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COMING

2

THE CROWN...

March 1-3............................Ringling Bros & Barnum & Bailey presents Fully Charged Gold Edition 5-9............................NCHSAA Eastern Regional Basketball Championship 12.............................FireAntz vs. Knoxville Ice Bears 15.............................FireAntz vs. Huntsville Havoc 16.............................FireAntz vs. Huntsville Havoc 19.............................FireAntz vs. Augusta RiverHawks 22.............................Luke Bryan: Dirt Road Diaries Tour 23-24........................American Girl Fashion Show 26.............................“March To Work” Job Fair 27.............................Harlem Globetrotters 2013 World Tour 28.............................Hiring Our Heroes Military Job Fair 29.............................Cape Fear Heroes vs. Washington Eagles 31.............................Manna Church’s Easter Services at the Crown

April 6-7............................Gun & Knife Show 12.............................Community Concerts presents Ricky Skaggs 13.............................Dancing with the Fayetteville Stars 20.............................Cape Fear Heroes vs. Harrisburg Stampede

1960 COLISEUM DRIVE FAYETTEVILLE, NC 28306 910.438.4100 910.436.TKTS (8587) www.AtTheCrown.com

crowncenternc @crowncenternc


March 2013

Volume 8, No. 3

Departments

9

Sweet Tea Chronicles Jim Dodson

14 PinePitch 17 Cos and Effect Cos Barnes 19 The Omnivorous Reader Stephen E. Smith

23 Bookshelf 27 Hitting Home Dale Nixon The Pleasures of Life Dept. 29 Tom Allen

30 Vine Wisdom Robyn James Kitchen Garden 33 The Jan Leitschuh

Features

55 Lest We Forget Poetry by Ann Deagon

37 Out of the Blue Deborah Salomon 39 Life of Jane Jane Borden 41 Material World Mary Elle Hunter 45 Birdwatch Susan Campbell 47 The Sporting Life Tom Bryant 51 Golftown Journal Lee Pace 88 Calendar 98 Home Of The Year 117 SandhillSeen 125 Thoughts from the Man Shed Geoff Cutler

127 128

PineNeedler

Mart Dickerson

SouthWords

Cristina Klug

Cover photograph and photograph this page by Tim Sayer

56 The Birds of Paradise By Maureen Clark

How a bold vision of renewal brought back the wild quail of Richmond County

66 Palustris Festival Guide The fourth annual staging

80 Story of A House

By Maureen Clark

The family farmhouse of Bill Webb has never looked better

87 March Almanac By Noah Salt

Ode to Narcissus and other signs of spring

4

February 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Beautiful & aBsorBent

at The Mews | 280 NW Broad Street | Southern Pines, NC 28387 | 910.692.2744 at Saltbox Village | 1249 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27511 | 919.467.1781

Coming in April to Cameron Village, Raleigh DUXIANA at The Mews | Downtown Southern Pines | 910.725.1577


PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Cassie Butler, Photographer, Graphic Designer, Writer 910.693.2464 • cassie@pinestrawmag.com

Kira Schoenfelder, Graphic Designer 910.693.2508 • kira@pinestrawmag.com

Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Ashley Wahl, Associate Editor Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Contributing Photographers

John Gessner, Tim Sayer Contributors

Tom Allen, Cos Barnes, Jane Borden,Tom Bryant, Susan Campbell, Maureen Clark, Ann Deagon, Geoff Cutler, Al Daniels, Annette Daniels, Mart Dickerson, Mary Elle Hunter, Robyn James, Christina Klug, Jan Leitschuh, Meridith Martens, Dale Nixon, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Noah Salt

PS David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Michelle Palladino, Sales Representative 910.691.9657 • mpalladino@pinestrawmag.com Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2508 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510 Pat Taylor, Advertising Director Advertising Graphic Design

Stacey Yongue, 910.693.2509 Mechelle Butler, Clay Culberson, Maegan Russell Circulation & Subscriptions

Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine

910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2013. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

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LAUGH

Not responsible for wrinkles.

When you move to Belle Meade or Pine Knoll, you’ll have plenty to smile about. These two beautiful, independent living communities are filled with fun, vibrant people like yourself who share an active, engaging lifestyle with the added security of the St. Joseph of the Pines continuum of care should you ever need it. So come make some friends – and add a few new laugh lines.

CALL TODAY – 910.246.1008

Where life just keeps getting better. Southern Pines, North Carolina • www.sjp.org • 910.246.1008 A member of the St. Joseph of the Pines Aging Services Network continuing the legacy of the Sisters of Providence.


sweet tea chronicles

A Walk in the Woods By Jim Dodson

Transcendental tree-

hugger Henry Thoreau once observed that a man who walks through the woods for the positive effect of the life of a forest on one’s soul is likely to be regarded as a loafer, whereas a fellow who surveys the woods for its uncut timber is broadly hailed as an enterprising citizen, a man in quest of a better world.

Walking in the woods with no agenda beyond open eyes and ears is an experience I rank right up there with reading a superb book or sharing a great meal with friends, quiet and seemingly ordinary pleasures that feed all of the senses and deepen one’s connection to a multi-layered world. If this makes me a tree-hugging transcendentalist, so be it. The grand architecture of old trees, hidden streams and overgrown forest paths have always been endlessly alluring to the kid in me who refuses to grow up. In another life I must have been a Junior Green Man or trainee Irish Druid or at least a decent tree frog because as a somewhat bookish and solitary kid whose imagination was fueled by Kipling’s Just So Stories and classical mythology, my parents couldn’t keep me out of the woods and streams of wherever we happened to live. By age 10 I’d authored at least two tree houses on land — or, as it were, trees — not my own, including an impressive affair built from scrap lumber in a century-old sycamore leaning over a creek in the woods behind my parents’ house on Dogwood Drive, in the heart of the small forest that came down to make way for a subdivision of princely brick minimansions not a month after I left for college. The shock was to come home at Christmas and discover (even though I hadn’t climbed up into that tree house for years) that my tree house and the grandfather sycamore were both gone, scraped from earth to make way for foundation footings. Even the creek had somehow vanished, gone underground. Boy Scouts meant a great deal to me not so much for the fellowship with like-minded kids in my patrol and troop, but because of the opportunities it afforded me to hike mountain trails or to go off the path and explore unknown woods, ideally on my own. Even the few times I managed to get myself lost, I never really felt all that lost. And one of the most fun things I ever did was go on a three-day survival camping trip in which we learned, among other things, how to make “biscuits” from the dried inner skin of a pine tree. They tasted terrible, but also wonderful. For my Eagle Scout project, not surprisingly, I cut a nature trail through the thick blackberry-tangled woods by my old elementary school on Greensboro’s south side. One of the first things I did when I returned home to North Carolina seven years ago was go check out my old nature trail just to see if it had somehow survived the passage of forty years, half expecting it to be a new subdivision. Amazingly, the woods were still intact though the hand-made

signs marking various species of trees and shrubs were long gone. Small price to pay for the surge of relief and joy I experienced walking that trail again after 43 years. All lessons in enchantment, notes spiritual writer Thomas Moore, begin in nature — especially in the mystery and majesty of trees. Plato, among others, believed earth-bound divinities resided among groves of trees, and every ancient religious tradition — including early Christianity, which took most important allegories, parables and symbols directly from long-extant pagan traditions and rites — assigned powerful enchantment to trees and forests, and the mysteries they contained. In European fairy tales designed principally to instruct the young, forests were always where both danger and the hero’s transformation lay in wait, a powerful metaphor for life. Buddha found enlightenment meditating beneath a Bodhi tree, while Jesus Christ — as related in the popular Appalachian mountain Easter legend — was crucified on an old wooden cross hewn from the slender dogwood tree: “With blossoms like the cross for all to see / As blood stains the petals marked in brown / The blossom’s center wears a thorny crown.” “Although nature is usually thought of as the quintessential example of the material world,” writes Moore in The Re-enchantment of Everyday Life, “paradoxically nature gives us the most fundamentally open mind to spirit. Mountains, and rivers, and deserts, enjoying a lifetime far exceeding our own, give us a taste of eternity, and an ancient forest or gorge reminds us that our own lives are brief in comparison.” Many years ago, not long before my father died, I used details from his memory of having carved my mother’s name and his own in a 200-year-old beech tree that grew in the forest of Compiegne, in France, not long before he shipped home from the Second World War. All I had to go on was that the venerable tree grew on a bridle path near an iron gate and a stone bridge, somewhere in the famous forest adjoining the market town where the Germans surrendered in World War I. The forest, now a municipal park, sprawled for hundreds of acres and was veined with creeks and sun-dappled bridle paths. I hunted for most of a golden October afternoon and was on the cusp of giving up when I took a different way out of the forest and crossed a small stone footbridge and stopped dead in my tracks. Bright yellow beech leaves were floating serenely in the black water beneath a small stone bridge,

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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sweet tea chronicles

and directly ahead stood a large rusted gate entrance to the park. Beside the gate rose a massive beech tree tattooed with hundreds of carved names and dates and initials. It took me a little while but I actually found their initials and the date when my father had been there in August of 1945, days before he shipped home. “Bonjour, Monsieur,” an elegant old man carrying a cane and dressed in a wool topcoat and felt bowler said to me as he shuffled past. I was halfway up the gate straining to get a close-up photograph to prove I’d been there — or, more correctly, my old man had. I explained in my horribly broken French about my father taking a walk in the woods here shortly after the liberation of Paris — about the summer afternoon he found a glorious beech that had stood since the days of Napoleon and left his mark in its skin. The old gent seemed to grasp my point, speaking a language that required no words. As beech leaves filtered down, he smiled and swept his cane to the vast canopy of limbs and tangled vines around us, turning a slow and stately circle, a twinkle in his eye. “Fantomes belles! C’est magique, n’est-ce pas?” All I could do was grin and nod, moved by his ardor for the woods. It really was one of my life’s most magical moments, though I didn’t have a clue what fantomes meant. When I showed my dad the photo, he smiled and nodded much as I had done. “He said the woods were full of beautiful ghosts,” I explained. “That woods must be full of them,” agreed my father. During the twenty years we lived in a post and beam house on a densely forested hill in Maine, just off the abandoned and overgrown town road of 100 years prior, on the remains of a farmstead surrounded by 600 acres of mature hemlock, birch and beech trees, I never felt more at home — or secure — than in our patch of woods, a house made from beams of Canadian spruce. My children and I grew accustomed to the rhythms of forest life, watching the seasons come and go, the familiar sounds of the house settling and the forest kingdom at night, the music of owls and eerie yip of coyotes under the moon, and shadowy movements of the deer we fed through the hardest days of winter. I had several hikes designed for different seasons, but the one I perhaps most enjoyed was the vernal pool deep in the forest overhung by a ledge of granite left by a receding glacier, mossy and embowed by balsam trees — my “Thinking Rock,” as I named it, the place I often went before the mayflies hatched and the black flies swarmed, to sit and read and make notes. When the flies became too intolerable, I simply waited until July’s dryness struck and went back — often to find the pool all but gone for another year, but spongy and

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©2013 Pinehurst, LLC

We don’t typically make people wait for their appointments, but sometimes they insist.

When you come to The Spa at Pinehurst for a treatment, you can enjoy a full day of relaxation. With spacious lounge areas, saunas, whirlpools, a swimming pool plus healthy snacks and smoothies, you can continue to unwind long after your appointment ends. So arrive early. Stay late. And we’ll make sure your appointment is right on time.

Receive 20% off treatments Monday-Wednesday.

Located next to The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 888.435.6957 • pinehurst.com


PINEHURST

PINEHURST

SEVEN LAKES NORTH

WOW - 5 bedrooms in this lovely home in a family friendly Pinehurst neighborhood! Beautifully kept and ready to move in! Split bedrooms, open floor plan, private backyard. Perfect for your growing family! Super Buy! 5 BR / 3 BA Code 971 www.23BerylCircle.com

"Rosemary's Lodge" is a gorgeous home in the Village of Pinehurst. This home was taken down to the foundation and completely rebuilt and expanded by Joe Ussery in 2005. The very best of both worlds - location in the Village and up to date renovations that honor the style and period of the original. You'll have to see this one to believe it! 4 BR / 3.5 BA Code 978 www.50OrangeRoad.com

Easy and elegant living on beautiful Lake Sequoia! This lovely home was completely renovated in 2005, including all new kitchen with granite countertops, new flooring, new roof, new deck, new low maintenance vinyl shake exterior - looks like a brand new house! Wonderful water views and a private, secluded lot will add to your enjoyment of this very special property. 4 BR / 3 BA Code 982 www.165FiretreeLane.com

PINEHURST

SEVEN LAKES WEST

PINEHURST

EnjoyfabulouslakeviewsfromthiselegantlakePinehurstVilla!Thelivingroomfeatures a vaulted ceiling, wood burning fireplace with tile hearth and wood mantel, fantastic lake views and sliding door access to the spacious deck. The master suite hasgreat lake viewsalso. Theperfecthouse for entertaining! 3 BR / 4 BA Code 979 www.9LakePinehurstVillas.com

Located at the end of a quiet, wooded cul-de-sac, this lovely home is absolutely charming with a light and open interior, vaulted ceilings, and hardwood floors. Enjoy the wonderful privacy of this secluded location from the spacious screened porch and deck. Immaculate! Great curb appeal! 4 BR / 3BA Code 980

This is an upscale home with lots of custom touches. Ceiling heights vary from 9’ to 14’. Hardwood floors throughout. Private wooded yard is beautifully landscaped. Located on a quiet cul-de-sac. This home includes a newly finished bonus room. 3 BR / 2 BA Code 981

www.108Rector.com

www.6ShamrockWay.com

SEVEN LAKES SOUTH

SEVEN LAKES SOUTH

PINEHURST

This home has one of the most extensive and tasteful renovations you'll ever see! It is like a brand new house! The floorplan is open and light with great views of the golf course and inviting outdoor spaces. Each of the 3 bedrooms is spacious enough to be the master and has its own private bath. Hardwoods throughout! Top of the line metal roof! 3 BR / 3.5 BA Code 984 www.117OxfordCourt.com

Comfort and Class! This attractive townhome is absolutely immaculate - beautifully updated. Spacious sunroom, lovely master bath, plenty of storage - perfect for the someone planning to downsize! Located just a short walk away from Seven Lakes Country Club. Easy living! 3 BR / 2 BA Code 975 www.118SandhamCourt.com

This is a charming home in a great location with many desirable features. In the living room and dining area you will find a hardwood floors, a gas log fireplace with media center above . 3 BR / 2 BA Code 977 www.235DiamondheadDrive.com

PINEHURST

PINEHURST

PINEHURST

Tucked away on its own little peninsula with water all around! One of the most unique locations in Pinehurst. The entrance drive is almost hidden so it's easy to miss, but once you see this lovely, sun-filled cottage on over an acre you'll be glad you didn't. Elegant and casual, this home has been tastefully updated. 3 BR / 2 BA Code 987 www.86GinghamLane.com

Gorgeous townhome in Lamplighter Village - beautifully maintained with wonderful updates. Hardwood floors, upgraded cabinetry, light fixtures, appliances. It in perfect condition and ready to move in! Pinehurst membership available! 3 BR / 3.5 BA Code 988

Lovely home is located at the end of a quiet, wooded cul-de-sac. Built by Big Sky, there are four bedrooms and three full baths - great for a family! A large, private backyard! 4 BR / 3 BA Code 976

www.180LamplighterVillageDrive.com

www.11GraysonLane.com

View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at

WWW.MARTHAGENTRY.COM

Military?! Check out our Military Advantage Program at www.MarthaGentry.com

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007


sweet tea chronicles

cool. I wrote whole parts of three different books in a notebook sitting on my Thinking Rock. March down South is a great time to walk the woods too, the ideal time to see nature as she stretches and puts on her slippers, forest floors coming alive with wild trillum and Virginia bluebells, even the magical pitcher plant if you’re really keen-eyed. Truthfully, I’m not much for walking through modern neighborhoods — unless I’m off the leash in Paris with an afternoon to kill — but fortunately the two places where I spend most of my days now — Greensboro and Southern Pines — have glorious urban forests where a walk at the edges of a day is a cure for anything that ails the spirit. Weymouth Woods, which surrounds my house, is home to the largest surviving longleaf pine forest in North America, a wood-walker’s paradise, sprawling pine barrens that are anything but, home to swamp thickets and soulful sandy ridges, an Eden of friendly dragonflies, hog nose snakes, fox squirrels and 160 different varieties of birds, including the splendid red-cockaded woodpecker, a highly social bird who makes his home in ancient pines. Not a mile from our house stands a very old longleaf said to be nearly twice as old as the U.S. Constitution, the oldest pine in North America. A couple of summers ago, my dog Mulligan — whom I found running wild in these same woods as a pup, hunting and living off the land — and I attended the tree’s 482nd birthday party. Mulligan wasn’t particularly impressed, keeping a sharp eye for something she might once have chased. But considering that the tree was standing just 30 or so years after Christopher Columbus set for North America was sure enough to get my attention. It has to be one of the oldest living things on Earth, not counting Hugh Hefner. In Greensboro, where I spend the other half of my time, I often walk the woods of Guilford Battleground Park at dawn, the nation’s oldest memorial battleground, a sacred ground where a ragtag army of farmers lost a battle but probably won the war against the British Army 232 years ago this March 15. I’ve known this old park’s stone paths since I was a Mulligan-sized pup and never fail to feel fantomes des patriotes when I’m walking there. Forest are made for weary men, wrote the poet Mary Carolyn David, that they might find their souls again. And little leaves are hung on trees, to whisper of old memories; And trails with cedar shadows black, Are placed there just to lead men back Beyond the pitfalls of success, To boyhood, peace, and happiness. Take a walk in the woods as spring dawns, and you’ll see what I mean. PS

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FRAMER’S COTTAGE 162 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387 910.246.2002

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Midmorning in Paris

Dialed In for Donations

Moore Free Care Clinic, which provides free medical care to local residents without health insurance, has come up with a new way to reach out for support. Borrowing from the public-radio playbook, the clinic is sponsoring a one-day Radiothon Friday, March 15, on WIOZ (102.5 Star FM). Clinic staff and patients will be on the radio telling of the clinic’s mission as the county’s sole free health care facility and ask listeners to call in with donations. The folks at Trident Marketing will take calls and pledges. The Radiothon begins at 6 a.m. and runs until 7 p.m. Call (866) 3687763 or donate early at www.moorefreecare.org.

On Thursday, March 14, at 10 a.m., the Arts Council of Moore County and Weymouth Center will present the first of three lectures in the 2013 Fine Arts Lectures Series. Portraiture became the favored genre of painting during the early decades of the 19th century in France. Art historian Molly Gwinn will present “Dressed for Success: Portraits of Parisian Middle Class.” Expect fascinating insight into the history of some of the world’s most popular portraits. Tickets: $10/ACMC & Weymouth members; $15/nonmembers. Weymouth Center, 555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. For reservations and more information, call (910) 692-2787 or visit www.mooreart.org.

Captain Planet

In 2010, Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. was dubbed one of Time Magazine’s “Heroes for the Planet” for his efforts to help restore the Hudson River. Hear his lecture, “The Green Gold Rush: a Vision for Energy Independency, Jobs, and National Wealth,” on Friday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m. Ruth Pauley Lecture Series events are free and open to the public. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College. Info: (910) 245-3132.

Twitter, Etc.

Here’s something all you tech-savvy nature lovers can tweet about. On Saturday, March 16, the Southern Pines Recreation & Parks Department, Weymouth Woods and Lowe’s Home Improvement will join forces to present a “Birds in the Sandhills” program at Weymouth Woods. Meet at 10 a.m. for a short bird narrative followed by bird watching and an early spring hike, then stick around to build your own birdhouse. BYOH (Bring Your Own Hammer), folks, and plan to help your little nestlings. Weymouth Woods, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2463 or www.southernpines.net/recreation.

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Emerald Isle

Oak and Pine

The Raleigh-based Quercus Quartet will perform at Weymouth Center on Sunday, March 10, at 3 p.m. as part of the Weymouth Chamber Music Series. The name Quercus, Latin for oak trees, reflects the strength and character of the group that hails from the City of Oaks. Tickets are $15. Admission is free for Friends of Weymouth members and piano and string lovers age 18 and under. Weymouth Center for the Arts & Humanities, 555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261 or www.weymouthcenter.org.

Andy Cooney’s “Forever Irish” concert at The Fair Barn on March 19 stars Cooney and his worldfamous band, the Three Irish Sopranos and Darrah Carr Dance — a combination no self-respecting Irish-American wants to miss. Show starts at 7 p.m. General admission: $25. Reserved seating: $30. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road South, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-0166 or www.andycooney.com/foreverirish.

(Bitter)sweet Home Alabama

Walter Bennett’s latest novel, Leaving Tuscaloosa, takes place the year before Bull Connor turned his fire hoses on civil rights protesters in Birmingham and the Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church. Meet the author of this gripping narrative at The Country Bookshop (140 Northwest Broad Street in Southern Pines) on Wednesday, March 20, at 6 p.m. For reservations and more information, call (910) 692-3211.

Palustris [puh-LUS-tris]: As Fun as it Sounds

The fourth annual Palustris Festival — think of it as a miniature version of Charleston’s Spoleto — is jampacked with music, theater, dance, demonstrations, art exhibits and a treasure trove of various lectures and workshops. From March 20–24, over 100 arts and cultural events are scheduled to take place in the Pinehurst, Southern Pines and Aberdeen areas of Moore County. Try your hand at the Victorian art of pressed flowers, tour historic sites, make jewelry, celebrate the birthday of the world’s oldest living longleaf pine tree — heck, why not do it all? See pages 64–79 of this issue of PineStraw to learn more about this year’s highlights, and visit www.palustrisfestival. com for an updated schedule of events.

Natural Wonder

“To be great is to be misunderstood,” the essayist said. Emerson wasn’t writing about orchids when he penned the oft-quoted gem, but he could have been. On Thursday, March 7, Jeff Baldwin will travel from the Orchid Gallery in Pittsboro to the Victor and Ball Garden Visitor’s Center at Sandhills Community College to share his orchid knowledge, including what to look for when buying one and how to care for it once you’ve brought it home. Orchids will be available for sale post 10 a.m. lecture, which is free and open to the public. For reservations, call (910) 695-3882.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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F I N D O U T H OW t o M A K E L I F E a BR EEZE A L L Y E A R LONG. JOIN US for LUNCH on MARCH 11 or MARCH 28 Join us at 10:30 am for one of our March luncheons at Penick Village. With 50 years of excellence behind us, enjoy a great neighborhood of new friends and a carefree lifestyle, more opportunities to do the things you love, and peace of mind for you and your family. To RSVP for the luncheon date you prefer, call soon as space is limited, at (910) 692-0386 or (910) 692-0382.

PENICK VILLAGE

A Continuing Care Retirement Community

500 East Rhode Island Avenue | Southern Pines, NC 28387 | (866) 545-1018 toll-free | penickvillage.org 16

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C o s a n d E f f ect

How do you want to retire?

My Other Mother An old maid who stole my heart

By Cos Barnes

Let me tell you

about my Aunt Sarah.

She was what society termed “an old maid.” She never married nor had a child, but she was my surrogate mother. How she would question that adjective and ask what it means. She had an incredible memory but if she could not remember details, she made them up. When she died, I regretted I had not recorded all her tales, but my mother said they were not necessarily true. “But they made a heck of a good story,” I replied. Aunt Sarah was an incurable exaggerater, the inventor of hyperbole, probably. When she told a funny story, she would get so tickled, she would be unable to talk; tears streamed down her cheeks and she gasped for breath. But the endings were always worth the wait. She related hilarious episodes about growing up in a family of 13 and her devilish brothers hiding leftover sweet potatoes in the lunch boxes of other children in the one-room school they attended. She grew somber remembering it was the brothers who kept the family together after fire left them homeless. She lived with my grandparents, as did my mother and I for some time. My mother worked outside the home, so it was Aunt Sarah who took me for vaccinations and conferred with my teachers. Disarmingly candid and surprisingly brave, it was she who insisted they falsify my birth date on my birth certificate so I could enter school a year earlier. I was only a few days off with a Sept. 18 birthday. I still feel guilty when I see the botched job done with ink eradicator. But I’ll give it to the old girl, she could lie with ease. It was she who suggested they put “traveling salesman” in the blank for father’s occupation. “It’ll save the child explanations and embarrassment,” she said, knowing how sensitive I was about being fatherless. Divorce was a rarity in my childhood, not a common occurrence like it is today. Once I wrote of her, “Aunt Sarah was dynamic, yet she retained a provincial naivete, she was earthy, unassuming but compelling without being conspicuous.” How my rumpled, bespectacled aunt laughed at that. She had no idea what I meant. She laughed at convention. She thought nothing of running somebody to work or a commitment in her night clothes, much to my grandmother’s chagrin. Her biggest social goof I remember was when she decided we could turn our plates over after lunch and have our pie on the bottom side. This did not sit well with Granny, either, but after all, Aunt Sarah was the dishwasher, and this was before electric helpers. She was a teetotaler in a circle of imbibers, but she rarely darkened the door of the church. Still, she sang off-key but with feeling her renditions of the old hymns, “Sweet Hour of Prayer” and “Shall We Gather at the River?” I remember her admonition that I would get colic if I ate too many cucumbers, and her punishment when I was caught with my cousins sneaking smokes in an abandoned pig pen. I was lucky. I had not one mother, but two. PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

17


T h e Om n i v o r o u s Rea d e r

Doggerel Verse

The rhyme and reason of the 2012 presidential campaign

By Stephen E. Smith

I have a friend

who employs an innocuous, straightforward observation to pacify people embroiled in angry political discussions. “Well,” he says, shrugging his shoulders, “we’re on a 24/7 news cycle.” This verbal device may be more perceptive than clever, especially as it applies to Calvin Trillin’s latest offering, Dogfight: The 2012 Presidential Campaign in Verse, a mildly amusing reminder of the agonies inflicted upon us during the seemingly endless presidential campaign.

Trillin is a witty guy. And more importantly, he’s perceptive and occasionally he’s flat-out hilarious. But 30 months of political news coverage — the explication of every infinitesimal detail of the Republican primaries and the presidential race, the parsing of every sentence uttered by every candidate, the examination of every remotely interesting piece of background information, the analysis of every gesture and involuntary tic, all of it reported ad nauseum 24 hours a day on network, cable and radio news — has left us jaded. I suspect this overexposure has permanently dulled our ability to enjoy political humor. After all, it’s difficult to laugh about something we’re heartily sick of. The excess is apparent in the opening verse: Mitt Romney put Seamus on top of the car. (“He liked it up there, and we weren’t going far.”) Obama, in boyhood, while in Indonesia, Once swallowed some dog meat without anesthesia.

