS  7RIGHTSVILLE"EACH 

!-OD / $OC3PECIALTY3TORE

WWWCOOLSWEATSNET

42 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B IRD WA T CH

Red-headed Woodpecker Beautiful and feisty, no stranger to our pine woodlands

By Susan Campbell

“Red-headed woodpecker� is a term

commonly used when referring to woodpeckers in the Sandhills. Of the eight species found here, all can have at least some red on the head. Ironically, the endangered red-cockaded has the least red feathering. It is only the male who has only a couple of red feathers in his cockade, and even that is not visible unless the bird is alarmed and at very close range. But in four species, the pileated, redbellied, yellow-bellied sapsucker and red-headed, there is considerable red feathering on the head of both sexes. It is only the red-headed, however, whose head and neck are completely red. Without a doubt, this woodpecker is my favorite of all the North American birds. The combination of such beautiful plumage with its feisty personality makes it very special. And it is no stranger to our pine woodlands. It can easily be attracted to bird feeders and may be seen and heard throughout our area year-round. Male and female birds are identical. The back, tail and wing tips are black. In contrast, the underside, rump and wing patches are white, which gives the bird away instantly in flight. And the dark red of the head makes this bird unmistakable. Young of the year,

however, are mostly a scaly gray but do have the white wing patches of the adults. And their loud, insistent vocalizations give them away instantly in the late summer as they trail around begging to be fed by their parents. In spite of its wide distribution and considerable charisma, the species is poorly understood. Red-headed populations have fluctuated greatly over time, possibly due to fluctuations in local food sources. Although they are generalists with a diet composed of everything from fruits, nuts, and flying insects to nestlings of other birds, they seem sensitive specifically to the abundance of acorns in the nonbreeding season. So individuals may wander in the colder months if the local oak trees provide little nourishment. Of particular interest here in Moore County is a partially albino individual that was noticed by a local biologist this summer. It is a male red-headed who is all white except for his red head. He is one of the most striking birds I have ever seen. If the white on this species signals superiority to potential mates and/or competitors, he has it made! But we know that white feathers not only make individuals more noticeable to predators (in his case, to perhaps a Cooper’s hawk) but are more brittle. Broken or excessively worn wing or tail feathers could affect sustained flight, maneuverability or the ability to hitch around on a tree. So the disadvantages associated with white plumage may outweigh the advantages for this woodpecker over the long run. Only time will tell. This red-headed woodpecker certainly has my vote as the most awesome bird around. PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, by phone at (910) 949-3207 or by mail at 144 Pine Ridge Drive, Whispering Pines, NC 28327.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

43


&!#)!,0,!34)#352'%29).#,5$).' "LEPHAROPLASTY%YELIDLIFT %NDOSCOPICFOREHEADLIFT

&ACELIFTS 2HINOPLASTY 3KINCANCERSURGERY

"/$9#/.4/52).').#,5$).' 0OST BARIATRICSURGERY 5LTRASONICASSISTEDLIPOSUCTION "REAST2EDUCTION 2ECONSTRUCTIVEPROCEDURES 3+).#!2%3%26)#%3).#,5$).' -ICRODERMABRASION

"REASTAUGMENTATIONAND REVISIONARYBREASTSURGERY !BDOMINALCONTOURINGSURGERY 0OST MASTECTOMYBREASTRECONSTRUCTION &ATGRAFTINGFORBREASTANDBODYCONTOURING

,ASERHAIRREMOVAL 0EELS $ERMAPLANING &ACIALTREATMENTSANDWAXING

4HE2ESULT#AN"E!STOUNDING OR3O3UBTLE.O/NE7ILL+NOW /URNEW SQUARE FOOT STATE OF THE ARTFACILITYHASITSOWNPRIVATEENTRANCE

QMBTUJDTVSHFSZDFOUFS &IRST6ILLAGE$RIVE 0INEHURST .#s   "/$9 *EFFERSON++ILPATRICK -$ &!#3 "OARD#ERTIFIED !MERICAN!CADEMYOF &ACIAL0LASTICAND2ECONSTRUCTIVE3URGERY WWWJKILPATRICKMDCOM

2USSELL"3TOKES -$ &!#3 "OARD#ERTIFIED !MERICAN"OARDOF0LASTIC3URGERY WWWDRSTOKESCOM

.OEL"-C$EVITT -$ &!#3 "OARD#ERTIFIED !MERICAN"OARDOF0LASTIC3URGERY WWWPINEHURSTSURGICALCOM

            

44

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e spo r t i n g l i f e

This Boy’s Life More often than not, the best lessons never came from a classroom

By Tom Bryant

“Anybody who reads this book is bound to realize that I had a real fine time as a kid.” — Robert Ruark, The Old Man and the Boy

If you haven’t read what I consider,

without a doubt, the finest piece of outdoor writing in the last seventy-five years, Ruark’s The Old Man and the Boy, I’m afraid your education is seriously lacking.

I guess I’m such a devoted fan of Ruark’s because all we would have had to do when we were youngsters was switch hats. He could have been Tom Bryant hunting and fishing in the low country of South Carolina with my grandfather, and I could have been Robert Ruark hunting and fishing the tidewater of South Port, North Carolina, with his grandfather. It’s like the dual universe they’re always fantasizing about. Anyhow, we both had great times as kids. It was hard not to in the decade of the ’50s. World War II was over, and the police action in Korea was about done. Brokaw’s “greatest generation” was home ready to make a life for themselves and their families. Wives and sweethearts were about to reap some of the rewards for having lived such a period of sacrifice. Times were booming — a chicken in every pot and a Ford or Chevrolet in every garage. Everybody everywhere was ready for some good times. Where was I when my daddy came marching home? On the farm in South Carolina. I was two months old when the war started and Dad left for the Navy and the war in the Pacific. Mom and I then moved in with my grandparents. Since Dad was gone for the duration of the conflict, my early years were spent hanging out with my grandfather as he took care of farming business. The country was aching to get back to normal after the war, and Dad took a job in the wholesale ice industry. In a couple of years, he became superintendent at the ice company in Aberdeen and we moved to Pinebluff. Good times number two. Life in Pinebluff was great. Mother never worked. As a matter of fact, I can’t remember many mothers who did work during those days. They stayed home and raised children, lots of children, who later would be known as baby boomers.

The village of Pinebluff was made for me — sand streets, long leaf pines, lots of wide-open places, and a bunch of kids my age. My friends and I lived outdoors. No air-conditioning or TV. When we were not out camping and exploring, we were making plans for special expeditions in the near future. All a boy needed was a bike and a dog. We were footloose and fancy free. Now that’s not to say we lived in never-never land. We had responsibilities. Chores were many and checked on. We did them or bikes were grounded, and there was nothing worse than having to walk for a week. Pinebluff was just an extension of the fun I had down on the farm with my granddad. Mother is from a big family, being one of eight children; therefore, I had at least that many surrogate fathers and mothers. My uncles were special. They took me under their wing, never treated me as a kid and had as much fun as I did on our many sojourns about the country. There was one trip that I remember fondly. I had to have been about twelve years old, and nothing was more fun than hanging out with my dad and uncles, especially when they were making plans for a major trip. We were visiting the farm one weekend close to my birthday. Summer was gone and fall, with its cool evenings and soft sounds, was best experienced on the great long front porch of the old plantation house. After Saturday supper, the adults would gather on the one end of the porch and talk about events of the day and plans for the future. On this particular evening, an early October full moon was coming up over the pasture and the far tree line. It was quiet with a dog barking occasionally in the near distance. Dad and my uncles, Tommy and Hubert, were sitting in rocking chairs rocking slowly as they watched the moon. I was kicked back in the swing, making it move from side to side with my foot propped on the armrest slowly pushing the chain. The swing creaked as the old ones do. The dog barked again. “That sounds like Ed Jr.’s dog,” my uncle Tommy said. Ed Jr. was one of many sons of Mary Greene, the mother who headed that household. The family lived on Granddaddy’s farm and had been there as long as I could remember. Ed and I were about the same age and played together often. I ate many biscuits in his mother’s kitchen. “I bet it’s that little fice dog that Granddad gave him,” I said. “Ed wants to make a squirrel dog out of him.” “If he’s as good as Ringo, he’ll be a good un’,” Uncle Hubert replied. Ringo was Granddad’s little Jack Russell, and he and I were tough on the squirrel population around the farm. Uncle Tommy lit up a cigarette. Everybody smoked in those days. It was

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

45


FallIntoaFreshNewLook! CosmeticBotox ChemicalPeels DermalFillers LaserTreatments Dermaplaning EuropeanFacial

$25Off Botox®Cosmetic($250ormore), Juvéderm®DermalFillerorChemicalPeelPackage Not valid with other offers. Must present ad at time of service. Expires 10/31/11

Visitourwebsiteforspecialoffersandmilitarydiscounts www.carolinaeye.comŏ 910-295-1501 ŏ 800-SEE-WELL

T h e spo r t i n g l i f e

almost un-American not to. “Who wants to go to Florida next weekend? Daddy wants me to go down there and pick some fruit from his groves. We need some for the holidays and I can sell the rest in the store.” Granddaddy had fruit trees galore on his place in Florida, more for a hobby than anything else. He hated for the fruit to go bad, so Tommy sold a bunch of it at the country store he and his family had on one corner of the farm. “Well, you know, I’m due some time off,” my dad said. “If we play it right, we can make a long weekend out of it and do some fishing while we’re there.” “I’ve got some time coming too,” Uncle Hubert said. “Count me in.” I was now sitting up in the swing, ears perked forward like a bird dog. School was in and there was probably little chance of me getting to tag along, but I was thinking fast and furious about how I could wrangle a spot on the trip. “Ahem, I’ve been thinking.” Six adult eyes swiveled my way, zeroing in on me like a hawk on a rabbit. “Whatcha been thinking about, son?” “Well, I’ve been making pretty much all As, and I bet Mr. Workman, my principal, and Mrs. Moore would let me off for a few days if you asked.” “Even if they did say it’s all right,” Dad replied, “we’re taking your granddad’s pick-up and there’s only room for the three of us. We’re gonna be crowded at that.” “I’ve thought about that,” I said. My mind was running full bore trying to stay one step ahead of the negatives. “I’ve got that new army expedition sleeping bag that I traded Maurice for, and it’s guaranteed to keep you warm at 20 below. I could ride in the back of the truck, hunker down in that bag, and be toasty warm. Once we get down there, I could help pick the fruit. Y’all don’t like to get up on those ladders. What do you think? I could be a big help.” “Well, I don’t know, son,” Dad said. The three men were looking at each other, grinning like Cheshire cats. It’s long trip.” Uncle Tommy and Uncle Hubert started laughing. “Go ahead, Monroe, tell him.” “Son, your mom got it fixed with the school last week. We’re playing a joke on you. You can go.” “Yeah,” said Uncle Tommy. “We need somebody to climb those ladders.” That was one of many trips I took with my dad and uncles, and what I learned in those days wasn’t always from the classroom. Ruark didn’t have a thing on me; I also had a real fine time as a kid. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist.

46 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

47


For some the Ultra life is a friendly game of softball, a weekend bike group or searching for that perfect round of golf. In the end, it's all about having fun. With 95 calories, 2.6 carbs and one exceptionally smooth taste, Michelob Ultra is the superior light beer perfectly balanced for your life.

WHAT'S YOUR ULTRA LIFE?

TELL US AT FACEBOOK.COM/MICHELOBULTRA

48

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills ©2011 Anheuser-Busch, Inc., Michelob Ultra®,IGHT"EER 3T,OUIS -/sCALORIES GCARBS GPROTEINANDGFAT PEROZ


Gol f tow n J o u r n al

Human Howitzers

Just imagine what Snead, Palmer and Nicklaus in their primes would do with today’s equipment

The Big Four: Hogan, Nelson, Palmer and Snead By Lee Pace

The press information packet for the 1951 Ryder Cup Match held at Pinehurst included a holeby-hole description of the 7,007-yard No. 2 course that the best players from the United States, Great Britain, and Ireland would play that first weekend in November. Here is how the likes of Sam Snead, Ben Hogan and Jimmy Demaret using persimmon woods and soft, wound balls figured to play some of the holes on the Donald Ross-designed tour de force at Pinehurst Country Club: Par-four second, driver and 3-wood to 1-iron. Par-four fifth, driver and 2 to 4-iron. Par-four eleventh, driver and 2 to 3-iron. Par-four eighteenth, driver and 3 to 5-iron. “I always wonder about all this talk about the ‘subtleties’ of Mr. Ross,” architect Pete Dye says. “I don’t think when he built this thing in the 1930s that he felt the golf course was subtle at all. I think he thought he built a golf course that was severe and challenged the hell out of the

great professionals at that time.” Sixty years later, Southern Pines’ Jack Fields won the North and South Amateur generating ball speeds in excess of 180 mph and hitting 8-irons into the greens of the second, fifth and eleventh holes and a 9-iron on the finishing hole. Fields stands 5 foot 8, no taller than Ben Hogan. As Bobby Jones said after watching Jack Nicklaus win the 1965 Masters, “He played a game with which I am not familiar.” Many people 50 and older are saying the same thing watching today’s elite golfers. Waddy Stokes, retired director of golf at Forest Creek Golf Club in Pinehurst, played the pro tour from 1978-80 before settling into the club pro business. He watched in wonder in mid-August as Keegan Bradley hit a driver and 7-iron on the 556-yard 12th hole at Atlanta Athletic Club in the final round in winning the PGA Championship. “When I played the tour, a 556-yard par-five was three shots for everyone,” Stokes says. “Now they’re getting home in two with a 7-iron. It’s hard to grasp. From 150 yards, most of us hit 7-irons, maybe a few 8s. Today they’ll hit a pitching wedge from 145.” Tom Weiskopf is the winner of two dozen professional tournaments and designer of some 60 courses worldwide. Standing 6 foot 3, Weiskopf was one of the longer hitters in the 1970s. “I will tell you this: The players are no bigger or stronger than they were in the past,” he says. “The equipment has changed everything. How far do you think George Bayer would have hit the ball today? Believe me, this J.B. Holmes and Bubba Watson, they couldn’t have come close to George Bayer if George had had this equipment. Believe

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

49


Gol f tow n J o u r n al

©2011 Pinehurst, LLC

Fresh fashion meets classic style at The Cupola.

