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©2013 Pinehurst, LLC

It doesn’t take all day to get a massage ... unless, of course, you want it to.

A typical treatment at The Spa at Pinehurst usually lasts 50-80 minutes. But with spacious lounge areas, saunas, whirlpools, a swimming pool plus healthy snacks and smoothies, you can relax all day. So call the Spa to schedule an appointment that will benefit you long after your treatment ends.

Receive 20% off treatments Monday-Wednesday.

Located next to The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 888.435.6957 • pinehurst.com


April 2013

DEPARTMENTS

Volume 8, No . 4

7 11 17 19

Sweet Tea Chronicles

23 27 29 31

Bookshelf

37

Out of the Blue

Jim Dodson

PinePitch Cos and Effect

Cos Barnes

The Omnivorous Reader Stephen E. Smith

Hitting Home

Dale Nixon

Vine Wisdom

Robyn James

The Kitchen Garden Jan Leitschuh

Deborah Salomon

39 41 43 47 53 84 99 109

Postcard From Paris

111 112

PineNeedler

Birdwatch

Christina Klug

Susan Campbell

The Sporting Life

Tom Bryant

Golftown Journal Lee Pace Sandhills Photography Club Calendar SandhillSeen Thoughts from the Man Shed Geoff Cutler

SouthWords

Mart Dickerson Ed Peele

FEATURES

57 Cheer the spear: a sonnet Poetry by deborah salomon

58 the second Chance Club by deborah salomon

Lucky dogs, home at last

71 doggie Photo booth by lumber river Photo booths

We called, they came, and everyone tried to sit and behave, well at least the dogs did

74 Mary’s Place by deborah salomon

The art of world travel comes home to Weymouth

83 april almanac by noah salt

April Fools, April blooms and the perfect spring garden guide and cookbook

COVER PHOTOGRAPH BY TIM SAYER PHOTOGRAPH THIS PAGE BY CASSIE BUTLER 2

April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Beautiful & aBsorBent

at The Mews | 280 NW Broad Street | Southern Pines, NC 28387 | 910.692.2744 at Saltbox Village | 1249 Kildaire Farm Road | Cary, NC 27511 | 919.467.1781

Coming in April to Cameron Village, Raleigh DUXIANA at The Mews | Downtown Southern Pines | 910.725.1577


PineStraw M A G A Z I N E Jim Dodson, Editor

910.693.2506 • jim@pinestrawmag.com

Andie Stuart Rose, Creative Director 910.693.2467 • andie@pinestrawmag.com

Cassie Butler, Photographer, Graphic Designer, Writer 910.693.2464 • cassie@pinestrawmag.com

Kira Schoenfelder, Graphic Designer 910.693.2508 • kira@pinestrawmag.com

Editorial

Deborah Salomon, Staff Writer Stephen E. Smith, Staff Writer Ashley Wahl, Associate Editor Sara King, Proofreader Mary Novitsky, Proofreader Contributing Photographers

John Gessner, Tim Sayer Contributors

Cos Barnes, Tom Bryant, Susan Campbell, Geoff Cutler, Al Daniels, Annette Daniels, Mart Dickerson, Robyn James, Pamela Powers January, Christina Klug, Jan Leitschuh, Dale Nixon, Lee Pace, Jeanne Paine, Ed Peele, Noah Salt

PS David Woronoff, Publisher Advertising Sales

Michelle Palladino, Sales Representative Terry Hartsell, 910.693.2513 Kerry Hooper, 910.693.2508 Perry Loflin, 910.693.2514 Peggy Marsh, 910.693.2516 Darlene McNeil-Smith, 910.693.2519 Johnsie Tipton, 910.693.2515 Karen Triplett, 910.693.2510 Pat Taylor, Advertising Director Advertising Graphic Design

Stacey Yongue, 910.693.2509 Mechelle Butler, Clay Culberson, Maegan Russell Circulation & Subscriptions

Darlene Stark, Circulation Director 910.693.2488

PineStraw Magazine

910.693.2467 173 W. Pennsylvania Avenue Southern Pines, NC 28387 pinestraw@thepilot.com • www.pinestrawmag.com ©Copyright 2013. Reproduction in whole or in part without written permission is prohibited. PineStraw magazine is published by The Pilot LLC

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


FEAST

May cause weight gain.

Living fully takes on a whole new meaning at Pine Knoll and Belle Meade. Our communities offer a virtual feast of opportunities to connect with cherished friends and make new ones. Delight in a past passion or learn something new. Enjoy a healthy lifestyle with just the right amount of indulgence in any of our excellent restaurants. Live secure in the knowledge the St. Joseph of the Pines continuum of care is there should you ever need it. Enjoying your retirement, your way has never been easier!

CALL TODAY – 910.246.1008

Where life just keeps getting better. Southern Pines, North Carolina • www.sjp.org • 910.246.1008 PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . Joseph . . . . . of . . the . . .Pines . . . .Aging . . . . .Services . . . . . .Network . . . . . . .continuing . . . . . . . .the . . legacy . . . . .of . .the . . Sisters . . . . . of . . Providence. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013 A member of the . St.

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SweeT TeA chronicleS

My Beautiful Madness BY JIM DODSON

with apologies

to Mr. Eliot, during the 15 years we lived on a coastal hill in Maine, April really was the cruelest of months, far more fickle than anything he knew in England — teasingly warm one minute, biting cold the next, with brave green crocus shoots poking through the hoarfrost one morning followed by a foot of new snow falling the next, days alternating between mud and ice, sun and gloom, and me the whole while dreaming of spring back home in Carolina.

Several times I had to shovel snow from the front walk just to get out the door for Easter services. And during those rare years we didn’t flee home for the holiday. The simple act of watching the Masters telecast was almost too much for my thawing senses to abide: all that lurid spring-green grass and banks of blooming azaleas; all those reverently hushed and respectful galleries sunning themselves in the short sleeves; the greatest names in golf bent to the task of earning the most coveted green jacket on the planet. Do you blame a son of Old Catawba — who otherwise loved everything about the simple life on a forested hill in Maine save for the approximate two days of spring it offered — from going a tad stir-crazy? A little madness in the spring, understood Dame Emily Dickinson, poet laureate of New England shut-ins, is wholesome even for the King. But forget the King — unless you mean His Majesty King Arnold, of course, because April is really the start of golf season for many of us. To make matters worse, my father would invariably phone from Greensboro on Masters Sunday to inquire, cheekily, if I’d seen any sign of my yard yet that spring. “Played over at Mid Pines yesterday with the boys,” he would casually let out like a showgirl accidentally showing too much leg to the vets at the old soldiers’ home. “Looked better than Augusta National. Wish you’d been with us. Your mom thinks the dogwoods and azaleas have never been more beautiful than this year. I’d have to agree. This year they’re something to see.” Because I hail from a race made up of far more gardeners than golfers, my mom, on the extension, would cheerfully inquire how my geographically challenged “Southern” garden had fared through yet another Maine winter. This was a small cultivated spot between the decks on the south-facing side of our

house where I attempted, with varying rates of success, to replicate the spring blooms so near and dear to my redneck heart. For several years running, in a bold affront to nature, I transported a string of young and entirely innocent Eastern redbud trees across several state lines and planted them in my “Southern” garden hoping they would somehow find a way to survive and even thrive and bloom their silly heads off. No single one did so, proving it’s not nice to try and fool Mother Nature. My form of arborcide became a source of family amusement for years. “So how’s your garden looking this April?” I’d politely ask her in return, knowing the answer even before I posed the question. Her spring flower beds were always standouts, little wonder she’d been one of the garden club volunteers who worked on the spring gardens at nearby Tanger Family Bicentennial Garden. “Oh, the daffodils came a bit earlier than expected and the cold nipped them a bit. But the irises and tulips were simply lovely. And my peonies are looking very good. Spring has really sprung here. You should see the azaleas this year, honey, especially across the street! Joe Franks and Frank Sinatra are doing their thing — a true sign of spring!” I could just picture old Joe Franks across the street from my boyhood home, polishing his beloved Cadillac with Ole Blue Eyes crooning from his Caddy’s eight-track, his house bunkered by tens of thousands of blazing azalea, red, white and several shades of pink, dogwood petals drifting down like snow, sweetly oblivious to the steady stream of cars bearing garden gawkers who couldn’t fathom how one street could possibly boast so many blooming shrubs. It wasn’t named Dogwood Drive for nothing. The Southern dogwood is a funny and frail creature. It generally only lives 30 to 40 years before it gives up the ghost to disease and decay. The two glorious spreading giants in our yard, as it happened — one pink, one white — lasted more than half a century before they showed signs of disease and seemed to lose sections of themselves with every passing year. By the time I moved home to North Carolina seven years ago, taking up a sweet life between Greensboro and the Sandhills, both they and my parents had passed on and old Joe Franks had polished his last Cadillac to the music of Ole Blue Eyes. But the lovely single woman who bought my parents’ house invited me to come dig up some of my mom’s beloved peonies and day lilies and transplant them to my own garden. That’s a holy spring task I have yet to perform simply because now that I gave up my faux Southern garden in Maine in favor of a lovely old house we rent in Southern Pines, I really have nowhere to dig in the soil and delve in the soul, as the small garden sign in my mother’s perennial beds read for decades.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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A Touch of Class…

Classic setting for an historic event… Don’t miss out… Get your tickets now PinehurstConcours.com

910-973-6594


sweet tea chronicles

pineapple lilies and mountain hyacinths no larger than the tip of your little After reluctantly parting with our house up North three years ago — waiting finger, dodging angry Chakma baboons and lethal spitting cobras. Every a year too long to pull the trigger to sell, thus losing a small fortune as the real time they found some extraordinary plant growing in its natural habitat, my estate market tanked — we found a beautiful old house in Weymouth Woods learned companions let out hoots of joy — “hortgasms,” as I referred to their that’s owned by a retired Pennsylvania couple. The house reminds me of the involuntary vocal passions. Ludwig Bemelman’s beloved Madeleine story that my daughter Maggie grew The book that came out of this adventure, Beautiful Madness, is far and up loving, and begins In an old house in Paris that was covered in vines, lived away the most fun book I’ve written. It reminded me of something important twelve little girls in two straight lines. about my connection to the soil — namely that I can’t ignore my other favorite As the ancients, all golfers, and certainly my farming forebears understood, outdoor passion — my own beautiful madness — for long. nature has a way of reminding us who keeps the upper hand and what’s really Especially at Masters time — which I’ll be attending again this year, by the important, the impermanence of life yet also the power of its annual renewal way — golf reasserts its comforting and familiar hold over me. But it’s really my in the form of glorious Southern spring, a perfect Easter symbol of resurreclove of getting gloriously dirty and working alone for hours in a garden of my tion and the Masters’ famed green jacket. own making, fussing with the soil and planning this new bed or that, digging For years, I suppose, grieving in a quiet way for the Northern garden I out or planting in, feeling the rain and smelling the spaded earth, watching gave up helped mute my itch to get down and dirty in the spring. The portico things come to life and briefly flourish before they too pass on for another and modest half-moon terrace of the old house where we’ve been surprisingly year that calls out to my redneck soul. It’s the closest mortal man can get, I happy sufficed, sheltered by a pair of Mediterranean hollies where the robins sometimes think, to playing God or simply brushing the divine. In one way invariably swarm in March, feasting on red berries that make them feisty and or another, with each returning spring, we’re all going the same way as my drunk with the nectar of returning spring, providing me just enough space for parents and old Joe Franks and even Ole Blue Eyes. a decent container garden that begins to bloom modestly come April. In another Walter Mitty life I might happily have been a landscape deThe redneck verdure in my Southern blood seems to be reasserting itself signer or even a golf course architect, several of whom are among my closest with even more intensity this spring, however. I find myself cruising the older friends. Winning the venerable Donald Ross Award from the Golf Course neighborhoods of Greensboro and Southern Pines looking at cottages and Superintendent’s Association of America as I did a couple years ago was not imagining myself as the staff gardener in residence. “I’m an old man but a only a lovely surprise but something of a sweet revelation that brought everyyoung gardener,” Thomas Jefferson was alleged to have remarked, and that thing full circle. certainly sums up my own reviving passion for the dirt. For me it all commences in earnest with sweet April’s rising curtain. Some years back, not long before I came home for good to the South, SPORTING CLAYS • UPLAND GAME HUNTING • LODGE BED & BREAKFAST Someday very soon I’m likely going to venture back to Dogwood Drive and I slipped off to South Africa for an entire month with a group of blissfully WORLD-CLASS EQUESTRIAN FACILITY “THE ORDINARY” SHOOTING LODGEthat belong to my past — finally•see about digging®up those glorious®peonies obsessed plant hunters and had one of the finest adventures of my life, ventur® , BARBOUR , REMINGTON PRO SHOP • DEALER FOR BERETTA and future. PS ing into some of the wildest Afromontaine jungles on Earth in quest of rare HIKING AND BIKING TRAILS • SPORTING COMPETITIONS AND CLINICS

© Deb Russell PhotoGRAPHIC

A Year-Round Sporting Destination SPORTING CLAYS • UPLAND QUAIL HUNTING WORLD-CLASS EQUESTRIAN FACILITY “THE LODGE” BED & BREAKFAST “THE ORDINARY” SHOOTING LODGE PRO SHOP: DEALER FOR BERETTA®, BARBOUR®, REMINGTON® HIKING AND BIKING TRAILS SPORTING COMPETITIONS AND CLINICS

© Deb Russell PhotoGRAPHIC

www.theforkfarm.com 3200 Fork Road, Norwood, NC 28128 • 704.474.4052

© Mike McNally

© Deb Russell PhotoGRAPHIC

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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CCNC

SEVEN LAKES NORTH

OLD TOWN PINEHURST

Charming contemporary with great golf course views on over an acre! Open floor plan with plenty of windows in back to enjoy the course and beautiful landscaping. The family room has a vaulted ceiling with great wood burning fireplace. A nice brick patio in back offers wonderful privacy while enjoying the view. $400,000 3 BR / 3.5 BA Code 983

Great water front home on Lake Echo! Exquisite view of the water! Master bedroom, formal dining room and kitchen on the main level; 2 bedrooms, family room and rec room on the lower level. The owners have recently replaced the roof, the deck and HVAC. $189,900 3 BR / 2 BA Code 989

www.10SawgrassPlace.com

www.111WildleafCourt.com

Quintessential Pinehurst Cottage with views of the famous #2 golf course and easy walking distance to the Village! Charming and beautifully maintained, this historic home offers high ceilings and moldings, hardwood floors, oversized windows, and lots of light! Enjoy the Pinehurst lifestyle! $469,000 2 BR / 2 BA Code 986

WHISPERING PINES

CARTHAGE

SEVEN LAKES SOUTH

Great value on nice family home in popular Whispering Pines neighborhood! Beautifullymaintainedwithniceupgrades-crownmolding,hardwoodfloors,stone front gas fireplace, big screened porch. Kitchen is open to an open keeping room area. Circulardrivewayand largefenced back yard $310,000 4BR/ 3.5BA Code 931

Exceptionally crafted, spacious country estate home on 10 acres! Quality gleams throughout! Beautifully positioned on 10 acre tract that could easily be your dream horse farm! Open floor plan, hardwoods and granite counters abound. 4th BR could easily convert to office/ study. $465,000 4 BR / 3 BA Code 992

This all brick home is immaculate and well maintained by the original owner. Great flow for entertaining. The Carolina room and deck overlook the golf course and provide a relaxing and serene view. Split bedroom plan for maximum flexibility. $239,000 3 BR / 2 BA Code 991

www.300WillowBrookDrive.com

www.108DevonshireAvenue.com

SEVEN LAKES WEST

SOUTHERN PINES

PINEHURST

Gorgeous big water view w/eastern exposure sets off the 5 BR/3.5 BA lakefront custom home. From the spacious living room to the allure of sunshine in the Carolina Room, everything in this house is crafted to showcase natures splendor! $765,000

Lock & leave luxurious lifestyle in convenient location near shopping, support facilities and Ft. Bragg. These maintenance free, Craftsman style townhomes border a Donald Ross Golf course and a 20 acre lake for canoeing and kayaking. The 3 bedroom, 2 -1/2 BA homes have 1st floor master suites, hardwood & tile flooring, granite countertops and stainless steel Energy Star appliances. $187,900

Enjoy magnificent lake views from this beautiful home with boat dock! The foyer’s cathedral ceiling continues into the living room with brick fireplace and large picture window. Open to the living room and kitchen, the dining room features hardwood floors, crown molding and chair rail, and a chandelier light. The hardwoods continue into the kitchen with oak cabinets, granite countertops, double ovens, breakfast bar and eat-in area. $595,000

www.45SunsetDrive.com

5 BR / 3.5 BA

Code 993

www.129ShawDrive.com

3 BR / 2.5 BA

www.45CypressCircle.com

Code 965

www.105PalmettoRoad.com

4 BR / 3.5 BA

Code 930

www.1060BurningTreeRoad.com

OLD TOWN

OLD TOWN

PINEHURST

Exquisite townhome right in the heart of the Village. This gorgeous second floor home is easily accessed by elevator and enjoys private views of downtown Pinehurst shaded by huge oak trees. The property has been completely renovated with deep crown molding, hardwood floors, state of the art kitchen and much more. $475,000 3 BR / 2.5 BA Code 910

Walk to the Village from this prime Old Town location! The oversized living room with hardwood floors is bright and cheerful with light streaming in through the large windows. The formal dining room has hardwood floors, deep crown molding, and three walls of windows. The updated kitchen features granite countertops, new appliances, crown molding, breakfast bar, built-in desk, and pantry closet. $395,000 3 BR / 2 BA Code 956

This beautifully kept one story home is located on a quiet street in Pinehurst, just minutes from the historic downtown Village. The home has a nice living room with gas fireplace with a marble surround, and the dining room has a large window with a Palladian window above for wonderful light! The backyard with deck and mature screening trees offers privacy and a wonderful place to relax or entertain. $198,000

www.6HollyHouse.com

www.110McLeanRoad.com

3 BR / 2 BA

Code 927

www.145SugarPineDrive.com

View Floor Plans and Virtual Tours of Our Listings and See ALL Moore County Listings and Community Information at

WWW.MARTHAGENTRY.COM

Military?! Check out our Military Advantage Program at www.MarthaGentry.com

Re/Max Prime Properties, 5 Chinquapin Rd., Pinehurst, NC 910-295-7100 • 800-214-9007


Puttin’ on the Glitz

Lose that significant other, dig out the spangles and stilettos and boogie on down to the 3rd Annual Ladies Night Out for Charity to benefit Arc of Moore County from 6:30 to 10 p.m. on April 13th at Pinehurst Country Club. Entertainment gleefully provided by the singing docs of House Calls. Gentlemen celebrities will be on hand to dance with the ladies – for a tip to be donated to the Arc, a non-profit United Way partner providing services to people with intellectual and developmental disabilities and their families. Tickets: $40-$75 at 673 S. Bennett St., (910) 692-8272; basic price includes heavy hors d’oeuvres. Step-up includes membership and vouchers for silent auction. Cash wine and martini bar.