Though dog lovers wouldn’t be either man’s base, A dogfight seemed what was in store for their race. And people were saying, “We wonder which dude’ll Emerge as the pit bull, and which as the poodle.” Why were the Seamus and the dogmeat stories reported so widely and so often to the American public? Who, other than an acutely sensitive animalrights type, cares about such foolishness? Apparently, Seamus is fine, and I know plenty of dogs who love to stick their heads out the car window while speeding down the highway. And so what if Obama ate dog meat? A member of Shackleton’s ill-fated Trans-Antarctic Expedition ate his pet Newfie and remarked, “I loved that dog, but this is the best damn thing I’ve ever eaten!” Since the ratings-driven networks give us what we crave, Dogfight amounts to little more than an untimely reminder that our appetite for this kind of political tripe leaves a bad taste in the mouth. We gobbled the slop and now we’re suffering the inevitable dyspepsia (excuse the protracted metaphor; inanity is contagious). To his credit, Trillin spares none of the usual suspects, beginning with Bobby Jindal: “. . . But Jindal, thought to be a true past master/ Of speaking, was, in fact, a true disaster./ . . . He proved to be an easy man to mock:/ He’s like the dorky page on 30 Rock.” Trillin lampoons the tea party to the tune of “Matchmaker” from Fiddler on the Roof, and bemoans the disappearance of Delaware’s Christine O’Donnell: “Because of you, just for a while,/ Those witchcraft jokes were back in style” (when were witch jokes in vogue?) Fox News earns a terse mention — yeah, the bias here is liberal — and a good many rhymes are devoted to Donald Trump’s wacky behavior: All White House hopefuls we forewarn: You’ll have to prove that you were born. Before Trump hits the state of granite,

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013 19


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March 2013 P���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e Om n i v o r o u s Rea d e r

He must identify the planet Where he first took on human form — A place where blowhards are the norm. Republican presidential aspirants Paul Ryan, Michele Bachmann, Rick Perry, Tim Pawlenty, Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, etc., are skewered in turn, and especially amusing are the Michele Bachmann lines sung to the tune of the Beatles’ “Michelle” and the verse devoted to flash-in-thepan Rick Perry: The biggest gaffe had happened in November, When Perry, in debate, could not remember The third of three departments he would toss Into the scrap heap once he was boss. Then he said “Oops.” With that word it was clear The White House was a place he’d not get near. The Newtster gets his comeuppance in the title to a prose entry: “Callista Gingrich, Aware That Her Husband Has Cheated On and Then Left Two Wives Who Had Serious Illnesses, Tries Desperately to Make Light of a Bad Cough.” The economic debate is dealt with in four short lines: “It comes to the same simple credo/ Around which the party has danced:/ If rich people pay less in taxes,/ Then everyone’s life is enhanced.” Akin, Mourdock and Ryan and their abortion/ birth control pronouncements aren’t overlooked: “The Rape Science Three can provide more reminders/ That now Mitt’s got wingnuts in all of those binders.” And so forth. Humorous though these verses may be, there isn’t a line in Dogfight that’s likely to find a permanent niche in popular culture — nothing as catchy as “Men seldom make passes/ at girls who wear glasses” or “”Candy is dandy but liquor is quicker.” But, then, Trillin isn’t recognized as a poet in the sense that Dorothy Parker and Ogden Nash are. Moreover, his verses are too topical to have much of a shelf life. Five years from now, who’s going to remember, outrageous as it is, that Gingrich accepted $25,000 a month from Freddie Mac to act as their “historian”? Trillin fans — those who found much to admire in About Alice, Remembering Denny and Messages from My Father — will file DogFight on the shelf beside A Heckuva Job: More of the Bush Administration in Rhyme; Obliviously On He Sails: The Bush Administration in Rhyme; and Deciding the Next Decider: The 2008 Presidential Election in Rhyme, and there it will probably remain, filed under “So clever it’s sad.” PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry is A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths. He can be reached at travisses@hotmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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March 2013 P�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B o o k s h el f

Art on Paper

March winds bring April showers — and a succulent garden of good books By Kimberly Daniels

With Palustris Festival on the mind

this month, we at The Country Bookshop are inclined to gravitate toward our artistic offerings . . .

A new independent press in South India, Tara Books, does amazing things with the printed word. Some of its books are one-of-a-kind works of art. Others are multiprint runs such as I Saw a Peacock with a Fiery Tail, a poem illustrated by Ramsingh Urveti. It is unlike anything I have ever seen. The children’s poem, which dates back to 17th century England, is written in trick verse. Urveti uses his drawings to stress the meaning of certain words. The poem’s verses are not repeated in the book’s text, but are revealed through inventive cutouts that are part of the drawings on the page. Sound complicated? It is simply beautiful. I have a friend who works in the art world. The Modern Art world. In a gallery. In London. I never know what she is talking about and sometimes feel a bit out of my league during our art conversations. That is, I used to. Recently, I discovered What Are You Looking At?, the surprising, shocking and sometimes strange story of 150 years of Modern Art by Will Gompertz. It is not an academic book but has all the need-to-know information to see or speak intelligently on the subject. If you want a really good read, pick up The Art Forger, by B.A. Shapiro. This book is just good. It begins by reminding the reader of a true to life event — the largest art theft in the world which took place at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in 1993. The book takes this event into thriller art chase and mystery. A talented artist in her early 30s who supports herself by making reproductions of famous artwork struggles not from lack of talent but from the lingering effects of an art world scandal sometime in her past. She has a moral crisis when asked to forge a stolen painting in exchange for sure acceptance into this high powered art world. This book is a gripping read but also leaves the reader asking: “What is great art and who says so?” This is the kind of art book that might inspire you to take a day trip to Raleigh. Visit the North Carolina Museum of Art or CAM (Contemporary Art Museum) downtown. While you are there, eat downtown at Capital Club 16 — a fantastic restaurant owned and operated by Southern Pines natives. Speaking of road trips . . . Did you miss Life, the autobiography of Rolling Stones guitarist Keith Richards? It came out in 2010, but if you are at all interested in the Stones, don’t read this . . . LISTEN to it in audio book. It is narrated by Johnny Depp and Keith Richards and won Audiobook of the Year at the Audies. *Please do not listen with kids in the car. If you are really thinking about an art road trip, check out the Art Travel Guide: Must See Contemporary Sites Across The USA, by Connie Terwilliger. This book is full of weird things. It is interesting to flip through, but may be more useful as a gift to a recent graduate road-tripping across the country. If you are interested in a more intellectual romp, check out The First Four Notes: Beethoven’s Fifth and the Human Imagination, by Matthew Guerrieri. This book is about the “da-da-da-dummm” (say it out loud . . . you know what I mean) and the interpretation of those notes and their influence all over the world for the last 200 years. He informs the reader that Beethoven still had his hearing when he wrote those notes and searches for the sources and inspiration in the cadence of ancient Greek poems . . . fascinating and sure to give you many dinner table factoids for years to come. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013 23


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March 2013P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B o o k s h el f

By Angie Tally Celebrate spring with new titles featuring classic children’s book characters and fabulous new stories. Peter Rabbit: Easter Surprise by Beatrix Potter. Peter Rabbit and his friends set out on a search for ducklings in this colorful new board book that is a must for every Easter basket. Ages birth-2. The Very Hungry Caterpillar Finger Puppet Book by Eric Carle. Since its original publication in 1981, millions of children have enjoyed munching through a buffet of treats with the Very Hungry Caterpillar. Now available as a board book with finger puppet, this beautiful ode to spring, and the new life it brings, will come alive to a new generation of young readers. Ages 1-3 The Lamb and the Butterfly by Arnold Sundgaard, illustrated by Eric Carle. Carefree Butterfly and cautious Lamb learn to value the beauty of individual differences in this springtime story of friendship. Ages 3-6 The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate. Recently named the winner of the 2013 Newbery Award for the best in children’s literature, this heartwarming tale is

based on the true story of Ivan, a captive silverback gorilla, who lived alone for 27 years in a glass cage in a shopping mall before being moved to Zoo Atlanta. Ages 8-12. 33 Minutes by Todd Hasak-Lowy. Just a few months after TMADE (The Most Amazing Day Ever) Sam Lewis finds himself face to face with his (former) best friend Morgan Sturtz in a playground showdown due to take place just after social studies class ends — in 33 minutes. “I liked this book a lot,” says Xander, age 11. “It spans just 33 minutes, is a mix of humor and seriousness and really shows how even the best of friendships can change.” Ages 9-14 The Tragedy Paper by Elizabeth LaBan. “Enter Here to Be and Find a Friend” is the motto of the prestigious Irving School. When 17-year-old albino Tim MacBeth enters as a transfer student, his only desire is to get through his senior year unnoticed. But as the deadline for his senior thesis, dubbed the “Tragedy Paper,” approaches, Tim finds himself reluctantly thrown into the public eye as he becomes more and more involved with Vanessa, the “It” girl on campus. Equal parts Dead Poets Society and Romeo and Juliet, The Tragedy Paper is a mesmerizing tale of forbidden love and the lengths people will go to keep their secrets. Ages 14 and up. PS Compiled by The Country Bookshop

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25


h itti n g h o m e

Still Dancing By Dale Nixon

I was reluctant to believe it.

I couldn’t say the words out loud. I thought if I didn’t acknowledge the facts, the facts would go away. Yet, here I am today writing this story, realizing when it goes into print that I’ll be admitting it is true. This is difficult. Give me a minute. I have to work up my nerve to admit to myself and to share with you that my oldest daughter, Edie, has MS — multiple sclerosis. When she first told me of the diagnosis, I didn’t even know what MS was or how it would affect her life. In my ignorance, I asked if she was one of Jerry’s Kids. No, she explained, that was muscular dystrophy; she had MS. Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, often disabling disease of the central nervous system. Symptoms may range from mild, such as numbness in the limbs, to severe, such as paralysis or loss of vision. Worldwide, 2.1 million people have MS. Most are diagnosed between ages 20 and 50, and about two-thirds are women. After she explained the specifics to me, I asked three hard questions: Is multiple sclerosis fatal? No. Is multiple sclerosis inherited? No. Can multiple sclerosis be cured? Not yet. Looking back, she said, her symptoms started when she was in grad school — tingling and numbness in her legs, blurred vision, slurred speech and a little falling around. The symptoms would come, but then they would go away (relapsing and remitting). But about two years ago they came back with a vengeance. A dedicated neurosurgeon and a multitude of tests gave her symptoms a name.

We cried a little and hugged a lot. I assured her I would be there for her and do anything I could to help. I remained optimistic and strong until I heard her car pull out of the driveway, and then I fell apart. I worried about canes and a wheelchair. There, I wrote it out loud. This was not happening to Edie. Why, this child could dance before she could walk. She bounced in her playpen to Motown tunes and clapped her hands to the beat of hard rock. I enrolled her in dance school at the tender age of 3, and she was so enamored with her pale pink ballet shoes she hugged them to her chest like a teddy bear and slept with them every night. She loved dance so much, she took 21 years of instruction (I know because I went to all of the recitals), earned a degree in dance education and taught dance in public schools. When she wasn’t dancing, she was running or skipping or darting back and forth from one activity to the other. Before I knew she had MS, I’d warn her to please slow down. Now, I’m afraid she will. The National Multiple Sclerosis Society has given us hope and inspiration. They fund research aimed at finding the cause and cure for MS. They also provide services and educational programs on a variety of topics including symptom management, emotional coping and adaptive living for those afflicted with this devastating disease. Because of them and their continued efforts, I know in my heart that twenty years from now, when Edie’s husband asks her to dance, she will be able to accept. To learn more about multiple sclerosis visit www.nationalMSsociety.org. PS Columnist Dale Nixon may be contacted at dalenixon@carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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T h e p l e as u r e s o f l i f e d e pt.

Shining Irish Eyes Pat Donahoe’s big, fat Irish birthday bash

By Tom Allen

I’m about as Irish as Chef

Boyardee. As far as I know, not a drop of blood from the Emerald Isle flows through my veins. I’ve heard that on March 17th, everyone is Irish. Sorry, not me. Two years ago I downed a plate of corned beef and cabbage. Too salty. I’m a bass, not a tenor. Ever hear of an Irish bass? I don’t know the words to “When Irish Eyes are Smiling” or “Danny Boy,” my kids say I look goofy in green, and I’m pretty sure I’d be seeking other employment if found at a pub, hoisting a third pint of Guinness, pinching anyone not wearing the appropriate color on St. Patrick’s Day.

I’m not Irish, but a few months ago, I discovered an Irish branch in my family tree, albeit only a twig. Mary Frances “Pat” Donahoe, my father’s first cousin, turned 90. He and my mom, along with my wife, Beverly, and me, were invited to what was billed as her Irish birthday celebration. Pat’s part of a big family. I sometimes envy folks surrounded by large families, families from American subcultures who immigrated to this country at the turn of the twentieth century, where relatives kiss you on both cheeks and feed you baklava and pierogies; families where all fifty-seven cousins know your name. Pat is my great-aunt Ada’s oldest daughter. Like my grandmother, Ada was a Methodist. In 1921, Ada married John Francis “Frank” Gallagher. Their union raised a few eyebrows among Ada’s rural Protestant relatives. Frank was an Irishman and a Catholic. But according to my dad, Frank’s sense of humor and undeniable love for Ada soon won the family over. Pat was born a year after they married, her sister, Lib, two years later. Another daughter, Sarah, died in infancy. The children were baptized into their father’s faith. When Pat and Lib were quite young, Frank became ill, requiring a lengthy hospital stay. He died in a railroad accident not long after. This was the desperate 1920s. Unable to support her children, Ada sought help. Her sisters became a safety net, offering Ada room and board. Pat and Lib could have lived with various aunts, but that would have meant the girls living apart. Frank’s brother, a priest, found Pat and Lib a home at Raleigh’s Nazareth Catholic Orphanage. The girls lived there through their teenage years, cared for by the Sisters of Mercy. Holidays and summers were spent with their mother and aunts. Dad says the girls married well. Lib and her husband, Norman, had six children. Pat and her Irishman, Don, raised eight. By the time Pat’s ninetieth birthday arrived, her family tree was bent to the ground with fruit — eight children, twelve grandchildren, four great-grandchildren. Widowed in 1976, Pat moved around the country, helping her own children raise their kids. Last year, she moved back to North Carolina. This Irish get-together was a first for me. Years ago I attended an Irish

wake, a rather subdued gathering, I thought, considering their reputation. I left just before they prayed the rosary. After that, I’m not sure what happened. “Party back at my house,” somebody said as I left the mortuary. Pat’s birthday gig took place at daughter Suzie’s home in Cary. By the time we arrived, a family multitude had made its way to the celebration. Grandkids bounced around in an inflatable house. Others splashed in a backyard pool. Adults gathered under a tent, a comfortable atmosphere for drinks and eats. Laughter prevailed. Everyone seemed to know everyone else. I knew not a soul, but so far, it all seemed pretty sedate — no one had thrown an unsuspecting grown-up into the pool; a table hadn’t been cleared for dancing an Irish jig. But I wondered, at what point would all Dublin break loose? Pat was sitting in a gazebo just off the deck, wearing an emerald chiffon blouse and green Hawaiian lei. I hadn’t seen her for at least forty years. My jaw dropped. She looked just like her mother, my great-aunt, Ada. They could have been twins. Introductions and hugs were exchanged. My dad took his seat next to Pat. His younger brother, who’d arrived earlier, sat on her other side. Her sister Lib was there as well. A slow procession of family made its way to the gazebo. Pat smiled and greeted each one, but for the next three hours, she and Lib laughed and reminisced with my dad and his brother. Family was everywhere but nowhere was that closeness more evident than in that gazebo. How many summers had they played together under my grandmother’s pecan trees, I wondered. What secrets had they shared? What memories did they create? It was as if they picked up right where they’d left off, years ago. I walked around and chatted with Pat’s kids and grandkids. They came from all over — Michigan, California, Texas. Nicer folks I’d never met. On top of that, no one doused me with green beer or made my dad wear a button that said “Kiss Me, I’m Irish.” They did tell me stories about Pat, about the values she’d instilled, the example she’d set, and the unconditional love she continued to offer. We noshed on roast beef sandwiches and grilled vegetables from a splendid buffet, surrounded by photographs from Pat’s past, anchored by a copy of When Irish Eyes are Smiling, signed by members of her family. T-shirts and a cookbook with Donahoe family recipes were offered as favors. One of Pat’s daughters told me the pound cake recipe, although bearing Pat’s name, belonged to my grandmother. My dad perused his copy all the way back to Moore County, smiling every time he read his mother’s treasured recipe. I left the party inspired, ready to break into a bass rendition of “Danny Boy.” Most of all, I found myself grateful for the gift of family, resulting from the courage two young girls and their mother found in the midst of a tragic loss. The luck of the Irish? Maybe. Or more likely, a matter of pure grace, perhaps aided by a nod from the Emerald Isle’s patron saint. Happy St. Patrick’s Day, Mary Frances “Pat” Gallagher Donahoe. Eat a plate of corned beef and cabbage for me, keep those Irish eyes smilin’, and always remember . . . Erin go Braugh! Ireland forever! PS Tom Allen is minister of education at First Baptist Church in Southern Pines. You may reach him at t_w_allen@yahoo.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

29


V i n e W isd o m

The Grace of Garnacha

By Robyn James

If I had to pinpoint

one special trend in the wine industry in the past year, I would say this is the year of the Spanish garnacha. This grape, pronounced grenache in the United States and France, is one of the most widely planted grapes in the world, particularly in Spain. Most likely having its origins in the Spanish region of Aragon, garnacha ripens late, so it needs the hot, dry conditions normally found in Spain. The long ripening process allows the sugars in the grape to reach high levels, making garnachabased wines capable of substantial alcohol levels. The best garnacha wines are from older vines (35-100 years old), where yields are kept low. They have characteristics of berry fruit such as raspberries and strawberries and can develop complex and intense notes of black currants, black cherries, black olives, coffee, gingerbread, leather and spices. Garnacha is also used to produce outstanding dry rosé wines.

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The Priorat region of Spain, long considered one of the finest wine growing regions in the world, has had a presence of Garnacha for several hundred years. A wave of young, ambitious winemakers rediscovered the low-yield bush vine trained garnacha in Priorat’s craggy, rocky soils. This combination creates a dense, rich, concentrated, dark colored wine with noticeable tannins. Spanish importer Jorge Ordonez deserves nearly all the credit for introducing these gems and many others to the United States. He convinced growers in Spain to promote cleanliness, proper storage and transport. He showcased these values to Americans, and we listened! And we bought! Of Spanish garnacha, Robert Parker has said, “This is a marvelous consumer resource for high quality wines selling at absurdly low prices. I often ask myself, if I had known wines like this existed when I began my career 33 years ago, would I have even considered trying to find great wines at low prices? This has been one of my go-to wineries for many years, given their relationship between quality and price. Once you taste these wines, you will probably ask the same question many people have: Why do I need to spend more?” Here are some of the tastier wines you don’t want to miss!

Bodegas Ateca Old Vine Garnacha, Spain, approx. $16

“Emphatically toasted and charred on the nose, this offers chocolate and hickory aromas. It feels smooth, plush, layered and not at all simple, with baked black fruit flavors that are draped over savory barbecue and spice accents. The toast is present by not overpowering on the finish.”

March 2013P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

Photograph by cassie butler

Spain’s go-to wino


V i n e W isd o m

Rated 91 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate

Bodegas Borsao Monte Oton, Spain, approx. $9

“This polished red is both fresh and intense, with focused black cherry, boysenberry, licorice and ginger flavors backed by smooth tannins and well-integrated acidity.” Rated 89 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate

Bodegas Breca Garnacha De Fuego, Spain, approx. $9

“This amazing wine boasts a dark ruby/purple color along with a sweet kiss of jammy black cherries intertwined with crushed rock notes that give the wine an undeniable minerality. As it hits the palate, a full-bodied, voluptuous texture takes hold and the flavor profile moves towards blacker fruits (ripe raspberries and black currants) intermixed with camphor and forest floor. This fullbodied, rich, glycerin-filled effort should drink well for 4-5 years, perhaps longer. Just when you think you’ve tasted the wine world’s greatest values, along comes the Bodegas Breca. Founded in 2005 by Jorge Ordonez, this Bodegas has 650 acres, mostly old vine grenache vineyards. All the vines were planted between 1925 and 1968, and yields average between 0.4 and one ton of fruit per acre.” Rated 92 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate

Honoro Vera Garnacha, Spain, approx. $9

“Honoro Vera garnacha sourced from Calatayud spent a brief 2 months in French oak. Aromas of sage, thyme, and black cherry lead to a plush, succulent wine with layers of spicy fruit.” Rated 88 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate

Bodegas Borsao Dry Rosé, Spain, approx. $9

“Made from 100 percent grenache, this rosé is a winner. Classic strawberry and framboise scents along with floral notes jump from the glass of this lovely effort. It has more body and power than is usually found in a dry rosé, as well as super amounts of fruit. I would not be surprised to see some tasters rate this wine even higher, especially when you consider the retail price. It’s mindboggling! Bodegas Borsao, which was founded in 1958, owns 3,700 acres in what is one of the emerging, super quality, realistically priced wine regions.” Rated 89 Points, Robert Parker, The Wine Advocate PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@ pinehurst.net.

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SERVICES Village of Pinehurst Rentals & Golf

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March 2013P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e k it c h e n g a r d e n

A Vineyard Reborn

How wise pruning brought a vintage vineyard back to life

L-R: Taylor Williams, Eldridge Johnson and Larry Best

By Jan Leitschuh

March means new life. Out

with the dead wood! In with the new, in this season of rejuvenation.

Most of the annual pruning should be done by now, but if not, early March is your last best chance to have a whack at your own backyard. In general, autumn is the wrong time to prune most anything — wrongwrong-wrong. I can see the urge to do it in the fall, as we’re already puttering in the yard tidying up fallen leaves and garden debris. But pruning as the plant is trying to shut down into its fall dormant season only stimulates tender growth that will be winter-killed, and thus taxes the plant’s resources. Of course, you’ll see overworked landscape crews pruning in December of necessity. But if you only have a few fruit trees, vines or bushes of your own, for the health of your kitchen garden landscape it’s best to wait until mid-February, an ideal time. Mid-February is exactly when a group of community-minded citizens, volunteers of the Walthour-Moss Foundation, tackled a wildly overgrown scuppernong vineyard, and became honorary “kitchen gardeners” by default. The volunteers deserve a medal. The vigorous vineyard had fallen into ruin. Posts had tipped over, trunks had rotted to shells. A young forest had sprung up within, making mowing impossible. Armed with pruners and saws, volunteers faced off a veritable viniferous Augean Stables of tangled vines, deadwood and 20-foot trees — and prevailed. And that is the story I’d like to tell this month, in this season of resurrection and renewal. The happy result will feed wildlife, encourage fellowship, preserve a cultural landscape, provide a focus for celebrations and perhaps, just perhaps, even lead to a very special local vintage. North of Southern Pines is a magical tract of land, a community resource called The Walthour-Moss Foundation. Open to the public for walking and

riding from sunrise to sunset, The Walthour-Moss Foundation is so extensive today that one could walk for almost eight-and-a-half miles from south to north, from the edge of Southern Pines to Little River, across Foundation land. “That much open land, that’s rare on the East Coast,” noted former WMF Board and Land Management Committee member Larry Best. The core Foundation acreage of 1,739 acres was established in the ’70s upon the death of William O. “Pappy” Moss to preserve the open Sandhills land. Gifts and careful purchases knit together a large unbroken tract that now spans over 4,000 acres of a longleaf pine ecosystem. The main Foundation land was caught between Youngs Road and May Street, but in 1985, the Foundation expanded northward with a purchase of 315 acres above Furr Road. This was the first acquisition of land outside the bounds of the main Foundation, and it sets the stage for our story about the vineyard. The next bit is Eldridge Johnson’s tale to tell. Young Eldridge would come down from the North to visit his grandfather’s large tract of land in Hoffman, and loved it all — the sun, the pines, the people, and his beloved quail hunting. He was a farmer at heart. After a stint in World War II, the young man from Radnor, Pennsylvania, planned to return down here to live. “My father didn’t want me down here, so after Granddad died, he sold the place in Hoffman. So I came down anyway,” says Johnson with a smile. “This piece came up, and the price was right.” “This piece” included 209 acres north of Youngs Road. Johnson was looking to farm it, and he and his wife, Betty, planted a fine peach orchard, some pecan trees and about an acre of scuppernong grapes — three varieties trained on the Geneva Double Curtain, a trellis system for large vines like muscadines that allows each trunk to carry up to four arms, or “cordons.” He bought a water truck, since there was no well on the land to settle the young stock through a hot and thirsty Sandhills summer. And he set the help in charge of watering everything, since he had to return North for the summer. When they got back in the winter, Johnson discovered that the help had

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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34 March 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e k it c h e n g a r d e n

“gone drunk” and the water truck never moved. The entire peach orchard of young saplings had perished. A few pecans straggled on. But the husky young scuppernongs, North Carolina natives, were thriving apace in the hot sand. “They lived and the peaches didn’t. I did sell some grapes to a local winery. I’d sell them by the ton,” he recalls. But labor then, as it is now, “was the sticking point. Plus, I was always gone during the harvest in September.” In addition, the local winery went out of business just as the grapes were starting to bear heavily. Though they planned to build a house on their farm, eventually Betty felt the land was too far out of town, and the couple purchased a place off Youngs Road. In 1993 the Foundation began a campaign to raise money for the purchase of the Johnsons’ 209 acres north of Youngs Road. According to the Foundation’s website, “Mr. Johnson generously offered the land (which was in two parcels) to the Foundation through a gift/ sale arrangement at the very reasonable cost of $2,600 per acre. The campaign was successful and the Johnson land was acquired, bringing the number of North Country acres to 524 and the total number of acres of The Walthour-Moss Foundation to 2,980.” As it turned out, the Johnsons’ purchase was a key parcel to help connect the northwardexpanding Foundation. “It was a seed piece, a kernel,” says Best. “I think it was a very important.” Over the years, other acquisitions knit together adjoining parcels into a fine tract of pine land that became the North Country. But what of the scuppernongs? The vineyard was planted in the late ’60s, according to Johnson. That would make it well over 40 years old. According to Norm Minery, a Foundation neighbor and Land Committee volunteer spearheading the restoration, trees up to 20 feet tall and seven inches in diameter had sprung up between the unpruned rows, obstructing mowing. The overgrown vines had abandoned their genteel Geneva Curtain and were leaping up these interloper tree supports. Minery’s tractor bucket and chainsaw eventually prevailed, and eventually the rows were neatly mowed, restoring some semblance of order. On to the grapes! I visited the sunny, windswept field — now called Moore Meadow — with Minery, Best and Johnson. With its high, cottony clouds, surrounding forest and dense patches of wild plum thickets, the place was a boon for birds and wildlife. In the vineyard, I observed an impossible snarl. The pruning challenge — one as old as the Bible and beyond — was restoration of the cordons, or fruiting arms, to manageable condition. But with many of the trunks hollowed out with rot, the massive tangle of deadwood on the wires, years of deadwood, was all holding some of the vines aloft.

Cooperative Extension horticulture agent Taylor Williams was consulted. He advised lime, an inexpensive and useful mineral for our acidic sands. Because a muscadine (and the pale green scuppernongs are muscadines) has extensive and vigorous roots, Williams suggested cutting each trunk off at ground level in the spring. That way the caretakers could then select a new trunk from the most vigorous of the emerging shoots, pinch the rest off and train the winner to reach up to the wire. When it did, hopefully the first year, pinching of the top would then encourage side shoots that could be trained into cordons. The process would take perhaps five years before the restored vines bore significant fruit. The volunteer caretakers huddled and came up with a plan. After all, messy and tangled as the vines were, rotted trunks and all, they still produced some fruit for wildlife and for lucky visitors. A few knowledgeable volunteers waded in to trim a few specimens as best as possible, untangling the jigsaw snarl and paring away deadwood to new classic cordons — a laborious and skilled process that took about an hour per trunk. Despite the hollowed trunks, this left a sort of a template, a visual pointer to the future. Then, each year, the caretakers would cut down two rows and train up new shoots. The first two rows were leveled, leaving the rest to produce some fruit this year. In the meantime, an army of willing volunteers would earn their kitchen gardener stripes and become pruners, simply whacking back the forest of vines and young trees, making summer mowing easier. They would learn as they went along how to train things up. And so it has happened. All the Foundation’s trail work and upkeep is volunteer-based — they call them the “Bushwhacker Club.” Now the community of bushwhackers has a new project, growing grapes and restoring a cultural landscape which, notes Best, “is not just historical structures anymore.” The idea of a vineyard tucked back in the woods is appealing to many, and the brainstorming is muscular. What an attractive spot — why not hold a celebration here? A good acre of well-trained vines can produce six to eight tons of fruit — why not pick some and take to a vintner who could produce a special Foundation label? “And muscadines are about the healthiest thing out there,” notes volunteer Susan Lindamood. And so a falling-down vineyard of improved native grapes is being brought back into production by a volunteer community of Bushwhackers. If that’s not a tale of renewal and new life, I don’t know what is. PS Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative.

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36 March 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Out of the Blue

Sky Malled Shopping worthy of Andy

By Deborah Salomon

Andy Rooney

appeared to me in a dream last night. OMG, I thought; my remark about not being worth the $30,000 60 Minutes reportedly paid for his weekly rant finally reached purgatory, where Andy has languished since his demise in 2011. He rose to smite me for dissing his treatment of mundane subjects.