The Carolina Hotel s Village of Pinehurst s 910. 235.8474 s pinehurst.com

11PNH240PinestrawOctCupola.indd 1

9/8/11 11:30 AM

Resurfacing For Existing Concrete Specializing In Garage Floors Unlimited Colors & Designs Available

Before

After

Garage Floors • Walkways • Patios • Driveways • Showrooms • Warehouses • And more

3 years Residential Warranty - Skid Resistant - Resists Black Tire Marks, Oils, Gasoline, All Household Chemicals & Most Corrosives

Phone/Fax 910-295-3821 • Cell 910-315-4901

me. How far do you think Jack Nicklaus would have hit it? Or myself?” That’s an interesting question. How far would Babe Zaharias and George Bayer, Mike Souchak and Sam Snead have powered the ball with titanium drivers and Pro-V1s? “I once asked Sam Snead, then in his 70s, if he would have been up there with the kids if he used neo-modern balls and clubs,” says Al Barkow, a lifelong golf journalist and author. “He nodded, gave that crooked little smile of his, and very assuredly said that he would. And he would have. Sam was the John Daly or Bubba of his day.” Two of the longer drivers in the mid 1900s were former football players — Bayer a draftee of the Washington Redskins and Souchak a threeyear starter at end and place-kicker at Duke. After a salary dispute with Redskins owner George Preston Marshall, Bayer quit football for golf and turned pro in 1954. He used incredible shoulder, arm and hand strength to launch a ball unfathomable distances — once acing the 250-yard eighth at Tam O’Shanter with a 1-iron and hitting his tee shot 10 yards past the hole on the 445-yard seventh at Tucson with help of the desert’s light air and a tailwind. Bayer’s clubs measured a swing-weight of E-2 — the equivalent of swinging a telephone pole. Sports Illustrated once called him “golf’s human howitzer.” “The guy was 6 foot 5, 260 pounds, had played in the NFL, was as strong as an ox and could hit it 310 or 320 yards with that equipment,” Weiskopf says. “I cannot conceive of George Bayer playing golf with the equipment we have today.” Souchak’s nickname at Duke was “Porky” because of his thick build. One year working under Tommy Armour and Claude Harmon at Winged Foot after college in the early 1950s helped him throttle back his aggressive style on the golf course, but he still had the power to land a drive just short of a greenside bunker on the 370-yard 14th in winning at San Antonio in 1955. Souchak beat Palmer in the 1959 Western Open at Pittsburgh Field Club, reaching the 504yard 11th with a driver and four-iron. He won 15 times on the PGA Tour. Author Herb Wind followed Bayer and Souchak in a practice round at Tucson in 1955 and hoped to see a slugfest. He was disappointed. “George and Mike were conscientiously intent on playing good golf shots and letting their distance take care of itself,” Wind observed. “Souchak would drive one about 300 yards down the resilient, straw-colored fairway. Bayer then would poke one five to 15 yards farther. Or if Bayer had the honor and drove first, there was no straining on Souchak’s part to get out past him.” Babe Zaharias was just 18 years old when

50 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


g O L f T OW n J O u r nA L

she won two gold medals in the 1932 Olympic Games in Los Angeles. She was invited to play Brentwood Country Club the day after the games concluded and amazed her hosts and onlookers by reaching the apron of the 523-yard 17th with two shots. She soon took up golf in earnest, shortening a long, loopy swing into a tighter, more controlled move. “I loosen my girdle and let it fly,” she liked to say. Peggy Kirk Bell at Pine Needles was close friends with Babe during the fledgling days of the LPGA Tour and once played an exhibition with Babe and Snead. “Babe would hit a good drive and say, ‘All right, Sam, see if you can beat that,’” Peggy remembers. “Snead accused her of playing a souped-up ball. He said, ‘Where’d you get those balls?’ She said, ‘Same place you got your’s — Wilson Sporting Goods. “Back in those days, we’d bounce balls on the sidewalk and play the one that bounced the highest. If we’d had today’s balls and clubs? Babe would have hit it a mile. JoAnne Carner, too. And Mickey Wright — she had the best swing on the tour.” The long-knocker to beat all long-knockers before Tiger or Bubba came along was, of course, Jack Nicklaus. The 18-year-old amateur from Columbus, Ohio, was invited to an exhibition in 1958 at Athens (Ohio) Country Club, where he first met the incumbent Masters champion, one Arnold Palmer. Before the round, they held an impromptu driving contest on the first tee, Palmer setting the stage with several of his lurching, blink-and-you-miss-it swings that sent the ball 270 yards or more. Then the heavyset, crew-cut Nicklaus, wielding a driver with a head that looked like a thimble compared with modern clubs, exploded through his tree-trunk legs and launched a series of towering drives that rose toward the heavens, crested and fell beyond a green that sat 360 yards away. “I think I would hit it right where the long hitters hit it today,” Nicklaus says. “In my day, 300-yard hitters were considered long, and 350 is considered long today. I like to think I would have been a 350 hitter.” Nicklaus paused, winked and smiled. “Maybe 360,” he says. It would have been fun to see the Bear versus Tiger on a level playing field — both wielding cannons with 400ccs of titanium. Of course, you’d have needed a 10,000-yard golf course — with no women or children anywhere in sight. PS

Pinehurst Resort Realty is the exclusive real estate-purchasing arm of Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, giving you a direct resource into this world-renowned destination and Pinehurst membership. Why Pinehurst Resort Realty is the Best Choice for Sandhills, NC Real Estate We know there are many choices in finding the right real estate agent. Look at our Sandhills realtor agent base, and you’ll clearly see a team of seasoned professionals who know and understand Pinehurst and Sandhills real estate like no other organization.

“Living here is like having a vacation that never ends!”

Located in the Lobby of The Carolina Hotel Village of Pinehurst, NC 28374 1-800-772-7588 www.pinehurstresortrealty.com • pinehurstresortrealty@pinehurst.com

Lee Pace will write about hickory golf and other vintage topics in his forthcoming book, “The Golden Age of Pinehurst,” due out in spring 2012. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

51


Providing Custom Homes & Remodeling

Fax 910-295-1549 P.O. Box 3090, Pinehurst, NC 28374

52

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


t h e h ot t i c k e t

Conducting Magic Sarah Hicks and the NC Symphony Orchestra “surf” into the Sandhills

By Ashley Wahl

In a purely nomadic sense, Sarah Hicks, associate conductor of the North Carolina Symphony, is a bit of a gypsy. Plus, there’s something whimsical about her very nature. Born in Tokyo and raised in Honolulu, Hicks travels wherever the music takes her — be that across Europe on a two-month tour with Sting or right here to our very own Sandhills. It all started with piano lessons at age 5. “I have an Asian mother,” Hicks says. “Asian mothers like for their children to play an instrument.” Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother comes to mind. Hicks laughs at how applicable Amy Chua’s memoir was to her own upbringing. Hicks began concertizing by age 10. At 17, over-use injuries in both hands forced her to retire from the ivory keys, crushing her dreams of a career as a concert pianist. “Dry your eyes,” her father said. “You can still hold a stick.” “And he was right,” she notes proudly. When her high school orchestra teacher gave her a shot at con-

ducting — handing her the baton for the first movement of Dvorak’s Symphony No. 8 — “that was that,” she says. “All it took.” Hicks currently lives in Minneapolis with her musician husband, French hornist Paul LaFollette. She is the principal pops conductor of the Minnesota Orchestra. She’s also staff conductor of the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia. Her gig with the NC Symphony began in September 2009. “I like naps,” she says. Contractually, Hicks spends nine weeks a year with the NC Symphony. “They really do own their name,” Hicks says of the orchestra, whose mission is to bring their music to towns and communities across the state. “They probably travel more than any orchestra in the country.” In that regard, Hicks fits right in. And in terms of her artistic style, the symphony has responded well. At thirty-something — a lady conductor never tells her age — Hicks is of a different generation than many of the orchestra’s members. She brings a fresh, youthful perspective wherever she goes, making her a highly requested guest conductor both in the States and abroad. She has also collaborated with a diverse array of musical artists, from Hilary Hahn to Ben Folds. (The Sting bit was true, too. She toured with him this past summer.)

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

53


The hOT TickeT

Exclusively Carrying… RUGS & CARPETS

Located in Pinehurst, 585 Hwy 5 | 295-2293

New Homes & Remodeling Value Makes the Difference

Pinehurst, NC | 910.692.3782 | www.bownesscustomhomes.com

Basically, she’s not afraid to push the boundaries of a concertgoer’s symphonic expectations. “To me, it’s not just about the music,” she insists, explaining how she assembles programs with her audience in mind. “It’s about having an experience, maybe learning something, and having a fun time. It’s really nice to work with an orchestra that gets that.” On November 3, Hicks will lead the NC Symphony at Pinecrest High School’s Robert E. Lee Auditorium as they perform ¡España!, a program that Hicks describes as an “exploration of the intersection between French and Spanish cultures.” Featuring selections from French composer Georges Bizet’s Carmen — a Spanish-set opera — in addition to works by Emmanuel Chabrier, Jules Massenet and Manuel de Falla, Hicks and the NC Symphony promise a flavorful concert filled with rhythmic vitality. “We’re wrapping up the program with one of my favorite pieces,” says Hicks of Falla’s Suites from The Three-Cornered Hat. “It’ll make you want to get up and dance,” she promises. Expect her to talk during the show, too. Hicks explains. “If I were an audience member, I’d want to know what the person who is guiding my concert experience has to say about the pieces that are going to be played.” Her job — much more than “waving my arms about,” she assures — certainly has its challenges. Namely: playing effective translator between composer and symphony, then symphony to orchestra. But the rewards are sweet. She’s driven by those little moments when everything clicks. “It’s hard to explain, but sometimes it’s in the strangest place, or at the most unexpected time of day or night. But then suddenly everybody’s riding the wave with me — ” she breaks off apologetically to excuse her surfer lingo, a product of growing up (yes, and surfing) in Hawaii. Then, with a smile, she continues. “We’re in the groove of the wave and we’re riding it together. And everyone feels it. Usually it doesn’t last for more than a minute or two. But it’s absolutely magical. “Those moments are rare. But they are what drive us to do what we do.” The North Carolina Symphony presents ¡España!, featuring associate conductor Sarah Hicks and Sein An, violinist, on Thursday, Nov. 3, 8 p.m. Robert E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School. Tickets/Information: (877) 6276724 or www.ncsymphony.org. PS

54 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sterling silver charms from $25

FRAMER’S COTTAGE .7"ROAD3Tp3OUTHERN0INES .# 910.246.2002

MKTG22796_FRAMER.indd 1

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

9/13/2011 4:38:46 PM

October 2011

55


a quick escape for you.

Watch your tensions float away with the exfoliating scrubs, soothing massage, hydrating facials and cleansing body wraps of our Forbes Four-Star-rated spa. Stay as long as you like

Receive 20% off all Day Spa Packages and a Complimentary Lunch*

©2011 Pinehurst, LLC

and send your worries on a holiday that goes on forever.

56

Located next to The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910.235.8320 • pinehurst.com October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .* . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills Valid Monday-Wednesday until 10/31/11. Subject to black-out dates.


October 2011 The Time I Drank October Up The time I drank October up I drank it from a golden cup And those around who could not see Imagined cider, whiskey, tea Only I will ever know I drank the sunshine that waits for snow Crisp, clear evenings, wind through chimes Jack-o’-lanterns in a line Children laughing all made up Threw some candy in my cup Ghosts and goblins; angels, clowns Green becoming red and brown Families at their festivals Where floating leaves turn into piles All of this was in my cup And before they knew, I drank it up! —Tammy McAnally

The author’s daughter, and inspiration for this poem, Adara Graham.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

57


Divorce • Military Divorce Adoption • Child Custody & Support Property Division • Traffic • Alimony Separation Agreements Southern Pines Office

165 E. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 Tel: (910) 725-1930

Fayetteville Office

2504-C Raeford Rd. Fayetteville, NC 28305 Tel: (910) 485-5200

www.baker-familylaw.com Bring this advertisment with you for a free consultation.

58

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

59


Scarlett Fiddle dee dee. War, war, war. This war talk is spoiling the fun at every party this spring. I get so bored I could scream.”

FIDDLE DEE DEE Dressed for a country picnic, our Scarlett O’Hara (Kimberly Daniels) enchants the local gentlemen with her Southern charm and grace. Left to right: Ross Leonard, Scott M. Thomas, Nathaniel Torrey, Daniel Wake, Mike Murphy, John R. McNeill, David Ward, Stephen Tuck. Our flirtatious Scarlett is clothed in a Shoshanna dress and hat from Monkee’s. Accessories from Traveling Chic Boutique.


T A K E

T W O

Seventy-five years ago, the iconic Novel about the South appeared. Three score and fifteen years later, we wondered what a modern day Scarlett, Rhett and company would look like in the designer clothes of the new South that rose from the ashes. PHOTOGraPHS By Tim Sayer • maKeUP By mOlly ParSOnS • Hair By K aTHe TaylOr • PHOTOGraPHeD aT THe WeymOUTH cenTer

STEELED MAGNOLIAS Ashley Wilkes (Anthony Parks) looks on as his two lady interests meet. If looks could kill, Scarlett greets demure Melanie (Anna Grace Schneider) with a smile so sweet it could strangle. Our Ashley wears a Kroon jacket, Maker & Co. shirt, Robert Talbott tie, all from Gentlemen’s Corner. Miss Melanie is wearing a dress and hat from Traveling Chic Boutique.

Scarlett: “Melanie! She’s a paleface mealy-mouth ninny and I hate her!”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

61


Scarlett: “Cathleen, who’s that man looking at us and smiling? The nasty, dark one?” Cathleen Calvert: “My dear, don’t you know? That’s Rhett Butler. He’s from Charleston. He has the most terrible reputation.” Scarlett: “He looks as if... as if he knows what I look like without my shimmy.”

YOU SCOUNDREL, YOU Our updated Rhett Butler (John Taws) is bewitched by our Scarlett at first sight. He’s wearing a sumptuous Kroon sports coat and Van Laack Royal shirt with accessories from Gentlemen’s Corner.

62

A SCANDALOUS DANCE Recently widowed Scarlett is breaking all the rules of etiquette by stepping out with that dapper rogue Rhett Butler. Our dissapproving belles, left to right, include: Cackie Kelly, Carolyn Belcher, Lily Camiña, Hill Galland, Caroline Young, Ginny Kelly, Jenna Woronoff, Anna Grace Schneider, Suzanne Holderfield, Ashley Cole, Wendy Dodson and Kerriann Hillgrove. Our dashing Rhett is wearing a Kroon coat, Peter Millar shirt, 1920 Gardeur pants and accessories from Gentlemen’s Corner. Our notorious Scarlett is dressed in an ISDA & Co dress from Morgan Miller.

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Scarlett: “Another dance and my reputation will be gone forever.” Rhett: “With enough courage you can do without a reputation.” PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

63


Scarlett: “As God as my witness. As God as my witness they’re not going to lick me. I’m going to live through this and when it’s all over I’ll never be hungry again nor any of my folk. If I have to lie, steal, cheat or kill, as God as my witness I’ll never be hungry again.”

TOUGH TIMES DON’T LAST, TOUGH WOMEN DO Though gardening is not her thing, our updated Scarlett vows to feed her family and find a way to save her beloved ancestral estate. She is seen here in a rugged Columbia checked shirt dress from River Jack Trading Co., perfect attire for pulling carrots.

64

Scarlett: “Well I must admit I might not be alive now, only for you. And when I think of myself with everything I could possibly hope for, and not a care in the world... And you here in this horrid jail... and not even a human jail, Rhett, a horse jail!”

MAMA OF INVENTION With Rhett behind bars, Scarlett cleverly uses Tara’s drapes to make a dress. Our Scarlett’s outfit was constructed by Carolyn Belcher with real curtain fabric and a tassel from Not Just Linens. A feathered headdress made by our local milliner Janet Kenworthy and a gray cotton sheath dress from Eve Avery complete her jailhouse ensemble.

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


NOT QUITE PARADISE The South may never rise again, but newly married Scarlett, strolling the grounds of a restored Tara, finally has everything she dreamed of... except the man of her dreams, Ashley Wilkes. Our rustic Rhett wears Agave shirt, Worn pants, Martin Dingman chukka boots and coat from Gentlemen’s Corner. The ever scheming Scarlett is dressed in a Donna Morgan frock from Morgan Miller.

Rhett: “Scarlett, did you ever think of marrying just for fun?” Scarlett: “Marriage, fun? Fiddle-dee-dee! Fun for men you mean.” 66

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


[Dropping Scarlett off at Ashley’s birthday party]

Rhett: “You go into the arena alone. The lions are hungry for you.”

LADY IN RED Following her spat with Rhett, Scarlett turns heads when she appears at Ashley’s birthday bash in a scandalous red dress. Our sizzling Scarlett wears a sexy ZINGA dress with accessories from Traveling Chic Boutique.


Rhett: “Frankly, my dear, I don’t give a damn.”

Scarlett: “Tara! Home. I’ll go home. And I’ll think of some way to get him back. After all ... tomorrow is another day.”