Information: www.thearcofmoore.org

Relish This

Relish (magazine) Cooking Show chef-director Brian Morris will host a show at 7 p.m. (doors open 5 p.m.) on April 11th at Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, emceed by local-mogul restaurateur Mark Elliott. Morris, who travels with the show 12 months a year, lists Nicole Kidman and Derek Jeter among his private clients. Fine cookware and Morris’s book will be for sale at the event. Admission: $10 Information: (910) 692-7271

Eat, Drink and Build

A Midway Garden Party — celebrating the construction of new homes in Aberdeen — is the theme of Habitat for Humanity of the N.C. Sandhills 15th Annual Gala at 6 p.m. April 13th at Country Club of North Carolina. Cocktails, dinner and dancing to the Gold Rush band – along with some very upscale auction items – make this an elegant spring social event. Cocktail attire preferred; black tie optional. Tickets: $125 per person (part tax-deductible). Information: (910) 295-1934 or info@sandhillshabitat.org

Pulling the Right Strings

Forget SpongeBob SquarePants. Red Herring Puppets will bring Aesop’s Fables to life at 3 p.m. on April 13th at Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities in Southern Pines. The original rhymed version with music and large tabletop puppets was created by artistic director Lisa Aimee Sturg (right), who has built puppets for Disney, Muppets from Space and the Academy Awards show. Sandhills puppeteer Maggie Baker (left) is part of the show. The fables, suitable for pre-K to grade five, address bullying, selfishness, competition, ingenuity and self-worth. Admission: Free for children. Information: (910) 692-6261

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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W ELCOM E SPR I NG with a C A R EF R EE L I F E S T Y L E a t P E N I C K V I L L AG E . JOIN US for LUNCH on APRIL 4 or APRIL 8 Join us at 10:30 am for one of our April luncheons at Penick Village. With almost 50 years of excellence behind us, we offer a great neighborhood of new friends, a carefree lifestyle, more opportunities to do the things you love, and peace of mind for you and your family. To RSVP for the luncheon date you prefer, call soon as space is limited, at (910) 692-0386 or (910) 692-0382.

PENICK VILLAGE A Continuing Care Retirement Community

500 East Rhode Island Avenue | Southern Pines, NC 28387 | (866) 545-1018 toll-free | penickvillage.org

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Beach on Beaches

First Ladies Times Three Plus Tea

What fun, to hear the wives behind the presidential thrones of Richard Nixon, Gerald Ford and Lyndon Johnson dish it out in proper accents, wigs and humor. Hard to believe that one actress has Pat, Betty and Lady Bird down, uh, pat. She is Emmy-winning Elaine Bromka, starring in Tea for Three, written by her and Eric Weinberger. This one-woman show coming to the Sunrise Theater in Southern Pines at 7 p.m. on April 28 purports to “reveal life and love in the White House … humanizes the political scene…whimsical and deeply moving.” Nice, but the gossip’s juicier. Reserved seats: $35, at the Sunrise box office: (910) 692-3611

The Ruth Pauley Lecture Series at 7:30 p.m. on April 4th at Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, will feature Dana Beach, director of the Coastal Conservation League. Beach, the author of Coastal Sprawls: The Impact of Development on Aquatic Ecosystems, will discuss the legacy of land conservation in the Carolina Low Country. Free and open to the public. Information: (910) 245-3132.

Tailgate Temptations, Hat Heaven The 62nd running of Stoneybrook Steeplechase on April 6 at the Carolina Horse Park in Raeford is so much more than horse racing. Come for the races but enjoy the hat contest, kids’ zone, stick horse races, 5K Run for the Ribbons and more. The tailgate picnics are prettier than still life paintings in any museum. Bring your own goodies or purchase food on site. Gates open at 9:30 a.m., races start at 1:30 p.m. General admission and parking pass: $25 in advance, $30 race day. Kids 12 and under free with adult. Information: (910) 875-2074 or www.carolinahorsepark.com

Quest for the Best Companions

Goal of the Companion Animal Clinic Foundation: reduction of unwanted and unowned animals by spay/neuter at the Vass facility. To raise funds, the all-volunteer organization will hold the 2nd Annual Quest for the Best Challenge from noon to 2:30 p.m. on April 13, a dressage and versatility show with six categories. At 6:30 p.m. on April 12, a “Calcutta” will be held at Jefferson Inn in Southern Pines, where riders may be bid for and judges “bribed” with dollar votes. Otherwise, vote for your favorite rider ($10 minimum) onsite or at www.companionanimalclinic.org. Winner will receive a Peoples’ Choice Award. Location: Reflections Farm, 369 Black Hawk Rd., Vass

The Good Olden Days

The Friends of Bryant House will sponsor the 8th Annual Clenny Creek Day at the 19th century home and 18th century cabin from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on April 20th . Should April showers intervene the event will happen April 21st. Be transported way back when by music, food games and historic recreations. Proceeds are used by the Moore County Historical Association to maintain the site. Location: 3361 Mt. Carmel Rd., Carthage. Admission: Free Information: (910) 692-2051 or www. moorehistory.com

Information: (910) 639-9910 or www.companionanimalclinic.org PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Floor Plans to Fit

Any Lifestyle

New Construction homes by

Shepherds Ridge Subdivision- Aberdeen

2 Pending, 5 Sold

1,400 + sq. ft. starting at $151,900 • · Spacious garages · Professional landscaping package · Appliance package with black smooth top range, dishwasher and microwave · Smooth ceilings · Security system · New home closing orientation

www.ShepherdsRidgeSubdivision.com Sinclair - Vass 2,195 sq. ft. starting at $197,900 • 1

Pending, 77 Sold

• 9’ ceilings • 200 rolling acres with a community pond • Lots of open space in a picturesque rural setting • Moore County schools • 15 minutes to Ft. Bragg • 15 minutes to quaint shops of Southern Pines • 15 Minutes to Moore Regional and historic Pinehurst

www.SinclairSubdivision.com Forest Hills Pointe - Aberdeen 2,727 sq. ft. starting at $233,900 • 2

Pending, 11 Sold

• Functional, family friendly floor plans • Spacious lots • Granite kitchen countertops • Soaring ceilings • Feels like country living, but is conveniently located in Aberdeen • Easy drive to Ft. Bragg

www.ForestHillsPointe.com Birkdale Village at Mid South 3,041 SQ. FT. STARTING AT $299,900 • 4

Pending, 16 Sold

• TWO country club memberships included in purchase price • Gourmet kitchen • HardiPlank ColorPlus siding • Coffered, vaulted and cathedral ceilings • Energy efficient, security systems, pest defense system & more • Golf front lots available Birkdale Agents are currently located in the Camden Villas Clubhouse

www.BirkdaleVillageatMidSouth.com CALL TODAY for a private tour and see for yourself the awesome amenities when you visit one of these outstanding communities by H&H Homes!

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190 Turner Street, Suite D | Southern Pines, NC 28387 910.693.3300 | Sales@LaroseandCompany.com

April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Farmers Market Times Two

The Sandhills Farmers’ Green Market will open from 3 to 6 p.m. on April 10th at Cannon Park (corner Rattlesnake Drive and Woods Road) in Pinehurst. A second location, Homegrown on the Green, opens from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. on May 4th at the sandlot near the Village Green in Pinehurst. The May opening features a demonstration by Matt Harmon, chef at Ashten’s in Southern Pines. All produce sold at the markets is grown within a 50 mile radius, assuring freshness. Information: www.sandhillsfarmersmarket.com The Moore County Farmers Market Association announces the following Spring Market Openings: FirstHealth Market opens Monday, April 15 from 2 to 5:30 p.m. 604 W. Morganton Road Market opens April 18 from 9 a.m.to 1 p.m. Southern Pines Downtown Market opens April 20 from 8 a.m to Noon Information: (910) 947-3752 or web search: Moore County Farmers Market Local Harvest

home Grown

Mary, Mary, how does your garden grow? A lot better if blooming with plants cultivated locally and purchased at the Sandhills Horticultural Society Spring Plant Sale, from 8 a.m. until noon on April 13th . Perennials and woody plants — from abelia to cryptomeria, loropetalum to nandina — will be offered near Steel Hall on the Sandhills Community College campus. The sale supports Sandhills Horticultural Society Gardens and Landscape students at the college Pre-orders accepted until April 8. Information and orders: (910) 246-4959. The Weymouth Center Plant Sale also happens from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. on April 13th, sponsored by the Dirt Gardeners. Price-friendly perennials, shrubs, trees, ground covers that selected to thrive in Sandhills soil. Experienced gardeners on hand to answer questions, provide advice. Also, an encore of the garden white elephant sale. Location: 555 E. Connecticut Ave. Information: (910) 255-0010. The Pinehurst Garden Club Plant Sale, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. on April 20, features geraniums, impatiens, begonias, mandevilla and others available for pre-order until April 5th. On sale day, buy hanging baskets, herbs and flowers grown in Moore County nurseries. Sales enable PGC to fund a full scholarship for a landscape student at Sandhills Community College, as well as beautification projects — and the Healing Garden and Arboretum. Location: Pinehurst Fire Station 91, 405 Magnolia Rd. Information: (910) 235-0070.

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


C o s a n d E f f ect

Shop Sanford

Tales Out of School The early days of Pinecrest High

Pinecrest High School cheerleaders, 1975. Sue Barnes seated on far left By Cos Barnes

Readers frequently give me suggestions for subjects to

write about. My doctor said he loved reading about how things used to be in our neck of the woods.

I thought immediately about Pinecrest High School, which was in its infancy when my family moved here in 1970. I went frequently to substitute teach and was amazed at its special features — classrooms large enough for a hundred students, beautiful and decorative glass windows and a campus situated on a large expanse of land. Pinecrest had its growing pains, however. In no time partitions were put up in the large classrooms. As any educator will tell you, it is as difficult to keep the attention of a 16-year-old as a 6-year-old. The windows were soon covered with poster boards to keep those students outside the classrooms from disturbing those inside. It was described as an architectural wonder, an innovative edifice. Groups came from all over the state to view its structure and walk its halls. There were disciplinary problems as the area integrated and consolidated all the county high schools simultaneously. At one time — for a short period — we were under curfew because of racial tensions. I remember a salesman came and took my husband and me to dinner. He refused to believe us when we told him we had to be home by eight o’clock. Parents and students alike abided by the rules, hoping for harmony. When my oldest daughter was to enter Pinecrest for ninth grade, they wisely decided to keep the ninth grades in the middle schools, so she did not enter the school until she was a sophomore. One day I substituted in an art class — substitutes have to be versatile — and was overwhelmed with the layout and the equipment provided for art students. I had taught in a fine Virginia school but was unused to such abundance and variety of materials. By the same token, my same daughter was in a play which took place in the media center before there was an auditorium. Robert E. Lee Auditorium was added some years later. I kept comparing my children’s education with mine, and I would call friends in Virginia to see if their schools were going through the same hurdles as we were. They were. It was a difficult time for our schools and our students. One class I substituted in was Bachelor Home Economics. I was thrilled at Christmas when the class made cookies for me. Luckily, I did not have to teach the boys to make a gathered skirt or put in a zipper. When my children entered college, I asked each how their Pinecrest education stacked up. “Pretty good,” my daughter, now a nurse, said. The other one is a lawyer, my son, a bank-insurance manager, so they did listen in class. Athletics were another matter. One was a cheerleader, another a member of the band, and my son played all sports. He was on the basketball team when Jeff Capel coached and his brother Ken played. I ran into one of his former football coaches recently. He identified himself, “I’m the one who tried to make a quarterback out of your son.” “Yes, and you did not win a single game,” I replied. But we went to all the games, praised Jerry Mashburn’s development of a marching band, and were loyal fans and boosters, making spaghetti with the best of them. PS Cos Barnes is a longtime contributor to PineStraw magazine. She can be contacted at cosbarnes@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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THE omnivoRouS REAdER

The Great Refrainer

Silent Cal Coolidge and the business of saying as little as possible

By sTePHen e. sMITH

Americans tend to

indentify our media-savvy 20th century presidents with their most memorable soundbite — “I’m not a crook,” “Read my lips. . . ,” “I didn’t have sex with that woman,” etc. — but it’s impossible to tell where Calvin Coolidge, the first president to address the American people via radio waves, falls on the oops-I’m-sorry-I-said-that scale. Silent Cal not only escapes being identified with any egregious misstatements, he escapes being identified with any utterance whatsoever. Indeed, the question most Americans would ask about Coolidge is: What did he say? The answer, according to Amity Shlaes’ new biography, Coolidge: An American Enigma, is not much. For Coolidge loquaciousness was a vice. All his life he made a point of saying as little as possible, even though he held more press conferences than any other American president, then or now. What he did say usually fell into the tomorrow-is-another-day category of self-verifying truisms: — “I am for economy, and after that I am for more economy.” Also, “The business of America is business.” Under Coolidge’s light-handed leadership the federal debt fell, the top income tax rate came down by half, the federal budget was always in surplus, and the unemployment rate lingered at 5 percent. Although Coolidge may have ridden the horse in the direction it was headed, there’s no denying that during his administration Americans wired their homes

for electricity, bought their first cars or household appliances on credit, took to the air in large numbers, submitted more patent applications than ever before, cut back on their nasty habit of lynching fellow citizens, quit the Ku Klux Klan in droves, lit the first White House Christmas tree and so forth. Shlaes would have us believe that most of the positive aspects of American life began to flourish during Coolidge’s tenure, in large part because he said and did little. She dubs Silent Cal “the great refrainer.” In her extensively researched biography, Shlaes includes all the obligatory facts concerning Coolidge’s rise to power — his sojourn in city offices and the state legislature, his stint as governor of Massachusetts, and in particular his handling of the long forgotten Boston police strike, the event that catapulted him into the national limelight. In September 1919, the majority of the Boston police force walked off the job, leaving the city open to hooliganism and looting. Governor Coolidge held to a hard line when dealing with Samuel Gompers and the union, stating: “There is no right to strike against the public safety, anywhere, anytime,” a stance that would later be adopted by Ronald Reagan when dealing with air traffic controllers. Coolidge’s three years as Warren Harding’s vice president left the American people with little insight into what his policies might be when he assumed the presidency. They need not have been concerned. When Coolidge took over the reins of government, the country was enjoying unparalleled prosperity. As president, he worked to keep federal interference at a minimum. He opposed farm subsidies, preferring a loan program. He spoke out on civil rights, but did little to promote equal opportunity for minorities, and he ignored pleas for federal relief and flood control measures, even when his native New England was ravaged by natural disasters. In short, Coolidge was a president who strongly embodied the contemporary Republican view of small government — which raises questions about the timely appearance of Shlaes’ “scholarly” work and the responsibility and

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T he O m n i v o r o u s R ea d er

motives of the biographer writing during a time of intense political turmoil. Ms. Shlaes, a syndicated columnist for more than a decade, is a former editor for the conservative The Wall Street Journal. She serves on the board of the Calvin Coolidge Memorial Foundation and is the author of The Forgotten Man: A New History of the Great Depression, whose hypothesis is that the New Deal only worsened and prolonged the Great Depression. In a recent editorial, she writes that Ronald Reagan isn’t the only president who could right our teetering economic system: “. . . if you look back, past Dwight Eisenhower and around the curve of history, you can find a Republican who did all those things: Calvin Coolidge.” She identifies Coolidge’s conservative approach to governance as enjoying three advantages that shaped a thriving economy. First is the Budget and Accounting Act of 1921, which denied the president control over the budget. The second is Coolidge’s determination to make austerity permanent. The third is Coolidge’s belief that ambitious budget cuts would be accepted if he could “align” them with ambitious tax cuts — all gratifying information for those who share the conservative viewpoint. As soon as Coolidge appeared in bookstores, a pundit no less than George Will wrote a column touting the virtues of Ms. Shlaes’ biography and the strengths of character demonstrated by Coolidge, stating that if Barack Obama, “America’s most loquacious president (699 firstterm teleprompter speeches),” could learn from the Coolidge biography — and by extension, from the man himself — the country would come together in an orgy of love and thanksgiving. Shlaes’ biography has been mentioned favorably by Joe Scarborough on Morning Joe and on other conservative news programs. Even the Raleigh News and Observer ran a letter to the editor touting the new Coolidge biography, reminding liberal readers that Ronald Reagan hung a portrait of Coolidge in his cabinet room. Shlaes isn’t effusively enthusiastic about Coolidge’s record as president, but she seems to gently nudge readers into the inescapable conclusion that Silent Cal’s approach to government is best reflected by today’s Republican Party, such as it is. The serious reader, Democrat or Republican, might do well to read David Greenberg’s 2006 Calvin Coolidge, which fills in some of Shlaes’ omissions and counterbalances her view of our 30th president. PS Stephen Smith’s most recent book of poetry is A Short Report on the Fire at Woolworths. He can be reached at travisses@ hotmail.com.

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April 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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BooKSHELf

A dog’s Life Cool books about your best friend

By KIMBerLy DanIeLs, who reminds you to be the person that your dog thinks that you are Porch Dogs by Nell Dickerson. I was in New York for a book conference. It was full of people and purpose and crowded craziness. In the middle of the mob of publishers and authors and information, someone handed me a promotional bookmark for Porch Dogs by Nell Dickerson. I got a sense of calm as I looked at these pictures on the bookmark and thought about Southern Pines. Southern Pines has some of the best porches I have ever seen — the art of porch living may not have been invented in our town, but it may have been perfected here. Nell Dickerson’s photographs capture more than just a dog and a porch: They capture the essence of the porch. Sometimes there are people in the picture. Sometimes there is action in the frame, or laundry blowing in the breeze. Only one thing is constant — the dogs seem to take on the personality of the porch and their expressions are suggestions of the activities that unfold on that porch.