But no; the ghostly apparition beckoned with a crooked finger. “Hand me that time capsule over yonder,” he smirked. “You have a keen, mean eye for an old dame. Fill it up with stuff that’s trending here and now — like the last real Twinkie.” Andy’s bushy eyebrows fairly crackled. “Damned if I didn’t die before that happened!” I awoke with a start. Coincidentally, that very morning I was flying north. I forgot Andy’s apparition until the seat belt was safely buckled, seat back and tray tables in the upright and locked position and all carry-on baggage stowed under the seat in front. Then I picked up the SkyMall catalog. Andy, my curmudgeonly muse, if this is the here and now, then send me back to the there and then. But, honestly, what better things (along with the items they replaced, for perspective) to stuff in the capsule? Scosche Rhythm Armband Pulse Monitor and Music Control, with apps to manage calories burned, distance, speed, pace, music, mapping, social sharing and, of course, much more. Ad features a ripped guy tickling the screen with manicured fingers: $99. Replaces: A jogging buddy. Comfy Couch Dog Bed: Furniture-grade materials, orthopedic foam cushion with spun polyester fill and free monogrammed pillow in pomegranate, chocolate, hazelnut, sage, gray and camel with contrasting piping; $169.95. Replaces: A couple of ratty old blankets folded up in a cut-down packing box and a donation to the local animal shelter. Talking Dog Collar: Record a command or funny phrase into the collarmounted unit. Remote control has four-phrase capacity. Works up to 100 feet. Push a button and scare friends (not to mention the dog) into a frenzy with, as Victrola broadcast, “his master’s voice”; $29.99. Replaces: Childish pranks. Sogno DreamWave Transcendental Relaxation Massage Chair with Thera-Eliptical Kneading and Inada Body-Scanning Sensors: Combines centuries-old Shiatsu healing techniques with massage chair technology;

$7,999. Replaces: A Japanese boy/girl friend with really good hands. Or a lifetime membership at the spa. BambinOz Instant Bottle Warmer: Warms baby bottles with batteries or electricity leveraging technology used in sports medicine, camping and fishing. Gently flex disc until it clicks — starts a chain reaction where the solution begins to crystallize and generate heat for up to an hour. Comes with fully insulated carrier: $25.50. Replaces: A breast. On the book beat: A Change of Habit: A Spiritual Journey from Sister Mary Kateri to Sister Mary Vodka, by Patty Ptak Kogutek (spellcheck going wild). The author recounts her spiritual journey from seven years in a convent to the struggles of moving on from the convent mentality, sharing the 7 Secrets of Guilt-Free Living: $15.99. Replaces: Lifetime Movie Network, Dr. Phil, Oprah, Sex & the City, Real Housewives of New Jersey. The Bacon Throw and Pillow: There’s nothing a little salt-cured pork can’t cure including the trauma of a dull, drab, unbaconified living space. Photo-realistic print on polyester: $44.95 and $19.95. Replaces: Messy pot-bellied pig pets. Mademoiselle Haute Couture Floor Lamp Statue: Life-sized work of decorative art, 8-foot-tall woman with black fabric shade, high boots, cocktail dress cast in designer resin with a black faux leather finish. Accepts a 60-watt bulb: $499 plus $99 shipping. Replaces: Saggy old blow-up doll. Box of Applause and Box of Laughter: Craving recognition? Someone who gets your jokes? Open Box of Applause to cheering and clapping. Box of Laughter provides peals, guffaws. Dark cherry finish and magnetic closure: $24.95. Replaces: Cover charge at a karaoke bar. Sea Lion case for iPhone 5: Using your iPhone in the pool or at the beach? Seal Shield has you covered. 100% waterproof with same antimicrobial technology used in hospitals: $79.99. Replaces: Double-lock zipper plastic sandwich bag — except for the antimicrobial feature. Wouldn’t want iPhone to get swine flu from the bacon pillow. Allow me a personal item — a word, actually. Oh, Andy, the atrocities we commit upon words. Will anybody ever gaze on Dover without remembering the fiscal cliff? Must “at the end of the day” mean something other than sunset? And how about poor Kool-Aid, catapulted from a sweet summer drink for kids to a poisonous libation gulped by the gullible? My word is a noun incessantly expressed as a gerund and oh-so-2012: trending. That’s it, folks. Capsule signed, sealed and buried. Rest in peace, Andy. I’m trending outta here. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and The Pilot. She may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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relish C E L E B R AT I N

G A M E R I C A’ S

OD LOVE OF FO

FEB 2013

®

R E L I S H .C O M

Love is in the air! HURRY.

Get the breadcrumbs!

GUMBO for a Gang

Red Velvet Brownie Hearts afloat (page 12)

Fat Tuesday = Dirty Rice

We’re cookin’. Live!

April 11, 2013 • Doors Open at 5:00 p.m. Owens Auditorium | Sandhills Community College

Don’t miss your opportunity to be part of a live cooking show! Tickets available at The Pilot, 145 W. Pennsylvania Avenue. Additional information available in the coming weeks in The Pilot. Can’t wait? Call for The Pilot for details: 910.692.7271.

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March 2013P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


life of jane

Sacred and Unearthed

Digging up an ancient Philistine bowl means feeling the pull of the universe By Jane Borden

It’s a brand new space that would

leave me uneasy, fearful that my worries and my fears would find ways in through cracks not yet clogged. But to each her own. Some people feel panic when they look at the stars and fathom their smallness in the universe, while others feel peace.

I’m crouching inside a room-sized hole in the ground, at the base of a chalky mount between the coast and inland hills of Israel, an area believed to be Gath, the ancient Philistine city that, according to the biblical Book of Kings, was razed by the Aramean king Hazael in 830 BCE. Buckets of detritus and clues have already been pulled from the dig. I’m standing on top of a buried village. And I’ve been given a pickaxe. I bring the tool to my shoulder, and then spin my head 360 degrees, looking for the feds, the government agents who will wheel in by kicking up dust in a black limousine, and then tackle the pick out of my hand, based on hiddencamera footage of me in my room at the kibbutz last night, dropping the plastic bathroom cup three times before successfully filling it with water, and then tripping over the carpet on my way to bed. Surely they wouldn’t give the uncredited and unscreened American girl a sharp tool with which she might disrupt seventeen years of archaeological research or, at best, impale her shin. But no one comes. And there is a lot of dirt to sift and remove from “Area D.” Gently, timidly, I begin to dig. My fellow journalists and I, who are touring the country on behalf of our respective publications, are giddy to have dirt under our nails and in our nostrils. Occasionally, something exciting appears in the hacked-up earth. An olive pit, which aids in carbon dating, and may also point to the location of a hearth. A pumpkin-seed-sized fragment of animal bone, which helps decipher what this village ate, raised, sacrificed or worshiped. A few shards of pottery, which, when glued together puzzle-style with nearby pieces, will hopefully lend a shape and design suggesting the people’s origins and cultural ties. Slowly, it becomes a rote process. I grow accustomed to the work, and start hacking the soil with less intention. Almost immediately, I pick my ax directly into a large shard of pottery just beneath view, and, in devastation, pull out the handful of pieces I created. Seeing me downtrodden, the supervising archaeologists, Aren Maeir and Amit Dagan, kindly say, “That’s why we have glue.” Imagining that an ancient Philistine might, as I do, store his or her pots

and vessels together, I now approach this corner with extra care, using only a brush. Immediately, the circular pattern of the bottom of a vessel appears. Digging through time, I discover its bulbous shape, reddishbrown hue. It is perfectly intact; it is perfect. Turned upside down, perhaps by a fleeing Philistine, perhaps by the centuries, it slowly reveals itself, each curve more breathtaking than the next. Handles appear, one on each side, and inches away, the circular shape of another smaller vessel’s base. My neighbor notices and abandons his post to help. We work in silence, although our breathing rates have audibly increased. The professors begin to direct us: remove this section of earth first, use the brush here and the ax here, be careful. The entire dig gathers around. Finally, the two ancient bowls are completely uncovered. Maeir uses measuring tape to record their precise locations and depths, and then slowly, as we hold our collective breath, pulls the larger vessel from the ground. He inspects it briefly and — as if he were a doctor holding an infant I’d birthed — hands it to me, a questionable decision as my hands immediately begin to tremble. It’s likely that the last person to touch that bowl was a ninth-century Philistine who either washed, ate from, dropped or abandoned that bowl in a moment of fleeing, dying or being captured. Later, when I think no one is watching, I cry a little without really knowing why. As someone who mines life for a living, spins experiences into essays and true-life tales, I constantly assess the ways in which one event in my life might mean the same thing as another: a run-in with a beautiful but fleeing deer in my driveway becomes a stand-in for a memory from my childhood that is now forgotten; the illusion I present to customers at a historical restaurant represents the self-inflicted delusion I harbor regarding an apartment I’ve rented. I rely on an intra-life metaphor system that in turn reshapes said life into a series of connected dots, gravitational pulls — between events and feelings, between reactions of the past and realizations of the present. My life is a series of pairs, triplets, and, if it’s a particularly long essay, quadruplets. The effect, for better or worse, is that the fabric of my experience is like the fabric of space, with certain planets, meteors and stars in orbit with one another, due to circumstance or insight, each irrevocably altered by its partners. But my time at the dig in Gath was more of an experiential singularity, an event too emotionally combustible for lines to remain that might connect it to any other event in my life. And yet, when the fog of adrenaline burned off, I saw that there is in fact a line, just one, that moves untouched through 2,842 years. And I saw that my solar system of attractions and warped space fabric is only one in a vast universe of pull, of bending toward. PS Jane Borden is a native of Greensboro and the author of the highly acclaimed memoir I Totally Meant To Do That. Illustration by Meridith Martens

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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March is

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• Personal history of colon polyps or rectal bleeding

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Whispering Pines

910.295.5555 | 910.949.4332 40

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M at e r ia l w o r l d

Wood Potting The art of turning ordinary pieces of wood into works of art By Mary Elle Hunter • Photographs by Cassie Butler

A small but dedicated group of arti-

sans meets monthly in Southern Pines to exchange information about their craft, and to develop their creative skills in the traditional art of making decorative objects out of wood. Called the Sandhills Woodturning Guild, the local group of twenty-five members is affiliated with the American Association of Woodturners and on a regional basis with the Woodturners Guild of North Carolina

Mike Girimont is one of the co-founders of the local group and observes that a majority of the present members started out as beginners in woodturning, making significant progress in a short time. His own experience with woodturning began in his thirties when he produced some very primitive bowls. “However,” he says, “it is only in the last ten years I really feel that I know what I am doing. My first real instruction came in a class led by Dr. Frank Penta in Raleigh. “The instant gratification of seeing the wood change shape right before my eyes has held my interest throughout the years,” he adds, and he has honed his skills by participating several times in week-long courses at the John C. Campbell Folk School in western North Carolina “that opened my eyes to all the possibilities.” Monthly get-togethers are held at Girimont’s home and include a “show and tell” segment during which members display an object of their choosing, plus a demonstration of a particular element of woodturning, and frequently, there is a symposium or workshop given by recognized experts in the field, such as Dr. Penta, a past president of the Woodturners Guild of North Carolina who also holds classes at the Campbell Folk School and the Appalachian Center for Crafts. Objects of the “show and tell” segment at the meetings vary from vases to platters, to wall decorations, to lidded boxes and salad bowls. Girimont says, “We call ourselves wood potters, because just about anything you see in a pottery shop can also be produced by a wood turner, and we often get our inspiration from a particular piece of pottery.” Members of the club are always on the lookout for castoff wood to use in their craft, such as local woods like holly, dogwood or Bradford pear. They scout roadsides, watching for fallen timber, or they are always interested in hearing from a friend or relative about a tree that has been cut down or blown over. Some of the woodturners purchase unusual hardwoods from the Pacific Northwest for their more elaborate projects, and on occasion import exotic woods from such far-off locaPineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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tions as Australia or Africa. Cherry and cherry burls are favorite types of local woods. Maple and oak and any of the hardwoods, like tupelo or pecan, are also preferred, according to Mike Girimont. He really likes working with burls, “because you never know just what you are going to get.” He describes a burl as being similar to a tumor growing on the limb of a tree. “A burl has a beautiful grain, producing a very unique look.” Among the pieces that Mike Girimont specializes in creating are natural edge bowls, platters and Christmas ornaments. Over the years he has crafted a collection of 140 ornaments that decorate the family’s holiday tree each year. “They are all hollow, and there is quite a trick to turning a globe to be hollow.” This is one of the skills he learned during his classes at the Folk School, and which he has perfected over time. The members of the Sandhills Woodturning Guild are a diverse mix of those with long-term experience and those who came to the hobby later in life. For example, included are a retired military officer, who was a newcomer to woodturning, and a shop teacher at the middle school level for over thirty years. Ron Rutkofske, who retired after spending years in the classroom, points out, “Since joining the group, I have learned all sorts of new ways of producing intricate shapes and designs.” Bill White, whose interest in woodturning was sparked by a gift of a lathe from his wife, has found a creative spirit after a career in the military. Now, after taking courses in the age-old art, he enjoys turning out imaginative pieces which complement the projects produced by his wife, an artist who works with glass. Fostering an appreciation of lathe-turning as a traditional and contemporary craft and a form of art is a concept shared by the members of the Sandhills Woodturning Guild. To tap into their enthusiasm and learn more about the organization, contact Mike Girimont at (910) 692-8681, or email him at mgirimont@nc.rr.com. PS Mary Elle Hunter is a frequent contributor to PineStraw magazine.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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TVOE_Pine_Mar13Final_Layout 1 2/5/13 10:41 AM Page 1

Great pairs for a great pair. Art for Eyes | Eye for Arts Fine Eyewear, Artwork and Jewelry 327 South Elm | Greensboro 336.274.1278 | TheViewOnElm.com Becky Causey | Licensed Optician Journalist and educator Justin Catanoso; singer/songwriter Laurelyn Dossett. A pair since 1984.

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B I R D WA T CH

Canada Goose A true sign of spring

By Susan Campbell

That unmistakable honk —

we have just about all heard it lately: the tell-tale sign of spring. The aggregations of winter have broken up into goose and gander. Canada geese here in the Sandhills are well on the way to producing the next generation. Indeed, the days are warming and the dawn is coming earlier and earlier. Spring is here.

Most are unaware of the fact that geese are very vigilant parents. Once a pair of Canadas has begun a family, they are a force to be reckoned with. A nest of four to seven eggs is laid in a deep nest of pine straw or grasses and lined with down plucked from the female’s breast. The eggs will be incubated non-stop during daylight hours, protected by the sitting goose as well as the gander, who is always close by. Any intruder will be heralded by the relentless vocalizing of both parents. Upon approach, any would-be predator, four legged or two legged, will be attacked with a furor. And it is the wings that are the weapon, not the bill. At dusk the eggs are covered with down to keep them well-hidden and warm while the parents head out to feed under the cover of darkness. After some three weeks of incubation, the goslings emerge and follow their parents to water. At this point, the young geese have very good chances of survival. Although snapping turtles and bird hawks may be a threat while the young are small, the adults are very effective at protecting the newest members of the family. They are kept on the water the vast majority of the

time where four-legged predators are unlikely to attack. Once the young of the year have attained full size, there are few threats to their survival. Unless they are attacked by another goose, few other animals are likely to be a problem. As a result, these birds can live a decade or more. The long lives and reproductive potential of geese are causing problems all over the eastern United States, and our area is no exception. We have a large population of non-migratory individuals that spend the year on our lakes, golf courses and farms. They are descendants of captive bred geese that were released for hunting sometime in the early to mid-1900s. With abundant vegetation and few threats to their survival (interest in waterfowl hunting has been on the decline), Canada goose numbers continue to grow. We do have northern birds that spend the winter here, but visiting flocks are few and far between. The truth of the matter is that these birds are here to stay. Action taken by municipalities is, in some cases, controlling local population growth. There are methods that, with the appropriate permits and personnel, can help. Monitoring of flocks is an integral part of the process, so goose control is a time-consuming endeavor. There is no easy fix. Introducing mute swans to bodies of water where geese have become unwanted is ineffective and actually will cause a new problem when the swans begin to reproduce. But the sight and sound of skeins of Canada geese in the air is magical. I will always stop and look to the sky, no matter where I am, for these majestic, enduring creatures. (*For more information on Canada goose control, contact Susan or the NC Wildlife Resources Commission.) PS Susan would love to hear from you. Send wildlife sightings and photos to susan@ncaves.com or call (252) 926-9982.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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T h e sp o r ti n g l i f e

The Cypress Swamp From Merchants Millpond to the mighty Chowan By Tom Bryant

Merchants Millpond hunkers down in Gates County on the far northeast corner of North Carolina. It’s a buster to get to, but as four of us found out in the late ’80s, it’s well worth the trip. We were into canoe paddling in those days, and most weekends would find us on a stretch of water, slowly drifting a laid-back swamp or blackwater river. That is, if we weren’t riding a roller coaster of a whitewater rapid.

I believe it was my good friend John Vernon who actually put us onto Merchants Millpond and Bennetts Creek. John did quite a bit of bird hunting in those days, and Gates County was one of his favorite places to hunt and one of the few locations that supported a growing population of the noble bobwhite. I wish it were so today, but I understand that the county, like most everywhere else in the state, has also suffered from a demise of the little birds, much to the misfortune of bird hunters. It was late winter, and spring seemed to be forever away. Duck season was over and it was too cold to fish, except for the diehards, and we weren’t in that group by any means. We were sitting as close to a blazing fire in the fireplace at the old Alamance Wildlife Club as we could get. Dick Coleman, one of the ringleaders of our group and major proponent of road trips, threw another log on the fire. “I’m bored stiff. We need to go somewhere and do something. Sitting around this fire is making me old.” That’s when Vernon tossed in the idea of canoeing Merchants Millpond. “I was in Gates County last fall, bird hunting with some of my good lawyer friends.” “Let me stop you right there,” threw in Coleman. “Is there such a thing as a good lawyer?” Coleman and Vernon were always at it in a friendly way, Coleman being an archconservative and Vernon leaning a little to the left.

We always had some good conversations out of that pair. “If my good friend from the right would listen for just a second, even he will be enlightened,” responded Vernon. This is going to be good, I thought as I walked over to the fridge to get a beer. “Can I get anybody anything?” “How about getting Coleman an open mind,” Vernon replied. “It looks as if I’m gonna have to call in the heavy guns. What’s Bobo doing today?” Coleman said, laughing. Tom Bobo was also a member of the group, and if it was possible, even a little more to the right of Coleman. I lined up with Coleman and Bobo; but Jim Lasley, a newspaperman, also more of the liberal kind, made the group even out, politically, that is. We always had some great talks, and I think our differences made us even stronger friends. “Before I was so rudely interrupted and as I was saying,” laughed Vernon, “Merchants Millpond up in Gates County is something to see. It’s one of the largest pure Cypress Swamps in the state, and if we really want to make a trip out of it, we could also paddle Bennetts Creek. The creek flows south out of the Millpond into the Chowan River. Probably take us three or four days, enough to keep even Coleman interested.” “OK,” Coleman replied, fired up now that a road trip was in the air. “When do we leave?” As we later found out, a man by the name of A. B. Coleman, no relation to our good friend Dick, purchased the Millpond in the ’60s and later donated it to the state. That gift, along with land the Nature Conservancy contributed, now makes up the 3,250 acres of Merchants Millpond State Park. We left home base late on a Friday, and the six-hour ride put us there after sundown. I’ve always hated to pitch camp after dark, and this trip was no exception. We kind of felt our way into the boat landing area of the millpond and put up tents right behind the vehicles. After a scratch supper of sardine sandwiches, we piled into the tents, hoping to get an early start the next morning. Sometime during the night, I thought I heard a bobcat cry, but I went right back to sleep. I was the first up the next morning right before sunrise. A cool thick fog,

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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almost heavy enough to be rain, floated out of the swamp. Cypress trees stretched heavenward, their top branches obscured by the mist. Coleman came yawning out of his tent, and we stood soaking up the silence. Somewhere deep across the waters of the millpond, we heard a loud splash along with the hacking croak made by a blue heron. “I’ve read,” Coleman said, “that this area is the northernmost extent of alligators’ habitat. You reckon that’s what we just heard?” “Nah,” I replied, “it’s too cold for alligators up here. If they’re up here, they’re still hibernating or whatever it is they do in the winter.” “Yeah, you’re probably right. Let’s get a move on. We’ve still got to take one of these cars down to the Chowan where we’ll take out. We’re burning daylight.” John and Jim were up by then, and we left them to pack the canoes while Coleman and I made the car portage. We arrived back at the millpond a little before noon and debated on camping another night at our present campsite or heading on down the creek after a brief paddle around the swamp. We decided to hit the creek. Bennetts Creek’s headwaters are on the western side of the Great Dismal Swamp and the creek flows into and out of Merchants Millpond State Park. South of the millpond, the creek meanders through the Chowan Swamp and into the Chowan River, our ultimate destination. Jim and John had packed the canoes perfectly, but unfortunately, after our brief tour around the swamp, we had to unpack them again so we could portage them over the dam that held back the waters of the millpond. Even with the late start and difficulties faced in crossing a couple of beaver dams, we still made it several miles down the creek before stopping to camp for the night. The rest of the trip was exactly as we had pictured it with abundant wildlife and waterfowl. We had great meals cooked by our executive outdoor chef, John Vernon, and were constantly amused by the dry wit of Dick Coleman. Our easy float ended after three days when we emerged from the little creek into the immense Chowan River. It’s been years since our adventure in Gates County, but I hope to make the same trip again this fall. I understand that a group of volunteers by the name of the Stewards of Bennetts Creek have constructed steps and a dock on the creek side of the millpond. It’ll be interesting to see if they have made the right kind of progress on that little creek that flows so delicately into the mighty Chowan. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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G o l f t ow n J o u r na l

A Masterful Motivation Snubbed by the Lords of Augusta National, how Pinehurst No. 2 became the legend it is today

By Lee Pace

Photograph Courtesy of the Tufts Archives

Before long the temperatures will rise,

the azaleas will pop, and Kenny Loggins’ lilting and tinkling tribute to Augusta National will waft through televisions worldwide, giving way to the grand theater of golf known as The Masters. Those lucky enough to have badges to this rite of spring will enjoy stoking their furnaces with pimento cheese sandwiches for the arduous treks up and down the steep hills of Augusta and gird their vocal chords for the inevitable celebrations down in Amen Corner on Sunday afternoon.

It’s perhaps fitting in these parts to pause and reflect a moment on Pinehurst’s inexorable links to Augusta and the April event that’s been running since 1934. The storylines include architect Donald Ross’ last major restructuring of Pinehurst No. 2 in the mid-1930s, the demise of the venerable North and South Open in the early 1950s, Pinehurst’s short-lived return to professional golf in the early 1970s, and even the recent restoration of No. 2 shepherded by Bill Coore and Ben Crenshaw. No. 2 up through 1934 featured flat, hard putting surfaces made of sand and clay and swept smooth with a broom-like apparatus as each foursome passed through, this before Ross and green superintendent Frank Maples found a strain of grass that could provide a thick, smooth and consistent

surface through the resort’s popular winter season. The current sixth hole was the fourth (the current fourth and fifth holes at the time were the first and ninth holes on a nine-hole No. 5 course), and the course had two holes that ventured off after the current tenth onto land now occupied by course No. 4. Though golf champion Bobby Jones of Atlanta did not participate regularly in the North and South Amateur, he termed Ross “an old and very highly esteemed friend of mine” and visited Pinehurst at various times throughout the 1920s and early 1930s. Jones admired Ross’ work at Augusta Country Club and Forest Hills Golf Club in Augusta and told Ross of his vision to build a golf course in or near Atlanta upon his retirement from competitive golf. According to journalist and historian Charles Price, Ross believed he had a deal to design the course at whatever time Jones located a site and established a business plan; that, of course, would turn out to be a club in Augusta, 145 miles to the east of Atlanta. Jones’ mind changed, though, in 1929 when he traveled to California’s Monterey Peninsula for the U.S. Amateur at Pebble Beach. Jones was stunned in defeat in the first round, losing to a 19-year-old named Johnny Goodman, and over the ensuing week with plenty of time on his hands, he struck up a friendship with Dr. Alister MacKenzie, a British physician who had left the practice of medicine to design golf courses. Jones and MacKenzie spent considerable time together playing MacKenzie’s new course at Cypress Point and talking golf architecture. “Ross was a notorious individualist,” Price explained in A Golf Story, his 1986 book about Jones and the Masters Tournament, “and Jones wanted a course with his designs incorporated into it, not a course entirely of somebody else’s . . . The more they talked, the more impressed Jones became with MacKenzie’s theories. While neither was aware of it, the Augusta

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G o l f t ow n J o u r na l

National Golf Club — and, hence, the Masters Tournament — was being born.” Ross wasn’t happy to learn that Jones was hiring MacKenzie to design the new course in Georgia. Pinehurst resident John Derr remembers the hair standing on Ross’ neck in the mid-1930s when Derr, at the time a young sportswriter from Greensboro, innocently made a glowing remark to Ross about this terrific new course in Augusta. “Ross was a proud, reserved, standoffish man, almost egotistically so,” Price wrote. “He was miffed. He considered himself to be America’s foremost architect.” This motivation to not allow a neophyte course in Augusta to steal Pinehurst’s thunder prompted Ross to make significant changes to No. 2. He reworked the routing in 1935, abandoning the holes between the current 10th and 11th, and adding the current fourth and fifth. He and Maples believed they could get an experimental strain of Bermuda grass to grow and thrive during the winter, and they built three trial grass greens on No. 2 for the 1934-35 season. They were well-received and held up from November through March, so Ross abandoned all the original greens for the new grass greens for the fall of 1935. Drawing on the sandy soil that drained so well, on his memories of many of the tabletop greens on his home course at Dornoch in Scotland, and on his belief that chipping and recovery shots were key tests of champion golf, Ross began shaping the putting surfaces and an intricate array of dips, swales and hollows around them. Presto, the course was ready for the 1936 PGA Championship. “I don’t see how a course could be any harder, but at the same time it’s the most pleasant course I’ve ever seen,” defending champion Johnny Revolta said. “You have to play No. 2 with your head as much as your hands.” At this time Pinehurst was the host each year to the North and South Open, an important stop on the spring professional tour after the winter leg in Florida. The field for a typical North and South Open in the 1920s included almost every prominent professional in the game: Walter Hagen, Gene Sarazen, Tommy Armour, Michael Brady, Jim Barnes, Freddie McLeod, Leo Diegel, MacDonald Smith and Johnny Ferrell among them. Ben Hogan made history by winning his first pro tournament in the North and South in 1940. Sam Snead and Byron Nelson won in the 1940s. The North and South along with the U.S. Open, British Open, PGA Championship, Western Open, British PGA Match Play and the American and British National Amateurs were among the group loosely considered “major” championships. “The North and South had an immediate

