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March 2012 Volume 7, No . 3

DEPARTMENTS

7 Sweet Tea Chronicles 10 15 17 19 23 25 27

Jim Dodson

PinePitch Cos and Effect Cos Barnes Poetry Ashley Wahl The Omnivorous Reader Stephen E. Smith

Bookshelf Hitting Home Dale Nixon

Vine Wisdom Robyn James

29

The Kitchen Garden

33 37

Serial Eater David C. Bailey Out of the Blue

39 41 112 121 127 128

Jan Leitschuh

Deborah Salomon

Birdwatch

Susan Campbell

The Sporting Life

Tom Bryant

Calendar SandhillSeen PineNeedler

Mart Dickerson

SouthWords

Laura Feder

FEATURES

45 The Passing Moment Photograph By John Gessner

46 Bonus Book Excerpt:

American Trumvirate By Jim Dodson

52 The Soul of a Caddie By Lee Pace

A tribute to Pinehurst loopers

56 The Pharoahs of the Fairways A photo tribute by Tim Sayer

62 A Caddie’s Life By Tom Constantine

This kid’s first job was still the best

64 Sod Story By David C. Bailey

In more ways than one, there is green in those fields

68 The House That Art Built By Deborah Salomon

Gallery owner Judy Broadhurst lives the artistic life

78 February Almanac By Noah Salt

Signs of spring

81 Palustris Festival Events and Calendar of Events

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY TIM SAYER PHOTOGRAPH THIS PAGE BY JOHN GESSNER 2

March 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Cassie Butler, Photographer/Graphic Designer Ashley Wahl, Editorial Assistant Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Contributing Photographers

Tim Sayer, John Gessner, Hannah Sharpe Contributors

David C. Bailey, Cos Barnes, Tom Bryant, Tom Constantine, Susan Campbell, Geoff Cutler, Frank Daniels III, Mart Dickerson, Laura Feder, Robyn James, Pamela Powers January, Jan Leitschuh, Dale Nixon, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Noah Salt

PS David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Darlene Stark, Advertising Manager 910.693.2488 • dstark@pinestrawmag.com Michelle Palladino, Sales Representative 910.691.9657 • mpalladino@pinestrawmag.com Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2508 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510 Pat Taylor, Advertising Director Advertising Graphic Design

Kristen Clark, B.J. Hill Mechelle Butler, Scott Yancey

Circulation & Subscriptions

910.693.2487

PineStraw Magazine

910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2012. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

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March 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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SweeT TeA chronicleS

Friends From Another life

BY JIM DODSON

There are

just three of them left now, old friends from another life.

One is a big country girl. Another a pure classical beauty. The third just wants to sit and play the blues. Most of the time they sit patiently in a corner of my home office, gathering dust, waiting for me to notice them. When visitors see them, they often say with surprise: “What beautiful guitars. I had no idea you were such a serious musician. Do you still play?” Here I draw a breath and slowly release it, a little embarrassed. “Yes, well — not much anymore, I’m afraid. It’s honestly been years. I’ve forgotten so much. I just play for fun.” It’s well deserved modesty. But the gospel truth. Once upon a time, in another life that feels ages ago, it was my deepest passion, the first thing I felt would drive and shape my life. My first guitar, a junior Harmony, arrived when I was five. We lived in Gulfport, Mississippi, where my father owned a small newspaper and my mother — a former West Virginia beauty contestant who once made a record and was offered a Hollywood screen test — sang Cole Porter songs to my brother and me in the bath and at bedtime. To manage his paper’s loading dock, my father had a man everyone called “Blind Jack,” impossibly old but supposedly the best guitar bluesman between Mobile and New Orleans. He’d been to jail and made records. On warm afternoons Jack would sit on a rickety dining room chair on the loading dock and play his guitar, which he called Miss Betty. I decided I wanted to be like Jack, a man who played the Delta blues on a Stella guitar. That Christmas, Santa brought the Harmony. Jack showed me my first chords. In Florence, South Carolina, where we lived for one strange but wonderful year and I started the first grade, my mother was recovering from a late-term miscarriage, and a black woman named Jesse May looked after us in the afternoons. She ruled us with an iron fist, shopped and cooked and always played the transistor radio while she was preparing supper, favoring a gospel music station and — on very rare occasions — a local DJ who played what she called “roadhouse” music. It was mostly black rhythm and blues artists with a little Elvis Presley and Jerry Lee Lewis thrown in. Among other things, she showed my brother and me how to dance by making us stand

on her feet as she did the steps to the “shake and shimmy” in our kitchen. She called this “feet dancing.” I loved Southern gospel and sang in the junior choir at the Lutheran Church but oh, I wanted to play music at a roadhouse. Weeks after we moved home to Greensboro, I received a new Stella for Christmas. I took my first formal lessons and learned to play hymns, the kind of Baptist hymns that made my Grandmother Taylor smile and nod — “Blest Be the Tie That Binds” and “Old Rugged Cross” and others. That next Christmas I accompanied the junior choir on “Silent Night.” By then I was addicted to the Flatt and Scruggs Show on weekends, live from the stage of Ryman Auditorium in Nashvile, Tennessee, home of the Grand Ole Opry — and fell hard for bluegrass music. The other show I never missed was the Porter Wagoner Show, which featured mainstream country stars like Ernest Tubb and the Texas Troubadours and a very young and talented Dolly Parton. I taught myself to play every song on Johnny Cash’s “I’ll Walk the Line” straight off the album. My dad was friendly with the general manager of the Greensboro Coliseum, which meant I’d sometimes go backstage and meet visiting artists after a performance. In this way I got to meet Peter, Paul and Mary, the Dave Clark Five, George Jones, Roy Orbison, Eddie Arnold, Ray Charles and even the great Johnny Cash. By junior high I was playing classical guitar, and by my sophomore year in high school I was working for Mr. Weinstein at the Lawndale Music Shop, giving guitar lessons on an Aria for the princely sum of four dollars an hour. I quit playing organized sports then because the money was so good and I planned to be a professional guitar-picker anyway. Somewhere about that time I went to see a pretty UNCG nursing student named Emmylou Harris perform at a coffeehouse near the college. I spoke with her briefly and clearly remember her telling me she was heading to Nashville. By this point I owned a secondhand Gibson and a new 12-string Yamaha, and thought I might go that same way myself. After all, I sang in an award-winning school choir and the Madrigals and played guitar in a well-known quartet called the “Queen’s Men.” We performed all over the Piedmont and once went to Atlanta for a concert. I was frequently asked to perform before school assemblies, doing my own covers of James Taylor, Dave Loggins and Gordon Lightfoot. About this time I purchased a brand new Alvarez Yairi guitar from Mr.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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sweet tea chronicles

©2012 Pinehurst, LLC

Fresh fashion meets classic style at The Cupola.

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst • 910. 235.8474 • pinehurst.com

Weinstein, a gorgeous jumbo model with amazing sound, mother-of-pearl inlay, and a finger action that was like touching velvet — the same guitar David Crosby and Graham Nash played in Crosby, Stills and Nash. With my employee discount, it cost me close to three-hundred dollars, a lot of bread back in 1971. This guitar thing went off to college with me, where I grew my hair and worked on the student newspaper but played for beer money with a couple of other fellows at a popular student hangout. I wrote several songs and entered a songwriting contest that netted an encouraging letter from a Nashville music publishing company. Two very different directions seemed to be opening up — that of a cub reporter following in his father’s footsteps into journalism, or that of a country music musician who had a little bit of every kind of Southern music in him. After graduation, I’d made up my mind to head for Nashville and find work as a studio musician, but went home to spend the summer writing new songs and work my second stint as a newspaper intern. I enrolled in the graduate writing program at UNCG figuring that would give me a little more time to figure things out and produce some fresh songs. One day an editor from the paper offered me a job and I took it. Not long after that, a good friend named Jim Jenkins said he wanted to introduce me to Dolly Parton after one of her big concerts in Greensboro. She invited us into her trailer and pulled off her wig. We sat and had the most delightful conversation and I let slip that I’d just been offered a job on the same magazine where Margaret Mitchell had worked — which meant I would probably never chase my dream to play guitar in Nashville. Dolly Parton slapped my knee. “Oh, honey,” she declared with that infectious down-home laugh of hers, “you made the right decision. Stick with writin’. This racket will make you do the craziest things to your body and make your hair fall out!” Please don’t feel sorry for me. Perhaps you had another life too, one that gives you both comfort and a bittersweet twinge to think about. In my case, a wonderfully diverse and rewarding career in journalism led me to a family in New England and literally took me around the world — probably much farther than country music ever would have. But the music stayed in me and my guitar love was always there. During my years in Atlanta I got to tour with a famous gospel choir, meet Gladys Knight, James Brown and Jimmy Buffett, hang out with the great Mac MacAnally (the brilliant Mississippian who wrote many of Alabama’s greatest hits) and have a rib dinner with the Rev. Al

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


sweet tea chronicles

Green and friends. I even got to jam with Ernest Tubb and his Texas Troubadours. A few years after that, a national magazine sent me to live in New Orleans for a month and write about the city’s love of jazz and blues. Another time, also on assignment, I spent all night riding with Isaac Tigret in his private rail car from New Orleans to Memphis. We sat up all night drinking bourbon and listening to blues music, talking about the rock and roll stars he’d known who inspired him to create the first Hard Rock Café. We finished the evening at B.B. King’s blues place on Beale Street, talking to the guitar legend between his sets. At one point he even invited me to play Lucille, his famous guitar. I was a kid again. My wife Alison gave me a lovely 40th birthday present, a beautiful Takamine classical guitar. Our children grew up listening to this little beauty, learning songs off Disney films and hearing the bedtime folks songs I grew up with. When they began singing in school talent shows — even on the radio at a Portland country station — I was pleased to be their guitar accompanist. Not long after their mom and I divorced, I purchased a beautiful blue Dean guitar for my daughter Maggie, a real Sweetheart of the Rodeo instrument with a pearl inlay of leaping dolphins, and also picked up an Ibanez Fender knock-off for her younger brother, Jack. Because I signed them up for lessons, and the store owner caught me eying a ruby-red Ibanez hollow-body number that reminded me of King’s Lucille, he made me a deal I couldn’t refuse. I took her home and named her Ruby. Last year, following my daughter’s college graduation, I drove her great-grandmother’s poster bed, my favorite leather chair, and Maggie’s Sweetheart of the Rodeo guitar up to her in Vermont. I’d been caretaking it for several years and often found myself reaching for it instead of my three surviving guitars, probably because it made me feel closer to my daughter, who was hundreds of miles away. She says she’s finally ready to learn to play it, but meanwhile is heading to New York to hunt for a job. “Everything has a season,” I like to say to her. “You’ll make beautiful music when you’re ready to learn.” I picture her someday playing folk songs from her childhood to a flaxen-haired child. Brother Jack, meanwhile, may be the family’s true guitar man. He took up playing at about age fourteen and has never looked back. Within a year of starting he was better than his teacher and today can play almost anything — jazz, blues, anything by a rock group. I listen to him play and just marvel, and then I reach for one of my three old friends, realizing I chose the right life after all. PS

FRAMER’S COTTAGE 162 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387 910.246.2002

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Born Wanderers

The Sam Ragan Writers Series presents The Red Clay Ramblers “unplugged” March 2-3, 7:30 p.m., at the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities. Now in their 40th year, this Tony Award-winning North Carolina string band has a repertoire that reflects their roots in old-time mountain music, as well as bluegrass, country, rock, New Orleans jazz, gospel and the American musical. Over the years, the band — Jack Herrick, Clay Buckner, Chris Frank and Bland Simpson — has performed with such figures as ’98 Grammy-winner Shawn Colvin (a Red Clay Rambler for most of ’87), Ralph Stanley and the Clinch Mountain Boys, Eugene Chadbourn, Ireland’s Boys of the Lough, Randy Newman (recorded “Ride, Gambler, Ride” with him for the film “Maverick”), and Michele Shocked. Don’t miss them. Cost: $30. Seating is limited. Read more/ Listen: www.redclayramblers.com. Tickets/Info: (910) 692-6261.

In a Pinch?

Irish or no, lads and lasses are invited to don their most festive green apparel for Pinehurst’s annual St. Patrick’s Day parade on Saturday, March 17, at 11 a.m. Parade includes antique cars, floats, decorated golf carts, bands, beauty queens and leprechauns; musical entertainment to follow. Free event. Historic Village of Pinehurst. Info: www.pinehurstbusinessguild.com.

When in Doubt, Do

The Pulitzer Prize and 2005 Tony Award-winning Broadway drama Doubt: A Parable is scheduled to show at the Sunrise Theater March 7 – 11 as Moore OnStage’s season finale. Written by John Patrick Shanley, Doubt tells a gripping story of suspicion that leaves the audience to question its own moral convictions. “It is doubt that changes things,” says the playwright. “When a man feels unsteady…he’s on the verge of growth.” Showtime: 7:30 p.m. (Wednesday through Saturday), 2 p.m. (Sunday matinee). Tickets: $23, $15 (Wednesday only). Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info/RSVP: www.mooreonstage.com or (910) 692-7118.

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A Rabbit Hole of Sorts

An “Alice-in-Wonderland”-themed spring flower show will be held March 30 and 31 at the Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities. Likened to a miniature Philadelphia International Flower Show, the event will showcase floral art by the North Carolina State Florist Association and will be open to the public from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. with educational design programs held in the great room at 1 p.m. both days. Exhibits will also be on display outside in the gardens surrounding the Boyd House. Tickets: $10/advance, $12/at door. A preview party will be held Thursday from 6:30 to 9:30 p.m. featuring the North Carolina State Florist Association Designer of the Year and Treadaway Cup winner (Tickets: $55); RSVP by March 20. Tickets available at Botanicals Fabulous Flowers and Orchids, and the Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3800.

March 2012 P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


hey Diddle Diddle

Show and Tell

Self Portrait in Rainbow Tights by Emily Rolland 1st place in 2011

The 2012 Young People’s Fine Arts Festival exhibit, on display March 2 through 17 at the Campbell House Galleries in Southern Pines, will showcase the artistic talents of students in grades K-12 from all Moore County public, private and charter schools. On March 1, the public is welcome to attend an awards ceremony from 5:30 to 7 p.m. to recognize high school artists in the realms of drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, photography, computer and 3D art. An opening reception for the exhibit will be held on Friday, March 2, from 5 to 7 p.m. Free. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue. Info: (910) 692-2787.

And They’re off

The 77th Annual Highfalls Old-Time Fiddlers’ Convention will be held on Saturday, March 10, at the North Moore High School auditorium. It helps if you play a stringed instrument (fiddle, banjo, guitar, mandolin, bass fiddle or Dobro), but cash prizes will also be awarded to top singers, dancers and pianists, in addition to top band and most promising young talent (12 and under). Registration held from 5 to 7:30 p.m.; shows start at 6 p.m. Admission: $7. Info: Highfalls Elementary School at (910) 464-3600.

i love lucy, Deb & lou

March is Women’s History Month. That’s why the League of Women Voters of Moore County will hold its annual “Lunch with Legends” event this month to celebrate the lives of three remarkable women who helped change the world. Dressed in period attire, “guests” include Lucy Stone, Deborah Sampson and Lou Henry Hoover, each portrayed by League members. Did you know that Stone helped begin the first Women’s Rights Initiative? That Sampson was the first known female soldier? Or that Hoover, a First Lady, was president of the Girl Scouts of America? Learn more about these notables on March 13, 12 p.m., at Little River Golf and Country Club. Tom Bernett will emcee. Tickets: $30. Info: Ginger Finney at (910) 673-1330.

In the 1940s, an Irishman named Mickey Walsh was so enchanted by the Sandhills that an entire institution was birthed from his decision to build a stable here: the Stoneybrook Steeplechase, which takes place at Carolina Horse Park on April 7. This 61st annual celebration of equine culture and cordial competition is sure to be a symphony of excitement, alive with the clip-clop of hooves, chatter of children and buzz about speculate winners. But horses won’t be the only ones trotting. Run for Ribbons 5K, a community fitness event to kick off a colorful day of cancer awareness, will be held on the track after the horse race. Tickets: $25/advance, $30/at gate. Tailgate space: $75-$450. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com.

luck of the irish

As luck would have it, Danny Infantino (classical guitar) and Seren Lyerly (violin) will be making sweet Celtic music together at a March 16 concert at Weymouth Center in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day. Show includes Irish ballads, instrumental jigs and reels; begins at 7 p.m. Green attire optional. Cost: $20/adults, $10/children. Tickets: Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Tickets/Info: (910) 692-6346.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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©2012 Pinehurst, LLC

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The (Sand)hills are Alive..

The Sandhills are alive with the sounds of live music at Poplar Knight Spot. The Rooster’s Wife Concert Series continues through March. The lineup: March 4 – Red June & Will Kimbrough; fiddle and guitars, Old-Time/Americana/bluegrass. Showtime: 6:45 p.m. March 11 – The Get Right Band; smart songwriting and musical expertise, Americana/bluegrass/R&B/ roots music. Showtime: 6:45 p.m. March 20 – Joe Craven Trio; Veteran jazzers featuring keyboard ace John R. Burr and drummer extraordinaire Kendrick Freeman. Showtime: 6:45 p.m. March 22 – Peggy Seeger; folk singer, songmaker and activist. Showtime: 6:45 p.m. March 23 – Brother Sun; harmonies as stirring as a gospel choir. Showtime: 8:30 p.m. Location: Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www. theroosterswife.org.

Rock on, Wood

Electric violinist Mark Wood is a rock star. He’s shared the stage with Billy Joel, Paul McCartney, Steven Tyler and Lenny Kravitz, he’s been on tour with Celine Dion, and he’s an original member of the multi-platinum-selling symphonic rock group Trans-Siberian Orchestra. He’s even starred in a Pepsi commercial — and he’s coming to Pinecrest High School on April 2 and 3 to lead a two-day workshop for Moore County high school and middle school orchestra students. Pinecrest Orchestra Conductor Nicole Peragine, who was a driving force in getting Wood to come here, says her students are “over the moon” with excitement. Wood, a Juilliard School grad, introduces alternative teaching methods into the classroom, which, Peragine says, is as helpful for the teachers as it is for the students. “Classical music is a dying art form,” says Peragine. “What Mark is doing is serving as a bridge for kids by making classical music accessible to them. He’s making the violin cool, basically.” A concert will be held in the Robert E. Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School on April 3 at 7 p.m. featuring Wood and Moore County string students; program includes Wood compositions and classic rock arrangements and is open to the public. Cost: $15, $25/preferred seating. Tickets available at the Moore County Arts Council, (910) 692-4356. Info: Nicole at nperagine@ncmcs.org.

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CoS And effeCT

The Kindness of friends By Cos BArnes

The second day of the new year was

bitterly cold as I left virginia, where I had attended the funeral of a childhood friend.

I left early in the morning to drive home. The signal on my dash alerted me the air in my tires was low. I stopped at a service station knowing the personnel would probably be too busy to help me at that hour. I asked a man who was standing at the door for advice. He motioned me to the air tank, filled each tire and explained they were probably low because of the cold. He refused the pay I offered him. As I mused about these events, I decided to forget about resolutions and concentrate on doing something for somebody else. Thus, friendships are born. One of my friends, whom I cheerleaded with in high school in virginia, puts flowers and seasonal greens on my mother’s grave when she does her mother’s in the same cemetery. I wonder how many people can say that about a friend. As I mused about the friendships I have witnessed, I remembered going to Charlotte many years ago to an art exhibit. There was a woman there leading another woman who was obviously blind. Taking as much time as needed, the sighted woman explained every detail of each painting to her friend. I was so awed by this kindness I could not concentrate on the other art I was witnessing. Many years later I took a blind woman to a funeral of a mutual friend, and as I sat there with her I explained everything that was going on: when the ministers entered, what they were doing prior to the service, who the musicians were, the design of the casket and the handmade quilt that draped it. How much more acute my senses were when shared with another. I paid attention to things I usually take for granted. When I first moved to Southern Pines I was welcomed by older women in my church. I felt immersed in the warmth of the camaraderie they had experienced for many years. When one was on her deathbed, I visited; there I found another sitting beside her, holding her hand. One of these vibrant women loved the homemade fudge made by another and requested some of it be placed in her coffin. I feel sure it was. Just last week I saw two women who have known each other for 62 years. They have weathered the deaths of others of their group, sickness, change, depression, disappointments, failing health. One still looks after the other, drives her where she wants to go, helps her walk on treacherous ground, and takes her to Mass. Friends do things for each other. I have one who is much better at flower arrangement than I am. She takes over when I entertain or need flowers in my church. I type her correspondence and write minutes for her clubs. The neatest thing in my life at present is that I have friends who were friends of my children. They have welcomed me into their world. They keep me informed on what is happening. Praise the human spirit. PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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Poetry c a p e

f e a r

v a l l e y

n e u r o s c i e n c e

c e n t e r

Kaleidoscope Eyes It’s like God turned turned the tank around

www.capefearvalley.com/neuro

& watched, watched the strands of color shift, shift & settle — puzzle pieces in their places golden petals & blue-green

capeable

of bringing you hope and healing

infinity. -Ashley Wahl

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March 2012 P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The oMnivorouS reAder

our forgotten War

The elusive War of 1812 is brilliantly illuminated by a pair of fi ne histories

By sTephen e. sMITh

A recent random Tv survey of New

Yorkers found that an alarming number of our countrymen believe that Francis Scott key’s greatest hit, “The Star-Spangled Banner,” was written during the Revolutionary War. Others were certain the national anthem was a patriotic tune composed during the Civil War and sung by Union soldiers as they marched into battle.

With the bicentennial of the War of 1812 upon us, historians have an opportunity to correct many of our misconceptions regarding the war and its outcomes. To this end, a slew of popular histories has recently appeared in bookstores and more are scheduled for release in the coming year. Publishers are hoping that bicentennial fever (be it ever so tepid) will sell these revisionary histories to the audience who gobbled up David McCullough’s John Adams and Joseph’s Ellis’ Founding Brothers. If you’re one of those readers, the news is mostly good: You’ll likely find yourself entertained and informed by two recent publications — Hugh Howard’s Mr. and Mrs. Madison’s War: America’s First Couple and the Second War for Independence, and Elizabeth Dowling Taylor’s A Slave in the White House: Paul Jennings and the Madisons. What distinguishes Howard’s history from its numerous predecessors is the inclusion of new primary sources — many of which are incorporated into a comprehensive narrative for the first time — and the division of the history into “books” intended to make the war and its political and military maneuvering more accessible to contemporary audiences. Within these divisions, Howard labels subsections in such a way as to mimic a

documentary format — “August 4, 1815 . . . Patuxent River . . . Aboard the U.S. Cutter Scorpion.” Although this organizational device is familiar to Tv audiences, it does little to energize a narrative that proceeds well enough under its own power. This small irritant aside, Howard does a yeoman’s job of explicating and analyzing the war’s most significant encounters — the USS Constitution’s defeat of the HMS Guerriere, the surrender of Fort Detroit, the Battles of Lake Erie and Bladensburg, the burning of the White House and the Capitol, the Battle of Lake Champlain, the bombardment of Fort McHenry, and the Battle of New Orleans. Howard is at his best when articulating the war’s ambiguous and often overlooked outcomes: “Though the expected gain of Canadian territory had not come to pass, a westward boom was under way,” he writes. “Foreign trade and shipping were quite restored. . . . The war had compelled an expansion of American manufacturing. In the absence of imported goods, Americans set about making what they wanted . . . and the nation’s government now underwrote the construction of public roads and canals.” The United States also became a naval power, West Point received increased funding in order to train a professional officer corps, and Madison signed into law a bill creating the Second Bank of the United States. Although not addressed in the Treaty of Ghent, impressment of American sailors ended, and most importantly, the United States emerged from the war as a world power. Unfortunately, the War of 1812 did nothing to abolish slavery or to mitigate it as a dominant issue in American life. Elizabeth Dowling Taylor’s A Slave in the White House explores Madison’s presidency by researching the life of a slave. Paul Jennings was 10 years old when his master, James Madison, first occupied the White House in 1809, and his role as Madison’s personal servant was of no small importance. Taylor speculates

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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T h e Om n i v o r o u s R e a d e r

that Jennings was one of those responsible for saving Washington’s portrait before the burning of the White House by British troops. “Jennings held the ladder, and after the enormous portrait, ninety-five inches high, had been freed from its frame, [he] was undoubtedly one of the ‘two colored boys’ who helped a pair of ‘gentlemen of New York’ load the stretched canvas onto a cart they had managed to procure.” Jennings continued as Madison’s slave until his master’s death in 1836, after which he was held in bondage by Dolley Madison, even though she had promised to free Jennings upon her husband’s demise. Daniel Webster, a staunch abolitionist, lent Jennings the money to purchase his freedom in 1847, and when an elderly, povertystricken Dolley Madison returned to live out her days in Washington, Jennings, who worked at a government clerical job, lent her money out of his own pocket. He also wrote the first White House memoir, A Short Reminiscence by a Slave of James Madison’s, the full text of which is reprinted in Taylor’s biography. Other recent histories of the War of 1812 at sea include Stephen Budiansky’s Perilous Fight: America’s Intrepid War with Britain on the High Seas, 1812-1815 and George C. Daughan’s 1812: The Navy’s War, both easy and excellent reads. For the less ambitious, there’s the woefully inadequate A Short, Easy History of the War of 1812, which amounts to little more than a précis of the Cliff Notes. And young readers will enjoy The Town That Fooled the British by Lisa and Robert Papp. To gain a firsthand perspective on America’s “forgotten war,” pick up a paperback copy of A Travel Guide to the War of 1812 in the Chesapeake: Eighteen Tours in Maryland, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Readers can follow the path taken by Dolley Madison as she escaped the burning capital, or they can retrace the route used by British troops as they marched to the Battle of North Point. Detailed maps and illustrations are provided along with a history lesson for each tour. As for “The Star-Spangled Banner,” the song remains a constant source of frustration, aesthetically and historically. Perhaps we should adopt Johnny Horton’s classic “The Battle of New Orleans” as our national anthem. Except for the part about shooting cannonballs out of alligators, the lyric is reasonably accurate, and even the least informed among us, New Yorkers included, can deduce that the song was inspired by, well, the Battle of New Orleans. PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry, A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths, is available at The Country Bookshop. Contact him at travisses@hotmail.com.

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B o o ks h e l f

New Releases for March

By The Country Bookshop Wild: From Lost to Found on the Pacific Fiction Hardcover Crest Trail by Cheryl Strayed. After a mid-20s woman’s The Dressmaker by Kate Alcott. A young housemaid quits her job and is marriage falls apart in the wake of her mother’s death, she chosen at the last minute to accompany a great fashion designer on the ill-fated impulsively decides to hike the Pacific Crest Trail from voyage of the Titanic. They both survive the sinking, but the designer and her the Mojave Desert through California and Oregon to husband make questionable choices in their lifeboat, which are not well received Washington State — alone. This is a humorous and vivid in the public eye. The reader can’t help but think, “What would I have done story of a woman overcoming life’s problems while on a madin that situation?” Birds of a Lesser Paradise by Megan Mayhew dening and healing journey. Bergman. Don’t pick up this incredible book of twelve short Children and Young adult Award Winners stories with the essential themes of nature, loss, love, pain, personal strength and animals if you have anything else The Newbery Medal is given annually to the book deemed the best book for to do. You won’t eat, you won’t sleep until you finish this children by an American author. The 2012 winner is: incredible collection. With settings in New England and Dead End in Norvelt by Jack Gantos. North Carolina, first-time author Megan Mayhew Bergman Grounded for the entire summer for “borrowing” his is able to capture in pen and ink feelings that are often diffather’s antique Japanese rifle and “accidentally” shootficult for us to express. ing it at his elderly neighbor, Jack finds himself facing The Book of Lost Fragrances by M.J. Rose. A the prospect of a very boring few months. Escape comes brother and sister struggle to save their family’s generations when he is wrangled by his father to assist in building a old French perfuming business by following the myth of a lost scent. The siblings runway in their backyard and is then also indentured to and a childhood friend follow mythology and dreams from the crypts of ancient his aforementioned elderly neighbor to assist in writEgypt to the catacombs of modern day Paris. Full of love, beauty, reincarnation ing an unusual obituary column. Unruly, unusual and and suspense, this book brings to life the power of scent and lost secrets. If you completely fun, perfect for ages 10-13. liked the Da Vinci Code, you will love this. The Caldecott Award is granted to the best picture book of the year illustrated The Book of Jonas by Stephen Dowd. A-15-year-old boy’s family is killed by an American author. The 2012 winner is: in a U.S. bombing raid on his village. An American soldier takes him under his A Ball for Daisy by Chris Raschka. This delightful, completely wordless wing and works to get him the help he needs. After a life in America the young picture book features Daisy, a black and white dog, boy returns to his Muslim home, and questions are raised about the human and her favorite toy. Naps, playtime, walks in the costs of war and how elusive the right action really is in the face of war. park are all awesome as long as Daisy has her ball, Carry the One by Carol Anshaw. Driving back but when the ball accidentally pops, Daisy learns to New York City from a wild country wedding, a sometimes great losses are accompanied by unexpectgroup of 20-somethings hit a young girl with their car ed new gains. Through the creative use of color and and kill her. One is prosecuted, yet they all carry the simple lines, picture book master Raschka presents a memory of this one young girl with them throughout story to be enjoyed by all ages. their lives. Written with beauty and grace, this thorThe Coretta Scott King Award is given annually to the best book for children oughly modern novel forces the reader to ask questions by an African-American author. This year’s award goes to: about what we carry with us for decades and what we have done that subtly defines our lives. Heart and Soul by Kadir Nelson. “It’s important that you pay attention, honey, because I’m only going to tell you this story but once,” says the wizened NonFiction narrator of this expansive, yet accessible introduction to African-American American Triumvirate: Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, Ben history. Beginning with the Declaration of Independence and gently working Hogan, and the Modern Age of Golf by James Dodson. Dodson through time to the election of Barack Obama, the stories of African-American dives into the overlapping story of the men who shaped the game of golf. After contributions to American history are revealed through the voice of one family’s the ’20s, the game of golf was declining until these three men burst onto the matriarch. Ages 9-13 scene full of talent and energy and carried golf’s popularity for decades. Join auThe Michael L. Printz Award is given to the book that thor and PineStraw editor James Dodson at his book-launch party at Pine Knoll most exemplifies literary excellence in young adult literature. on March 13th. For 2012, the winner is: The Mark Inside: A Perfect Swindle, a Cunning Revenge, Where Things Come Back by John Corey Whaley. and a Small History of a Big Con by Amy Reading. This true When Cullen Whittier’s gifted, insightful, eternally kind crime story takes place in 1919 when a gang of con men led by “Big Joe” Furey brother disappears the same month a supposedly extinct swindled the honest Texas rancher J. Frank Norfleet for everything he owned. woodpecker appears in his hometown of Lily, Arkansas, This is the story of the revenge Norfleet takes on these men. Intertwined with Cullen quietly, angrily and calmly begins to work through the history of con artistry in America, this book is a fascinating exploration of this difficult but sometimes amusing time in his strange the swindle. hometown. PS PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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h i tt i n g h o m e

It’s Black and White Don’t mess up Mama’s floor

By Dale Nixon

It was something I had wanted for a long time: a black and white block tile kitchen floor.