TOO LITTLE, TOO LATE With Melanie translated to the sweet hereafter, Ashley is finally free for Scarlett. Too late, she discovers she truly loves Rhett, but he has had enough. Our resilient heroine Scarlett must find a way to get him back. Here she’s turned out in a Milly of NY dress from Monkee’s. Departing Rhett wears a Peter Millar coat and accessories from Gentlemen’s Corner.

68

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


By Kimberly “Scarlett” Daniels Gone With the Wind first hit bookstores seventy-five years ago. Written by an unknown Atlanta author, sold — during the Depression — for the sky-high price of $3 and weighing three pounds, the book reached the best-seller list after two weeks, stayed on that list for two years, won the Pulitzer Prize and became a cultural icon that exists to this day. One thing I love about Gone With the Wind is that Margaret Mitchell Marsh started writing her story at the end. After writing the final chapter in 1926, she worked for ten years on a story of boundless characters living through a historically accurate antebellum South, Civil War and Reconstruction. This ending — the one that has caused readers and movie goers alike to desire something different, happy and complete — was Mitchell’s first piece of plot development. The movie premiered in Atlanta in 1939, and record-breaking book sales continued. Mitchell answered all of her letters from fans but rarely made public appearances to support the book. She did, however, attend a party at the Piedmont Driving Club celebrating the movie’s premiere. After the producers made sure the author and Clark Gable spoke, Gable declared her to be the most “fascinating woman I have ever met.” Controversial, fiery and irrepressible, Scarlett’s story is now a quintessential part of Southern mythology. In a 1939 letter rejecting personal comparisons to Scarlett, Mitchell wrote: “About the only good qualities Scarlett had were courage and a refusal to admit defeat. But on the other side she was selfish, vain, almost illiterate, a bungler in her dealings with other people, a person with shoddy tastes and a fondness for cheap companions. She neglected her children and she was the ruination of every man who loved her. She stopped at nothing in her grasping determination to make money, including cheating, swindling, and cruel abuse of the helpless convicts she hired. She committed murder, she stole her sister’s sweetheart with a lie, and she offered her body for sale at a price.” Scarlett may have been all these things, but her power was a valuable inspiration to those in peril during World War Two. Hitler was aware that Gone With the Wind provided inspiration and strength in times of war, and consequently banned the book in Nazi occupied countries. People were killed because they owned the novel. One woman testified that Gone With the Wind gave her strength to survive Auschwitz. Description of Mitchell in her senior annual of 1918: Appearance: Swaggering Hobby: Aviators Pet Aversion: Civilians Favorite Expression: “Curses!” Highest Ambition: To send them away with a smile!

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

69


Coffee With Birch FicTiOn By mary VOn canOn SiSK

Sarah Morton killed me . Just as sure as I’m laid

out here in this wood box with my head resting on a pink satin pillow, Sarah Morton killed me with her coffee cup. I guess it’s a good thing I’m not breathing or the cloying smell of carnations would have me coughing and sneezing big time. Folks I hardly know are walking by, staring me in the face and commenting on what a good job Fred Flagg did to make me look alive. He combed the front of my hair, where it would show, but he sure left a mess of tangles in the back. Also, he didn’t bother to button up the back of my dress. Just tucked it around my body since he figured I couldn’t move and disturb it. Sarah Morton went over to my house and selected it for him. A worn-out old thing I hadn’t worn in years. I think she did it for spite, or because she thinks she’ll take my good ones for herself. I just hope she is standing in that long line of people. If she is in that line, and she tries to shed alligator tears when she looks at me, I’m going to open my eyes and wink at her. She’ll either tear out of the church screaming or she’ll fall dead on the floor with a heart attack. Be just like her to die and try to steal the show. My husband died three years ago, and I’d gotten used to living alone. In fact, I enjoyed my mornings more after Birch died than I did when he was living. Rest his soul, he was a good man but bad to argue with the television screen, and he did mumble while he was reading the paper. As I said, I was perfectly content with my life. I’d get up and make coffee, turn an egg over light and toast a muffin. After I polished that off, I’d take my second cup of coffee out to the porch, sit in the rocker,

70

and read the newspaper. It was peaceful there with the sweet smell of roses and the soft chirps of birds around the birdfeeder. That all ended when Sarah Morton moved next door. She decided I needed company, and here she’d come across the yard, yakking and talking about nothing and holding her big cup of coffee. That cup was three times the size of a regular cup, and it was plain out ugly. The gold script I LOVE MY MOMMIE on the cup was surrounded by straggly purple flowers that didn’t look like any flowers God ever put on this green Earth. Just like me Sarah didn’t have children, yet she’d bought the cup from the flea-market. She was convinced it belonged in a museum and probably had been stolen from one before it landed in Sid’s Odds and Ends on Broad Street. She watched the soaps, which I didn’t, and she’d sit there and rattle on about them as if I cared a hoot about who was sleeping with his best friend’s wife. I just quit going out to the porch, but that didn’t stop her. She’d open my door and come on in, sloshing coffee all over the rug. I’d finally had enough. I got up early one morning. Put my coffee in a thermos, picked up the newspaper and threw my aluminum beach lounger in the trunk of my car. I drove around awhile before I decided to go way out in the country where my husband’s family had lived on a big farm. The house and the barns were long gone, but there was a family cemetery, and I had buried Birch there under a big shady oak tree. The dirt road from the highway out to the cemetery was in bad shape so I parked on the shoulder of the highway. After I locked the car, I took my lounger, thermos and newspaper and walked over to Birch’s grave.

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


It was a beautiful cool day. I put the lounger under the oak tree, poured my coffee and began to read the paper. I remembered Birch always read the sports section and checked the stock market, so I thought I’d look to see how his favorite Braves were doing. Not bad, not bad at all, so I read the whole article to him. That morning had been so quiet and peaceful without Sarah Morton’s endless chatter that I slipped away each day for the next month. Of course, when I got back in the afternoon I had to dodge her or else make up some tale about where I’d been. I think Birch really enjoyed me reading the newspapers, and I thought about getting a little battery radio so he could listen to the games. While I was in the Big Bee Supply Store buying the radio, I browsed around and ended up buying a canopy tent, like you put up in the back yard, an insulated ice chest, and a folding card table. I laughed all the way home. It would be just like setting up a little camp site, and I could stay out there all day without having to tell Sarah Morton any of my business. I’d go early and stay until dark, and she could carry that blasted coffee cup to hell and back for all I cared. I set up my camp, and I could just imagine old Birch lying there grinning while I struggled to get the poles just right for my canopy tent. He never was one to read directions, and I was having trouble holding the instructions while trying to join pole A to pole B2 and insert lock WX into the base support. When I finished and it was standing there firm and square, I couldn’t resist looking over at his grave and giving him a “Get That Smirk Of Your Face, I Told You I Could Do It!” salute. Along with the camping equipment, I also took boxes of old photographs, for I planned to get all our snapshots into albums. None of that scrapbook foolishness Sarah Morton did with ribbon and hearts and stuff, I just wanted to get the photographs organized. Some were of Birch’s old family, and I was hoping he could help me with the names. I’d bought that insulated ice chest to store the pictures and albums in. No sense in dragging all that stuff out there each day since the ice chest would keep them nice and dry in case of rain. Life was good all that fall. I’d get up early, pack my lunch, get my thermos and drive out there. After I’d sipped my coffee and read Birch the newspaper, I set up my card table and spend the day pasting photos in the books while he listened to ballgames on the radio. One morning in mid-December, just as I was getting ready to pour my coffee in the thermos, the door flies open and Sarah Morton comes charging in with coffee cup in hand.

She demanded to know, and she demanded it in a loud voice. “Where have you been and what’s been going on?” Sarah Morton has got little squinty eyes that were narrowed to slits, a little piggy nose, and her mouth was so wide open her gold molar in the back was showing. I assured her nothing was going on. She said she’d learned a lot from her soaps, and she was convinced I was involved with a man, or worse, yet, men. She wanted to remind me that it was a sin to mess around even if your husband is dead. She had placed that I LOVE MY MOMMIE cup of coffee on the edge of my table and I had such an urge, but I didn’t do it. If I had, I would have had to clean up the spilled coffee and broken china before I could leave. I looked her straight in the eye and I told her there was a man I was spending time with, and I had slept with him for years and I would continue to spend time with him. Then I handed her that ugly cup and pointed to the door. She gasped, vowed she’d never darken my door again, and spilt that coffee all over my porch when she clasped her hand to her heaving heavy breast. It was windy and cold with black clouds forming in the west as I drove to the cemetery. I soon realized, due to Sarah Morton’s nosy interference, I had forgotten my heavy coat, but it was not a problem, for I planned to stay at the cemetery just long enough to tell Birch his tech stock, which he’d bought against my advice, had gone down and he’d lost a pot of money. It served him right for not listening to me. Snow started falling while I was talking to Birch, and I realized that while I was standing up there freezing, he was just as warm as ever and not listening to a thing I was saying. I’d had enough of him and enough of Sarah Morton, who had driven me out of my own house. I walked back to the car and sat in there and cried a little before I turned on the ignition. The car didn’t start. It growled a few times. The battery clicked and then stopped completely. It was dead silent except for the wind whistling through the trees and the thumps of small limbs hitting the car. Snow covered the car and the chill inside grew. I was on an unused country road with no one knowing my whereabouts. Deer hunters found me three days later. I was still sitting at the steering wheel, and Fred Flagg had a time straightening me out flat. After the service, they’ll take me out and bury me next to Birch. Sarah Morton will never be arrested, but I still call it murder when you’re killed by her big mouth and her flea market coffee cup. PS

More than just green... We’ll take your thumb to the next level.

500 US Highway #1 South Aberdeen, NC 28315 910.944.7469

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

71


Bleeding Pines Of Turpentine

S

By r ay OWen outhern Pines is a town named for its forest. In its heart is a great surviving remnant of a once 90-million-acre forest of longleaf pines, many of the trees marked with V-shaped cuts made by former slaves or their descendants to let loose the flow of sap collected for turpentine. Hundreds of the trees remain in the Weymouth section, more than in any other town in America. At the turn of the 20th century, Helen Boyd Dull took a carriage ride up the eastern hill above the train depot in Southern Pines, into the region’s last great stand of virgin longleaf pines. Here she encountered turpentiners working in the dying forest. There were scores of trees whose sides were stripped of their bark, their carved faces a ghostly white from dried resin. Moved by what she saw, she asked her father, industrialist James Boyd, to buy the land and spare the trees. As a result, many of the old-growth pines survive today scattered throughout the Weymouth neighborhood and in the adjacent Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve. This tale is the inspiration for the cultural theater performance Bleeding Pines of Turpentine, a multi-arts performance I wrote, that tells the story of the trees and the way we have marked this land in a way that marks us as a community. The performance utilizes dance, music, projected images and poetic monologue in a type of performance art that I call “cultural theater.” The thrust of cultural theater comes from the layering of various artistic elements and the inclusion of performers whose roots are represented by the theme. An early version of the play opened during the Palustris Festival in March, 2011. A pipe band march signaled the start of the performance, which featured dancer Diana Turner-Forte, accompanied by guitarist Ryan Book. At the center was the dramatization of a story I originally wrote for PineStraw, titled “The Siren of the Round Timber Tract.” (Round timber is the local name for old growth trees.) Rod Brower and Together-N-Unity Choir provided the accompaniment, with their soulful renderings of traditional African-American spirituals. The backdrop was a series of short films and projected images by photographers Brady Beck and Frank Hunter, depicting the natural world and surviving turpentine trees. Among those attending was a contingent from Southern Pines’ sister city, Newry and Mourne in Northern Ireland. Frances Caherty and former Newry/Mourne Mayor Michael Carr were particularly impressed. And they began laying the groundwork for bringing the production to the Maiden of the Mournes International Festival held at Warrenpoint, Northern Ireland. On August 5 of this year, eleven cast members of Bleeding Pines of Turpentine set off for a performance at Warrenpoint Town Hall. Throughout our nine-day tour, members of the troupe were asked to perform numerous times in a variety of venues. The Irish were particularly enchanted by Rod Brower and Together-N-Unity Choir. We learned that there is a great affinity between the people of Northern Ireland and the American struggle for civil rights. I believe this accounts for the powerful affinity they have for Pines, with its graphic depiction of the turpentiners and the often silent human struggle for Bleeding Pines something more. Irish filmmaker George Kingsnorth has begun work on a documentary about Bleeding Pines of Turpentine, and he hopes to come to the States in November to complete the film. Looking ahead, a very special performance of Bleeding Pines of Turpentine will be offered at 7:30 p.m., on Saturday, November 5, 2011, in Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College. Sponsored by The Walthour-Moss Foundation, Sandhills Community College Fine Arts Department and Arts Council of Moore County, the program will be the first time the play has been performed in its entirety, with new scenes, additional dancers, and a cellist and violinist. Joining the cast will be DanceFusion, the resident dance company of the Carolina Performing Arts center, along with photographer Caroline Young and the St. Andrews Presbyterian College Pipe Band. A panel discussion about the play is being planned for Sunday, November 6, with details pending. The panel will consist of noted scholars who will talk about the turpentine industry in North Carolina, the longleaf pine forest and its decline, and the fate of the remaining turpentine trees. Preceding the panel will be a cameo of Bleeding Pines of Turpentine, setting the tone for a dialogue about this remarkable aspect of our community.

Bleeding Pines of Turpentine - A Cultural Theater Production: Inset Photographs By Hannah Sharpe. Turpentine Tree Photograph By Frank Hunter

72

Location: Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst Admission: Free, but an entry ticket is required. Tickets: Southern Pines: Arts Council of Moore County (Campbell House), Country Bookshop, and Traveling Chic Boutique. Pinehurst: Given Memorial Library and Sandhills Community College Library. And online at www.walthour-moss.org. Information: 910-692-2787

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


&

C USTOM H OME R EMODELING BY

Re

“The Custom Home and Remodeling Contractor of Choice in Pinehurst” • We “partner” with the customer to insure “maximum satisfaction” • Over 30 years experience BEFORE

• Budget and On Schedule Sensitive • Reliable, Trustworthy & Quality Craftsmanship

AFTER

CERTIFIED GREEN PROFESSIONAL™

6895 NC HWY 211 WEST • WEST END

295-5400

Wayne Haddock, President

WWW. PINEHURSTHOMESINC . COM

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

73


In Star:

I

By maria JOHnSOn • PHOTOGraPHS By JOHn GeSSner

t sure didn’t look haunted from the outside. The rangy old Victorian, wearing a shade of blue that looked to have been drained straight from the sky, was well-kept. A friendly dog greeted me in the gravel parking lot, and by the time I pulled my bag from the backseat, manager Richard Wallace was already on the wrap-around porch, waving me into the Star Hotel Bed and Breakfast Inn — a name sure to snare the search terms of anyone trolling the Internet for a bed near the North Carolina Zoo, or Seagrove, or Pinehurst, or the Uwharrie Mountains, or any other reason a soul might want to stay in the tiny town of Star, which twinkles on the eastern edge of Montgomery County. But tourism wasn’t what brought me there. What reeled me in was a telephone conversation I’d had with Richard’s wife, Joyce, after a friend raved about this charming, art-stuffed B&B in the middle of nowhere. Was there a story there? I had called to asked Joyce about the history of the place, which she recounted at the don’t-rush-me pace of a woman who might not have been everywhere but has seen just about everything. The ghost materialized toward the end of our conversation, almost an afterthought. Art, fascinating history, breakfast and a ghost? I was so there. I had never