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G o l f t ow n J o u r na l

atmosphere of class and elegance,” historian and journalist Dan Jenkins wrote in Golf Digest in 1990. “Dress for dinner, veranda stuff. In fact, the North and South was the Masters before there was a Masters (1934) and for many years before the Masters finally out-Southerned the North and South.” The tournament met its demise in 1952 when the Tufts family, which founded the village in 1895, decided it had had enough of professional golf — of squabbles over purses, of the less-thanblue-blood social strata of the pros, over the rudeness of four of nine members of the American Ryder Cup team leaving Pinehurst after the 1951 victory over Great Britain and Ireland and not competing in the North and South the following week. Richard Tufts, a long-time administrative giant with the USGA and the president of Pinehurst Inc., believed that pro golf was too much of a carnival and detracted from his members’ and hotel guests’ enjoyment of the game. So for two decades there was no professional golf at Pinehurst. When the Tufts family sold the club and resort to the Diamondhead Corp. in 1970, the new owners quickly looked to reestablish Pinehurst’s niche in the professional game. Company president Bill Maurer was at The Masters in 1971 and marveled at how the tournament had become so imbedded in the fabric of the game in only three and a half decades of existence. “I was thinking to myself that it is unfortunate a tournament as great as The Masters is not in its 50th year at Pinehurst,” Maurer recalled later. “But the people who had Pinehurst before us apparently didn’t think that way. “We’re always talking about Pinehurst being the golf capital of the world, so you could have the ‘World Championship’ at Pinehurst,” Maurer ventured. Maurer over the next year sold Joe Dey, commissioner of the Tournament Players Division of the PGA of America, on the idea of a “World Open” at Pinehurst — eight rounds over two weeks for the astronomical purse of half a million dollars and $100,000 to the winner. The dates were blocked for November 1973. “If we do a first-class job, we’ll earn a place somewhere down the road,” Maurer said. “It could take 10 years.” Pinehurst was back in the professional golf business and would be for exactly one decade. The inaugural event was beset by cold weather, modest galleries and the fact that Jack Nicklaus, Lee Trevino and Tom Weiskopf chose not to enter. Miller Barber won the eight-round tournament, beating a tour rookie named Ben Crenshaw by two shots. The finest golfers of the era would win at Pinehurst in the 1970s in a tournament cut to the customary 72 holes and spon-

sored at times by Colgate and named in honor of the new World Golf Hall of Fame, which was opened in 1974. Johnny Miller, Hale Irwin, Tom Watson and Raymond Floyd collected wins, and Nicklaus added to his North and South Amateur victory from 1959 with a professional triumph in 1975. But it was also a star-crossed decade as the tournament had shaky financial underpinnings when Colgate withdrew in the late 1970s, and the golf course was never at its best during the mid-August through late September time frame. The lush green of Augusta, the perfect wall-towall maintenance and the kaleidoscope of color that met TV viewers as the game of golf exploded in the 1980s and ’90s created what many in golf design and maintenance circles tag “The Augusta Syndrome” — the fervent and nearly maniacal pursuit of clubs nationwide to match Augusta’s beauty, maintenance budgets be damned. Architect Bill Coore in his work in Pinehurst from 2010-11 shook his head one day while musing that the toughest week for any private club superintendent is the one in April immediately following The Masters. Members have watched all weekend on television as the game’s finest players compete on a course coifed and buffed with an unlimited budget for staff, equipment and materials. “To me,” Coore says, “Augusta is an example

of a fantastic golf course and a wonderful club. But to hold it up as the model for all golf courses is just not right.” So Coore and design partner Ben Crenshaw ripped out untold acres of lush Bermuda rough, restored the native sandy perimeters and their menu of wire grass, pine needles and organic material, and turned the appearance of No. 2 back 75 years in time. The Anti-Augusta, if you will. Everything turned out fine, then, in the respective evolutions of Pinehurst and Augusta. Augusta is, well, Augusta, and Pinehurst has carved a comfortable niche with the USGA, with three U.S. Opens, one Women’s Open, a Senior Open and national amateurs for both men and women having been on the schedule since the late 1980s. No. 2 is seen today as a template for the USGA’s campaign to sell clubs on the idea of less water and less chemicals in their maintenance procedures. It’s an interesting “what if,” though, musing what the world of golf might look like today if Bobby Jones hadn’t lost to Johnny Goodman way back in 1929. PS Lee Pace’s new book, The Golden Age of Pinehurst, is available in the golf shop at Pinehurst Resort & Country Club and at bookstores everywhere.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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©2013 Pinehurst, LLC

Nothing says Pinehurst like the Putter Boy logo. And at the Pinehurst Golf Shop in the Clubhouse, you’ll find him on just about everything. Pinehurst Golf Shop Pinehurst Resort and Country Club • 910. 235. 8154


March 2013

Lest We Forget for Cora

Here three strands of barbed wire kept the uningenious cows out of the woodlot so they would not spoil their milk at blunder against trees. The wire’s down this fifty years at least. Only this poplar, thickened like a woman between the unrelenting bands, bark cinched at knee and waist and neck, has overgrown what choked her. She witnesses. Do not forget the poplar, or the fence. I write this for the beauty of a woman’s face Black, deep-lined, grown old in Birmingham

— Ann Deagon April 27, 1976

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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At the end of the day, Bill Webb, center, listens to Wade Meacham’s story

The Birds of Paradise

A bold vision to restore wild quail populations produced a revival of a beloved sporting tradition

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By Maureen Clark • Photographs by Tim Sayer

im Sayer’s wonderful pictures of an afternoon quail hunting on the Webb Farm in Richmond County suggest that this is a story of a day in the field. It is not. Seasoned sportsmen have already told that tale. Garden & Gun contributor T. Edward Nickens calls the land “some of the finest bird country I have ever seen.” In The Bird Hunting Report, Tom Keer considered the farm one that “discerning quail hunters instantly recognize as a quail Valhalla.” An upcoming article in Britain’s Sporting Times written by Ian Gregson will likely continue the accolades. This story, however, is about one man’s answer to his own question: “With tobacco phased out, how does a family farm survive in the sandy soil of the Sandhills?” On a cold morning in February, the sound of occasional bursts of distant shotgun fire carries over the winter fields. Bill Webb has slipped away from his law office in Rockingham. “It’s twelve minutes, door to door,” he notes. The distance is meaningful. A two-mile radius from where he stands includes the site on Cartledge Creek where ancestors fleeing the Irish potato famine in 1850 built a dirt floor log cabin. Ruins of a frame home built in 1906 rest undisturbed. His own early Victorian farmhouse built in 1908 and the hunting lodge constructed more recently are within the circle. Over a hundred and sixty years of history commit him to the land. When Webb returned to Richmond County in the ’70s with a law degree from Wake Forest University in hand, he decided he couldn’t find a better spot to settle than the sandy land on the western edge of the Sandhills and the eastern rim of the Pee Dee River basin. “I have lived a Robert Ruark life here,”

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he surmises. A quiet reverence for family, friends and neighbors, dogs and wildlife underscored Webb’s resolve to press the fields into a new translation. Tall, and comfortable in a tweed jacket, Webb wears the half smile of a man either remembering a good story or about to tell one. “We had farmed tobacco here since the ’30s,” Webb said. “When the tobacco economy turned, most people put in timber. But my mother, who is the majority landowner, didn’t like the aesthetics of that. I got the idea for a serious quail hunting operation on a trip in 1985 to Dixie Plantation in South Georgia. They had 16,000 acres, but I could see taking part of that and starting a habitat here.” The manager of Dixie Plantation encouraged him. But South Georgia has the largest of the remaining original pine savannas that once swept down the Eastern Seaboard. Webb’s vision involved the complex task of recreating a landscape. It took decades. The wild quail population that Webb sought to re-establish requires a strictly prescribed habitat and specific forage in order to thrive. The elements include a thinned pine canopy with shrubby undergrowth for cover, like wiregrass, interspersed with cropland and grass vegetation. The landscape should be disturbed by controlled burns regularly, or activities like cropping. The diet of a bobwhite quail, as specific as habitat, involves a crop variety of grains and grasses. Land holdings were expanded to 1,300 acres. Webb carried out a program of intensive land management for years that involved thinning trees, prescribed burns, creating trails and planting cover crops. “We hand-planted a perennial base of 300 thousand bi-color lespedeza,” he explained. “We plant the fields annually with millet and milo.” The quail signified by the sound of distant shooting are a combination of a

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wild population and a surrogate species that was introduced to the habitat. Day-old chicks are placed in metal containers, located in the wild, that provide food, water and heat. When the chicks are five weeks old, Webb places them, in groups of thirty, in areas of good habitat. “Five weeks is an important time,” he says. “The quail at that age have not lost their wild instinct and will hunt like wild birds.” The oils necessary to protect birds from the elements will only secrete from the glands of chicks raised outdoors. In the beginning, Webb banded the surrogated birds, to see how they survived. “I didn’t have to do that for long,” he said. “I realized that almost all the coveys I found had a mixture of banded and wild birds.” The surrogated quail mixed well with the wild bred. Webb’s concern that a commercial hunting operation would deplete the wild coveys was similarly unfounded. “The wild birds changed their habits during the shooting season,” he observed. Normally, quail feed later in the morning than their wild counterparts, like duck. “I started seeing them feeding at daybreak or dusk. They are smart,” he says, smiling. “I really quit worrying about them when I saw them feeding in the moonlight.” The Webb Farm opened for commercial bird hunting five years ago. He had worked for twenty years creating what he calls “the most expensive wildlife habitat you can undertake. The hardest thing is managing the undergrowth to a waisthigh level, always fighting the briars and gum tree sprouts.” Only once was he tempted to give up. “I was ready to throw in the towel in 2000,” he says. “It was when we got 24 inches of snow in one day that stayed for a week. We lost all the birds. When the snow melted, I could only find one covey.” Webb’s build-it-and-they-will-come approach worked out. Webb Farms opened for commercial hunting in October 2007. “I didn’t do any advertising. We just grew by word of mouth. After Tom Higgins, a sports writer for The Charlotte PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Observer, wrote about us, the phone started ringing.” The season for quail hunting runs from October 1 to March 31. Visitors to the farm primarily come from the Piedmont Crescent in North Carolina, but a number have come from Texas, California, Arizona, and as far away as Nova Scotia and England. A handsome farm-style lodge with wrap-around porch accommodates eight hunters for overnight stays. The Lodge is wife Debbie Webb’s domain. Her background in corporate caterering and the restaurant business ensures that a day in the field will be followed by dining on legendary Southern cuisine. Lobster macaroni and buttermilk-fried quail are guest favorites. The lodge offers deep porches and rocking chairs, a great room centered on a stone fireplace near a big screen TV for watching games. The dinners are family style. Outside there are kennels, a farm office with the beginnings of Debbie’s retail operation. A raised fire pit terrace, under construction, is already in use. “I would be in a bind without her,” Webb says of his wife of 15 years. “She has the calm professionalism to manage and knows how to create an entertaining atmosphere.” The staff of Webb Farm includes about 15 people involved in land management, cooking, cleaning birds, guiding hunts and looking after the bird dogs. A key personality in the farm’s success is Wade Meacham, the head guide and dog trainer, whom Debbie considers “more of a son to us.” Webb remembers him “out there hunting before he was head-high to the briar bushes.” Meacham’s ties to the farm go back generations. Mimicking the script of A River Runs Through It, his dad, Bill Meacham, was a Methodist minister well known for his skill in training bird dogs and preaching bird hunting from the pulpit. Webb remembers, as a child, the warmth of his father coming through the door with Bill Meacham and friends, his coat stuffed with quail. “My dad never pushed me,” he said. “He just gave me the opportunity. I started hunting when I was 10, but the dogs were what intrigued me.” His favorite was Yap, an old, gangling German shorthair given to him by the local magistrate Clarence Parsons. “One day I sent Yap back into a cover after a quail about five times,” Webb said. “Then, after a long time, he came back with a bird. When I got back to the truck, I realized he had circled around and brought me a quail from the back seat. He was goofy looking, but how can you not love a dog like that? He did what he figured would make me happy. Yap didn’t cover much ground, but at the end of the day, he’d be right there with the best of them.”

From left, Jay Loftin, Wade Meacham, Danny Hawks and Bob Tillman follow Folly

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uests at Webb Farms have the option of bringing their own bird dogs, as well as a choice between hunting on foot or by “mule.” Webb has four custom built Kawaski mules adapted for bird hunting. Each is equipped with dog boxes, raised back seat for the hunters, front gun racks and coolers for storing game. On the afternoon of PineStraw’s visit, Meacham’s Irish lab, Finn, waited on the floorboard of his master’s vehicle. He was physically obedient but his eyes begged the milling hunters to get the show on the road. A second Webb Farm innovation is Meacham’s use of Irish labs to flush coveys pointed by the bird dogs. Webb’s kennel of 18 dogs is supplemented by dogs Meacham trains from his Sundog Kennels. Bob Tillman from Wrightsville Beach and Jay Loftin from Raleigh are riding with Meacham for the afternoon shooting. Both men have been hunting at the farm on a regular basis for the past five years. In the dog boxes are two pointers, Folly and Spud, an English setter, and a young German wirehaired pointer that Meacham is training. Hunting the eastern side of the preserve, the mule carries the party down sandy lanes, through piney woods and over fields created for game. Occasionally the hunters pass the ramshackle ruins of tenant farm housing. The ground level ruins are accompanied by the more durable, dark sentinel remains of tobacco barns, ghosts of a bygone era.

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Gunner, a German wirehaired pointer owned by Hugh Bingham in Southern Pines, had the best point of the day

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Wade Meacham’s Irish lab “Mighty Finn”

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Webb’s quail performed as predicted. It is February and as Nickens noted in Garden & Gun, the spunky bobwhite quail are “bound and determined to make it to the end of the season.” Tillman and Jay, according to Meacham, are crack shots. Two dogs work the fields within range of the vehicle. When Meacham stops for a point, Tillman and Loftin move to a position behind the dogs. Finn flushes the quail, and shots ring out. A hit creates what Meacham calls a “Carolina snowstorm of bird feathers.” Tillman routinely praises the dog, quietly picks up spent shells, and stows the birds retrieved by Finn in a cooler. We encounter coveys as large as fifteen birds and a few as small as three. Tillman shakes off any praise for his shooting, preferring to maintain friendly banter with Loftin. Meacham calls a flush ending with two shots and one bird retrieved a “Mozambique double tap.” Jay covers a rare missed shot with the claim, “I only shoot males.” Both men are good humored about the PineStraw entourage. “You know,” Tillman reflects at the end of the afternoon, laughing at something Loftin has said, “The shooting is secondary out here. This is more about the camaraderie.” Webb knows that. The habitat, the bobwhite quail, the bird dogs and sport are grist for fellowship. He learned that early, watching his father and Wade’s before he was old enough to verbalize the feeling. And he is thankful for that final draw at Webb Farms. “I am fortunate to be successful in the worst economy of my lifetime.”

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Jay Loftin, left, and Bob Tillman share a laugh PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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From the Kitchens of Webb Farm Debbie Webb agreed to share a few of the hunters’ favorite recipes from her kitchen at Webb Farm. TOLL HOUSE PIE 4 eggs 1 cup all purpose flour 2 cups light brown sugar 2 sticks butter, softened — not melted 2 cups semi-sweet chocolate morsels 1 ½1/2 cups coarsely chopped pecans

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Partially melt butter, add brown sugar, eggs, flour. Stir chocolate chips and pecans into flour mixture. Pour into 2 deep dish pie shells or 16 tart shells. Bake at 300 degrees for one hour in pie shells or 35 minutes in tart shells. ORANGE SWEET POTATOES 8 large sweet potatoes Zest of one orange 3 cups orange juice ½1/2 cup white sugar or agave syrup Boil sweet potatoes with skins on. Cool and peel. Place sweet potatoes, orange zest and sugar or syrup in bowl then mash with potato masher. Place part of the potatoes in blender and cover with orange juice. Pulse until creamy. Place mixture in baking dish or individual ramekins. Top with mixture below. TOPPING 2 cups all purpose flour 3 cups brown sugar 1 stick melted margarine Combine topping ingredients until crumbly. Place on top of sweet potato mixture and brown until just warm and bubbly at 400 degrees for 20 minutes.

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MERIDITH MARTENS, artist Large Scale Paintings Custom Residential & Corporate Design

WEBB FARM SOUTHERN QUAIL 12 quail 8 tablespoons butter 1 cup House-Autry chicken breader 3 tablespoons flour 4 cups chicken stock 1/2½ cup white wine 1 can cream of celery soup or 1 cup of sautéed celery and onion Salt and pepper to taste Wild rice Thoroughly wash cleaned quail. Coat quail in chicken breader. Brown quail in skillet with butter until golden. Remove quail from skillet and place in baking dish. Make a slurry of 3 tablespoons flour and 1 cup of chicken stock and set aside. Add remainder of the chicken stock, white wine, salt and pepper to the skillet with pan drippings from quail. Bring mixture to a boil in the skillet. Reduce heat and slowly add the slurry of flour/stock and cream of celery soup (or sautéed celery and onion). Pour contents of skillet over quail. Slowly bake covered for 2 to 2 ½1/2 hours in 250 degree oven until tender. Serve with wild rice. PS

www.meridithmartens.com PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Linda Riggs Pottery

Tuesday, March 19

Southern Pines Rotary Palustris Gala

6 — 8 p.m. The third annual Palustris Gala, a formal cocktail party to kick-off the 2013 Palustris Festival, will feature mini-performances by artists participating in the five-day, community-wide arts event. Presented and sponsored by the Southern Pines Rotary Club, funds raised will promote the Rotary’s community and international service projects. Tickets may be purchased from any Southern Pines Rotarian, The Country Bookshop, or at the door the night of (if available). Belle Meade, 100 Waters Drive, Southern Pines

Wednesday, March 20

History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen by Kirk Tours

Self-Guided Tour of Art in the Gardens

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Artists from across North Carolina will display their outdoor art in the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The opening day for this display will be March 15. The art will be for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are open from sunrise to sunset, so participants may tour the gardens any time during the Palustris Festival. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in case of inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-695-3882

Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. Along the trails, sculptures and visual art created by Moore County Schools students will be on display, inspired by the theme “Around the World in the Art-boretum”. The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. 910-295-1900

The Victorian Art of Pressed Flowers

9 a.m. — 10:30 a.m. Join Nancy Heilman for a fun-filled and informative demonstration on the Victorian art of pressing flowers. Participants will make a small pressed flower picture of their very own. All materials provided. This lecture is free and open to the public. Van Dusen Hall, Room 103, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

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Lecture/Workshop

10 — 11:15 a.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. A “tour guide veteran” of 23 years, Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.” Cost: $15/Adults & Seniors; $10/Children (12 & under). Tour gift included. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Follow the Leader Art Class

10 a.m. — 1 p.m. If you ever thought you might like to try painting in oil but lack confidence or felt you didn’t have the skills, then this step-by-step class will get you started. With artist Joan Williams leading the way, you will complete a small oil painting to take home with you. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to paint. Space is very limited, thus reservations are required by calling 910-944-3979. Admission: $25 per person. Dress code: Painting clothes. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Not Your Granny’s Quilts

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Sandhills Quilters Guild will showcase an outstanding array of appliqued and pieced quilts, some of which will be available for purchase. The quilt exhibit will be open any time Owens Auditorium is open and/or in use during the Palustris Festival. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Palustris Art Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills will present a special Palustris art exhibit at their Exchange Street Gallery featuring their members’ art in all mediums, priced from $50-$100. This will be a great chance to acquire a piece of original, fine art at a reasonable price. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open to provide the opportunity to stop by and see the artist at work. Located in Aberdeen, the Artists League of the Sandhills aims to promote interest in the visual arts by providing

Suzy Morgan Paintings & Charles & Dance

9 a.m. — 5 p.m. Arts Council of Moore County is proud to present an art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Suzy Morgan and pottery by Charles & Linda Riggs. Suzy Morgan is a passionate, self-taught painter. Painting mainly in acrylic, her style falls somewhere between the looseness of impressionism and the straight lines of realism. Charlie and Linda Riggs work together to create a variety of decorative types of pottery. Most of their work is thrown by Charlie, who takes time to make a very smooth surface that will later be polished with terra sigillata. Linda hand builds sculptural bowls, trays, animals and jewelry, which are later finished with one of her specialty techniques — saggar firing or naked raku. Free and open to the public.. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Arts Council of Moore County, 910-692-2787

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Art

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quality art education at all levels at a reasonable cost and a friendly environment in which to work and exhibit. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery & Wine Bar, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Nancy Rawlinson, 910-246-2266

Pottery Experience

North Carolina Folklife: The Art of Living

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda Dalton Pottery Studio is excited to welcome all Palustris attendees to their 3rd annual, “Pottery Experience”. Linda and Jim offer studio tours, Q&A sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations, and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself, and then watch as it is fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! Children welcome. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Studio tours, throwing demonstrations and children’s play area available as requested. Free and open to the public. 1 p.m. Glaze your own Raku piece for $25. Call 910-947-5325 for reservations. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End. Linda & Jim Dalton, 910-947-5325

11 a.m. — 12 p.m. Ray Linville, associate professor of English and humanities at Sandhills Communty College, will examine traditions of folklife — expressive culture that includes a wide range of creative and symbolic forms — in a variety of communities across the state. A native of North Carolina, he also examines the American South each semester with students in a college transfer course that focuses on politics, history, religion, music, art, literature, race relations, family and society, and other cultural issues of this region. Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories and you will have a chance to vote on your favorite. “Beautiful yarn,” the translation of the Italian phrase ‘’Bella filati,’’ is only fitting for the shop. Nestled in the unique town of Southern Pines, Bella Filati was founded on the idea that knitters should have a choice when buying luxury yarns, and have access to a fun environment for knitting instruction to those wanting to learn. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Holly Floyd, 910-6923528

Custom Framing: The Icing Around the Art

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. King’s Custom Framing presents an incredibly special art exhibit featuring original works from the private collections of selected local residents, including works of noted local artists. Art is beauty and inspiration. Timeless, creative frame design is the icing around the art. See how experienced professionals create frame designs that are as unique and evocative as the art it surrounds. A selection of original art from some of the area’s premier local artists will be available for purchase. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 6+) welcome. King’s Custom Framing, 15 Dawn Road, Ste. 3, Pinehurst. Sharon Ferguson, 910-295-5451

Double Takes 2013

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents Double Takes 2013. A collaboration of photographers and artists, Double Takes seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Free and

Dance

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Music

John Gessner Photography

11 a.m. — 10 p.m. In their entrance and dining rooms, The Squire’s Pub will display the photographic art of John Gessner, who is a published and recognized photographer in North Carolina. The photos are quad tone giclees taken along ley lines in England. While enjoying John’s wonderful photography, enjoy The Squire’s Pub’s “Casual Dinning, Serious Food.’’ Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Squire’s Pub, 1720 US Hwy. 1, South, Southern Pines. Scott Dawson, 910-695-1161

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

12:30 p.m. — 1:45 p.m. & 2:15 — 3:30 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. Hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people like Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 seasons, plus tales about cottages, hotels, Generals, the Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and much more. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Cost: $15/Adults & Seniors; $10/ Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Beadology 101

1 — 2 p.m. Explore the world of beads at Aberdeen Bead Company. Learn the tools and techniques for making jewelry. Each person will create a necklace and a pair of dangle earrings. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Cost: $20 per person. For reservations, call 910-944-1212. Children (ages 8+) welcome. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910-9441212

Doo Wop Revisited

1 — 2:30 p.m. SCC’s Dr. John Turner and WIOZ 550 AM’s Billy Bag-O-Donuts examine the styles, artists and songs of Doo Wop music. From the Ink Spots and Mills Brothers through the advent of Motown and the hits of the Four Seasons, there will be plenty of music and video performances. Doo Wop was a significant contribution to the beginning of Rock and Roll and carried its own weight through the late 50s and 60s with such treasured recordings as “In the Still of the Night” and “Earth Angel”, still ranked by sources as the top songs of the early Rock and Roll era. This lecture is free

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Wacky Wednesday Kid’s Class

3:30 — 5 p.m. This mixed media “Wacky Wednesday Kid’s Class” at Aberdeen Bead Company lets children create self portraits using papers, paint, and other crafts supplies. This 90-minute class is open to children ages 8+. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Cost: $15 per child. For reservations, call 910-944-1212. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910-944-1212

Thursday, March 21 Self-Guided Tour of Art in the Gardens

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Artists from across North Carolina will display their outdoor art in the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The opening day for this display will be March 15. The art will be for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are open from sunrise to sunset, so participants may tour the gardens any time during the Palustris Festival. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in case of inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-695-3882

Self-Guided Walking Tour 8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. Along the trails, sculptures and visual art created by Moore County Schools students will be on display, inspired by the theme “Around the World in the Art-boretum”. The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst.

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Lecture/Workshop

910-295-1900

History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen by Kirk Tours

9 — 10:15 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. — 12 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. A “tour guide veteran” of 23 years, Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.” Cost: $15/Adults & Seniors; $10/Children (12 & under). Tour gift included. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Suzy Morgan Paintings & Charles & Linda Riggs Pottery

9 a.m. — 5 p.m. Arts Council of Moore County is proud to present an art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Suzy Morgan and pottery by Charles & Linda Riggs. Suzy Morgan is a passionate, self-taught painter. Painting mainly in acrylic, her style falls somewhere between the looseness of impressionism and the straight lines of realism. Charlie and Linda Riggs work together to create a variety of decorative types of pottery. Most of their work is thrown by Charlie, who takes time to make a very smooth surface that will later be polished with terra sigillata. Linda hand builds sculptural bowls, trays, animals and jewelry, which are later finished with one of her specialty techniques — saggar firing or naked raku. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Arts Council of Moore County, 910-692-2787

Follow the Leader Art Class

10 a.m. — 1 p.m. If you ever thought you might like to try painting in oil but lack confidence or felt you didn’t have the skills, then this step-by-step class will get you started. With artist Joan Williams leading the way, you will complete a small oil painting to take home with you. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to paint. Space is very limited, thus reservations are required by calling 910-944-3979. Admission: $25 per person. Dress code: Painting clothes. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-9443979

Sandhills Community College Arts & Crafts Fair

10 a.m. — 2 p.m. This arts and crafts fair will feature artists and craftspeople from the Sandhills and statewide. Sale includes a variety of wares: pottery, jewelry, art, and more! Free and open to the pubic. Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Denise Baker, 910-695-3879

Horsehair Pottery Firing Demonstration

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Pierce Gallery features Lumberton potter Jim Tripp for a horsehair pottery firing demonstration. Visitors are invited to actively participate in this interactive Native American art form. Bring hair from your own horse or horsehair will be provided. Different size pots will be available for firing with prices ranging from $35 to $125. Free and open to the public. Children welcome.

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March 2013P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The Pierce Gallery, 167 E. New Hampshire Avenue, Southern Pines. Wilder Rich, 910-246-1550

Not Your Granny’s Quilts

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Sandhills Quilters Guild will showcase an outstanding array of appliqued and pieced quilts, some of which will be available for purchase. The quilt exhibit will be open any time Owens Auditorium is open and/or in use during the Palustris Festival. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

exhibit featuring original works from the private collections of selected local residents, including works of noted local artists. Art is beauty and inspiration. Timeless, creative frame design is the icing around the art. See how experienced professionals create frame designs that are as unique and evocative as the art it surrounds. A selection of original art from some of the area’s premier local artists will be available for purchase. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 6+) welcome. King’s Custom Framing, 15 Dawn Road, Ste. 3, Pinehurst. Sharon Ferguson, 910-295-5451

Double Takes 2013

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents “Double Takes 2013”. A collaboration of photographers and artists, “Double Takes” seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. FREE and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery & Wine Bar, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Nancy Rawlinson, 910246-2266

Palustris Art Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills will present a special Palustris art exhibit at their Exchange Street Gallery featuring their members’ art in all mediums, priced from $50-$100. This will be a great chance to acquire a piece of original, fine art at a reasonable price. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open to provide the opportunity to stop by and see the artist at work. Located in Aberdeen, the Artists League of the Sandhills aims to promote interest in the visual arts by providing quality art education at all levels at a reasonable cost and a friendly environment in which to work and exhibit. Free and open to the public. Children are welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Finding the Funny in Films

11 a.m. —12 p.m. Gerald Mast and others have explored ‘’what makes us laugh’’ as a way to explain humor. Presented by Ron Layne, an instructional officer at Sandhills Community College, this hourlong glimpse at films provides evidence in support of the Relief Theory, the Incongruity Theory, and the Superiority Theory as they apply to a wide range of films. Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda Dalton Pottery Studio is excited to welcome all Palustris attendees to their 3rd annual, “Pottery Experience”. Linda and Jim offer studio tours, question and answer sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations, and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself, and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! Children welcome. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Studio tours, throwing demonstrations and children’s play area available as requested. Free and open to the public. 1 p.m. Glaze your own Raku piece for $25. Call 910-947-5325 for reservations. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End. Linda & Jim Dalton, 910947-5325

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories and you will have a chance to vote on your favorite. Beautiful Yarn, the translation of the Italian phrase ‘’Bella Filati,’’ is only fitting for our shop. Nestled in the unique town of Southern Pines, NC and founded on the idea of providing knitters a choice when buying luxury yarns as well as offering a fun environment for knitting instruction to those wanting to learn. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Holly Floyd, 910-692-3528

Custom Framing: The Icing Around the Art

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. The King’s Custom Framing presents an incredibly special art

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John Gessner Photography

11 a.m. — 10 p.m. In their entrance and dining rooms, The Squire’s Pub will display the photographic art of John Gessner, who is a published and recognized photographer in North Carolina. The photos are quad tone giclees taken along ley lines in England. While enjoying John’s wonderful photography, enjoy The Squire’s Pub’s ‘’Casual Dinning, Serious Food.’’ Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Squire’s Pub, 1720 US Hwy. 1, South, Southern Pines. Scott Dawson, 910-6951161

Artists, Beaders & Crafters Show

12 — 8 p.m. Presented by the Aberdeen Bead Company, the ABC Show is an art/craft exhibit featuring local artists, beaders and crafters. A Meet-the-Artist Reception will be held that evening from 6 to 8 p.m. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910-9441212

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

1 — 2:15 p.m. & 2:45 — 4 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 seasons. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little

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bit.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors / $10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

HOME and AWAY Photo Exhibit

4 — 6 p.m. Sandhills Community College is proud to present an opening reception at Hastings Gallery for HOME and AWAY an exhibit featuring photos by Brady Beck. Brady Beck was born in West Lafayette, Indiana and moved with his family to Raleigh, NC in 1986. He earned a B.S. in Wildlife Science from NC State University in 1992. Since, he has worked as a biologist for several conservation groups in the Sandhills. He currently works on the Sandhills Game Land for the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. His photography interests sprouted from his love of the natural world. His images have been published in Wildlife in North Carolina, The Nature Conservancy’s North Carolina Afield, Nature Conservancy Magazine, Snow’s Cut Monthly, as well as several scientific journals featuring papers on Redcockaded Woodpeckers. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Hastings Art Gallery at SCC Boyd Library, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Denise Baker, 910-692-6185

Mamajowali in Concert

6:46 — 9:15 p.m. The Rooster’s Wife presents Mamajowali in concert. Mamajowali is composed of Mamadou Sidibe, Joe Craven and Walter Strauss. To hear these three musicians from far flung places collaborate is to take in three souls listening and greeting one another in a universal language seamlessly interweaving two continents and three bright musical sensibilities. The blend of kamale ngoni (the hunter’s harp) with 6-string guitar, percussion, fiddle, mandolin and singing is uncommon, familiar, traditional, and innovative- — all at the same time. Doors open at 6 p.m.; Tickets: $15 each. Children under 12 free. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Janet Kenworthy, 910944-7502

Pinecrest Orchestra Pops Concert

7 — 8:30 p.m. Under the direction of Derrick Foskey, the Pinecrest High School Orchestra will present a Pops Concert featuring movie and video game music, Broadway classics and music from artists like Smash Mouth, Evanescence and Aerosmith. Suggested donation $5. Open to all ages. R.E. Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School, 250 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines.