Everyone had tried to talk me out of it. Even the manufacturer said it would show every speck of dust and every scuff mark from a shoe. But I had to have it. I had seen the tiles in the glossy pages of interior design magazines. I had watched stars dance across it in television commercials and on the big screen. Fancy restaurants adopted the dramatic pattern. And I wanted it, too. Never mind the upkeep. I’d mop it, wax it, buff it, strip it, vacuum it and sweep it. I wanted a black and white block tile kitchen floor. So my husband Bob conceded, and we ordered the floor. From the moment the tiles were glued into place, it became my biggest obsession. I could hear my daughters whisper to their friends as they entered the back door, “Don’t mess up Mama’s floor. She’ll get mad.” Bob would take his shoes off before entering the house, and my friends would stand outside and holler, “Can I come in?” I asked house guests to eat crackers and potato chips while standing over the sink, and I cringed each time a drink was spilled. My obsession with the floor extended beyond family and friends. A local plumber still can’t get over the fact that I went without hot water for three days because I didn’t want him tracking across my kitchen floor. Each time he rang the doorbell for entrance, I’d crack the door just enough to stick my head through and say, “You can’t come in for repairs today. I just mopped the floor.” When I explained to Bob the reason we were without hot water

for three days, he realized I needed some help with the upkeep of the floor. He rented a heavy chrome piece of machinery and waxed and buffed the floor. When he finished, the kitchen was a mirror in black and white. I couldn’t detect a single scratch or scuff mark, and I was content in knowing that the maintenance would be at a minimum for months. I did, however, detect a change in Bob’s attitude concerning the floor. He walked across the black and white tiles as if he were walking on eggshells. He was constantly bending over to pick up a piece of lint or flick a particle of dust away. The floor was getting to both of us. Something had to be done. I shared my thoughts with Bob when he came home from work. I told him we had become slaves to the floor and that our obsession should be in living, not in cleaning. He reached across the kitchen counter and pressed a disc into our CD player. I heard the strains of Garnet Mims and the Enchanters’ “Quiet Place” (one of our all-time favorite songs). He held out his hand to me and said, “Do you want to dance?” I hesitated a moment and glanced down at his shoes — Weejuns, of course. I knew at that moment we were making a choice. I took his hand and matched him step-for-step. I could hear the heels of our shoes scraping and sliding across the floor. We swayed and rocked to the beat of the music, each of us knowing we were tracing our patterns onto the floor. But this was living; not cleaning. We had made our choice. PS Columnist Dale Nixon resides in Concord but enjoys a slice of heaven (disguised as a condominium) in the village of Pinehurst. You may contact her by email at dalenixon@ carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

March 2012

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Vine Wisdom

Wine Lit

From their pens to our lips In Europe we thought of wine as something as healthy and normal as food and also a great giver of happiness and well being and delight. Drinking wine was not a snobbism nor a sign of sophistication nor a cult.. it was as natural as eating and to me as necessary. — Ernest Hemingway

By Robyn James

March is the month of the

Palustris Festival in Moore County, a time when we indulge ourselves in art, culture and literature. I have to wonder if anyone, in studying the works of the masters of literature, ever noticed what I have. Each has his or her own passion, mystery, subject matter and style. But a tenuous thread weaves its subtle way through each masterpiece that perhaps is only recognizable to an oenophile: Poetic, passionate, friendly, humorous references to wine. The vine has inspired so much passion and philosophy over the decades, I want to share with you the best of the best of wine in our favorite authors. Writing in my sixty-fourth year, I can truthfully say that since I reached the age of discretion I have consistently drunk more than most people would say is good for me. Nor did I regret it. Wine has been for me a firm friend and a wise counselor. Often ... wine has shown me matters in their true perspective, and has, as though by the touch of a magic wand, reduced great disasters to small inconveniences. Wine has lit up for me the pages of literature, and revealed in life romance lurking in the commonplace. Wine has made me bold but not foolish; has induced me to say silly things but not to do them. — Duff Cooper, Old Men Forget Age appears to be best in four things; old wood best to burn, old wine to drink, old friends to trust, and old authors to read. — Francis Bacon Language is wine upon the lips. — Virginia Woolf Music is the wine which inspires one to new generative processes, and I am Bacchus who presses out this glorious wine for mankind and makes them spiritually drunken. — Ludwig van Beethoven What I do and what I dream include thee, as the wine must taste of its own grapes. — Elizabeth Barrett Browning Wine is bottled poetry. — Robert Louis Stevenson

The wine-cup is the little silver well, Where truth, if truth there be, doth dwell. — William Shakespeare, English poet and writer (1564-1616) Days of wine and roses laugh and run away, Like a child at play. — Johnny Mercer, Days of Wine and Roses Souls of poets dead and gone, What Elysium have ye known, Happy field or mossy cavern, Choicer than the Mermaid Tavern? Have ye tippled drink more fine Than mine host’s Canary wine? — John Keats, “Lines on the Mermaid Tavern” Give me women, wine and snuff Until I cry out ‘hold, enough!’ You may do so san objection Till the day of resurrection; For bless my beard then aye shall be My beloved Trinity. — John Keats, “Give Me Women, Wine and Snuff” Here’s to the corkscrew — a useful key to unlock the storehouse of wit, the treasury of laughter, the front door of fellowship, and the gate of pleasant folly. — W.E.P. French (From the wine list of Commander’s Palace in New Orleans courtesy of John McDonald, Dallas) There is not the hundredth part of the wine consumed in this kingdom that there ought to be. Our foggy climate wants help. — Jane Austen, Northanger Abbey What though youth gave love and roses age still leaves us friends and wine. — Thomas Moore In water one sees one’s own face; But in wine, one beholds the heart of another. — An Old Frech proverb courtesy of Bob Higgins Give me wine to wash me clean of the weather-stains of care. — Ralph Waldo Emerson [Bond has just been surprised by the double agent, Grant.] “Red wine with fish. Well, that should have told me something.” James Bond in From Russia with Love (1963) PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@pinehurst.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

March 2012

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WHISPERING PINES

LAKE AUMAN

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Elegant lake front home with beautiful water views, a home theatre with wet bar, private boat dock with boat lift, a lake fed irrigation system and so much more! 4 BR / 3.5 BA $649,000

This gorgeous custom home overlooks the 1st green with views of the 2nd green and Doon Pond in National Golf Course. 4 BR / 3.5 BA $600,000

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Elegant custom built Villa in CCNC enjoys a gorgeous setting overlooking water on an oversized lot. Lovely views from large patio and interior areas. 3 BR / 2.5 BA $449,000

Tucked away in a private setting, this new and elegant Pinewild golf front home offers expansive views, spacious rooms, gourmet kitchen and so much more! 3 BR / 3.5 BA $475,000

Lake Auman water front home with private boat dock and beach area! This custom home built by Bolton Builders offers wonderful space and views! 4 BR / 3 BA $499,000

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SOUTHERN PINES

PINEHURST

WHISPERING PINES

Beautifully renovated home on almost 2 private, wooded acres! The floorplan Has been opened up and the rooms are large and spacious with a gourmet kitchen! 4 BR / 2.5 BA $334,000

Beautifully renovated golf front home overlooks the 9th hole of Pinehurst course #3. The house and grounds have been meticulously redone and the result is beautiful. 4 BR / 3.5 BA $349,900

This beautiful lakefront home has been beautifully renovated. Enjoy expansive lake views from one of the nicest waterfront properties in Whispering Pines! 3 BR / 3 BA $379,000

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ABERDEEN

PINEHURST

FOXFIRE

Lovely home located at the end of a cul-de-sac features a large fenced yard with Great privacy, super floorplan that is very open and a great deck for summer grilling! 3 BR / 2.5 BA $229,900

Lovely traditional brick home in a quiet neighborhood. Large, open rooms, split BR floorplan in perfect condition! Enjoy the private backyard from the spacious scr. porch. 3 BR / 2 BA $269,000

Beautifully renovated for the discriminating buyer! This lovely one story brick home has a totally new look. It’s very inviting w/ spacious rms, oversized Carolina & great yd. 3 BR / 2.5 BA $210,000

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View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at 28

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March 2012 P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The kitchen garden

A Different Sort Of Seed

Why Moore County — and America — need more farmers

By Jan Leitschuh

This promising month of March, a

time dear to all lovers of good garden dirt, heralds the turning over of fallow ground.

Directly into the Good Earth go seeds and sets of many cold-tolerant vegetables: broccoli and cabbage plants, lettuce, more spinach, carrots, chard, sweet peas, beets, onions, kale and more. In our warm climate, some hard-chargers have even begun this process in February. It’s an ancient ritual that stirs the blood of every true son or daughter of the soil — dig a hole, drop in a seed. Then wait, and hope the changeable March weather cooperates. It is fitting then, in this capricious month of new beginnings, that we talk about the sowing of an entirely different sort of seed. We all need to eat. No matter what opinions, concepts and ideas divide us, the mass of humanity is united in this one unswerving reality; regular nourishment is required to sustain life, liberty and the pursuit of the perfect homegrown tomato sandwich or Southern pork barbecue. Even — or perhaps, especially — the most avid of gardeners among us recognize the need for a vibrant agriculture, particularly our local agriculture. Which brings us back to a seed I would like to suggest that we, as a community, help to sprout: the “growing” of young farmers. You see, those who grow our food are aging out. As the agricultural population has dwindled, the average age of U.S. farmers is rising. The loss of a certain sort of knowledge upon which humanity depends is certainly cause for concern, wouldn’t you agree? Here in Moore County, the average age of farmers is roughly 57 years old. Farming is hard work, in some ways a young person’s game, despite technological and labor-saving advances. And yet — where are the young people choosing farming for a career, one of the oldest and most fundamental underpinnings of civilization? Nationwide, there are only about 960,000 persons claiming farming as their principal occupation, according to the U.S. Census, which loosely defines a farm as any establishment which produced and sold, or normally would have produced and sold, $1,000 or more of agricultural products during the year. Few families will live on the minimum of $1,000 of agricultural products a year, so it’s easy to see how dependent we are becoming on a small core group of growers. Again, who will grow our food? And what will happen to all this open land in our area as our farmers age out? We are fortunate in this county to have some forward-thinking leadership. A committee has been formed to address this issue and and propose solutions to reverse the loss of farmers. One of the best I’ve heard locally so far: an idea with the current working title of “Moore County 4-H Young Farmer Endowment.” With endowment income, the community could extend small grants to encourage its youth wishing to farm, particularly in the sustainable manner needed for

the future. Grants could be used for internships and pairing with mentors, or direct start-up capital for fencing, livestock, seed, tools, greenhouses and more. “We have a rapidly changing agriculture,” says Moore County Cooperative Extension agent Taylor Williams, “that on the one hand presents enormous opportunities for someone, and on the other hurts an aging population of farmers. Take the loss of the tobacco market. It would be irresponsible to tell someone nearing the end of their career to remake themselves. Older farmers have commitments due to equipment purchases; they’re indebted, they’re like anyone else with kids to put through college and have aging parents — and the one asset they have is their land. Yes, it’s an asset, but they have to pay taxes on that land to keep it, and to keep it they have to work it. If they sell the farmland, their heirs get an enormous capital gains bill. The older farmer owns his own equipment, it’s paid for but it’s aging too. At the same time, there are enormous opportunities in biofuels and local foods. These require new skills in marketing and production. We need to find ways to encourage youth to explore agriculture as a viable career, and explore new methods of growing crops.” Few people realize the importance of agriculture to the economic health of the county, says Williams. Agriculture is close to 14 percent of our work force here. “It directly undergirds our value-added industries in food and textiles, supports lots of things we don’t consider as farming, such as farm insurance, feed stores, commercial turf, nursery and landscape industries, equipment dealers. These services are big business here in this county and contribute to its prosperity. Take that away and you’ve reduced your diversity and made yourself much less resilient in an economic downturn.” Need more reasons why our county’s population might care about loss of farmland and our agricultural brain trust? Williams reels off several other aspects to consider: The landscape: “This is a tourism county . People come here not because it looks like New Jersey; they come because it looks like the Sandhills, with pines, peach trees, rolling open landscape. Part of your tourism product is your open land and your food. If you don’t have open land and distinctive food — a taste of a place — you don’t have a distinctive product. Besides golf, we have equestrian sports and we have world-renowned pottery, just to name a few. We also have agritourism, farmer’s markets, peaches, strawberries, asparagus, farm stands — an astonishing variety of things.” Taxes: “If you let open land become a housing development, studies nationwide have demonstrated that your taxes will go up. Many studies, repeated in communities across the country, demonstrate that for every $1 in taxes, $1.18 in services are required. Turn these into housing projects, your taxes will go up. With farmland, when farmers pay a dollar in taxes, they get $0.30 back in services.” Loss of a valuable resource: “Once it’s paved over, it’s paved over — never to grow food again! Once you do that, you’ve imperiled the air you breathe and the water you drink. You’ve lost all of your open space, lost the visual, and lost

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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March 2012 P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The kitchen garden

diversity of wildlife. You’re not going to have as effective songbird habitat, or trails for equestrian and recreational use.” Culture: “Farmers represent a knowledge base of the land and cultural heritage. It would be a shame if this was lost. This is who we are as people. I look at young people and see that somehow they have lost something precious; the love of the land, the opportunity to test and challenge themselves physically, to explore their capacities in the physical world. This is part of the reason we have a childhood obesity problem; they’ve exercised their thumbs at the expense of the rest of their body. In 4-H we try to show kids something that is extremely necessary, what is needed to survive. “Somehow our technology needs to have some basis in a physical reality that serves to challenge the imagination, that has some foundation in the real world of nature. We preserve old gristmills and such for a reason, so in this raw physical way you can see mechanical principles at work. Those who have lived outdoors know how to accomplish real things, and see the interconnected relationships.” So what is the call to action? Attractive T-shirts are being explored — stay tuned — and the 4-H is exploring as a fundraiser running the Carthage “Gathering Site” for Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative. But a small check right now would mean a great deal to the program. The value will be leveraged atop a $12,000 nest egg that Moore County Cooperative Extension has generated through previous fundraisers. The ambitious goal is to raise that total to $25,000 — an additional $13,000. Moore County is blessed with progressive leadership and a good and growing food awareness among its citizenry — especially the dawning awareness of the dollar-leveraging value of “local” in creating a community prosperity. “For very little money,” says Williams, “we can enable kids to both want to and have an opportunity to explore a career in agriculture, and start a new agriculture, hopefully one that will be ‘neighbors feeding neighbors,’ (the motto of Sandhills Farm to Table Co-op). This is getting back to our roots and sustaining rural economies who have really taken a hit.” Won’t you plant some small seeds in your community? We all know what happens to the acorn, given the proper soil. And it’s easy: dig a hole, drop in a seed. Contribution checks can be made out to NC 4-H Development Fund and on the memo line designate “Moore County Endowment.” Mail to “NC 4-H Development Fund,” Moore County Cooperative Extension, P.O. Box 1149, Carthage, NC 28327. Any amount is helpful. PS Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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T h e S e r i A L e AT e r

The inside Story

chef Mark elliott makes carving a pig fun and informative

By DaViD c. Bailey

Painted on the side of Mark

Photographs by Cassie Butler

Elliott’s farm-to-fork refrigerated Ford truck is the motto “Know Thy Food.” Taking the meat-loving chef’s mandate literally, some of the more adventurous diners at Elliott’s on Linden show up for his hog take-downs. “I hope you’re not squeamish,” says Elliott with a boyish grin, waving a meat saw over the carcass of half a hog that’s sporting one of those macabre grins that only dead hogs assume. “Ehhhh-hewww,” goes the saw. “Ehhh-hew, ehh-hew, eh-hew.” “Every time I do this I get better,” says Elliott to an audience of 42, each of whom paid $39 to watch him dismember a pig . . . and drink North Carolina craft beer. . . and eat a five course meal featuring pork, pork, pork, pork and, well, more pork (hey, it works for me). But the real draw is the mélange of information, entertainment and excess that mixes culinary instruction, food art, down-home victuals and tres chic viands along with comedy: “I don’t slice and drink at the same time,” quips Elliott when someone offers him a glass of Duck Rabbit Sweet Stout. “You lose pinkies doing that.” Though it could have been billed Hop’n’Hogfest, Elliott calls his soirees “Swine & Suds: For the Love of Pork.” It’s his way of filling the tables on offnights and introducing customers to his local-food philosophy. “People will

spend a lot of time worrying about the brand of their car, their clothing, even the faucet in their house, and then they’ll run to the supermarket and buy the cheapest steak,” he says. Elliott’s hogs come from Cane Creek Farm, a 550-acre spread in Snow Camp where livestock rotate continuously from pasture to woods. “I can look you in the eye and say I know this pig had a good life and was raised properly and was cared for and well fed.” The 45-year-old Elliott, who was executive chef at Magnolia Inn before opening several boites around town, started his demonstrations with locally sourced lambs, 35 or 40 of which he buys a year. About two years ago, he also did a hog demo and it proved popular. Working from the snout to the tail, the show begins with Elliott using a flexible and very, very sharp knife to demonstrate the location of a pork-blade steak, named for the shoulder blade. The Boston butt, he says, is a continuation of this piece of meat. He also shows us where the pork cheeks and jowl come from. “I’m Brazilian,” says a young woman following every movement of Elliott’s knife. “We eat everything. Do you salt the jowl?” Elliott does, he says, but also uses it in lentils dressed with a sherry vinaigrette. “From there to there is your pork belly. That’s your bacon,” Elliott says, taking up his saw. “Ehhh-hew, ehh-hew, eh-hew.” A highly recognizable piece of meat emerges: “So that’s your slab bacon. We’ll age it with salt, maybe even truffle salt.” Platters of pulled pork on chive-and-cheddar biscuits arrive. No one seems the least bit fazed about openly snacking on the demo’s next of kin, certainly not the Serial Eater. Why would people pay good money to watch a porcine autopsy? Good question, Elliott says, and the answers are many. Knowing where a cut of meat comes from gives it a back story, making the eating of it more interesting. TV shows like “ER” and cooking shows have made people more comfortable with graphic

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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T h e S e r i A L e AT e r

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depictions of (to use a phrase coined by T.S. Eliot) what’s beneath the skin. But most of all, Elliott thinks, people want to reconnect with the source of their food. “In England where I grew up, there was a butcher, there was a greengrocer, there was a fishmonger. Everybody who’s here is interested in where his food comes from,” he says — anatomically and geographically. “They want to understand the story.” Elliott says he is also a storyteller, only he underlines his narrative with a knife and saw. Mark Elliott grew up in Devon in the southeastern part of England, famed for its beef and dairy products. He says his mother was a great cook, serving up hearty fare — huge English breakfasts, Yorkshire pudding and roast beef. His dad loved to fix fish and chips and would carve the kids’ initials out of potatoes. From the age of 11, Elliott knew he wanted to be a chef, taking home ec in school and getting teased for it. Rather than trying to put together a rock band like other teens, he worked after school in a fancy restaurant called Disraeli’s, “after the prime minister guy, you know. It was haute cuisine during the era of full-silver service.” At 17, he became an apprentice to a chef while earning a degree in classical French cuisine from South Devon Technical College. After working for a hotel group in Nuremburg, Germany, he signed on as chef on a yacht owned by a rich Hawaiian couple. Sailing the French and Italian Riviera, Elliott learned some basic lessons on adapting his classical brigade-style French training to accommodate what was fresh and available — lessons that are at the very heart of what he’s branded as his farm-chef-table style of cuisine. “You had to improvise, he says. “Day-inand-day-out you had to go into the village and get what was fresh.” After a stint with the renowned Hawaiian fusion chef Roy Yamaguchi, Elliott moved to Pinehurst. In addition to Elliott’s on Linden, he’s started two other restaurants (both in Southern Pines) since leaving the Magnolia Inn — the highly casual Sly Fox in 2010, which he calls a gastro-pub, and Rue 32 in 2011, a downtown boite specializing in small plates “with worldly flavors.” Although the three restaurants are obviously by design based on three different concepts appealing to three distinct audiences, one constant stands out — the local produce movement that keeps gaining popularity. Elliott’s own career has come full circle back to farms, where he makes treks as many as three times a week to pick up butter, milk and cream from Maple View Farm in Hillsborough; artisinal goat cheese from Goat Lady Dairy in Climax and Celebrity Dairy in Siler City; lambs from Santa Maria Farm in Aberdeen; grits from Old Mill of Guilford in Oak Ridge; and hogs from Cane Creek, which raises a mix of hog breeds from Gloucestershire Old Spots to Farmer’s Hybrids. “Ehhh-hew, ehh-hew, eh-hew,” goes the saw. “Once this comes off,” Elliott says, “you’re going to

March 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e S e r i al e at e r

have an ‘aha’ moment. Sure enough, what emerges is a piece of meat everyone’s seen in the supermarket, the loin. “I like to cut them so there’s a lot of meat left on the ribs,” he says. Active muscles like the shoulder and belly have the most flavor, whereas center-cut pork chops from the loin are meatier and more likely to be tender, though not quite as flavorful. Working front to back, Elliott shows where the hams come from. “Any difference in the taste between the front leg and the back leg?” someone asks. “There’s always someone who can detect a difference, but me, I’m an eater. I like it all,” he says, gripping his love handles through his apron with both hands. “You don’t get like this eating on a diet.” The hogs Elliott gets weigh about 280 pounds, a whole lot of meat. Much of it is scrap, ends and pieces, which means that Elliott has introduced his diners to scrapple (don’t ask what it is if you don’t already know), pates and ham hock (the equivalent of our shins) — a part of the pig that helped him win the 2011 N.C. Department of Agriculture’s Best Dish in N.C. competition for house-cured shins served with red-eye vinaigrette. And what makes his five-course pork so lip-smacking good is how he’s used those ends and pieces to serve five courses of home-spun, comfort food from many different cultures — pulled pork, blood sausage, mortadella,

pork terrine and a ham that Elliott spontaneously pulls out of the walk-in cooler and takes around from table to table, offering diners freshly sliced, savory slabs of quick-cured ham. In fact, much of the appeal to these Hop’n’Hogfests is Elliott’s irrepressible and irresistible love of meat and how much pleasure he derives from seeing people enjoy themselves. No sooner does our table catch him dousing his own portion of blood sausage in the kitchen with classic British HP Sauce than he’s pouring it over our blood sausage. He tells us he recently got two whole cows in and someone asks him whether he’s considering doing a cow take-down. At first, he said he thought a cow was way too big for a demo, massive in fact, but after he got to thinking about it, he decided a half a cow was, well, half as big. Big beef demo coming soon.

“I’m one of those people who in life is always tinkering,” he says. “I never consider myself complete. I’m always learning.” And as Mark Elliott learns, his students wait for what’s next, napkin tucked under their chin, fork in hand. Upcoming at Elliott’s on Linden: On Wednesday, March 21 at 6 p.m, Elliott will host a beef breakdown, featuring a portion of a steer from Hill Top Angus Farm in Mount Gilead, followed by a four-course dinner beginning at about 7 p.m. for $29. The next Swine & Suds event will be Thursday, April 12, at 6 p.m. with dinner at 7 p.m. for $39. For more reservations or information call (910) 215-0775 or visit www.elliottsonlinden.com . PS Our foodie David C. Bailey is a contributor to PineStraw magazine and O.Henry magazine.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

March 2012

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o u t o f t h e bl u e

Picking Your Pocketbooks My favorite bags are plain and functional. What is in them — well, that’s another story

By Deborah Salomon

Clothes may make the man but a

purse says volumes about a woman. Those volumes have been edited drastically since radio personality Art Linkletter rummaged for embarrassing contents in the purses of audience members.

Think of your purse as a Rorschach ink blot. In fact, the trendy ones look like inkblots: amorphous, blighted with bling, trailing buckles and tassels. Practical? Hardly. But this should come as no surprise to a society that turned men’s denim work pants into a fashion icon. Biblically and before, “purse” meant a unisex pouch containing coins. Money is about the last thing you’ll find in a woman’s purse today. With cell phones and digital parking meters, we don’t even need coins. Soon, perhaps, pink piggy banks equipped with debit-card receptors? “Pocketbook” makes even less sense — but maybe not. Most purses have interior and exterior pockets. Some are ponderous enough to carry the complete works of William Shakespeare, and I don’t mean on Kindle. Perhaps pocketbook, the purse, was coined after Pocket Books, a trademark of Simon & Shuster for “dime” novels. Since most dime novels featured bosomy damsels and their Fabio lovers on the covers, women needed a sack in which to carry the dime and hide the torrid tome. Handbag seems most logical: a bag carried in the hand. Except I carry mine over my shoulder. Handbag could mean clutch, a style Duchess Catherine reinvigorated. At least she has a lady-in-waiting to pick it up when she puts it down. I’ve lost multiple clutches unless they had spaghetti shoulder straps — a semantics nightmare. Which leaves “bag,” as in bag lady. Or bag men, who carry stolen loot. Or man bags, those sporty leather rectangles liberated guys sling over their brawny shoulders until teased under the table. Back to the ink blot: A woman who carries a slender, flat bag is well-organized to the picky point. She’s probably with a man because car keys and wallets don’t fit. She is spared vision issues that require reading glasses, sunglasses, contact lens case, wetting drops. She applies a day-long coat of makeup at home. She doesn’t have allergies or a cold: No hanky. If she ever develops chest pains — tough. Smartphone, yes. Aspirin, no. Next, the huge, metal-studded bags in neon colors. I call them Bette Midlers — brash, loud, screaming: If you don’t like my big turquoise patentleather purse I’ll hit you over the head with it. Fully loaded, those bags double as unconcealed weapons for which no permit is required. Women who carry bags with the designer’s name replicated all over are making a statement: “This is who I am.” No further information available at this time.