Dickerson’s last book, Gone: A Heartbreaking Story of the Civil War: A Plea for Preservation, caused her to spend time studying and photographing the houses and architectural relics from the Civil War. It was during this time that she realized how air conditioning had changed the architecture of the South, how few new houses even had porches. “We Southerners used to be social,” she notes. “Now, we risk losing what makes us Southern: porch sitting. But there is hope. Our dogs maintain the tradition.” Nell Dickerson is a native Mississippian and cousin of the late novelist and historian Shelby Foote. She thought about her dog’s vigil as she recalled the noisy porch of her childhood. “I felt like he understood that the porch was the gateway between inside and outside and that it was his duty to keep sentry there in case someone wanted to pass,” she recalls. The serenity our dogs maintain on our porches is alive and well in our town, and this book deserves its own place on the porches of the pines. Nell Dickerson will be coming to The Country Bookshop on Sunday, April 28, at 2 p.m. The Big New Yorker Book of Dogs by The New Yorker magazine. This beautiful red coffee table book is a classy tribute to everything dogs. It has poems, essays, cartoons, pictures of dogs and the people who love them. There are sections devoted to good dogs, bad dogs, top dogs and underdogs. Writers such as James Thurber, John Updike, Anne Sexton, Marjorie Garber, Jonathan Lethem and Joan Acocella fondly recall favorite pets, discuss the benefits of obedience training and speculate on the rational capacity of dogs. This book is a pleasure to flip through. Maddie on Things by Theron Humphrey. Maddie is a coonhound who went on a yearlong cross-country road trip with her owner, Theron. He worked on a project and Maggie . . . well, Maggie stood on things. The result is this adorable book of offbeat poses: Maggie standing on bicycles, watermelons, horses and anything else they come across on the trip. Fun and whimsical, this little book will bring a smile to your face. The Art of Racing in the Rain by Garth Stein. If you missed this book, then it is time to go to The Country Bookshop, pick up this book and meet Enzo. He is a philosopher and the canine narrator of this fabulous tale. It is

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � April 2013 23


BooKSHELf

both bittersweet and transformative. It is about love, loyalty, hope and family. It is good. And you should read it. Inside of a Dog: What Dogs See, Smell, and Know by Alexandra Horowitz. Have you ever been curious about what the world looks like through those eyes on the canine next to you? You do not need to wonder for another moment. This book will let you find out! Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love by Larry Levin. When a family went to the vet to put their cat down, the ugliest dog in the world trotted toward them and stole their hearts. Rin Tin Tin: the Life and the Legend by Susan Orlean. This book is a richly textured history of 21st century entertainment and entrepreneurship and the changing role of dogs in American family and society, but at its heart, it’s an exploration of the heartfelt and true connection between humans and animals.

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Young and old, purebred or mutt, we love our dogs. They are our brave protectors, make us laugh, are loyal friends, explore nature with us, teach us things and allow us to spoil them. This month, we celebrate the dogs in our lives with some wonderful books. Otis And The Puppy by Loren Long. Otis, the friendly tractor, and his animal friends love to play hide and seek on the farm. One day, when the newest addition to the farm, a puppy, decides to play his own game of hide and seek in the dark, the farm friends must work together to find him. This third book in the Otis series, with its retro artwork and sweet stories, offers refreshing reminders of innocent days. Ages 3-6. Bellissima Bulldog: The French Bulldog with an Italian Name by Teresa Rigsbee. Whether

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BooKSHELf

prancing in front of the mirror in her diamond studded collar, shopping in her Italian movie star glasses or snacking on Gatto Gelato at the Café Du Chein, Bellissima Bulldog always declares “Je Suis La Reine!” and loves reigning as Queen and mastering the art of “far niente,” Enjoying the sweetness of doing nothing! All ages.

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Zorro Gets an Outfit by Carter Goodrich. Zorro, macho wonderdog, had a pretty good life. His best friend, Mr. Bud, was close nearby, there were always biscuits and twice-a-day walks. Everything was perfect! Until… his owner brought home a BRAND NEW OUTFIT! What does a macho man do when he has to wear a cape??? Doggy fun for ages 2-6. I Didn’t Do It, poems by Particia MacLachlan and Emily MacLachlan Charest. Why do we love them so much? Because they charm us with their cuteness, their antics and even the havoc they bring to our worlds. This collection of 14 short simple poems with beautiful watercolor illustrations celebrates all things we love about the dogs in our worlds. Ages 3-8. And don’t forget about our local canine celebrities: Buddy and Luther. Buddy’s New Little Sister is the newest in the fun beginning reader series written by local reading specialist Kathy McGougan. Upcoming Event NEXT Month: So You Want to Write A Children’s Book Sunday, May 19 at 2 p.m. Have you always wanted to write a children’s book? Start the journey with Kelly Starling Lyons, author of the Coretta Scott King Illustrator Award-winning Ellen’s Broom, in a class designed to introduce you to the field. In this one-day workshop, you’ll get a basic understanding of children’s book genres, mine your life for story ideas, gain insight into the business of children’s book publishing and learn about resources and tools of the trade. By the end of the class, you’ll be steps closer to making your dream come true. Call The Country Bookshop at (910) 692-3211 to register. PS

capeable of getting you back in the game Whether your passion is golf, tennis or even taking walks with your spouse, when the pain of arthritis makes you consider hip or knee replacement surgery, there’s really only one choice. Only one joint replacement program in the Sandhills has been awarded two Gold Seals of ApprovalTM from The Joint Commission, the nation’s premier accreditation agency. And Cape Fear Valley is designated a Blue Distinction CenterSM for Hip and Knee surgery by Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. Just two of the many reasons we’re CAPEable of keeping you in the game. For a referral to an orthopedic surgeon who is part of Cape Fear Valley’s award-winning Race to Recovery joint replacement program, please call Carelink at (910) 615-link (5465) or toll free at 1-888-728-well.

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Compiled by The Country Bookshop PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � April 2013

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h i tt i n g h o m e

Guys Just Wanna Have Fun

By Dale Nixon

A popular

advertisement states that “Blondes have more fun.” I profess hype and trickery. Everybody knows that blondes don’t have more fun; men do.

For instance, take the movie “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid.” Butch and “the Kid” rode bicycles, played cards and robbed banks. They had a good time doing it. In the final shoot-out scene, bullets had riddled their bodies and blood was spilling everywhere. Do you know what Butch and “the Kid” were doing? They were laughing and joking because they were still having fun. The co-stars, Paul Newman and Robert Redford, went on to make another popular movie together titled “The Sting.” Do you know why? Because they enjoyed each other’s company so much while filming the riding of the bicycles, the playing of cards and the robbing of banks in their previous hit film. Anyone who watches sports on television knows what I say is true. Guys can get away with anything and have a good time doing it. Take the way jocks are always patting each other on the bottom. Each time one of them scores a point, throws a ball that someone catches, puts a ball through a hoop or knocks someone down, all of the teammates run over and pat the hero on the bottom. Is this fun? I have never nor have I ever wanted to pat one of my girlfriends on the bottom for a game well played (or for any other reason). I can see all of us girls now at bridge club. I scream, “Alice, you made our bid!” (as I run over and pat her derriere for the stratagem.) Speaking of cards, what about all the fun men have at this meeting of chance? Men don’t have to clean baseboards, dust furniture and bake pound cakes to play cards. They send an email to their buddies, buy a few beverages and stock up on chips and dip. Men know how to have a good time. Males enjoy going out to lunch together. They flip a coin to see who is going to pay for the meal or they silently divvy up the bill. No problem.

A lunch bill is no simple matter for women. We females order salads and then several of us will split dessert. Then the bill comes. “Dale, you ate three bites of my pie. You owe me 42 ½ cents.” “Anita, you ate two bites of my pie. You owe me 22 cents.” I have two friends who didn’t speak to one another for a year over a luncheon bill. One girl got a slice of lemon in her iced tea and her companion said she should have anted up five more cents because she herself had gotten her tea ungarnished. The last time I went to lunch with a group of ladies, the minute the bill arrived I threw a $10 check on the table and excused myself. Through the walls of the bathroom I could hear the screaming and hollering that transpired. Food is another way men have fun. They order what they want to eat, and they eat it. Women never order what they want to eat, and they never eat it. We sneak and eat. We wait until we get home to eat the good stuff. After all, we only had half a salad for lunch and three bites of pie. Men even eat fun foods. They eat pickled eggs, Slim Jims, onions, garlic and jalapeno peppers. They never worry about breath fresheners. Women eat lettuce, boiled eggs, fruit and cottage cheese. They are never without a roll of breath mints. Being a male entitles them to kick tires, lock themselves out of the house and lose their keys. Men don’t have to wear all of the constrictive underwear we do, either. This allows them the freedom to move about and breathe, which gives them more oxygen to laugh. On the flip side, men can’t wear makeup to improve their looks. They can’t cry when they get their feelings hurt or become emotional over a sad movie. Most of the time they have to keep their worries and stresses locked inside and exude confidence at all times. So guys, I’m not jealous. You can have your fun. I like things just the way they are….Well, I could dye my hair blonde. PS Columnist Dale Nixon may be contacted at dalenixon@carolina.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Vine Wisdom

Tasting Room Etiquette Great wine and good manners make fine companions

By Robyn James

The number of wineries in North

Carolina has quadrupled since the year 2000; we now have over 100 wineries and rank ninth in wine production in the country.

This provides a great destination for the spring weekend warriors to venture out and visit the tasting rooms of wineries. I have, as most retailers, visited hundreds of winery tasting rooms around the world. These visits have often produced some of the best “Can you believe?” stories. So, along with some peers, I put together guidelines for traversing winery tasting rooms.

]

Start with research. Check the websites of the wineries you intend to visit and familiarize yourself with their policies, hours and products.

]

Many small, boutique wineries are family run, so consider yourself a guest. The owners and the staff are proud of their facility and want everyone to enjoy their visit. If a tour is offered, take it, just as you would as a guest in someone’s home.

]

Do not arrive five minutes before closing and expect a tasting and tour.

] A tasting room is different from a festival or a bar. The atmosphere is quiet and low key. Loud, outside voices are inappropriate, as is perfume and blatant criticism. You may be speaking to the winemaker behind the bar. Expressing your distaste for a particular wine is rude. Other visitors may love that selection. They don’t need your comments to cloud their judgment. Likewise if you are fond of a particular wine, don’t ask to taste it over and over again. This is a tasting room, not a cocktail party. Show your admiration by purchasing a case of the wine to take home.

] Never belittle people for their opinions. Don’t act or sound like a wine snob. There are always those who know less and more about wine than you. ]

If you appear drunk, the tasting room attendant is not permitted, by law, to serve you, even at a tasting. Have a large breakfast and lunch the day you decide to taste, drink more water than wine and pack plenty of snacks. Do not ever reach out and grab the bottles on the bar to serve yourself. Wait for the attendant to serve you.

] Tasting rooms can be crowded on the weekends; be polite, get a taste and step back to review your wine and check out the other items for sale at the winery. Give others a chance at the tasting bar. ]

If the winery has a picnic area, don’t drink wine from a different winery with your picnic.

] What should you do with the wine in your glass you have tasted? If you don’t want the rest of it, pour it into the dump bucket that is provided or ask the server for a small cup to spit in. You can spit directly into the dump bucket, but if that bothers you, use a cup. Don’t throw or spit your wine on the floor of the tasting room. (Yes, I have seen this.) ] Many wineries allow visitors to stroll through their vineyards. Be mindful of the value of the precious plants. Don’t touch the vines and certainly do not pick any grapes. That’s a big no-no. ]

Lastly, don’t feel obligated to purchase wine you don’t care for, or join a wine club that locks you into repeated purchases. PS Robyn James is proprietor of The Wine Cellar and Tasting Room in Southern Pines. Contact her at winecellar@pinehurst.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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NOw OPen Ow n e r s :

Molly schrader & egan eitzel M w

910-725-0588

155 e Pennsylvania Ave., Downtown southern Pines 30

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The kiTchen gARden

Appetite for Spring now’s the time to make your garden really grow

By JaN leitsChuh

Produce hunger hits hard this time

of year.

Asparagus is rolling in, fresh Sandhills strawberries aren’t far behind, and green onions, sugar snap peas and crisp salad greens are just starting their springtime run. Likely, though, it’s the thought of a red, ripe tomato, splitting with juice and flavor, that has captured the imagination. So, why not grow you some? Getting your hands in the dirt is sheer pleasure in the spring, a creative act in the season of creation. Even if you know you’ll not grow a proper kitchen garden, at least put a tomato or two in the ground, or train a watermelon up your porch rail for the kids or grandkids to enjoy. Pot culture requires more attention to watering, rootcooling and nutrition, but in the right situation can be very productive and fun. Okra can be downright lovely, tucked among the landscape. An edging of red and green lettuces can be a stunning edible landscape. A few bush beans tucked in here and there will let you gather “a mess” for fresh supper eating. Seed catalogs clog the mailboxes, full of sexy produce pictures. They’re fine, but a little known secret is that not just plants but seed is also available locally at several places around town and the county — check out the feed or garden stores in Aberdeen, Southern Pines and Carthage, for starters. The nice thing is, local stores generally carry locally favored varieties that perform well here. The other nice thing is, you can often order, say, a quarter’s worth of salad mix or peas. That’s all you might need for the first planting. Making a new planting every ten days will keep you from being overwhelmed by an abundance of produce coming in all at once. Of course, if you have a chest freezer, you’re good to go on the abundance thing, and can save a bunch of money. Freeze at the peak of freshness, control what you spray on it (or don’t) and make your own convenience foods in little containers for winter eating from the very best ingredients. (I love popping a large frozen tub of, say, chopped garden-grown tomatoes and peppers into a pot of jarred spaghetti sauce to sex it up with flavor, nutrition and chunks.). And, in an era of food-system recalls and crises, it doesn’t get any cleaner or fresher than what you yourself have grown.

If you need a little kitchen garden how-to, NC State University offers a great handbook for vegetable gardening in general. You can find it free online by Googling “NCSU + Home Vegetable Gardening.” Our local Cooperative Extension also has a fantastic support system for horticulture, with Master Gardeners on call from March through October 31. Call 947-3188 mornings from 10 a.m. - 12 noon with your garden questions. This is an excellent community resource. This is also where you take your soil samples. Of course, you’ll want to get your soil ready. Maybe you’ve already done that in early March, when you can plant some great stuff: spinach, cabbage, dill, beets, kale, carrots, sugar snap (edible-podded) peas, arugula, green onions, broccoli, lettuce, Irish potatoes, chard, turnips, mustard greens, English peas, Asian greens, radishes and more. Our sandy soils have excellent drainage; they warm up quicker than the clay-based soils farther north in the county. If you haven’t put any of these veggies in, there’s still time, especially early in April, though you may be dealing with heat and bugs toward harvest time. Hopefully, you’ve already tilled in lots of well-rotted compost and other organic matter. It’s near-miraculous stuff to a sand gardener. In our light, loose soils and with our heavy summer rains, vital nutrients like potassium and nitrogen tend to leach away quickly — right into the water supply, causing problems with groundwater and streams. Organic matter acts like a magnet, capturing these elements and working to hold them in areas available to plant roots. Organic matter also acts like a sponge, holding water in our normally drought-y sands. It also acts as a “nutrient bank,” feeding both the vast populations of beneficial soil life as well the plants. Get you some. Lime is a common and inexpensive mineral additive that is also useful in our acidic sands. Plants generally prefer things on the slightly acidic side, but our soils are pretty darn acidic, which makes some important soil nutrients unavailable. Lime will correct this. Get a soil test every three or four years to keep tabs on your garden’s pH. Believe it or not, an appropriate amount of lime also helps drought-proof your garden and landscape (though you will want to avoid liming rhododendrons and blueberries). Ideally, last fall was the best time for any needed applications of lime, but now is better than later. My husband and I garden organically, so at this time we also incorporate greensand and Sul-Po-Mag for needed potassium. Once established with ma-

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The kiTchen gARden

nure compost, our garden’s phosphorus levels have tended to be stable. Nitrogen is a little tougher to come by in an organic system in the spring, as the soil hasn’t warmed up yet enough for various chemical and biological processes to happen. But soon enough, with warm weather, they catch up. You may prefer a little 10-10-10, but if so, use a light hand — you don’t want to salt the life out of your soil. Organic farmers and gardeners are using all sorts of “probiotic” sprays and compost teas to increase the biological diversity of their soils. You’ve got to give Ma Nature a little credit for knowing how to grow stuff. “Good dirt” is much more than a place to park plant roots, and soil life is there for a reason. Preserve what you have. Don’t plant seeds too deeply or too thickly (and then thin the seedling to the spacing on the package). Firm the bottom of your furrow (I usually draw a line with a stick or a trowel), sprinkle the seeds out carefully, then cover to about three or four times the depth of the seed, firmly again, lightly. Water in well. Once you put your seeds in the ground, be sure to keep things well-watered. This is a critical period. Seeds need continuous moisture to sprout, and even one blazing day can wither a tentative new shoot. An old trick is to put a board over fine seeds like carrots, checking daily, removing at the very first sign of sprouting. Around mid-April, you can begin planting a few cucumbers, some yellow squash and zucchini, some early green beans, a few flowers. In about two weeks, plant a little more. Wait until the end of April or even into May for the heat-lovers like tomatoes, bell and hot peppers, okra, eggplant, basil, sweet potatoes, field peas, cantaloupe and watermelons. What’s the rush? The temptation is that when air temperature is warm — say, the 70s and 80s — to go ahead and stick your plants in the ground. But if you feel the soil, you’ll notice it’s still quite chilly. The plants will languish unhappily until the soil finally warms up or even rot in colder ground. Better to get your plants now while the selection is good, and pot them up a size. Put them in a sunny window, or better yet on a sunny porch, and bring them in at night for a week or two. Don’t plant them until the end of the month, if you can stand to wait. You’ll get a jump start on your neighbors and be bragging about the first ’mater sandwich on the block in no time. If you have lots of seeds and transplants and confidence, and don’t mind experimenting and perhaps losing a few, break all these rules and see what happens. Plant early and push the season. Once I told a friend in Wisconsin that June was too late to plant her garden. “Too late?” she said with a smile, “Too late!” She proved me wrong with an abundant harvest. Direct experience is really the best teacher of all. Young transplants from the store should be “hardened off” before planting, by exposing them to gradually increasing amounts of sunlight over a

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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THIS IS WHAT PEACE OF MIND LOOKS LIKE

WARNING THESE PREMISES PROTECTED BY

(800) 426-9388

THE SIGN OF QUALITY SECURITY 127 Hay Street • Fayetteville, NC • 28301 (910) 483-1196 • www.HolmesSecurity.net 34 April 2013

� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


T h e k i t c h e n g ar d e n

week or two. I try to plant on an overcast day, so as to reduce transplant shock. Barring that, I may shade the new transplants for a day or so, with a spare flower pot or milk jug, anything that casts a shadow. When planting tomatoes, it helps to bury them deeply, to encourage roots to sprout along the stem. Toss in a few annual flowers like the jewelcolored zinnias, airy cosmos, celosia, rudbeckia or sunflowers, because a garden should be beautiful, too, and elevate the soul (if stunning violet eggplant or glowing orange peppers don’t do it for you). Flowers also attract beneficial insects. You’ll have a summer’s worth of centerpieces and cheer, and you’ll always have something to take to a friend who needs a lift. After planting, hold off on the mulches until the soil warms up. Mulch is the next-best thing since peppermint for a sand gardener (after good compost). It deflects the sun and keeps moisture in the soil, cooling plant roots. It also encourages soil life. Rotted straw is great if you can find it clean, although some straws have been sprayed with a persistent broad-leaf herbicide that carries through and can kill your garden, so know your source. I also used to use old unprinted newspaper end rolls that The Pilot used to sell.Alas, no more. I would lay the paper down as a weedblock when soils had warmed, then apply mulch over that. Some people use clean cardboard to do the same. But if mulch is applied too early to chilly soils, it will slow things down. So wait until mid-May-ish to mulch. Feel the soil to judge for yourself. Growing a bit of your own fresh food need not be a solitary exercise. We know that food provides the scaffolding for community. Let me leave you with the popular twist on the old adage: “Give a man two fish, and he eats for the day; teach a man to garden, and the whole neighborhood has fresh tomatoes.” Good luck with that produce hunger. PS

Tell the world

YOUR STORY

Jan Leitschuh is a local gardener, avid eater of fresh produce and co-founder of the Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative.