74

A doll-faced ghost and a wonderful night’s sleep, with full breakfast

seen a ghost. That I knew of. But I wasn’t opposed to seeing one. In theory. Richard ushered me over the threshold, and Joyce joined us. I was in another world all right — one brimming with antique furniture, paintings, chandeliers, tapestries, vases, mantle clocks, lace and cherubs. No wonder some guests have called this a little Biltmore House. Joyce and Richard showed me around and fleshed out the history of their B&B, which opened in 1896 as the Star Hotel. The owners were Angus and Deborah Leach. They sited their hotel just a cinder’s leap away from the train depot, back in the days when the rails sang with the business of lumber and turpentine. A couple of locals, the Cooper brothers, hammered together the hotel’s staircases before they went on to bigger carpentry projects, including the grand staircase aboard the ill-fated Titanic. Over the next century, the hotel rode ups and downs. It spent several years as a boarding house before Joyce’s brother, Gary Spivey, a professional psychic, spotted the house as Joyce sped him to the airport after one of his visits from California, where he rubbed elbows with the likes of Shirley MacLaine and Danielle Steele. For a couple of years, Gary, whose trademark is a snowy Afro, had been

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


P S T R AV E L E R

looking for an old house back home to transform into a B&B. He told Joyce to check out the gingerbread gem in Star. When she called him with the price, he made her repeat it. By California standards, the 6,000-square-foot hotel was a steal, so he snapped up the property in 2004, hired Joyce as his B&B manager, and spent four years directing an extreme makeover from afar. Joyce and Richard — who are just as folksy as Gary is flamboyant — had some time. She’d just left her job at a hosiery mill to take care of ailing relatives, and the hosiery plant where Richard had worked since high school years had just shuttered. Star’s fortunes were flagging, but things were picking up on Depot Street. Every once in a while, a tractor-trailer pulled up and disgorged a load of art and antiques that Gary had picked up somewhere. “He’d call and tell me what to do with it,” Joyce says. “He wanted to leave it old but make it elegant.” It was during this time that Joyce saw the ghost for the first time. She was ironing curtains by the dining room window when she felt someone watching her. She saw nothing, but the feeling dogged her. Joyce looked up again, and saw a woman standing across the room, near the fireplace. She wore a dark dress with a wrap-around collar. The woman didn’t look mad, or sad, or happy. She just looked at Joyce. And Joyce looked back. For some reason, Joyce wasn’t scared. She didn’t speak to the woman or approach her. The woman vanished. Joyce knew who she was. She recognized her from old photos that she and Richard had assembled to illustrate the B&B’s past. She was Deborah Leach, the first owner. Dark-haired, fair-eyed, doll-faced Deborah Leach, who died the day before Halloween in 1901, five years into her life as a professional hostess. She was 51. Deborah was at the hotel — she lived downstairs with her family — when she buckled. Was it an aneurysm? A hernia? Someone performed surgery on the kitchen table. Deborah died in the kitchen — or in the dining room, depending on who is telling the story, which has faded from wear through the generations. Her body was buried in a cemetery a couple of miles away. But Deborah’s spirit did not leave home. Joyce and her brother have seen her several times. Other people have, too. Once, Joyce’s friend Ruth Russell came over with her family and their accountant for a hot dog supper. The accountant got up from the dining room table and went to the kitchen for another hot dog. “Ummh,” he grunted when he got back. Joyce wondered if it was a comment on her hot dogs. A few minutes later, Ruth was on her way to the kitchen when she called out, “Come back! We’re in here!” When she returned, the accountant eyed her. “You seen her, too,” he said. Then came a cry. To Joyce and Ruth, it sounded like the coughing cry of a baby starting to fuss. They looked at each other and scanned the room. Had anyone else heard a baby cry? No. Joyce knows this sounds crazy. She sprinkles her stories with, “You’re going to think I’m nuts.” But this woman who keeps a Bible by the front door knows what she has seen and heard. The most interesting time Deborah appeared, she says, was when Joyce was working with her 15-year-old grandson in the kitchen. Deborah kept pointing at him. Joyce didn’t understand. Deborah crossed her hands over her chest. Then she pointed to a painting high on the kitchen wall. It depicted Madonna and child. That’s what makes Joyce think Deborah’s lingering has something to do with a child, maybe one lost in infancy. Joyce says her guests have never seen Deborah, but some have reported

strange happenings. Doorknobs turning. The sound of a straw broom whisking. Lights flickering. One guest said she was sitting on the bed when it felt like someone pushed her backward. Another guest told Joyce she heard the maid humming upstairs. “Here we go,” Joyce thought. “I ain’t got no maid.” Once in a while, guests come looking for Deborah, whom Gary Spivey advertises on the B&B’s website. A Maryland couple, who said they lived in a haunted house, were desperate to see her, but Deborah kept to herself. “You wouldn’t believe anybody so disappointed at not seeing a ghost,” says Richard, who has never seen Deborah and is perfectly fine with that. Most guests leave talking about the hospitality, not the ghost. Joyce asks people in advance what they want for breakfast, and she tries to accommodate them. I eat anything, so later that night I went to the Angus Leach Room looking forward to morning. I thought about leaving my door open, as I do at home. Call it a habit of motherhood. I want to hear if someone calls me. On second thought, I closed the door. And locked it. This ghost business was getting complicated. On one hand, a paranormal experience would be cool. On the other hand, I didn’t want to join the ghosts by being startled to the other side. I wondered if anyone had ever become a ghost after being scared to death by a ghost. Would the new ghost haunt the old ghost as revenge? Is that possible? Can a ghost read your mind? And what if you have a hole in your underwear — can a ghost see that? My head hurt with spiritual questions. I turned on the TV to relax. I flipped to Tennis Channel. If a ghost called my name, her moans would have to be louder than Maria Sharapova’s. Good luck with that one, dearly departed. I climbed into the comfy sleigh bed and fell asleep. I stirred only once, about 4 a.m. Was I imagining a scraping sound? Could it have been a passing car? I listened for a minute, heard nothing and fell back asleep. A few hours later, Joyce met me in the dining room with scrambled eggs, bacon, hash browns, toast, biscuits and tea. She and Richard sat down and regaled me with their innkeepers’ stories. They told about the Japanese guest whose breakfast order they forgot to take. Joyce played it safe and cooked the man a breakfast like mine. He ate it all. Later, someone called from the company he was visiting. He asked Joyce to back off the food. The guest didn’t want a heaping American breakfast, but he was too polite to say. “They said, ‘You liked to killed the little fella,’” Richard says. “We didn’t know it was his custom to eat everything set before him.” They recalled the kid who arrived by taxi, spoke with a foreign accent, carried only a backpack and spent several days holed up in a room with his computer. Joyce was suspicious, especially when the boy ordered salad for breakfast. Salad? What kind of anti-American order was that? Joyce rode up to the police station. They said to wait and see if he paid with cash. Well, the guy paid with a credit card, and later he sent them a postcard thanking them for their hospitality, so false terrorist alarm on that one. Richard and Joyce laughed at themselves easily. After breakfast, Joyce went to a community meeting, and Richard drove me around town. Out of curiosity, I asked him to stop at the cemetery, so we could see if Angus and Deborah Leach were buried near any young children. They weren’t. It didn’t matter. I left Star sure of one thing. The B&B contains at least two spirits, and they are the sweetest souls you’d ever want to meet. PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

75


STORY OF A HOUSE

Arnold Slept Here

Inhabitants have adapted Hale Cottage but cannot retrofit its history By DeBOraH SalOmOn • PHOTOGraPHS By JOHn GeSSner HiSTOric PHOTOGraPHS FrOm THe TUFTS arcHiVeS

R

ight about now, cottagers from Philadelphia and north would be streaming back to Pinehurst by rail and roadster. Mrs. G. M. Howard, Halifax, Nova Scotia, October, 1922: My old maid Nora McNeil is going to clean my house this fall before I come down. I wonder if you would give her some money — not more than $15. I’m just so anxious to get to Pinehurst again. That house was Hale Cottage, one of 38 built in 1895 by soda-fountain czar James Walker Tufts of Boston to accommodate middle-class families seeking a temperate climate and, for some, a “cure” for tuberculosis. Anna Goddard Shelander, Boston, 1897: It was on the suggestion of our family physician that we made the trip to Pinehurst. We returned refreshed and invigorated by the closer-than-usual contact with unspoiled nature and salubrious climate. Tufts’ business plan, carried out by son Leonard Tufts, was to rent the cottages for 10 percent of construction costs for at least 10 years, then sell to carefully screened buyers.

Smart plan. Hale Cottage, built for $1,850 and rented for $160 per season, was sold to the Howards in 1914 for $15,000. By then, Pinehurst was a happening place for golf. Howard, a bird hunter who took up the local sport, rightly called his purchase “my humble habitation.” A document listed only three rooms with no proper kitchen since winter folk, to encourage sociability, took meals at the Casino in town. Vegetation was scruffy, roads unpaved. But Hale — unlike the other cottages — bore a notable’s name: clergyman Dr. Edward Everett Hale, Tufts’ illustrious friend, author of Man Without a Country, chaplain to the U.S. Senate and Pinehurst’s first one-man chamber of commerce. It was Hale who persuaded Tufts to develop the uninhabited tract as a health resort. He writes, in The Christian Register, 1897: Such a person, if he would like to go there in any month from the first of October to the first of May will find almost anything he wants. He can live in an excellent hotel or a small apartment where he can bake his own potatoes in his own ashes. So happened this modest cottage which, unlike most of the

Hale Cottage in the foreground, still under construction, Laurel Cottage behind (torn down in 1934 for the Post Office), and the Casino building upper left.

76

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The parlor — one of three original rooms — retains a period feel. Furnishings of unknown origins came with the house.

Hale Cottage in the foreground, Laurel Cottage to the right.

Hale Cottage on the right, Plymouth Cottage on the left.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

77


surviving 32, has been enlarged, renovated, updated, reinvented — but never glamorized. In that sense, Hale may be more authentic than showplace cottages Craven and Concord.

o Oddly, Pinehurst cheerleader Hale preferred lodgings at The Holly Inn. Not Jack Nicklaus, Arnold Palmer or Dustin Hoffman, who have occupied the house located a few steps from après-golf action. Everybody who passes the dear-departed Pinehurst village post office sees “Hale Cottage, 1895” over the door. However, the exterior sends a message of change: a charming iron fence and gate … but all-weather siding. A classic wide porch with handsomely turned posts … and an aluminum storm door. Additions spring from the house in three directions, nearly obscuring the core. History goes sketchy here. “…they contemplate numerous improvements,” reads an announcement of the sale to the Howard family. A kitchen appeared to be one of them. According to inventories at the Tufts Archives dated 1906, the house had only an ice box in the back hall. The “front room,” or parlor, contained beds, as did the bedroom and “maid’s room.” However, historians note that servants were brought in by day, returned to what is now Taylortown by night. The Howards must have added a bathroom or two also; during the summer of 1922, a robbery was reported, with intruders entering through the “maid’s toilet room.” The house remained in the Howard family until 1944, when it was purchased by Robert Gouger, the owner of Yucca Cottage, who remodeled Hale as an investment. Aye, there’s the rub. The location — superb, but size was insufficient for rental income. Over the years, the house grew to include a step-down TV den off the living room with sliding glass doors opening onto a wood deck. A bathroom with skylight, now removed, was added to the front bedroom. The dining room, about twice the size of the parlor, was created from sleeping space. A bedroom wing with carpeted floors opens off the dining room. A modern eat-in kitchen containing a rare and stunning red Aga stove from England was in place when Tonia and Karman Goudarzi of Wilmington took a stroll through the village in the spring of 2001. “We stopped (at a real estate office) to look at pictures, with no intention of buying anything,” Tonia recalls. Larry DeMolet asked if they would like to see a few listings, including Hale Cottage. “We walked into the house and it felt like home. So we made a ridiculously low offer. It included furnishings because I didn’t have time to find any.” To their surprise, the offer was accepted. The Goudarzis built a master suite and back porch, remodeled bathrooms,

78

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Dining room, furnished in graceful antique reproductions, was originally sleeping space. Fireplace was covered during renovations but pine floors remain. Flowers and styling by Aldena Frye.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

79


Left: Cottages were built without kitchens. This one was added early on, and remodeled by current owners. Above: A British Aga stove not only cooks, but heats the kitchen. updated the kitchen, added wood floors to the den and split one large bedroom into two for the children, who were given free rein over decorating. Their son chose an electric blue Carolina Panthers theme with a satin bedspread, bobble-head players and a lamp made from a football helmet. A few old upholstered pieces and antique reproductions, as well as high ceilings, carved moldings, paneled doors and that Mayberry front porch whisper yesteryear. Tonia admires the Aga stove, which throws out welcome heat during winter months. “I don’t cook much; we usually eat out. Breakfast at the Villager Deli is a must. But we did sit on the front porch and read the stove manual.” Although the Goudarzis did not research Hale Cottage, Tonia has developed an awareness: “It’s a very comforting house. You feel its warmth. Maybe that’s because of the history. My husband is a surgeon; he sleeps so much better here, away from the chaos in Wilmington.” But what would James Tufts and Edward Everett Hale say to multiple flat-screen TVs, a wine fridge set into the dining room wall, tiled showers, recessed lighting and AC? Nods to modernity, and a mobile golfing culture. Amenities change. The pines, the soil, wildlife, climate and people do not. Hale, circa 1900: Every man should break the backbone of his work before noon and spend as much of the afternoon as possible in recreation. With or without advertising, the people who wanted that sort of thing, as dear Abe Lincoln said, found out that that sort of thing was here. PS

80

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

81


RWKHUÅŽQHH\HZHDU



ZZZPHWURVSHFVXV 60F3KHUVRQ&KXUFK5G 0F3KHUVRQ6TXDUH6XLWHLQ)D\HWWHYLOOH

82

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Earth and Sky

The Month Of Mums And Cider-Making

October, goes an ancient folk ditty, inherits summer’s hand-me-downs — the last of the sunflowers, a final blaze of asters and dahlias with cosmos at its peak. Goldenrod and chrysanthemums achieve their glory, too. Japanese anemones are spectacular October bloomers, perfect for cutting and using in wedding arrangements. That staccato sound you hear on the roof is likely to be black walnuts, pecans or persimmons reaching harvest stage. Before the first hard frost most varieties of apples are ready for picking. Owing to its even daytime temperatures and cool nights, October is considered the best month for making cider.

Gardener’s Bookshelf

“As the natural world prepares to shut up shop, the gardener may be inclined to do the same. But as most of us know, fall is the busiest season of the year. Where I live, it is also one of the pleasantest out of doors. The scent of burning leaves is, alas, no longer with us — burning trash is forbidden in the village. There are epiphanies to make up for that loss. Swans are on the increase in our marsh and on a misty autumn morning when I am hard at work, a wedge of them may fly overhead, so low that I hear the rustle of their pinions. Hummingbirds, too, visit at this time of year, pausing in their incredible flight to Central and South America...There is a feeling of suspense: When will the final curtain fall? Heavier dews presage the morning when the moisture will have turned into ice, glazing the shriveled dahlias and lima beans, and the annuals will be blasted beyond recall. These deaths are stingless. I wouldn’t want it otherwise. I gardened one year in a tropical country and found that eternal bloom led to ennui. Up here, I bury my bulbs in the same spirit the squirrel, my enemy, goes about his work. He will find the chestnuts he has hidden in the rose garden when he needs them (so will I when they sprout next spring), and my bulbs will come up in due course.” – from “Autumn,” Green Thoughts, A Writer in the Garden, by Eleanor Perenyi.