A granny bag is always nondescript black or brown, probably vinyl, with intermediate-length straps, no definable shape, no heavy metal, room for Tums, a compact and lipstick, a wallet stuffed with photos, a box of raisins, maybe an appointment book and a flip phone. Because they are so alike, granny bags should never be put down near other granny bags or the owner could end up with somebody else’s Hershey kisses. Chances are, the woman who carries a flowery quilted cotton bag is sweet, kind, traditional, wears wraparound skirts, chalk-white beads and espadrilles. I own way too many purses because I wouldn’t spend what the only one I ever wanted costs. Instead of succumbing I paid for it twice in compromises. They all have shoulder straps partly to keep my hands free, mostly so I won’t look like Elizabeth II, queen of handbags. Soft-sided is best, with a wide opening, preferably zippered. Flaps are too floppy. Nothing more frustrating than a roomy bag with a narrow entryway into which I must thread wrap-around sunglasses. I want an exterior cell-phone pocket with a secure closure. In that bag you will find my life: passport (in case Fabio whisks me away to Mustique); cash in the zippered pocket (should I lose my credit cards); credit and membership cards, driver’s license and registration; checks from three banks, business cards and enough health insurance documentation for open heart surgery all bulging from a wallet. Also a reporter’s notebook, a tiny flashlight, a key ring heavy enough to weigh down Quasimodo; three packets of airline peanuts, four pens and one pencil in case they run dry; two lipsticks, a comb, rubber bands, safety pins, aspirin and allergy pills, a handkerchief and Kleenex, reading glasses, coin purse, granola bar and a Ziploc bag full of coupons, half expired. Therefore, my big but not oversized purse (leather in winter, fabric in summer, no vinyl, no heavy metal, no designer label, definitely no quilted cotton) tells you that I am practical, prepared and secure in my unfashionableness. In fact, my specialty is turning silk purses back into sow’s ears. But if you break a bra strap, need quarters for the newspaper box or get a snack attack — snatch mine. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and can be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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March 2012 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B IRD WA T CH

Western Tanager

Photograph by Maike McCloy

This rare traveler recently appeared in Pinehurst. Keep your eyes out for more.

By Susan Campbell

Here in the Sandhills we

occasionally find western wanderers soaring overhead, perched in the treetops, or even at a feeder. Birds have wings and so they can (and do) end up anywhere. That is the most exciting part of watching birds: You never know who might show up!

We do know that some birds are more prone to vagrancy. Whether this condition is a result of wandering, getting lost or blown off course, we cannot usually say. Species that are long-distance migrants are, not surprisingly, at risk for mishaps en route. Very little about migration is understood even though it has been studied a great deal. The fact is that birds do migrate and that most individuals are successful at it, which allows their genes to be passed on to the next generation. This is not to say that those birds that end up off track are bound to stay lost forever or perish as a result of a wrong turn along the way. In fact, we believe that these out-of-place individuals in some cases represent the beginning of a range expansion for their species. Records have been kept long enough now that we have documented bird populations moving into new areas of the United States. A species that has been observed in the winter more and more frequently, well outside of its normal range, is the Western tanager. This small but colorful songbird is found in the warmer months throughout

most of the western U.S. in a variety of wooded habitats. They head for Mexico and Central America come fall. However, in the early 1990s, one showed up at a feeder in Wilmington and stayed not just one winter but returned for two more. It fed on suet, shelled seeds and fruit during its stay. Since then, more than a dozen other individuals have been documented along the southern coast of our state. What does this mean? It is probably too soon to tell. But bird lovers in our southeastern counties are keeping their eye out for Westerns each year. This winter, a male Western tanager turned up in a yard in Pinehurst. The hosts, being bird people, realized who this out-of-place visitor was. All tanagers molt twice a year and happen to be drab from early fall through early spring so identification is a bit tricky when these birds tend to appear in the East. Unlike our more familiar summer and scarlet tanagers, Westerns have noticeable barring on their wings and are a bit brighter yellow on their underparts. I would wager that very few people reading this column have ever seen a Western tanager or even heard of the species before. But it pays to be prepared with binoculars and a good field guide should something “odd” like this show up. Rarities are always possible — whether you are visiting a large wildlife refuge, local park, are in a McDonald’s parking lot or even in your own backyard. PS Susan would love to receive your wildlife sightings and photos. She can be contacted by email at susan@ncaves.com, by phone at (910) 949-3207 or by mail at 144 Pine Ridge Drive, Whispering Pines, NC 28327.

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T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

A Rich Man It’s the journey that counts, not the arrival. And don’t forget the view along the way

By Tom Bryant

“Rich,” the old

man said dreamily, “is not baying after what you can’t have. Rich is having the time to do what you want to do. Rich is a little whisky to drink and some food to eat and a roof over your head and a fish pole and a boat and a gun and a dollar for a box of shells. Rich is not owing any money to anybody, and not spending what you haven’t got.”

Robert Ruark, The Old Man’s Boy Grows Older The only person I’ve known to come close to Ruark’s description of a rich man was my grandfather. He came along at a time when hard work, a little luck, and a lot of smarts enabled him to accumulate wealth, but he knew how to use his money and his time. I would say that I have been extremely lucky to follow along in my grandfather’s footsteps, not so much with wealth, but now that I’m retired, with time. It has taken some adjustments, but Linda, my bride, and I, in the short years that we have been away from the everyday work hassle, have learned to slow down and smell the roses, or hunt ducks, or fish, or take camping trips, or just do whatever we want. I don’t want to jinx our good fortune during these so-called golden years, but we’re having a good time. For the past several days, I’ve been sorting through and cleaning up duck hunting gear. After a duck season that will enter the hunting journal as a bust due to the spring-like weather, I’ve been anxious to begin our late winter adventure, which will be a fishing/camping trip down to Everglades City and Chokoloskee Island on the southwestern tip of Florida. My grandfather introduced me to southern Florida when I was a youngster. He had a cabin on Halfway Creek, which flows out of the Everglades into Chokoloskee Bay. During those days, I was fortunate that my grammar school principal let me take a couple of weeks during the winter to visit my grandfather

at his camp. I can remember him saying that the trip would be a great educational experience, and the only thing I would have to do would be write a paper about what I had learned and present it to my class when I returned. For a 12-year-old boy, the trip was quite an adventure. For eight days or more, my grandfather and I were out on the creeks and bays or roaming the Ten Thousand Islands. We caught fish like you wouldn’t believe. Snook, snapper, sheepshead, bream, trout, redfish, and an occasional channel bass. After a day on the water, we would come home with enough fish to feed half the neighborhood. I had such a marvelous time during those visits that a few years ago on a trip to Key West, Linda and I decided to see if the area was the same as I remembered. In a way, I was reluctant to stop by Everglades City because I was afraid that it had gone the way of other early outdoor haunts of mine. Perhaps civilization had arrived and, in the name of progress, ruined everything. We were pleasantly relieved to see that it had changed very little. The coconut trees were fewer but still as tall and majestic as ever, and the old Rod and Gun Club was perched on the banks of the Barron River in all its remembered glory. Although we were there only part of a day, we resolved to add the location to our after-retirement plans and go back for a longer visit. Two years ago we returned to the little village and spent a week at what Linda now refers to as “The Fish Camp.” The little Airstream’s campsite was smaller than we were used to, but its location was perfect, right on Chokoloskee Bay. We had all the conveniences of home with our little camper and beautiful views to boot. Unfortunately on this trip, I was undersupplied in the fishing department. I reasoned when we left home that since we were going to be camping all around Florida, I wouldn’t need much fishing gear. Wrong. On our next adventure, I hope to take my canoe and a couple of bait casters and a fly rod. Last week I talked to the camp manager who told me an old line that I’ve heard before and wanted to be true. He said the fishing is so good that you have to hide your bait while you’re baiting the hook or the fish will jump right in the boat. I’ve always been interested in Southern swamps, probably because I cut

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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T h e sp o r t i n g l i f e

my teeth on black water rivers of South Carolina, again thanks to my grandfather. There are wild areas of beautiful primordial bog lands that can only be seen by small boats or canoes. I’ve paddled the Okefenokee Swamp on the border of Georgia and Florida several times; but in the past few years, it has turned into more of a tourist location, and Linda and I give it a wide berth. Man has succeeded in destroying a big portion of the Everglades by draining the northern area for cattle ranches and produce farms, but the lower section around Everglades City is holding its own. Even though the community has been discovered by snowbirds (tourists from snowbound states who head south for the winter), their numbers are not as many as in other areas of the state. The natives of the Everglades, including the Seminoles, have changed just as their counterparts have in other wilderness areas of the country. The old timers have died and the young generation is up to speed in everything, including electronics. When the feds took over the swamp in the early forties and made it a national park, some regulations took away the livelihoods of most of the local population. No more alligator hunting or trapping or commercial fishing and crabbing. So being an independent lot, the populace did what they had to do to make a living. Just like some of our North Carolina mountain people, many of the folks surrounding the Everglades started making whisky. When the feds found and destroyed their stills, they resorted to using their boats for smuggling drugs from South America. At one time, during a federal drug bust in Everglades City, a large part of the population was indicted. Economically, the little town is different now for sure. Residents of Everglades City and Chokoloskee Island make their living by guiding fishermen and showing rich tourists around their incredible swamp. I like to think, though, that my visit means a little more than taking an airboat ride or participating in the newcomer tourist thing. On this adventure, I’ll try hard to be recognized as a sportsman like my granddad and keep the Glades’ interest at heart. Ruark was right. “Rich” is a state of mind. The older I get, the more I try to follow the Old Man’s definition for what rich means to the outdoorsman. Watching a sunset over the Ten Thousand Islands doesn’t cost a thing, but the reward is immeasurable. I know many folks with tons of money, big houses, fancy cars and all the fine wine and food they can eat or drink, but I’m afraid all that stuff may have kept them from seeing my kind of sunset. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist.

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You’ll fi nd more than 50 of the best brands here, including one you can’t find anywhere else. Adidas • Peter Millar • Sport Haley • Tail • Tehama • Puma • Titleist • Tommy Bahama • Under Armour • FootJoy • Straight Down Pinehurst Collection • SDI • Zero • Maui Jim • Oakley • Brighton • Dooney & Burke • Putterboy Collection • Vera Bradley • Isda Cole Haan • Lilly Pulitzer • Iliac • Aveda • La Bella Donna • J. Lindeberg • Ashworth • Oxford • Polo • Ashworth • Adidas • Ahead American Needle • Bobby Jones • Callaway • Cutter & Buck • EP Pro • Fairway & Greene Gear • Greg Norman • Imperial • Nike

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t h e P ass i n g M o m e n t

Late afternoon, Pinehurst, February 2012 Gail Williamson grew up next door to the store her grandfather built and father operated in the 1930s. Photographs by John Gessner

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3 us 1 n o Ch B r a ok m Bo Ble la i va

a

L

Prologue: Ode to Billy Joe

et’s begin with perhaps the most memorable Masters ever played, the last time Sam Snead, Byron Nelson, or Ben Hogan won a major golf championship. The year was 1954, and the unlikely star who outshone the three greatest players since Bobby Jones was a genial, wisecracking, thirty-two- year- old lumber broker from the foothills of North Carolina’s Blue Ridge Mountains, an unknown amateur named William Joseph Patton — “Billy Joe” to his friends back home in tiny Morganton. Prior to his unlikely summons to Augusta, the most outstanding items on Billy Joe’s résumé were lone victories in the Carolina Amateur and the Carolina Open and a somewhat surprising appointment as an alternate to the 1953 Walker Cup team, which netted him the Masters invitation. He was known for his sharp wit and infectious storytelling, his blazing backswing and go-for-broke style of play that often sent his drives anywhere but the fairway. His buddies back at the Mimosa Hills Country Club were almost as amused as they were impressed by his unexpected new honor. Several made a point, in fact, of asking Billy Joe to at least bring home an autograph by Ben Hogan or Sam Snead. Five decades later, not long before he passed away, Billy Joe Patton sat on a pretty terrace at the retirement home where he lived in Morganton, and recalled the most remarkable week of his life. “I drove down to Augusta on Monday of Masters week very excited that I would finally get to meet Snead, Hogan, and Nelson. I’d only seen Byron and Ben play in Greensboro and Asheville. I also decided that, with nothing to lose, I would just try to have some fun. The instant I turned up Magnolia Lane, though, my heart was racing like you can’t believe. “In those days, players parked right in front of the clubhouse. So I parked and got my clubs out of the trunk and noticed a Cadillac convertible sitting nearby with a fella wearing a banded straw hat sitting there talking to a lady. ‘Oh, my God,’ I said to myself. ‘That’s Sam Snead.’ I tried not to disturb them, but as I passed Sam

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A m e r i c a n T r i u m v i r at e

Snead looked over at me, winked and tipped his hat. “I knew it was going to be a fun week,” Billy Joe recalled fifty-five years after the fact, with a roguish little twinkle in his eyes. “That was the first time I ever saw Sam Snead.” But it wouldn’t be the last. With a homemade golf swing that was quicker than a frightened hummingbird, Billy Joe entered the tournament’s annual long-drive contest on Wednesday afternoon and won it with a poke of 338 yards, the first time an amateur had ever done so. Members of the press swarmed around the well-dressed Carolinian with gray-flecked hair and neat rimless eyeglasses, discovering a fellow who was not only having the time of his life but also charming fans with every utterance and unorthodox swing. “Are you planning to hit the ball that hard in the tournament?” one of them demanded. Billy Joe smiled. “Well,” he drawled pleasantly, “I didn’t come this far to lay up, that’s for sure. You didn’t pay to see me play it safe.” He followed up this disarming swagger by shooting 70 on a cold and blustery opening day to tie veteran E. J. “Dutch” Harrison for the first-round lead. Only two other players in the field, Lloyd Mangrum and Jack Burke Jr., managed to shoot under par that day. Defending champion Ben Hogan got around the course in 72, former champion Sam Snead in 74. And Byron Nelson, who retired from competitive golf at the end of the 1946 season but never missed an opportunity to compete in the Masters, split the difference between his great rivals with an opening 73. Going in, these three were the unchallenged favorites at golf’s most prized invitational event, more or less in that order. Each, after all, had won the Masters twice. Between them they owned twenty-one major championships, nine Vardon trophies for the year’s lowest scoring average, eleven Player of the Year honors, fourteen Ryder Cup appearances and no fewer than thirteen PGA Tour records. But on the heels of his extraordinary year in 1953, when he won five of the eight events he entered and captured the Masters, U.S. Open, and British Open, Ben Hogan had announced his plans to dial back his appearances and join his longtime friend and rival Byron Nelson in retirement. Many felt Slammin’ Sammy Snead wouldn’t be far behind. Though he still displayed the silkiest natural swing ever seen in championship golf, within a month he would turn forty-two, an old man by tour standards. For the record, Byron had already reached that mark, and Hogan would hit it later that year in August. “There was an unmistakable feeling that an era was ending that year at Augusta,” says Bill Campbell, the other outstanding amateur in the field that week, a thoughtful West Virginian playing in his fourth Masters. Something of a protégé of Snead’s, he would go on to anchor eight Walker Cup teams and eventually serve as president of the United States Golf Association. “Everyone knew why Sam and Ben and even Byron were there. Each one wanted one more major title, ideally the Masters, because they each owned two titles and together they had more or less put the Masters on the map. Everyone was watching to see who would take the rubber match, so to speak. But that’s what makes what Billy Joe accomplished all the more wonderful. He stole the show from the three greatest players who ever played at one time, on the greatest stage in golf.” On day two, when the weather turned colder and gustier, Harrison carded a 79 and Hogan slipped back a stroke to 73, leaving Billy Joe alone atop the leaderboard at the halfway mark with 144. Cary Middelcoff, who was five strokes off the lead, took a glance at the board with the easygoing amateur in first and sourly grumbled, “If that guy wins the Masters, it will set golf back fifty years.” One veteran wire service reporter aptly dubbed the colorful amateur the “Falstaff from the Foothills.” The fans couldn’t have disagreed more. As he strolled Augusta National’s lushly groomed fairways, at times twirling a club and whistling out loud, Billy Joe waved to friends from back home in the gallery and exchanged warm greetings with any stranger who cheered him on, and shook every hand offered from behind the ropes. “Always wink at the crowds,” he advised a young

player making a similar debut decades later. “That way everybody thinks you’re winking at them.” Ben Hogan wasn’t the least bit pleased to be paired with the talk of the tournament for his third round. Since his miraculous return from a terrible car accident that nearly took his life in late 1949, he had won six major championships and achieved mythic stature in American sports. Long considered the coldest and most methodical player who ever played, and quite possibly the finest shotmaker of all time, he was a legend whose personal omerta was a code of silence that suffered no fools and certainly not a gabby amateur, and everything Billy Joe did that day irritated the poker- faced Hogan, starting with the fact that he, like millions of Americans, seemed to play golf purely for the fun of it. For Ben Hogan, golf wasn’t merely a source of livelihood and fame; it was his sole means of survival. Fun never entered the equation. The amateur’s first big sin was outdriving his playing partner on the opening holes. Then, as they were walking together to the fourth tee, one of his High Country pals playfully called out, “Hey, Billy Joe, who’s that little guy in the funny white cap?” The comment probably wasn’t meant to be malicious or insulting, most likely just an attempt to help keep his friend loose and free-swinging. But as Billy Joe predictably began spraying his drives right and left, the “Wee Ice Man” — as admiring Scots in 1953 at the British Open had nicknamed Hogan — refused to pay the amateur any attention, and his expression grew even more glacial after Billy Joe executed several near- impossible recovery shots from deep trouble to save par, prompting Hogan to mutter as he trudged off the ninth green, “I can’t stand this.” True to form, however, Hogan buckled down and finished with a 69, while Billy Joe ambled into the house wearing the same catfish smile, lucky to have carded a 75, but still the new darling. “Billy Joe had put on a wonderful display,” Bill Campbell remembers, “but the feeling around the tournament was that it was time for the amateurs to step aside and let the legends take over and settle the matter. That would most likely be Sam or Ben.” Snead’s third- round 70 could easily have been three shots better, but he was still in the thick of it. Nelson, on the other hand, followed an untidy second-round 76 with a 74 that pretty well took him out of contention for a third title. He would, however, rally in the final round and finish tied for twelfth, not bad, Herbert Warren Wind later noted, for a man who’d retired nearly a decade before. As Ben Hogan strode down the fairway of the fourth hole in the final round, bound tightly in adhesive leg bandages from groin to ankle and wrapped in his own secure world of absolute mental isolation, a thunderous roar came off the sixth hole ahead, causing him to do something he rarely did in the heat of competition. Spotting a wire service reporter, he walked over to ask what had just happened. The reporter held up one finger. “Billy Joe just made an ace on six,” he said. Hogan showed no emotion. At the sixth tee, a second sustained roar echoed through the pines. Billy Joe, Hogan learned, had just birdied the eighth hole. And after his drive on seven found the heart of the fairway, he heard another roar come from the direction of the clubhouse. That turned out to be Billy Joe’s birdie at nine. The greatest player of the age and the amiable amateur were now tied for the lead in the eighteenth edition of the Masters. As Hogan stood on the eleventh tee, Billy Joe hit his drive on the famous par-five thirteenth, a low slice that stopped in the pine trees bordering the fairway. From this spot, most experienced players intent on winning a major championship would choose wisdom over valor and lay up short of Rae’s Creek, allowing themselves a short pitch to the green and a decent shot at birdie. Billy Joe, however, hearing the summons of the gods in his ears, gambled on a different path to glory. All week long his fans had been issuing glandular rebel yells and patting him on the back, urging him to go for every risky shot on this notoriously unforgiving golf course. One bit of fanciful Augusta lore

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A m e r i c a n T r i u m v i r at e

holds that as he was trying to decide between going for the green or laying up, a big-time gambler — who stood to lose a fortune if one of the favorites got upset by some good-time hacker — took Billy Joe’s elbow and informed him that his mama had been rushed to the hospital back home, hoping this news might derail his freight train. No one knows for sure if that really happened, but Billy Joe chose to go for the green and knocked his second shot into the creek. After retrieving his ball from the water, choosing to play the chip in his bare feet, he slipped and dumped his ball in the water for a second time in ten minutes. The huge gallery went deathly quiet, witnessing every amateur’s nightmare being played out before them. Unsmiling for the first time that week, Billy Joe wound up with a double-bogey seven on the hole. Back on hole eleven, meanwhile, unaware of Billy Joe’s troubles ahead, Hogan made a rare tactical error by attacking a flag tucked in the lower front portion of the green; his approach shot trickled into the pond, producing a Greek chorus of groans from the vast galleries assembled on three pivotal holes in what Herb Wind would soon christen “Amen Corner.” Hogan took six there, but Billy Joe’s adrenaline and poor choices resulted in a costly bogey on fifteen. As he was tapping in for his seven at fifteen, three holes ahead Sam Snead finished his round with a workmanlike 72 that put him in the house at 289 — and, for the moment at least, in sole possession of the lead. His partisans were going crazy up on the hilltop by the clubhouse. Just under an hour later, however, Hogan limped home with an unhappy 75 that tied him. At this stage of his life and career, the last thing Ben wanted to endure was a playoff — especially against his greatest remaining rival. On the other hand, he was relieved that he wouldn’t have to battle an amateur with a wild swing and a free spirit for his third Masters title. By that point, Billy Joe Patton was standing under the famous oak tree by the clubhouse, enjoying a cold beverage and signing autographs and soaking up the congratulations of every Masters patron who passed by. A few minutes before, having just missed an eighteen-foot putt for birdie that would have put him in the playoff for the 1954 title, Billy Joe had dropped his head in disappointment — but quickly raised it again and beamed at the crowd, as if he still heard the angels singing. “They all wanted to shake his hand,” remembered CBS broadcaster and fellow North Carolinian John Derr. “Billy Joe was suddenly every ordinary golfer’s hero — a guy who’d nearly beaten the two finest players of the age on what was becoming the single most admired setting in golf.”

T

he next day’s playoff shaped up like a golf junkie’s dream come true, the two reigning titans of the game in a head-to-head rubber match for glory with all the intimacy of a country club match-play final. As events unfolded, however, they both played careful and fairly uninspired golf through twelve holes, but Snead made his move by making a birdie at thirteen. Showing visible signs of fatigue, Hogan three-putted on sixteen for a bogey four. During their match, it would be remembered, he reached every green in regulation whereas Snead hit only fourteen. But he needed thirty-six putts against his opponent’s thirty-three, and therein lay the winning margin. Ben shot 71, Sam a stroke better. At the presentation ceremony, as they posed with Bob Jones for a photograph with the real star of the week — the tournament’s low amateur — Snead grinned and said, “Hey, Billy Joe, you damn near got the whole turkey.” “Well, Sam, I gave it my best.” Billy Joe was still in a daze, he admitted later, because he’d learned his performance meant he would be invited back next year. Snead turned to Hogan. “It’s nice of you to let me have another one,” he drawled as Bob Jones helped him slip on his champion’s green jacket, then added playfully, “Hey, brother, I thought someone said you were going to retire. Did you forget?” Hogan smiled, always gracious in defeat. “Only how to putt, Sam,” he replied.

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The comment was telling. Neither man would win another major championship. From this moment, an officially “retired” Ben Hogan’s public appearances became much rarer events, highlighted by a pair of near-wins in the next two Masters and a trio of breathtakingly contested U.S. Opens in ’55, ’56, and ’60. He would win only one more tournament — his fourth Colonial National Invitational in 1959. At this point his vaunted skills would sharply taper away and his tournament entries would dwindle until they ceased altogether in 1971. The seemingly ageless Sam Snead, on the other hand, enjoyed something of a playing renaissance, winning fourteen more tour events and another six times on the senior tour. Similar to Hogan, he made bold runs at four more major championships only to come up just shy. Before he was finished, however, he would win five World Senior titles and continue to tour and give exhibitions until he became the pro emeritus at his beloved Greenbrier Resort in West Virginia, the first man to win a PGA event in six different decades. Whatever else is true of the 1954 Masters, the real winners that remarkable week were the Masters tournament itself and the game’s popularity in America at large. Patton’s play and the hugely anticipated battle royale between Hogan, Snead, and Nelson generated more press coverage around the world than any time since Jones left the game — confirming a growing belief that the Masters had finally achieved major parity with the British and American opens and the PGA Championship, bringing out the best in pro and amateur alike on a course that would soon be familiar to every golf fan on the planet. Billy Joe’s smiling mug appeared on the cover of Newsweek magazine, and golf writer Charlie Price declared that golf had a new “Give ’em hell people’s hero,” the kind of guy any fan could relate to. In the tournament’s afterglow, golf clubs across the land reported a significant uptick in membership inquiries, while driving ranges and public courses that summer reported record turnouts. The end of an era that Bill Campbell had sensed was real. In the same summer, a younger Coke-swigging amateur from western Pennsylvania won the United States Amateur Championship in Detroit and decided to try to make a living in professional golf. He, too, had a go-for-broke style that every golf fan could relate to. In some ways, Billy Joe Patton had merely been the warm- up act for Arnold Daniel Palmer. Within two years, the Masters would be televised for the first time; and two years after that Palmer would capture his first green jacket and the hearts of millions of American golfers.

“I

f a single golf tournament ever had a more magical week I simply can’t name it,” Herb Wind told me one cool April afternoon in 2001, during what had become an annual post-Masters lunch at his retirement village north of Boston. “I agree with those who say Billy Joe’s Masters represented a turning point in the game of golf. Ben, Sam, and Byron, after all, had set the stage for golf’s greatest period of expansion. But they were just leaving that stage, passing the torch, if you will, to Arnold and Jack Nicklaus and eventually all the rest. Now we have young Tiger Woods.” Woods had won his first Masters in 1997, and this was our third spring luncheon, but I wasn’t there to talk about golf’s most exciting newcomer. I was there to collect Wind’s thoughts about Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, Sam Snead, and the era of golf he perhaps understood better than anyone. Not long after I helped Arnold Palmer write his memoirs in 1998, Ben Hogan’s estate invited me to write an authorized biography of the most elusive superstar in the game’s history. Before I officially said yes, I wanted to talk with Herb in depth about Hogan’s career and to see if he shared my growing belief that Hogan, along with Snead and Nelson, had shaped modern golf in a number of ways. This wasn’t just my own theory. During my decade at Golf Magazine, and