Sterling silver charms from $25

FRAMER’S COTTAGE Editor’s note: Norm Minery, far left, was misidentified in the March issue of PineStraw. He is a member of the Walthour-Moss Land Committee.

162 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387 910.246.2002

MKTG62868_FRAMER_M.indd 1

3/6/2013 3:28:59 PM

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Pinehurst Medical Clinic

Care when you need it . . .

Pinehurst Medical Clinic offers Saturday & Sunday Walk-In Clinics for Established Patients. Medical staff will be at: PMC East Building (205 Page Road in Pinehurst) every Saturday and Sunday mornings. Sanford Medical Group (555 Carthage Street in Sanford) every Saturday morning. We are here to provide treatment for acute minor problems, such as the flu, earache, coughs, etc. You must be a registered patient of the Pinehurst Medical Clinic/Sanford Medical Clinic to receive care at the walk-in clinics. You don’t need to call first or have an appointment, just walk-in – first come, first served. We conveniently bill your insurance as we would during a normal visit, with all required co-pays being paid at time of service. Follow-up appointments will be arranged if needed during the week. Evaluation of acute chest pain or dyspnea or any major problem should be seen in the Emergency Room.

New Patient Appointments Welcome Please call our New Patient Department (910) 235-2664 • (800) 272-5682 For more information and a complete listing of our physicians and specialties, visit our website: www.pinehurstmedical.com Walk-In Clinic Hours Pinehurst Medical East Walk-In Clinic 205 Page Road Pinehurst, NC 28374 Phone: 910-295-5511

Sanford Medical Group Walk-In Clinic 555 Carthage Street Sanford, NC 27330 Phone: 919-774-6518

Hours of Operation Saturday: 8:00am - 11:30am Sunday: 10:00am - 1:30pm

Hours of Operation Saturday: 8:30am - 12:30pm

36 April 2013 P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Out of the Blue

Driving Miss Debbie

By Deborah Salomon

In a few weeks my oldest grandson

will get his driver’s license — the most significant earned milestone toward adulthood unless you count potty training.

Driving changes everything. Driving is the common denominator that joins prince to laborer, chauffeur to cabbie, soccer mom to Danica Patrick. Nobel Prize winners and axe murderers drive. U.S. presidents complain that a civil liberty has been denied them, except in truck or golf cart, on private property. But then Queen Elizabeth II slips away in her royal Range Rover, on occasion. The act of driving a car must signify something, since Saudi Arabia prohibits women from doing it. The list of inventions/accomplishments that changed the world surely include electricity, airplanes, telephones, lunar landing, computers, human organ transplantations, but I’ll wager that all involved, save Ben Franklin, operated a motor vehicle. How do you think Neil Armstrong got to the launch pad? Driving is such a badge of independence that adaptations have been created for persons with various disabilities. Point made. That doesn’t mean I’m ready for the chubby blond cherub who grabbed my finger when he was 15 minutes old to latch onto the steering wheel. This takes me back to my 16th birthday in 1955. My father taught me to drive his 1949 battleship-gray stick-shift Studebaker in the supermarket parking lot early Sunday mornings. My father was harder to manage than the car. Patience paid off; I aced the written and road tests, even parallel parking, which became a specialty. My mother, not a confident driver, gladly turned the keys over to me on road trips. Driving represented freedom, sweet freedom. Gas cost 10 cents a gallon. We just rode around. But I never had my own car until all three of my children were in school. Danny, the youngest, was my grandson’s father. Cars were his life. As I

recall, his second word was “cah” soon followed by “vroom.” This chubby blond cherub (who learned to steer from his father’s lap, at 9) begged me to save the Cutlass convertible with white leather upholstery until he turned 16. On his birthday we were first in line at the license bureau. That hot July morning I begged him not to take the examiner out with the top down. Nothing doing. They both came back smiling. But for months I lived in terror. Took him two glorious years to destroy the Cutlass. At least nobody got hurt. Freedom has limits. My mother, in her late 80s and legally blind, still drove to the grocery store and “to get my hair fixed” in a two-ton Buick tank. I informed her, gently at first, that she could lose everything, including her house, if she caused a serious accident. Oh, that’s not going to happen — I know the way blindfolded, she said. Exactly. Only when I pretended to dial the insurance company did she relent. Of course to friends she painted me the villain and herself the martyr. I might behave similarly. Driving is me. I’ve driven the rutted, icy back roads of New England. I’ve navigated the horror that is Boston’s Storrow Drive at rush hour and, with gritted teeth and no GPS, found my way around the Charlotte and Atlanta freeways. Jersey Turnpike? A piece of cake. My husband’s idea of a road trip was you drive, I sleep. I’ve driven alone from N.C. to Canada several times, once in the dead of winter. Snow I can handle; fog is the enemy. Against medical advice I’ve driven with an above-the-knee cast on my leg, but it was the left leg. Parking tickets, many. Moving violations, none, unless you count a warning. Two fender-benders (neither my fault), one catastrophic crash (I wasn’t driving). Driving is still freedom When I can no longer grab the keys and go, somebody please do the humane thing. I’m no Miss Daisy. Sure, I’m queasy about seeing my precious grandson (and his brother, 19 months later) behind the wheel. They are still children, for all the big-boy posturing. But will I hop into the passenger seat, grinning? You bet. Vroom . . . off we go. PS Deborah Salomon is a staff writer for PineStraw and The Pilot. She may be reached at debsalomon@nc.rr.com.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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P o st c ar d fr o m P ar i s

Spreading the Love Everyone needs a forbidden taste, n’est-ce pas?

By Christina Klug

Photograph By Cassie Butler

My French lover is dark and irresistible.

We started seeing each other some time ago but were a bit off and on for a while. Since he was not from America, I needed time to decide if I wanted to pursue a relationship with him — you never know if you can trust those foreigners. I’ll admit at first it was a physical attraction; I found the way he touched my lips intoxicating. The smell of him would linger, and I’d find traces of him hours after he left on my hair, face and hands. Sometimes I felt like people were staring because of the way he attached himself to my hips but I didn’t care. He was my forbidden taste, my sinful indulgence. I was happy. My French lover goes by the name of Nutella. This past summer my feelings elevated from a small crush to a slight obsession, when it seemed a popular craze for almost every household to support Nutella as a healthy breakfast alternative on a piece of toast. Eat it with a glass of orange juice and call yourself well-balanced — or at least what the label reads. I would sit on kitchen counters with an open container and a spoon, practically going shot for shot with toddlers. What better way to prepare myself for a year in France? I thought. Didn’t it originate here or something? As we’ve gotten to know each other better, I’ve realized he has Italian roots. Discovering the way Nutella and a fresh baguette coexist was a bit like the way I felt the first time I went skydiving — addicted and hungry for more. A delicious combination leaving me capaciously satisfied for the length of time it takes me to walk up the stairs and decide I do indeed need another piece. My head over heels feelings caused me to quickly devour my first jar. The words of my mother rang in my ears: “Christina, don’t throw yourself at him.” I considered putting brown construction paper on the inside, hoping to camouflage its empty content, but settled for shoving the jar in a back corner of the kitchen cabinets, and me and my lover took a break. Brokenhearted as I was, I would pine for my nightly Nutella fix, but I thought it best I keep my distance for a few weeks and play a little hard to get. One day, I could stand it no longer and had to go buy another jar at the store. Much like Veruca Salt in Willy Wonka, ripping back the golden wrapping, I dunked my finger, wanting a taste now! Holding the jar and the steering wheel in one hand. The other, partially covered in Nutella, partially driving stick shift. In horror of my monstrous stage five clinger behavior, I momentarily considered running the red light so the camera installed for driving tickets could capture me in my weakest moment. My vulnerability showed him how much I cared and things started going quite well between us. He took me on the most romantic and memorable date of my life one rainy afternoon in the fall. With him, wrapped in a crepe, we stood at Trocodero, in awe of the Eiffel Tower and overwhelmed by the beauty of the city before

us. We got lost in the crowd and like in a scene from a movie, he expressed his deepest feelings for me. Though he was a bit gooey, it warmed my insides and I found myself weak in the knees. Sometimes the best things are a bit messy, I reminded myself. We decided to start seeing each other exclusively; every day I found myself counting down the minutes till he joined me for tea around four o’clock. That was when we got to know each other the best, and I found myself stealing away to the kitchen for the rest of the evening to share our moments alone in the corner. I’m ashamed to admit that sometimes late at night I’d sneak him up to my bedroom. Smitten, I couldn’t get over how much I adored him — both the sweet and salty sides of him. What is it about young love that seems so insatiable? But after a while the Nutella thing cooled and began to run its course. He was too comfortable, too predictable, and I began to wonder if this was really what I wanted out of this year in Paris. Hadn’t I moved here to become a healthy, cultured, independent young woman? Was I settling for the first taste of anything that came my way? Was I becoming blind to the way he was making me grow in all the wrong ways? During Paris Fashion Week, it was a dream to drink champagne alongside the Vera Wang collection set up for market in a suite at Hotel Maurice that costs more per night than what I am making this entire year. On the same floor as Kanye West, I might add. Feeling excluded, Nutella was not happy, and made my life a nightmare the next day. We stumbled across a few fashion shows at the Grand Palais, where he literally smothered me. Wearing the remnants of a disastrous breakfast with Nutella, I tried to hide the huge brown blob that had found a home on the front of my white shirt. In the midst of models, designers, photographers and the like, I was miserable. It was the first time I was embarrassed to be associated with Nutella. One afternoon, debating on how I was going to break up with Nutella, stalking him on the Internet all the while, I found I’d been played a fool. Apparently I was not the only one who had such an obsession. A simple Google search showed me the things no girl wants to know about her socalled lover. And suddenly I realized I had found my easy way out. We could make it casual since that was clearly the way he viewed our relationship. So I adapted the French outlook on dating and started seeing many suitors — pain au chocolat, Milka and Bueno bars, chocolat chaud, to name a few. The more the better I thought, wanting to make up for lost time. If there was one thing I was thankful for learning from my first love, Nutella, is the realization that I’m far too young to be looking to settle down quite yet. PS Christina Klug, a former PineStraw intern, is out in the wild world loving Nutella and making her fortune as an au pair in France.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


B I R D WA T CH

Barred Owl

The eerie voice in the spring woods of the Sandhills

By Susan Campbell

“Who cooks for

you? Who cooks for you a-a-a-a-ll?” echoes through wet woods throughout the Sandhills in early spring. It is male barred owls claiming territory and advertising for a mate. They are large but well camouflaged birds. Only a little bit smaller than the great horned owl, barreds are often their close neighbors. Therefore, disputes over space and feeding areas are not uncommon. Vocal sparring at this time of year can get quite heated. Male barred owls can be heard now, calling and squawking not only at night but possibly at dawn and dusk as well.

This owl gets its name from the distinct vertical brown streaks on its breast, belly and flanks. The bird’s spotted head and dorsal surface in addition to the barring make it very hard to spot during daylight hours when it is perched motionless close to the trunk of a large tree. Their liquid-brown eyes make them very endearing to bird lovers far and wide. Barred owls feed on a wide variety of prey found in swamps and bottomland forests. They feed on not only mice, rats, rabbits, small and medium sized birds but reptiles and amphibians as well. These owls will also wade into shallow streams and pools after crayfish and small fish. Barred owls take advantage of large flying insects such as moths and large beetles at dusk as well. Barreds, in spite of their size, actually nest in cavities. They will use old

woodpecker holes, rotted stump holes and even larger man-made nest boxes. Up to five young are raised by both parents for close to a full year. Adult barred owls are sedentary and probably mate for life. This likely explains why they tend to be so defensive of their territory. Not surprisingly, during the breeding season, the larger-bodied female barred owls are the most aggressive. Raccoons, opossums and hawks are common nest predators. But it is great horned owls that are the greatest predatory threat, so competition can be quite intense. These owls are not adverse to roosting or even nesting close to human habitation. People who get close to a nest may be subjected to distraction displays. The female may call loudly, quiver her wings or even attack with her talons. So should you discover a nest hole, it is best to give it a wide berth to avoid any unintended consequences. They are known to use the same cavity year after year if they are successful. A pair of barred owls was documented to use the same cavity in the middle of the campus of the University of North Carolina for six seasons. Despite the fact that they are non-migratory, barreds have expanded their range. They have moved westward into the Pacific Northwest through southwestern Canada over the last century. They are now in the process of displacing other native owls of the region including their close cousin, the endangered spotted owl. Certainly the future of this endearing species is secure in our area. For a chance at encountering a barred owl (and perhaps other owl species) here in the Sandhills, consider attending an evening “Owl Prowl” at Weymouth Woods. Call (910) 692-2167 for details of the next scheduled prowl. PS Susan would love to hear from you. Send wildlife sightings and photos to susan@ncaves.com or call (252) 926-9982.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Sunday April 28 at 2 pm Nell Dickerson

PORCH DOGS

Porch dogs highlights a true southern tradition — and man’s best friend The porch has been the Southern gathering place for centuries, and while most of us have moved indoors, dogs still hold vigil on the welcome mat. Photographer Nell Dickerson traveled across the southeastern United States to capture snapshots of this Southern tradition in her latest book, Porch Dogs. The book features 60-plus portraits of man’s best friend on timeworn porches across the South.

“I love the South and have a lifelong commitment to preserve its culture,” says Dickerson. “Both architecture and dogs manifest that rich, complex world that defines the South.” Nell Dickerson is coming to The Country Bookshop and we invite you and your dogs to come porch sit at TCB! We will be transforming the front of our store into a front porch with chairs and plants and tea. Nell will sign books and speak about preservation, pooches, porches and the architecture of the South. Please bring your pooch and join us!

Wednesday, May 8 at 6 pm Lee Craig

JOSEPHUS DANIELS: HIS LIFE AND TIMES Ticketed Dinner Event at CCNC

Tickets will be on sale at the Country Bookshop on April 8. $67 (includes 1 dinner and 1 book ), $100 (includes 2 dinners and 1 book)

North Carolinian Josephus Daniels was a key member of Woodrow Wilson’s cabinet and one of the most influential progressive politicians in the country. As secretary of the navy during the First World War; he became one of the most important men in the world. Before that, Daniels revolutionized the newspaper industry in the South, forever changing the relationship between politics and the news media.

Lee A. Craig, an expert on economic history and Alumni Distinguished Professor at NC State, delves into Daniels’s extensive archive to inform this nuanced and eminently readable biography, following Daniels’s rise to power in North Carolina and chronicling his influence on twentieth-century politics. He will be speaking at a ticketed dinner at CCNC on May 8. Josephus’ grandson, Frank A. Daniels Jr. will introduce Craig. He is the retired president and publisher of The News and Observer Publishing Company and president of The Pilot Newspaper in Southern Pines.

140 NW Broad St • Southern Pines • 910.692.3211 • thecountrybookshop.biz


The SPoRTing liFe

life, death and Rebirth at Slim’s

Spring cometh again with daffodils by the shed

By tom BRyaNt

it was time� After three solid days of rain,

along with the damp cold that seeps into the bones, I was going cabin crazy. I had to do something. Writing was no good. The muse left when the bad weather came. I would sit up in the roost, the little garage apartment where I do my creative stuff, and just stare out the window at the miserable, soggy, frigid weather. I would have loved to see the rain just a month earlier, at the height of duck season. Now it was worthless. Insult added to injury as I was still getting over the upper respiratory crud that had afflicted so many across the country. Point of fact, as another sneezing fit racked my miserable bones, I hated February and was looking forward to spring.