October’s moon is called the Hunter’s moon or Blood Moon because in old times, as days shortened and nights deepened, hunters anxious to improve their food stocks before the onset of winter used its feeble light to hunt by. As nights lengthen, a landmark feature of the northern sky early in the evening is the Great Square of Pegasus, the winged horse of Greek mythology, comprised of four bright stars first identified and named by astronomer and mathematician Ptolemy. Sometimes called the “Autumn Dipper,” ancient Babylonians believed its bowl revealed the doorway to heaven. Modern astronomers regard it as an ideal window into neighboring galaxies. Here on Earth, October’s darkening skies have long been considered heralds of strange doings. Two hundred years after the Battle of Agincourt, in 1599, William Shakespeare memorialized the day belonging to France’s St. Crispen — the patron saint of cobblers — with King Harry’s rousing speech to his outnumbered troops. “This story shall n’er go by/ From this day to the end of the world/ But we in it shall be remembered / We few, we happy few, we band of brothers...” St. Crispen’s Day is October 25. In America, October might be considered the real “month of presidents” because more were born in this month than any other — six in total (1735 — John Adams, 1822 — Rutherford B. Hayes; 1829 — Chester Arthur; 1858 — Theodore Roosevelt; 1890 — Dwight Eisenhower; 1924 — Jimmy Carter). Henry Ford introduced his revolutionary Model T Ford on October 1, 1908. The cult horror movie “Night of the Living Dead” had its world premiere in Pittsburgh on October 1, 1968. Disney World opened in Orlando, Fla., on the same day in 1971. Winnie the Pooh and Sony’s Walkman also debuted in October, 1926 and 1979 respectively, both on October 14, each becoming an icon of modern culture.

To Do List

Rake and aerate your lawn. Now’s a good time to conduct a soil test and apply lime or a light winter fertilizer. Prepare for spring by planting an array of bulbs as well as hardy annuals like pansies and snapdragons. Plan your spring garden to bloom in stages beginning with crocus and hyacinth, followed by daffodils and tulips. After first frost, collect seed from heirloom plants and self-seeding annuals. Now’s the time to dig up and divide clumps of certain perennials like hosta, daylilies, and many varieties of daisies. Following a hard second freeze, dig up tulip, dahlia and other annual bulbs, clean and store in cool dry place.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

83


HomeStyles


HomeStyles


Sunday

Monday

BEATLE WORKSHOP.

CHILDREN’S THEATRE AUDITIONS. The Tortoise Versus the Hare.

ART EXHIBIT FUN IN THE WOODS THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Mark Stuart..

CAROLINA PHILHARMONIC. 7 p.m. The Four Freshmen.

CONTINUING ED: Healthy Living Class.

HORSE FARM TOUR. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m

ARTour TO NEW ORLEANS. Spotlighting the Big Easy’s art, architecture, history and jazz. Jazz dinner cruise aboard the Steamboat Natchez with the Grammy-nominated Dukes of Dixieland.

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Dehlia Low. FUN IN THE WOODS: Old Growth Hike. 3 p.m.

CLASSICAL CONCERT SERIES. 8 p.m.

THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Joe. 6:46 p.m.

MID-ATLANTIC STAR PARTY. CONTINUING ED: Healthy Living Class.

HISTORY LECTURE: Princeton in the Sandhills. 2 p.m. FUN IN THE WOODS: Naturally Scary Stuff. 3 p.m. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Jon Shain Trio.

ART EXHIBIT.

SENIOR ACTIVITY: Halloween. 12 p.m.

Wednesday

Thursday

SWINGS FOR NATIONAL HOMES GOLF THEATRE LIVE IN HD: TOURNAMENT. 9 a.m. The Kitchen. CHILDREN’S STORY HARVEST THE TIME. 1:30 p.m. PROMISE BENEFIT.

CONTINUING ED: Healthy Living Class.

FUNINTHEWOODS: SANDHILLS Insects with Gall. PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 - 9 p.m. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Angel Band. ART EXHIBIT.

FUN IN THE WOODS: Fall Wildflowers. 3 p.m.

Tuesday

SENIOR ACTIVITY: Italian Heritage Month. 10:30 a.m. ART EXHIBIT.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 4 p.m. Justin Catanoso. FIRST FRIDAY. 5 - 8:30 p.m.

SHAKORI HILLS: Grassroots Festival.

OUR SAVIOR LUTHERAN CHURCH CONCERT SERIES: Paul and Sophia.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m.

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY: Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony. 8 p.m.

INTERNATIONAL SARDINE FESTIVAL. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m.

LONGLEAF GARDEN CLUB: Home for the Holidays.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Tanya Denckla Cobb.

GARDEN LECTURE: Growing Daylilies. 2 - 4 p.m.

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m.

MEET THE CULINARY AUTHOR. 5 p.m. John INSTRUCTION: Good Wukovits. Bites.

RUTH PAULY LECTURE SERIES: “Getting Immigration Right.” 7:30 p.m. LIVE THEATRE. Dial M for Murder. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. Serenade.

ART EXHIBIT.

ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION.

MEETTHEAUTHOR. 5:30p.m.Jeff Bramwell.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 4:30 p.m. Ellen Baker. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11: 45 a.m.

Friday

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. KIDS IN THE KITCHEN WORKSHOP. PINECREST CHORAL CONCERT. 7 p.m.

ART EXHIBIT.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISE-IN. BLUEGRASS IN THE PINES. QUILT SHOW. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. “Pieceful Garden Quilt Show”. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. PHOTO GALLERY & BENEFIT. 6 p.m. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m.


Saturday ABERDEEN FEAR FACTORY. ART EXHIBIT. Four Friends: Abstract to Realism. FUN IN THE WOODS: Bird Walk. CAMERON ANTIQUES FAIR. OUTDOOR MUSIC FEST. 4 - 8 p.m. SUNFLIX MOVIE: Sarah’s Key. 7:30 p.m. COOKING DEMO: Pumpkin & Gourds. WINE TASTING: Cabernet. 12 - 4 p.m. PINEHURST OKTOBERFEST. 2 - 7 p.m. SHAW HOUSE VINTAGE COLLECTIBLE & ANTIQUE FAIR. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Col. Bill Richardson and Kevin Maurer. FALL PLANT SALE. 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. CLEANUP SOUTHERN PINES. 9 a.m. SENIOR ACTIVITY: Fieldtrip to Harmony Hall. HOLLY ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL. MET OPERA IN HD: Donizetti’s Anna Bolena. COOKING DEMO & TASTING. COOKING DEMO: Autumn Cocktails. FALL-O-WEEN CARNIVAL. 3 - 5 p.m. FIRELIGHT TOURS AT TOWN CREEK. 7 - 9 p.m. ABERDEEN FEAR FACTORY. MILES FOR MIRA 5K. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Saturday Sampler. COOKING DEMO: Halloween Party. 12 & 2 p.m. MET OPERA IN HD: Mozart’s Don Giovanni. BOO AT THE ZOO. CHICKEN & DUMPLING DINNER.

Arts & Entertainment Calendar October 1 - 22

October 2

ABERDEEN FEAR FACTORY. 6:30 p.m. - Midnight (Thurs., Fri. & Sat.) Industrial strength horror at the old Doxey Furniture Building, 10570 Hwy 211 East, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-0908 or www.aberdeenfearfactory.com.

PINEHURST SPRINT TRIATHLON. 8 a.m. Race includes 750-meter swim, 18-mile bike and 5k run; USA Triathlon sanctioned race. Pinehurst Marina, Pinehurst. Information: www.setupevents.com.

October 1 - 28 ART EXHIBIT. Four Friends: Abstract to Realism. Featuring the works of artists Sharon Ferguson, Marilyn Vendemia and Laurie Deleot; their innate visual preferences as diverse as their artistic origins. Upwards of 80 pieces in oil, watercolor, acrylic and ink. Gallery Hours: Monday through Thursday from 7:45 a.m. until 9 p.m.; Friday from 7:45 a.m. until 5 p.m.; Saturday from 8:30 a.m. until 2 p.m. Hastings Gallery, Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College. Information: (910) 695-3819.

October 1 FUN IN THE WOODS: Bird Walk. 8 a.m. Bring binoculars and bug spray and join the Park Ranger on a 2-mile hike to look for southbound migratory birds. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. AUTUMNFEST & ROAD RACE. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. Arts and crafts, live entertainment, great food, fun rides, One-Mile Fun Run/ Walk, 5K Road Race, and more. Downtown Park, between Broad and Ashe Streets, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2463. CAMERON ANTIQUES FAIR. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Over 300 antique dealers and 13 shops display their antiques and collectibles along Main Street in the Historic District, Cameron. Rain or shine. Information: (910) 245-1185 or www.antiquesofcameron.com. WELLNESS WORKSHOP: A Holistic Approach to Breast Cancer. 10:30 a.m. - 12 p.m. Join Jessica Pateella, ND to discuss prevention, natural options and everyday things you use that are linked to breast cancer. Cost: $27. 100 Magnolia Rd, Suite 2230 in the Village of Pinehurst. Information: www.awarenesswellness.com. COOKING DEMO: Tea Party. 12 & 2 p.m. Sample exotic and refreshing varieties of tea from the Republic of Teas along with delicious accompaniments. Free. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Riesling. 12 - 4 p.m. Riesling, the first success in Washington State, remains the star, thriving in the cool, northern climate. Free. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. GOURMET PIZZA TASTING. 12 - 2 p.m. Includes tasting of Chicago pizza and homemade pretzels. Free and open to the public. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. OUTDOOR MUSIC FEST. 4 - 8 p.m. Music provided by young area musicians including Baxter Clement and his students; event follows AutumnFest. Tickets: $5/advance; $7/at door. Food provided by Hickory Tavern available for purchase. Proceeds benefit the Junior League of Moore County and their efforts to support women at risk in our communities. Corner of New York and Bennett Sts. Information: www.jlmcnc.org.

October 1 - 3 SUNFLIX MOVIE: Sarah’s Key. 7:30 p.m. (Sat. - Mon.); 2:30 p.m. (Sat. & Sun.) American journalist Julia Jarmond stumbles upon a family secret that forever links her to the destiny of a young Jewish girl named Sarah. The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.org. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

BEATLE WORKSHOP. 1 - 3 p.m. Featuring Mark Stuart and Spencer Bohran. The Rooster’s Wife, Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 9447502 or www.theroosterswife.org. ART EXHIBIT OPENING. 2 - 5 p.m. Escapes: City and Country Landscapes featuring the artwork of Tommy B. McDonell and Karen Walker. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. FUN IN THE WOODS: Birds, Blooms & Butterflies. 3 p.m. Join the Park Ranger for an exploration of autumn flowers and the creatures that visit them. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. OCTOBER STARTER HORSE TRIALS. NCDCTA recognized only. Free for spectators. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd., Raeford. Information: Carolina Horse Park at (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:46 p.m. Featuring Nashville guitarist Mark Stuart. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

October 3 CHILDREN’S THEATRE AUDITIONS. 3:30 - 5:30 p.m. The Tortoise Versus the Hare directed by the Missoula Children’s Theatre. Tentative location: Southern Pines Elementary School Auditorium. Free and open to children grades K-8; Must stay for entire 2-hour audition and have free schedule from Oct. 3-8 from 3:30 - 8 p.m.; No advance preparation necessary. Information: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org. APPLICATION DEADLINE: Regional Artist Project Grants. 5 p.m. Open to emerging and established artists who reside in Bladen, Brunswick, Columbus, Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, New Hanover, Pender, Richmond, Robeson, Sampson or Scotland counties. Applications available for download at www.theartscouncil. com/rapsgrant.php. Information: (910) 323-1776. CONTINUING ED: Healthy Living Class. Mondays, 1 - 3 p.m. Local author Jane McClaren shares ideas from her book Honest Eating. Van Dusen Hall, Sandhills Community College. Registration/Info: (910) 695-3980.

October 5 SWINGS FOR HOMES GOLF TOURNAMENT. 9 a.m. Pinehurst No.8. Speaking appearance by award-winning author James Dodson at the tournament. All proceeds go to Habitat for Humanity of the NC Sandhills to build safe, decent & affordable houses. Information: Habitat at (910) 295-1934 or rmartinez@sandhillshabitat.org CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. MEET THE AUTHOR. 5:30 p.m. Jeff Bramwell presents his beautifully photographed cookbook, Vinoburger, a vinous and culinary travelogue intended to provide the home chef and wine enthusiast with a fun and unique approach to learning about the world’s greatest wine regions. Recipes features ingredients authentic to each wine region, presented in the familiar, unpretentious

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

87


ca l e n da r form of America’s favorite food: the hamburger. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz. LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 - 1:30 p.m. Enjoy a complimentary lunch and goodie bag while learning all about hair removal at The Laser Institute of Pinehurst, 80 Aviemore Court, Suite A. Information: (910) 295-1130; pinehurstlaser.com.

October 6 NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD: The Kitchen. 2 & 7 p.m. Live from London, a blackly funny and furious examination of life lived at breakneck speed, when work threatens to define who we are. Featuring an ensemble of 30 people using real food and actors who are actually cooking and preparing food on stage. Directed by Bijan Sheibani. Tickets: $20. The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.org. GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Anne Holmes and Susan Brown, local interior designers, will conduct a design workshop. Bring your problems (with interior design) and these ladies will solve them on the spot. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. HARVEST THE PROMISE BENEFIT. 6 p.m. Silent and live auction featuring favorite dishes from area chefs and restaurants including The Bakehouse, Rhett’s Fratello’s and Nina’s. All proceeds benefit homeless children and their families in Moore County. Tickets: $50/person; $80/couple. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Rd., Pinehurst. Information: Susan at (910) 944-7149 or susan.familypromise@gmail.com.

October 6 - 9 SHAKORI HILLS: Grassroots Festival of Music &

Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

Dance. Featuring over 50 bands and performers on two big outdoor stages, a large dance tent and intimate cabaret tent, local crafts, delicious food, sustainability workshops and children’s activities. Located on 72 acres of beautiful farmland, 1439 Henderson Tanyard Rd., Silk Hope, NC. Tickets vary. Tickets/Information/ Schedule: www.shakorihillsgrassroots.org.

October 7 ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 6 - 8 p.m. Featuring works by the Pastel Society of NC. Exhibit on display through Oct. 28. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2787. MEET THE AUTHOR. 4 p.m. In the early twentieth century, Justin Catanoso’s Italian grandfather immigrated to America to escape poverty and hardship. When Catanoso learns in 2001 that Pope John Paul II has put his Italian cousin on the pathway to sainthood, he journeys to Italy to learn about the family his grandfather left behind in Calabria. The result: My Cousin the Saint: A Search for Faith, Family and Miracles. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz. FIRST FRIDAY. 5 - 8:30 p.m. A family-friendly community event featuring live music by Dangermuffin. Food & beverages available for purchase. The grassy knoll adjacent to the Sunrise Theater, Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: www.firstfridaysouthernpines.com. OUR SAVIOR LUTHERAN CHURCH CONCERT SERIES: Paul and Sophia. 7 p.m. A concert of traditional and contemporary piano and organ works performed by Paul Chandley and Sophia Pavlenko. Program includes Purvis, Bach, Mussorgsky and Rachmaninoff. Suggested donations: $10/adults; $5/students. Our Savior Lutheran Church, 1517 Luther Way, Southern Pines. Information: www.oslcsp.org.