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8 — 10 p.m. Judson Theatre Company presents four-time Emmy Award winner Michael Learned (The Waltons) and Lance E. Nichols (HBO’s Treme, Benjamin Button) in Driving Miss Daisy, the heartwarming and humorous story of the unlikely friendship between a crotchety, Southern lady and her proud chauffeur. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and an Academy Award-winning film. Show schedule for Palustris: Thu., March 21 at 8 p.m.; Fri., March 22 at 8 p.m.; Sat., March 23 at 2 & 8 p.m.; and Sun., March 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets: $36-$40. Tickets available online at www.JudsonTheatre.com or via phone from Etix: 1-800-514-ETIX (3849). [No exchanges or refunds. All shows, dates, times, prices and artists are subject to change.] Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Friday, March 22

Self-Guided Tour of Art in the Gardens

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Artists from across North Carolina will display their outdoor art in the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The opening day for this display will be March 15. The art will be for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are open from sunrise to sunset, so participants may tour the gardens any time during the Palustris Festival. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in case of inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-695-3882

Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. Along the trails, you will see the sculptures and visual art created by students in Moore County Schools inspired by the theme “Around the World in the Art-boretum.” The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. 910-295-1900

History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen by Kirk Tours

9 — 10:15 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. — 12 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. 23-year “tour guide veteran” Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors

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March 2013P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors/$10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Suzy Morgan Paintings & Charles & Linda Riggs Pottery

9 a.m. — 5 p.m. Arts Council of Moore County is proud to present an art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Suzy Morgan and pottery by Charles & Linda Riggs. Suzy Morgan is a self-taught painter and loves it with a passion. Painting mainly in acrylic, her style falls somewhere between the looseness of impressionism and the straight lines of realism. Charlie and Linda Riggs work together to create a variety of decorative types of pottery. Most of their work is thrown by Charlie who takes time to make a very smooth surface that will later be polished with terra sigillata. Linda hand builds sculptural bowls, trays, animals and jewelry which are later finished with one of her specialty techniques--saggar firing or naked raku. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Arts Council of Moore County, 910-692-2787

Fun with Alcohol Ink

9:30 a.m. — 12 p.m. This is a great class to dip your feet into alcohol ink. With artist Karen Walker leading the way, you will learn how to express yourself with this colorful and fun medium. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to create. Space is very limited, thus reservations are required. Admission: $25 per person. Reservations are a must by calling 910-944-3979. Dress code: Painting clothes. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Art, Culture & Community

10 — 11 a.m. Art is important in every society. It tells the tales of development, and of trials and tribulations. Culturally speaking, the arts allow for the expression of creative exercise and teach tolerance for diversity. Led by Denise Drum Baker, Southern Pines Sister Cities Chair and Sandhills Community College art professor, this discussion will focus on how art brought two communities together: Southern Pines and Newry/ Mourne, Northern Ireland. Panelists will include Denise Drum Baker (SCC’s Director of Fine Arts), Mike Haney (Former Mayor of Southern Pines), Ray Owen (Moore County historian & creative director of the Longleaf Ensemble), Ryan Book (SCC music instructor), and Reagan Parsons (Town Manager of Southern Pines). Free and open to the public. Clement Dining Room, Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Sandhills Community College Arts & Crafts Fair

10 a.m. — 2 p.m. This arts and crafts fair will feature artists and craftspeople from the Sandhills and statewide. The sale will include a variety of wares from pottery, jewelry, art, and more! Free and open to the pubic. Dempsey Student Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. Denise Baker, 910-695-3879

Horsehair Pottery Firing Demonstration

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Pierce Gallery features Lumberton potter Jim Tripp for a horsehair pottery firing demonstration. Visitors may actively participate in this

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interactive Native American art form by bringing hair from their own horses or horsehair will be available. Different size pots will be available for firing with prices ranging from $35 to $125. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Pierce Gallery, 167 E. New Hampshire Avenue, Southern Pines. Wilder Rich, 910-2461550

Not Your Granny’s Quilts

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Sandhills Quilters Guild will showcase an outstanding array of appliqued and pieced quilts. We will also have some quilts available for sale. The quilt exhibit will be open any time Owens Auditorium is open and/or in use during the Palustris Festival. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Palustris Art Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills will present a special Palustris art exhibit at their Exchange Street Gallery featuring their members’ art in all mediums with pricing of $50-$100. This will be a great chance to acquire a piece of original, fine art at a reasonable price. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open to provide the opportunity to stop by and see the artist at work. Located in Aberdeen, NC, the Artists League of the Sandhills aims to promote interest in the visual arts by providing quality art education at all levels at a reasonable cost and a friendly environment in which to work and exhibit. Free and open to the public. Children are welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda Dalton Pottery Studio is excited to welcome all Palustris attendees to their 3rd annual, “Pottery Experience”. Linda and Jim offer studio tours, question and answer sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations, and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself, and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! Children welcome. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. Authentic Kiln Opening. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Studio tours, throwing demonstrations and children’s play area available as requested. Free and open to the public. 1 p.m. Glaze your own Raku piece for $25. Call 910-947-5325 for reservations. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End. Linda & Jim Dalton, 910-9475325

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories and you will have a chance to vote on your favorite. Beautiful Yarn, the translation of the Italian phrase ‘’Bella Filati,’’ is only fitting for our shop. Nestled in the unique town of Southern Pines, NC and founded on the idea of providing knitters a choice when buying luxury yarns as well as offering a fun environment for knitting instruction to those wanting to learn. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Holly Floyd, 910-692-3528

Custom Framing: The Icing Around the Art

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. The King’s Custom Framing presents an incredibly special art exhibit featuring original works from the private collections of selected local residents, including works of noted local artists. Art is beauty and inspiration. Timeless, creative frame design is the icing around the art. See how experienced professionals create frame

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designs that are as unique and evocative as the art it surrounds. A selection of original art from some of the area’s premier local artists will be available for purchase. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 6+) welcome. King’s Custom Framing, 15 Dawn Road, Ste. 3, Pinehurst. Sharon Ferguson, 910-295-5451

Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors/$10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Double Takes 2013

Historic Boyd House Tour

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents “Double Takes 2013”. A collaboration of photographers and artists, “Double Takes” seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. FREE and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery & Wine Bar, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Nancy Rawlinson, 910-246-2266

Dream Writing: Making Songs While You Sleep

1 — 4 p.m. Enjoy a docent-led tour of the historic Boyd House and grounds, now called Weymouth Center. Formerly the home of author James Boyd and his wife, Katharine, Weymouth was the center of a very social life in the 1920s and 1930s visited by such literary greats as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, Paul Green and Sherwood Anderson. Now, Weymouth Center functions as a cultural center, housing the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, Writers-in-Residence program, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. 910-692-6261

Young Shakespearians present Hamlet

11 a.m. —1 p.m. Maura Kennedy of The Kennedy’s guides this 2-hour workshop that teaches how to use the imagery from your dreams to inform your writing. The daughter of a professor of English, and the ”musical one” of seven children (others include a nuclear physicist, a comedian, a photographer, and a couple of authors), Maura carved out her moments of teenage creative solitude sequestered in a closet, blasting Queen and Kate Bush on headphones, while she read C.S. Lewis and Stephen R. Donaldson. Not given to the hermitic life, she made nocturnal escapes, crawling out of her bedroom window and across the roof of her family’s suburban split-level home, to hit the streets of post-industrial Syracuse, New York, in search of crunching power chords and soaring pop hooks. Tickets: $12 each (includes refreshments). Free admission for children under 12. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Janet Kenworthy, 910-944-7502

1 — 4 p.m. & 6:30 — 9:30 p.m. Bring your entire family to see a stage production of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Prince of Denmark performed by enthusiastic Shakespearean actors ages 6-17 (plus one mom!). The Young Shakespearians, a group of youth ages 6-17, share a love for acting and for Shakespeare. Directors Valerie Cox and her mom, Lillie Townsend, a retired English professor, adapt the Shakespeare dramas and coach the young actors. Lisa Burton, mom to four of the actors/actresses, joins the directors this season bringing her acting experience to the group as acting coach, and also joins the young actors. Lisa will delight the audience with her masterfully humorous portrayal of Polonius. This year, they will present the consummate tragedy Hamlet, Prince of Denmark, considered by many to be Shakespeare’s greatest work. The adapted script closely follows the original language and plot, and the ability of these talented youth to bring these age-old, yet ageless stories to life is often remarkable. $5-10 donation suggested. Children welcome. Bethesda Presbyterian Church, 1002 N. Sandhills Blvd., Aberdeen.

John Gessner Photography

11 a.m. — 10 p.m. In their entrance and dining rooms, The Squire’s Pub will display the photographic art of John Gessner, who is a published and recognized photographer in North Carolina. The photos are quad tone giclees taken along ley lines in England. While enjoying John’s wonderful photography, enjoy The Squire’s Pub’s “Casual Dinning, Serious Food.’’ Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Squire’s Pub, 1720 US Hwy. 1, South, Southern Pines. Scott Dawson, 910-695-1161

Zig Zag Cluster Rings Class

Sandhills Community College Music Department Concert

12 — 1 p.m. The SCC Music Department presents a special concert featuring students and faculty. Free and open to the public. Children (6+) welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

1 — 2:15 p.m. & 2:45 — 4 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. 23-year “tour guide veteran” Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.”

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2 — 4 p.m. For this “Zig Zag Cluster Rings” class at Aberdeen Bead Company, learn to make unique rings using wire and beads. Create a set of Zig Zag Cluster rings. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Cost: $25 per person. For reservations, call 910-944-1212. Children (ages 8+) welcome. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910-9441212

Green Fire: Aldo Leopold & a Land Ethic for Our Time

3 — 4:30 p.m. & 7 — 8: 30 p.m. Green Fire: Aldo Leopold and a Land Ethic for Our Time is a documentary film about the life of Aldo Leopold, father of the modern conservation movement and his philosophy of extending our concept of interpersonal ethics to include the land and wildlife. “Green Fire” describes the formation of Leopold’s idea, exploring how it changed one man and later permeated through all arenas of conservation. The film draws on Leopold’s life and experiences to provide context and validity, then explores the deep impact of his thinking on conservation

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projects around the world today. Through these examples, the film challenges viewers to contemplate their own relationship with the land community. Tickets: $7 / adults; $6 / seniors; $5/children. Southern Pines Civic Club, 105 S. Ashe St., Southern Pines. 910-6950853

Prize and an Academy Award-winning film. Show schedule for Palustris: Thu., March 21 at 8 p.m.; Fri., March 22 at 8 p.m.; Sat., March 23 at 2 & 8 p.m.; and Sun., March 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets: $36-$40. Tickets available online at www.JudsonTheatre.com or via phone from Etix: 1-800-514-ETIX (3849). [No exchanges or refunds. All shows, dates, times, prices and artists are subject to change.] Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Tour of the Temple

3:30 — 4 p.m. This tour will be led by members of Temple Beth Shalom prior to Vivian Jacobson’s lecture, “Chagall in Israel.” The half-hour tour will emphasize the Temple’s religious objects, Torah scrolls, prayer books, Eternal light, and other ceremonial Jewish objects. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 5+) welcome. Temple Beth Shalom, 131 Jackson Springs Rd., Foxfire. 910-673–5224

Saturday, March 23 Arts in the Arboretum

Chagall in Israel

4 — 5 p.m. North Carolina Humanities Council lecturer, Vivian R. Jacobson, will present a lecture entitled, “Chagall in Israel”, that will explore Marc Chagall’s artistic and spiritual legacy. This lecture examines these artistic pilgrimages serving as an introduction to his paintings and other artwork that he donated to the Jerusalem Museum and the Tel Aviv Museum, as well as sketches, drawings and other works found in both private and public collections. Time for Q&A immediately following the lecture. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Temple Beth Shalom, 131 Jackson Springs Rd., Foxfire. 910-673-5224

The Kennedy’s Positively Jive

6:46 — 9:15 p.m. The Rooster’s Wife partners with Moore Buddies for a benefit concert featuring The Kennedy’s. In a career that now spans two decades, New York duo Maura and Pete Kennedy have traversed a broad musical landscape, surveying power pop, acoustic songwriting, organic rock rooted in their early days in Austin, and a Byrds-inspired jangle that drew the attention of McGuinn, Steve Earle, and most notably Nanci Griffith. The duo co-produced Nanci’s latest CD, and are currently touring the U.S. and the British Isles with the Texas songstress. Tickets: $100, includes concert, refreshments, and door prizes. This is a benefit for Moore Buddies. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Janet Kenworthy, 910-944-7502

History of Beach Music & The Shag

7 — 8:30 p.m. Remember the old days under the boardwalk, down by the sea? Then you are familiar with the sandy shores of the Carolinas, with people dancing to the sounds of beach music. But, do you know the history of beach music and its popular dance, The Shag? Aberdeen Parks and Recreation Department will present the history of beach music and how this popular sound led to The Shag becoming the state dance of North Carolina. Tickets: $10 per person. (Includes presentation, demonstration, and refreshments. Tickets must be purchased in advance.) Aberdeen Recreation Station (Aberdeen Lake Park), 301 Lake Park Crossing, Aberdeen. Leigh Baggs, 910-944-7275

Driving Miss Daisy

8 — 10 p.m. Judson Theatre Company presents four-time Emmy Award winner Michael Learned (The Waltons) and Lance E. Nichols (HBO’s Treme, Benjamin Button) in Driving Miss Daisy, the heartwarming and humorous story of the unlikely friendship between a crotchety, Southern lady and her proud chauffeur. Winner of the Pulitzer

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8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum and the Pinehurst Parks & Recreation Dept. invite you to travel with them “Around the World in the Art-boretum,” and experience the dance, music, and hands-on crafts from many different cultures. Passports will be provided. All events are interactive and free to the public. Children welcome. In the event of rain, all activities will take place in the Pinehurst Village Hall. 8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Self-guided tour of the Village Arboretum. Includes Art and Nature, an exhibition of sculpture and art by students from Moore County Schools located throughout the Arboretum. 10 a.m. Hark to the sounds of the Scottish Bagpipes heard throughout the beautiful Village Arboretum. Try out your dancing skills as you learn the steps of “The Highland Fling’’! 11 a.m. Watch the graceful Japanese Okinawa Kenpin Kai Dancers, and make a native craft. 11:30 a.m. Learn traditional Polynesian dances with Aloha Ka’naka O Hula Dancers and make your own flower lei. 12 p.m. Enjoy “Taste of the USA!” Concessions providing hot dogs, hamburgers, and beverages, or bring your own picnic and enjoy a place on our meadow. 12 p.m. Drum up some fun with the West Pine Middle School African D.R.U.M. Ensemble, followed by an invitation to join the Drum Circle, a remarkable experience. 1 p.m. An “Arts Adventure Trail Hunt” for children under 12, will focus on the Internationally themed art exhibit created by students from Moore County Schools and displayed throughout the Arboretum. The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. 910-295-1900

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Weymouth Woods: “A Toast to the Old Growth”

8 a.m. —5 p.m. Weymouth Woods presents “A Toast to the Old Growth” celebrating the Birthday of the Oldest Longleaf in the World and the Incredible Diversity of the Longleaf Pine Forest. 8 a.m. Bird Walk. Search for early spring migrant birds and ‘’winter birds’’ of the longleaf pine forest on this 2-mile hike. Learn to identify birds by sight and sound. Meet at the park office. 8 a.m — 5 p.m. Nature Geocache Challenge. Do you enjoy a challenge? Are you interested in learning more about Weymouth Woods? Stop by the park office and pick up instructions for a nature scavenger hunt, geocache style. You’ll need to bring your own GPS unit that allows coordinate entry, and be prepared to hike a couple of miles. 8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Raffle Fundraiser. The Weymouth Woods Park Advisory Committee is sponsoring a raffle to raise funds to develop an audio program and wayside displays for the Pine Barrens Trail. 10 a.m. Wildflower Hike. Wildlife biologist Alicia Jackson will lead a hike to look at wildflowers, shrubs, and trees. Meet at the park office. 11:30 a.m. & 1 p.m. Old Growth Hike. Meet the oldest known longleaf pine tree in the world! Learn more about this old growth stand. Meet at the park office and carpool four miles to the Boyd Tract. From there, it’s a 200-yard hike to the 465-year-old tree. 2:30 p.m. Red-cockaded Woodpeckers. Join Brady Beck, biologist with the North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission, for an overview of the ecology and research techniques used in studying and managing this endangered species. Meet at the park office. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bring your walking shoes and outdoor attire. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve, 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southhern Pines, 910-692-2167

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. Along the trails, you will see the sculptures and visual art created by students in Moore County Schools inspired by the theme “Around the World in the Art-boretum.” The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. 910-295-1900

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Lecture/Workshop

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Artists from across North Carolina will display their outdoor art in the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The opening day for this display will be March 15. The art will be for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are open from sunrise to sunset, so participants may tour the gardens any time during the Palustris Festival. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in case of inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-695-3882

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

9 — 10:15 a.m. & 10:45 a.m. — 12 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 seasons. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors / $10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Suzy Morgan Paintings & Charles & Linda Riggs Pottery

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Arts Council of Moore County is proud to present an art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Suzy Morgan and pottery by Charles & Linda Riggs. Suzy Morgan is a selftaught painter and loves it with a passion. Painting mainly in acrylic, her style falls somewhere between the looseness of impressionism and the straight lines of realism. Charlie and Linda Riggs work together to create a variety of decorative types of pottery. Most of their work is thrown by Charlie who takes time to make a very smooth surface that will later be polished with terra sigillata. Linda hand builds sculptural bowls, trays, animals and jewelry which are later finished with one of her specialty techniques--saggar firing or naked raku. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Arts Council of Moore County, 910-692-2787

Longleaf Ensemble: Meet Your Wildlife Neighbors

Self-Guided Walking Tour

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Self-Guided Tour of Art in the Gardens

Music

10 — 10:45 a.m. The Longleaf Cultural Theatre Ensemble invites you to join photographer & filmmaker Brady Beck for an illustrated introduction to area wildlife in a program geared for young people, as well as the young at heart, called “Meet Your Wildlife Neighbors”. A wildlife biologist working on the Sandhills Game Land, Beck is a regular contributor to ‘’Meet Your Neighbors,’’ a worldwide photographic initiative dedicated to reconnecting people with the wildlife on their own doorsteps — and enriching their lives in the process. Tickets: $5 / advance; $7 / at door. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Feel free to bring a cushion for sitting on pine pews. Old Bethesda Presbyterian Church, 1020 Bethesda Rd, Aberdeen.

Making Image Transfer

10 a.m. — 12 p.m. Give your creativity a jump-start by painting with paper. Led by artist Sandy Stratil, this class will introduce you to collage using tissue paper, found objects

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& materials, and photo transfer. The Artists League of the Sandhills will furnish all supplies. Open to anyone with a desire to create. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Admission: $25. Reservations: 910-944-3979. Dress code: Painting clothes. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Coffee & Crystals

10 a.m. — 1 p.m. Enjoy complimentary coffee while creating a crystal charm bracelet at Aberdeen Bead Company. Learn some basic jewelry techniques, including crimping and wire wrapping. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Cost: $25 per person. For reservations, call 910-944-1212. Children, ages 8+, welcome. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910-9441212

question and answer sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations, and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself, and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! Children welcome. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Studio tours, throwing demonstrations and children’s play area available as requested. Free and open to the public. 1 p.m. Glaze your own Raku piece for $25. Call 910-947-5325 for reservations. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End. Linda & Jim Dalton, 910947-5325

Bella Filati Customer Showcase

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. View a dazzling showcase of goods knitted and crocheted by Bella Filati’s customers. The work will be submitted in all knitted and crocheted categories and you will have a chance to vote on your favorite. Beautiful Yarn, the translation of the Italian phrase ‘’Bella Filati,’’ is only fitting for our shop. Nestled in the unique town of Southern Pines, NC and founded on the idea of providing knitters a choice when buying luxury yarns as well as offering a fun environment for knitting instruction to those wanting to learn. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Bella Filati, 277 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Holly Floyd, 910-692-3528

Yesteryear: Dolls & Toys

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Moore County Historical Association presents “Yesteryear Memories: Dolls & Toys, which will exhibit old dolls, toys, and accessories at the Shaw House Homestead. Items will be on display in the Shaw House, Garner House, and Sanders Cabin. Admission: $5 (Children 12 and under free). Children welcome. Walking shoes suggested. Shaw House, 110 W. Morganton Rd, Southern Pines. 910-692-2051

Horsehair Pottery Firing Demonstration

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. The Pierce Gallery features Lumberton potter Jim Tripp for a horsehair pottery firing demonstration. Visitors may actively participate in this interactive Native American art form by bringing hair from their own horses or horsehair will be available. Different size pots will be available for firing with prices ranging from $35 to $125. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Pierce Gallery, 167 E. New Hampshire Avenue, Southern Pines. Wilder Rich, 910-246-1550

Not Your Granny’s Quilts

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Sandhills Quilters Guild will showcase an outstanding array of appliqued and pieced quilts. We will also have some quilts available for sale. The quilt exhibit will be open any time Owens Auditorium is open and/or in use during the Palustris Festival. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Palustris Art Exhibit & Open Studios

10 a.m. — 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills will present a special Palustris art exhibit at their Exchange Street Gallery featuring their members’ art in all mediums with pricing of $50-$100. This will be a great chance to acquire a piece of original, fine art at a reasonable price. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open to provide the opportunity to stop by and see the artist at work. Located in Aberdeen, NC, the Artists League of the Sandhills aims to promote interest in the visual arts by providing quality art education at all levels at a reasonable cost and a friendly environment in which to work and exhibit. Free and open to the public. Children are welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Pottery Experience

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda Dalton Pottery Studio is excited to welcome all Palustris attendees to their 3rd annual, “Pottery Experience”. Linda and Jim offer studio tours,

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Custom Framing: The Icing Around the Art

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. The King’s Custom Framing presents an incredibly special art exhibit featuring original works from the private collections of selected local residents, including works of noted local artists. Art is beauty and inspiration. Timeless, creative frame design is the icing around the art. See how experienced professionals create frame designs that are as unique and evocative as the art it surrounds. A selection of original art from some of the area’s premier local artists will be available for purchase. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 6+) welcome. King’s Custom Framing, 15 Dawn Road, Ste. 3, Pinehurst. Sharon Ferguson, 910-295-5451

Double Takes 2013

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents “Double Takes 2013”. A collaboration of photographers and artists, “Double Takes” seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery & Wine Bar, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Nancy Rawlinson, 910-246-2266

Longleaf Ensemble: Ryan Book, Diana Turner-Forte & RisingPhoenix

11 a.m. —12 p.m. The Longleaf Cultural Theatre Ensemble presents classical dancer/ choreographer Diana Turner-Forte & RisingPhoenix, accompanied by composer/ guitarist Ryan Book. This multi-arts performance, set in a Civil War era church, includes photographer/filmmaker Brady Beck; choirmaster Rod Brower & TogetherN-Unity; singer/songwriter Abigail Dowd; and writer Ray Owen. Through cuttingedge theatrical productions, their aim is telling stories that matter. Tickets: $12/ advance, $15/at door. Seating is limited. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Feel free to bring a cushion for sitting on pine pews. Old Bethesda Presbyterian Church, 1020 Bethesda Rd, Aberdeen.

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Top 10 Surprising Things About Custom Picture Framing

11 a.m. — 3 p.m. “The Top 10 Surprising Things About Custom Picture Framing” is presented by The King’s Custom Framing. In this fast-paced and fun series of demonstrations, the King’s staff will share how they create custom frames that are as artful as their contents. Various stations will feature the importance of design, preservation framing products, conservation methods, glazing techniques and more. State of the art computerized visualization and mat cutter systems will be demonstrated. This event is perfect for anyone interested in learning more about the unlimited options available with custom picture framing. Free and open to the public. Children (ages 6+) welcome. King’s Custom Framing, 15 Dawn Road, Ste. 3, Pinehurst. Sharon Ferguson, 910-295-5451

John Gessner Photography

11 a.m. — 10 p.m. In their entrance and dining rooms, The Squire’s Pub will display the photographic art of John Gessner, who is a published and recognized photographer in North Carolina. The photos are quad tone giclees taken along ley lines in England. While enjoying John’s wonderful photography, enjoy The Squire’s Pub’s. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. The Squire’s Pub, 1720 US Hwy. 1, South, Southern Pines. Scott Dawson, 910695-1161

History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen by Kirk Tours

1 — 2:15 p.m. & 2:45 —4 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. 23-year “tour guide veteran” Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors, $10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Longleaf Ensemble: Rod Brower & Together-N-Unity Choir 2 — 3 p.m. The Longleaf Cultural Theatre Ensemble presents Southern gospel & Sandhills Blues with Rod Brower & Together-N-Unity Choir. This multi-arts performance, set in a Civil War era church, will feature ‘’Jump Jim Crow,’’ a musical sketch about the only successful coup d’etat in American history that happened right here in North Carolina; includes photographer/ filmmaker Brady Beck; composer/guitarist Ryan Book; composer Adam Halstead; writer Ray Owen; choreographer Diana TurnerForte & RisingPhoenix; photographer Caroline Young. Through cutting-edge theatrical productions, their aim is telling stories that matter. Tickets: $12/advance , $15/at door. Seating is limited. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Feel free to bring a cushion for sitting on pine pews.

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Old Bethesda Presbyterian Church, 1020 Bethesda Rd, Aberdeen.