There was only one thing to do and that was ride up to Slim’s old country store and see if any of the regulars were about. Slim was no longer with us, going the way of several of my friends in the past couple of years. As I backed the Bronco out of the garage, I thought how every passing day emphasizes our mortality. Too many friends have died recently. I went in the house to tell Linda where I was going. I think she was a little relieved to see that finally I had something to do. I’m afraid my restlessness had affected her mood. “You be careful,” she said. “Why are you driving the Bronco? You know it leaks. Take the Cruiser. It’s safer.” “Nah,” I replied. “The Bronco needs to get out, too. We’re both about to go bonkers.” “I believe it, especially when you start talking about that truck like it’s alive. Tell Bubba I said hey, and you get home in time for supper. Don’t

forget your phone.” Bubba and I have been friends forever, it seems. Fortunately for the regulars who frequent Slim’s old store, Bubba bought the place after Slim died. To keep it open, he hired Leroy, Slim’s cousin, to run it for him. We would still have a place to go, as Bubba so eloquently put it, where the idiot television box couldn’t intrude. Bubba hates TV and cell phones. He claims that the latest craze, the smart phone, is an oxymoron. When you’re at Slim’s Country Store, you leave that cell phone in your vehicle. If you don’t and it rings, he will banish you from the place. There is a story about Bubba that I know to be true. One early spring day when the newly nesting birds were singing and bream were beginning to bed, Bubba and a friend of his, who was also his investment counselor, were in a small boat fishing at the pond at the Alamance Wildlife Club. The friend’s cell phone rang. Now the phone was in a jacket on the middle seat of the boat. Bubba picked up the jacket, retrieved the phone, and tossed the still ringing instrument into the lake. He didn’t say a word, just kept fishing as his friend, the stockbroker, sat in the boat wide-eyed. The ride up to the ancient store was uneventful with the exception of my having to constantly wipe the inside of the front windscreen where rivulets of rainwater seeped. I should have listened to Linda, I thought as I was nearing Slim’s place. The old Bronco has become a fair weather vehicle. “Happens to all of us,” I said aloud, not wanting to hurt the old vehicle’s feelings. “Man, I’ve got to get around people more. I’m talking to things.” I pulled into the gravel parking lot at Slim’s, dodged mud puddles, and came to a soggy halt. I dragged an old canvas tarp out of the back of the truck and draped it over the top just as Bubba came out on the porch and hollered through the wind-driven rain at me. “Get on in here out o’ the rain, boy. You look like a drowned muskrat.” “Yeah,” I replied. “I feel like one too. Linda’s gonna kill me if I have a relapse with this crud. How you doing, Bubba?” “I’m doing a lot better than you, it looks like. Come on in by the stove. Leroy just put in a fresh load of hickory.” The potbelly stove sat catty-corner in the store and was glowing red from

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � April 2013

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T h e sp o rt i n g l i f e

Leroy’s latest load of aged firewood. Four slat-back straight chairs were in a semi-circle around the blazing fire. I was surprised to see that I was the only one in the place. Even Leroy seemed to be missing. “Where is everybody?” “Leroy had to run home for a while, so I told him I’d look out for things while he’s gone. The rest of the crowd kinda drifts in and out. Get some coffee.” I poured myself a mug and sat down by the fire. Bubba moved one of the chairs and dragged over his favorite rocker. “You look kinda beat, boy,” he said as he took a sip of his coffee. “Things been rough down your way?” “Not too good, Bubba, what with all the sickness and people up and dying on us. You heard about Blue, I guess?” Cliff Blue, a longtime friend, had recently passed away, suffering from heart disease. “That was a shocker,” Bubba replied. “But you know, really it wasn’t. We’re getting old Tom. I read that Clifton was 72, no spring chicken just like the rest of us.” “You’re right, but it’s still not easy to accept. You sorta wonder where the time went.” We sat silently for a bit, watching the fire as it flickered through the glass on the door of the stove. Bubba got up and went to the drink box behind the counter. He came back with a flask. “Hold out your cup, Buddy Roe.” He poured in a big shot of an amber liquid. “This brandy will warm you up and make you feel better. Come on back here. I want to show you something.” We walked to the back of the store. “Look out there.” Bubba pointed, and through the plate glass window at the back of the old place, I saw a clump of blooming daffodils. They were in the lee of the wind right next to the shed where Slim had kept his 1940 John Deere tractor. “Aren’t they pretty?” Bubba asked. “I watched Slim plant those things — just a few — when he put them in the ground, but they come back more and more every year. Every time I’m at the store, I come back here to see if they’re still blooming. If you think about it, everything is relative. Those flowers are here just a little bit, but they sure are beautiful while they’re blooming. Then you turn around and they’re gone. But you know they’ll be back next year, bigger and better. Could be we’re a lot like those flowers — here today, gone in a little while, only to come back even better than before.” I looked at the little clump of flowers as Bubba headed back to the fire. I felt better. It could have been Bubba’s homespun philosophy that helped or more likely the dollop of brown whiskey he poured into my coffee cup. Whatever, I’ll take it. PS Tom Bryant, a Southern Pines resident, is a lifelong outdoorsman and PineStraw’s Sporting Life columnist. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills ©2012 Anheuser-Busch, Michelob Ultra® Light Beer, St. Louis, MO • 95 calories, 2.6g carbs, 0.6g protein and 0.0g fat, per 12 oz.


G o l ft o w n J o u r n a l

The Four-Five Flip

For the U.S. Open next summer, two of Pinehurst No. 2’s most celebrated — and feared — holes will swap pars

By Lee Pace

Sports Illustrated’s coverage of the 1999

Photographs By Cassie Butler

U.S. Open at Pinehurst included a two-page photo spread of golfer Billy Mayfair launching his tee shot on the fifth hole, the trunk and limbs of a large pine tree framing the image on two sides. The headline “Hell Hole” was emblazoned over the image. Forthwith writer Gary Van Sickle produced 1,500 words that included death, fear, intimidation, ugly, dreaded and unpleasant — and those words came in just the first three paragraphs.

The par-4 fifth hole on Pinehurst No. 2 has long been one of the most difficult in golf. It’s long (475 yards as listed on the championship tee and 436 from the members’ tee). The fairway cants gradually from right to left, leaving golfers with oppressively long approach shots from ball-above-feet lies, the perfect prescription for a fat shot or a pull-hook or both. The fairway and approach to the green reflect balls to the left, into what used to be deep Bermuda rough and now, post the Bill Coore-Ben Crenshaw restoration, is a potpourri of hardpan sand, wire grass and assorted agronomic goblins. And then there’s the green — heavily bunkered, starkly contoured around the edges and possessing a flat spot the size of a nickel dead in the center. Phil Mickelson said the green of the fifth was “close to impossible,” a notion seconded by Tim Herron in labeling it a “par-6 green.” Hal Sutton said there was one way to handle the fifth: “Buckle your chin strap before you tee off.” The collected fields in 1999 and 2005 averaged 4.47 shots, nearly half a shot over par. When the U.S. Open returns to Pinehurst in just over a year, however, golfers will find a significant change to the course when they arrive at the fourth and fifth holes. The fourth, previously a par-5, will play as a par-4. And the fifth will

now be a par-5. After the U.S. Open and the Women’s Open depart Pinehurst at the end of June 2014, resort guests and members will play with scorecards listing four and five with pars of 4/5, meaning the tees and configurations for each hole will vary from day to day or week to week. One day you might play four from new forward tees as a long par-4 and five from a new back tee as a three-shot hole. On another you might play four from its familiar 507-yard tee as a par-5 and then play five from the old forward tees as the hedonistic par-4 that all of golf has grown to know and loathe over the years. The changes come at the behest of Mike Davis, executive director of the USGA and its chief of course set-up for the Open, with an assist from the history book and the opinions of Coore & Crenshaw, the architects who directed the restoration of No. 2 from 2010-12 from its modern orgy of svelte grass to its mid20th century persona of wide and bouncy fairways, hardpan sandy perimeters and scruffy, scraggy bunker edges. “Four just feels like a long par-4 to me and five feels like a short par-5,” Davis said one day in 2010 while touring the course with Coore. “It makes sense architecturally to switch pars. But you’re losing a little of that mystique of the past.” “Five has been known as one of the toughest par-4s in the U.S. Open,” Coore adds. “You would lose that little historical connection. “On the other hand, five was originally a par-5. So you have that history there as well. “I can see both sides of it.” The fourth and fifth holes were originally the first and ninth holes of a ninehole employee course used in the 1920s. Architect Donald Ross added them to No. 2 in 1935 when he abandoned two other holes — the ones he felt were the weakest on the course — that ran between the current 10th and 11th on ground now occupied by course No. 4. Golfers in the 1936 PGA Championship played four and five as back-to-back par-5s. The eighth hole, meanwhile, was a par-4. Five was listed at 467 yards and eight was 466 yards. The course measured 6,879 yards with a par of 72.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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G o l ft o w n J o u r n a l

The pars on five and eight were flopped before the 1951 Ryder Cup Match, with eight being lengthened to 488 yards as a three-shot hole; No. 5 was shortened as a par-4 and played at 440 yards for the Ryder Cup. Pinehurst resident and former U.S. Amateur champion Dick Chapman noted in the Ryder Cup program that the switching of pars led to a subtle change in mindset on the part of golfers. “The fifth used to be a fairly easy par-5, where many fours were made,” Chapman wrote. “On the other hand, the eighth was an extremely difficult par-4, where only the longest could hope to get up in the two. As a result, very few fours were made. Strange, now that the par has been changed, fours are much less frequent on the fifth and more abundant on the eighth.” So when Ross died in 1948, the fifth hole was a par-5, thus Davis has some historical precedent on which he can hook the change. The other reasons involve the original angle of the fourth hole and the comparative severity of the two greens. From his first tour of the course when planning the restoration in February 2010, Coore opined that the new tee built for the fourth hole in 1996 to lengthen it in advance of the 1999 Open had stripped the hole of one of its architectural nuances. Ross designed the hole as a dogleg left, and from the tee there was an element of mystery as golfers couldn’t see the green and an element of strategy as a bunker on the left side posed some options for aggressive or cautionary play off the tee. The new tee, however, was moved backward and to the right (as a golfer looks down the fairway); it lengthened the hole to 565 yards and straightened it out, leaving the green visible from the tee. “So much of the character of this hole is lost from the new back tee,” Coore says. “The bunker is now an afterthought. It’s just another straight hole. To me, the angle from the tee is an important part of this hole.” Thus he and Davis agreed that the preferred tee to use for the fourth hole was the original tee to the left of the small restroom facility. From that tee the hole plays just over 500 yards, much too short for a legitimate par-5 for today’s athletic golfer and souped-up equipment. So if the fourth is now shortened to a par-4, all the more reason to stretch five out into a par-5. That’s where the greens’ slopes and surrounds come into play. Davis believes the fourth green is one of the most sedate on the course, and certainly the fifth green is one of the most severe. He thinks four’s green is better for a long par-4 receiving a shot from 200 yards and five’s green is better for a par-5, receiving a wedge shot. You can run an approach shot along the ground onto the fourth green; that’s a tough task on five given the bunker front-left that guards most of the entrance. Davis stands in the fifth fairway, about eighty

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April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Moore CouNty’S NuMber#1

real eState Firm

685 Lake Forest Dr. SE $365,000 Award winning international designer Kevin Wulz has produced this exceptional 3 bed 2 bath home. Walls of windows capture the beautiful landscaping and views of Lake Pinehurst. Interior is finished with imported Italian ceramics and hard wood flooring. Open floor plan provides a natural flow for easy living. Come see this extraordinary home.

Dave Berger

www.DaveBergerBroker.com DaveBergerBroker@gmail.com

aBErdEEn • 112 BonnIE BrooKS Ct • $390,000 4 Bedroom / 3 Baths Unique and Beautiful home in desirable Bonnie Brook subdivision on quiet cul-de-sac. All the room you’ll need with hardwoods in main living area, gas fireplace, granite countertops, tons of natural light, breakfast nook and formal dining area.

MIRA Foundation USA cordially invites you to the Fourth Annual

Dining Dark in the

Don a blindfold and experience the unique sensation of dining while engaging senses other than sight. Saturday, April 20, 2013 6:30pm The St. Andrews Room at the Pinehurst Resort Club Reservations: $125 per person

www.mirausa.org 910.944.7757

“Our g�ide dogs give blind children a new leash on life. . . ”

Dianne ForsBerg

www.pinehursthomesource.com

910-315-5073

to learn more about me and my company, please visit: www.tammyLyne.com WhyILoveMyCompany.com

tammy lyne, realtor 910-235-0208

CharMing DOwntOwn COttagES 370 E Morganton rd. • $265,000 Main historic cottage c1935 w/ original slate roof, shake siding, heart pine floors & beams. Separate guest cottage suite. Beautiful grounds. Call Kim for showing appointment.

Kim Stout • 910-528-2008 www.kimBerlystout.com

www.internationalrlrealtltyspecialists.com

195 Short Street • Southern Pines, NC

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Windridge

Gardens

1650 Valley View Road • Southern Pines, NC Adjacent to Hyland Golf Course on US 1

910-692-0855 www.WindridgeGardens.com Spring Hours

Mon-Sat. 10am-6pm | Sun. 1pm-6pm

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G o l ft o w n J o u r n a l

yards from the green. “If we play this as a par-5 and you lay up to this spot, you’ve still got a brutal shot as tough as this green is,” he says. Moments later, he’s walking on the green, noting the miniscule cupping areas away from the edges of the putting surface. He points to some areas where he might place a flag if the hole is played as a par-5. “As a five, you can push the hole locations,” Davis says. “It’ll be the shortest five they play all year long. We won’t feel guilty. I would put the holes more in the center as a four than a five.” As Davis leaned further and further during his visits to Pinehurst in 2010-12 into flipping the pars on four and five, he asked Pinehurst President and CEO Don Padgett about the availability of land that once was on the site of the old World Golf Hall of Fame. From the existing championship tee on five, you work your way back and find a cart path, a hillside and then some flat ground. A tee built on that plateau would stretch the hole as much as 575 yards or so. Pinehurst owned the land and Padgett arranged for Coore & Crenshaw to use it for a new tee, which was built in the summer of 2012. It’s a quite a view from there today. You play through a narrow chute of tall pine trees, and the cross bunker from the left that is easy to clear from the forward tees is now staring you in the eye, daring you to blink. Then on the second shot, you see the questions Ross posed way back in 1935 — do you play safely short of the bunker on the left corner of the dogleg into the green, or do you try to carry it and risk pushing the ball into two bunkers frontright of the green? The proof, of course, will be in the playing of the new holes year after year, championship after championship. The idea is getting mixed reviews from those who have heard about it. Among the skeptics is Pinehurst Country Club member Pete Moss. “Thousands and thousands of people have come in and played No. 5 as a par-4,” Moss says. “They say, ‘That’s the hardest par-4 I’ve ever seen, I want to see the pros play it as a par-4.’ The USGA is coming in and taking away the public course that’s played by everyone. When you play No. 2, one of the things you remember is playing that second shot. It’s the hardest shot a lot of people will ever play in their life. And they’ve taken that away, I think.” Me? I think a 200-yard hybrid shot slightly uphill off a mostly flat lie on the fourth hole is much easier than a similar length shot off a side-hill lie on five, particularly when you can bounce the shot into the green on four and you cannot on five. So I think the changes will be fun to try. Either way, recording a total of nine shots on those two holes is an accomplishment of Herculean proportions. PS Lee Pace’s book, The Golden Age of Pinehurst, is available in Pinehurst’s golf and gifts shops. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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TOP 10 REASONS

to dine at the squire’s Pub 10. Signature Bibb House Salad 9. Mediterranean Salmon Salad 8. Calamari Fries 7. New England Chips n’ Clam Dip 6. Perfect Grilled Pork Chips 5. Seared Tuna Steak with Cusabi Sauce 4. Guinness Spiced London Broil 3. Grilled Chicken Breast Adobo 2. Rainbow Trout Amandine

and the #1 Reason 1. the revolutionary

burger!

His Royal Highness His Royal Still King of the Highness Superbikes Still King of the Superbikes Ask About Our Military Programs Ask About Our Military Programs

Carolina BMW BMWDR 2407Carolina GREENGATE 2407 GREENGATE DR GREENSBORO, NC 27406-5250 GREENSBORO, NC 27406-5250 336-272-4269 336-272-4269 www.ridecarolina.com www.ridecarolina.com

His Royal Highness Still King of the Superbikes Ask About Our Military Programs

Carolina BMW 2407 GREENGATE DR GREENSBORO, NC 27406-5250 336-272-4269 www.ridecarolina.com

Voted BEST BURGER Fayetteville Observer Pinehurst Outlook

BEST OF MOORE Award

1720 US 1 South Southern Pines, NC

910-695-1161

Taste Buds Blooming Here! 52

April 2013 � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � �PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


b

Sandhills Photography Club Pets Competition Winners, Class A

a

c

d

f

e

a) 1st Place “Oliver’s Shadow” by Neva Scheve b) 2nd Place “Lizzie Likes Pink” by Jill Margeson c) 3rd Place “Tender Moments” by Gisela Danielson d) Honorable Mention “High Fashion” by Hunter Rudd e) Honorable Mention “Purrfect” by Donna Ford f) Honorable Mention “I Refuse to be Ignored” by Debra Regula

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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MERIDITH MARTENS, artist An

Fine Art Animal Portraits

Maintenance Free Living!

Our most popular floor plan just got better! The New Canterbury Model features 3 Bedrooms, 3 Baths, a Carolina Room & Den.

meridithmartens@nc.rr.com 910 692-9448 Independently Owned & Operated

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www.meridithmartens.com

April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Pets competition Winners, class B

g

h

j

The Sandhills Photography Club welcomes all who have an interest in improving their photography skills, and in gaining the technical knowledge that goes along with it. The club meets at 7 p.m. on the second Monday of each month at The Hannah Center Theater on The O’Neal School campus. Regardless of skill or background, any prospective member is invited to attend. Information: sandhillsphotoclub.org.

k

i

g) 1st Place “Billy the Kid” by Matt Smith h) 2nd Place “Love Those Eyes” by Diane McCall i) 3rd Place “Bluebelle” by Patty Carlton j) Honorable Mention “Bobbers the Bunny” by Carlie Smith k) Honorable Mention “Fetch” by Grace Hill

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � April 2013

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The first round after a great round starts here. The Ryder Cup Lounge Just off the porch of the historic Carolina Hotel, the Ryder Cup offers a generous selection of draft beers, scotch and bourbon as well as a mouth-watering menu with

Wednesday Special

50%ff

any bottle or glass of

everything from Jumbo Lump Crabcake Sliders to Backyard Rib Stacks. So after your last putt drops, pick up a glass at the Ryder Cup.