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he always seemed to author a different way to lose it. In doing so, he became another ten years as golf correspondent for Departures, I’d spent a nice chunk convinced, as he once told me, that he was terribly jinxed. That’s why winning of time interviewing early tour stars like Gene Sarazen, Henry Picard, and that final Masters in 1954 meant so much to him.” Paul Runyan, as well as a host of younger pros including Tommy Bolt, Cary I asked if Sam’s colorful personality might have contributed to his image Middlecoff, Jack Burke Jr., Mike Souchak, Bob Rosburg, Dow Finsterwald, problems. Growing up in his adopted home of Greensboro, I’d heard enough Dave Marr, Don January, Ken Venturi, Jack Fleck, Eddie Merrins, amateur legdarkly amusing stories about the Slammer to know that while his unfiltered ends Bill Campbell and Harvie Ward, and, of course, the incomparable Arnold backwoods showmanship appealed to millions of fans, some of his less savory Palmer. To a man, in some form or another, they pointed to the galvanizing efcomments and antics rubbed others the wrong way. His off-color fect that Hogan, Snead, and Nelson humor, for instance, was legendary. At one point, I asked Arnold had on the game. Palmer about the annual Champions Dinner at Augusta, a tradiIn 1994, I spent two days tion Ben Hogan started with money from his own pocket in 1953. chatting with Byron Nelson at Arnold smiled, shook his head, and said, “The dinner is never his Fairway Ranch in Roanoke, complete until Sam displays his physical prowess by kicking the top Texas, ostensibly to gather insights of the door and tells an even worse joke than the year before — at for the fiftieth anniversary of his which point Byron politely excuses himself and goes home to bed.” remarkable year in 1945, when he At the other end of the spectrum, however, I knew from many captured eleven tournaments in conversations with Sam’s closest friends that he was a man of a row and won a total of eighteen uncommon generosity, quietly assisting groups and individuals who in all. Much of our conversation needed a financial boost — belying his popular image as that of a dwelt on Byron’s early career and wealthy skinflint who kept his money safely stashed in a tin can burhis relationship with his leadied in his backyard. If you scratched the surface of town life in Hot ing two rivals. Remarkably, they Springs, one found such stories were quite commonplace, almost alwere all born in 1912 and broke ways involving a local youngster, family, or organization in financial through in quick succession to need. Moreover, I knew from my own experiences around him that, revive public interest in golf in the depending on his mood and the circumstances, Samuel Jackson midst of the darkest days of the Ben Hogan, Byron Nelson, Arnold Palmer, Sam Snead Snead could be as charming and smooth as a Spanish diplomat — or Great Depression. as chilly as the January wind. “The darker side of Sam’s large charisma,” his A few months later, I called on Sam Snead at the Greenbrier and enjoyed longtime friend Bill Campbell told me one winter afternoon at his home in two days of golf and conversation with one of the most colorful, beloved, West Virginia, “is that Sam is possibly the most unfiltered and honest fellow and controversial players of his time. Sam’s seven major titles and eighty- two you’ll ever meet. Sam never left any doubt about how he felt about a person or official victories made him the winningest player in PGA history, but I sensed circumstance. In this way he was pretty simple — and yet, to my way of thinkthat, not unlike his old rival Byron, he felt a little forgotten by writers and ing, he might have been the most interesting and complex of the three.” fans of the modern age. When I pointed out that I had just been hired to help Herb nodded. “Sam was an original, no question about it. That’s what enPalmer write his long-awaited memoirs, Sam laughed and said in a low growl, deared him to so many at a time when the game desperately needed a bonafide “Well, you tell Arnold if it hadn’t been for me and old Ben and Byron, hell, star and headline maker. The tour was really struggling when Sam broke nobody would’ve ever heard of him!” He graciously invited me to come visit through out west and won a flurry of tournaments on the winter tour in 1937. him up at his home in Hot Springs, Virginia, when I finished this project so He was a complete unknown, a plainspoken hillbilly from the Blue Ridge we could “talk some more.” I assured him I would love nothing better. Mountains, as they portrayed him — but he gave golf a legitimate star at a moThis was the background for my lunch visit with Herb Wind in 2001, ment when the tour could easily have gone under. That same year, Byron won when I wanted to hear what the dean of American golf writers, and coauthor his first Masters and Sam nearly won the Open. People really started to pay of Ben’s best-selling Five Lessons: The Modern Fundamentals of Golf, had to say attention to them, and interest in professional golf suddenly grew. Two years about his mythic friend, but also about Sam and Byron. after that, Byron Nelson won the Open and the year after that, of course, Ben Herb laughed when I told him what Sam had told me to tell Arnold Palmer, broke through at Pinehurst and won three tournaments in a matter of weeks. and smiled rather knowingly when I suggested it was a shame that up until then Suddenly you had three hot players making headlines.” no one had produced major biographies on Sam and Byron like the one I was Herb sipped his cucumber soup again and added, “There’s something else embarking upon with Ben. The deeper I got into my subject, the more I realized I find fascinating, and no one has really written about this effect. If you look the critical roles Snead and Nelson played in shaping Hogan’s life and golf game at the long history of golf, any time there were two or three great rivals in the — not to mention reviving the game at a time when professional golf could easily game, the game flourished. In early Scotland you had the famous challenge have slipped back to little more than a second- rate sport. money matches of the Morrises, young and old Tom, and Allan Robertson “You’re quite right. Both Byron and Sam, I think, perhaps feel a little forand later the Dunns from North Berwick. Then came Britain’s Great gotten in light of the so-called Hogan mystique.” He paused to taste his chilled Triumvirate of Vardon, Taylor, and Braid. They created golf’s first popular cucumber soup in the empty, sun-filled dining room. We were sitting by a golf boom and exported the passion for the game to our shores. We soon large picture window, and through the glass the first brave tulips were poking had our own homegrown stars and great rivals in the form of Bobby Jones, up their heads to face yet another reluctant New England spring. “There’s no Walter Hagen, and Gene Sarazen. Golf grew in boundless leaps during these question that Sam feels slighted by history and the golf establishment at large. periods — and so, I might add, did the technology. That seemed to advance Most of that stems from his painful record in the Opens. He never won our significantly any time there was a trio of stars.” Open and, in fact, managed to lose several of them in the most agonizing ways “So how,” I asked bluntly, “do Sam, Byron, and Ben rank in terms of trios possible. Generally speaking, no player is regarded as truly great unless he of rivals?” wins the tournament believed to be the hardest of all to win — our own Open. He looked up at me, glanced out the window at the emerging tulips, pursed Sam could easily have won several of them, five or six by his own count, but PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 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his lips, and gently shook his graying head, his spoon hovering midair. Every year, I knew from his caregiver, Herb’s brilliant mind was a little more fragile. But his eyes had a sympathetic, alert look in them, and his mind seemed to be happily roaming the fairways of his glorious reporting days. It would be the last lunch we ever had together. “Perhaps I’m not the most neutral of observers on this subject, but I always felt there were never three better players who came along at the same moment — and did so much to propel the game forward. Any one of the three would have made that time remarkable. But the fact that Sam, Byron, and Ben all three appeared at the same moment and effectively changed how golf was perceived in this country — not to mention launched it into the modern era in terms of equipment and the many things they innovated — sets them apart, at least in my judgment, as the finest trio of any time.” Before I could agree with him, my host added, with visible emotion, “You know they were all three born the same year — 1912. What a remarkable year. Fenway Park opened and the Titanic sunk. The fact that two of the three came out of the same caddie yard down in Texas is extraordinary. Equally important, I think, is the fact that their individual personalities, playing styles, and personal values couldn’t have been more different. That’s why each generated his own large group of die- hard followers. They shaped the game and influenced every generation of players that followed them. They introduced practices and ideas that are commonplace today.” “I keep thinking somebody should write about them,” I heard myself say, something I’d been thinking about for months. “A book, I mean, about the effect their trio had on golf.” “Theirs is an extraordinary story that deserves to be told,” he said, then looked at me and smiled again. “I think of them, in fact, as our great triumvirate — the American Triumvirate.”

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hen I mentioned Herb’s comments to Byron a few days later in Roanoke, he merely smiled. His second wife, Peggy, had made us a delicious lunch and lit a crackling fire in their den. After lunch, he showed me some beautiful woodworking projects he was working on out in his shop — one of them being a small chest for Tom Watson’s daughter, Meg — and now we’d settled in his den to continue our conversation about the early days of the tour. The afternoon had turned gray and cold and Peggy had placed a beautiful plaid blanket on her husband’s legs. “That’s very kind of Herb to say,” said Byron. “Looking back, it was an amazing time in golf. But I sometimes feel like it happened to someone other than me. I really think Sam and Ben deserve the lion’s share of the attention because they won more tournaments than I did.” “But only because you retired so early,” I suggested. The official PGA Tour record book spoke for itself. Sam Snead is credited with eighty-two tournament victories, a number that includes seven major championships. Ben Hogan’s official number is nine majors and sixty wins, spanning a career that reached its celebrated apogee atop golf’s Mount Olympus in 1953. Byron Nelson’s total of fifty-two wins and five major championships takes on deeper significance when you take a closer look at his historic final year: he won eighteen out of thirty tournaments, collected seven second-place finishes and produced a scoring average of 68.33 that stood as a record for more than half a century. A common but false assumption is that Byron, who was deemed unfit for active military service due to a congenital blood disorder, pulled off the feat while much of his competition was away in the service. In fact, Sam played in twenty-seven events in 1945 and Ben played in eighteen. Both stars played in more than twenty-seven events in 1946 while Byron — preparing to officially retire and start his cattle ranch — scaled back to twenty-one. Between the resumption of the tour in 1944 and his final appearance in late 1946, Byron won an astonishing thirty-five of his last seventy- six tournaments. Moreover, between 1945 and 1953, at least one member of this American

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Triumvirate won a tournament or finished in the top three more than 60 percent of the time. The record for the most wins in a season was, of course, owned by Byron, with eighteen, but the second and third names on the record list belonged to Ben (thirteen in 1946) and Sam (eleven in 1950). Not even Tiger Woods has ever come close to these marks. Finally, recordkeeping was at best sketchy and at worst nonexistent back then, and in fact all three won dozens more tournaments than they were officially given credit for by the modern Tour. Sam’s partians, for instance, insist he won more than 135 tournaments: he himself claimed the PGA Tour should have at a minimum recognized 115 wins. Likewise, Byron captured at least two dozen two-or three-day events that aren’t included in his total, and Ben told friends he won eighty-five tournaments of some sort or another. So a rough count suggests some 276 victories between the three of them. Byron Nelson was in his prime, just thirty-four, when he walked away from the game, not unlike his friend and hero Bobby Jones. So one can only imagine what his “official” number would have been had he competed another dozen years. Something else to consider is which of the three men — at his peak — was actually the best player. Fans of Byron point out he had five major championships under his belt when he retired in 1946 — two Masters titles, two PGAs, and one U.S. Open. Entering that season, Sam had laid claim to only one major title, the 1942 PGA, but went on to win the British Open at St. Andrews. Ben won his first major championship that summer, too, the first of his two PGA Championships. “If Byron had wanted to keep playing,” Bob Rosburg once told me, “I have no doubt the record everyone would be chasing today would have belonged to him.” True to his gentle, self-effacing nature and deep Christian convictions that regarded earthly achievements as secondary to matters of personal faith, Byron shrugged off these points as I politely raised them in his cozy den. “You know,” he said in his flat Texas drawl, “I know this may sound kind of strange to some folks, but I always considered the things I did after my playing days ended really more significant. I became a good rancher and very active in my church life. I had time to help a few young players who were coming along about that time. Eventually I became a broadcaster and became involved with the golf tournament over in Dallas. I know folks remember me for that eleven in a row, but to tell the truth, nothing meant more to me than helping people.” Unlike Sam or Ben, who enjoyed sweetheart deals with leading golf clubs and resorts that required little more than the use of their names, Byron remained an active head club professional almost up to the day he left the Tour, making his professional feats even more impressive. The young players he worked with included Frank Stranahan, Ken Venturi, Harvie Ward, Dave Marr, Johnny Miller, Corey Pavin, and Ben Crenshaw. His work and close friendship with Tom Watson preceded Watson’s breakthrough and evolution into a major champion. “There’s no question that Byron unlocked the mystery of the modern golf swing,” Venturi told me over the phone a few days before I ventured out to see Byron in Roanoke for the final time. “As far as I’m concerned, he really is the father of the modern golf swing. His golf instruction books — like Ben’s — shaped thousands of young golf swings, including my own, and they’re still doing it today. But more importantly, Byron is the finest gentleman and perhaps the greatest ambassador golf has ever had. He represents everything that is good about the game and the people who love it. In that respect, he touched untold millions.” Indeed, his knowledge of the swing — and mastery of it — prompted the USGA to nickname its own testing robot “Iron Byron.” Perhaps the straightest driver of the ball ever, he is credited with developing the techniques that moved golf from the hickory shaft to the steel shaft era. “Byron’s divots are so straight,” Dave Marr once remarked, “they look like dollar bills.” The first player to become a full-time TV commentator, he led the way for Venturi, Miller, and several others. Then he focused his energies on the tournament in nearby Dallas that became the first PGA event to be perma-

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nently named in honor of a player, the Byron Nelson Classic, helping the Salesmanship Club of that city establish the model of charitable giving that’s standard on tour today. His tenure as an honorary starter at the Masters lasted twenty years, almost a decade longer than anyone else. During our last afternoon together in 2001, Byron seemed both eager to help with my Ben Hogan biography and pleased and a little surprised when I told him that Herb Wind had given me a broader idea, the story of an American Triumvirate. “I will say this,” he told me as we stood outside in a warm Texas wind before we shook hands and said goodbye. “It always struck me as unfortunate that Ben Hogan never really permitted the world to see who he really was — and by that I mean to say not just the cold and intimidating figure so many people think of. But the nice man I knew growing up, and the friend I grew close to when we traveled the early tour together with our wives. We had some wonderful times. And Ben has been both a friend and an inspiration to this game. Millions have tried to copy his golf swing. Every year seems to bring a new book about his secret. That should tell you something.” “And what about Sam?” I had to ask, recalling Arnold’s remark about the Champions Dinner, inwardly bracing for the response. But Lord Byron just smiled. “Sam is Sam. People either love or dislike Sam. There’s no in between. Part of it is Sam doesn’t care for strangers. But if he knows and trusts you, he can be the sole of charm. He’s a lot more complex than most people think, and I’ve always believed he’s a little misunderstood. He was very good for the game — the first serious athlete who kept himself in top shape. They all do that on tour these days. But Sam was the first. There’s never been a more gifted natural player.” Then he winked at me and added, “That’s why he and I still show up to hit the first shots at Augusta every spring, you know. Sam still tries to outdrive me, though I tell him, ‘Why shouldn’t you, Sam? I’ve been retired from golf for over fifty years!’”

f A little over a year after Ben Hogan: An American Life was published, I stopped off in Latrobe during the 2006 U.S. Open to see the new house my boyhood hero Arnold Palmer had built for his new wife, Kit, a gracious lady from California. Following the Saturday afternoon telecast from Winged Foot, Arnold and I went to dinner at the country club where he’d grown up and his father, Deacon, had been the professional. We sat at a small table by the window and talked about his grandson Sam’s pending matriculation from Clemson to the Tour, my recent relocation from Maine to my native North Carolina, and how Tiger Woods now owned the PGA Tour and it seemed only a matter of time before he bettered Jack Nicklaus’s record of eighteen major championships. Arnold seemed pleased to learn I was happy to be back in my old boyhood stomping ground — where I’d first seen him play at the Greater Greensboro Open — and congratulated me on winning the USGA’s Herbert Warren Wind Book Award for my biography on Ben Hogan. Ironically, Herb Wind had passed away just one week before the start of the Open at Pinehurst in 2005, the event that prompted my relocation home to North Carolina. It felt as if a circle had been completed for me — though, as I admitted to Arnold, thanks to Herb, I still had some unfinished business with Sam, Byron, and Ben. I told him about the triumvirate idea and wondered if he felt, as I did, that these three remarkable sons of 1912 — so utterly different in every respect — had collectively saved the ailing professional golf tour, elevating it to heights it hadn’t enjoyed since the days of Jones and Hagen, and set the stage, as it were, for the coming of a king. Arnold pondered for a moment. “You know,” he finally began, “when I decided to turn professional, as Pap warned me, there wasn’t a great deal of money in the professional game. Only a handful of players made a good

living at it. It was still something of a vagabond’s life. Most guys went broke out there. But the three guys we all looked to were Sam, Byron, and Hogan. They’d proved you could make a good living just playing golf and they did things that nobody else had ever done before.” “Such as?” “Well, let’s start with Sam. I met him first. We had a lot of fun playing together. Sam was a serious athlete who made the game look easy and fun to play. People were naturally drawn to that. He was always clowning around, making people smile, which made him all the more popular. I was an athlete, too, and in that respect he became a role model for me. I saw how he took care of himself and extended his career for decades. When talk about starting up a senior tour got serious, Sam was the first guy they called. He’s one reason I supported the senior tour so enthusiastically — now called the Champions Tour, of course. Sam was great for golf.” “Byron?” “Well, for me, Byron was the definition of a gentleman, the greatest ambassador of the game I ever saw. There’s no question his golf swing took the game into the modern era, and his year in 1945 will never be equaled, period. The work he did on TV and with his charity tournament were the models for those who came after him. Byron’s real gift is for people. He loves people and they love him. Don’t believe he’s ever turned anyone down for anything, including an autograph or a speaking engagement. He cares deeply about the traditions and he’s inspired so many great young players in the game. I’d say he really influenced me the most of the three.” “How about Ben?” Arnold smiled. A commonly held view is that Hogan resented this brash and upstart kid from Pennsylvania whose style left nothing in the bag and the massive galleries he quickly generated — an army on the hoof, so to speak. Tellingly, in my presence at least, Arnold always referred to Sam and Byron by their first names, Hogan by his last. “You know, Hogan and I actually liked each other. We had our differences but certainly had great respect for each other. He was a true professional in every respect of the word. I think the essential difference between us is that Hogan didn’t need anyone but Hogan and I was more like Sam and Byron. I needed the fans. Still, you can’t argue with the things he accomplished — the way he meticulously practiced and prepared for a tournament, the ability he developed to summon whatever was necessary to win, not to mention the really fine equipment company he created after he left the game. These were all important improvements, things taken for granted in golf today. And the difficulties he overcame also can’t be overstated. Unless you’ve won a Masters or a U.S. Open or a British Open, you have no idea how difficult that is to do. Hogan earned his glory — and in doing so he made a lot of people pay attention to the game of golf.” Before I could ask him another question, Arnold said, “There’s no question in my mind, they paved the way for the rest of us.” “You mean the Big Three?” I asked — referring, of course, to the triumvirate of Palmer, Nicklaus, and Player that dominated golf through the 1960s and early ’70s, yet further proof of Herb Wind’s theory about the power of three. “No,” Arnold came back. “I mean all of us. You. Me. Anyone who loves golf. Even Tiger Woods. We all owe them a big debt of gratitude.” This, coming from the most charismatic and influential figure in modern golf history, really meant something. And it seemed like both a good ending point for a fine evening with my boyhood hero and a great starting point for American Triumvirate. Please join Jim Dodson and The Country Bookshop for a book signing and the launch of American Triumvirate: M arch 13, 5:30 p.m. at Weymouth Center. Admission is free and books will be available for purchase. R efreshments and cake will be served.

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The Soul of a caddie A tribute to the caddies of Pinehurst golf

North and South Tournament caddies, 1939

By lee PaCe

The caddie driver is a common club, not turned up at

Fortunately, the esteem of the once lowly bag-toter has improved immensely over the course of a century. Caddies have been part and parcel of the Sandhills golf scene from the beginning — much like wire grass, pine straw, two-down presses and nineteenth hole libations. John Daniel, better known by his nickname “Barney Google,” helped Harvie Ward read the greens of Pinehurst No. 2 and one-putt 18 times over a 36-hole North and South Amateur championship win over Frank Stranahan in 1948. “Ward didn’t beat Stranahan today,” one spectator was quoted as saying in Golf World magazine. “Barney Google did.” Jimmy Steed handed Sam Snead the clubs he used to win three North and South Open titles from 1941-50, finish second three more times and traveled with him to Greensboro to work most of the eight Greater Greensboro Open championships Snead collected. “Sam had a great many talents, but one of them was not selecting clubs,” says Bill Campbell, a noted competitor of the era. “Jimmy had the knack of giving Sam the right clubs.”

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Photographs from the Tufts Archives

the end, and is to be used to keep the caddie awake. A caddie is a parody on a small boy, who carries clubs and helps lose the ball. Expert golfers can drive both a ball and a caddie over the course at the same time without help. The Pinehurst Outlook, 1905


Hardrock, 1980 Jerry Boggan dressed like a peacock and trouped through the pine forests chasing Billy Joe Patton’s errant shots during Patton’s three North and South victories from 1954-63. Boggan delivered newspapers starting at 2 a.m. and then would show up at the golf course to lug Patton’s bag, dressed for the weekend in a green suede sweater, green alligator shoes, yellow pants and a yellow and green plaid cap. “I’m ashamed,” Patton would say. “My caddie looks better than me.” And then there was Fletcher Gaines, the rotund little elf who carried for Tommy Armour, Gene Sarazen and Porky Oliver in the North and South Open, and later for Curtis Strange during the Wake Forest golfer’s two North and South Amateur wins from 1975-76. Strange used to ask Gaines to watch him carefully at the top of his backswing and let him know if his hands and the clubhead were “square.” Gaines didn’t know what Strange meant, but he would answer nonetheless, “Yeah, it looks square to me.” Told years later that Fletcher had been shoveling him a load of it way back when, Strange just smiled and said, “Fletcher Gaines, that old son of a bitch.” Daniel, Steed, Boggan, Gaines and other legendary caddies like Hardrock Robinson have graduated to the great caddie yard in the sky, but there remains plenty of fascinating history and an appropriate mix of the new guard in the Pinehurst caddie staff. “These guys are national gems,” Don Padgett, the director of golf at Pinehurst from 1987-2002, said upon the launch of the Pinehurst Caddie Hall of Fame in 2001. “They are walking history books.” And they take the game back to its roots — when Scotsmen walked the links and had time between shots to converse with their playing companions, to give thought to the next shot and to properly inhale the nature. That’s even more important on a course like No. 2, which allows golfers to take motorized carts but restricts them to the extremities of each hole. “You get to the ball too fast when you’re riding,” says Willie McRae, at 78 the most senior caddie at Pinehurst today. “There’s no time to think.” “This golf course was not meant to be played out of a golf cart,” adds Tom Harmicar, a three-year veteran of the staff. “On this golf course, if you get in a cart, you’re just wasting your time. It’s like going to 31 Flavors and ordering vanilla.”

Caddie “Rabbit,” 1935

Fletcher Gaines, Senior Open, 1994

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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The caddie business has changed throughout golf and in Pinehurst over the last hundred years. Pinehurst used to have more than 500 caddies on staff in the 1920s and sometimes on busy days the caddie master would dispatch a wagon to the local schoolhouse to get more boys. Resort management has been steadfast in the face of escalating “cart golf” over the last half-century to keep the caddie staff intact. In 1997, Caddie Master Enterprises Inc. took over Pinehurst’s caddie operation and has approximately 100 caddies on staff during the busy spring and fall seasons. “Our job is to enhance the experience of playing a wonderful, historic golf course,” says Eddie McKenzie, a 22-year member of the caddie staff who grew up in Southern Pines and whose ex-

To walk these fairways with a caddie in tow is a one of golf’s purest pleasures. perience stretches to the PGA and LPGA Tours. “We help golfers with the subtleties of the greens, with playing the right shots around the greens. “A good caddie also relaxes the player. The point is, we’re out here to play eighteen holes and have fun. This is a hard golf course. It takes its toll. I tell a guy if he’s disgusted with the last hole, ‘Hey, it’s like your first girlfriend. Unless you marry her, she’s history. She’s done. Forget it and enjoy the rest of the day.’” Thaddeus McRae caddied for 35 years at Pinehurst in the mid twentieth century and started his son Willie on the job in 1943 at the age of ten. Willie’s been walking the fairways of No. 2 ever since and in 2004 estimated that he’d walked to Los Angeles and back fifteen times carrying bags around the course. He still works today, though management has made a concession to allow him to drive a golf cart around the course — anywhere except on the putting green. “And I’ve got a few more miles left,” says McRae, who along with Jesse James, Bobby Hill, John Ross and Jeff “Ratman” Ferguson represent the old guard on the caddie staff. “My mama always said you’re never old until you die and prove it.” Among the caddie staff today are two

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g o l f T ow n J o u r nA l

Pinehurst Country Club members who first moved to Pinehurst to retire, but essentially got bored and looked for something to do besides play golf. Tony Smarrelli retired to Pinehurst in 1993 and Harmicar in 2008. They joined the caddie staff and found the work a good way to earn a little extra money, get some exercise, meet interesting people and be around golfers. “It’s a great walk, it’s great exercise,” says Smarrelli. “People enjoy caddies. They learn so much more about a course walking and getting a feel for it. On the first hole here, if you hit it left, you’re going to walk ninety yards from the cart to your ball. People need help reading these greens. There are a lot of double breaks they’d never see. If you miss your line by a couple of inches, you wind up four feet from the hole.” “This job is a lot of fun,” adds Harmicar. “There are a lot of good caddies out here. They know what they’re doing. There are guys with degrees. But they get caddie fever and wouldn’t want to be anywhere else.” The value of having a caddie has risen of late with the restoration to No. 2 over 2010-11 authored by the architecture team of Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw. Previously there had been more than a thousand sprinkler heads on the course, many marking yardages to the green, but more than half have been removed and now are found only in the middle of the fairways. It’s harder to find a yardage now, but the caddies are required to carry range-finders and thus have an accurate number to the flag at any point on the course. All of the flags on the course are the same color, removing the old red/white/yellow system of marking front-to-back hole locations. And then there is the issue of how to negotiate the areas of hardpan sand, wire grass and gnarly bunkers. “Donald Ross believed in making you play every club in your bag,” says Eric Stang, a fiveyear member of the staff. “Now you’re going to play every one. You can’t just wale away with the driver without thinking anymore. You’ve got to play some long irons off the tee.” “Before, this course looked like a driving range,” Smarrelli says. “It was all grass, you hit between the trees. Now you see the angles, you play the angles; it’s more of a thinking man’s course. Every hole is beautiful. The resort guests love the look. It’s frustrating for some playing off the hardpan. That’s a tough shot for them.” Pinehurst No. 2 now has the look and personality it sported through the mid-1900s and happily is still accented with one of golf’s most venerable traditions. To walk these fairways with a caddie in tow is a one of golf’s purest pleasures. PS

Pinehurst Resort Realty is the exclusive real estate-purchasing arm of Pinehurst Resort and Country Club, giving you a direct resource into this world-renowned destination and Pinehurst membership. Why Pinehurst Resort Realty is the Best Choice for Sandhills, NC Real Estate We know there are many choices in finding the right real estate agent. Look at our Sandhills realtor agent base, and you’ll clearly see a team of seasoned professionals who know and understand Pinehurst and Sandhills real estate like no other organization.

“Living here is like having a vacation that never ends!”

Located in the Lobby of The Carolina Hotel Village of Pinehurst, NC 28374 1-800-772-7588 www.pinehurstresortrealty.com • pinehurstresortrealty@pinehurst.com

Lee Pace writes about the traditions of Pinehurst and its venerable No. 2 course in his forthcoming book, The Golden Age of Pinehurst. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Pharoahs of the

Fairways Veteran Pinehurst Wind & Yardage Experts PhoTo essay By Tim sayer

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Eddie McKenzie l 58

27 years of service

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Jesse Jones l

32 years of service

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Bob Scheirer l 60

23 years of service

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Charlie Spain l

24 years of service

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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A Caddie’s Life The country club was another world — and we were better for being part of it

By Tom Constantine

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he Country Club of Buffalo is an outstanding example of country club life in the Northeast in the 1950s. Although the original club was actually located in the city of Buffalo, it was relocated in 1928 to the village of Williamsville, New York, approximately ten miles east of Buffalo. The golf course is a Donald Ross design and is set on the edge of what is known in western New York as an escarpment from which the members on clear days could see Lake Ontario in the far distance. The clubhouse itself is an architectural masterpiece of stone and brick that well could be used for a movie set. The Buffalo area was, during this period, an industrial powerhouse and the members of the club represented the highest strata of wealth and social acceptance. Membership was very restrictive, expensive and the waiting list was long. As a young caddie, I can vividly recall trudging up the eighteenth hole, a heavy bag on each shoulder, looking up to an elaborate landscaped terrace with a bright awning where men in golf clothes and women in cocktail dresses sipped gin and tonics as they looked out over the eighteenth green and polo fields. Even though I was dressed in what by this time was a sweat-filled T-shirt, jeans, sneakers and sunburned skin, somehow I felt a sense of pride in being part of this wonderful environment. Sadly, the game of golf and, more importantly, the business of golf has changed so much that it is necessary to explain how it was possible that a 14-year-old boy from a limited economic background living in a city neighborhood could become a caddie at the elite Country Club of Buffalo. The answer is really quite simple. We, as young boys, were at that awkward stage of life where the newspaper routes that we had managed since we were 11 or 12 no longer provided the money needed for our big dreams. My problem was made even more difficult because my parents required that I attend a Catholic high school in the city of Buffalo and that I was responsible to earn enough money to pay for the tuition. We also needed to have something to occupy our time because trouble was always just around the corner. After numerous summer days of three-on-three basketball, touch football in the streets and hopping freight trains, we spent the nights on the street corners dreaming about owning one of the customized cars that cruised by, driven by older boys with girls who just one year previous were part of our social set. On one of those warm and boring nights, a friend, Bob Lee, told us about a job caddying at the Country Club of Buffalo that paid good money. Even though none of us had ever played golf or seen a caddie, we thought it sounded like a good idea. Fortunately for us, the caddie program at the Country Club of Buffalo was well managed. The caddie master Bill O’Brien, a man in his late 50s, always dressed in

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a button-down shirt, tie, Footjoy shoes, an Irish cap and ever present cigar and made sure that he had the best program in the state. The rumor was that he had been an excellent professional golfer in the 1930s who had suffered a major injury to his hip. He interviewed each boy who applied and instructed us as to what to wear and how to act. We were to show up with clean clothes, haircuts and showered every day. There was to be no swearing, smoking or gambling on the premises. As we became older senior caddies, we found a way to get around the gambling edict. There was a one-week training program for those selected, and you were then paired with a senior caddie for the first several weeks. The pay in 1953 seemed enormous to us — four dollars for a single bag for eighteen holes and six dollars for double bags. As you became more experienced, you worked six days a week from Tuesday to Sunday and often could get assignments for 36 holes. We would hitchhike out from Buffalo to Williamsville at about 7 a.m. and whenever the day ended, usually the late afternoon, the members exiting the main gate would give us a ride back to Buffalo. I was always impressed that these wealthy and powerful people would welcome several sweaty and tired caddies into the back of their luxury sedans for a ride home. The epitome of life for a caddie at the Country Club of Buffalo was to be recognized as one of the top ten caddies. Once so identified, you would usually be chosen to work for the best golfers in the club. In late 1954, I had finally been accepted into this elite group. We knew exactly where to stand, how to find errant golf balls, and in an era before yardage markers, tell the golfers the distance and, based on your experience, the right club to use. Far and away the best caddie in the club at the time was Denny Morrissey, a year older than I and a model I tried to emulate. He was often assigned to the best golfer in the club, Ward Wettlaufer, who was also the best golfer in the area, the best golfer in New York and, for a time, one of the best amateurs in the United States.  Ward Wettlaufer was the son of a prominent and wealthy Buffalo businessman. Although he had been raised in a life of privilege, he had none of the arrogance that sometimes can affect those born into such circumstances. He was a young man of exceptional athletic skills and, because of his attitude, he had the great honor of being held in the highest esteem by all of the caddies. In 1955, Denny Morrissey left caddying to prepare for college as he had a basketball scholarship to LeMoyne College in Syracuse, New York. As luck would have it, I was assigned as the primary caddie for this outstanding amateur golfer. My days consisted of endless hours shagging golf balls for Ward’s disciplined approach to practice, caddying for 27 holes and finishing on the practice green until the sun went down. Thankfully, he was kind enough to drive me home because we were often the last people left at the club. There were numerous tournaments in the Buffalo/Rochester area where he competed against the best golfers, professional