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

October 7 - 8 AMERICAN CRAFT WEEK ON BUSBEE RD. The Potters of Busbee Rd. in Northern Moore County will be hosting several events in celebration of American Craft Week. On Oct. 7-8, Ben Owen Pottery will have a special wood kiln opening, wheel demonstrations by Ben and refreshments. On Oct. 8, demos will also be given by Busbee Rd. potters and blacksmiths at the Mill Creek Forge. Call for schedule. Busbee Road is located off Highway 705, halfway between Seagrove and Robbins. Information: (910) 464-3700. CHILDREN’S THEATRE PERFORMANCES. 7 p.m. The Tortoise Versus the Hare, featuring children grades K-8; directed by the Missoula Children’s Theatre. Tentative location: Southern Pines Elementary School Auditorium. Tickets: $5/ACMC members; $10/non-members. Information: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

October 8 COOKING DEMO: Pumpkin & Gourds. 12 & 2 p.m. Discover the easiest way to prepare these seasonal fruits. Free. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Cabernet. 12 - 4 p.m. These grapes grow between the Andes Mountains of Chile and the Pacific Ocean, producing exhilarating and enjoyable wines garnering respect and recognition around the world. Free. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. PINEHURST OKTOBERFEST. 2 - 7 p.m. A day of fun, food, and music featuring the Bavarian Brass Band (starting at 2:30 p.m.), interactive contests, games, and a children’s area with bouncers, face painting and more. A large tent with tables and chairs will be provided; lawn chairs and blankets also welcome. Free admission;

Sports

88 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r food and beverages available for purchase. The Village Arboretum, Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-0166. SHAW HOUSE VINTAGE COLLECTIBLE & ANTIQUE FAIR. 9 a.m. - 3 p.m. Food, live traditional music, guided tours of the three historic dwellings on the property, gifts and books about local and regional history, and a silent auction promise to make it a fun day for all the family. Held rain or shine; free admission. 110 Morganton Road and SW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2051 or www.moorehistory.com. MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Col. Bill Richardson and Kevin Maurer will discuss their book, Valleys of Death: A Memoir of the Korean War, a story of survival and determination during the first battle of the Cold War. From the battle at Unsan to his 34 months in captivity, enduring starvation, torture, sleep deprivation, and Chinese attempts at indoctrination, Col. Richardson never lost his defiance toward his captors, no matter how much they tried to break him. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

October 9 FUN IN THE WOODS: Insects with Gall. 3 p.m. When certain insects lay their eggs on plants, a growth called a gall is formed. Look for gall and any other mysterious natural objects along a 1.5-mile hike. Weymouth Woods Visitor Center, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Featuring powerful female vocal trio Angel Band. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org. CAROLINA PHILHARMONIC. 7 p.m. The Four Freshmen, a vocal harmony like no other. R.E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, Southern Pines. Tickets: $25/general; $50/reserved priority seating. Information: (910) 687-4746 or shop.carolinaphil.org.

October 10 SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 - 9 p.m. Print competition on the topic of “Vegetation” featuring “Optimized” and “Creative” classes. “Optimized” entries can be “as shot” or with post editing that does not alter the truth of the image. “Creative” category has no limitations on post processing. Guests welcome. Christ Fellowship Church, Midland & Pee Dee Rds., Southern Pines. Information: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

October 11 SENIOR ACTIVITY: Italian Heritage Month. 10:30 a.m. Senior Program Coordinator Rynet Oxendine will make her famous spaghetti. Lunch will be served at 11:30 a.m. Cost: $5/residents; $10/non-residents (includes salad, bread, pasta and drink). Sign up by Oct. 5. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376.

October 12 CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. GARDEN LECTURE: Growing Daylilies. 2 - 4 p.m. A presentation by Noble Westen, sponsored by the Sandhills Horticultural Soeiety and the Sandhills Council of Gardens Clubs. Free event. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College. Information/Reservations: Tricia Mabe at (910) 695-3882. Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

89


ca l e n da r MEET THE AUTHOR. 4:30 p.m. Ellen Baker with her latest novel, I Gave My Heart to Know This, and Keeping the House. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

October 13 NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY: Tchaikovsky’s Fifth Symphony. 8 p.m. Miguel Harth-Bedoya, conductor; Augustin Hadelich, violin. Program: Enrique Soro, Sibelius, Tchaikovsky. Robert E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, Southern Pines. Information/Tickets: NC Symphony Box Office at (877) 627-6724 or www.ncsymphony.org. LONGLEAF GARDEN CLUB: Home for the Holidays. 1 p.m. Four National Council Master Judges and members of Longleaf Garden Club will demonstrate their particular holiday theme of either autumn, Thanksgiving, Christmas or New Year’s Eve using flowers, mechanics, containers, and also color palette, scale and principles of design. Five floral designs will be available for raffle. Cider and light refreshments will be served. Tickets: $10 (available at The Country Bookshop, Southern Pines).The Village Chapel, 10 Azalea Rd., Pinehurst. Information: Barbara at (910) 246-6134.

October 14 INTERNATIONAL SARDINE FESTIVAL. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Join family, friends, neighbors, Town officials and staff for a lunch of sardines, crackers, colas and moonpies. Lake Aberdeen, US Hwy 1, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7275. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free and open to the public; reservations required. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. Tanya Denckla Cobb with her new book, Reclaiming Our Food: How the Grassroots Food Movement Is Changing the Way We Eat, a compilation of stories of people across America who are finding new ways to grow, process, and distribute food for their own communities. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

HOLLY ARTS AND CRAFTS FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. - 4 p.m. Featuring the talents of hand crafters in a variety of genres, from woodworking to glass, stitched art to lawn ornaments, hand-crafted jewelry to metal sculpture. Area restaurants and food vendors dot the gathering as downtown shops offer sales and specials. Held in the heart of Pinehurst’s Historic Old Town area. Free and open to the public. Information: (910) 295-7462.

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411.

CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Saturday Sampler. 12 - 1 p.m. Getting Saucy From Bechamel to Blancmange. Includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage. Cost: $20. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information/Reservations: (910) 986-2367.

October 15 FALL PLANT SALE. 8 a.m. - 12 p.m. Sandhills Horticultural Society & Student Horticultural Club Fall Plant Sale includes woody plants (azaleas, hollies, camellias), perennials, daffodils, pansies and spring flowering bulbs. Pre-order forms available at the Ball Visitors Center. Steed Hall, Sandhills Community College. Information: Tricia Mabe at (910) 695-3882. CLEANUP SOUTHERN PINES. 9 a.m. A cooperative effort to clean up the town. Gloves, vests and collections bags will be supplied; streets will be assigned. Meet at the shelter at the downtown park for hot coffee and refreshments. Rain date: Oct. 22. Information: Tom at (910) 692-7685. SENIOR ACTIVITY: Fieldtrip to Harmony Hall. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Travel to White Oak, NC to learn about (and see) the historic Harmony Hall, built by Colonel James A. Richardson in 1768. Meet at the Campbell House parking lot. Cost: $12/residents; $24/non-residents (includes transportation and ticket). Sign up by Oct. 5. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376.

COOKING DEMO: Fall Desserts. 12 & 2 p.m. Luscious desserts that highlight the beautiful fruits and flavors of the season. Free. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Vin de Pays. 12 - 4 p.m. A Mediterranean climate creates a lush, easy-going grenache, syrah, merlot blend from the south of France. Free. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. MET OPERA IN HD: Donizetti’s Anna Bolena. 1 p.m. An ill-fated queen driven insane by her unfaithful king. Starring Anna Netrebko (Anna Bolena), Ekaterina Gubanova (Jane Seymour) and Ildar Abdrazakov (Henry VIII). Marco Armiliato conducts. Duration: 4 hours, 15 min. Tickets: $25. The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.org.

October 16 HORSE FARM TOUR. 11 a.m. - 4 p.m A selfguided excursion to the beautiful horse farms of the Sandhills. Includes equine demonstrations; lunch available for purchase. All proceeds benefit Prancing Horse Therapeutic Riding Center. No pets, please. Tickets: $20/advance; $25/day of tour. Free admission for children under 12. Start at NCSU Equine Health Center, 6045 US HWY 1 North, Southern Pines. Tickets/Information: (910) 246-3202; prancinghorsecenter@yahoo.com; www.prancinghorsecenter.com. FUN IN THE WOODS: Fall Wildflowers. 3 p.m. Join the Park Ranger for a 1.5-mile hike to discover some of the colorful Fall wildflowers in bloom. Weymouth Woods Visitor Center, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE. 6:46 p.m. Featuring Asheville-based Americana/Bluegrass band Dehlia Low. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

October 17 - 21 ARTour TO NEW ORLEANS. Spotlighting the Big Easy’s art, architecture, history and jazz. Jazz dinner cruise aboard the Steamboat Natchez with the Grammy-nominated Dukes of Dixieland, a jazz brunch at Court of 2 Sisters Restaurant and tours of Longue Vue Mansion & Gardens, Oak Alley, Laura Plantation, and the French Quarter. Information/ Availability: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org.

“Bentley & Max”

October 18

Longhaird Dachshunds Graphite on Canson Paper

Pamela Powers January

FINE ART PORTRAITS OF PETS www.pamelapowersjanuary.com • 910.692.0505

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11: 45 a.m. The National Consensus of the Role of Federal Government in Education, and local redistricting results. Table on the Green, Midland Country Club. Reservations required by Oct. 14. Information/ Reservations: Charlotte Gallagher at (910) 944-9611. Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

90 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Good Bites. 6:30 - 7:45 p.m. High Tea Southern Style. Includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage/spirits. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information/Reservations: (910) 986-2367.

October 19 CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m.Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. MEET THE AUTHOR. 5 p.m. John Wukovits with his new book, Admiral “Bull” Halsey: The Life and Wars of the Navy’s Most Controversial Commander, the story of a great leader from the tragic aftermath of Pearl Harbor. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 6923211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

October 20 RUTH PAULY LECTURE SERIES: “Getting Immigration Right.” 7:30 p.m. Featuring speakers David Coates and Peter Siavelis. Coates is the Worrell Chair in Anglo-American Studies at Wake Forrest University where he has written extensively on contemporary political economy and US public policy. Siavelis is Associate Professor and Director of the Latin American and Latino Studies Program at Wake Forrest, publishing numerous articles on electoral and legislative politics. Talks are free and open to the public. No tickets are required. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Airport Road, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 245-3132. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:46 p.m. Featuring Mick McCauley and Winifred Horan of Solas, with their duet project, Serenade. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

October 20 - 23 HORSE SHOW: Autumn In the Pines. USEF “A” Hunter-Jumper Show. Carolina Horse Park, just off Hwy 211, between Aberdeen and Raeford. Information: Andrew Ellis at (910) 637-2958 or www.carolinahorsepark.com.

October 20 - November 6 LIVE THEATRE. Dial M for Murder. Motivated by resentment, jealousy and greed, Tony has devised a plan to have his wealthy wife Margot murdered. Temple Theatre, 120 Carthage St., Sanford. Tickets/ Information: (919) 774-4155 or www.templeshows.com.

October 21 CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free and open to the public; reservations required. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. SENIOR ACTIVITY: Bingo! 2 p.m. Game uses words rather than numbers; Autumn-themed. Light refreshments included. Bring a small gift for admission. Sign up by Oct. 18. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376. CLASSIC CAR & TRUCK CRUISE-IN. 5 - 8 p.m. Featuring door prizes, 50/50 drawing and music, weather permitting. Ledo Pizza, 1480 US Hwy 1 South, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 639-1494. BLUEGRASS IN THE PINES. 6:30 - 8 p.m. Featuring South Ridge Bluegrass Band. Bring a blanket or chair; concessions available for purchase. Free and open to the public. Downtown Park, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376 or www.southernpines.net/recreation. Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

91


Resale

Retail

ca l e n da r

October 21 - 22 QUILT SHOW. 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. The Hearts and Hands ECA Quilt Guild’s “Pieceful Garden Quilt Show” features over 100 quilts, vendor booths, door prizes, raffle baskets, raffle quilt, boutique with handmade items, silent auction quilted table runners and an antique quilt display. Lunch is available on site. Admission: $5 (free for children under 12). Dennis A. Wicker Civic Center, 1801 Nash St., Sanford. Information: heartsandhandsnc.org or info@heartsandhandsnc.org.

October 22 COOKING DEMO & TASTING. Featuring guest chef, Chocolatier Carole Huettig. Includes chocoloate making demo, instruction, tasting and facts about chocolate. Cost: 10. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information/Reservations: (910) 986-2367. COOKING DEMO: Autumn Cocktails. 12 & 2 p.m. Free. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. FALL-O-WEEN CARNIVAL. 3 - 5 p.m. Games, activities, Moon Bounce, face painting, prizes and more for children ages 10 and under. Children will be able to trick-or-treat in a safe and supervised environment with candy and prizes provided by the Aberdeen Parks and Recreation Department. Cost: $3/Aberdeen Residents; $5/Non-residents. Costumes encouraged. Aberdeen Lake Park, US Hwy 1, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7275. FIRELIGHT TOURS AT TOWN CREEK. 7 - 9 p.m. See Town Creek Indian Mound by moon and firelight as the Pee Dee Culture did over 800 years ago. Tours depart every 15 minutes from the Visitor Center. Town Creek Indian Mound, 509 Town Creek Mound Rd., Mount Gilead. Information: (910) 439-6802.

October 23 FUN IN THE WOODS: Old Growth Hike. 3 p.m. Bring water, sunscreen and bugspray and join for a 1-mile hike to meet the oldest known longleaf pine in the world (at 463-years old, this tree is also one of the largest longleaf pines in NC). Meet at the park visitor center for short carpool to the Boyd Tract. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:46 p.m. Featuring the all-Joe band, Joe. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

October 24 CLASSICAL CONCERT SERIES. 8 p.m. Featuring teen violinist Caroline Goulding, who has appeared as soloist with many of America’s best orchestras, debuted at Carnegie Hall, been featured on NBC, NPR, and PBS, won first prize in the 2009-10 Young Concert Artists International Auditions, and her debut recording received a Grammy nomination for Best Solo Instrumentalist (without orchestra). Sunrise Theater, Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2787.

October 24 - 30 MID-ATLANTIC STAR PARTY. A congenial gathering of astronomers, photographers, scientists, and other night owls. Convened in a Dark Park under Clear Skies for the purpose of Looking Up. Information: www.masp.us Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

92 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r

October 24 - 31 ABERDEEN FEAR FACTORY. 6:30 p.m. - Midnight. Industrial strength horror at the old Doxey Furniture Building, 10570 Hwy 211 East, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-0908 or www.aberdeenfearfactory.com.

October 26 CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 295-6022. KIDS IN THE KITCHEN WORKSHOP. Includes hands-on demo (2 hr), snack and etiquette lesson. Cost: $30. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information/Reservations: (910) 986-2367. PINECREST CHORAL CONCERT. 7 p.m. Featuring world-renowned conductor Eric Whitacre and singers from across the region. Pinecrest High School, R.E. Lee Auditorium. Tickets may be purchased from the Arts Council of Moore County, (910) 692-2787, or at Pinecrest High School. General Admission: $15/advance; $20/at door. Dress Circle: $25. Info: Erin Plisco at (910) 692-6554x7103.

October 28 CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Garden Delight. 12 p.m. Free and open to the public; reservations required. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 986-2367. PHOTO GALLERY & BENEFIT. 6 p.m. Photos of Nepal for sale to benefit Asha Nepal, a safe haven and education center for victims of human trafficking in Nepal and India. 195 Restaurant, 195 Bell St., Southern Pines. Information: asha. fundraiser@gmail.com or www.asha-nepal.org. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 - 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Information: (910) 369-0411.

October 29 MILES FOR MIRA 5K. Fun Run/Walk and costume competition. Race moves from downtown Southern Pines to Sandhills Community College (SCC) and Reservoir Park. Family fun from 8:30 a.m. until noon behind the Dempsey Student Center at SCC features live music, face painting, entertainment, coffee and pastries and chance to meet MIRA’s newest guide dogs. Information: www.milesformira.com. CULINARY INSTRUCTION: Saturday Sampler. 12 - 1 p.m. That Ole Black Magic, Creole Voodoo. Includes demo, recipe, tasting, beverage. Cost: $20. Green Gate Gourmet, 105 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Information/Reservations: (910) 986-2367. COOKING DEMO: Halloween Party. 12 & 2 p.m. Demonstration featuring tasty yet ghoulish treats. Free. Elliott’s Provision Company, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. WINE TASTING: Sauvignon Blanc. 12 - 4 p.m. Cloudy Bay is not the only great sauvignon blanc from Marlborough, New Zealand. Discover the crisp, herbal flavors unique to this region. Free. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Information: (910) 215-0775. MET OPERA IN HD: Mozart’s Don Giovanni. 1 p.m. Mariusz Kwiecien brings his youthful and sensual interpretation of Mozart’s timeless anti-hero to the Met for the first time. Michael Grandage directs; James Levine conducts. Duration: 4 hours. Tickets: $25. The Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.org. CHICKEN & DUMPLING DINNER. 5 - 8 p.m. Annual dinner and auction to benefit Jackson Springs Community Club’s Scholarship Fund. Cost: $7 (includes dessert). Community Club, 447 Mill Rd., Jackson Springs. Information: O’Neal Bennett at (910) 974-9406.