Expires April 30, 2013. *Gratuity based on full retail.

Li v e Mu s i c Bob Redding

The Carolina Hotel • Village of Pinehurst, North Carolina • 910.235.8415 • pinehurst.com

©2013 Pinehurst, LLC

Friday & Saturday Nights • Sunday Brunch


April 2013 Cheer the Spear: A Sonnet Perky, green and phallic Dressed in butter, a la Gallic, This harbinger of spring, from fragrant earth erupts Abrupt — yeah, welcome. An ancient history owns the spear With Latin name, as now, the same. Asparagus. Adore them tender-crisp and cold, enrobed in Swiss Prosciutto, for a salty kiss. Or roasted with their lily cousin garlic. Would I, reborn in some enchanted land Desire yet to be its queen? No, neigh and nada! I’d sooner reincarnate green Asparagus, with petal tips — and not an inch of hips. — Deborah Salomon

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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L u c k y D o g s , H o m e A t L ast

The Second Chance Club By Deborah Salomon • Photographs by Tim Sayer They are the unwanted, the abandoned, the abused — the pups with begging eyes. Take me home. Love me. I cannot speak but I will lick your face, sleep at your feet, reward you with silent devotion . . . forever. These animals have a decent chance in Moore County, with several volunteer and other organizations working on their behalf, from low-cost spay-neuter clinics to online wish lists that match people and pets. “This is my passion,” says Pam Partis, co-chairman with Angela Zumwalt of the Moore County Citizens’ Pet Responsibility Committee. “I have never lived anyplace where you can [so effectively] influence and change.” Partis has three dogs and two cats. When she and her husband moved to Moore County from California, they rented a motorhome to make the trip easier on their animal family. Partis proposed a speed-dating event at The Country Bookshop in June where, in conjunction with the Pet Placement Project/Animal Center of Moore County, prospective owners met and learned about available pets. All eight canine attendees were adopted. Partis goes into the schools where, with mascot Scooter, she teaches pet responsibility to fourthgraders, especially the importance of spay/neuter. The children respond enthusiastically. “Those are the moments that keep you going,” Partis says. For free “match-up” services go to www.mcprc.org and click on “P3/Pet Placement Project.” A volunteer will print out your list and walk through the shelter for possible matches.

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LuCky D o g S, Home AT L A S T

The Oulettes and Sam A happy girl finally running free

Mary Oulette, after adopting many rescue dogs, wanted a golden retriever. She saw a possibility pictured in the Pet Placement Project ad which appeared in The Pilot. Sam (Samantha), selected from a shelter, lived up to expectations except for a medical condition. “You might want to check for hip dysplasia” Oulette was told. Indeed, Sam was unusually quiet for a retriever. Oulette learned that Sam was probably born with dysplasia; her hip bone became dislodged from its socket, causing restricted movement and pain. Perhaps this was why Sam was given up. Oulette and her family opted for surgery. Now, Sam is a different, happier girl who runs and jumps like a normal retriever. She goes to work with Oulette’s husband. She’s learned to play dead, “sit pretty” and shake. When Oulette sits down, Sam’s head and paw appear in her lap. Sam has enriched the Oulettes’ life. “It’s always good having a companion who doesn’t judge,” Oulette says. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .April 2013

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The Collins Family and Cowboy An awesome gift from God

Olivia Collins, 10, won an essay contest about being a responsible pet owner. After the awards ceremony, Pam Partis, of Moore County Citizens’ Pet Responsibility Committee, suggested the family — without a pet for two years — look at a dog in foster care. “We drove to a horse farm that was fostering five dogs,” Olivia’s mother, Rebecca Collins, recalls. The yellow Lab mix, sweet and playful, jumped in their car unbidden when they opened the door. His love of riding suggested the name Cowboy. When someone says “wanna ride, Cowboy?” he runs to the door and plants his nose on the doorknob. Cowboy had been brought to the Animal Shelter of Moore County with an infected wound after being shot in the head. “He’s a gift from God, that he was shot and lived,” Rebecca says. Cowboy loves to chew toys but refrains from furniture and shoes. Once, he couldn’t resist investigating a bag of garbage. Apprehended, Cowboy slunk off to his kennel in self-punishment. “He’s an awesome dog,” Rebecca says.

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Lucky D o g s, Home A t L ast


The Whitehouse Family and Redskin

What’s in a different name? A world of love and companionship Rev. Bob and Joanna Whitehouse wanted to give their son Ross a dog for Christmas. Nothing unusual about that. Except Ross, 19, has Asperger’s syndrome, an autism spectrum disorder. “We felt that a dog [of his own] would mean companionship and responsibility,” Bob says. Bob learned about Angela Zumwalt and the pet matching service. A list was drawn up and an Animal Center of Moore County dog identified, sort of. “I grew up with large dogs, my wife with small,” Bob says. In 21 years of marriage they never had a dog, only a rescued cat, now 18. Honeydew was bigger (40 pounds) and younger than they had in mind, with the face of a shepherd, a Lab body, hound instincts and latent puppy behavior. “But when she lay down at Ross’s feet, it was love at first sight,” Bob says. Despite her gender and brown coat Ross named his canine companion Redskin, after the Washington Redskins, his favorite football team. The family learned that Honeydew/Redskin could be difficult on the leash; obviously frightened by previous experience, she cowered at the sight of golf carts and bicycles. Ross has persevered; he walks Redskin four or five times a day, gets ideas from The Dog Whisperer and made a toy from a fishing pole with a skunk tied at the end. After three months the bond is strong. “My son takes responsibility for her care,” Bob says. Redskin sleeps in her master’s room. He walks, exercises and feeds her. “She is Ross’s dog,” Bob says proudly.

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Lucky D o g s, Home A t L ast

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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LuCky D o g S, Home AT L A S T

Carol Wilkinson and Blue

Once an unmannered delinquent, now a treasured life companion Carol Wilkinson wasn’t looking for a dog after her long-time rescue companion died. She knew Blue only as belonging to a man at St. Joseph of the Pines, where she volunteered. When the man died, somebody from the retirement facility called Carol: Can you take this dog before he is surrendered to a shelter? That was seven years ago. “Blue was a juvenile delinquent,” no training, no manners, Carol recalls. Now, the black Lab has “more degrees than a thermometer,” including Canine Good Citizenship and Therapy Dogs International certification. He participates in pet responsibility programs in schools and visits the elderly. Blue even has a girlfriend; they play together at the Elks Club. Carol saw the possibility for more. “I have multiple sclerosis. I always wanted to train Blue as my service dog.” Fine with Blue. He picks up things Carol drops, takes clothes out of the dryer, retrieves her shoes from the closet. “We communicate without speaking. We never part company,” except at the grocery store, Carol adds. That includes sitting at her feet on flights to California and Canada. Blue has dog paddled the Atlantic and Pacific. He sleeps on her bed, gets along with the old cat. “Blue is a stabling influence in my life,” Carol says. “Everyone needs to pet a dog. You’re only whole when you have one.”

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LuCky D o g S, Home AT L A S T

The Fords and Buddy

The loss of a son leaves an impossible void. But Buddy, once homeless, is filling it with love Last June, Donna Ford suffered the unthinkable: the death of her son, Lance. But grace and healing sometimes come in unexpected ways. Ford was familiar with the work of Barbara Shepherd, director of Animal Advocates of Moore County, and through a golf tournament to honor Lance, Donna met Brenda Burt of GodSent Angels Mission, an organization aiding the homeless. From Brenda, Donna heard the sad story of a pup and his homeless master living under a bridge, in Rockingham, eating cat food or whatever was available. The man relinquished this gentle, sick tuxedo pit/Lab/ Border Collie mix only when assured his companion would find a suitable home. “His system was so messed up, with digestive problems,” Donna says. “It took weeks of feeding him chicken and rice.” The homeless man called the dog Buddy. “I tried to think of a different name,” Donna says. “Buddy is what you call a dog when you can’t think of anything else.” Donna and husband Wesley adopted Buddy in February. They kept the name because that’s what Lance called his friends. “Lance loved everybody and everybody loved him,” Donna says. And now she loves Buddy in sweet memory of Lance. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .April 2013

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Lucky D o g s, Home A t L ast

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April 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The Landinghams and Simon and Olive One big happy family

Back in 2007, Jill and Chad Landingham thought they had the ideal “family” when they acquired a beautiful Bernese mountain dog named Olive and introduced her to their two rescue cats. “Because Chad and I are both self-employed [he has a computer business, she is a hairdresser at Bamboo in Southern Pines] and out of the house sometimes eight to ten hours a day, we needed a dog that was low maintenance and comfortable. Olive was perfect and she melted our hearts.” But early last year, Jill got to worrying about Olive being alone for stretches of the day, fearing she might be getting lonely. The challenge: “Let’s find Olive the perfect companion.” The answer: “On Facebook one night I happened to be looking at Tim Sayer’s photographs of local rescued animals when a picture of a dog named ‘Ears’ appeared,” Jill recounts. “He was a pit bull with the most soulful brown eyes you’ve ever seen.” Jill moseyed out to Animal Control to meet “Ears.” It was love at first sight. “He was so adorable and sweet he instantly touched my heart. He got so excited and just wanted to be loved.” The next day, a Saturday, Chad and Olive accompanied her to meet the family’s potential newest member, a doggie version of Internet dating. “It was like a match made in heaven,” she says. “A week later, after he was neutered, we brought him home and gave him a new name — Simon.” That was almost exactly one year ago and the Landinghams couldn’t be happier. “Simon has taken over all of our lives,” Jill reports. “He is simply the sweetest and most gentle dog you’ve ever seen — yet so solid we jokingly call him The Log because of the way he sleeps in our bed.” For the record, she adds, “there are four of us in bed together now, two humans, two dogs — one big happy family.”

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Phyllis Magnuson and Lucy The beloved Border Collie who came home again

Phyllis Magnuson bought Lucy for her husband four years ago on Valentine’s Day. They had just purchased a house with 10 acres, where they keep goats and chickens. “We needed a dog to help us work the land,” Phyllis says. “I also wanted a dog that was loyal and smart.” One plus two equals a Border Collie. The best-selling Intelligence of Dogs rates this breed tops in intelligence, as evidenced by trainability. But last summer Lucy got away. “It was unlike her; she crossed the dam to Crane’s Creek Road,” losing her tag in the process. The Magnusons worried even though Lucy was microchipped. They distributed flyers and listed Lucy in The Pilot’s lost and found, also online. Sure enough, Lucy had been taken in by a family new to the neighborhood. Someone recognized her photo and re-united Lucy with the Magnusons. Now, Lucy’s back to herding goats, other dogs, the car, people — anything. “She puts her arms around your neck and her head on your shoulder when she wants a hug,” Phyllis says. Best of all, they watch Animal Planet together. “She likes the bigger dogs, the fast runners best,” Phyllis notes.

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Lucky D o g s, Home A t L ast

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Remembering Sanchez

The rescued dog that changed our photographer’s life By tim Sayer Doing the photography for the pet adoption stories in this issue was a labor of love. My passion for animal advocacy was sparked when I first moved to the area 10 years ago and picked up a stray from the side of the highway late one night while driving home from a concert in Carrboro. I’d seen a lot of road kill on the way up there, and on the way back, my passenger and I saw the glow of dog eyes in the high grass on the side of the road. Why not offer him a ride? Covered in ticks and smelling like he had run afoul of a few skunks in the woods, my furry hitchhiker happily jumped in my car with his signature perma-grin and a look that seemed to say, “What’s up, man? What took you so long?” He seemed every bit as carefree and free-wheeling as I was, but there was no way I wanted the responsibility of taking care of a dog. I vowed to drop him off at the pound the next day. And did. But my conscience got the better of me. We had bonded the night before and I couldn’t have forgiven myself if such an intelligent and charismatic dog was put to death because I didn’t want the responsibility of being a dog owner. While visiting him at Moore County Animal Control I learned from the overwhelmed workers inside that shelters all over the state were bursting at the seams with perfectly good pets being euthanized in large part because of a lax attitude towards spaying and neutering. The euthanasia rates are staggering and downright heartbreaking. Well I decided that “Sanchez” wasn’t going to be another statistic, so I paid the adoption fee and took him home. What came out of that relationship is something that I will never forget. A mixed breed mutt of debatable pedigree, he was an ambassador of good will; a loyal friend and constant companion for eight amazing years. Adopting him turned out to be the best decision I ever made. It may sound

weird, but I owe so much to him. He actually rescued me in many aspects. Others who have adopted strays understand. He taught me so much about myself — about unconditional love and what it means to really live and embrace the moment. He was the one constant in my life as I worked my own tail off to realize my dream of becoming a professional photographer. If I had a bad day, this dog and his happy demeanor quickly turned it around. Like Sanchez, I learned to appreciate the little things in life; focus on the gifts we have and not take things for granted. If he had food and water in his bowl, some fresh air to run around in and someone to love him, he was a happy camper. What more do we really need? Our culture and the media has brainwashed us into thinking our happiness is tied to obtaining that new car, iPhone or another shiny piece of technology or material object. But when it’s all said and done, it’s our relationships and the love we share that ultimately brings us contentment. Sanchez passed away more than a year ago, and it took me a long time to get to a place where I could even imagine the idea of adopting another dog. My girlfriend, Jessie, changed all that when she showed me a clipping from the paper with a picture of our new dog, Shiloh. She was rescued from a shelter that had been evacuated during Hurricane Isaac this past year in New Orleans. The Moore County Humane Society had taken her in and Jessie urged me to go in to meet her. It was pretty much love at first sight. After a brief walk with her outside I hurried in and put in my adoption application. Sometimes you just know, and this was one of those times. I’d never been as nervous in my life as I was those two days waiting for the adoption to be approved. Shiloh has been in our lives for five months and has been a Godsend of joy, love and laughter. Somewhere Sanchez is looking down with that perma-grin; tail wagging in emphatic, unconditional approval. PS

Tim Sayer and girlfriend, Jessie Ferrell, on a recent hike with Shiloh, Sanchez’s rescued successor.

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Doggie Photo Booth Every dog has a story and hopefully a human to share life’s journey. On a bark, we invited a few friends, canine and human, to drop by The Country Bookshop for a family picture in an old fashioned photo booth with donations to benefit Companion Animal Clinic Foundation, Moore Humane Society and Animal Advocates. Lumber River Photo Booths supplied the photo booth, our friends supplied the smiles.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


Mary’s Place

Story of a house

A globetrotting artist brings her world to Weymouth

By Deborah Salomon • Photograhs by John Gessner

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avender and lace, chintz and chaises, flowers and four-posters, sugar and spice and everything nice — that’s what Mary Schwab’s house is made of. However, lest you think all’s curly girly, notice the African swords, the Napoleonic-era box painted with prisoners’ blood, the mastodon molar, a gourd once filled with milk and blood to nourish warriors, a document signed by Abraham Lincoln, a pope’s timepiece and all manner of curios Mary collected while cruising the continents. She has a fountain, a reflecting pool and detached greenhouse/studio with glass-paneled ceiling. Just no computer, tablet or Kindle. “I don’t have time,” says the twice-widowed, busy-busy artist-designer, mother of five, grandmother of seven, bon vivant and friend to hundreds. But not too busy to walk her three rescued dogs at 6:45 each morning. Mary hosts A-list parties. Out-of-towners often occupy the guest cottage — when she’s not off to London, Rome or Venice. Otherwise, Mary and generations of family heirlooms seem to fill the 4,000-square-foot brick residence without crowding or clutter. That’s a bit much for one lady — unless that lady is Mary Schwab. “She’s a Renaissance woman,” declares friend and real estate agent Maureen Clark. “This was a house just waiting for her attention.” Mary, svelte in fine calfskin pants and cashmere sweater, couldn’t be happier with the showplace she has created in a Weymouth enclave known for historic manses. Hers, designed by Aymar Embury II and built on spec in 1920 by the Boyds, remains serenely, solidly Colonial Revival brick with verandas and a circular drive, surrounded by tall pines and 22 dogwoods. Called Woodstock, the house was in 1924 owned by a Mrs. Dull, perhaps of the family into which PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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James Boyd’s daughter married. The original footprint was long and narrow, just one room deep, with many interior doors that hampered flow. Strangely, the main entrance was in the back — a feature now altered.

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his house reminds me of where I came from,” Mary told her daughter on a drive around Southern Pines nine years ago. That would be Scarsdale, an affluent New York City suburb. Life, however, has positioned her in homes of several modes, including tropical Floridian. During the visit, recently widowed Mary learned that this daughter would momentarily be adopting a baby. Her place was here, Mary decided, among the longleaf pines. Fortuitously, the house she loved at first sight was on the market. Within a few days, her bid had been accepted and the Florida place sold. Mary knew nothing about the house or its history. Woostock’s condition was problematic, a plus for an enthusiastic renovator. “I’ve had a lot of houses over 100 years old, each with different personalities,” Mary says. Previous owners, she assumed, couldn’t figure out what to do with this one. “(The house) was a grand old lady who wanted to be brought back.” In other words, Woodstock required more “work” than Mary Tyler Moore and Carol Burnett combined. Mary designed the renovation, which included moving walls, relocating doors, adding a bay window, extending the footprint to include a high-ceiling hunt room for her 10-ft. French armoire. Recently she added a garden parlor opening onto a trellised gazebo where she takes meals during clement weather. She converted a smelly garage/workshop into guest quarters, kitchenette included, with a rustic log walls.

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April 2013 P������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������ PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P�������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


An acre of pine straw became a formal garden delineated by boxwoods, punctuated by Mary’s own sculpture, ablaze with azaleas. “It wasn’t a job — it was fun,” Mary insists, gleefully. If ever a house needed a docent and audio guide, Woodstock qualifies. Mary’s furnishings own no single period or provenance. All are antique, inherited, or acquired at auction. Some Middle Eastern carpets are delicately threadbare. Yet all appear indigenous to Woodstock.