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and amateur. At this level the caddie is a part of a team walking ahead with a big Turkish towel around your neck and consulting with the golfer as to the right club to use. Often, there was a gallery of friends and members following the match, and somehow, as the caddie, you had a sense of being someone special even among the wealthy and powerful. Interestingly enough, Wettlaufer’s primary opponent in so many of these matches was John Konsek, the son of a driving range proprietor in Cheektowaga, New York. The competition between these two was friendly but intense. For years, the final pairing in the New York State Amateur Tournament was Konsek vs. Wettlaufer. Konsek went on to Purdue, where he played golf and, if memory serves me, beat Jack Nicklaus of Ohio State at least once. He became a prominent physician and surgeon in Indiana. Ward Wettlaufer won the Tam O’Shanter Open, the North and South in Pinehurst and was a member of the Walker Cup Team. He took a long leave of absence from golf in order to run the family business.  The sad part of this story is that the opportunities for a young boy to get a job as a caddie these days are, for the most part, nonexistent, save for a few places like Pinehurst and more enlightened golf clubs. Caddying is more than just a job to make money although I must say that in my case it was very beneficial. The real important benefit was to learn about a game where honor and integrity are fundamental. It afforded me an opportunity to witness the behavior of accomplished individuals, as they say, “up close and personal.” You saw how they dressed, how they treated the lowly caddie.  There is no doubt in my mind that those summers where I was hot, tired and felt the straps of those heavy bags burning into my shoulders prepared me for life. I only wish that 14-year-old boys of today from blue collar families could be given the same privilege that I was granted. Unfortunately, as golf courses realized that the profits from golf carts exceeded the benefits from a caddie program, the handwriting was “on the wall.” This, coupled with increasingly restrictive federal and state regulations on the amount of hours that a young person could work, virtually eliminated caddie programs with the exception of the most elite and expensive courses where professional adult caddies are employed. In most locations, the opportunity to have a paper route for 11- and 12-year-olds has been lost to adults who deliver by cars. In fact, in many areas, parents are reluctant to allow young people to deliver papers for fear that they might be robbed when collecting money from houses on their route. Far too many young boys and girls do not have an opportunity to learn a work ethic and money management. I know as we get older it is common to talk about changes in societal mores. However, I do not believe it is just the observations of a cynical senior to say we have lost some very important experiences for young boys, and we are the lesser for it. PS

Tom Constantine, a part-time resident of the Sandhills, is the retired superintendent of the New York State Police and former head of the Federal Drug Enforcement Administration. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Sod Story

There’s green in those fields. Just ask the Harris brothers. But perfection doesn’t come easy By David C. Bailey Photographs By Cassie Butler

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he next time you’re moaning and groaning about how much yard work you have to do, consider Charles and Mark Harris at Sandhill Turf Inc. in Candor. “In 1986, my father planted seven acres of fescue right over here by the barn,” VP and General Manager Mark Harris says. “Today we’re at about 800 acres of turf in production” — which at peak times needs cutting as often as three or four times a week. Not that the brothers are complaining. By converting the land from row crops such as tobacco, peaches and soybeans to turf grass, their father, High Point attorney William P. Harris, built a business that employs as many as thirty-five employees and generates as much as $3 million in sales — with a product millions see on TV when the Washington Redskins are playing at FedExField. As its name suggests, the company specializes in turf, also known as sod — mats of the greenest of grass, bound to a thin slice of earth by some of the tightest root masses on the planet. Sod is big business in North Carolina, where Sandhill Turf President Charles Harris estimates as many as sixty growers compete to carpet golf courses, sports fields, cemeteries and roadsides with turf. Grass (and we’re not talking Acapulco Gold) brings

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in big money — as much as $10-12,000 an acre for premium-grade Zoysia grass, half that for Bermuda grass. “The tobacco farmers around here say, ‘I spent my life trying to kill Bermuda grass and here you are selling it,’” Mark Harris quips. The Sandhills are ideal for growing turf, both warm-season and coldseason grasses. “We’re in the transition zone, where you can grow both of them,” Charles Harris says. After the first frost, warm-season grasses like Bermuda, Zoysia, Centipede and St. Augustine go dormant and turn brown. Cool-season grasses — fescue, rye, bluegrass and bentgrass — are green year-around, but not as heat-tolerant. Another advantage to the Piedmont’s Sandhills is soil that’s 90 percent sandy, providing better drainage and a deeper root system. “It’s a coarse sand. Fine sand doesn’t percolate well,” says Charles Harris. “There’s a certain area back here, several acres, on top of this hill, that’s really conducive to growing a grass that’s identical to USGA [U.S. Golf Association] putting-green specifications.” Although the Harrises have supplied turf as far north as Cape Cod, Massachusetts, and south to Alabama, transportation costs mean most clients are within a 100-mile radius. About 60 percent of the grass grown at Sandhill Turf is Bermuda. “In Pinehurst and Southern Pines I’d say 99-100

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percent of golf courses have got Bermuda grass on the fairways and tees,” Charles Harris says. Sandhill Turf blanketed both Tom Fazio’s Forest Creek Golf Club and Donald Ross’ Pine Needles in Bermuda grass. But not just any Bermuda grass. Sandhill Turf sells only “blue-tag certified” grass. To understand and appreciate what that means, it’s time for your crash course in Green Grass 101. The world’s 10,000 species of grass, says Britannica, “are clearly the most abundant and important family of the Earth’s flora.” Growing on every continent, grasses, which include rye, sorghum and corn, are obviously a vital food source for both mankind and cattle. Bermuda grass, found in over 100 countries today, probably originated in Africa or India, not in Bermuda. In fact, Hindus in India consider Bermuda grass sacred because it sustains their sacred cows. In Roman times, the sap of Bermuda grass was used as a diuretic and an astringent to stop bleeding. But anyone who’s tried to eliminate Bermuda grass won’t be surprised to learn that it’s also called devil’s grass and ranks among the three most troublesome weeds for growers of sugarcane, cotton and corn. Says Charles Harris, “A weed by definition is any undesirable plant. We don’t think of ourselves as growing a weed.” That’s because when it comes to providing a durable, hardy and resilient platform for sports fields and roadsides, Bermuda grass is almost unequaled. “It has been suggested that if ever a plant deserved a monument for its service to mankind, it was Bermuda grass,” enthuses Richard L. Duble, a turfgrass specialist with the Texas Cooperative Extension, “for what it has done to prevent soil erosion, to stabilize ditch banks, roadsides and airfields, to beautify landscapes and to provide a smooth, resilient playing surface for sports fields and playgrounds.” Contributing to Bermuda grass’s hardiness is its method of propagation. “It has little runners on top of the ground, stolons, and also rhizomes, which travel underground,” Charles Harris says. “You say how in the world did that Bermuda grass get all the way over here under that concrete sidewalk, and it’s the underground root system that’s doing it.” But the grass from Sandhill Turf that covers Kenan Memorial Stadium at UNC-Chapel Hill, Carter-Finley Stadium at N.C. State and Scott Stadium at the University of Virginia is not just any Bermuda grass, it’s licensed and registered. Licensed grasses come from rootstock grown and engineered by university field stations. For instance, TifSport Bermuda grass was developed and patented by the University of Georgia’s Agricultural Research Foundation in Tifton, Georgia. This is not your grandfather’s or even your father’s grass: “TifSport is the best of 66 fine-textured mutants derived from irradiating Midiron stolons with 8,000 rads of Cobalt 60 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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gamma radiation,” reads one scientific description of it. And establishing a field of this grass is, to say the least, not just a little bit of a process. “These hybrid Bermuda grasses don’t produce seed,” says Charles Harris, a Wake Forest graduate. The grass sprouts from sprigs, essentially the runners and roots, which sell for $2-5 a bushel. It takes 500-1,000 bushels to plant an acre. Even before the grass is planted, inspectors from the North Carolina Crop Improvement Association check paperwork to make sure the stock is pure and then walk the field to make sure fumigants have sterilized the soil to impede the growth of anything other than the designated and registered grass. Months later, after the sprigs have come up and carpeted the field, the inspectors return: “They do a field inspection twice a year looking for all types of common grasses and noxious weeds,” says Elon graduate Mark Harris. “There’s a threshold, five plants per acre.” Only after the field has been inspected can the grass be sold as “blue-tag certified.” Amazingly, once established, turf can be cut year after year as long as the crop gets plenty of water, fertilizer and pesticides. Slower-growing Zoysia can take 18-24 months to produce a crop of sod, but Bermuda can be harvested yearly. When the grass is removed, mechanical harvesters take as little as a quarter¼-to a half-inch of soil. “Once you plant one of these fields, there’s not a replanting process,” says Charles Harris. “It stays planted and comes back from the root system. We’ve had some in for twenty years.” But product life cycles do not usually last twenty years. Research stations are constantly coming up with new strains of grass that offer a significant measure of difference.

TifGrand Bermuda, Charles Harris says, “is the newest grass out of Tifton. It’s a really finetextured and dense grass so the golf ball will sit up on it.” Think of a carpet, he says. “The denser it is, the better wear-tolerance it has. TifGrand is very dense, and the other thing they bred into TifGrand is shade-tolerance.” Whereas standard Bermuda grass needs seven to eight hours of sun a day, TifGrand needs only five to six hours; it thrives even where trees shade the fairway. Zoysia grass is emerging as a keen competitor to Bermuda grass. In 2009, Sandhill Turf installed Zeon Zoysia at Greensboro Country Club and in 2010 at Carmel Country Club in Charlotte. “Zeon is fine-bladed, a really kind of striking grass in its color and texture,” Charles Harris says. “It’s unique, and sets the course apart aesthetically. The PGA [Championship] at Atlanta Athletic Club was played on Zoysia fairways. It’s a lot more expensive than Bermuda grass on the front end, but there’s a benefit once you get it in.” For one, it doesn’t take as much fertilizer. “There are also grasses coming out that don’t require as much mowing, pesticides or water,” Mark Harris says. One grass in development would need mowing only once a month. “It grows sideways instead of straight up.” Others are more cold-hardy. And if you’re one of these people who always see red on a putting green, there might be a grass in the offing for you. One scientist, the Harrises recall, was working on a red grass. He was from N.C. State, of course. For more information: Sandhill Turf Inc., 255 N.C. Highway 211, Candor, NC 27229, (910) 673-2177 or www.sandhillturf.com

Aahhhh,

spring is arriving in the South! Beers that are big, rich, and malty have sustained us through the cold, dark days of winter, but it’s time to say goodbye to porters, stouts, and say “hello” to lighter, easier drinking beauties. What place to enjoy a brew? On the patio as our spring garden begins to bloom.

Come out and enjoy these upcoming events: March 7th

“Return to the Light Beer” Dinner: Learn how how to find beer that will suit your palate as the days get longer.

March 17th

“St. Patrick’s Day” : Yes even a British pub can bring a few Irish classics to the table. Slainte!

March 24th

“Ring in the Spring Sly Fox Cornhole Tourney & Roast”: Pull your team together. Enjoy the outdoors, live music, and lively competition as we christen the change of seasons.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Blue Bruce Dorfman’s (left and middle) complement contemporary sculpture by Elaine Reed (on glass table). Landscape by Philip Lekki hanging over ornate case piece.

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Story of a house

The House That Art Built Gallery Owner Walks the Walk, at Home By Deborah Salomon Photographs By John Gessner

A Michael Northuis — not Picasso — hangs over a Judy Broadhurst alabaster in foyer.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Left: The Broadhurst living room, their “celebration place,” houses a Rachel Clearfield (upper left), a Jim Henry (lower left) and a Wayne Trapp (over doors). Above: A still life by Richard Fennell suites the dining mode of bentwood Burled table and chairs.

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f the shoemaker’s children shouldn’t go barefoot, then the gallery owner mustn’t live in a house with bare walls. Judy Broadhurst does not. Painted brick and white surfaces, flooded with light, backdrop a collection of contemporary paintings chosen solely because she appreciates them or knows their creators. “It’s like having a friend here with me,” says the owner of Broadhurst Art Gallery in Pinehurst. Paintings are hung at neck-craning heights; they are hung over doorways, from wall indentions, above the kitchen sink, at eye level and lower. Some are enormous textural abstracts, others modest portraits. Sculptures, including alabasters by Judy, rise from the floor, spread across tabletops and shelves. The furniture itself is sculpturesque art deco mixed with ornate European, stark modern, whimsical and comfy. Each room is, in fact, a personal gallery. Only the bedroom, however, has four walls. Otherwise, space – demarcated by columns, installations and ceiling heights — flows from a soaring foyer to an open kitchen; from a living room with alcoves and skylights to an intimate dining area, a reading nook and a glass-walled den with

fireplace and built-in bookcases. The Broadhursts seldom entertain, despite the perfect setting. “I like to talk to interesting people,” Judy says. “I don’t like cocktail parties.” Instead, here Judy and Dr. Jack Broadhurst — cat veterinarian extraordinaire – read, converse and listen to soft music from the intramural sound system. Land lines, doorbell and computer have been banned. (Smartphones OK.) Jack watches football upstairs. Other diversion comes from deer, foxes, squirrels and birds, recently an owl, taking refuge in a long-leaf pine stand surrounding the house. Just beyond lies Judy’s organic vegetable garden. Two rescued cats scamper inside. The one with fanciful whiskers goes by Salvador. Perfect. Another perfection that only frazzled urban commuters appreciate: Broadhurst Art Gallery and Jack’s Cat Health Clinic are within sight of their home. Judy and Jack work under the same roof. “We may not see each other but I’m aware that he’s there,” Judy says.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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A

massing and reimaging this compound demanded determination and luck – all tempered by the experience mature partners bring to a second marriage. Or, as Judy offers, “This is a combination of our lives up to this point.” Long before reaching this point, Judy was raised on a produce farm in Wilmington, North Carolina. Her talents surfaced early. “I built sculptures with rocks in the stream. It didn’t bother me that they washed away in the rain.” The ocean provided seafood, and beach sand provided material for castles and cathedrals. “I don’t remember ever going to a gallery or museum,” Judy says. Art was not a factor in her early schooling, culminating in a nursing degree from Rex Hospital in Raleigh. She married a successful advertising executive and raised three children in a showplace Raleigh home. Judy developed her proclivity during docent instruction at the North Carolina Museum of Art and classes at North Carolina State University. Rather than the classics, “My love is the contemporary — new art, not necessarily abstract.” Divorced, her children grown, Judy gravitated to the New York she knew from Saks and Bergdorf’s. “I wasn’t afraid of the city. I wanted a New York experience, a learning experience.” She purchased a fashionable East Side apartment, volunteered at the Whitney Museum of American Art, studied sculpture, spent weekends in the Hamptons and made friends among arts intelligentsia. “They accepted me because I was serious about art and wanted to learn.” Judy sculpts but has given up painting. “There are enough bad watercolorists in the world,” she says. “I bloomed in New York. I was the luckiest person in the world.” Listen closely: Manhattanese inflections pepper her soft Southern accent. The tryst lasted eight years. Breakfast at Tiffany’s, anyone? Enter Dr. Jack Broadhurst, born in Smithfield, North Carolina, also divorced with three children. “I grew up in a 1940s ladies’ home and garden house,” he says. Art consisted of his sisters’ portraits in their debutante gowns. Jack found veterinary practice difficult in New York and suburbs. Judy appeared. Carolina called. He was looking for a location where people valued their pets — and could afford the highest standard of care. His office is home-like; appointments last an hour. Pinehurst seemed a good fit. “My friends thought it was funny that I moved from East 61st Street and Third Avenue in Manhattan to Little River Lane in Southern Pines,” their first residence, Judy recalls.

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The Broadhurst’s family room-den successfully combines an Eames chair with geometric abstract by Victor Vasarely (over fireplace), Lake Como Street Scene by Joseph Cave (over sofa) and Judy’s alabaster (on desk).

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Paintings and a tile tray provide color in neutral kitchen, which overlooks the circular drive.

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Bird, by William Moore is one of several outdoor sculptures on patio and grounds.

Purchasing an established veterinary practice presented problems. Then, at the gym, Jack heard of properties for sale on Midland Road: a motel and an unkempt brick ranch house with outbuildings, formerly a horse farm. The Broadhursts waded through details which, because of proximity to Midland Road, restricted Jack to a cats-only practice. They relocated in 1990. Judy knew little about operating a gallery but had fantastic ideas for the house. “Essentially, we turned a five-bedroom house into a one-bedroom house,” she says, with separate guest quarters for visiting children. Renovations took a year. Instead of razing the outdated residence, they saved the foundation and exterior walls but gutted the interior, built patios, an impressive entranceway and an addition (the den). Upstairs bedrooms became Jack’s TV room while the two small main-floor bedrooms are now the master bedroom and dressing room. Judy worked with construction professionals, including Joe Ussery, but the concept was hers. Archways, recessed wall space and structural shelves were designed to display particular objects. Nowhere is this more striking than just inside the glass front door, where as introduction to the living-with-art concept, an

abstract in Carolina blue by New York artist Bruce Dorfman faces Picasso lookalikes by Michael Northius. The living room, which Judy calls a celebration space, feels a bit intimidating with its molded glass coffee table, burled deco room divider, Henry Moore sketches, gold accented case piece, coffin-sized antique chest and Henry Moore sketches. “I’m not a purist when it comes to antiques,” Judy says. “I buy on looks.” She is not, however, above placing a charming deco dressing table next to a painting that mirrors its color and design. Or framing a stick figure her daughter drew as a toddler. Because they are both art. “That’s fine, if people match paintings to the décor. You have to be happy with it.” Judy cannot fathom multi-million dollar homes devoid of art. Or why people deem art too expensive, then spend lavishly on golf. “You can’t tell people what to put on their walls; just educate their eye as to what makes them feel good.” The kitchen, set at the front of the house, is functional rather than glamorous, done in neutrals, focusing on an outdoor bird sculpture by William Moore framed by a square picture window. “I like to look out and see Jack coming home,” Judy says.

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Above: Judy Broadhurst in her reading corner. Below: Once a dull ranch house, the painted brick home with soaring entrance has become a stunning gallery space. Statue by Shawn Phillip Morin.

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Painting by Jeanne Bessette mirrors deco design of mini-dressing table in master suite.

They hit a plumbing snag when European bathroom fixtures (toilets and bidet) and kitchen appliances did not fix standard connections. Occasionally, a painting emits bad vibes. Judy hung a piece she loved, in primary reds. “But the shapes were upsetting.” Adieu. What about Jack? How does a scientist fit into this serene oasis-in-the-pines? For openers, he walked off the space that would become his clinic and transferred measurements to graph paper. He likes living close so he can check on post-op patients during the evening. He enjoys the privacy, far from the road, where he can observe wildlife. “[The house] is very relaxing. Sometimes my days can be tense. I come home, absorb the ambience, have a glass of wine and talk to Judy.” Judy seeks Jack’s input when selecting paintings. His favorite is a street scene from Lake Como, where they visited, which hangs over his leather sofa in the den. At present, kittycat art is confined to the clinic. The location has had a tremendous impact on Jack’s career. “Because of this property, I grew as a professional. It energized us,” he says. Being limited to cats gave him the opportunity for research. In 2010 he received

A Louis St. Lewis beauty dominates the dressing room. Another Broadhurst sculpture on counter.

the Distinguished Veterinarian Award from the N.C. Veterinary Medical Association. In addition, Jack has secured a patent for his approach to treating infectious diseases.

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roadhurst Art Gallery is well-known on the Eastern Seaboard through its website. Other galleries have gone out of business but big-name artists are “climbing over Judy’s walls,” Jack says proudly. And, although their residence is not a satellite sales venue, it is definitely an extension of the Broadhurst realm. “I always felt a need to do something like this,” Judy says. She has blocked all memory of the ramshackle ranch Jack found. “This house is truer me than any place I’ve ever lived. This is real. “I’m happy about the way we worked out our lives,” she continues. “And if I’m happy, Jack is happy. We promised ourselves that when we’re home, we’d be totally at home. And we are.”

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The garden Philosopher

By noah salT

Sky notes for March The month of March is named for the Roman god of war — Mars — as is the “angry red planet,” the fourth planet from the sun, tinged red owing to the abundance of iron oxide in its composition. In ancient Rome, the month of March, called “Martias,” was regarded as the start of the new year, the ideal moment to plant crops and undertake military campaigns. Owing to the planet Mars’ closeness to the sun this month, the planet is but a faint glimmer in the night sky. But spring heralds other fine stargazing opportunities like Jupiter blazing in the west moments after sunset and Saturn rising in the east a couple hours after dark. On a clear night with a decent telescope, you’ll even see the famous banded rings. This year the Vernal Equinox arrives at 1:14 on March 20, announcing the official start of spring in the northern hemisphere.

“Snowdrops are blooming, crocuses are up and so are some of the daffodils, and here and there the grass is quite green. Spring is here. Of course, it depends on what you mean by ‘spring.’ For most gardeners, spring is when things at last start to grow again and snowdrops bloom and buds swell. The witch hazels are out; the new leaves of clematus are half an inch long. For others, spring means no shirt and coffee in the summerhouse. They will never acknowledge spring until April 14. But for us, the die-hard gardeners, spring is already here, even though we may have snow, an ice storm or two, and ground frost for another six weeks.” From One Man’s Garden by Henry Mitchell

Meanwhile in The garden Crocus and snowdrops typically anounce spring’s arrival in early March, but showy daffodils and heavenly scented hyacinth (a popular Greek symbol of rebirth) dominate the garden bed toward month’s end — though this year, owing to our extra mild winter have opened weeks ahead of normal. The first tulips will soon follow. March is the last good opportunity to plant container grown shrubs and fruit trees until fall. Before signs of growth are indicated, this is also the last time to heavily prune and shape rose bushes and other ornamental plants. This is also the time to transplant anything, ideally before spring growth is evident. Continue to pinch flower plantings to encourage vigorous growth and summer blooms. Toward the end of the month, lightly apply bulb-boosting fertilizer to emerging summer-blooming bulbs. While most lawns are best seeded in the late autumn, early March is a good time to sew new lawns and lay sod. Be sure to keep your seeded lawn and sod well irrigated. Following the last significant frost — which normally occurs in the Sandhills around March 28 — refresh soil beds with several inches of rich organic matter. Now is the time to get your summer garden into gear by planting hardy annuals — snapdragons, petunias, and verbenas. Your local garden center will have its broadest selections of annuals and perennials this month, including many warm weather tropical plants. Add at least three inches of mulch to insulate plantings against unsuspected cold snaps and slow the progress of weeds in all beds.

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our favorite Signs of Spring Forsythia in bloom The smell of the earth Hatching chicks Jelly Beans The call of peepers (tree frogs) Noticeably longer days Return of robins (though maybe they never left) College spring break Lambs arrive The sound of birds at dawn and dusk First thunderstorms Flip-flops Dogs sleeping in the sun Wine on the porch

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HomeStyles


HomeStyles

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What: Photography Exhibit Date: Saturday, March 24 Location: Southern Pines Civic Club Information: See page 101

PieDmonT BeeCh foresT l Beech trees dominate a moist hardwood forest on this north-facing piedmont slope. Beech often retain some of their brown leaves throughout the winter, providing a beautiful contrast with the evergreen Christmas ferns that so often grow beneath them.

l ongleaf savanna fire l Prescribed burning is necessary to restore and maintain fire-dependent communities in a landscape where allowing natural fire is no longer a possibility.

anCienT BalD - CyPress l The Black River Preserve, managed by the Nature Conservancy, is the most spectacular old-growth example of what was once a common sight along North Carolina’s blackwater rivers. It is home to the oldest stand of trees in eastern North America, with bald-cypress exceeding 1,600 years old.

Natural Landscapes Photographic Display

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David Blevins is an award-winning freelance nature photographer and forest ecologist. His photography comes from an appreciation of natural patterns that can be found in what at first seems to be a chaotic world. Wildlife behavior, the organization of a plant, or the natural patterns of landscapes are all sources of inspiration for his photography. David’s most recent work has focused on visualizing what the wild North Carolina landscape was like prior to European settlement. The core of this work is a collection of landscape images with compositions based on the patterns formed by natural vegetation. A selection of this work was recently published by UNC Press in a book called Wild North Carolina: Discovering the Wonders of our State’s Natural Communities. David is currently working on a new book with UNC Press on the natural areas of North Carolina’s Barrier Islands. This exhibit is a part of the series of events put on by the grassroots organization Save Our Sandhills. Meet David and hear him lead two Save Our Sandhills lectures this same day.

easTern Prairie Blue WilD inDigo l Management by the North Carolina Botanical Garden at Penny’s Bend, including prescribed burning and clearing of invading trees, has allowed this population of rare prairie blue wild indigo to thrive.

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What: Concert Date: Thursday, March 22 Location: Pinecrest High School Information: See page 95

Branford Marsalis and Joey Calderazzo Duo

Bringing a little bit of jazz and classical music to Palustris, The Branford Marsalis & Joey Calderazzo Duo will be performing Thursday night. Of the famous jazz musician Marsalis family, it wasn’t Branford whom Chris Dunn discovered first. Dunn, the executive director of the Moore County Arts Council, is a trumpet player himself, which is why in college he first revered brother Wynton Marsalis, also a trumpeter. Since then, Dunn became a fan of Branford, the renowned Grammywinning saxophonist and Tony Award nominee through late nights on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and his award-winning quartet. After more than ten years of performing together, Branford and his long-time quartet member Joey Calderazzo released their first duo album, Songs of Mirth and Melancholy, in June 2011. With Joey on the piano and Branford on the sax, this big-name traveling duo is worth much more than the Palustris ticket price. “We try to keep everything at a lower pice so anyone can participate,” Dunn says. “This performance is the same quality as something you’d see in DPAC at a third of the cost, and it’s right here in your backyard.” Some chords and songs are inspired by Brahms, Schumann, Prokofiev and Wagner, and though Branford and Joey hold in high regard the traditions of classical sound, they aren’t afraid to infuse Joey’s personal style picked up from his solo piano tour in Europe or throw in Branford’s soprano saxophone as if it were the vocal line. This romantic blend of classical and jazz is truly a balance between melancholy and mirth, and it will put your spirit in a place you’ll like to revisit more often.

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What: Textile Exhibit Date: Saturday, March 24 Location: The Shaw House Information: See page 103

The dictionary describes “quilt” as a bed cover of two layers filled with wool, cotton or down and held in place by a stitched design. Quilters think of quilts with three layers — a top, a batting (or lining) and a back. The quilting part is the stitching that holds the three layers together, the decorative top layer. The American tradition of quilting began in the early eighteenth century. Pioneer women made the quilts to keep their families warm. Quilts were made mostly by women who found quilt-making one of the few creative outlets allowed them. Early quilt-makers were untrained in art and design, and yet produced works of art. Early pieced quilt tops were often made from scraps of cloth or discarded clothes. Commercially printed cotton was available from 1820 and came mostly in calicoes. In the quilt show at the Shaw House, early examples of appliqued, pieced and embroidered crazy quilts will be on display. Full-size, crib and doll quilts are shown throughout the three houses, which all came from private collections. The highlight of the exhibit? Early nineteenth century quilts that were buried during the Civil War. The sampler was originally a cloth used to practice stitches and a means of learning to execute embroidery patterns and designs. Initially unframed and narrow in width, it could be rolled and stored as a scroll and consulted for various stitches. Samplers used to be a schoolgirl art that kept fingers busy and minds on a moral saying or two. More than twenty-five examples will be displayed beginning with one dated 1801, a finely worked cross-stitch by an 8-year-old girl, wool on linen and a silk memorial. Two are from D.C., including an early Moore County sampler. Every “stitcher” needed tools to create her form of art. The exhibition will display more than one-hundred silver and gold thimbles, both American and English-made, thimble cases of silver, vegetable ivory and blown glass along with needle cases, pin cushions, tape measures, darners and English transfer ware in Scotch tartan plaids. Hand-stitched clothing and early examples of crewel, candle wicking and embroidery are included in the show. Many of the items have never been on display before.