October 29 - 30 BOO AT THE ZOO. Featuring games, a costume contest, musical entertainment, mural painting, and all kinds of Halloween fun. This safe, daytime activity will be presented in the plaza areas of the zoo. Clowns and magicians will rove these areas entertaining visitors of all ages. NC Zoological Park, off Hwy 220, Asheboro. Information: (800) 488-0444.

October 30 HISTORY LECTURE: Princeton in the Sandhills. 2 p.m. Physician and musician Dr. Alexander McLeod will discuss the three families who planted the seeds that made small town Southern Pines more than just a winter resort, and led it to become the unique cultural oasis that it remains today. First Baptist Church. Information: (910) 692-2051 or www.moorehistory.com. FUN IN THE WOODS: Naturally Scary Stuff. 3 p.m. Folklore about plants and animals find their way into our imagination. Join the Park Ranger in the auditorium for an interesting program, followed by a short hike. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Rd., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-2167. THE ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:46 p.m. Featuring the Jon Shain Trio, bluegrass/blues. Dress for

Sports

Custom Homes • Renovation • Real Estate

910.295.2800

precisionbuildrealestate@gmail.com www.precisionhomes.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

93


ca l e n da r Halloween. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Information: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

October 31 SENIOR ACTIVITY: Halloween. 12 p.m. Make Halloween treats to eat; scary music and Halloween Bingo too. Cost: $2/residents; $4/non-residents. Sign up by Oct. 27. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Information: (910) 692-7376.

November 3 NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. 8 p.m. ¡España!, featuring Associate Conductor Sarah Hicks and Sein An, violinist. Robert E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School. Tickets/Information: (877) 6276724 or www.ncsymphony.org. Art Galleries Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Rd., Pinehurst, showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meet-the-artist opportunities are available. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., and Saturday, 1-4 p.m. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. Art Gallery at the Market Place, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst, features original art by local artists Joan Williams, Deane Billings, Jeanette Sheehan, Mike D’Andrea, Janet Burdick, Nancy Yanchus, and Cele Bryant. Meet one of the artists Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. (910) 215-5963. Artist Alley features juried art and fine crafts from local and regional artists, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077. Artists League of the Sandhills, located at 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon - 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines, is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and every third weekend of the month from 2-4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. The Gallery at Seven Lakes, a gallery dedicated to local artists. The Gallery is open on Wednesday and Thursday each week from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 1145 Seven Lakes Drive, The St. Mary Magdalen building. Just 9 miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211. Hastings Gallery is located in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are 7:45 a.m. - 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 7:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday; and 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst, features original artwork by local artists Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter, Mary Frey, Jean Frost, Sandy Scott and artist/owner Jane Casnellie. Open MondaySaturday 10:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www. hollyhocksartgallery.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Open Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines, showcases the arts and crafts of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday, Wednesday-Saturday. (910) 695-0029. Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

94 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Film

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


D

i n i n g

Gui

d e

New Expanded Menu!

Table on the Green Now pairing American Cuisine with the exotic tastes of Thailand

910-295-3240, 295-4118 Midland Country Club, Midland Road PUBLIC WELCOME www.tableonthegreen.com

Live Music & Entertainment Please call for info

Sunday Brunch Menu 10-2pm Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 Tues. - Sat. Dinner 5 - 9 Tues. - Sat. Closed Monday Reservations Suggested | Banquet Room Available Elegant Dining with Family Friendly Atmosphere PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

95


D

i n i n g

Gui

d e

Locally Grown and Operated 910.246.3510 140 E. New Hampshire Avenue Downtown Southern Pines Serving Dinner Tuesday-Sunday

www.ashtens.com

96 October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Dr., Aberdeen, is open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery.com.

Historical Sites

Studio 590, located in a historic log cabin, is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Studio 590 offers fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. Studio 590 is located by the pond in the Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle in Pinehurst South. (910) 639-9404. White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100. The Downtown Gallery (inside Flynne’s Coffee Bar) is located at 115 NE Broad St. in downtown Southern Pines. Ever-changing array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, located at 25 Chinquapin Road in Pinehurst, is featuring local artist Nancy Campbell. Original oil and watercolor paintings are on display inside the tea shop. Open Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www.ladybedfords.com.

Nature Centers Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve (898 acres). 1024 Ft. Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900. Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908. Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2-5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331. House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051. Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739. North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261. Shaw House Property. Open 1-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday. (910) 692-2051. Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642. Union Station. Open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin Open 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677 To add an event, send us an e-mail at pinestraw@thepilot. com by the first of the month prior to the event.

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

PineNeedler Answers It's all about "FALL From page 111

Solution:

T I M E

E V E N

C H A U N E V A L L E Y

A V I A T E

M O L D

P R E W A A R G E D R L I I V B E Y A N

2 1 4 9 5 6 8 7 3

7 8 5 3 1 2 6 4 9

Y E A Y R E L P L L E O D D H R I A P S P H O

9 3 6 7 8 4 1 2 5

P A L E D O B E S E P R A T E S V E R G E E E E S M O T A I A M N S A X O N T I E R E M A D A C L I S P L E O I L C T E L

8 6 7 1 4 9 5 3 2

1 9 3 5 2 8 4 6 7

4 5 2 6 7 3 9 8 1

3 4 1 8 9 7 2 5 6

C O P S I N E O R R E S U N E O N T C U O N M A

5 7 8 2 6 1 3 9 4

A U R O R A

T R E N D Y

I A R N S T O B E Y

N A S A

6 2 9 4 3 5 7 1 8

Sports

A NEW Meaning to FINE

DINING Urban flavors of the world presented on small plates

Where wine and food come together under one roof… Come find your favorite pair.

Open Tues-Sat. Lunch 11:30-2:30 Dinner 5-close Reservations Recommended

290 W. Pennsylvania Ave. 910-725-1910

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

97


&HOHEUDWHWKH6HDVRQ

FirstHealth Moore Regional Hospital Auxiliary cordially invites you to the

+ROLGD\ %DOO Saturday, December 10, 2011 Carolina Hotel Cocktails, Dinner and Dancing 7:00 pm For ticket information and sponsorships, please call: 910.695.7510 Proceeds from the Holiday Ball will support the FirstHealth Dental Care Centers.

0RRUH5HJLRQDO+ RVSLWDO$X[LOLDU\ FHOHEUDWLQJ\HDUVRIVHUYLFHWRRXUFRPPXQLW\ 98

DoctorsVisionCenter

ÂŽ

For a lifetime of seeing and looking your best.

L. Kennedy Bumgarner, O.D. Wm. Scott Athans, O.D. Michele P. Keel, O.D. Ralph M. Hendrix, O.D. Professional Care Treatment and management of eye disease Eye injury and emergency services Comprehensive eye exams for all ages Contact Lens Specialists Complete Optical Services Licensed opticians Jane Mills and John Hildebrand Newest eyeglasses and lens technology

Introducing new eyewear from Tom Ford and Swarovski! Designer Eyewear & Sunwear from Armani, Jimmy Choo, Gucci, Fendi, Calvin Klein, Marc Jacobs, Michael Kors, Hugo Boss, Oakley & many others

(910) 692-3937 160 Fox Hollow Road, Pinehurst (beside Turnberry Wood)

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Moore County Literacy Council Wine Tasting August 9, 2011 Photographs by Lisa Sauder

Pat Counter and Susan Sherard

Loretta Jacobson, Paul Jacobson, and Cynthia Pizzini

Erin and Trey Yelverton

Sharon and Peter Russell

Laurel Holden and Hill Galland

Sam and Rita Jordan and Carol Sparks and Pat Counter

Marian and Tim Maroney

Sandy and Bob Rudolph

Jeanie and Rick Riordan and Bill and Donna May

Susan Bellew, Laurie Holden, and Sarah Green



Dr. Skladany’s State-of-the-art cosmetic dentistry includes: • Digital X-Rays with 3D Panoramic Views • CEREC Single Visit Crowns & Onlays • Implant Cosmetics • Veneers & Bridgework • Partials & Dentures

:LWK)LGHOLW\$QG'LVSDWFK

6WURQJ3ULFHV5HDOL]HGLQ -XQH

1&3DLQW'HFRUDWHG%ODQNHW&KHVW 

$XFWLRQ (VWDWH6HWWOHPHQW DQG$SSUDLVDO6HUYLFHV

Preventive & Restorative Care For All Ages

910-215-4554

10 Memorial Dr. • Pinehurst (across from Pinehurst Trace)

,QGR3HUVLDQ.XODK.KXG +HOPHWZLWK6KLHOG 1&)/

WKFHQWXU\&KLQHVH&ORLVRQQH 6FKRODU6HW

7HOHSKRQH 

&RUQHUVWRQH&W+LOOVERURXJK1&

::://$8&7,216&20 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

October 2011

99


100

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Denny and Cathy DiDonato & John and Kathy Snyder

SandhillSeen Sandhills Children Center Bocce Ball Tournament at the Harness Track August 20, 2011 Photographs by Lisa Sauder

Maria, Julia, Bill, and Mollie Pate Dave Williamson, John Madden, Amanda Duffy, Steve Dahl

Susan and Brent Holmes

Sherry Page, Melissa Page, and Colleen Shaw

Karen Goudy, Susie Boals, and Karla Ceraso

Kimberly Daniels, Kristen Clark, Ginny Kelly, Kathryn Galloway

CUTLER TREE

Tree Pruning • Removal Plant Site Consulting Stump Grinding • Shrub Care Tree Conservation for New Home Sites Free Estimates Geoffrey Cutler Fully Insured 910-692-7769 910-690-7657

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

101


102

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Emily Balogh, Brian Karn and Karl Balogh

SandhillSeen Polocrosse - Pinehurst Harness Track September 18, 2011 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Chuck Younger

Wade, Crawford and Kate Liner Megan Waggener, Jessa Russell and Jamie Lee

Carolina vs. Sugarloaf

Mary Campbell Katie Mintz and Andrew Diemer

Paige Vallee

Carolina vs. Orange County John Cook and Liz Hartwell

Ryan Murphy, Erica Valley and Sarah Ferebe

Corn Craze Maze Corn Maze & Pumpkin Patch OPEN: October 2nd - 31st

Fridays: 6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m. Saturdays: 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m. Sundays: 2:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m. Weekdays by Appointment for Groups

Ages 13 and up: $8.00 • Ages 3-12: $6.00 Age 3 and under: Free Hayrides: $5.00 per person Package (Maze and Hayride): $12.00 School & Church Groups Welcome $10.00 per person (group=10 or more • Hayride included)

Located behind Kalawi Farm & Ben’s Ice Cream in Eagle Springs on Highway 211 Call 673-1470 for more information PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011 103


Subscribe today and have PineStraw delivered to your mail box!

$35/ yr • In State

$45/ yr • Out of State

NAME ADDRESS CITY

STATE

ZIP

PHONE

E-MAIL ADDRESS

PAYMENT ENCLOSED

BILL ME LATER

3 ways to subscribe Fill out and return Call 910.693.2490 or E-mail dstark@thepilot.com

104

M A G A Z I N E

P.O. BOX 58 Southern Pines, NC 28388

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Moore County Kennel Club of NC Pinehurst Harness Track - September 17-18, 2011 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Karen Wynn, Katherine Settle and Allen & Kelly Willard

Lisa Shrank, Karolynne McAteer, Beth Dowd, Jane Forsyth, Terry & Charlie Cook and Steve Watson

Ryker Michaela Duke and Miranda

Mimi Hodges and Graham Phallon

Lisa Weaver and Tucker

Phillop Martin and Doll

Ken Norkett and Eve

Mike McKarney, Linda McKarney and Lisa Schrank

Winston-Salem author, photographer, and attorney takes the reader on an undersea journey of the most rare living shells in the world.

IP VY HOUSE G UBLISHING

ROUP

%FTJHOFEBOE)BOEDSBGUFEXJUI'JOF%JBNPOETBOE(FNTUPOFTJO1SFDJPVT.FUBMT

+FXFMTPG1JOFIVSTUÂ….BSLFU4RVBSF 1JOFIVSTU /$Â…Â…4JODF JOPPineStrawAd5.indd 1

8/9/11 9:02:56 AM

Customized publishing solutions for the discerning author.

NEED PROPANE FOR HOME, BUSINESS, OR THE FARM? WE HAVE YOU COVERED.

Complimentary Manuscript Evaluation All Genres (manuscript must be complete)

We value, support, promote, appreciate North Carolina authors.

Amanda Faber Publishing Coordinator 5122 Bur Oak Circle Raleigh, NC 27612 phone: 919.782.0281 toll free: 800.948.2786 www.ivyhousebooks.com

Demand more from your propane company. We have the PRICE YOU WANT with the GREAT SERVICE YOU DESERVE. U Home heating U Forklift cylinders

U Autogas U Blue Rhino tank exchange

CALL US TODAY AND LEARN MORE ABOUT HOW WE CAN MEET YOUR PROPANE NEEDS.