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eside the front door (formerly the back door) is a tiny room, open on both sides, where servants unloaded luggage. “This is my grandma’s room,” a favorite nook with bookshelves, chairs and family photos covering every surface, including an original radiator cover. Other seating areas include the Red Room, an office-den with an easy chair for each dog, where Mary paints and takes care of business. The opulent living room, predominantly ivory, has scallopedged drapes visible from outside, a crackled, fading portrait of Mary’s great-great-great grandmother over the mantel and a black 12-panel Chinese screen, carved front and back, behind her mother’s reupholstered sofas. A small Matisse drawing contrasts with other living room art — mostly landscapes and portraiture. The garden room is light, bright, contemporary. Finally, the Hunt Room was added to accommodate that giant armoire. Here, wood-paneled walls and cathedral ceiling enclose hunting trophies, patriarch’s portraits, a custom-made piano and, totally out of character, an enormous ultramodern brown sofa, circa 21st century High Point, with low seat, soaring back and arms. PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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“It’s perfect to snuggle,” Mary says. Or, with full bathroom, serve as a sleeping space in case stairs should ever pose a problem. Cleopatra could be guest of honor and nobody would notice anything but the dining room chandelier — perhaps the hunt murals, painted by Mary, featuring local riders. The oversize milky-white glass fixture, handblown to order in Murano, comes with a story worthy of O. Henry.

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ut no room says Mary more than the kitchen, which, lacking hanging cabinets, doesn’t look like one. She tore up the vinyl floor, put down bluestone slate, used ancient boards for counters and to top an island fashioned from a French bureau. Overhead shelves hold blue, white and yellow crockery for a country air. Her Sub-Zero, instead of being wood-paneled, is faux-painted (by Mary) with crockery matching real bowls, pitchers and plates on the shelves. Mary bought the fridge at an auction in Aspen for $800, paid that and more to have it shipped, and still saved on the deal, she grins. The kitchen window was pushed out for more light, her passion. This allowed a window seat where she can sit with the dogs. Previous owners had turned the butler’s pantry into a laundry room but, thankfully, left the floor-to-ceiling cupboards, which once again hold fine tableware, not Tide. Upstairs affords only three bedrooms, some reconfigured to suit Mary’s needs. They all feel like English country gardens with flowery fabric, not

wallpaper, glued to the walls. Granddaughter Juliette’s Room is identified by a profile portrait painted by Mary. The guest room bed has mahogany posters thicker than a ship’s mast, while Mary’s bed is set into a lavishly curtained proscenium familiar to audiences at Shakespeare’s Globe or Verdi’s La Scala. Dramatic? Not for this businesswoman, scriptwriter, model and producer of MTV’s first rock video. Mary calls herself a nester, meaning “a person who keeps things with memories.” This also suggests using precious objects or at least keeping them visible. Clocks, books, paintings, mirrors, figurines — everywhere. “If you can’t live with things you shouldn’t have them,” she reasons. The result is that Mary Schwab observes the crystal goblet eternally half full. Her motto: “You’re either up or you’re out.” She sees Southern Pines/ Pinehurst as “an area where it’s easy to make wonderful friends with diverse people, bright as pennies.” Her home is both springboard and backdrop for nourishing these relationships, whether an impromptu luncheon or a book club discussion. Therefore, instead of anchoring some grandmotherly porch rocker, Mary lavished energy and resources making Woodstock hers. “When I walk in, it says I’m home — surrounded by the things I love, my things. God gave us individuality; we’re not from the same mold.” Reasonable to say that God threw away the one that created Woodstock’s latest chatelaine. PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


The Taste of Four Season Farm

By Noah Salt

By Noah Salt

April commences with a celebrated day of pranks dating to medieval times and winds up with our national homage to trees, also known as Arbor Day. Between these calendar points, temperatures range upward seven degrees, rain typically falls in abundance, and Southern gardens burst forth with flowers galore — beds of tulips and hyacinth, iris and dogwoods, apple trees and azaleas have their big moment, as do rhododendron and early daylilies, daisies and allium. Lawns are at their greenest, dotted with dandelions and screaming for a good mowing. Now is the time to plant cosmos and zinnia seeds straight into the warming soil. The woods are full of Virginia bluebells and the roadside ditches wear carpets of the first buttercups — so common in grazing meadows worldwide. English farm lore holds they are the reason butter is yellow. In Roman mythology, Flora was celebrated as the goddess of the flower and the renewed cycle of life with a festival of eating and drinking and weddings, making the beginning of the critical growing season for grapes and olives. The precise origins of April Fool’s Day are unknown, but it is mentioned as early as The Nun’s Priest’s Tale by Geoffrey Chaucer in his Canterbury Tales (1392) wherein a vain chanticleer cock is fooled by a wily fox. Iranians also make a claim to the tradition of innocent prank-making that dates back to 536 B.C., and the French and Italians each have their own days dating from medieval times in which masters attempted to fool servants and even lovers played innocent tricks on each other. In Scotland, the unwitting “fool” is sent in search of “gowks,” a fowl that does not exist, while in Poland elaborate hoaxes are common. The idea seems to be to throw off the seriousness of winter and embrace the whimsy of returning spring. For those of you who don’t fancy fooling friends or planting trees, National Golf Day is on the 18th, National Kiss Your Mate Day on the 28th.

For anyone who loves good food and great gardening wisdom, April brings a special gift in the form of The Four Season Farm Gardener’s Cookbook ($22.95) by Barbara Damrosch and Eliot Coleman, America’s foremost authorities on organic gardening and the gurus of sustainable living. These two national treasures have put together a sumptuously illustrated and powerfully useful exegesis on how to create the perfect sustainable garden — and what extraordinary things you can do with what comes out of it. The first half of the book is devoted to why and how you should grow your own food, including detailed, easy-to-digest advice and helpful working plans for providing the best soil and growing the most nutritious organic food. Part two takes you into the kitchen at Four Seasons Farm near Blue Hill, Maine, where Barbara and Eliot dazzle their guests with 120 of the finest homegrown recipes you’ll ever taste ranging from the simple sandwiches to the most memorable stews, soups, roasts, salads and desserts (hint: the Stuffed Squash Blossom Fritters are a sublime opener), often served alfresco in the garden. Take it from the Almanac Gardener, who has been lucky enough to dine with them twice, this is one garden and kitchen resource you’ll be using like your favorite garden gloves. Look for an excerpt in next month’s O.Henry magazine. Out in the garden, Out in the windy, swinging dark, Under the trees and over the flower-beds, Over the grass and under the hedge-border, Someone is sweeping, sweeping, Some old gardener. Out in the windy, swinging dark, Someone is secretly putting in order, Someone is creeping, creeping. ⁃ Katherine Mansfield, from Out in the Garden, 1922

Writer in the Garden “Peace — and grief — made gardens more precious. The gaze turned inwards, away from the world. A retired friend of mine remembers her father-in-law’s garden, so vital to him and the family. He had been badly wounded at the Somme, but seemed completely at peace in his garden, which was tremendously long but very narrow, the width of their little terraced house. He grew practically all their vegetables and fruit, and his wife celebrated Whit Sunday each year with a lunch off the season’s first crop. He saved his own seeds, sorting out and sowing them in soil that was rich and black from the compost and manure dug in over many years. He had a small shed with a folding chair and outside it a patch of lawn circled with snapdragons. The other flowers — Japanese anemones, gladioli, roses, chrysanths, stocks, sweet peas, sweet Williams — grew in rows, like the vegetables. They were poor, since he could not work for a long time after the war, and the garden was their lifeline, as it must have been for many people. It used to give him huge pleasure to load his grownup children with boxes of vegetables when they called. He never went to a garden centre in his life.” From A Little History of British Gardening, 2004, by Jenny Uglow PS

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Tuesday

Monday

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

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FLOWERS OF FAYETTEVILLE. Fayetteville Blooms! Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sun. 12 – 5 p.m. Continues through the 14th. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens, 536 North Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or www. capefearbg.org.

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A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. STONE MOSAIC WORKSHOP. 2 – 4 p.m. Mosaic stepping-stone workshop. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens. TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 6:30 p.m. Thirty questions while you dine.

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LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Does Laser Hair Removal Really Work? The Laser Institute of Pinehurst. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Southern Pines Public Library.

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RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. Dana Beach will discuss “Coastal Conservation.” Free and open to the public. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 245-3132.

“PEEPS” DIORAMA CONTEST. 5 p.m. Kids of all ages are welcome to enter the contest. Southern Pines Public Library. STARGAZING 101 AT WEYMOUTH. 8 p.m. Enjoy a beautiful spring night and discover how easy it is to locate stars and constellations. Meet at the Weymouth Woods Visitor Center.

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PINEHURST HARNESS TRACK SPRING MATINEE RACES. 11 a.m. gates open; opening ceremonies 1 p.m.; races begin at 1:30 p.m. Pinehurst Harness Track.

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SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 – 9 p.m. Member Competition: ‘Scapes. Hannah Theater Center at The O’Neal School.

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A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines Library will offer tax guidance. PIZZA AT THE LIBRARY. 5 p.m. Kids grades 6-8 are invited to stop in and explore the exciting world of flight with kites. Southern Pines Public Library.

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SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. 3 – 6 p.m. Cannon Park, Pinehurst. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. GUEST LECTURE. 6 p.m. Stephen Prickett. GUEST BARTENDER AT SLY FOX. 7 – 9 p.m. Manna!

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RICKY SKAGGS IN CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. The country artist will perform as the Community Concert’s last show of the season. Crown Theatre. MOVIE IN THE PINES. 8:30 p.m. Madagascar 3 will be showing at Downtown Park.

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SPRING FASHION SHOW & LUNCHEON. 12 p.m. Lunch includes an entry of quiche followed by dessert. Fashions are by Stein Mart. Tickets: $30. Carolina Hotel Dining Room.

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Sunday

SENIOR EVENT. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Travel to Greensboro to enjoy a Sunday matinee and buffet lunch. AUTHOR AT THE LIBRARY. 3 – 4 p.m. Sheri Castle at Southern Pines Public Library.

AUTHOR EVENT. 2 p.m. Nell Dickerson. The Country Bookshop. SPRING CLASSICAL CONCERT. 4 p.m. The Moore County Choral Society will present its 38th annual concert. PERFORMANCE AT SUNRISE THEATER. 7 p.m. Tea for Three.

TAX FREE BURGERS AT SLY FOX. Be rewarded by not paying tax on any burgers this day. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

WORKING DOG COMPETITION. K2 Solutions, Inc. hosts its first Working Dog Competition. Events are aimed to challenge both handlers and canines. Noncompetitor fee: $100, includes BBQ Monday night, vendor show, and awards banquet. Competition runs through May 2.

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. 11:30 a.m. Jamie Wiseman, clinical supervisor of Youth Villages in Pinehurst will talk about the evidence based treatment model for children with behavior challenges. Table on the Green.

SENIOR EVENT. 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. To celebrate National Park Week, travel to all the Town’s parks, then have lunch at Pressbox Grill. Cost: $2 resident/$4 nonresident (transportation only). BEER DINNER AT SLY FOX. A four-course dinner : burgers paired with the appropriate craft beer. Cost: $39. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines.

SANDHILLS FARM TO TABLE BOX DELIVERY. There’s still time to subscribe. Info: www. sandhillsfarm2table.com. SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. 3 – 6 p.m. Enjoy live music, local chef demonstrations, and kids activities. Cannon Park.

AUTHOR EVENT. Clay Rice will be creating silhouettes all day at the store. The Country Bookshop. SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. 3 – 6 p.m. Enjoy live music, local chef demonstrations, and kids activities. Cannon Park. PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library.

SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. Car Care Month. Douglass Community Center. MOVIE AT THE LIBRARY. 2:30 – 4:30 p.m. Southern Pines Public Library. GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Master Gardener, Linda Hamwi. EARTH DAY AT THE LIBRARY. 5:30 – 6:30 p.m. The evening will be filled with learning when to plant spring gardens, you’ll have the chance to create your own and then stick around for dinner. Southern Pines Public Library.

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WINE, BEER, & FOOD TASTING. 6 – 9 p.m. 14th annual event featuring over one hundred wines provided by Mutual Distributing Company. Proceeds benefit Sandhills Children’s Center. The Fair Barn.


Arts entertainment

Saturday

&

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STONEYBROOK STEEPLECHASE. 9 a.m. Carolina Horse Park. WATCH MANCESTER MATCH AT SLY FOX. A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. Southern Pines Library. FREE COOKING DEMO & WINE TASTING. Elliott’s on Linden. MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Phyllis Andrews. Hollyhocks Art Gallery. STONE MOSAIC WORKSHOP. 2 – 4 p.m. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens, Fayetteville.

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HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY SPRING PLANT SALE. 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. WEYMOUTH CENTER PLANT SALE. 9 a.m. – 1 p.m. FREE COOKING DEMO & WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Elliott’s on Linden. MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Hollyhocks Art Gallery. CHILDREN’S PUPPET SHOW. 3 p.m. Weymouth Center. BARN DANCE. 6 – 10 p.m. HABITAT SPRING GALA. 6 p.m. CCNC. LADIES NIGHT OUT FOR CHARITY. 6:30 – 10 p.m. Pinehurst Country Club.

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PINEHURST GARDEN CLUB PLANT SALE. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. GARDEN, FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. CLENNY CREEK DAY AT BRYANT HOUSE. 10 a.m. FREE COOKING DEMO & WINE TASTING. MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. PUBLIC LECTURE. 2 p.m. MIRA FUNDRAISING DINNER. FREE MOVIE SHOWING. 8 p.m.

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BOOK SALE. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Friends of the Library will hold their annual Book Sale at the Southern Pines Train Depot. SPRINGFEST. 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Broad Street and downtown Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376. OPERA AT SUNRISE THEATER. 12 p.m. Handel’s Giulio Cesare. FREE COOKING DEMO. & WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. “Crepes.” Elliott’s on Linden. MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Hollyhocks Art Gallery.

cA l e n dA r

April 1—14

April 6

Botanical Gardens, 536 North Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or www.capefearbg.org.

hat contests, expansive Kids Zone with stick horse races and pony rides. Tickets: $25/advance; $30/race day; kids 12 and under free. Carolina Horse Park, 2814 Montrose Road, Raeford. Info: (910) 875-2074 or www.stoneybrooksteeplechase.com.

FLOWERS OF FAYETTEVILLE. Fayetteville Blooms! STONEYBROOK STEEPLECHASE. 9 a.m. The 62nd • • Mon. – Sat. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Sun. 12 – 5 p.m. Cape Fear annual race features 5K/1K Run for the Ribbons, tailgating and

April 2

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines • Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must register onsite,

WATCH MANCHESTER MATCH AT SLY FOX. • 10 a.m. Watch the Premier League’s biggest and best rivalry

STONE MOSAIC WORKSHOP. 2 – 4 p.m. Mosaic • stepping-stone workshop. Cost: $35/members; $40/non-

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines • Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must register onsite,

TRIVIA NIGHT AT SLY FOX. 6:30 p.m. Thirty • questions while you dine. Do you have what it takes to

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. • “Strawberries.” Enjoy the berries in a variety of ways while

April 3

MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Phyllis Andrews. • Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info:

and there are no prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

members. Pre-registration required. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens, 536 North Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or www.capefearbg.org. win this battle of wits? The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

LUNCH AND LEARN. 12:30 – 1:30 p.m. Does Laser • Hair Removal Really Work? Cynosure Laser Answers your

games, Manchester United v. Manchester City. Traditional English breakfast menu available. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621. and there are no prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

they’re at their peak from April until June. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie.com.

Questions. The Laser Institute of Pinehurst, 80 Aviemore Court, Suite A, Pinehurst. Info/RSVP: (910) 295-1130.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Pinot gris from • Oregon. Discover the subtle but distinct nuances in flavor

and fun, and then stay for playtime. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

STONE MOSAIC WORKSHOP. 2 – 4 p.m. Mosaic • stepping-stone workshop. Cost: $35/members; $40/non-

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For infants • and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Stories, songs,

April 4

RUTH PAULEY LECTURE SERIES. 7:30 p.m. Dana • Beach will discuss “Coastal Conservation.” Free and open

between pinot gris and its twin sister from Italy, pinot grigio. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. members. Pre-registration required. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens, 536 North Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or www.capefearbg.org.

to the public. Owens Auditorium, Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 245-3132.

April 7

April 5

nies 1 p.m.; races begin at 1:30 p.m. Admission: $5; children under 12/free. Pinehurst Harness Track, Route 5, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 281-4608.

“PEEPS” DIORAMA CONTEST. 5 p.m. Kids of all • ages are welcome to enter the contest, with book characters

represented by marshmallow chicks and rabbits. For contest rules and entry forms, visit the library or go online. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

STARGAZING 101 AT WEYMOUTH. 8 p.m. Enjoy • a beautiful spring night and discover how easy it is to locate

stars and constellations. A Park Ranger will teach how to orient oneself using the North Star, and how to locate the brightest stars in the visible constellations. Free and open to the public. Meet at the Weymouth Woods Visitor Center, 1024 Fort Bragg Road Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-2167.

PINEHURST HARNESS TRACK SPRING • MATINEE RACES. 11 a.m. gates open; opening ceremo-

April 8

SANDHILLS PHOTO CLUB MEETING. 7 – 9 p.m. • Member Competition: ‘Scapes. Hannah Theater Center at The O’Neal School, 3300 Airport Road, Southern Pines. Info: www.sandhillsphotoclub.org.

April 9

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern Pines • Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must register onsite, and there are no prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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The CLUB of the sandhills

1 Membership

2 Clubs, 4 courses • Family and Single Memberships • Legends Membership (over 75) • Junior Executive Memberships (23-39) Active Duty • Social Memberships MilitAry Discounts on All MeMberships • Four championship golf courses • Unlimited Golf at all four courses • Unlimited Complimentary PGA golf instruction • Swimming pool & fitness center access • Annual Cart Plan programs with interclub access

Call for membership information Foxfire

Whispering Pines

910.295.5555 | 910.949.4332 86

April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r PIZZA AT THE LIBRARY. 5 p.m. Kids grades 6-8 • are invited to stop in and explore the exciting world of flight with kites. You will learn about flight and then create your own kite to take outside and fly! Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

April 10

$40.50. The Country Club of North Carolina, 1600 Morganton Road, Pinehurst. Info: Hope Price, (910) 692-7727; reservations: (910) 692-6565.