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Photographs by Cassie Butler

A Stitch in Time — Nineteenth Century Textiles


What: A Night of Splendid Liars Date: Saturday, March 24 Location: Poplar Knight Spot Information: See page 107

Night of Glorious Lies and Other Tall Tales

Pinehurst resident Ed “Moose” Duke likes it when somebody calls him a liar. “I’ve been called just about everything in my life,” he quips in his strong Piedmont twang, “and besides, I’ve had a whole lifetime of makin’ up tall tales and spinning ’em for anyone who would listen.” A couple of years ago, not long after he retired from teaching school in Hoke County and began mining his life in rural North Carolina for material as a professional storyteller, Duke performed at the famed Bald Face Liar’s Competition at the Storytelling Festival in Laurinburg and took second place to one of the best loved tale-spinners in the South. “I reckon it was good for me to come in second lying,” he quips. “Cause it’ll just make me try harder to be the best liar and storyteller around, brother.” In celebration of the traditional art of storytelling, Duke and two equally acclaimed tale-spinners, Martha Reed Johnson of Florence, South Carolina and Tyris D. Jones of Laurinburg, North Carolina will headline the “Night of Glorious Lies and Tall Tales,” sponsored jointly by PineStraw magazine and The Country Bookshop, scheduled for Saturday, 6 p.m., at the Popular Knight Spot in Aberdeen. Duke’s family-friendly repertoire runs the gamut from tales about the courting of his grandparents on the banks of the Haw River to his rather — ahem — extraordinary friendships with a pair of pet possums called “Dude” and “Bug,” with a dozen stops in between. Martha Reed Johnson, another featured teller at the Laurinburg Festival and winner of the 2011 South Carolina Toastmasters Humorous Speech Contest, brings her own distinctive — and somewhat “Yankeefied” — take on the art of prevarication with delightful stories about her family life growing up in New England with a minister mother and a schoolteacher father, tales spiced with accounts of zany family travel and everyday family humor. A middle-school counselor and mother of two, Johnson turned to storytelling after witnessing the positive effects of the spinning tale on young

people at camp. “As someone who specializes in drug and alcohol issues, I was very impressed with the effect a professional storyteller had on the kids. That’s when I decided to jump in and do my own thing. Luckily, I had the kind of crazy family and rich experience that gave me plenty of good material.” Tyris D. Jones, on the other hand, it’s no lie to say, always envisioned himself on the stage — or at least near it. Following graduation in 1992 from N.C. Central University with a degree in theater, Jones toured with a Tony award-winning African-American acting company as a lighting designer and props manager, eventually returning to work as a teacher’s aide in his hometown of Laurinburg. “After a teacher asked me to tell the story of Harriet Tubman,” he explains, “that was when I realized I actually belonged on the stage — not lighting it. I come from a family of storytellers and have so much to draw from; it’s like coming full circle.” In 2008, Jones won the Bald Face Liars Competition and in 2009 was one of six storytellers invited to do their thing at the National Storytelling Festival in Jonesboro, Tennessee. Like his fellow “glorious liars” Duke and Johnson, Jones now finds himself in popular demand around the Carolinas. “As technology has taken over a larger portion of people’s lives,” says Martha Johnson, “the art of storytelling — of talking and listening — has been forgotten in modern life. I think that’s why people are always so charmed and delighted when they come out and listen to us do our thing. These are real stories of the heart that just about anyone can relate to.” “When I make someone young or old laugh,” adds Ed Duke, “that’s almost like listening to the angels sing — and it reminds me of why storytelling is such a wonderful thing.” PineStraw and The Country Bookshop invite you to bring the family and your own tall tales. Banjo (and haircutting) virtuoso Bryon Morris of the Blues Crossing Barbershop will provide spectacular banjo picking. The audience will be encouraged to compete in a “Liar’s Slam” for prizes. Cost of this event is $10.

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What: Concert Date: Thursday, March 22 Location: Poplar Knight Spot Information: Page 95

Folk Singer Peggy Seeger in Concert

Peggy Seeger has much to say, and the transparency in her folk music reflects her experiences and world views — both the positive and the negative. Her deep, thought-provoking ballads come from a lifetime of activism as well as her personal struggles and triumphs. The singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist is considered to be one of North America’s finest female folk singers. Her instruments include guitar, autoharp, banjo, piano, Appalachian dulcimer and English concertina. In concert, Seeger mixes traditional and contemporary songs because she says an evening made totally of one would be lacking in perspective. Coming from a family that is well-known in folk and classical music circles, Seeger’s excitement about music began at an early age. She has been writing songs for more than fifty years. “Songwriting helps me to live in the present, ‘at the same time as myself,’” as her husband used to say. “It is a way of holding up a mirror to ourselves, in all of our tragic and comic poses.” After her English husband’s death, Seeger said she went through a state of rediscovery and change. She plowed up the garden in Beckenham, sold the house and moved to Asheville. In Asheville she found new friends and music. She now lives in Oxford, England. Seeger will also be speaking about the role of folk music in the lives of women with historic context Friday evening. See full Palustris Festival schedule (pages 92 — 111) for more details.

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What: Art Exhibit Date: Thursday, March 22 — Saturday, March 24 Location: Sandhills Community College, Hastings Gallery Information: Pages 92 — 111

Secular Art with Sacred Meaning

Sandhills Community College art instructor Ray Martin was born and raised on the tobacco farms of his Sandhills grandfathers. From an early age, he drew characters from the visible realm as well as from other dimensions. Martin explores two constant visions: mixed media paintings and constructions that often call to mind reliquaries or altarpieces, with the sacred imbedded in the secular, as well as observational paintings, often landscapes, painted “en plein air” that focus on the astonishing enchantment possible in the everyday world. He typically works in oil or watercolors. Martin’s work is largely allegorical and symbolic in content, and conjures meaning in a manner parallel to the logic of dreams. He turns to the intimacy of self-exploration, believing the reflective unearthing of a single life is his path to universally sharing a connection with others. Like his Cherokee shaman ancestors, he offers his art as a gift for healing. On Thursday, March 22 from 4 — 5 p.m., a lecture will touch upon the fact that virtually all art in various cultures manifested as conversations with the divine, that is, until the industrial revolution in the West. This lecture will take place at the Sandhills Community College Boyd Library Teresa Woods Reading Room, then to a gallery tour of Ray Martin’s work.

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What: Art Exhibit Date: Thursday, March 22 – Sunday, March 25 Location: Campbell House Galleries Information: Pages 92 – 111

Beth Roy Paintings

Artist Beth Roy grew up in rural Michigan, where she acquired the foundation in which her paintings come to life today. She began riding horses at an early age and her life-long relationship with them has allowed her to translate them beautifully on canvas. Beginning as a watercolor painter for fifteen years, Beth switched to oil painting as her permanent medium. “Oil is a very forgiving medium. It lets you play with multiple colors and express moods effortlessly,” she says. Beth and her husband Tom live on their farm in Vass, with three horses, three cats and a dog.

Dian Moore Pottery

Dian Ellis Moore began her experiences with pottery thirty-three years ago while living in Ohio, when a neighbor found a bag of clay and they began hand-building little pots. After watching a friend and professional potter throw, she bought books on how to make pottery and went to Cleveland to buy a kiln and the parts to make a kick wheel. She attended some classes, but it wasn’t until she moved to Pinehurst in 1982 that she decided to retire from her career in dental hygiene to work with clay. For twenty-five years Dian has displayed and sold her pottery at more than ninety shops and galleries, including Midland Crafters.

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What: Lecture and Music Date: Sunday, March 25 Location: Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College Information: Page 111 “Chaos Manor” is the graphic name given in the 1950s to 821 Sixth Avenue, New York City. The same dull white building is called “The Jazz Loft” by Sam Stephenson in his book The Jazz Loft Project. The equally accepted names show the dichotomy of midcentury jazz music. The name Chaos Manor shows us the “hole” of the genre, as it was the mutual meeting place of washed-up musicians, manics and adicts. The name Jazz Loft shows us the “haven” of a few rooms that resounded with the tireless skill of jazz masters. The building is an honest history of the music and time; one we would be ignorant of if not for the obsessive documentation that photographer W. Eugene Smith captured from his fourth floor window. On March 25, from 4 to 5:30 p.m., in Owens Auditorium, Sam Stephenson will present the story within and behind The Jazz Loft Project. He will be followed by a jazz concert by drummer Ron Free, bassist Bob Bowen and pianist Court Stewart. The event is part of the 2012 Palustris Festival; free and open to the public, thanks to sponsorship by the Sandhills Community College Fine Arts Department.

Control: Ink Flow Karen Walker March 5, 9:00-1:30pm - $40 Watercolor on Yupo Tommy McDonell March 6, 10:00-4:00 pm $50 + supply fee Learn To Journal: Simple Contour Ink Drawing With Watercolor Or Watercolor Pencils Betty Hendrix March 7, 10:00-4:00 pm - $50 Using Impasto Technique in Oil/Acrylic Painting Linda Bruening March 10, 9:30-3:30 pm - $50

Sam Stephenson lives in Chapel Hill. He has taken 147 trips to New York and spent fifteen years in twenty-two states and Japan unearthing the evolution recorded by Smith. He says that his hometown gave him a “unique connection” to the project, because most of the African American players have roots in the South. “Monk has always been my favorite jazz artist,” he says. “He’s the reason that I forged on with this project. Monk’s from Rocky Mount, and I feel kinship to him even though he’s black and I’m white.” “What Smith wrote, and what I put together – it’s like writing about an argument at the dinner table,” Stephenson says. In other words, this goes past the pedestalled jazz and the school of popular culture. “It’s banal everyday life, like the 364 days around your birthday that aren’t celebrated and recorded.” The people were “as beautiful as [they] are nuts” as described by Halliday in the book. The Jazz Loft Project introduces us to the lost past with readings from plays, unrepeated news updates and radio commercials that can’t be found on YouTube. They do not exist outside of their echoings in space and Smith’s recordings. Being transported back to the 50s had various effects on the jazz loft’s inhabitants that Stephenson tracked down. Ronnie Free, who will be presenting the material with Stephenson at Owens Auditorium, says it was like “going back in a time machine.” Stephenson records what was recorded in a chaotic impassioned way that reveals demons. The chronological snips of audio and a specific 227 photographs blueprint both the person of Smith and Stephenson’s own life’s truths.

Intermediate Ink Painting: Control: Negative Painting Karen Walker March 12, 9:00-1:30 pm - $40 Break it down: Geometric Abstract Landscapes JJ Love March 14, 9:00-3:00 pm - $50 Intermediate Ink Painting: Control: Masking Karen Walker March 19, 9:00-1:30 pm - $40 Intermediate Ink Painting: Save This Painting Karen Walker March 26, 9:00-1:30 pm - $40

Classes offered during Palustris: Follow the Leader with Joan Williams Saturday March 24th, 10 – 1 pm $25 Digital Art with JJ Love Saturday March 24th 4 – 5 pm Free. Must RSVP Follow the Leader with Joan Williams Sunday March 25th, 10 – 1 pm $25

Workshops:

April 2 -5 Sterling Edwards “Expressive Creations in Watercolors” – 4 days - $365 July 18 – 20 Harold Frontz “Mastering the Elements” Oil – 3 days - $210 Oct 16 – 18 Kate Worm “On Location and Moving Toward Abstraction-A Contemporary Approach” Oil, Watercolor/Gouache, Acrylic Accepted – 3 days - $415 (Member Discount Available)

Exchange Street Gallery

“Artfully Done”

Featuring the Full Members of the Artist League Palustris: Gallery/Studios open 10 – 4 pm March 22nd through April 25th Regular Gallery Hours M – S 10 - 3 pm

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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What: Art and Nature Walking Tour Date: Thursday, March 15 — Sunday, March 25 Location: The Village Arboredum, Pinehurst Information: Page 103

Art and Nature Self-Guided Walking Tour

The Village Arboretum is featuring a sculpture exhibition put on by fifth-grade artists from both Pinehurst Elementary and West Pine Elementary schools. The Art and Nature exhibit will be displayed for the self-guided daily walking tour throughout the Village Arboretum. One elementary class learned about the oversized outdoor artwork of Claes Oldenburg and found special interest in his realistic food pieces. When the classes were invited to display artwork at the Arboretum, they decided to create their own smaller scale picnic pieces for the art walk. “It always takes me by surprise how these young artists can take a ball of wet clay and work them into little masterpieces,” says Sally Hale, the class’ visual arts teacher. West Pine Middle School students used the theme Art and Nature by choosing to make clay frogs; but onlookers won’t be seeing the typical green frog in this festival. Students have added personality to their frogs with expressive eyes, bright-colored glazes and polka dot and stripe designs. “The students had a blast making the frogs, discussing ideas for their frog designs, and seeing them form really made students realize how art has come to life in front of their eyes. All I did was guide them, which is our job as a teacher, and they are the creators,” says another art teacher, Jill Hartsell. This student sculpture exhibit is one part of the series of kidfriendly art events taking place in the Village Arboretum on Saturday: kite-making, pine cone sculpture sessions, woodcarving and basket-making demonstrations, a life-sized puppet show, an interactive drum performance, an adventure trail hunt. See page 103 for the full listing of Saturday’s Arts in the Arboretum events.

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Wednesday, March 21 Southern Pines Rotary Palustris Gala

6 p.m. The second annual Palustris Gala will be a formal cocktail party to kick off the 2012 Palustris Festival, and will feature mini-performances by artists participating in the four-day, community-wide arts event. Sponsored by the Southern Pines Rotary Club, funds raised will promote community and international service projects. Tickets: $50. Tickets may be purchased from any Southern Pines Rotarian, The Country Bookshop, or at the door the night of Gala (if available). Belle Meade, 100 Waters Drive, Southern Pines

Thursday, March 22

The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing yearround interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-1900

Beth Roy Paintings & Dian Moore Pottery

9 a.m. — 5 p.m. Art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Beth Roy and pottery by Dian Moore. Growing up in rural Michigan, artist Beth Roy acquired the foundation which allows her paintings to come to life today. She began riding horses at an early age and her lifelong relationship with them has allowed her to translate them beautifully. Her works are currently represented in Swansboro, Pinehurst and Southern Pines. Beth and her husband Tom live on their farm in Vass.

Secular Art with Sacred Meaning

7:30 a.m. — 9 p.m. Secular Art with Sacred Meaning is an art exhibit that features the works of SCC Art Instructor Ray Martin. His work is largely allegorical and symbolic in content and conjures meaning in a manner parallel to the logic of dreams. Ray’s work includes mixed media paintings and constructions as well as oil and watercolor pieces. Hastings Gallery at Sandhills Community College Boyd Library, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

Arts in the Garden Sculpture Exhibit, Tours and Lecture

8 a.m.— 5 p.m. Enjoy a self-guided strolling tour of the SCC Horticultural Gardens. Sculpture in the gardens will be by artists across North Carolina. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on the half hour. A short lecture on the history of landscaping will be held at 1:30 p.m. Free and open to the pubic; but donations accepted. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3882

Village Arboretum Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m.— 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. In addition, enjoy Art and Nature, an exhibition of sculpture by art students from Moore County Schools located throughout the Arboretum. The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept.

Dian Ellis Moore began her experiences with pottery 33 years ago while living in Ohio. She attended classes at the Cuyahoga School of Art and by the time the family moved to Pinehurst in 1982, she decided to retire from her career in Dental Hygiene and work with clay. For 25 years Dian displayed and sold her pottery at Midland Crafters. Dian’s pots were also sold at many craft shows and at more than 90 shops and galleries in the eastern US. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Every Tree Tells a Story Photo Exhibit

9 a.m.— 5 p.m. The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s 2010 Landslide: Every Tree Tells a Story traveling photography exhibition featuring 26 images of 12 different locations in the US and Puerto Rico, including photos by Frank Hunter of the Bleeding Pines in Southern Pines. This traveling photography exhibition features sentinel and specimen trees, allées and boulevards, urban forests, formal and vernacular — things that surround us and are living reminders of our heritage. These trees and tree groupings recall our nation’s past and have the potential to bear witness to coming generations. These natural and living features command the same awe and admiration that our culture bestows upon the arts, architecture and design. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

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Thursday, March 22 A Fine Art of Fractals

10 —10:50 a.m. Eric Ton, fine arts professor at SCC, will offer a lecture with multi-media presentation showing, explaining and tracking the development of fractal art. Fractal art is a form of algorithmic art created by calculating fractal objects and representing the calculation results as still images, animations and media. Fractal art is usually created indirectly with the assistance of fractal-generating software, iterating through three phases: setting parameters of appropriate fractal software; executing the possibly lengthy calculation; and evaluating the product. In some cases, other graphics programs are used to further modify the images produced. This is called post-processing. The word “fractal” was coined less than 20 years ago by one of history’s most creative mathematicians, Benoit Mandelbrot, whose seminal work, The Fractal Geometry of Nature, first introduced and explained concepts underlying this new vision. To view some of Eric Ton’s artwork, visit www.ericton.weebly.com. This lecture is free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3878

Artfully Done Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Exchange Street Gallery at the Artists League of the Sandhills is presenting Artfully Done, featuring paintings in all mediums by members of the League. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Double Takes

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents Double Takes. A collaboration of photographers and artists, Double Takes seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-246-2266

Follow the Leader Art Class

10 a.m. — 1 p.m. With an instructor leading the way, complete a small oil painting to take home with you. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to paint. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Dress code: Painting clothes. Admission $25. Call to make reservations. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda and Jim Dalton of Linda Dalton Pottery Studio are opening their doors for studio tours, Q&A sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! There will be a children’s play area all day with plenty of clay and shaping tools to allow young (or old) minds to be as creative as they wish. Free and open to the public. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Gallery open for tours and shopping 10 a.m. — 12 p.m. Glaze your own raku session; $25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. 1 p.m. Throwing demonstration 2 — 4 p.m. Glaze your own raku session;$25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End, 910-947-5325

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m.— 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories Vote on your favorite piece. The Italian phrase “Bella Filati” translates to “beautiful yarn.” Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-3528

Kirk Tours History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen

10 — 11:15 a.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen. The 22-year veteran Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes”. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-295-2257

Sandhills Community College Arts & Crafts Sale/Exhibit 10 a.m.— 2 p.m. This arts and crafts sale will feature wares made by SCC students and faculty. The sale will include scarves, jewelry, holiday cards, notecards, toys and more. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3821

Meet the Artists at Broadhurst Gallery

11 a.m.— 5 p.m. Broadhurst staff and visiting artists will provide tours, demos and gallery talks. Possible out-of town visiting artists include Jim Adams, Judy Cox, Jason Craighead, Linda Ruth Dickinson, Jim Gaither and Louis St. Lewis. Check online for updates and to preview the artists works: www.broadhurstgallery.com. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Broadhurst Art Gallery & Gardens, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-4817

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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Thursday, March 22

Southern Talk: A Pure Form of Art (and Gift from God)

11:15 a.m.— 12:15 p.m. Ray Linville, SCC’s associate professor of English and humanities, will examine Southern speech patterns and describe major influences that have created uniquely regional expressions. Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3867

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

12:30 p.m.— 1:45 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 years. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Children (ages 8 & up) welcome . Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-2257

Little Orphan Annie Anglo Saxon Junk & Scat Band

1 — 2 p.m. Join award-winning writer and poet Stephen Smith and two of his musical friends, Larry Allen and Rick Smith, for a lively combination of poetry and song, all with a distinct local flavor. Be prepared to sing along and laugh out loud. Free and open to the public. Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-246-5361

The Sistah Reading Club: The Help

2:30 — 3:30 p.m. Join Gwendolyn Russell and Alfreda Stroman of The Sistah Reading Club as they lead a literary analysis of African American women working domestically for white southern families. Review themes from the book, The Help by Kathryn Stockett, racism, moral issues and civil rights. Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3872

Gallery Talk: Secular Art with Sacred Meaning

4 — 5 p.m. Virtually all art in various cultures manifested as conversations with the divine, until the industrial revolution in the west. During a time of increased secularism, there are still artists passionate about expressing truths of the spirit. This lecture will take place in the Teresa Woods Reading Room, then lead to a gallery tour in Hastings Gallery, featuring artwork by Ray Martin. Free and open to the public. Teresa Woods Reading Room and Hastings Gallery at Sandhills Community College Boyd Library, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

Rooster’s Wife Presents Folk Singer Peggy Seeger in Concert

6:46 — 9 p.m. Peggy Seeger is a historic figure in American folk music. Playing six instruments, Ms. Seeger is a song maker, folk singer and activist from the world famous Seeger family. This will be her last US tour. Doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets: $15/advance, $18/at door. Children under 12 free. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-7502

History of Beach Music and the Shag

7 — 9 p.m. More Details TBD. Admission: $10 (includes refreshments) Aberdeen Recreation Station, 301 Lake Park Crossing, Aberdeen, 910-944-7275

Ava Gardner Film Festival

7:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. Tonight: Barefoot Contessa (1954; 128 mins.) Admission: $7. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

Branford Marsalis & Joey Calderazzo Duo

8 — 9:30 p.m. The Arts Council of Moore County presents a special, opening night concert for the Palustris Festival featuring Branford Marsalis & Joey Calderazzo Duo. Join us for an inspired and intimate evening of duo performance from NEA Jazz Master, renowned Grammy Award� winning saxophonist and Tony Award nominee Branford Marsalis and his Quartet’s longtime pianist, Joey Calderazzo. While their paired evolution has been a brightness at the core of an adventurous band that itself has added light and heat to the music of its time, on their spectacular duo collaboration Songs of Mirth and Melancholy, Marsalis and Calderazzo reveal an ever deepening musical relationship and provide the listener with a glimpse into their musical journey. Tickets: $25/in advance, $35/at door. Tickets available at www.palustrisfestival. com or at the Arts Council Campbell House office, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Pinecrest High School R.E. Lee Auditorium, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines

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Friday, March 23

A Pressing Matter

Friday, March 23 Secular Art with Sacred Meaning

7:30 a.m. — 9 p.m. Secular Art with Sacred Meaning is an art exhibit that features the works of SCC Art Instructor Ray Martin. His work is largely allegorical and symbolic in content and conjures meaning in a manner parallel to the logic of dreams. Ray’s work includes mixed media paintings and constructions as well as oil and watercolor pieces. Hastings Gallery at Sandhills Community College Boyd Library, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

Arts in the Garden Sculpture Exhibit and Walking Tour

8 a.m.— 5 p.m. Enjoy a self-guided strolling tour of the SCC Horticultural Gardens. Sculpture in the gardens will be by North Carolina artists. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic; donations accepted. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910695-3882

Walking Tour

10 — 10:50 a.m. Join Nancy Heilman for a fun-filled and informative demonstration on the Victorian art of pressing flowers. Learn how to press flowers, learn to preserve your favorite blossoms, and learn to use pressed material for stationery and/or framing. Free and open to the public. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-246-4138

Fusions of Cultures: The Spirit of Argyll America Revealed

10 — 10:50 a.m. This lecture is based on the book, Fusions of Cultures - The Spirit of Argyll America Revealed, by Ernest Gilchrist. This book speaks of the history and growth of the Southeast, specifically North Carolina. It connects the roots and heritage of the Native American and African culture to the Scottish and “Argyll” travelers that planted roots and left behind the residue of a rich and painted past. From the “Tar Heel” origins, tea colored rivers, to the long-leaf pine, and the life and works of Paul Green, Gilchrist paints a vivid history entwining his own life with the lives of many pioneers before. Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

Sandhills Community College Arts & Crafts Sale/Exhibit

Village Arboretum Self-Guided

8 a.m.— 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. In addition, enjoy Art and Nature, an exhibition of sculpture by art students from Moore County Schools located throughout the Arboretum. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing yearround interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-1900

Beth Roy Paintings & Dian Moore Pottery

9 a.m.— 5 p.m. Art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Beth Roy and pottery by Dian Moore. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Every Tree Tells a Story Photo Exhibit

9 a.m.— 5 p.m. The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s 2010 Landslide: Every Tree Tells a Story traveling photography exhibition featuring 26 images of 12 different locations in the US and Puerto Rico, including photos by Frank Hunter of the Bleeding Pines in Southern Pines. This traveling photography exhibition features sentinel and specimen trees, allées and boulevards, urban forests, formal and vernacular — things that surround us and are living reminders of our heritage. These trees and tree groupings recall our nation’s past and have the potential to bear witness to coming generations. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

10 a.m.— 2 p.m. This arts and crafts sale will feature wares made by SCC students and faculty. The sale will include scarves, jewelry, holiday cards, notecards, toys and more. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome.

Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3821

Artfully Done Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m.— 4 p.m. The Exchange Street Gallery at the Artists League of the Sandhills is presenting Artfully Done, featuring paintings in all mediums by members of the League. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda and Jim Dalton of Linda Dalton Pottery Studio are opening their doors for studio tours, Q&A sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself and then see it being fired in the kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! There will be a children’s play area all day with plenty of clay and shaping tools. Free and open to the public. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Gallery open for tours and shopping 10 a.m. A true kiln opening. The kiln will be opened after firing for 20 hours at 2300 degrees and cooling for 40 hours. These pieces, which include a large variety of decorative functional work, will be for sale. 12 p.m. Throwing demonstration. 2 — 4 p.m. Glaze your own raku session;$25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End, 910-947-5325

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mak e Life a br eeze a LL y e a r Long. With a great neighborhood of new friends and a carefree lifestyle at our continuing care retirement community, enjoy more opportunities to do the things you love as you give your family, and yourself, peace of mind. To learn more about the variety of living options we offer, call us today at (910) 692-0386 or (910) 692-0382. Visit us at www.penickvillage.org.

PENICK VILLAGE

500 east rhode island avenue | Southern Pines, nC 28387 (866) 545-1018 toll-free

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Friday, March 23 Double Takes

10 a.m.— 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents Double Takes. A collaboration of photographers and artists, Double Takes seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-246-2266

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m.— 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories. Vote on your favorite piece. The Italian phrase “Bella Filati” translates to “beautiful yarn.” Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-3528

Perspectives on the Civil War — 150 Years Later

11 — 11:50 a.m. Lecture led by Abbe Allen DeBolt. See the Civil War through the eyes of two soldiers, Lt. John Gillis of the 64 Ohio Volunteer Infantry and Confederate soldier James Wallace of Missouri. Free and open to the public. Children (10+ years old) welcome. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3864

Meet the Artists at Broadhurst Gallery

11 a.m.— 5 p.m. Broadhurst staff and visiting artists will provide tours, demos and gallery talks. Possible out-of town visiting artists include Jim Adams, Judy Cox, Jason Craighead, Linda Ruth Dickinson, Jim Gaither and Louis St. Lewis. For updates and to preview the artists works, visit www.broadhurstgallery.com. Children welcome. Broadhurst Art Gallery & Gardens, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-4817

Kirk Tours History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen 11:30 a.m. — 12:45 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen. The 22-year veteran Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes”. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Southern Pines Train Station.

Rock and Roll: The First Decade

2 — 3:15 p.m. Dr. John Turner gives a multi-media presentation on Rock and Roll music (1955-1964). There will be plenty of music with an emphasis on this genre’s impact on American culture: the economy, fashions, religion and the music business. It was a time when popular music fought with Rock and Roll and what a battle it was! This lecture is free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

Kirk Tours History Tour of Pinehurst

2 — 3:15 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 years. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Children (ages 8 & up) welcome . Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-2257

Introduction to Our Temple

3:30 — 4 p.m. Take a half-hour tour of the Temple Beth Shalom, prior to Vivian Jacobson’s lecture, The Chagall Windows of Reconcilation. The tour will emphasize the Temple’s religious objects, Torah scrolls, prayer books, Eternal light, and other ceremonial Jewish objects. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 5+) welcome. Temple Beth Shalom, 131 Jackson Springs Road, Foxfire, 910-673-5224

The Chagall Windows of Reconciliation

4 — 5 p.m. Sponsored by the N.C. Humanities Council, lecturer Vivian R. Jacobson will present a lecture entitled, The Chagall Windows of Reconciliation — St. Stephan Church, Mainz, Germany, that will focus on the windows designed by artist Marc Chagall as a sign of reconciliation for France and Germany and for Christians and Jews. Jacobson will give a detailed analysis of the artwork as it coincides with Chagall’s passion for the Bible. This presentation is meant to bring the message that Chagall has sent to the world in all of his artworks: hope, peace, reconciliation and love. Time for questions and answers will be allowed immediately following the lecture. In addition, a book signing and sale will be available. Free and open to the public. Children welcome.

Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-295-2257

A Celtic Concert

12 — 1:15 p.m. The SCC Music Department presents an eclectic and unique celebration of Celtic music featuring both faculty and student ensembles and soloists. Experience the rich tradition of Ireland, Scotland and Wales with both a traditional and contemporary twist. Admission: Free and open to the public. Children (6+ years old) welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3828

Temple Beth Shalom, 131 Jackson Springs Road, Foxfire, 910-673-5224

Peggy Seeger: A Feminist View of Anglo-American Songs

5:30 — 8 p.m. Presented by The Rooster’s Wife and The Country Bookshop, the role of folk music in the lives of women will be discussed in a historic context by Peggy Seeger, as one who has lived the folk revival and continues to promote music today. Tickets: $15/in advance, $18/at door. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-7502

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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Friday, March 23 /Saturday, March 24 Guys and Dolls Jr.

7 — 8:30 p.m. This theatrical musical production of Guys and Dolls Jr. will feature the New Century Middle School students. Tickets: $5/adults, $3/children.