Bookmaking & Doodle Arts for Kids

2 — 4 p.m. This “Bookmaking & Doodle Arts for Kids” class at Aberdeen Bead Company will allows your children to explore their creative side. Each child will learn a basic bookmaking technique to create a sketchbook and practice doodle art. Space is limited, thus reservations are required. Cost: $15. For reservations, call 910-944-1212. Children, ages 8+, welcome. Aberdeen Bead Company, 105 W. South Street, Aberdeen. Molly Menard, 910944-1212

Driving Miss Daisy

2 — 4 p.m. & 8 —10 p.m. Judson Theatre Company presents four-time Emmy Award winner Michael Learned (The Waltons) and Lance E. Nichols (HBO’s Treme, Benjamin Button) in Driving Miss Daisy, the heartwarming and humorous story of the unlikely friendship between a crotchety, Southern lady and her proud chauffeur. Winner of the Pulitzer Prize and an Academy Award-winning film. Show schedule for Palustris: Sat., March 23 at 2 & 8 p.m.; and Sun., March 24 at 2 p.m. Tickets: $36-$40. Tickets available online at www.JudsonTheatre.com or via phone from Etix: 1-800-514-ETIX (3849). [No exchanges or refunds. All shows, dates, times, prices and artists are subject to change.] Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

PACK in the Park

2 — 4 p.m. Palustris Activities for Children and Kids (PACK) in the Park will be held at Aberdeen Lake Park. This free special event is for children ages 10 & under. Expect: clowns, live entertainment, a Bouncy Castle, make-and-take craft projects, Kids ID’s, and many more fun activities. The Bouncy Castle and Big Slide are sponsored by Dog Nation of Aberdeen. Free and open to the public. In case of rain, many activities will be held inside the Recreation Station at Aberdeen Lake Park. Aberdeen Recreation Station (Aberdeen Lake Park), 301 Lake Park Crossing, Aberdeen. Leigh Baggs, 910-944-7275

Longleaf Ensemble: Singer/Songwriter Abigail Dowd

4 —5 p.m. The Longleaf Cultural Theatre Ensemble presents the soulful sounds of Carolina songbird Abigail Dowd. This multi-arts performance, set in a Civil War era church, includes photographer/filmmaker Brady Beck; choirmaster Rod Brower & Together-N-Unity; singer/songwriter Abigail Dowd; writer Ray Owen; and photographer Caroline Young. Through cuttingedge theatrical productions, their aim is telling stories that matter. Tickets: $12/ advance, $15/at door. Seating is limited. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Feel free to bring a cushion for sitting on pine pews. Old Bethesda Presbyterian Church, 1020 Bethesda Rd, Aberdeen.

Moore County Choral Society Ensemble

5 —5:45 p.m. The Moore County Choral Society Ensemble draws its membership from the society through auditions. The Ensemble serves as community ambassadors for the society, bringing quality choral music to venues inaccessible to

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the much larger chorus. The MCCS Ensemble proudly presents the choral society by performing several times each year. The Ensemble will perform choral music of varying historical periods and genres. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Brwonson Presbyterian Church, 330 S. May St., Southern Pines, 910-692-6252

McKenzies Mill Band in Concert

8 — 10 p.m. Born and raised in the small southern town of West End, comes the rocking new duo . . . McKenzies Mill, founded by brothers Justin and Ryan Harris. They moved to Nashville in 2005 to make their dream a reality. In 2011, they won The Wildhorse Saloon Band Contest judged by Producer Michael Knox, Bo Bice, Wildhorse GM, and Jeff Howard of A.P.A., and in 2012, they won the Bud Light Battle of the Bands for Port Paradise 2012 and the MGM Grand/NFR Rodeo Finals Contest to become the NFR Afterparty band for 10 consecutive nights at the MGM Grand Las Vegas. Now our local boys come home to rock the house. Sunrise Theater, 250 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Ginny Trigg, 910-692-8501

Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Arts Council of Moore County, 910-692-2787

Not Your Granny’s Quilts

1 — 4 p.m. Sandhills Quilters Guild will showcase an outstanding array of appliqued and pieced quilts. We will also have some quilts available for sale. The quilt exhibit will be open any time Owens Auditorium is open and/or in use during the Palustris Festival. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Palustris Art Exhibit & Open Studios

1 — 4 p.m. Artists League of the Sandhills will present a special Palustris art exhibit at their Exchange Street Gallery featuring their members’ art in all mediums with pricing of $50-$100. This will be a great chance to acquire a piece of original, fine art at a reasonable price. The Artists League members’ studio spaces will also be open to provide the opportunity to stop by and see the artist at work. Located in Aberdeen, NC, the Artists League of the Sandhills aims to promote interest in the visual arts by providing quality art education at all levels at a reasonable cost and a friendly environment in which to work and exhibit. Free and open to the public. Children are welcome. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

Sunday, March 24

Self-Guided Tour of Art in the Gardens

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Artists from across North Carolina will display their outdoor art in the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The opening day for this display will be March 15. The art will be for sale with a portion of the proceeds going to the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are open from sunrise to sunset, so participants may tour the gardens any time during the Palustris Festival. Guided tours of the gardens will be offered from 1 to 3 p.m. on the half hour. Free and open to the pubic. Children welcome. Walking shoes recommended. Tours closed in case of inclement weather. Ball Visitor’s Center, Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-695-3882

Pottery Experience

Self-Guided Walking Tour

8 a.m. — 5 p.m. Friends of the Arboretum invite you to enjoy a self-guided walking tour of the Village Arboretum. Trail maps, designed and illustrated by local artist Susan Edquist, are available at most entrances to the park. Along the trails, you will see the sculptures and visual art created by students in Moore County Schools inspired by the theme “Around the World in the Art-boretum.” The Village Arboretum, located adjacent to the Pinehurst Village Hall, is part of Rassie Wicker Park and is maintained by the Village of Pinehurst, Parks & Recreation Dept. The 35-acre tract is planted with hundreds of native trees and shrubs providing year-round interest. The trail system is perfect for walkers and nature lovers. Many of the trails are wheelchair accessible. Dogs on leash are welcome. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes are helpful. Village Arboretum, 395 Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. 910-295-1900

Suzy Morgan Paintings & Charles & Linda Riggs Pottery

1 — 4 p.m. Arts Council of Moore County is proud to present an art exhibit at Campbell House Galleries featuring paintings by Suzy Morgan and pottery by Charles & Linda Riggs. Suzy Morgan is a self-taught painter and loves it with a passion. Painting mainly in acrylic, her style falls somewhere between the looseness of impressionism and the straight lines of realism. Charlie and Linda Riggs work together to create a variety of decorative types of pottery. Most of their work is thrown by Charlie who takes time to make a very smooth surface that will later be polished with terra sigillata. Linda hand builds sculptural bowls, trays, animals and jewelry which are later finished with one of her specialty techniques--saggar firing or naked raku. Free and open to the public. Children welcome.

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10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Linda Dalton Pottery Studio is excited to welcome all Palustris attendees to their 3rd annual, “Pottery Experience”. Linda and Jim offer studio tours, question and answer sessions, kiln openings, throwing demonstrations, and a chance to purchase your own bisqued pot, glaze it yourself, and then see it being fired in the raku kiln. After a few minutes of cooling, it’s ready to take home! Children welcome. Bring a bag lunch and stay a while. 10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Studio tours, throwing demonstrations and children’s play area available as requested. Free and open to the public. 1 p.m. Glaze your own Raku piece for $25. Call 910-9475325 for reservations. Linda Dalton Pottery, 250 Oakhurst Vista, West End. Linda & Jim Dalton, 910-947-5325

Double Takes 2013

10 a.m. — 5 p.m. Eye Candy Gallery, in partnership with the Sandhills Photography Club and area artists, presents “Double Takes 2013”. A collaboration of photographers and artists, “Double Takes” seeks to showcase photography as Fine Art and the interconnected inspiration between photography and a variety of art media. FREE and open to the public. Children welcome. Eye Candy Gallery & Wine Bar, 275 NE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Nancy Rawlinson, 910-246-2266

Moore County Hounds Hunt Meet

1 — 1:45 p.m. Moore County Hounds with staff huntsman & Masters will ride through Weymouth from Ridge Street, around front of house, to rear, and out to Weymouth Woods meadow, where they will meet a field of riders to begin the hunt. An announcer will explain the process, protocol, and history of the hunt. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Walking shoes suggested. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. 910-692-6261

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Historic Boyd House Tour

1 — 4 p.m. Enjoy a docent-led tour of the historic Boyd House and grounds, which is now called Weymouth Center. Formerly the home of author James Boyd and his wife, Katharine Boyd, Weymouth Center was the center of a very social life in the 1920s and 1930s by entertaining such literary friends as F. Scott Fitzgerald, Thomas Wolfe, Paul Green and Sherwood Anderson. Now, Weymouth Center functions as a cultural center with the North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame, Writers-in-Residence program, and is listed in the National Register of Historic Places. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. 910-692-6261

Paul Gauguin in Brittany

2 —3 p.m. When Paul Gauguin left Paris in 1888 and headed for the fishing village of Pont-Aven, he gathered a ‘’school’’ of like-minded artists. Together they established a style of symbolic art called Synthetism. Space is limited for this lecture, thus reservations are requested. Free — reservations requested by calling 910-944-3979. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange Street, Aberdeen. 910-944-3979

History Tour of Pinehurst by Kirk Tours

2 — 3:15 p.m. & 3:45 — 5 p.m. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours will narrate the motorized, historical windshield tour of Pinehurst, sharing local history and facts of our beautiful Home of American Golf. You will hear stories, history and historical facts about famous people, the cottages, hotels, Generals, Pinehurst Winery, the Casino and many more including Annie Oakley, who lived here for 7 seasons. Come on this tour of Pinehurst to learn how “we protect the past, preserve the future and slow down time just a little bit.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors / $10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Pinehurst Theater Building. Pinehurst Theater Building, 90 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

History Tour of Southern Pines & Aberdeen by Kirk Tours

2 — 3:15 p.m. Kirk Tours is offering a special historical windshield tour of Southern Pines and Aberdeen. 23year “tour guide veteran” Marva Kirk will narrate the motorized tour and share local history and facts of our beautiful Sandhills area. You’ll hear stories about horse country, famous authors, ambassadors and historical facts about the early life and industry in the Sandhills and the railroad. Marva will explain the reasons you won’t want to leave our area once you get “sand in your shoes.” Cost: $15 for Adults & Seniors/$10 Children (12 & under). Tour gift included in the cost. Reservations required. Call 910-295-2257 or email reservations@kirktours.com. Children (ages 8 & up) welcome. Departure Location: Southern Pines Train Station. Southern Pines Train Station, 235 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines. Marva Kirk of Kirk Tours, 910-295-2257

Driving Miss Daisy Dance Lecture/Workshop 78

Music

2 — 4 p.m. Judson Theatre Company presents four-time Emmy Award winner Michael Learned (The Waltons) and Lance E. Nichols (HBO’s Treme, Benjamin Button) in Driving Miss Daisy, the heartwarming and humorous story of the unlikely friendship between a crotchety, Southern lady and her proud chauffeur. Tickets: $36-$40. Tickets available online at www.JudsonTheatre.com or via phone from Etix: 1-800-514-ETIX (3849). [No exchanges or refunds. All shows, dates, times, prices and artists are subject to change.] Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Still Cookin’: Food & Memory in Southern Literature

3 — 4 p.m. From Mary Randolph’s 1824 book The Virginia Housewife to the 20th century, Southerners have written, argued, and reminisced about food. In this lecture presented by the Southern Pines Public Library, Dr. Mary Ellis Gibson traces the history of southern foodtalk in cookbooks and fiction, asking why southerners are so obsessed with eating together and why they find it even more important to remember and talk about meals they have shared. This event is part of the Southern Pines Pulbic Library’s “Home-Grown” series focusing on local foods, sustainability, self-sufficiency, community revitalization, history, and traditions. This project is made possible by funding from the North Carolina Humanities Council. Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Library Staff, 910-692-8235

Birthday Party for the Oldest Longleaf Pine

4 — 5 p.m. Join representatives from Weymouth Woods and Weymouth Center on a short walk to celebrate the 464th birthday of the oldest known Longleaf pine tree in the world. After returning to Weymouth Center, enjoy birthday cake and a ‘’toast’’ to the largest surviving vestige of original longleaf forest that once covered most of the southeastern United States Free and open to the public. Children welcome. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. 910-692-6261

Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen

6:46 — 9 p.m. The Rooster’s Wife presents Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen in concert. Frank Solivan & Dirty Kitchen play a wide variety of New Acoustic American Roots Music focusing on bluegrass and acoustic country, yet blues, folk, swing, and jazz also shine through. Powerful vocal harmonies, expressive songwriting, smooth ballads, and instrumental prowess lend this versatile group of musicians to any type of venue. Each member is an inventive powerhouse. Doors open at 6 p.m.; Concert at 6:46 p.m. Tickets: $15/advance, $18/at door. Children under 12 free. Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight Street, Aberdeen. Janet Kenworthy, 910-944-7502

JAZZ: The Wolff Brothers

7 — 9 p.m. The Wolff Brothers will once again join forces on two grands to present an evening of exceptional jazz. Brothers, Joshua and David Michael Wolff, conductor of the Carolina Philharmonic, both began their studies as classical pianists. As a teenager, Joshua was gradually drawn into the language of jazz and never turned back. For the past two decades, they’ve pursued parallel careers as performing artists worldwide, and this is only the second time they’ve given a concert together. Tickets: $20/Adults, $5/Children. Children (ages 12+) welcome. Owens Auditorium at Sandhills Community College, 3395 Airport Road, Pinehurst. 910-692-6185

Special

Event

Theatre

Tour

Visual

Art

March 2013 P���������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Please help us count down to the 60th Anniversary of The Country Bookshop in September!

This March we are asking our customers to help us celebrate 60 YEARS by having 60 HOURS of live reading in the bookshop window. Read your book or one in the shop for 15 minutes or an hour. Call 910.692.3211 or stop by to schedule a time to participate. Thank you for helping us celebrate 60 great years.

The Country Bookshop

140 NW Broad St • Southern Pines • 910.692.3211 • thecountrybookshop.biz


Story of a house

Well Lived, Well Loved The restored farmhouse of Bill and Debbie Webb has stood up gracefully to the passage of time and change

M

any of North Carolina’s architecturally remarkable old farmhouses are not as lucky as the 105-year-old country home of Bill and Debbie Webb. The white frame house gazes west, across the fields with perfect grace. Although it appears to be in pampered condition, there was a time when survival looked bleak. When Bill returned to Ellerbe after graduating from Wake Forest University School of Law in 1978, his parents gave him the farmhouse and three surrounding acres. He remembers the cold January day looking at his gift with a grim perspective. “The weeds were head-high, the windows busted out and I could see the sky through the roof. When I got started on the work, it took a bulldozer to push the wisteria off the back half of the house.” Bill knew the farmhouse growing up as his grandparents John and Elizabeth Webb’s home. The country road out front bears the name. Century-old hardwoods surround the house, with a fifty-foot-tall magnolia on the perimeter. The house was built in 1908 at a time when a more elaborate version of the Queen Anne-style architecture was popular among successful businessmen in North Carolina. The Webb home, a modest rendering of the style, features the characteristic double front doors with triple windows on the second story above the entry, tall flanking chimneys and an offset, deep front porch balanced by a bay window on the opposite end. “This house had some rough times,” Bill explained. “In the early ’20s it took a direct hit from a tornado that set the smokehouse down in Cartledge

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Creek, a third of a mile down the hill.” After John Webb died, and a brief habitation by tenant farmers, the house sat abandoned for over ten years. Today the property glows from Bill and Debbie’s care and attention. Their home offers the perfect retreat for two busy professionals. Debbie grew up in Hickory, and is a graduate of Sandhills Community College. She acquired her training as a culinary specialist at the Santa Fe School of Cooking and in the small Tuscan village of Montefollonico. She is well-known in Richmond County for having owned Steeples, a popular restaurant located in a former Catholic church. During the filming in Hamlet of the movie Billy Bathgate starring Dustin Hoffman and Nicole Kidman, her restaurant was rented by the film’s production company. “For four months I fed the whole crew ,” she said. Notably, Debbie also managed corporate suite catering at the North Carolina Speedway in Rockingham. These days, she is running the Lodge at Webb Farms, the family quail hunting enterprise the Webbs launched five years ago. The simple farmhouse kitchen at home is where she most enjoys cooking. Like all the original rooms in the house, the floors are wide plank heart pine. A yellow tile backsplash warms the working part of the kitchen. Bill found the dark, hand-milled ceiling beams in the kitchen and family room ceilings in an old cotton gin on the Little River in Richmond County. The family room sits on the foundation of a screened porch that used to have a well in the middle. It was designed, Bill said, “so you didn’t have to go outside to get water.”

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This page: Photograph on left by Tim Sayer; Photograph on right by Maureen Clark

By Maureen Clark • Photograhs by John Gessner


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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An old corn crib that Debbie transformed into a one bedroom guest house with a living room and kitchen.

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Story of a house

Many if not all of the antiques in the house are primitive pieces that Bill found in Richmond, lower Montgomery or western Moore County. “I was influenced by a local surveyor who collected primitive antiques,” Bill said. “He taught me how to spot pieces and got me going to auctions.” His mother, Glenna Webb, taught him how do to the refinishing. “Instead of playing golf,” Bill said, “my hobby back then was furniture.” He is most proud of a large pie safe in their family room. “I believe it was made by a cabinet maker in Anson County named Little. It came from the Calvin Little Plantation in Richmond County.” The safe, used to store hams, was coated in grease when Bill acquired it. Some of the pierced tins were missing. Bill recreated the missing squares by painstakingly punching out replacements. Debbie’s influence is visible in the dramatic Western

Bill Webb and his house dog Doc, a Rhodesian Ridgeback PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Story of a house

landscapes hung throughout the house. Her daughter, Breece, lives in Albuquerque and is a friend of the artist. The landscape hanging over Bill’s pie safe depicts storm clouds coming over a mountain range. “When I get home, I just look at that, and it gives me pleasure. It calms me down. I have seen clouds just like that in Montana and New Mexico.” A wide center hall connects the family room to the living room with a row of bedrooms on one side. The original beadboard walls are in place with high ceilings overhead. The Webbs enjoy the front porch in warm weather, sitting in the rockers with a morning cup of coffee, or catching a breeze and watching the sun set over the fields at dusk. The outbuildings include an old corn crib that Debbie transformed into a one bedroom guest house with a living room and kitchen. Out back are the ken-

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Story of a house

nels that house the Webbs’ 18 bird dogs. Bill has a keen interest in his dogs. “If we have an opening (at the business) on a Saturday I will get out and try a dog.” Otherwise, he just enjoys “messing” with them. Late in the day he will go out back to check on the dogs. “I’ll walk down the line and rub their noses and talk to them. It gets you level.” Only one of Bill’s three daughters shares his love of the sport. Jenna Webb, a gunsmith in Fayetteville, has hunted with him over the years. Daughters Olivia and Holly prefer fly fishing. “I don’t care which sport they choose as long as they get outdoors,” he said. “Those are the people in the future who will try to promote conservation and will protect the habitats.” And, hopefully, like Bill and Debbie, preserve the landmark country homes. PS

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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March 2013P����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The March Sky As nights grow shorter in the Northern Hemisphere, the brightest winter constellations shift to the west. Notable among the nighttime star clusters is the famous Pleiades, the Seven Sisters, arguably the finest star cluster in the Northern sky.

By Noah Salt

M

arch is a month of powerful change, both in nature and the affairs of man, a time of thawing Earth and violent winds, aptly named for the Roman god of war. AngloSaxons called it Hlyd-monath, the month of storms, perhaps giving rise to the popular folk belief that if it comes in “roaring like a lion” it will hopefully exit “like a lamb.” Formerly the first month of the ancient Roman calendar, a time meant for house cleaning and purification rites, it ushers in spring and brings the opportunity for fresh new beginnings. A month best observed walking and planning. This year spring officially arrives on the 20th day of the month, and Easter falls eleven days later. Across human history, March has been a propitious month of debuts. According to his ship’s log, explorer Ponce de León got his first glimpse of Florida in March, 1512. International icons Coca-Cola and France’s Eiffel Tower were both introduced in March, and the first trans-Atlantic telephone call was made March 5, 1926. Juliette Low started the Girl Scouts in 1912, and the “Star-Spangled Banner” became our national anthem in 1931. The U.S. adopted Eastern standard time March 13 (1884), and Hawaii officially became a state on March 13 (1959). Jonas Salk introduced the first polio vaccine (1953) and RCA debuted the first color TV set a year later. Fittingly, Walter Cronkite made his first appearance as the anchorman of the CBS News in March 1962, a post he occupied until his retirement in 1981. Our favorite March day is the 17th, when green beer flows and 34 million Americans claiming direct Irish ancestry throw a heck of a party, though official “Peanut Butter Lovers Day” on the 1st is admittedly a very close second.

Out in the Garden With spring officially sprung, March brings a flurry of tasks to the gardener’s days. Assuming you cleaned and organized your garden shed over the winter, here are a few tasks that should be done now: Early March is the last time you can safely prune most trees and shrubs, the perfect time to snip away dead canes on roses and trim back summer and autumn clematis. Hedges may be planted a final time and fruit trees given a final pruning. As garden temps rise, this is an excellent time to get your soil tested. Kits are available at almost every garden center or county agricultural extension office. Now’s the time to enhance your soil nutrient amendments, including composting and mulching mature beddings. Set out organic slug traps now. Planning and labeling and even getting a jump on staking are tasks that will save you time once the warm weather arrives and weeding becomes an issue. Some hardy annuals like sweet peas can be sown around midmonth. Indoors, start tender annuals and vegetables from seed, including broccoli, kale, cabbage and onions.

“The afternoon is bright,
with spring in the air,
a mild March afternoon,
with the breath of April stirring,
I am alone in the quiet patio
looking for some old untried illusion —
some shadow on the whiteness of the wall
some memory asleep
on the stone rim of the fountain,
perhaps in the air
the light swish of some trailing gown.”
 — Antonio Machado, 1875-1939 Selected Poems, #3 Translated by Alan S. Trueblood

Ode to Narcissus A flower most closely associated with March is the narcissus, or “wild daffodil,” named for the vain young man of Greek mythology who met his demise by becoming smitten with his own image on the reflected surface of a stream, only to be reborn as a golden flower, sometimes called the Lent lily because it blooms in early spring and often fades by Easter Day. Naturalized in clouds of bold and pale yellow across the meadows of New England and Britain, daffodils are the true golden herald of spring’s arrival in much of the Northern Hemisphere, immortalized by William Wordsworth, a devoted rambler who was so moved by a field of wild narcissus in Ullswater in 1802, he wrote: “I wandered lonely as a cloud / That floats on high o’er vales and hills, / When all at once I saw a crowd, / A host of golden daffodils; / beside the lake, beneath the trees, / fluttering and dancing in the breeze.” PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Friday

1

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange. RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. will discuss “The Green Gold Rush: a Vision for Energy Independency, Jobs, and National Wealth.” Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst.

3

Tuesday

Monday

Sunday MOVIE AT THE LIBRARY. 2:30 p.m. A heartwarming story, starring Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton.Southern Pines Public Library. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Live music from Rhiannon Giddens, and John Flynn. Two preeminent members of the folk community share the bill. The Poplar Knight Spot.

Wednesday

Thursday

4

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 6:30 p.m.

5

LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Topic: The “Facial Brush” Truths Revealed, along with Merz Aesthetics, makers of Radiesse and Belotero Dermal Fillers. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Stories, songs, and fun, and then stay for playtime. Southern Pines Public Library.

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7

ORCHID PRESENTATION. 10 a.m. Jeff Baldwin from the Orchid Gallery speaks. Victor and Ball Garden Visitor’s Center. SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. National Weather Preparedness Month. CLASSIC MOVIE NIGHT. 7 – 8:30 p.m. To Catch a Thief. The Fair Barn.

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange.

10

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Kate McGarry plays jazz in Aberdeen! As well as the soaring vocals and blazing guitar of Keith Ganz. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot.

11

SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 – 9 p.m. Program presented by Scott Hotaling. Guests welcome. Hannah Theater Center at The O’Neal School.

12

WOMEN VOTERS LUNCH WITH LEGENDS. 11:30 a.m. This year’s guests are Elizabeth Cady Stanton, an early leader in women’s rights and women’s suffrage; and Mary Eliza Church Terrell, co-founder of the National Association of Colored Women. PIZZA AT THE LIBRARY. 5 p.m. Pizza with Peeps! Southern Pines Public Library.

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SENIOR EVENT. 12:15 – 1 p.m. Irish-American Heritage Month. A representative will be here to talk about the history of this special event. Douglass Community Center. OLDIES & GOODIES FILM. 2:30 p.m. A 1966 film.Southern Pines Public Library. MAGIC AT SLY FOX.

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FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange.

17

FLEA MARKET. 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Moore County Community Flea Market. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. ST. PATRICK’S AT SLY FOX. Dinner featuring traditional Irish cuisine and beer. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Howard Levy and Joe Craven. The Poplar Knight Spot.

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WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:30 a.m. The League of Women Voters luncheon. Table on the Green. LEARN TO DRAW. 5:30 p.m. Kids are invited to learn to draw Manga-style. IRISH MUSIC CONCERT. 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Forever Irish Concert.

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21

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MOORE COUNTY CONCERT BAND. BRIDAL SHOW. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT.

25

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance.

27

24

Palustris Festival

See pages 64-79 for event listings.

31

ART SHOW. Through April 21. “Anne Frank: A History for Today” and “Art and Propaganda in NaziOccupied Holland.” Arts Council of Fayetteville.

26

GOLF TOURNAMENT. 12:30 p.m. Kelly Cup Golf Championship. SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. Celebrate the first day of Spring. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For infants and toddlers.

Palustris Festival

WINE TASTING AND AUCTION. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Belle Meade. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Live music from Mamajowali. The Poplar Knight Spot.

Palustris Festival

8

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange. ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Pete and Maura Kennedy perform a benefit for Moore Buddies. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. The Poplar Knight Spot.

Palustris Festival

See pages 64-79 for event listings.

See pages 64-79 for event listings.

See pages 64-79 for event listings.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Southern Pines Public Library.

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MEET THE AUTHOR. 4 p.m. Meet Karen Pullen, the author of Cold Feet. The Country Bookshop.

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange.

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Arts Entertainment C a l e n d a r

Saturday A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. SENIOR EVENT. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. National Pig Day, which calls for a trip to Pik ‘N Pig. Cost is $2 resident/$4 non-resident. Call and sign up on March 1. Depart from Campbell House, Southern Pines.

2

March1

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance.

9

&

RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. Robert F. Kennedy, Jr. will discuss “The Green Gold Rush: A Vision for Energy Independency, Jobs, and National Wealth.” Kennedy was named one of Time magazine’s “Heroes for the Planet” for leading the fight to restore the Hudson River. Free and open to the public. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 245-3132.

March 2

• 16

BIRDS IN THE SANDHILLS. 10 a.m. A brief narrative of birds before hiking, bird watching, and constructing birdhouses. A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. PLANTING WORKSHOP. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Hilarie Blevins will give a demonstration on making cement plant containers. Sandhills Horticultural Gardens. PINEHURST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE. 11 a.m. A day of green festivities.

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance.

23

SENIOR EVENT. 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. National Pig Day calls for a trip to Pik ‘N Pig. Cost: $2/resident; $4/ non-resident. Call and sign up on March 1. Depart from Campbell House, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

• •

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Cheese.” Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Pinot gris from Oregon. Discover the subtle but distinct nuances in flavor between pinot gris and its twin sister from Italy, pinot grigio. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

March 3

MOVIE AT THE LIBRARY. 2:30 p.m. A heartwarming story

starring Jennifer Garner and Joel Edgerton. A happily married couple awake to find Timothy, a boy with leaves growing from his ankles standing in their kitchen. Bring a pillow. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Live music from Rhiannon Giddens and John Flynn. Two preeminent members of the folk community share the bill. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 5

TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 6:30 p.m. Thirty questions while you dine, do you have what it takes to win this battle of wits? The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

March 6

LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Topic: The “Facial Brush” Truths Revealed, along with Merz Aesthetics, makers of Radiesse and Belotero Dermal Fillers. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst, 80 Aviemore Court, Suite A, Pinehurst. Info/RSVP: (910) 295-1130.

Palustris Festival

See pages 64-79 for event listings.

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A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. SENIOR EVENT. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Trip to “Southern Season,” the premiere destination for specialty foods and products. Depart from Campbell House. CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. Enjoy roasted meats from the grill, live music, and lively competition in order to christen the change of seasons properly.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Stories, songs, and fun for infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

March 7

ORCHID PRESENTATION. 10 a.m. Jeff Baldwin from the Orchid Gallery in Pittsboro will speak about what to look for when buying an orchid and how to care for the plant at home. A selection of orchids will be available for sale following the presentation. Free and open to the public. Reservations required. Sandhills Community College, Victor and Ball Garden Visitor’s Center. Info: (910) 695-3882.

SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. National Weather Preparedness Month. A representative from the Southern Pines Fire Department will discuss the importance of being prepared in case of inclement weather. Free to the public.

CLASSIC MOVIE NIGHT. 7 – 8:30 p.m. To Catch a Thief. Starring Carey Grant and Grace Kelly. Concessions available for purchase. Free. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Rd. South, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-0166.

March 9

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Asparagus.” The fleshy green spears of asparagus are both succulent and tender and have been considered a delicacy since ancient times. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Chardonnay from France. Elegance comes to mind. The region is Burgundy, known for some of the most famous, timeless chardonnays in the world. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 – 9 p.m. Program presented by Scott Hotaling. Guests welcome. Hannah Theater Center at The O’Neal School, 3300 Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

March 12

WOMEN VOTERS LUNCH WITH LEGENDS. 11:30 a.m. The League of Women Voters of Moore

March 2013P�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

Film

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

March 11

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Dance/Theater

• •

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Kate McGarry plays jazz in Aberdeen! Featuring the soaring vocals and blazing guitar of Keith Ganz. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

• •

Music/Concerts

• •

March 10

Key:

Art

Sign up by March 1. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

Sports


ca l e n d a r County hosts the Fifth Annual Lunch with Legends. This year’s guests are Elizabeth Cady Stanton, an early leader in women’s rights and women’s suffrage; and Mary Eliza Church Terrell, co-founder of the National Association of Colored Women. Cost: $30. Carolina Hotel, 80 Carolina Vista Dr., Pinehurst. Reservations: Mary Lou Bernett, (910) 672-8839.

March 16

PIZZA AT THE LIBRARY. 5 p.m. Pizza with Peeps! Kids grades 6-8 are invited to bring a shoebox and work on their peeps dioramas in the library. Participants in the Teen Advisory Board (TAB) are also invited to come and help build the dioramas. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

PLANTING WORKSHOP. 10 – 11:30 a.m. Hilarie Blevins will give a demonstration on making cement plant containers. Instructions will be handed out. Cost: $5; Horticultural Society members, free. Sandhills Horticultural Gardens, 3395 Airport Rd., Pinehurst. Info/reservations: (910) 695-3882.

March 14

SENIOR EVENT. 12:15 – 1 p.m. Irish-American Heritage Month. A representative from the Southern Pines Public Library will be here to talk about the history of this special event. We will enjoy Irish soda bread and green punch! Cost is $3 resident/$6 non-resident. Call and sign up on March 1. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

OLDIES & GOODIES FILM. 2:30 p.m. A five-time Academy Award winner, this 1966 film is an emotionally charged drama starring Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton. Free and open to the public. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

MAGIC AT SLY FOX. 7 p.m. Sleight of Hand extraordinaire, Brandon Williams, will be here to entertain you while you dine. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

BIRDS IN THE SANDHILLS. 10 a.m. A brief narrative of birds before hiking, bird watching, and constructing birdhouses for youth to take home. Free and open to the public. Weymouth Woods, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2463 or www.southernpines.net/recreation.

• •

PINEHURST ST. PATRICK’S DAY PARADE. 11 a.m. A day of green festivities and shamrocks beginning with the parade through the village, followed by center stage entertainment, featuring Miss North Carolina, The Boombadeers and the 82nd All American Airborne Chorus. Village of Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-3400.

• •

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Macaroons.” Elliott’s on Linden, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Welcome Spring with a sauvignon blanc from New Zealand. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

March 17

FLEA MARKET. 8 a.m. – 2 p.m. Moore County Community Flea Market. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst.

ST. PATRICK’S AT SLY FOX. Dinner featuring traditional Irish cuisine and pair it with an Irish beer. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Howard Levy and Joe Craven Flecktones founder, two time Grammy winner joins multi instrumentalist Joe Craven, both veterans of Jerry’s last record. Expect the unexpected from these two masters. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 18 – April 21

ART SHOW. Anne Frank: A History for Today and Art and Propaganda in Nazi-Occupied Holland. The exhibits will serve as a springboard for dialogue about the effects of intolerance in the past and today, and provide an opportunity to address the positive values of diversity and tolerance. Free and open to the public. Arts Council of Fayetteville, 301 Hay St., Fayetteville. Info: www.theartscouncil.com.

March 19

WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:30 a.m. The League of Women Voters luncheon. Guest speaker is Dr. Aaron Spence, Moore County Superintendent. Cost: $12. Open to the public. Table on the Green, Midland Country Club. Reservations: Charlotte Gallagher, (910) 944-9611.

LEARN TO DRAW. 5:30 p.m. Kids grades 6-12 are invited to learn to draw Manga-style with artist Jana Guitar. Free with refreshments provided. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

IRISH MUSIC CONCERT. 7 p.m. – 9 p.m. The Forever Irish Concert starring Andy Cooney’s “World Famous Irish Band,” Three Irish Sopranos and Darrah Carr Dance. Tickets: $25; reserved seating: $30. Tickets available

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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ca l e n d a r at the Fair Barn or Pinehurst Village Hall. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Rd. South, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-0166.

March 20

GOLF TOURNAMENT. 12:30 p.m. Kelly Cup Golf Championship
to benefit Sandhills Children’s Center. Shotgun start. Cost:
$200/person; $800/team; $1,000/team and sponsorship. Pinehurst No. 8. Info: (910) 692-3323 or SandhillsChildrensCenter.org.

SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. Celebrate the first day of spring at the Spring Carnival. Participate in a carnival for older adults by playing Spring Cake Hop, Frog Toss, Ducks on a Pond, Butterfly Toss. Everyone is a winner. Refreshments provided. Cost: $2/resident; $4/non-resident. Sign up by March 10. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Stories, songs, and fun for infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

MEET THE AUTHOR. 6 p.m. This will include dinner and is part of the Palustris Festival. Walter Bennett will discuss his book Leaving Tuscaloosa, a mystery set in mid 20th century Alabama. He will also touch on his writing process, inspiration for the novel and the legacy of race relations in the South. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www. thecountrybookshop.biz.

March 21

WINE TASTING AND AUCTION. 6:30 – 8:30 p.m. Join the ladies of the Junior League of Moore County for a night of entertainment including wine, appetizers, music by vocal artist Joe Murphy, a silent auction and more. Tickets: $35; $50 at the door. Belle Meade, 100 Waters Dr., Southern Pines. Info: www.jlmcnc.org.

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Live music from Mamajowali. West Africa meets Northern California with American traditional sounds thrown in for good measure. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 22

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Pete and Maura Kennedy bring huge chops to a benefit for Moore Buddies. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 23

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Grass fed beef.” Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Viognier. Once a well-kept secret from the Northern Rhone Valley. The world has discovered this unique, aromatic white wine with a hint of peach and apricot. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

March 24

MOORE COUNTY CONCERT BAND. 2 p.m. A non-profit organization of volunteer musicians. Free and open to the public. Grand Ballroom of the Carolina Hotel, Pinehurst. Info: www.moorecountyband.com.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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BRIDAL SHOW. 2 p.m. – 5 p.m. Meet with area wedding vendors. See in person all they have to offer, including cakes and caterers, florists, photographers, limousines, planners, decorators and more. Free admission. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Rd. South, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-0166.

ROOSTER’S WIFE CONCERT. 6:46 p.m. Frank Solivan and Dirty Kitchen. The finest in modern Bluegrass. Seating is by general admission. Doors open 6 p.m. Tickets available at the door and online. The Poplar Knight Spot, 114 Knight St., Aberdeen. Info: (910) 944-7502 or www.theroosterswife.org.

March 27

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Stories, songs, and fun for infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Playtime follows. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

March 28

MEET THE AUTHOR. 4 p.m. Meet Karen Pullen, the author of Cold Feet. Karen is the owner/operator of a bed and breakfast in Pittsboro, NC. This is her first novel. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www. thecountrybookshop.biz.

March 30

SENIOR EVENT. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Trip to “Southern Season,” the premiere destination for specialty foods and products. Stop for lunch at K&W Cafeteria. Cost: $10/resident; $20/ non-resident (transportation only). Call, sign up and pay by March 20. Depart from Campbell House, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

• • •

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Oatmeal cookies.” Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Syrah. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. CORNHOLE TOURNAMENT AT SLY FOX. Enjoy roasted meats from the grill, live music, and lively competition in order to christen the change of seasons properly. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

Tuesdays

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must register onsite. No prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

Fridays

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345.

Saturdays A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must register onsite. No prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

Art Galleries ABOUT ART GALLERY inside The Market Place Midland Bistro Building, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst. The gallery features local artists. Open Monday-Friday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (910) 215-596. ART NUTZ AND RAVEN POTTERY, 125 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Come see the potter at work. Features art, pottery from local potters, handmade jewelry, glass and more. Monday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 695-1555, www.ravenpottery.com. Artist GAlleRy OF SOUTHERN PINES, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Features art and fine crafts from more than 60 North Carolina artists. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077. Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon – 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst. Showcases works by nation-

• ••• •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Fun History Sports

94

Dance/Theater

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

March 2013P�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


   Fayetteville

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Equestrian

. . . on the campus of the . . .School, on the an campus of the Grier historic Grier School, an historic girls boarding school in the girls boarding school Allegheny Mountains of in the Allegheny Mountains Central Pennsylvania. of Central Pennsylvania.

Allegheny Riding Camp - English Hunter/Jumper, Riding Camp  &OHMJTI twoAllegheny judged horse shows per session, 90)VOUFS+VNQFS minute riding UXP KVEHFE IPSTF TIPXT QFS TFTTJPO  NJOVUF SJEJOH lessons, all levels beginner to advanced, optional equine MFTTPOT BMM MFWFMT UP BEWBODFE PQUJPOBM FRVJOF studies activities, lotsCFHJOOFS of optional arts activities TUVEJFT BDUJWJUJFT MPUT PG PQUJPOBMHunter/Jumper, BSUT BDUJWJUJFT Show Camper Program - English Show Camper Program  &OHMJTI )VOUFS+VNQFS experienced trainer, travel team, “Aâ€? “AAâ€? shows, FYQFSJFODFE USBJOFS USBWFM UFBN i"u i""u privately owned horses welcomed, reasonableTIPXT stall fees, QSJWBUFMZ PXOFE IPSTFT XFMDPNFE SFBTPOBCMF show horses available for lease, reasonable fees TUBMM GFFT TIPX IPSTFT BWBJMBCMF GPS MFBTF SFBTPOBCMF GFFT • State of the art facilities, for girls 7 to 17 r 4UBUF PG UIFPerforming BSU GBDJMJUJFT GPSCamp HJSMT  UP  • Creative and Arts r $SFBUJWF BOE 1FSGPSNJOH "SUT $BNQ • Intensive Dance Program r *OUFOTJWF %BODFTheatre 1SPHSBN • Intensive Musical Program r *OUFOTJWF • Art Portfolio.VTJDBM ProgramÄ‚FBUSF 1SPHSBN r "SU Camp 1PSUGPMJP 1SPHSBN • Junior r +VOJPS $BNQ Camp • Mother/Daughter r .PUIFS%BVHIUFS $BNQ

bestcamp.org bestcamp@grier.org bestcamp.org bestcamp@grier.org /griersummercamp /griersummercamp

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March 2013P�����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n d a r ally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meet-the-artist opportunities available. MondayFriday (closed Wednesday), 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 1 – 4 p.m & special appointments. (910) 295-4817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and every third weekend of the month from 2 – 4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. The Downtown Gallery inside Cup of Flow, 115 NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Ever-changing array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999. The Gallery at Seven Lakes at the St. Mary Magdalene building, 1145 Seven Lakes Drive. Just nine miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211, this gallery is dedicated to local artists. Wednesday-Thursday 1 – 4 p.m. Hastings Gallery in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. – 9 p.m., Friday 7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. HOLLYHOCKS ART GALLERY, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Features artwork by local award winning artists, Phyllis Andrews, Betty DiBartolomeo, Equine Sculptor Morgen Kilbourn, Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter and artist/ owner, Jane Casnellie. Monday-Saturday 10:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. Meet the artists on Saturdays, 12 – 3 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www. hollyhocksartgallery.com. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 25 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst. Features local artist Nancy Campbell’s original oil and watercolor paintings. Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www.ladybedfords.com.

for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908. Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2 – 5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331. House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round. Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051.

We are an authorized PFAFF® dealer. Machines are available at all price and skill levels from beginner to expert. Come by and see our vast selection of fabric, yarns, patterns and notions!

Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1 – 4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739. North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261. Shaw House Property. Open 1 – 4 p.m. TuesdayFriday. (910) 692-2051. Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Friday, and 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642. Union Station. Open 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin Open 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677. PS To add an event, email us at pinestraw@thepilot.com by the first of the month prior to the event.

PineNeedler Answers

— Find X Designs —

Fabric & Yarn 719 Carthage Street • Sanford, NC 27330 919-774-4700 • Find us on Facebook! Hours: Monday - Saturday 10:00 - 6:00 Locally owned and operated.

From page 127

The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen. Specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Monday, Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines. Showcases art of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Monday, Wednesday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., (910) 695-0029. SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Drive, Aberdeen. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 944-9440, www. skyartgallery.com. Studio 590 by the pond in Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle, Pinehurst. This historic log cabin is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. (910) 639-9404. White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100.

Nature Centers Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve (898 acres). 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

Historical Sites Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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mo or e cou n t y hom e bu i lde r s a sso c i at ion

H ome

O F THE

Year

Gold Winner

$1M-$1.5M Harris & Son Construction Company, Inc. 40 Brookhaven Road, Pinehurst

Designed to fit in with its older neighbors, this 9,000 SF beauty achieves both comfort and delight with the many special features designed in. Located along Pinehurst #2, this home defines the good life. Some of the features found within include a 1,200 wine bottle cellar, a theatre room, a golf simulator, and a pub room. Off the pub room is a private guest suite with separate entrances from the golf course and street. The master suite invites the owners to stay a while, with a fireplace, his and her baths, musical showers and heated tile floor, and a coffee alcove for that first cup. The home includes a beautiful office and exercise room on the first floor. On the second floor are two guest suites with private sitting area, private balconies, refrigerator and coffee bar. The kitchen is every chef’s dream and includes a corner fireplace in the breakfast area and Italian granite counters. All porches have motorized screens to close them in or leave them open to the outdoors. The home is built for energy efficiency, with state of the art technology and insulation throughout.

Gold Winner

$950K-$1M B.E. Vaughan & Son, Inc. 45 McLean Road, Pinehurst

A visit to this home brings a sense of nostalgia. Designed by Stagaard & Chao, Architects, this house is meant to feel like home. Reclaimed oak floors greet visitors in the foyer, and rustic pine vaulted beams from the late 20s hover overhead. A wood burning fireplace and cabinetry add to the feeling of warmth. The master suite is spacious and private. From the living room one enters the lanai, which opens up to a landscaped courtyard with a functional studio. The kitchen is a focal point, with antique pine trusses, unique granite counters, an exquisite French stove, and custom kitchen cabinetry. The good life in this 4,056 SF (heated space) home is made better with a sitting room, a wine room, a butler’s pantry, and a quaint dining area. Chariots are kept in a three-car garage, big enough for the golf cart too. There are 1,576 SF of unheated space. Well designed porches, a trellis covered deck, and other touches make this home a special place, whether you are at home or staying in the guest quarters. A geothermal HVAC system makes sure the home is cozy year round, at a minimum of cost.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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$1M-$1.5M Masters Properties, Inc.

335 Grande Pines Vista, Jackson Springs

Silver Winner

The two-story foyer features wood paneling, a custom floor medallion and chandelier. The study located off the foyer features a coffered ceiling in solid cherry. A “cook’s kitchen” features a large island and maple cabinets. The family room has 20-foot ceilings, a fireplace and wood paneling. The master suite has a masonry fireplace and a master bath. Two guest rooms, a bonus room and storage closet complete upstairs. Outside is an open-air porch and a screened porch with slate flooring, an outdoor kitchen and fireplace. A 5,426 SF detached garage features a “man cave” with 28-foot ceilings overlooking the custom showroom floor below.

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$950K-$1M McLendon Hills Construction 140 Jonathons Drive, West End

Silver Winner

Designed by Frank Betz, the plan “The Greywell” offers a blend of traditional concepts enhanced with craftsman-style accents. The outside view of the house is dominated by the home’s impressive stacked stone exterior walls. Upon entering the residence, the visitor immediately notices the coffered ceiling, wainscoting and stone fireplace. The owners sing praises of the insulation of the home. This may be contributed to the windows and the Geo-thermal system. The setting offers spaciousness for both a garden and a detached workshop. With over 1.5 acres, this panoramic lakeside home allows the owner to enjoy sunset views on a level landscape.

March 2013 i�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


mo or e cou n t y hom e bu i lde r s a sso c i at ion

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Gold Winner

$650-$700K Bill Reaves Construction Company 1610 Stanton Hill Road, Cameron

The residence is situated on a large acre tract in the country between Carthage and Robbins. The house is both fun and relaxing. It features a post-and-beam construction, incorporating more conventional framing to ensure energy efficiency. A two-story, two-sided wood fireplace is made with air-tight doors for energy conservation and fresh air intake. One side is open to the screen room for outside enjoyment. There are special fossil tiles on the kitchen backsplash and the bar top made from “fossil stone� found in a riverbed in Montana. The convenient layout provides the owners with a main level master suite, and guest bedrooms on the second level. The master suite features a vent gas fireplace, and access to a private screen porch. The energy efficient home and outbuildings actually generate electricity to send back to the grid. It is heated with geothermal heat pumps. A horse barn is built for animals and equipment and a garage/workshop features a full attic for storage, three car bays and a separate workshop for hobbies and maintenance.

$650-700k Bolton Builders, Inc.

124 Otter Drive, Seven Lakes

Silver Winner

This Spanish influenced home, designed by Artiga Design, overlooks Lake Auman and is built for comfort. The interior boasts a spectacular foyer that leads to the living area and a curved stairway. The gourmet kitchen features custom cabinetry and granite. A handsome stone arch separates the kitchen and family room, giving the whole house an open feel. Bathrooms are tasteful with custom cabinets and granite tops. A stone fireplace in the family room is a focal point. The stairway and loft overlook the kitchen and provide passage to a family room and bath. The exterior is stucco and features 3 porches with lake views. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Gold Winner

$525-$600K Huckabee Homes, Inc

The Martin home sits near the main entrance of Pinewild Country Club. The presence of matching garages on either side of the front door lends itself to a majestic home. The front porch consists of stacked stone, with the remainder of the home primarily brick. The home, with 3,623 SF of heated space and 1,300 SF of unheated space, has a large kitchen and wet bar for entertaining. There is a 414 SF bonus room as well. The owner is a furniture maker and one of the garages is wired to accommodate the machinery required. The masonry pizza oven in the rear is a great way to prepare casual dining for his guests. The house includes several energy saving features, such as a geo-thermal HVAC system and enhanced insulation.

19 Pinewild Drive, Pinehurst

$525-$600K Pinehurst Homes, Inc.

18 New Castle Court, Pinehurst

Silver Winner

This residence is of contemporary style, located in a golf course community. Designed by Anderson Nichols Design, The Green Certified Home consists of three bedrooms with private baths, a powder room, spacious kitchen, breakfast area, great room with coffered ceiling and a stone fireplace, dining room, master suite with oversize closets and sitting area, master bath with a large walk-in shower, utility room, oversize garage, covered rear terrace and screen porch. Quality hardwood, tile kitchen flooring, custom cabinets with granite tops, a farm sink, and luxury carpet finished the look.

102

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Gold Winner

$450-$525K Yates Hussey Construction, Inc. 3 St. Georges Drive, Pinehurst

$450-$525K Alan Walters Construction Company 102 Wakefield Way, Southern Pines

Silver Winner

This beautiful new cottage-style home in Forest Creek was designed by Sande and Alan Walters and includes 3,280 SF of heated space and 360 SF of unheated space. The house features 10-foot ceilings on the main floor, custom kitchen cabinets and granite counters, and a sunroom with big windows and a beaded ceiling. The exterior is painted brick, with stone accent points. The fireplace is masonry built, with views of an extensively landscaped yard. In the back is a courtyard with stone columns. A covered porch looks out to the yard on the first floor, and a small balcony overlooks the courtyard from the second floor.

Building a home for the Dwiggins turned out to be an enjoyable and challenging project. The property, on Pinehurst #6, had 17 feet of elevation fall from the golf course to the street. Setting the elevation of the house to maximize the golf course view, while sculpting the driveway into the front and managing water runoff issues all turned out rewarding for the new owners and the builder. The home has a combination of sustainable exterior materials using Hardie siding and shakes with stone and brick. A patio with fire pit and a spacious screen porch overlook the golf course, making the outdoors as inviting as the interior of this beautiful home. The interior has beautiful moldings, tile showers, hardwood floors and custom cabinets. The home has a plenty of green features incorporated. The owners’ creativity and choice of colors and materials helped turn this beautiful home into a special project.

$450-$525K Bolton Builders, Inc.

33 Glasgow Drive, Pinehurst

Bronze Winner

This beautiful traditional home overlooks the golf course and enjoys beautiful views. Designed by Bolton Builders, Inc. and Design Studios, Ltd., the interior includes a gourmet kitchen with custom cabinets and granite tops. Custom interior trim includes crown molding throughout. The exterior showcases an antique painted brick. The screen porch and patio provide a setting for outdoor living with a great view of the golf course. The lot was left as natural as possible to provide a scenic setting for the home. Energy features include a Dencor energy system and green building practices.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Gold Winner

The Gernhart’s new home is a threebedroom, two-bath, single story structure with a wonderful view of the golf course. A 12-foot sliding door leading to a very large rear porch was a focal point during construction. The outside veneer is mostly brick with portions of stacked stone. The open floor plan lends itself well to casual living and entertaining. The cherry floors and custom cabinets reveal this house as a showpiece.

$350-$400K Huckabee Homes, Inc.

54 Grey Abbey Drive, Pinehurst

$350-$400K Wonderful Life Construction, Inc. 181 SW Lake Forest Drive, Pinehurst

Silver Winner

He wanted a hobby room and a workshop. She wanted an open floor plan and a home for entertaining. Breathtaking views of Lake Pinehurst were a given. That, and a challenging lakefront lot design were the basic elements in this new Energy Star home. A two-story, fourbedroom design emerged to fit the lot and the owners have a living upstairs with views and a downstairs with a party area, separate kitchen, a workshop, hobby area and a 4th bedroom — along with ample storage.

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$350-$400K Huckabee Homes, Inc.

10 Pomeroy Drive, Pinehurst

Bronze Winner

Lee & Rita Kent’s home was built on the first tee of the Magnolia course in Pinewild Country Club. The design of the home and layout was scrutinized due to the visibility of the home. The home is a combination of Hardie siding and brick, utilizing several elevation changes to enhance the visual appeal of the home. The home has a screened porch and a deck at the rear to enjoy the golf course view.

March 2013 i�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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Gold Winner

$300-$350K Step-One Design, Inc.

3 E Magnolia Court, Southern Pines

$300-$350K Bartlett Construction, LLC

3 Augusta Drive, Southern Pines

Silver Winner

The beautiful combination of colors and materials used on the exterior, highlight the exceptional appearance of this three bedroom and 2.5 bath home. The open floor plan consists of high ceilings, which gives this home a very spacious atmosphere. The master suite has its own identity because of its location and room size. Off the elegant and custom kitchen, is an oversized keeping room. The custom woodwork trim package highlights this home’s many details.

This charming 2,809 SF cottage-styled home features Hardie siding, cedar beams and shakes, and natural stone tapered columns. Handcrafted, fully functioning shutters with traditional hardware add a special touch. The house has an open floor plan with a gourmet eat-in kitchen that includes granite and quartz countertops. The kitchen is open to the great room, and a covered back porch. There are hand scraped wide plank floors throughout the downstairs kitchen, dining, great room areas. The great room includes a beautiful stone wall with a gas fireplace and a coffered ceiling. The master bedroom suite has a tray ceiling and his and her closets, and can be opened up to the sunroom. The master bath features a free standing tub, a walk-in tile shower, and his and her vanities. There is an additional bedroom suite on the first floor with its own bathroom. The second floor has an additional bedroom and a full bath, large bonus room and a large storage area. The ecological features in this home are high efficiency heating & cooling, radiant barrier sheathing in the attic and an “on demand” hot water heater.

$300-$350K McLendon Hills Construction

637 McLendon Hills Drive, West End

Bronze Winner

The plan for this beautiful lakefront home is called The Catalina, chosen because it captures a classic Southern design, with its large columned front porch. A gazebo style sunroom gives a nod to the Victorian as well. The first floor has an open floor plan with a large kitchen and pantry and the master bedroom suite. The home features classic elements such as black and white marble and stone throughout. Floor to ceiling windows in several parts of the house allowing for total views of the lake. The second floor has two private bedrooms and baths.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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$200-$250K Daniel Adams Construction 1265 Greenbriar Drive, Vass

Award of Excellence

This 2,200 SF home is designed for family living. On one level, with a smartly divided split bedroom plan. The master suite offers abundant storage and a private getaway. Family bedrooms are tucked away for privacy. The great room is open to the kitchen and dining area to enhance involvement in daily activities. The exterior is a combination of cottage (stone and columns) and low country (siding and ginger trim). Roof breaks add visual interest. This home is high energy efficient.

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Under $100K Harris & Son Construction Company, Inc. 192 J. Dowdy Road, Carthage

Award of Excellence

This cabin encloses 768 SF, plus a 154 SF bedroom loft. The interior cedar wood was harvested off the Harris family farm. Pre-finished shakes don the outside, topped by a galvanized roof. The living area’s 24’ ceiling sets the tone for a stone fireplace. The upstairs bedroom loft has a private bath and walk-in closet. Both baths have beautiful mahogany ceilings. Wrought iron railing adds the right touch to the staircase. Beautiful hardwood floorings are present throughout.

Best Porch Renovation under $30K Bartlett Construction, LLC 106 Carr Court, Seven Lakes

Silver Winner

This octagonal screen porch features a four-season window/screen system along with a vaulted ceiling and pine tongueand-groove roof decking, tile flooring and a custom built stone fireplace. This is a perfect place to relax, talk, or read a book, and it catches the breeze from any direction.

Gold Winner

Best Porch Renovation under $30K Pinehurst Homes, Inc.

The construction of the Prestipino Terrace was the answer to the owners’ complaints about their rear patio. They had an awning but it just didn’t provide the coverage they needed. They seldom spent any time on the patio even though the landscape in the rear yard is wonderful. The solution became a covered terrace with added columns for appeal. The brick and roof materials were identified to create a good match. The roof pitch was maximized to create the best drainage possible. Dormers prevented a gable roof design so a shed roof was constructed. The covered terrace introduced a spacious shelter from the weather and sun. The final product appears to have been a part of the home since its original construction.

620 Donald Ross Drive, Pinehurst

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mo or e cou n t y hom e bu i lde r s a sso c i at ion

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Commercial: Stewart Construction & Development Company

Commercial: Harris & Son Construction Company, Inc.

Commercial: Seldomridge Construction Services, Inc.

155 Grant Street, Seven Lakes

530 NW Broad Street, Southern Pines

581 Seven Lake Drive, Seven Lakes

Award of Excellence

The Sandhills Pediatrics Clinic is a 9,800 square foot facility located in Seven Lakes. Designed by Christine Dandeneau, the building has LEED including geothermal HVAC, a rainwater collection system plus LED & motion sensor lighting. The building has 16 exam rooms, 2 nurse’s stations, 2 doctor’s offices, a large reception area with waiting rooms. The upper level has a flex space with a conference room and employee break-room. This facility offers a positive patient experience and energy-efficient measures for long-term savings.

Award of Excellence

Dr. Moubry’s dental office is located in So. Pines and the building enhances the area around it. The 3,100 SF facility has seven operatives, a private full bath for Dr. Moubry, a kitchen for the staff and an upstairs conference room. The building is fully generated in case of power failure. During construction, Hardie siding and Andersen windows were chosen to enhance the look and feel of the building.