800-672-4342

Certain restrictions apply. Minimum fill may be required. MK-17047

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

105


PineServices

    

  

  

Yes, WE’RE LENDING

            

Ginny Webb

Mortgage Loan Specialist NMLS# 69833 SOUTHERN PINES 205 SE Broad Street 910-692-6222 Ž

Call us today!

www.FirstBancorp.com 866-792-4357 Member FDIC

Equal Housing Lender

         

   

 !"#$ %& %$'$

()*%+ ##,!#)-./+##0!#& 123-4(55$67)6/ $%&$38,9&!$&+,$#',

  

       

              ! " #!  $ %  #   

  

$

          


T h o u g h ts f r o m T h e Ma n S h e d

Dear Mom A letter from your puppy with the blue collar

By Geoff Cutler

Dear Mom,

I wanted to write you to tell you not to worry about me. I love my new family, except for the three gray cats. No matter what I do, chase them, bark at them, they just won’t play with me. I don’t know why. That day my new parents came for me, and I was running around our living room floor with the red-and-green-collar puppies, I was having so much fun. And then my new mom picked me up and took me away from you and the rest of my family. I was so scared and I cried in the car. They took me a long way away and finally to a new house, which is where I live now. I started to sniff around, and that’s when I saw one of the gray cats for the first time. I thought it wanted to play with me so I went over to say hi, and it swatted me in the face with a claw. I yelped loudly and ran for the corner of the room. I thought there might be another dog for me to play with because I could smell her. Once the cats were put outside, I put my nose to the floor and went to see if I could find her. Maybe she would be nice to me. I looked in every room, but no dog. Then I saw some pictures of her. She looked just like me, only not black. She was a reddish color like my two sisters back at our house. Then I found her collar. It was tacked to the side of a table above the bed where I sleep. I sniffed the collar. It belonged to her, all right. I don’t think she is around anymore, and something tells me she is never coming back. It’s OK, though, because like I said, I love my new family, and we have a lot of fun all the time. Every day my new dad takes me with him in his truck. My parents get up early in the morning, and my mom feeds me and the cats. I have to go outside when they eat their food, and then I come in and eat my food. While I eat, I watch my dad, and then I follow him everywhere and step on his toes. I don’t want him to leave without me. He almost never does, and he rolls the windows down in his truck, and I stick my head out into the wind, and off we go down the road. I love riding in the truck more than anything, and my new mom packs water and treats for me to eat and drink. Dad goes somewhere new every day with other men in other trucks. They cut trees and bushes. The tools make a lot of noise, but I’m getting used to it. When he lets me out, I run

around and sometimes there are other dogs to play with. The smells of dogs and cats are everywhere. I smell everything. When I come home, I am so tired I just fall down and go to sleep. I sleep on spots in the floor where cold air comes out. One day, a boy and a girl came to our house. I think they are my new brother and sister. The girl is so pretty, and she hugs me and kisses me, and she goes running and she takes me with her. The boy looks just like my dad, and he takes me outside and plays ball with me in the yard. I wrestle with him, and we fall down and I jump on him and lick him all over. Then they are gone again. Then they come back. Then they go. They don’t stay with me all the time like my mom and dad do, and those three gray cats. My new brother and sister have gone again now. Sometimes, my new mom takes me to this place. There are a lot of people there and many dogs and cats. Every time I go there, they pick me up and put me on this cold table. And then, somebody I do not know grabs my tail, and looks in my ears and my mouth, and then they jab me with something sharp. It hurts a little, but what really gets me is I start to pee all over the table, and I get embarrassed. It’s not just at this place that that happens, either. I just don’t get it, but every time I see one of my new family, or someone that is nice to me, I pee. No matter what I do, it just happens. Mom, will I do that always, or will that stop some day? I hope it stops. That’s about all I have to tell you except one more thing. When I was with you and my brothers and sisters, I never wanted to leave. Not ever. Now, I never want to ever leave my new family. At night time, when I go to sleep, I sleep right next to my new mom, and during the night she reaches down and rubs my stomach. I feel like I am right next to you again. That should tell you not to ever worry about me, and so when you think of me, please know I am very happy. Oh! Just one more thing. They don’t call me blue-collar puppy anymore like you did. They call me Wyatt. Love, Wyatt (your blue collar puppy) PS Geoff Cutler is owner of Cutler Tree LLC in Southern Pines. He is a regular contributor to both The Pilot and PineStraw. He can be reached at geoffcutler@ embarqmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

107


   Fayetteville


Libra

(Sept . 24 - Oct . 23) well glory be! I’d sooner swish fish oil than be in your shoes this month . Although addressing an issue in the love department sounds about as appealing as a plunk in the head from a falling chestnut, buck up, Bumpkin . for better or worse, you’re fixing to find yourself in a situation that’s hairier than second-hand skivvies . On the 11th, a wealth of opportunity awaits if you’re up for the plunge . If not, create your own happiness on the 21st when neptune has you feeling sharper than blade of Bluegrass . And when life deals you lemons on the 25th, for Pete’s sake, Sweet Cheeks, fold!

g

Scorpio (Oct. 24 - Nov. 22)

h

That’s not rotten squash you smell, Sugar. It’s change, and it’s heading your way faster than wild grass through a woodchuck. Grab life by the horns on the 13th when Saturn throws you more ups and downs than Mama’s favorite soap opera. When temptation as welcome as a skunk at a lawn party beckons on the 22nd, avoid it like the plague! They always say ye who never makes mistakes never makes discoveries. Scratch that notion, Pumpkin Face.

i

Sagittarius (Nov. 23 - Dec. 21)

Well if this don’t beat a goose a-pecking! You don’t have to stop being yourself for people to think you’re the berries, Child. Course, it wouldn’t kill you to eat a little humble pie, neither. On the 11th, the full moon will have you feeling sweeter than Mama’s apple bonbons just as sure as a cat has climbing gear. Use that hunk of energy to help others, Hon, particularly in the middle of the month when someone right near cooks your goose.

Capricorn (Dec. 22 - Jan. 20)

l

Put your tray table up, things are fixing to plumb take off! When Jupiter has your aspirations higher than a Carolina pine on the 5th, don’t bite off more than you can chew — you remember what happened last time you tried to pull that stunt, Sweetheart. On the 13th, things could get sloppier than grandma’s kisses if you let them. Let sleeping dogs lie and keep your eye on the prize. And when Mars has you feeling tougher than a two-dollar steak, well, I recommend you take full-fledged advantage.

m

Aquarius (Jan. 21 - Feb. 19)

I declare. You may be a sweet-talking thing, but you’re right near as full of wind as a corn-eating horse. A slip of the tongue on the 3rd will have you busy as a stump-tailed cow at fly time trying to cover up your keister. (I’ll let you jerk yourself out of that knot, Hon.) By the 11th, your head’s liable to feel foggier than a batch of Blue Ridge cider. Don’t sweat it, Neptune will slap you back to reality faster than you can say Bob’s your uncle. Never you mind about that.

n

Pisces (Feb. 20 - March 20)

Well, dog my cats. Jupiter just may give you the nudge you need to do a little soul searching, Sweet Pea. A word from the wise: Open your mind and shut your pie hole. Oh, and when it comes to affairs of the spirit, yours could use a little seasoning. Just don’t eat your supper before you say grace. On the 25th, reality may be tougher to stomach that Grandpa Harry’s meatballs. You’ll muster up the strength to soldier on, no doubt. What you lose on the swings you can gain on the roundabouts.

Aries (March 21 - April 20)

a

For the love of pickled pigs feet, Child, Jupiter has you feeling friskier than two teens in the backseat of Mama’s Monte Carlo! Keep in mind: Loose lips sink ships. On the 11th, you’ll have to meet someone in the middle before either one of you can move forward — once you do, you’ll be more productive than a pair of Siamese rabbits after the oyster special. Save some of that gusto for the 26th when Venus plumb peppers up your gumbo.

Taurus (April 21 - May 21)

b

Well I’ll be John Brown! With a to-do list bigger than Charlie Sheen’s slush fund, don’t be afraid to ask for a little help once in a cotton-picking while. (Your calendar needs a colonic cleanse just about as badly as I do!) On the 6th, prepare yourself for a situation that’s stickier than salted licorice. Just remember: If you chase two rabbits, you won’t catch one. Oh, and with the grace of the new moon on the 23rd, you’ll discover that an old concern of yours isn’t worth a wet whistle anymore. It’s always darkest just before the dawn.

Gemini (May 22 - June 21)

c

Hot-ma Gandhi! With the full moon on the 11th, your social life is fixing to be in more jeopardy than Alex Trebek’s mustache to a pair of anvil pruners. Take advice from someone you respect on the 17th, even if truth’s a bitter pill to swallow. Oh, and keep your words soft and sweet this month, Baby Cake — you’ll be eating them on the 23rd if you’re not careful. You’ll catch more flies with honey than with vinegar.

d

Cancer (June 22 - July 23)

As my Uncle Foote used to say, snakes hang thick from a cypress tree like sausage on a smokehouse wall. You know what that means better than anyone. Although you’ll feel as disconnected as a hambone to split pea soup in the beginning of the month, hang tight for Neptune’s grace on the 21st when you’re able to start drawing blueprints for a brighter future. A getaway on the 28th will help hoist you out of the doldrums, just don’t forget your wits while you’re gone. By hook or by crook, leave the past for the wolves and soldier on, Beanstalk!

Leo (July 23 - Aug. 23)

e

Lordy be. Darned if you couldn’t right near talk the hind leg off a dog. With Mars motivating you on the 11th, for Pete’s sake, Child, scratch what’s been itching you and make a move that’s more anticipated than the next movie in that dishy vampire saga. Trust me, Sugar Lump; with the grace of Neptune on the 21st, life will be spicier than grandma’s eggplant curry! Of course, happiness usually comes at a cost. Let the chips fall where they may.

Virgo (Aug. 24 - Sept. 23)

f

Bless your weary soul, the hits just keep on coming, Pumpkin. Don’t expect your imagination to save you from reality on the 6th, Sweetheart. I swan, that brain of yours is funnier than a fart in church. When Saturn tries to lead you astray on the 8th, think before you leap for once; otherwise, prepare yourself for a conflict as useful as a negligee on a wedding night. Like it or not, it’s time to wake up and smell the pork rinds, Sugar. You ain’t the only one with problems bigger than Barbra Streisand’s sneezer. PS

Astrid Stellanova, 58, owned and operated Curl Up and Dye Beauty Salon in Windblow, NC, for many years until arthritic fingers and her popular astrological readings opened up a new career path. Feel free to contact Astrid for insights on your personal stars or hair advice for any occasion at astridstellanova@rocketmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

109


Sanford 


OctoberIt's PineNeedler It’s All About Fall! all about "FALL" 1

2

3

4

13

5 14

17 20

30

19 22

26

35 38

47

48

54

55

60

61

64

65

67

68

www.CrosswordWeaver.com

1ACROSS Thermometer FALL 5 Got white, from fright Thermometer FALL 101 Feline 5 Got white, from fright 13 Piano key substance 10 Feline 15 Fat 13 Piano key substance 16 Possessive pronoun 15 Fat 17 Possessive pronoun 16 Disturbance 18 Disturbance 17 Blabber 19 (prefix) Blabber 18 Before 20 Upright 19 Before (prefix) 22 Upright 20 Adaptation 22 IsAdaptation 24 Is 24 “Golly” 25 "Golly" 25 Geek 26 Geek as a steak 26 27 Blacken, Blacken, as a steak 27 30 Dregs 30 Dregs 32 Snake-like eel 32 Snake-like eel 33 Back to school mo. 33 Back to school mo. 34 Story line 34 Story line 35 Atmosphere 35 Atmosphere 36 Pine“FALL” "FALL" 36 Pine 38 Memory loss loss 38 Memory 42 Pole 43 Neuron end 44 Pot

1 8

40

41

58

59

44 49

51

ACROSS

39

43

50

12

32

37

46

11

23

31

42 45

10

18

34

36

9

25

29

33

8

16

21

28

7

15

24 27

6

52

53

56

57

62

63 66 69

42 Pole Legitimate 45Neuron 43 end Cake level 48 44 Pot Bird's home 49Legitimate 45 50 Tel __ (Israel's capital) 48 Cake level 51 Dress edge 49 Bird’s home 52 Flurry 50 Tel __ (Israel’s capital) 54 African country, west coast 51 Dress edge 56 President Bill___ 52 Repose 60Flurry 54 country, west coast Fruit tree "FALL" 61African 56 President Bill___ 63 Self contained underwater 60 Repose breathing apparatus 61 tree “FALL” Terminal abbr. 64Fruit Rotcontained underwater 65Self 63 "FALL" 66 Pine Tree breathing apparatus Japanese money 67Terminal 64 abbr. Carolina, Magnolia, or Pine 68Rot 65 Needles, ie 66 Pine Tree “FALL” 69 Tropical bird 67 Japanese money 68 Carolina, Magnolia, or Pine DOWN Needles, e.g. 691Tropical What a bird clock tells

1 4 3

2 3 4 5

Level Fungus Before the battle What toast does, with "up"

7 3 2 9 3 5 6 8 2 5 8 6 8 1 4 9 7 4 2 5 9 4 3 2 7 1

6 Abridged (abbr.) DOWN

trees "Fall" 7 Hardwood 1 What a clock tells 8 Sugar-free brand 2 Level 9 Elk's cousin 3 Fungus 10 Xerox 4 Before the battle 11 Dawn 5 What toast does, with “up” 12 Voguish 6 Abridged (abbr.) 14 365 days 7 21 Hardwood trees “Fall” Shouted 8 23 Sugar-free brand Saw logs 9 25 Elk’sGrasp cousin 1027Xerox Metal container 1128Dawn Tint Ripen 1229Voguish Goddess 1431365 days of dawn Vikings home, abv. 2132Shouted Trudge 2334Saw logs Not moral nor immoral 35 25 Grasp Use a range in Pinehurst? 2737Metal container 38 Wood chopper 28 Tint 39 Take to court 29 Ripen 40 April 15th Agcy. 3141Goddess of dawn Picnic pest 3243Vikings home, abbr. Point 3445Trudge Dale 3546Not Flymoral nor immoral 3747Use a range in Pinehurst? Recent rebel in the news 3848Wood chopper Afternoon drink need Petty officer. ie 3949Take to court "Hungry 4051April 15th __" agcy.(children's game) Phonograph record 4153Picnic pest Skin affliction 55 43 Point Jail room 4556Dale 57 Sandwich fish 46 Fly 58 Comply 47 Recent rebel in the news 59 Space admin. 4862Afternoon drink need Tell a tall tale 49 Petty officer, e.g. 51 “Hungry __” (children’s game) 53 Phonograph record 55 Skin affliction 56 Jail room 57 Sandwich fish 58 Comply 59 Space admin. 62 Tell a tall tale

6

Sudoku: Fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3x3 box contain the numbers 1-9. Puzzle answers on page 97

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . October 2011

111


so u t h w o r d s

Rare October Let’s all go out and drink it in

By Steve Bouser

When poet James

Russell Lowell wrote, “Then, if ever, come perfect days,” he was talking about June.

I beg to differ. If there are such things as perfect days, they must be very much like those we have been blessed with recently. June is fine. But give me that crisp, gentle, lovely feel in the air just now. That flawless china-blue sky. That delicate way the sun slants just so. And over it all, that nameless poignancy that tugs at the heart and seems to say: Enjoy, enjoy. It’s later than you think. You can’t quite put your finger on this sub-season, when the days are warm and the nights are cool, and both furnaces and air conditioners stand idle. It’s not exactly fall, since nothing much is falling yet in the way of leaves. Most of your mainstream trees — oaks, hickories and such — have scarcely begun turning as yet. But the avant-garde dogwoods have gone to the backs of their closets and begun trying on their maroons and their plums and their exquisitely subtle bronzes — accessorizing them with shiny and faintly silly little beads of bright red, the “dogberries” after which Shakespeare named one of his comic characters. If seasons were desserts, this particular fleeting time of year would be a deep-dish apple pie set on a sun-dappled windowsill to cool. The intense heat of the oven is now but a memory. The crust has mellowed to perfection. The sugars and tart juices have had time to mingle at their leisure and suffuse the whole with their succulent magic. The calls of birds and the chattering of insects are somehow different now — more subdued, more contemplative. The bluejay’s scolding buzz, formerly so shrill and purposeful, is now more of an afterthought that sounds lazy and distracted, as if his heart just weren’t in it. Even the ditzy

mockingbird, the most manic of the guests at summer’s long party, has sobered up and begun looking around for his things. The leggy roses in our backyard, their year’s work mostly done, seem to welcome their current state of benign neglect. From a hanging pot, an exhausted geranium with nothing more to prove tosses off a single pink blossom at a careless angle. Only the late-blooming chrysanthemums, shouting out in their lavenders and oranges and buttercup-yellows from every supermarket sidewalk, have saved their best for last. In trying to describe this indescribable moment in the Earth’s waltz around the sun, one is tempted to reach for the phrase “Indian summer.” Technically, however, you can’t wear the Indian summer campaign ribbon on your uniform unless you have first been through the battle of the first hard frost. We can’t show off that decoration quite yet because we haven’t earned it. What we have here, indeed, is a priceless gift just dropped undeservedly in our lap. Maybe that’s why we sometimes take it for granted. If glorious days like these were available only in the South of France or on the western slopes of the Andes, jet-setters would plan their vacations around them. But they come our way free of charge right here at home, so we tend to give them more than a passing appreciative glance on our way to and from work. Or to indulge ourselves in a momentary wave of nostalgia when our noses catch a tantalizing whiff of some indefinable something through the car window. We should go out and drink it all in instead, shouldn’t we — as if this spell of wondrously soft October weather were going to be the last we would ever be allowed to experience. We should be bottling these days up in our memory, like dandelion wine to be savored in winter’s long night. PS Steve Bouser is editor of The Pilot, in which this column originally appeared in October 1999. Illustration by Pamela Powers January

112

October 2011 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Profile for PineStraw Magazine

October PineStraw 2011  

October PineStraw 2011  

Advertisement