Saturday, March 24 Secular Art with Sacred Meaning

New Century Middle School, 1577 Union Church Road, Cameron, 910-947-1301

7:30 a.m. — 9 p.m. Secular Art with Sacred Meaning is an art exhibit that features the works of SCC Art Instructor Ray Martin. His work is largely allegorical and symbolic in content and conjures meaning in a manner parallel to the logic of dreams. Ray’s work includes mixed media paintings and constructions as well as oil and watercolor pieces.

JAZZ: Wolff Brothers

Hastings Gallery at Sandhills Community College Boyd Library, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-695-3879

7 — 9 p.m. Brothers Joshua and David Michael Wolff, conductor of the Carolina Philharmonic, both began their studies as classical pianists. As a teenager, Joshua was gradually drawn into the language of jazz and never turned back. For the past two decades, they’ve pursued parallel careers as performing artists worldwide, but have never given a concert together — until now. The brothers will be on two grands in jazz, classical, pop and crossover repertoire, backed up by bass and drums. Beloved, everwitty radio personality Billy Bag ‘o Donuts (WIOZ-AM 550) will join the musicians onstage to offer a running commentary on the performance, sure to entertain! From Mozart and Ravel to Scott Joplin, George Gershwin, Art Tatum, Fats Waller and jazz standards; this is a night to remember. Tickets: $20/adults, $10/children. Children (ages 12+) welcome.

Save Our Sandhills Events

9 a.m. — 5:30 p.m. There is a “web of connection” through life: a web between past and present, a web between plant life and animal life to create an ecosystem, a web between mankind and nature. The grassroots organization Save Our Sandhills celebrates those webs of connection that create sense from chaos, thereby making our lives more meaningful and enjoyable. All Save Our Sandhills events located in the Southern Pines Civic Club, 105 S. Ashe Street, Southern Pines, 910-315-1233 Nature Photography Exhibit by David Blevins

Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-687-4746

Ava Gardner Film Festival

7:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. Tonight: On the Beach (1959; 134 mins.) Admission: $7. Children (11+ years) welcome. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

Rooster’s Wife Concert — An Evening with Brother Sun

8:30 — 10 p.m. Following the tradition of folk music, Brother Sun creates three-part harmony from a background of gospel, blues, and traditional and modern songwriting. Tickets: $15/advance, $18/at door. Children under 12 free. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-7502

9 a.m. — 5:30 p.m. Enjoy a celebration of North Carolina’s natural landscapes through the photographic display of David Blevins. Items will be offered for sale. Wild North Carolina Author and Photographer

9:30 —11a.m. Author Michael Schafale and nature photographer David Blevins will discuss their book, Wild North Carolina, illuminating our state’s natural communities and highlighting the reasons plants and animals are found where they are, with a special focus on the Sandhills. Autographed books will be offered for sale. Eating Wild: Terry Sharpe

11 a.m. — 12:30 p.m. Terry Sharpe, a wildlife biologist and forester who spent 30 years working with the North Carolina Wildlife Commission, will describe the joys of reconnecting with a more natural way of life. Considering the great outdoors to be one big dinner plate, he will discuss favorites on his menu, provide guidelines on finding and preparing them, and bring samples to taste. Live Bluegrass by Joe and Abbey and Friends

12:30 — 1:30 p.m. Traditional bluegrass music by Joe and Abbey and Friends. Refreshments will be served. Children (12+ years) welcome. Looking for Longleaf: Lawrence Earley

1:30 — 3 p.m. Lawrence Earley, writer, photographer and former editor of Wildlife in North Carolina magazine, will discuss his book, Looking for Longleaf. Having the ability to bring the past to life, he will explain how the longleaf pine ecosystem was exploited, the problems with regeneration of the pines and the renewed commitment needed to help this biodiverse ecosystem thrive. Autographed books for sale. Photographing Nature: David Blevins

3 — 4:30 p.m. David Blevins, a nature photographer and forest ecologist, will describe how patterns in landscapes help people to see familiar places in a new way and new places with a sense of familiarity. Live Bluegrass by Joe and Abbey and Friends

4:30 — 5:30 p.m. Traditional bluegrass music by Joe and Abbey and Friends. Refreshments from The Fresh Market and Nature’s Own will be served. Donations accepted. Dress is casual. Children (12+ years) welcome. All Save Our Sandhills events located in the Southern Pines Civic Club, 105 S. Ashe Street, Southern Pines, 910-315-1233

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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Saturday, March 24 Textile Exhibit at Shaw House

D.R.U.M. Ensemble

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Moore County Historical Association will exhibit 19th century needlework on the Shaw House property. Vintage quilts, samplers, clothing and needlework tools, such as gold and silver thimbles will be on display. Articles on loan from a private collection for this one-day event. Suggested donation: $2. Children welcome. Walking shoes suggested. Shaw House, 110 W. Morganton Road, Southern Pines, 910-692-2051

12 p.m. West Pine Middle School’s D.R.U.M. Ensemble is an interactive performance directed by Marci Houseman. The audience is invited to drum with the students. Where the Wild Things Are, An Adventure Trail Hunt

1 p.m. A woodland garden adventure trail hunt for children under 12. Follow the clues and win a prize! Woodcarving and Basket-Making Demonstrations

1 — 4 p.m. Woodcarving demonstration (birds, flowers, etc.) and pine needle basket-making in the Magnolia Garden. The Golf Capital Chorus

3 p.m. Barbershop at its best! Located in the Magnolia Garden.

Artfully Done Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Exchange Street Gallery at the Artists League of the Sandhills is presenting Artfully Done, featuring paintings in all mediums by members of the League. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Arts In The Arboretum

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum and the Pinehurst Parks & Recreation Dept. invite you to enjoy a day celebrating the arts and the natural beauty of the Arboretum in the historic Village of Pinehurst. Trail maps are provided at most entrances. All events are free to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. All Arts in the Arboretum events located at The Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-1900 Village Arboretum Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Includes Art and Nature, an exhibition of sculpture by art students from Moore County Schools located throughout the Arboretum. Pine Cone Sculpture Session

10 a.m. Led by artist Barbara Sickenberger, make a pine cone sculpture to take home (supplies furnished). Open for all ages. Design, Make and Fly a Kite

10 a.m. Come Fly a Kite! Design your own (kits furnished) and watch a kite-flying demonstration in the Meadow. Doug Berky Performs With Life-Sized Puppets

11 a.m. Puppets take the stage with well-known puppeteer Doug Berky. Life-sized puppets represent characters from the World’s Wisdom Stories: The Lion and the Mouse, The Boy Who Cried Wolf, and more. Picnic in the Park

12 p.m. Bring your lunch basket and a blanket (drinks provided).

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour

All Arts in the Arboretum Events Located at the Village Arboretum 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-1900

Double Takes

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents Double Takes. A collaboration of photographers and artists, Double Takes seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-246-2266

Every Tree Tells a Story Photo Exhibit

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s 2010 Landslide: Every Tree Tells a Story traveling photography exhibition featuring 26 images of 12 different locations in the US and Puerto Rico, including photos by Frank Hunter of the Bleeding Pines in Southern Pines. This photography exhibition features sentinel and specimen trees, allées and boulevards, urban forests, formal and vernacular — things that surround us and are living reminders of our heritage. These trees and tree groupings recall our nation’s past and have the potential to bear witness to coming generations. These natural and living features command the same awe and admiration that our culture bestows upon the arts, architecture and design. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Follow the Leader Art Class

10 a.m. — 1 p.m. With an instructor leading the way, complete a small oil painting to take home with you. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to paint. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Dress code: Painting clothes. Admission $25. Call to make reservations. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda and Jim Dalton of Linda Dalton Pottery Studio are opening their doors for studio tours, Q&A sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! There will be a children’s play area all day with plenty of clay and shaping tools to allow young (or old) minds to be as creative as they wish. All events are geared to adults and children of all ages. Free and open to the public. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Gallery open for tours and shopping.

Visual Art

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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Saturday, March 24

10 a.m. — 12 p.m. Glaze your own raku session; $25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. 1 p.m. Throwing demonstration. 2 — 4 p.m. Glaze your own raku session; $25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End, 910-947-5325

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories. Vote on your favorite piece. The Italian phrase “Bella Filati” translates to “beautiful yarn.” Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-3528

Beth Roy Paintings & Dian Moore Pottery

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Beth Roy and pottery by Dian Moore. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Longleaf Cultural Theater Ensemble

10 — 11 a.m. An introduction to “cultural theater” features new performance pieces by this multi-arts ensemble. Performers include: Ray Owen (actor, writer & creative director), Brady Beck (photographer & filmmaker), Rod Brower & Together-N-Unity Choir, Ryan Book (guitarist & composer), Abigail Dowd (actress & singer/songwriter), Diana TurnerForte (principal dancer & choreographer), Caroline Young (photographer) and Carolina Performing Arts Center’s resident company, DanceFusion. Tickets: $5/in advance, $7/at Door. Tickets available for purchase at www.palustrisfestival.com. Children welcome. Carolina Performing Arts Center, 670 SW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-995-4754

Kirk Tours History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen

10 — 11:15 a.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen. The 22-year veteran Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes”. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-295-2257

Seagrove Area Potters Sale, Demo and Talk

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. While viewing the art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries, enjoy watching Seagrove Area Potters Jeff Brown, Bobbie Thomas and Dan Triece as they demonstrate on the potters wheel and speak with the public about their craft. Potters will also be selling their wares on site. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Historic Walking Tour of Pinehurst

10:30 — 11:30 a.m. The Tufts Archives will have an historic Walking Tour of the Village of Pinehurst. The tour begins at the Given Memorial Library/Tufts Achives. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-6022

Meet the Artists at Broadhurst Gallery

11 a.m.— 5 p.m. Broadhurst staff and visiting artists will provide tours, demos and gallery talks. Possible out-of town visiting artists include Jim Adams, Judy Cox, Jason Craighead, Linda Ruth Dickinson, Jim Gaither and Louis St. Lewis. Visit www. broadhurstgallery.com for updates and to preview the artists works. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Broadhurst Art Gallery & Gardens, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-4817

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

12:30 — 1:45 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 years. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Children (ages 8 & up) welcome . Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-2257

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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March 2012 P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Saturday, March 24

Historic Walking Tour of Pinehurst

Guitarist Ryan Book in Concert

Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-6022

Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-6261

PACK in the Park

Letters to Anna

1:30 — 2:30 p.m. The Tufts Archives will have an historic Walking Tour of the Village of Pinehurst. The tour begins at the Given Memorial Library/Tufts Achives. Free and open to the public.

2 — 4 p.m. PACK stands for Palustris Activities for Children & Kids, thus PACK in the Park will include a lot of activities for children at Aberdeen Lake Park. More detailed information coming soon. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Aberdeen Recreation Station, 301 Lake Park Crossing, Aberdeen, 910-944-7275

Ava Gardner Film Festival

5 — 6 p.m. Classical guitarist Ryan Book will perform original compositions and works by Villa-Lobos, Bach, Barrios and Dyens. A reception will immediately follow the concert. Admission: $10. Children (ages 6+) welcome.

6 — 7 p.m. This lecture is a remembrance of Stonewall Jackson by his wife and North Carolinian, Anna. The event includes a reading of his actual letters from during the war, ending in his tragic death in May, 1863. Tickets: $5/adults. Free for children under 12. Children welcome. Malcolm Blue Farm, 1177 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen, 910-315-5967

2:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. This afternoon: Showboat (1951; 108 mins.) Admission: $7. Children (11+ years) welcome.

Night of Splendid Liars

Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

Holy Songs of Joy

3 — 4:30 p.m. Religious masterworks choral concert with orchestra and soloists based on the passion and resurrection of Jesus Christ (Easter). Tickets: $10 (Children under 12 and active military free). Our Saviour Lutheran Church, 1517 Luther Way, Southern Pines, 910-692-2662

Digital Art

4 — 5 p.m. In this Artists League lecture, multimedia artist J.J. Love explains what digital art is, how it is created and how to view it. Reservations requested. Children welcome. Free and open to the public.

ecial Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art

Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Longleaf Cultural Theater Ensemble

4 — 5 p.m. An introduction to “cultural theater” features new performance pieces by this multi-arts ensemble. Performers include: Ray Owen (actor, writer & creative director), Brady Beck (photographer & filmmaker), Rod Brower & Together-N-Unity Choir, Ryan Book (guitarist & composer), Abigail Dowd (actress & singer/songwriter), Diana Turner-Forte (principal dancer & choreographer), Caroline Young (photographer) and Carolina Performing Arts Center’s resident company, DanceFusion. Tickets: $5/ in advance, $7/at door. Purchase tickets at www.palustrisfestival.com. Kids welcome. Carolina Performing Arts Center, 670 SW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-995-4754

7 — 9 p.m. PineStraw magazine and the Country Bookshop are pleased to bring you “The Night of Glorious Lies & Other Tall Tales,” an evening of gifted storytellers each trying to outdo the other in a spirited roundelay that’s bound to produce laughter and tears. In a down-home celebration of the oral arts and traditional storytelling, we’ll feature five superb verbal illusionists and even invite members of the audience to try and top our tall-talking pros. There will be great food and bluegrass music, too — all for the price of a donation to the arts. Admission: $10. Children welcome.

Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-7502

Pinecrest Choirs in Concert

7:30 — 8:30 p.m. Brownson Presbyterian Church and Pinecrest High School Choral Department present the Pinecrest Chamber Ensemble and Sotta Voce in concert. The concert, led by Erin Plisco, will feature a variety of choral works, both secular and sacred. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Brownson Presbyterian Church, 330 S. May Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-6252

Ava Gardner Film Festival

7:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. Tonight: Barefoot Contessa (1954; 128 mins.) Admission: $7. Children (11+ years) welcome. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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Sunday, March 25

Sunday, March 25 Village Arboretum Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps are available at most entrances to the park. In addition, enjoy Art and Nature, an exhibition of sculpture by art students from Moore County Schools located throughout the Arboretum. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing yearround interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-1900

Artfully Done Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Exchange Street Gallery at the Artists League of the Sandhills is presenting Artfully Done, featuring paintings in all mediums by members of the League. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen, 910-944-3979

Double Takes

10 a.m.— 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents Double Takes. A collaboration of photographers and artists, Double Takes seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-246-2266

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda and Jim Dalton of Linda Dalton Pottery Studio are opening their doors for studio tours, Q&A sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Gallery open for tours and shopping 10 a.m. — 12 p.m. Glaze your own raku session; $25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. 2 — 4 p.m. Glaze your own raku session;$25 for glaze your own raku piece, limit of 6 people per session, reservations required. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End, 910-947-5325

Every Tree Tells a Story Photo Exhibit

1 — 4 p.m. The Cultural Landscape Foundation’s 2010 Landslide: Every Tree Tells a Story traveling photography exhibition featuring 26 images of 12 different locations in the US and Puerto Rico, including photos by Frank Hunter of the Bleeding Pines in Southern Pines. This traveling photography exhibition features sentinel and specimen trees, allées and boulevards, urban forests, formal and vernacular — things that surround us and are living reminders of our heritage. Free and open to the public.

Beth Roy Paintings & Dian Moore Pottery

1 — 4 p.m. Art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Beth Roy and pottery by Dian Moore. FREE and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Kirk Tours History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen

1:30 — 2:45 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen. The 22-year veteran Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes”. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-295-2257

Moore County Concert Band

2 — 3 p.m. This “old time” concert in the park by the Moore County Concert Band features overtures and orchestral transcriptions, virtuoso soloists, novelties and the stirring music of John Philip Sousa. Featured on this concert will be the overture to Franz von Suppè’s opera Morning, Noon and Night in Vienna, and the music of Gilbert and Sullivan’s H.M.S. Pinafore. Trombone soloist Harold McKinney will perform Arthur Pryor’s The Supervisor and Mary Ann Groff-Neiman and Soo Goh will perform Mendelssohn’s Concertpiece No. 2 for Two Clarinets. The Moore County Concert Band is directed by David Seiberling, retired director of bands at Union Pines High School. Special guest conductor for this program will be Marcus Neiman of Medina, Ohio in the guise of John Philip Sousa himself. Free and open to the public. Children are welcome. Carolina Hotel at Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst, 910-245-7267

Ava Gardner Film Festival

2:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. This afternoon: On the Beach (1959; 134 mins.) Admission: $7. Children, 11+ years, welcome. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

Traditional Gullah Folk Music & Stories

3 — 4 p.m. The Gullah Lady, (aka Sharon Cooper-Murray), will present the history, stories and music of the South Carolina Lowcountry Gullah people with whom Pat Conroy worked and wrote about in the The Water is Wide. This program is presented in conjunction with the library’s annual Author Read Series featuring Conroy and is sponsored by the Friends of the Southern Pines Library. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-8235

Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Dance Lecture/Reading Music Special Event Theatre/Film Tour Visual Art PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P P March 2012

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New Expanded Menu!

Table on the Green Now pairing American Cuisine with the exotic tastes of Thailand

910-295-3240, 295-4118 Midland Country Club, Midland Road PUBLIC WELCOME www.tableonthegreen.com

Live Music & Entertainment Please call for info

Sunday Brunch Menu 10-2pm Lunch 11:30 - 2:30 Tues. - Sat. Dinner 5 - 9 Tues. - Sat. Closed Monday Reservations Suggested | Banquet Room Available Elegant Dining with Family Friendly Atmosphere

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March 2012 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Sunday, March 25 History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

3:30 — 4:45 p.m. Marva Kirk will narrate the historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts. You will hear stories about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 years. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome . Cost: $15/adults, seniors; $10/children 12 & under. Tour gift included in price. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Tour departs from the Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst, 910-295-2257

The Jazz Loft Project

3:30 — 5 p.m. Sam Stephenson will present The Making of the Jazz Loft Project, which features photographer W. Eugene Smith’s tapes and images of The Jazz Loft Project. After the presentation, Ron Free (a famous drummer from the early days of jazz) and a quartet of jazz musicians will perform, including Courtland Stewart, Bob Bowen and Steve Boletchek. Mr. Free will open the last set for a jam session open to all who wish to play with the band. Free and open to the public. More information on page 89. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst, 910-580-4514

A Cappella Show Off: College Edition

7 — 9:30 p.m. In this time of “March Madness,” the Arts Council of Moore County will present a special showcase of a cappella singing groups from four North Carolina colleges in Moore County’s very own version of The Sing Off. The college a cappella groups that will be performing are UNC-CH’s Achordants, UNC-G’s Sapphires, NCSU’s Acappology and Duke’s Rhythm & Blue. TICKETS: $10/adults, $5/students (with student ID). Tickets available for purchase at www. palustrisfestival.com or at the Arts Council offices (Campbell House, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines). Children welcome. R.E. Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines, 910-692-2787

Ava Gardner Film Festival

Choral Evensong

5:30 — 6:30 p.m. The Emmanuel Choir, under the direction of choirmaster & organist Dr. Homer Ashton Ferguson III, will present a service of Choral Evensong. This English Cathedral tradition will feature Magnificat and Nunc Dimittis in C by Sir Charles V. Stanford and other revered anthems from the English Choral repertoire. Free and open to the public. Children welcome.

7:30 p.m. Born in tiny Grabtown, NC in 1922 to poor farmers, Ava Gardner became one of Hollywood’s most famous leading ladies. The Sunrise Theater will host a variety of her best films. Tonight: Showboat (1951; 108 mins.) Admission: TBD. Children (11+ years) welcome. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-8501

Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 340 S. Ridge Street, Southern Pines, 910-692-3171

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Sunday

Monday

Tuesday

Wednesday

Thursday

March

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE 2 & 7 p.m. The Sunrise

PINE NEEDLES MEN’S INVITATIONAL

GATHERING AT GIVEN 3:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library

ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION 5:30 – 7 p.m. Campbell House Galleries

ART EXHIBIT & AWARDS CEREMONY 5:30 – 7 p.m. Campbell House

JAZZY FRIDAYS 7 – 10 p.m. Cypress Bend Vineyards

1

COMEDY SHOW 7:30 p.m. Cole Auditorium, RCC

HOME & GARDEN EXPO 12 – 5 p.m. The Carolina Hotel

ART CLASS. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills

ART CLASS 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Artists League

OLDIES FILM SERIES 2:30 p.m. SP Public Library

LUNCH & LEARN 12:30 – 1:30 p.m.

RUTH PAULY LECTURE SERIES 7:30 p.m. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College

4 5 6 7 8

ANDY COONEY’S FOREVER IRISH CONCERT 3 p.m. The Sunrise Theater

ART CLASS 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:45 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot

FLORAL DESIGN CLASS 6:30 p.m. Aldena Frye’s

MOORE ON STAGE 2 p.m.

SENIOR EVENT 11:30 a.m. The positive and negative effects of coffee on our bodies. Douglas Community Center

LEAGUE OF ART CLASS 9 a.m. WOMEN VOTERS – 1:30 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills LUNCH WITH LEGENDS 12 p.m. SANDHILLS AFTERNOON TEA PHOTO CLUB 2:30 p.m. MEETING 7 p.m. Christ Fellowship PIZZA WITH Church PIZAZZ 5 – 6 p.m.

BIRTHDAY PARTY 5 – 6:30 p.m. Southern Pines Police Department MOORE ON STAGE PRODUCTION 7:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills

Friday

MOORE ON STAGE PRODUCTION 7:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater

JUNIOR LEAGUE ANNUAL WINE TASTING 6-9 p.m. Belle Meade

2

SAM RAGAN WRITERS SERIES 7:30 p.m. Weymouth Center MOORE ON STAGE PRODUCTION 7:30 p.m. Sunrise Theater

9

SENIOR EVENT 5:30 p.m. Crosswork Puzzles at Douglas Community Center

11 1213 14 15 16

SP HORSE TRIALS

MOVIE 2:30 p.m. SP Library WEYMOUTH CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES 3 p.m. PHILHARMONIC POPS SERIES 4 p.m.

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY Beethoven & Strauss 8 p.m. Pinecrest High School Auditorium

JAZZY FRIDAYS 7 – 10 p.m. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery CELTIC MUSIC CONCERT 7 p.m. Weymouth Center

MOORE COUNTY CHORAL SOCIETY WINE GALA 7:30 p.m.

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES 6:45 p.m. ONE-DAY TOURNAMENT Seven Lakes

ENGLISH SPEAKING UNION MEETING 6 p.m. CCNC

ART CLASS 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Artist League of the Sandhills

SANDHILLS QUILTING GUILD MEETING 9:30 a.m. First Baptist Church

SENIOR EVENT 1:30 p.m. Douglas Community Center

PINEHURST FORUM PRESENTS 6 p.m. Carolina Hotel

NC FARMERS SERIES: Hilltop Beef 6 p.m. Elliott’s on Linden

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES 6:45 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot

SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS Carolina Horse Park

18 19 20 21 22 23 WOMEN OF WEYMOUTH 10 a.m. Weymouth Center

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING 11:45 a.m. Table on the Green

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES 6:45 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot

SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS Carolina Horse Park

ART CLASS 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Artist League of the Sandhills

MOORE COUNTY CONCERT BAND 2 p.m. Carolina Hotel

TAR HEEL CUP MATCHES Dormie Club, West End

TAR HEEL CUP MATCHES Dormie Club, West End

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES 8:30 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot

PALUSTRIS SOUTHERN FESTIVAL EVENTS PINES ROTARY PALUSTRIS see pages 92-111 for full schedule GALA 6 p.m. Belle Meade see page 92 for more info NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD 2 p.m. (live); 7 p.m. (encore) at Sunrise

ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION 6 – 8 p.m. Campbell House

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY Mozart’s Two Pianos 8 p.m. Pinecrest High School Auditorium

JAZZY FRIDAYS 7 – 10 p.m. Cypress Bend Vineyards

252627 28 29 30 PALUSTRIS FESTIVAL EVENTS see pages 92-111

CLASSICAL CONCERT SERIES 8 p.m. Sunrise Theater

SPRING FLOWER SHOW PREVIEW PARTY 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Weymouth

SPRING FLOWER SHOW 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Weymouth Center

EASTER EGG HUNT & MOVIE 7:30 p.m. Downtown Southern Pines Park


Saturday SENIOR EVENT 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Depart from Campbell House parking lot for a field trip to the Aloha Safari Zoo.

3

PINE NEEDLES MEN’S INVITATIONAL HOME & GARDEN EXPO 12 – 5 p.m. The Carolina Hotel SAM RAGAN WRITERS SERIES 7:30 p.m. Weymouth Center ART CLASS 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

10

WOMEN’S GOLF SEMINAR 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Mid Pines HIGHFALLS OLD-TIME FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION 6 p.m. SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS I Carolina Horse Park MOORE ON STAGE PRODUCTION 7:30 p.m. Sunrise WOMEN’S GOLF SEMINAR 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Mid Pines

17

PINEHURST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE 11 a.m. Village of Pinehurst ST. PATRICK’S DAY AT SLY FOX

ART IN THE GARDENS Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. Exhibiting sculptures through May 24.

SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS Carolina Horse Park

24

CORN HOLE TOURNAMENT & WEENIE ROAST The Sly Fox Pub

PALUSTRIS FESTIVAL EVENTS see pages 92-111 for full schedule listing

SPRING FLOWER SHOW 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Weymouth Center

31

Arts & Entertainment Calendar March 1

NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD. 2 p.m. (live) & 7 p.m. (encore) The Comedy of Errors by William Shakespeare. Two sets of twins separated at birth collide in the same city without meeting for one crazy day, as multiple mistaken identities lead to confusion on a grand scale. Tickets: $20; $10/students. The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or visit www.sunrisetheater.com. GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Pat Corso will give the history of the U.S.G.A selecting Pinehurst #2 as a U.S. Open venue. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022. ART EXHIBIT & AWARDS CEREMONY. 5:30 – 7 p.m. 2012 Young People’s Fine Arts Festival. High School art students will be awarded for works in the realms of drawing, painting, printmaking, mixed media, photography, and computer and 3D art. Exhibit on display through March 17. Call for schedule. Free. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787. DAMES & DRINKS. 6:30 p.m. Discover a few new cocktails for the spring season. Cost: $29+ Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. COMEDY SHOW. 7:30 p.m. Comedienne Jeanne Robertson with clean, real-life comedy. Tickets: $25. Cole Auditorium, Richmond Community College, Hamlet. Tickets/ Info: (910) 410-1691.

March 1-4 


PINE NEEDLES MEN’S INVITATIONAL. An invite-only event. Pine Needles Lodge & Golf Club, 1005 Midland Road, Southern Pines. Info: Pine Needles at (910) 692-8611.

March 2 


ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 5 – 7 p.m. 2012 Young People’s Fine Arts Festival. Exhibit on display through March 17. Call for schedule. Free. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 – 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Gates open at 6 p.m. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411.

March 2-3

SAM RAGAN WRITERS SERIES. 7:30 p.m. The Red Clay Ramblers, “unplugged.” A Tony Award-winning North Carolina string band whose repertoire reflects their roots in old-time mountain music, as well as bluegrass, country, rock, New Orleans jazz, gospel and the American musical. Tickets: $30. Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

March 2-4


HOME & GARDEN EXPO. Friday, 12 – 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sunday, 12 – 5 p.m. Sponsored by the Moore County Home Builders Association. The Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 944-2992.

March 3

SENIOR EVENT. 9:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. Field trip to Aloha Safari Zoo. Depart from Campbell House parking lot, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info/RSVP: (910) 692-7376.

March 4

ANDY COONEY’S FOREVER IRISH CONCERT. 3 p.m. Andy Cooney and the Irish Sopranos. Tickets: $30/general; $35/ premium reserved. The Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.com.

Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:45 p.m. Live music from Red June and Will Kimbrough. Genre: Americana/bluegrass. Doors open at 6 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 5

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. “Intermediate Ink Painting” with Karen Walker. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $40. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague. org. FLORAL DESIGN CLASS. 6:30 p.m. All materials included. Cost: $50. Aldena Frye’s, 107 South St., Aberdeen. Info/RSVP: (910) 944-1071 or (910) 944-1073.

March 6

ART CLASS. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. “Watercolor on Yupo” with Tommy McDonnell. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $50 (plus supply fee). Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. SENIOR EVENT. 11:30 a.m. National Caffeine Awareness Month. Learn about the positive and negative effects of coffee on our bodies. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

March 7

ART CLASS. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. “Learn to Journal: Simple Contour Ink Drawing with Watercolor or Watercolor Pencils” with Betty Hendrix. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $50. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. LUNCH & LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Topic: Spring Colors featuring Being True mineral makeup and Spa Ritual nail therapy. Includes lunch, gift bag and specials. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst, 80 Aviemore Court, Suite A, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 2951140 or www.pinehurstlaser.com. BIRTHDAY PARTY. 5 – 6:30 p.m. Celebrate the 125th Birthday of the Town of Southern Pines. Southern Pines Police Department, 450 W. Pennsylvania Ave. TEEN ADVISORY BOARD MEETING. 6 p.m. A “Peeps” show. Peeps Diorama contest with book characters represented by marshmallow chicks and rabbits. Grades 9-12. New members welcome. For contest rules and entry forms, visit library or website. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. RETURN TO THE LIGHT BEER DINNER. Say goodbye to porters and stouts; hello spring and light beer. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621. AROUND THE WORLD IN EIGHTY MINUTES. Taste five regions from around the globe; wine pairings available. Cost: $40/ person; $15/wine pairings. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1910.