Award of Excellence

The project was to add to the handsome Chapel in the Pines — to create a fellowship hall with kitchen, multipurpose and Sunday school rooms, offices, and a conference room — and the first elevator in Seven Lakes. As an addition, the new construction needed to be done with the existing building in view, so the two pieces fit together visually. The project was required to work around an existing columbarium and courtyard and to avoid creating steps between the old building and the new.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Gold Winner

Interior Renovation/Addition This project consists of adding a master closet addition along with renovation the master bathroom. Other projects include renovating and installing new custom kitchen cabinets along with granite counter tops and a new seating area for family time. Also completed in this renovation were three bathrooms with upgraded bath and glass shower facilities and vanities, a laundry room and finishing out the bonus room. A custom trim package was also installed through out the home, including a new front door.

Best Interior Facelift $100-$150K Bartlett Construction, LLC 63 Devon Drive, Pinehurst

Silver Winner

Best Interior Facelift $100-$150K New South Construction 500 Lake Dornoch Drive, Pinehurst

108

Built as a golf retreat house, the house was showing its age. New owners use the house seasonally and wanted to update the interior of the house. Each bedroom was given its own updated bathroom with travertine flooring and a marble slab shower. The small kitchen was enclosed to allow room for the dining room used as a conference room for golf groups. The kitchen was updated with travertine flooring, Corian tops and appliances. A wood coffered ceiling and wainscoting was added to the great room, with heart pine flooring and a brick fireplace for a country club feel. Low E windows and attic insulation were added for better efficiency.

Best Interior Facelift $250-$300K Alan Walters Construction Company 135 Idlewild Road, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

Every room of this house got a makeover, as the owners wanted something that reminded them of the NC mountains. The house, originally built in 1999, got new cabinets and granite countertops in the kitchen and a stone fireplace in the great room, which features a vaulted ceiling. The dining room got a new tray ceiling. The master bath got a new tile shower and a big cedar closet with a washer and dryer. What started as a kitchen remodel project transformed this entire house.

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mo or e cou n t y hom e bu i lde r s a sso c i at ion

Best Kitchen over $50K Bowness Custom Homes

Best Kitchen under $50K Masters Properties, Inc.

Southern Pines

510 Dundee Trail, Southern Pines

Award of Excellence

A 1980’s kitchen had served its purpose and now it was time to update. The owners had been basically happy with the kitchen layout except for a few annoying issues. With careful planning and staying within the existing walls, the new cabinet design eliminated the problems. The project included replacing the vinyl floors with hardwood flooring that matched the adjacent dining flooring. New stained cabinets, granite tops and appliances updated the convenience and style of the kitchen.

Award of Excellence

A young military couple bought a “fixer upper” on a quiet, gorgeous lake-view lot. The owners tackled the closed-off kitchen first. Demolition involved opening up a partition wall to provide access to the kitchen from the living room, replacing track lighting with can lights, and replacing floors with new hardwood flooring. Gorgeous white cabinety with Carrera marble countertops lighten the room. Stainless steel appliances, a white glass backsplash, a large bartop/island and chrome pendant lights complete the transformation.

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Best Landscaping Project over $500K Pinehurst Homes, Inc. 475 Lake Dornoch Drive, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

The residence is on 3.3 acres, positioned on a lake and golf course. The project was intended to improve the house’s curb using a “West Indies” theme. New retaining walls enlarged the parking area. A 2,600 SF flagstone patio was installed and a sunken 20-foot round fire pit built overlooks the lake. In addition, 76 trees were planted, along with thousands of azaleas, shrubs, grasses and ground covers. 30,000 SF of Bermuda sod compliments the added landscape. Bill Reaves Construction assisted significantly with the project.

Best Room Renovation $200-$250K BVH Construction Services, Inc. 105 Sunset Point, Seven Lakes

Award of Excellence

The builder used an existing entry and added covered porch for a more dramatic entry to the front of the home. A more drastic change to the rear of the home involved removing an existing deck and excavating the crawl space underneath the home to add more living space to the existing floor plan. To reach the lower level from inside the home, a spiral staircase was installed. To replace the outdoor living space a twostory covered porch was built, leaving an attractive and inviting space.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Best Room Renovation over $50K Pinehurst Homes, Inc. 160 Dundee Road, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

The Camellia Cottage is in the Pinehurst Historical District and is an original Sears & Roebuck house. It included a detached garage that held an unfinished bonus room. The builder remodeled Camellia in 2011, and came back to finish the bonus room. Their instructions were to use the cottage as a guide for the bonus room’s new look. With a new staircase and sidewalks, the bonus room is now an extension of the cottage. The new apartment includes a spacious bathroom, dry bar, and large bedroom with closets.

Best Exterior Facelift over $50K Bowness Custom Homes Southern Pines

Award of Excellence

The 1980’s home had a Tudor style exterior (board & stucco) that was popular in its time, but now looked dated. The owners planned to update the kitchen, but also wanted the exterior to have a current look that was timeless. The best choice was a cottage style with white cedar shingle siding. Looking at the old pictures, it is hard to believe the transformation that took place.

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Best Historic Renovation $150-$200K Bowness Custom Homes 15 Carolina Vista Drive, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

In 1915, the Quaker Oats family built a home in Pinehurst, adding an 800 SF log cabin as a playroom. The current owners envisioned a guesthouse but needed work. There was no bathroom or kitchen. Once the basics were brought up to code, a kitchen was added to a corner of the living room. Then a tub and shower was placed in the cabin’s closet. Many of the existing cabin features; doors, trim and flooring were re-used with as little finishing as possible.

Best Room Addition $250-$300K Pinehurst Homes, Inc. 255 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

Starting with a home in the historical district of Pinehurst, the charge was to build a “twin” garage to an existing one, and include a master suite and game room to the new side. Design plans were extremely important to match the existing appearance. Historical detail was directed to every aspect of the project. New garage doors were custom built and finished to match. Everything was done with one eye on the new structure and one on the old.

110

Best Room Addition over $100K BVH Construction Services, Inc.

Best Room Addition under $50K Bartlett Construction, LLC

130 Brookline Drive, Pinehurst

27 Deacon Palmer Place, Southern Pines

Award of Excellence

An existing patio was removed and a new covered outdoor living space and covered grill area was added. The new interior space is made up of cedar beams and walls, surrounded by phantom screens to enclose the area, making a spacious and enjoyable space to entertain.

Award of Excellence

This sunroom addition had a previous life as a screened porch. It features more space, with floor-to-ceiling windows, and a coffered ceiling that complements the stone fireplace. The brick paver flooring gives the whole space an outdoor feeling.

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mo or e cou n t y hom e bu i lde r s a sso c i at ion

Whole House Renovation $1M-$1.5M Pinehurst Homes, Inc. 475 Lake Dornoch Drive, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

This home is proof that a builder can do a lot with a million dollars. Starting with a 500 SF addition to the rear, there is virtually no area that didn’t get a makeover during the 18-month project. This included a guest suite on the lower level that is handicap accessible via an elevator. Three bedrooms with baths, including a steam shower, were designed for the lower level, plus a game room with two large TVs, a wine cellar, a kitchen and craft room and more functional space. The master suite was expanded upstairs by 225 SF.

Whole House Renovation $300-$350k Huckabee Homes, Inc 5 Bob O’Link Road, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

This major renovation involved renovating and adding rooms to the entire house. A great room, a bathroom and two bedrooms were added and the outside of the home was changed significantly in the process. All materials used were of the highest quality, such as Azek trim boards and garage doors, poplar interior trim, and IPE decking. Custom cabinetry in the kitchen and great room added polish to this nice home. Icynene insulation was used to enhance performance.

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Whole House Renovation $800-$850K Dabbs Brothers, LLC

Whole House Renovation $600-$650K Bowness Custom Homes

1 Inverrary Road, Pinehurst

3412 Youngs Road, Southern Pines

Award of Excellence

The challenge was the reformation of an outdated structure into a masterpiece of design and functionality. The answer was collaboration between design with the contractor and owners to complete the five-month project. The whole house was touched in some way. In that process, the builder added an extension to the home, replaced all windows and doors, added a fireplace, replaced all HVAC, plumbing, electrical and home audio systems, exterior facing, a new roof, and custom cabinets.

Whole House Renovation $150-$200K Huckabee Homes, Inc 150 Crest Road, Southern Pines

Award of Excellence

This old home in Southern Pines was renovated by adding a two story addition, a full second floor family room, and adding a raised patio on the rear of the home. Renovations within the home include adding exterior doors, interior doors, painting, floor covering, lighting and stucco. The homeowner is also adding a significant waterfall feature and landscaping patio.

Award of Excellence

This home had a small fire and there was smoke damage. The owner liked the house layout; there was no need for major re-design. Staying in budget, the builder converted eight-foot walls to nine feet. Cedar shingle siding replaced previously painted brick. The biggest improvements were in bathrooms and closet layouts. Using existing walls and space from a small den that had been more hallway than room, bathrooms and closets were re-organized.

Whole House Renovation $100-$150K Pinehurst Homes, Inc. 3 Village Lane, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

Built in the 1980s in Historic District of Pinehurst, the owners decided it was time for a facelift. The project did not involve major demolition, but did entail modification of the kitchen layout, new granite tops, installation of bead board in the den’s vaulted ceiling, a stone fireplace and updating all of the baths. High on the projects success list was creating a second level play area for children in the bonus room.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Best Outdoor Living $150-$200K Dabbs Brothers, LLC 55 Horse Creek Run, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

Once the site of the Clarendon Gardens, the owners wanted to incorporate their love of gardening and outdoor entertaining, while preserving the historic significance of the property. The work included extensive grading and adding multiple water features, including a 100’ brick rill with steps to a coy pond. All native plant material was preserved while adding garden space through terraced planter boxes. Also added were a fireplace, trellises, a pergola and a brick pizza oven.

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Best Master Bathroom over $50K Bowness Custom Homes

Best Master Bathroom under $30K Pinehurst Homes, Inc.

40 Huntington Valley Drive, Pinehurst

8 Beasley Drive, Pinehurst

Award of Excellence

The old bathroom had space but valuable areas were consumed by dead spots. The bathroom had potential, but once the space was stripped down to the studs, it was obvious how much space was wasted. With careful planning, every inch was used. Cabinets and counter tops have 50 percent more usable space and the shower is almost double in size. New cabinets, marble tops, whirlpool tub, marble floors and the owner’s touches transformed it into a beautiful experience.

Award of Excellence

The owners had a typical master bath, small shower and whirlpool tub. Lighting was not adequate. Pinehurst Homes, Inc. and Johnsye White designed a new layout. A hand held unit provides handicap use. The walk-in shower has a sitting area where one can dry off. LED lighting was installed, the vanity retained with a new granite top. Granite was also used to cap the shower. The master closet was updated by Colony Shade.

March 2013 i��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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Christ Church Anglican Holy Week Schedule

March 24 Palm Sunday Eucharist March 28 Maundy Thursday Eucharist March 29 Good Friday March 30 Easter Eve

March 31 Easter Sunday

10:30am 7:00pm

Vigil

12:00pm

Eucharist

10:30am

Paschal Candle

7:00pm

The Rev. Dr. John Lawrence Sharpe, SSC Rector

750 Fairway Drive, Southern Pines, NC 28387 (910) 246-0955 • christchurchanglican.us


EMMANUEL EPISCOPAL CHURCH 350 Ea st Mas sachusetts Avenue South er n Pines, NC 28387 (910) 692- 3171 • ww w.emmanuel-paris h.org

Holy Week and Easter Schedule Palm Sunday: March 24 7:30 a.m. Rite I Service/Holy Eucharist 9:00 a.m. & 11:00 a.m.Rite II Service/Holy Eucharist Stations of the Cross: Monday, March 25 & Tuesday, March 26, 6:00 p.m. Tenebrae Service: Wednesday, March 27, 6:00 p.m. Maundy Thursday Service/Holy Eucharist: March 28, 7:00 p.m. Good Friday Service: Friday, March 29, Noon-3:00 p.m. Easter Sunday: Sunday, March 31, 6:00 a.m. The Great Vigil of Easter/Holy Eucharist Breakfast and Egg Hunt following the Vigil Service 9:00 a.m. Rite II Service/Holy Eucharist, 11:00 a.m. Rite II Service/Holy Eucharist

Sacred Heart Roman Catholic Church 300 Dundee Rd., Pienhurst, North Carolina

(910) 295-6550 • www.sacredheartpinehurst.org

LENTEN SCHEDULES - 2013

Stations of the Cross Fridays at Noon excluding Good Friday

HOLY WEEK SCHEDULE

PALM SUNDAY of the LORD’S PASSION Saturday, March 23, 2013, 4:30 PM Mass Sunday, March 24, 2013, 8:00 AM and 10:45 AM Mass MONDAY of HOLY WEEK March 25, 2013 Mass at 8:00 AM WEDNESDAY of HOLY WEEK March 27, 2013 Mass at 8:00 AM

EASTER TRIDUUM

THURSDAY of HOLY WEEK March 28, 2013 Mass of the Lord’s Supper at 5:30 PM GOOD FRIDAY March 29, 2013 Celebration of the Lord’s Passion at 3:00 PM • Living Stations of the Cross at 5:00 PM HOLY SATURDAY March 30, 2013,Easter Vigil Mass at 8:00 PM EASTER SUNDAY March 31, 2013, Masses at 8:00 AM - 10:00 AM - 12 Noon

The Community Congregational Church of Southern Pines You are invited to join us for worship service Sunday service – 11:00 a.m. Adult Bible Study – 10:00 a.m. Youth Sunday School - 10:00 a.m. (Summer worship service – 10:00 a.m.) Nursery Provided www.communitycongregational.org  1 %HQQHWW 6WUHHW ‡ 6RXWKHUQ 3LQHV ‡ 


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SandhillSeen

Starsheona & Carlouse Allbrooks, Christi Allbrooks & Zy-Qae Bledsoe

Martin Luther King, Jr. March Downtown Southern Pines Monday, January 21, 2013 Photographs by Cassie Butler

Boys & Girls Club of the Sandhills

Precious, Tiffany & Jeanette Sealy, Zanila Smith

Elaine Ballard, Yarona Thomas, Jimmy Taylor

Tonya McNeil, Keyana Drakeford, Cynthia Cheatham

Jean Collins, Jaquan Goins, Trivon Kelly, Walter Jones, Will Green

Elasha Lambert, Traniya Brower

Reianna, Criptal & Lauren Graham, Porsalyn Murchison, Aleacia Lambert

Wilma Laney, Shelbi McMillan, Ronda Smith, Carol Williams, Pamela & Arthur Darby

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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SandhillSeen Friend to Friend Benefit Luncheon at CCNC Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Boo & Betty DeVane, Faye Urello, Frankie Maxwell, Trish Christina

Photographs by Cassie Butler

Mary Ellen Meade, Gerri Anderson, Jackie Williams Barbara Livolsi, Sharon Widing

Colleen West, Andrea Hodel, Anne Thompson

Back: Tracy Thompson, Terry Cook, Liz Hammerman; Front: Andrea Moore, Marillee Nagy Jackie Abell, Carol Butler, Lisa Youngclaus

Peggy Rogers, Brenda Davis, Debby DiBianca Back: Rebecca Ragsdale, Rachel Ring; Front: Denise Krauza, Heike Smith, Thuy Le Tess Gillespe, Nancy Ellis, Michele Kelly

Marilyn Neely, Denise Baddour, Raney Rogers, Frances Wilson

Back: Chris Johnson, Arleene Bearak, Jane Waldemar, Denise Petricola, Kathy Beddow; Front: Pat Dube, Marcey Katzman, Harriet Ecker

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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A Very Big T hank-you to Our C lients. When You’re Happy, We’re Happy.

We’re pleased to announce that Edward Jones has been ranked “Highest in Investor Satisfaction with Full Service Brokerage Firms” according to the J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Full Service Investor Satisfaction StudySM. We’ve always believed our way of doing business made sense for our clients. It seems they agree. Edward Jones received the highest numerical score among full service brokerage rms in the proprietary J.D. Power and Associates 2012 Full Service Investor Satisfaction StudySM. Study based on responses from 4,401 investors measuring 16 investment rms and measures opinions of investors who used full-service investment institutions. Proprietary study results are based on experiences and perceptions of consumers surveyed in February, 2012. Your experiences may vary. Visit jdpower.com.

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SandhillSeen Moore County Hounds Hunt Breakfast at Mid Pines Inn Saturday, February 2, 2013 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Dick Webb, Meriwether Hudson Morris

Carol Butler, Reggie Miller

Danielle Veasy, Dr. Doug Jackson, Leonard Short

Maj. Gen. Sid Shachnow, Katie Walsh, Dr. Jock Tate

Betty Johnson, Neil Schwartzberg

Helen & Charles DuBose

Marianne & Peter Winkelman

Ginny & Keith Thomasson

Dan Butler, Dr. Lee Sedwick, Colin MacNair III

Anne Webb, Mary Schwab, Mickey Wirtz

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

121


Coming Soon i

For appointments or more information, call Molly (850) 217-7755

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St. Joseph of the Pines “SJP Something for Every Generation” team: Saoussen Dhamna, Mike Shepard, Dawn Wilson

SandhillSeen

The Moore County Schools “The A Bee C’s” team: Dr. Aaron Spence, Dante Poole

9th Annual Spelling Bee for Literacy Thursday, February 7, 2013 Photographs by Al & Annette Daniels

The Town of Aberdeen/Aberdeen Exterminating “All Aboard Aberdeen” team: Regina Rosy, Kathy Liles, Jim McRae

Karen Triplett, Gail Cummins

Meridith Martens, MCLC Queen Bee Susan Sherard, Patty Kempton

Lisa Hanna, Wade Garner

Rebecca Cummings, Debby Currier, Donna Campbell Steve Hurst, Twana McKnight, Sandy & Lynn Waterkotte

The Boles Funeral Home “Boles Queen Beez” team: Denise Grandolfo, Cathy Davis, Marsha Southers

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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124

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March 2013 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h o u g h ts f r o m T h e M a n S h e d

Where Angelo and Isabelle Lived By Geoff Cutler

March didn’t mean the end of

spring in our old neighborhood. But even an inkling that it might be a nice day brought Angelo out of his house to start turning his soil in preparation for his summer flower garden. He knew that it might snow a few more times, so it wasn’t like he was putting up his shovel, or anything like that.

We used to sit in the window and watch him. Before a blizzard was even over, he’d come out of his basement with that shovel, and beginning at his garage, shoveling slowly and methodically, he’d work his way down the driveway toward the road. Scrape . . . whump . . . scrape . . . whump! Sometimes I’d watch him for several minutes at a time, put into a trance by the steady rhythm of his work. After an hour or so, he’d finally reach the road where he’d begin to dig into the drifts left by the municipal plows. Angelo was strong for an 80-year-old retired trolley engineer. Angelo was Italian. Isabelle, Portuguese. They married very young. Isabelle blamed her father for it, and try as I might, I can’t remember the exact details now, but she told us it had something to do with pre-arrangement, an arrangement Isabelle was none too shy to tell us had ruined her life. She came flying out of the house one day, shrieking to herself about Angelo and mad as a hornet. When she spotted my wife, Brooke, hanging the laundry on the line, Isabelle marched right over to tell her about it. In the middle of a blizzard or thunderstorm, on the hottest day of the year when you could fry an egg on the pavement, Angelo didn’t spend most of his life out of doors because he loved the work; he spent most of his time out of doors working because he was trying to stay as far away from Isabelle as he could get. And unfortunately, because ours was a neighborhood packed with up and down two family row houses, with identical yards the size of rooftop helipads, poor old Angelo could never really get that far away. So in just a skip and a jump, all four and half feet and ninety pounds of Isabelle was standing in our kids’ sandbox haranguing Brooke. “Do you know what that SOB just told me to do? Wash the windows, that’s what! An old woman like me. I told that Guinea bastard he wasn’t boss of the sh*t house and to wash the windows himself. I swear, if my father was still alive — God rest his soul — I’d wring his Portugee neck, that’s what I’d do. Can you imagine him marrying me off to that no good for nothing Angelo? Fifty-seven years I’ve had to put up with . . .” and on and on it went until the poor old dear had worn herself completely out.

Then, noticing our baby girl for the first time, who was looking up at her and about to cry, Isabelle leaned over and scooped the child up out of the sand and pressed her tight to her bosom. “Ah. . . the saints were looking over you the day this child was born . . . just look at that hair. God love her.” And then sprinkled Whitney with her kisses. Now, lest you think Isabelle was some type of bigot, don’t believe it! Not for a second. Isabelle and Angelo just bickered all the time. That’s all. It defined their marriage and was the way they communicated with each other. Isabelle loved Angelo, and vice versa, and were one to have died while we lived there, the other would have felt as if he or she was the last person on Earth. Truth be told, whatever it was Isabelle had told us about her marriage being pre-arranged by her father was more likely than not, unadulterated bunk! She just used it as an excuse to explain their constant bickering. If fact, that’s what made the neighborhood so wonderful. It was a jumbled-up hodgepodge of good hard-working people from almost every ethnicity, color and religion that one can imagine. And we knew almost everything about each other’s lives because we lived on top of one other. Off our back porch, which was no bigger than two single-sized beds laid end to end, we could exchange pleasantries, or have a full-blown conversation with ten different families, and no one had to raise their voices above what could be heard in an ordinary living room. Or, if it was winter and too cold to be outside, we could just throw open our windows and chat away. Do you remember the old Prince spaghetti commercial? It’s Wednesday, “Prince Spaghetti Day” in Boston’s North End, and Mrs. Martignetti sticks her head out the window and calls for Anthony to come home for dinner. “Anthony . . . Anthony,“ she’d yell out across the neighborhood, and Anthony would hear her, and come running. Our neighborhood was just like that. I’d be sitting on the porch reading the paper after work, and Pam would come onto her porch. We’d say hi, and then she’d yell out across the neighborhood, “David . . . David . . . COPS is on . . . time to come home!” And little David, playing somewhere close by with my son, would come running. I loved that old neighborhood. Our kids were both born there. They played in the street with the other kids, and the parents gathered there after work. The policeman, the dock worker, the teacher and the secretary. And we talked about our days, the headlines, our churches, and our children. We lived close, and we knew each other well. Angelo came out of his basement and he saw us all in the street. He waved with his trowel and went to turn the soil. PS Geoff Cutler is owner of Cutler Tree LLC in Southern Pines. He is a regular contributor to PineStraw. He can be reached at geoffcutler@embarqmail.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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March PineNeedler Celebrate March!

By Mart Dickerson

ACROSS 1 School assns. (abbr.) 5 Charts 9 South American country 13 Recommend 14 Asian nation 15 Car rental agency 16 France & Germany river 17 Make used to 18 Not as much 19 CELEBRATE! 21 Cause extreme pain 23 Cook, in Seagrove, NC 25 What Celestial Seasonings makes 26 Manipulate 29 Satiate 31 Upon (2 wds.) 34 CELEBRATE! 37 Surprise attack 39 Dirty like a chimney sweeper 40 Flightless bird 41 Passageway at the Sunrise 42 Wealthy 43 Temporary decline in trade 45 Knight’s game 48 Beat it! to a cat 49 Pigpen 50 After eight 52 Afloat 54 Milk producing farms 57 U.S. President Harry 61 __ vu 62 Trim shrubs 64 Pineapple brand 65 Copy into a computer 66 Down duck 67 Small particle 68 What our trees produce (plural) 69 Take a break 70 Smell

DOWN 1 Mouser 2 Snare 3 Seaweed substance 4 Stems of letters 5 Not max 6 Adjoin 7 Ross ___, philanthropist 8 Music player 9 CELEBRATE! 10 Always 11 Ascend 12 Battleship initials 14 SW Asian river 20 Peachy keen 22 Summer skin color 24 Oldest 26 Russia initials 27 Unemotional 28 Era 30 Tinseled cloth 32 Fertile desert area 33 Airplane operator 35 Greek people 36 Desert plant 38 Refuse to believe 41 Spring flower 44 CELEBRATE! 46 Male title of respect 47 Accurate rifleman 51 Spooky 53 Sound related 54 Prefix ten 55 Open a bit 56 Lather 58 Ambience 59 Singing voice 60 Come close to 61 CELEBRATE! (abbr.) 63 Tennis barrier

Sudoku:

Fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3x3 box contain the numbers 1-9. Puzzle answers on page 97

Mart Dickerson lives in Southern Pines and would welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle masters. She can be reached at martaroonie@gmail.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . March 2013

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southwords

French Driving Lessons By Christina Klug

In August I

moved to a small suburb in France called Sevres to work as an au pair for a year. My first day, I awoke to little girls’ voices belting “Defying Gravity,” a favorite from the Broadway musical Wicked, and I immediately felt settled into my new home. Until I walked downstairs and their dad, Chris, threw me the car keys and said, “Let’s go open you a bank account and test your manual skills. You’re driving.” While we live 3.6 kilometers from the edge of Paris — that’s 2.23 miles for those of you back home still not using the metric system — we live at the top of a very steep hill. And this sleep-deprived American wasn’t ready for Parisian roads via stick shift with a stranger a mere twelve hours post entering the country. I would prove unprepared many times after this first drive. In my first French lesson I was told all I needed to know was ça va and c’est bon. My first driving lesson was equally as vague. I was informed that people never learn to parallel park because they just bump the cars in front and behind until they are parked, and that people to the right always have the right of way. However, much like the language, there are about a hundred exceptions to the priority on the right rule. There was no mention that only during certain hours were the parking men strict on paying, or that people may drive half a mile in reverse and expect me to do the same. Nor was there warning of the overzealous pedestrians and the aggressive men on scooters that come out of nowhere. It’s taken me months to realize the sign that looked like a giant mustache was really indicating a speed bump. Perhaps a brief overview of the road signs would have been a good idea. I’ve had a dangerous amount of uncontrollable laughter behind the wheel of an aged Carolina blue hatchback Peugeot, radio blasting, rearview mirror full of small children adorned with snack wrappers. I’ve learned that, to shake Josephine of a bad mood, all it takes is lifting my hands off the steering wheel and yelling, “Wooo!”, pretending the big hill is a roller-coaster. I’ve practiced patience, driving around for two hours looking for the doctor’s office, entertaining myself with obnoxious imitations of the French radio voices and by singing Beyonce’s “Yo Si

128

Fuera un Chico” with the Spanish channel. I’ve been resourceful, using Lucy’s schoolbooks to get the ice off the car. I thought there weren’t any ice scrapers. Sometimes I feel I should be earning Girl Scout badges. One day I was feeling pretty confident that I could get myself to the nearby shopping center. The getting back part proved disastrous. Parisian road signs are oversized, overly ambiguous arrows, so I missed my turn. Lost on the highway, cursing the iPhone with no working data plan in my pocket, I hoped I could get off the next exit and turn around. Seven wrong turns and three highways later, I eventually found a sign headed back to Paris and spotted bus 179, which goes past my house. It took me five times longer than it should have to get home that day because I stopped with the bus at each and every stop to ensure I didn’t get lost again. The driver probably contacted RATP alerting them of a young blonde stalker. For four euros a month I am allowed to commit hit and runs on a daily basis — an insurance plan that America should adopt. Though it’s neither frequent nor encouraged, it has happened a few times. The worst was when I was driving past the girls’ mom, Marie, and waving to get her attention. Momentarily taking my hands off the ten and two position caused me to nail the side mirror of an illegally parked car with the flashers on. The noise was loud enough to wake the neighborhood and get her attention. I’m not entirely certain if she knew what happened or if the mirror shattered, but thankfully the incident was never spoken of and the parents don’t care about new dents and scratches. My first run-in with the police came when I was stopped at a red light. Excited to finally have a cellphone service that I could use to make cheap calls to America, I took advantage of time in the car to phone home. The police rolled down their window, causing me to glance over. They followed with a slight wave that led to arms flailing. I’m embarrassed to admit my thoughts were, are they swatting a bug or just being overly welcome? Blue lights snapped me back from my alternate reality and made me realize they were wanting me to roll my own window down so we could chat about my illegal activities. Apparently talking on the phone and not wearing seat belts are not permitted in France. While one would think my most difficult obstacle might be that I came knowing very little French — so little I had never taken a class before and mistakenly thought, where better to learn French than in Paris? Or perhaps the challenge of living in an extravagant city like Paris and traveling Europe on a less than adequate au pair salary. Or that I had moved away from family and friends and was having to face the post-college world essentially alone. But no, all those have worked themselves out in their own ways. It’s the driving I still can’t seem to get a grasp of. C’est la vie. PS Christina Klug, a former PineStraw intern, is out in the wild world making her fortune as an au pair in France.

March 2013 i������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills



March 2013 PineStraw