March 7-11 


MOORE ON STAGE PRODUCTION. 7:30 p.m. (Wed. – Sat.); 2 p.m. (Sun.) Doubt, A Parable. Winner of the 2005 Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award, Doubt is a gripping story of suspicion cast on a priest’s behavior that is less about scandal than about fascinatingly nuanced questions of moral certainty. Tickets: $23/$15 (Wednesday only). Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info/RSVP: www.mooreonstage.com or (910) 692-7118.

March 8 


OLDIES & GOODIES FILM SERIES. 2:30 p.m. The Adventures of Robin Hood. A 1938 swashbuckler film starring Errol Flynn, Olivia de Havilland, Claude Rains and Basil Rathbone. Enjoy refreshments and meet other film buffs; free event. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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ca l e n da r RUTH PAULY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. “Giving It All Away” by Doris Buffett, philanthropist, sister of financier Warren Buffett, and subject of Giving It All Away by Michael Zitz. Buffett’s Sunshine Lady Foundation has given over $100 million to businesses, medicine, research, and the arts. Talks are free and open to the public. No tickets are required. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 245-3132.

March 10 


ART CLASS. 9:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m. “Using Impasto Technique in Oil/Acrylic Painting” with Linda Bruening. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $50. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. WOMEN’S GOLF SEMINAR. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. “Breakthrough to Your ‘A’ Game: Ditch Your Inner Critic and Release Your True Champion.” Season-opening mental game seminar for women with performance coach Veronica Champion. Mid Pines, 1010 Midland Rd., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2114 or www.truechampioncoaching.com.

HIGHFALLS OLD-TIME FIDDLERS’ CONVENTION. 6 p.m. Registration for musicians 5 - 7:30 p.m. Admission: $7. North Moore High School Auditorium, 1504 North Moore Road, Robbins. Info: Highfalls Elementary School, (910) 464-3600.

March 10-11 


SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS I. Carolina Horse Park at Five Points, just off Hwy. 211, between Aberdeen and Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com.

March 11 


SUNDAY AFTERNOON MOVIE. 2:30 p.m. Kids grades 3-5 and their parents are invited to watch this PG-

Key: Art

114

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

rated feature film inspired by the amazing true story of a brave dolphin and the compassionate strangers who banded together to save her life. Refreshments provided; free event. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. WEYMOUTH CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES. 3 p.m. Featuring tenor Carmund White, Jr. A new voice for Weymouth, his operatic and heritage repertoire promises to be particularly exciting for the Weymouth audience. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261. CAROLINA PHILHARMONIC PINEHURST POPS SERIES. 4 p.m. Miss Saigon. Tickets: $25/general, $50/priority reserved seating. Robert E. Lee Auditorium, Pinecrest High School, Southern Pines. Info: www.CarolinaPhil.org. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:45 p.m. Live music from the Get Right Band. Genre: country soul. Doors open at 6 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 12

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. “Negative Painting” with Karen Walker. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $40. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 p.m. Photographer Johnny Horne presents “Night & Low Light Photography.” New members welcome. Christ Fellowship Church, Midland & Pee Dee Roads, Southern Pines. Info: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

March 13

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS LUNCH WITH

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

LEGENDS. 12 p.m. “Guests” include Lucy Stone, abolitionist and feminist who helped begin the first Women’s Rights Initiative; Deborah Sampson, the first female soldier, who was honorably discharged from the Revolutionary Army when her gender was realized; and Lou Henry Hoover, a First Lady, a geologist and former president of the Girl Scouts of America. Cost: $30. Little River Golf and Country Club. Info: Ginger Finney at (910) 673-1330. AFTERNOON TEA SERIES. 2:30 p.m. Nancy Gouger Smith, born and raised in Pinehurst, will share how the Village has changed over the years. Cost: $25 (includes party favors and door prizes). Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 21 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0100. PIZZA WITH PIZAZZ. 5 – 6 p.m. Free pizza and demonstrations by the Southern Pines Fire Department; sound and lighting special effects included. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net. MOORE COUNTY CHORAL SOCIETY WINE GALA. 7:30 – 9:30 p.m. A celebration of Mozart featuring chamber musicians from the Moore Philharmonic Orchestra, hors d’oeuvres and wine pairings. The Fresh Market, 155 Beverly Lane, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6927683 or www.moorecountychoralsociety.org.

March 14

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 3 p.m. “Break it Down: Geometric Abstract Landscapes” with J.J. Love. Artist League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $50. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. ENGLISH SPEAKING UNION MEETING. 6 p.m. Featuring Vicki Leon, author of Working IX to V. Country Club of North Carolina, Pinehurst. Memberships/RSVP/ Info: (910) 235-0635 or bmoc@embarqmail.com.

March 2012 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r

March 15 


JUNIOR LEAGUE ANNUAL WINE TASTING. 6-9 p.m. Wine tasting and heavy hors d’oeuvres. Entertainment: “Tribute to Johnny Cash” featuring Baxter Clement. Valet available. Tickets: $35/individual, $325/table of six. Belle Meade, 100 Water Dr., Southern Pines. Tickets/Info: www. jlmcnc.org. NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. Beethoven & Strauss. 8 p.m. Grant Llewellyn, Music Director, and Barbara Shirvis, soprano. Discover two sides of the musical spectrum in a lineup pairing lighthearted works with two majestic and moving compositions. Pinecrest High School Auditorium, Southern Pines. Tickets/info: NC Symphony Box Office at (877) 627-6724.

March 16 


SENIOR EVENT. 5:30 p.m. American Crosswork Puzzle Weekend. Fun and light refreshments. Cost: $1/resident, $2/non-resident. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 – 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Gates open at 6 p.m. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411. CELTIC MUSIC CONCERT. 7 p.m. Danny Infantino will perform Irish ballads and songs in celebration of St. Patrick’s Day. Seren Lyerly (violin) will accompany. Tickets: $20/adults, $10/children. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6346.

March 17


WOMEN’S GOLF SEMINAR. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. “Breakthrough to Your ‘A’ Game: Ditch Your Inner Critic

Key: Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Film

and Release Your True Champion.” Season-opening mental game seminar for women with performance coach Veronica Champion. Mid Pines, 1010 Midland Rd., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2114 or www.truechampioncoaching.com. PINEHURST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE. 11 a.m. Come on out and celebrate the Irish in you! Free. Historic Village of Pinehurst. Info/entry form: www.pinehurstbusinessguild.com. ST. PATRICK’S DAY AT SLY FOX PUB. Let the festivities begin. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info/Reservations: (910) 725-1621.

March 17 – May 24

ART IN THE GARDENS. Sculptures by NC artists on display in the beautiful setting of Sandhills Horticultural Gardens of Sandhills Community College. Sculptures will be for sale with a percentage going to the gardens. Info: (910) 695-3882.

March 18 


ONE-DAY TOURNAMENT. Sponsored through the Carolinas Golf Association. Seven Lakes County Club. Info: (910) 673-1000 or www.carolinasgolf.org.

March 19

ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. “Masking” with Karen Walker. Artist League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $40. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www. artistleague.org. WOMEN OF WEYMOUTH. 10 a.m. Program: “What Medievalists Do When You’re Not Looking,” presented by professor Steve Barney. Barney, whose grandmother was a friend of Katharine Boyd, played at Weymouth as a

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

young boy and has published ten books, including studies of Old English and Chaucer and a number of edited texts. Guests are welcome. Weymouth Center for the Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

March 20

SANDHILLS QUILTING GUILD MEETING. 9:30 a.m. Join the fun and pick up new ideas for quilting. First Baptist Church, Southern Pines. Info: Jackie at (910) 673-7566. LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:45 a.m. Speaker to be announced. Table on the Green, Midland Country Club. Anyone welcome. Cost: $12. Info/RSVP: Charlotte at (910) 944-9611. GUEST CHEF SERIES. Guest chef; new menu. Cost: $30. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1910. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:45 p.m. Live music from the Joe Craven Trio. Genre: jazz. Doors open at 6 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 21

SENIOR EVENT. 1:30 p.m. Make spring crafts in celebration of National Craft Month. Douglas Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. NC FARMERS SERIES: Hilltop Beef. 6 p.m. Demo, discussion and dinner. Featuring a slide show, beef fabrication and grass-fed beef. Cost: $29+ Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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 Sanford

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March 22

PINEHURST FORUM PRESENTS. 6 p.m. Yale Whiffenpoofs, the world’s oldest and best-known collegiate a cappella group. Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort. Tickets/ info: www.pinehurstforum.org. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 6:45 p.m. Live music from Peggy Seeger. Genre: folk. Doors open at 6 p.m. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 22-25

PALUSTRIS FESTIVAL. A celebration of the visual, literary and performing arts in Moore County. See Pages 92 — 111 for a complete listing of Palustris

Festival events; featured artists and events found on pages 83 — 91. Tickets/Information: www.PalustrisFestival.com.

March 23

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT SERIES. 8:30 p.m. Live music from Brother Sun. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 23-25

SOUTHERN PINES HORSE TRIALS. Featuring advanced and Olympic level riders from around the nation. Free and open to the public. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Rd., Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or visit www.carolinahorsepark.com.

March 24

CORN HOLE TOURNAMENT & WEENIE ROAST. Roasted meats, live music and lively competition. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

March 25 


MOORE COUNTY CONCERT BAND. 2 p.m. Free. Cardinal Ballroom, Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst Resort. Info: www.moorecountyband.com.

March 26 


ART CLASS. 9 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. “Save this Painting” with Karen Walker. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St., Aberdeen. Cost: $40. Info: (910) 944-3979 or www.artistleague.org. WINE DINNER. 6:30 p.m. Five wines, six courses. Featuring a representative from Falcor Winery. Cost: $75+/ person. Rue 32, 290 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info/RSVP: (910) 725-1910. CLASSICAL CONCERT SERIES. 8 p.m. Featuring the Modigliani String Quartet, one of the world’s most sought after chamber ensembles. Phillipe Bernhard and Loïc Rio on violins, Laurent Marfaing on viola, and François Kieffer on cello. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787.

March 26-27 


TAR HEEL CUP MATCHES. Sponsored through the Carolinas Golf Association. Dormie Club, West End. Info: (910) 673-1000 or www.carolinasgolf.org.

March 29 


NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE IN HD. 2 p.m. (live); 7 p.m. (encore). She Stoops to Conquer. Hardcastle, a man of substance, looks forward to acquainting his daughter with his old pal’s son with a view of marriage. But thanks to playboy Lumpkin, he’s mistaken by his prospective son-in-law Marlow for an innkeeper, his daughter for the local barmaid. Misdemeanors multiply, love blossoms, mayhem ensues. Tickets: $20. Sunrise Theatre, 250 NW Broad St., Southern

Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Film Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

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ca l e n da r Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.com.

Ave, Southern Pines. Info: 910-692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

NORTH CAROLINA SYMPHONY. Mozart’s Two Pianos. 8 p.m. Andrew Grams, conductor, and twins Christina and Michelle Naughton, duo pianos. Enjoy an evening of beloved classics and all-American talent. Program: Weber, Mozart, and Brahms. Pinecrest High School Auditorium, Southern Pines. Tickets/info: NC Symphony Box Office at (877) 627-6724.

COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. Enhance your kitchen competence every Saturday. Grits (3/3); NC Peanuts (3/10); St. Patrick’s Day (3/17); Knife Skills (3/24); Breakfast for dinner (3/31). Elliott’s Provision Company, Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

SPAIN TAPAS. “The Genesis of Rue 32.” Order what you want, as often as you’d like. Cost: $34+ Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. SPRING FLOWER SHOW PREVIEW PARTY. 6:30 – 9:30 p.m. Preview an Alice in Wonderland-themed garden show featuring the North Carolina State Florist Association. Cost: $55. Tickets available at Weymouth Center and Botanicals. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3800.

March 30 


ART EXHIBIT & OPENING RECEPTION. 6 – 8 p.m. Featuring the works of Beth Roy (paintings) and Dian Moore (pottery). Exhibit on display through April 27, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., weekdays. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2787 or www.mooreart.org. JAZZY FRIDAYS. 7 – 10 p.m. Live jazz music and hors d’oeuvres, rain or shine. Gates open at 6 p.m. Admission: $10. Cypress Bend Vineyards & Winery, Riverton Road, Wagram. Info: (910) 369-0411.

EASTER EGG HUNT & MOVIE IN THE PINES 7:30 p.m. Easter egg hunt, food, family fun and an animated movie. The movie “Hop” will begin at 8:00 pm. This free event is for the whole family! Downtown Park, 145 SE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2871

ARTIST AT WORK. 12 – 3 p.m. Meet artist Morgen Kilbourn (3/3); Caroline Love (3/10); Jane Casnellie (3/17); Carolyn Rotter (3/24 & 3/31). Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.hollyhocksartgallery.com. FREE WINE TASTINGS. 12 – 4 p.m. Bodega Gratia, Argentina (3/3); Dogfish Head (3/10); Cremant de Limoux Rose (3/17); Campos de Luz (3/24); Gerard Bertrand Chardonnay (3/31). Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Rd., Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

Art Galleries Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Rd., Pinehurst, showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meet-the-artist opportunities are available. Tuesday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., and Saturday, 1-4 p.m. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. ART NUTZ AND RAVEN POTTERY, 125 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Come see the potter at work. Features art, local pottery from many potters, handmade jewelry, glass and more. Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 6951555, www.ravenpottery.com. Artist Alley features juried art and fine crafts from local and regional artists, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. 11 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077.

Artists League of the Sandhills, located at 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon - 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines, is open 9 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and every third weekend of the month from 2-4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. The Gallery at Seven Lakes, a gallery dedicated to local artists. The Gallery is open on Wednesday and Thursday each week from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. 1145 Seven Lakes Drive, The St. Mary Magdalen building. Just 9 miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211. Hastings Gallery is located in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are 7:45 a.m. - 9 p.m., Monday-Thursday; 7:45 a.m. - 5 p.m. Friday; and 8:30 a.m. - 2 p.m. Saturday. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst, features original artwork by local artists Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter, Morgen Kilbourn and artist/owner Caroline Love, Deane Billings, Jane Casnellie. Meet the Artists, Saturdays, Noon to 3 p.m. Open Monday-Saturday 10:30 a.m. - 9:30 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www.hollyhocksartgallery.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Open Monday, Thursday, Friday and Saturday 11 a.m. - 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines, showcases the arts and crafts of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Open 10 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday, Wednesday-Saturday. (910) 695-0029.

March 30-31

SPRING FLOWER SHOW. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. An Alice in Wonderland-themed garden show featuring the North Carolina State Florist Association. Educational design programs will be held in the great room at 1 p.m. Benefits the Weymouth Center. Cost: $10 (advance), $12 (at door). Tickets available at Weymouth Center and Botanicals. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3800.

Weekly Happenings Tuesdays

Worship Directory

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. (Through April 14) Clients must register onsite; no prior appointments by phone. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave, Southern Pines. Info: 910-692-8235 or www.sppl.net. FREE YOGA FOR PTS VETS. 6 p.m. Yoga for retired veterans who suffer from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder. No previous yoga experience necessary. Yoga Massage in the Sandhills, 5374 Niagara Carthage Rd., Southern Pines. Info: Mary Ann at 910-949-2162.

Wednesdays

CHILDREN’S STORY TIME. 1:30 p.m. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Rd., Pinehurst. Info: 910-295-6022. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. (March 14, 21, 28) Bring infants and toddlers (ages birth through 5 years) for stories, songs and fun. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

Saturdays

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. (Through April 14) Clients must register onsite; no prior appointments by phone. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut

Key: Art Music/Concerts Dance/Theater Literature/Speakers Fun History Sports

Film

Come Celebrate the Journey

Palm Sunday ~ April 1: “The Celebration of Christ’s Joyful Entrance”. Worship at 8:45 and 11:10 AM. Maundy Thursday ~ April 5: The Lord’s Supper. Worship at 7 PM. Good Friday ~ April 6: The Passion Story. Worship at 12 noon. Easter ~ April 8: The Resurrection of Our Lord. Worship at 8:45 and 11:10 AM. The Chancel Choir with Brass.

Brownson Memorial Presbyterian Church 330 South May Street at Indiana Ave, Southern Pines 910.692.6252 ~ www.brownsonchurch.org

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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ca l e n da r SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Dr., Aberdeen, is open 10 a.m. 5 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery.com. Studio 590, located in a historic log cabin, is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Studio 590 offers fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. Located by the pond in the Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle in Pinehurst South. (910) 639-9404.

Historical Sites

Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908.

White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100.

Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2-5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331.

The Downtown Gallery (inside Flynne’s Coffee Bar) is located at 115 NE Broad St. in downtown Southern Pines. Ever-changing array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999.

House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051.

Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, located at 25 Chinquapin Road in Pinehurst, is featuring local artist Nancy Campbell. Original oil and watercolor paintings are on display inside the tea shop. Open Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www.ladybedfords.com.

Nature Centers

Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve (898 acres). 1024 Ft. Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

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Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1-4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739. North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. - 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261. Shaw House Property. Open 1-4 p.m. TuesdayFriday. (910) 692-2051. Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642. Union Station. Open 8 a.m. - 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin Open 10 a.m. - 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677 To add an event, send us an e-mail at pinestraw@thepilot.com by the first of the month prior to the event.

PineNeedler Answers

National Month! FromNutrition page 95

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March 2012 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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SandhillSeen MCH Hunt Breakfast at Mid Pines February 4, 2012 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Neil Schwartzberg, Dr. Nick Ellis Jeanne Paine, Dan Butler

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SandhillSeen Moore County Hounds Formal Foxhunting Photographs by Jeanne Paine

David Raley, Mel Wyatt

Codie Hayes, Kayela Smith, Savannah Russell

Rita

David Raley Dr. Nick Ellis, Sassy & Kevin Riley, Effie Ellis

Tot Goodwin, Dick Webb

Effie Ellis, Dick Webb

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SandhillSeen Friend to Friend Benefit Luncheon at CCNC January 25, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Marilyn Neely, Frances Wilson, Twana McKnight, Adele Chestnut

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Excellent Land Investment 14 1/2 deeded acres on Morganton Rd, Adjoining Lawn and Tennis Club Zoned Plan Development, Southern Pines ETJ Many uses, Medical complex, commercial, Residential, etc. Will consider trade or lease Vickie Haddock, Fore Properties 910-603-2808 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � March 2012

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SandhillSeen Love Letters Performance at SCC January 19, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

George & Wanda Little, Beverly & David Harper

Linda & Bob Torok

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April Medlock, Jennifer Bowe, Beth Elliot

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March 2012 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen Harpeth RISING at The Rooster’s Wife January 15, 2012 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Beth Lyerly, Peggy Baldwin, Roger Waddell

Kathe Taylor, Sierra Marino

Sally & Alan Bolton

Jim & Vera Stafford, Ron & Xuan Callahan

Dr. George & Dr. Margaret Binder, Eileen & Dr. Jim Nolan

Janet Kenworthy, Peggy Baldwin

Ed Cloer, Betsy Markey

Karson, Dr. Steve and Kenan VanScoyoc

Liz Giri, Franklin Dean

Harpeth RISING: Chris Burgess (percussion), Rebecca Reed-Lunn (banjo), Jordana Greenberg (violin), Maria Di Meglio (cello)

Deanna McCall, Joan Beasley

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2012

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March PineNeedler National Nutrition Month

ACROSS 1 Cover a present 5 Swiss mountains 9 Goes without food 14 Hawaiian dance 15 Hawaiian island 16 Jell-O tomato salad 17 Spring flower 18 Tablet 19 Musical production 20 Bill at Dugan’s or Neville’s 21 Blueberries, plums, eggplants 23 Paradise 24 Evoke 26 Disallow 28 Dined 29 Baseball player Ty 31 Tomato, raspberries, grapes, watermelon, beets 34 Ocean wave 37 Gain a point 39 Worker

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Expert Actor Alda Enter Handcuffs Limited (abbr.) Sandwich cookie Foxy Airport abbr. Difficult Ballet skirt Lemons, squash, corn, cantaloupe, peach ENE, i.e. (abbr.) Coral reef In __ of (instead of) Wise man Storms Prayer ending Biblical “you” Splinter of glass Geek Early part of day

DOWN 1 Onions, potatoes, cauliflower, mushrooms 2 Rustic 3 Defense, in court 4 Ma’s partners 5 One with a missing limb 6 Den 7 Meaty orange part 8 Window part 9 ____Schwartz, toy store 10 Colorado skiing town 11 Raced 12 Wheel 13 Look over 21 Brad ___, actor 22 Recede, as the tide 25 Capital of Egypt 27 Six-pack, at the gym 29 Chocolate tree 30 Unseal 31 Theatrical part 32 Time periods 33 Cozy6room Den 34 Says 7noMeaty orange part 35 Animal pack part 8 Window 36 Attended 9 ____Schwartz, Toy Store 38 Sepals of a flower Colorado skiing town 10Jersey’s 39 New neighbor, abbr. 11 Raced 43 Parking area 12 Wheel 45 Amaze 46 Talon 13 Look over 49 Shaft light ___, actor 21ofBrad 51 Swiss Recede, as the tide 22mathematician 53 Potato state 25 Capital of Egypt 54 African country 27 Six-pack, at the gym 55 Lettuce, spinach, grapes, 29 Chocolate avocado, lime, kiwitree Unseal 56 Sticky substances 30 black 57 Mormon State part 31 Theatrical 58 Roman garments periods 32 Time 60 Zeal33 Cozy room 61 Green citrus fruit 34 Says no 62 Ogle Animal 35drug, 65 Acid abbr.pack 36 Attended 67 Short-term memory

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38 Sepals of a flower 39 New Jersey's neighbor, abv www.CrosswordWeaver.com 43 Parking area 45 Amaze ACROSS 7 47 6 Limited 4 5(abbr.) 46 Talon 48 Sandwich cookie 8 50 Foxy 49 Shaft of light present 1 Cover a5 ENGLISH WESTERN 51 Swiss mathematician Airport abbr. 5 Swiss mountains 51 6 3 Potato statecolumn 53 row, 9 Goes without food 52 Difficult Fill in the grid so every every 6 3 African 54 14 Hawaiian dance 56 Ballet skirt and every 3x3 box contain the country numbers 1-9. 55 Lettuce, HUNTERS DRIVING DRESSAGE 15 Hawaiian Island 59 lemons, squash,corn, 4 2 canteloupe,peach 16 Jell-o tomato salad Puzzle answers on page 117 spinach,grapes,acocado, lime, kiwi 8 ENE,i.e.(abbr.) 1 17 Spring flower 63 barndoorconsignments.com Pines andsubstances would black 56 Sticky 18 Tablet 64 Coral reef Mart Dickerson lives in Southern 9 8 1 2 welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle masters. Mormon State 57 Musical production In __ of (instead of) 19 66 58 Roman garments 20 Bill at Dugan's or Neville's 67 Wise man 8 6 She can be reached at martaroonie@gmail.com 60 Zeal 21 Blueberries, plums, eggplants 68 Storms LOCATED BEHIND ABERDEEN SUPPLY 5 3 69 9 Prayer ending 1 61 Green citrus fruit 23 Paradise 104 KNIGHT ST., ABERDEEN, NC 910-944-5011 62 Ogle 24 Evoke 70 Biblical "you" 65 Acid drug, abv. 26 Disallow 71 Splinter of glass Short-term memory Dined Geek 28 72 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � 67 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � March 2012 127 29 Baseball player Ty 73 Early part of day 31 Tomato,raspberries,grapes, 71

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southwords

Hope Floats By Laura Feder

40

— the magic number growing up. It was two precious digits that would finally free me from my loathed carseat. Most kids probably don’t even remember making such a transition, but for my life it was a huge milestone. My mother still recalls me weighing myself in the bathroom and lying about the scale’s unfortunate results. It was humiliating, really, to be the only first-grader to still get picked up from school and buckled into a “baby seat.”

Growing up, and still today, I was always told that I was little. Though I am the youngest of four, the three older being all boys, I never had a problem keeping up with them. Even when they so blatantly told me I wasn’t invited on their boyish adventures, I still tagged along. Nobody was going to tell me that I couldn’t do anything because of my size (or because I was a girl). So maybe it was my little sister complex, but the word “small” just wasn’t in my vocabulary. And I guess it’s because I never felt small. There was no foot race I couldn’t win against my older brothers. I always scored the most goals on my soccer team (22 in one season if we’re talking specifics). And, I’ve always had a big enough personality that never quite fit into my little body. It was only recently that I began to feel my real size — small. Not long ago, I graduated from the University of Georgia with a Bachelor of Arts in journalism and mass communications. I was enrolled in a graduate program at the Portfolio Center in Atlanta, Georgia, that would begin in the fall shortly after graduation. There, I was to study art direction and advertisement design. I had my life pretty much mapped out, and the best part was that I wasn’t going to have to face this tough economy, and suffer through a dreaded job search (at least not yet). Throughout college I watched and listened as my professors became less and less hopeful for us, their students. The reality was that this terrible economy was a real beast, mean and bitter to its very core. Truthfully, I never even thought about grad school until I had to look that ugly monster in the eyes. Once I did, well, I quickly made the decision to stay in school. But, truth be told, I began to let fear drive and shape the next chapter of my life instead of my naturally brave ambition. I never even let myself consider the working world because I was certain there was no space for me. Or so it seemed. The summer following graduation, I stuck around Athens to say my final goodbyes to the place and people who had changed me forever over the last four years. I had spent the entire semester prior not truly believing the end was in sight; it took the whole summer to cope. And somewhere in the middle of July, between looking at apartments in Atlanta and measuring my small, pathetic bank account, I freaked. Not only could I not afford the price of living in a city like Atlanta, but also I was about to make a $40,000 investment in a grad school program I wasn’t gung ho on (for the right reasons). Stressing over big life decisions, empty pockets and my archenemy, fear, I pulled the plug on grad school (or postponed it indefinitely, I like to say), and put my faith to the test. I didn’t have a plan, and had barely enough money to get me out of Athens. The economy hit my family pretty hard in 2008, so for the last few years I’ve

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tried to ask for money only in desperate situations — I wasn’t desperate yet. I continued to claw at closed doors, praying that just one would open, but it seemed every day confirmed my biggest fear — there was just no room for even little me. It wasn’t until one phone call over the summer that I began to feel some relief. My college roommate Christine called to catch up, and after unloading my current trial on her, she suggested that I come live with her in Richmond, Virginia. No, not a job, not the security of a paid salary, but a room under the same roof as a good friend — “If you want it, it’s yours,” she said. I was hesitant at first, of course. It seemed the entire situation moved at an uncomfortable pace: too slow when I wished it would speed up, and too fast when I’d pray for it to slow down. It was more than my type A personality could handle. I’m used to always knowing my next ten steps, but I felt that this leap of a faith was a gift. So I decided to say “yes” first and to figure out the rest once I got there — to Richmond, that is. Moving day was a complete blur, filled with sentimental emotions. My dear grandmother was gracious enough to help me move all my things into my new place. The day seemed to fly by, probably because there wasn’t much to unpack, but also because I knew what tomorrow meant: the first day of being a big kid, or not a kid at all — being an adult. I tried to hold myself together as best I could when my grandmother drove out of sight, but it was for the most part a lost battle. Just like a movie scene, I sat at the top of my steps with my head in my hands and just cried, allowing myself to slowly realize the ending of a giant chapter in my life. But the next day did come, and the next day, and the next day and the next day. I snagged a job at a small cupcake shop my first week there just to keep the income flowing. Mixing up and decorating baked goods all day was not a bad first gig, but I had to keep moving. I was determined to find a work environment where I could grow and learn more about the creative world: social media, graphic design, journalism, advertising and so on. I continued to network, which entailed calling random men and women who had at one point in their lives known one of my family members. It sounds awkward and sometimes it was, but other times it led to things like a temp job at one of the world’s largest advertising agencies. And that is where I am now: a substitute receptionist at The Martin Agency. It’s the bottom of the totem pole, no doubt about it, but for me it’s a huge foot in the door. It took several months fighting to get to where I am, which isn’t even stable ground, and still I have many miles to go. But I’ll tell you something: The key is hope. My wise Sandhills grandmother told me recently, “Once you’ve lost hope in yourself, your family and friends, the world and God — you’ve lost your reason to get out of bed in the morning.” I realize now that it’s been my free ticket all along, the very thing that has carried me throughout this entire journey. Hope is what helps weary eyes stay fixed on the road ahead — and it’s hard to feel small when you’re gazing at the big picture. PS Laura Feder is a recent graduate of the University of Georgia who frequently visits family in the Sandhills. Illustration by Pamela Powers January

March 2012 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Profile for PineStraw Magazine

March PineStraw 2012  

March PineStraw 2012  

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