Concert’s last show of the season. Tickets: $35-$65. Crown Theatre, 1960 Coliseum Drive, Fayetteville. Info: (910) 438-4100.

to raise funds. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

or a chair. Concessions will be available on site. In case of inclement weather, the movie will be moved to April 19. Downtown Park, 145 SE Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

GUEST BARTENDER AT SLY FOX. 7 – 9 p.m. MOVIE IN THE PINES. 8:30 p.m. Madagascar • • A representative from MANNA! will bartend in order 3 will be showing at Downtown Park. Bring a blanket

April 11

GARDEN CLUB TOUR OF HOMES AND • GARDENS. The 65th annual Southern Pines and

Pinehurst area tour. Tickets: $20; $25 day of. Tickets can be purchased at the Campbell House and The Country Bookshop. Info: www.southernpinesgardenclub.com.

SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. 3 – 6 p.m. Local freshly harvested fruits and vegetables, baked goods, free range eggs, pasture raised pork and beef, artisan goats cheeses, jams and jellies, handcrafted soaps, flowers, pottery and more. Enjoy live music, local chef demonstrations, and kids activities. Cannon Park, Rattlesnake Drive and Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info: Melanie Riley, (803) 517-5476.

SENIOR EVENT. 12 – 1 p.m. In respect to Car • Care Month, a representative from Perry Brothers will

discuss how to maintain a vehicle to keep it running as long as possible. Learn how to maintain tires, proper oil maintenance, etc. Free and open to the public. Douglass Community Center, 1185 W. Pennsylvania Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

MOVIE AT THE LIBRARY. 2:30 ­– 4:30 p.m. The • Oldies & Goodies film series presents a 1967 classic starring Sidney Poitier and Katharine Hepburn. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For • • infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Stories, songs, and fun, and then stay for playtime. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

GUEST LECTURE. 6 p.m. The English• Speaking Union welcomes Stephen Prickett. Topic: “Did Shakespeare Have a Hand in the King James Bible.” Cocktails with dinner to follow. Cost:

Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

GATHERING AT GIVEN. 3:30 p.m. Master Gardener, Linda Hamwi, will speak about growing herbs in containers or gardens. Linda will also discuss harvesting, drying and cooking with herbs. Free and open to the public. Given Memorial Library, 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-6022.

April 12

• • • Film

RICKY SKAGGS IN CONCERT. 7:30 p.m. The country artist will perform as the Community Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

April 12 – 13

QUEST FOR THE BEST CHALLENGE. • 6:30 p.m. Benefit the Companion Animal Clinic.

Top riders and horses compete in a fun and friendly competition to determine the Sandhills’ most refined and versatile partnership. Meet the riders Friday at The Jefferson Inn, competition Saturday at Reflections Farm, 369 Black Hawk Road, Vass. Info and to vote for the rider of your choice, www.companionanimalclinic. org or (910) 639-9910.

April 13

HORTICULTURAL SOCIETY SPRING • PLANT SALE. 8 a.m. – 12 p.m. Support the Sandhills Horticultural Gardens and the Landscape Gardening students at the college and at the same time, obtain excellent locally grown plants. Sandhills Community College, Steed Hall, Pinehurst. Info/pre-order: (910) 246-4959 or (910) 695-3882.

WEYMOUTH CENTER PLANT SALE. 9 • a.m. – 1 p.m. Price friendly perennials, shrubs, trees, groundcovers, vines, and herbs that thrive in the

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ca l e n da r heat, humidity, and poor soils of the Sandhills. Cash and checks accepted. 555 East Connecticut Avenue, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 255-0010.

A.A.R.P. TAX HELP. 10 a.m. – 1 p.m. Southern • Pines Library will offer tax guidance. Clients must

register onsite, and there are no prior appointments by phone. 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. “Honey.” • Not only has honey been around for centuries, did you know that a teaspoon of local honey will help reduce your allergies? Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Jane Casnellie. • Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www.janecasnellie.com.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. • Chardonnay from France. Elliott’s on Linden, 905

CHILDREN’S PUPPET SHOW. 3 p.m. Red Herring Puppets have created an original rhymed version of the classic tales told with music and large tabletop puppets. These timeless stories are simple to understand and address topics relevant to school age children such as bullying, selfishness, competition, ingenuity, and the affirmation that little beings can achieve great things. Free. Weymouth Center, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6261.

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

HABITAT SPRING GALA. 6 p.m. The Sandhills • Habitat for Humanity 15 annual “Midway Garden th

Party.” Auction items range from vacation spots around the country to enticing culinary events. Cocktails, dinner and dancing to “Gold Rush” band. Cocktail and black tie optional. Tickets: $125. Country Club of North Carolina, 1600 Morganton Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 295-1934.

AUTHOR AT THE LIBRARY. 3 – 4 p.m. Sheri • Castle, author of The New Southern Garden Cookbook:

Recipes for Enjoying the Best from Homegrown Gardens, Farmers’ Markets, Roadside Stands and CSA Farm Boxes, will demonstrate a recipe at this event, as well as answer your cooking questions. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

April 15

TAX FREE BURGERS AT SLY FOX. Be re• warded by not paying tax on any burgers this day. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

April 16

April 14

Villages in Pinehurst, will talk about the evidence based treatment model for children with behavior challenges. Open to the public. Reservations required. Table on the Green, 2205 Midland Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 944-9611.

The Arc of Moore County with dancing, music by House Call, and heavy hors d’oeuvres. Tickets: $40; $75/premium ticket. Pinehurst Country Club, The St. Andrews Room. Info: (910) 692-8272 or www. thearcofmoore.org.

SENIOR EVENT. 11 a.m. – 7 p.m. Travel to • Greensboro to enjoy a Sunday matinee and buffet lunch. We will enjoy the play “The Color Purple” at • • • • • Film

The Barn Dinner Theatre. Cost: $50 resident/$100 non-resident (includes transportation, show ticket and lunch). Depart from the Campbell House, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

LADIES NIGHT OUT FOR CHARITY. 6:30 • – 10 p.m. The 3 annual Mom Prom will support rd

Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

Key:

BARN DANCE. 6 – 10 p.m. There will be boot scootin’ fun, country music, and good eats to benefit Prancing Horse Therapeutic Horseback Riding Center. Silent auction, music by DJ Prince Pete and dinner by Dickey’s BBQ Pit. Tickets: $60, can be purchased at The Country Bookshop, Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, Given Book Store and Sandhills Winery. McLendon Hills Equestrian Center, West End. Info: (910) 2463202 or www.prancinghorsecenter.com.

Literature/Speakers

Fun

History

Sports

LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS MEETING. • 11:30 a.m. Jamie Wiseman, clinical supervisor of Youth

April 17

• SANDHILLS FARM TO TABLE BOX D

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Opening in April

MOORE COUNTY

FARMERS MARKET

Tomatoes, Strawberries, Fruits, Veggies, Jams, Meats, Flowers & Plants Opens April 15th • Mondays- FirstHealth

(Fitness Center) Facility courtesy of First Health 170 Memorial Dr • Pinehurst 2pm-5:30pm Will be open through October 28th

OpenYearRound•Thursdays- 604W.MorgantonRd (Armory Sports Complex) Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Southern Pines 9am-1pm

Opens April 20th • Saturdays - Downtown Southern Pines Facility courtesy of Town of Southern Pines Broad St & New York Ave 8am-Noon Will be open through October 26th

Call 947-3752 or 690-9520 for more info Websearch: Moore County Farmers Market Local Harvest www.facebook.com/Moore County Farmers Market SNAP Welcomed Here

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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ca l e n da r DELIVERY. Delivery of $430,000 worth of local fruits and vegetables begins this month. Sandhills Farm to Table Cooperative, a grassroots community endeavor organized to provide members with fresh local produce and local farmers with a stable market. There’s still time to subscribe. Info: www.sandhillsfarm2table.com.

SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. • 3 – 6 p.m. Local freshly harvested fruits and vegetables, baked goods, free range eggs, pasture raised pork and beef, artisan goats cheeses, jams and jellies, handcrafted soaps, flowers, pottery and more. Enjoy live music, local chef demonstrations, and kids activities. Cannon Park, Rattlesnake Drive and Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info: Melanie Riley, (803) 517-5476.

April 18

EARTH DAY AT THE LIBRARY. 5:30 – 6:30 • p.m. The evening will be filled with learning when to

plant spring gardens, you’ll have the chance to create your own and then stick around for dinner. Children in grades K-5 and their families are invited. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

April 19

BUDDY HOLLY CONCERT AT THE • TEMPLE THEATER. 8 p.m. Baxter Clement as

Buddy Holly, along with other guest artists. A fundraiser for Temple Theater. Reserved seating: $25. 120 Carthage St., Sanford. Info: (919) 744-4155 or www.templeshows.com.

April 20

PINEHURST GARDEN CLUB PLANT • SALE. 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. Geraniums, impatiens, vinca,

begonias, and mandevilla available for pre-order. A variety of herbs, hanging baskets, etc. will be available day of. All proceeds to benefit a student of Sandhills Community College, and local beautification projects. Parking lot at the corner of Magnolia Road and Rassie Wicker Drive, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 235-0070.

GARDEN, FOOD & WINE FESTIVAL. 10 • a.m. – 3 p.m. Featuring 13th annual spring plant sale. Cape Fear Botanical Gardens, 536 North Eastern Blvd., Fayetteville. Info: (910) 486-0221 or www. capefearbg.org.

CLENNY CREEK DAY AT BRYANT HOUSE. • 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. 8 annual celebration features th

games, vendors, historic interpretations, food, music and reenactments reflecting the colonial days. Rain date: April 21, 12 – 5 p.m. Bryant House, 3361 Mt. Carmel Road, Carthage. Info: (910) 692-2051 or www.moorehistory.com. FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. • “Sausage.” Good sausage is all about balance. Balance

of salt and savory, balance of meat and fat, balance of spices and herbs within the whole. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Betty • DeBartolomeo. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www. janecasnellie.com.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

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Dance/Theater Fun History

April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Sauvignon blanc from New Zealand. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775. PUBLIC LECTURE. 2 p.m. “Peace for the • World: Prayers that counteract terrorism.” Lecturer

is Kari Mashos, member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship. Sandhills Horticultural Center, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 692-7759.

MIRA FUNDRAISING DINNER. 6:30 p.m. • 3 annual Dining in the Dark Dinner. Cocktails rd

with dinner to follow at 7:15. Proceeds allow blind youngsters with MIRA to receive guide dogs. Tickets: $125. Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive. Info: (910) 944-7757.

FREE MOVIE SHOWING. 8 p.m. Wreck it • Ralph. Bring blankets or lawns chairs and a enjoy free

family movie at the Village Arboretum. Come early for free face painting and games. AJ’s Concessions will have hot dogs, drinks, candy and popcorn available for purchase. Pinehurst Arboretum. Info: (910) 295-0166.

April 22

SPRING FASHION SHOW & LUNCHEON. • 12 p.m. Lunch includes an entree of quiche followed by dessert. Fashions are by Stein Mart. Tickets: $30. Carolina Hotel Dining Room, Pinehurst Resort, 80 Carolina Vista Drive. Info: (910) 295- 4677.

April 24

AUTHOR EVENT. An all day event, Clay • Rice will be creating silhouettes all day at the store. Please sign up by calling or walking in for a time. At 11 a.m. Clay will perform songs for his new book. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www. thecountrybookshop.biz.

SANDHILLS FARMERS GREEN MARKET. • 3 – 6 p.m. Local freshly harvested fruits and vegetables, baked goods, free range eggs, pasture raised pork and beef, artisan goats cheeses, jams and jellies, handcrafted soaps, flowers, pottery and more. Enjoy live music, local chef demonstrations, and kids activities. Cannon Park, Rattlesnake Drive and Woods Road, Pinehurst. Info: Melanie Riley, (803) 517-5476.

PRESCHOOL STORYTIME. 3:30 – 4 p.m. For • infants and toddlers ages birth through 5 years. Stories, songs, and fun, and then stay for playtime. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

April 26

WINE, BEER, & FOOD TASTING. 6 – 9 p.m. • 14 annual event featuring over one hundred wines th

provided by Mutual Distributing Company. Sample delicious cuisine from a number of area chefs. Proceeds benefit Sandhills Children’s Center. Sponsorship packages available. Tickets: $50; $100/at the door. The Fair Barn, 200 Beulah Hill Road, Pinehurst. Info: www. sandhillschildrenscenter.org.

April 26 – 27

• BEDDING PLANT SALE. 1 – 5 p.m., Friday; ••• • • • • • Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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ca l e n da r 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Saturday. Petunias, impatiens and marigolds plus tomatoes, peppers and herbs are featured. Proceeds from the sale benefit the student’s annual educational field trip. Sandhills Community College, Steed Hall, Pinehurst. Info/pre-order: (910) 246-4959 or (910) 695-3882.

April 27

BOOK SALE. 9 a.m. – 4 p.m. Friends of the • Library will hold their annual Book Sale at the

Southern Pines Train Depot. Thousands of almost new and gently used books will be available for purchase at extremely reasonable prices. Southern Pines Public Library, 170 W. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8235 or www.sppl.net.

SPRINGFEST. 10 a.m. –­ 4 p.m. Bike races for • 10 and under begin at 11:15, registration 9 – 10:55

a.m. Featuring displays by local businesses, community organizations, and fine artists and craftspeople. Broad Street and downtown Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

OPERA AT SUNRISE THEATER. 12 p.m. • Handel’s Giulio Cesare. Tickets $25. The opera that

conquered London in Handel’s time comes to the Met in David McVicar’s lively production. Sunrise Theater, 250 North West Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-8501 or www.sunrisetheater.com.

FREE COOKING DEMO. 12 & 2 p.m. • “Crepes.” The versatile crepe can be dressed up or

down with many different add-ons. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

MEET THE ARTIST. 12 – 3 p.m. Morgen • Kilbourn. Hollyhocks Art Gallery, 905 Linden

Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 255-0665 or www. janecasnellie.com.

FREE WINE TASTING. 12 – 4 p.m. Viognier. • Once a well-kept secret from the Northern Rhone Valley, the world has discovered this unique, aromatic white wine with a hint of peach and apricot. Elliott’s on Linden, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Info: (910) 215-0775.

April 28

AUTHOR EVENT. 2 p.m. Nell Dickerson, au• thor of Porch Dogs, will host a porch-sitting event as the store front will be transformed into a classic Southern front porch. Dogs are welcomed. The Country Bookshop, 140 NW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-3211 or www.thecountrybookshop.biz.

SPRING CLASSICAL CONCERT. 4 p.m. • The Moore County Choral Society will present its

38th annual concert. Tickets: $18; available at The Campbell House, The Country Bookshop, Kirk Tours/Pinehurst, Sandhills Winery/Seven Lakes, at the door and online. Robert E. Lee Auditorium at Pinecrest High School, 100 Voit Gilmore Lane, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-6979 or www.moorecountychoralsociety.org.

PERFORMANCE AT SUNRISE THEATER. • 7 p.m. Tea for Three. a behind-the-scenes look at Lady

Bird Johnson, Pat Nixon, and Betty Ford. Share the journey of each as she deals with the fishbowl of First

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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cA l e n dA r

Whispering Pines Animal Hospital E. Lyerly, D.V.M • E. Pelkey, D.V.M Wm. McDuffie, D.V.M • D. Hobbs, D.V.M K. Andrews, D.V.M

Compassionate Care for Cherished Pets

Ladydom. Tickets: $35. Sunrise Theater, 250 North West Broad Street, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 6928501 or www.sunrisetheater.com.

WEEKLY HAPPENINGS Mondays

LIVE MUSIC AT CIRCLE M CITY. 7 p.m. • Gather at the wild west town’s free music event. 74

April 29 – May 2

WORKING DOG COMPETITION. • K2 Solutions, Inc. hosts its first Working Dog

Cowboy Lane, Sanford. Info: (919) 499-8493.

Competition. Events are aimed to challenge both handler’s and canine’s control, capabilities and tenacity. Non-competitor fee: $100, includes BBQ Monday night, vendor show, and awards banquet. To compete or purchase a non-competitor pass sign up online. Info/registration: (910) 692-6898 or www.k2si.com.

April 30

SENIOR EVENT. 10:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. To celebrate National Park Week, travel to all the town’s parks today and enjoy the beautiful weather, then have lunch at Pressbox Grill. Cost: $2 resident/$4 nonresident (transportation only). Sign up by April 15. Meet at the Campbell House, Southern Pines. Info: (910) 692-7376.

BEER DINNER AT SLY FOX. A four-course • dinner themed around the altogether wonderful burger and paired with the appropriate craft beer. Cost: $39. The Sly Fox Pub, 795 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1621.

Call to schedule an appointment!

(910) 949-2111

Key:

• • Art

Music/Concerts

Dance/Theater

Fridays

FREE COOKING DEMO. 5 – 6 p.m. A fun way • to play with your food using quick, easy, in-season ingredients. Samples included. The Flavor Exchange, 115 E New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Info: (910) 725-1345.

Art Galleries ABOUT ART GALLERY inside The Market Place Midland Bistro Building, 2160 Midland Road, Pinehurst. The gallery features local artists. Open Monday-Friday 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. (910) 215-596. ART NUTZ AND RAVEN POTTERY, 125 SW Broad St., Southern Pines. Come see the potter at work. Features art, pottery from local potters, handmade jewelry, glass and more. MondaySaturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 695-1555, www. ravenpottery.com. ARTIST GALLERY OF SOUTHERN PINES, 167 E. New Hampshire Ave., Southern Pines. Features art and fine crafts from more than 60 North Carolina artists. 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 692-6077.

• • Film

Literature/Speakers

• • Fun

History

Sports

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910.235.CoiN (2646)

April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


ca l e n da r Artists League of the Sandhills, 129 Exchange St. in historic Aberdeen. Exhibit hours are noon – 3 p.m., Monday-Saturday. (910) 944-3979. Broadhurst Gallery, 2212 Midland Road, Pinehurst. Showcases works by nationally recognized artists such as Louis St. Lewis, Lula Smith, Shawn Morin, Rachel Clearfield, Judy Cox and Jason Craighead. Meet-the-artist opportunities available. Monday-Friday (closed Wednesday), 11 a.m. – 5 p.m., Saturday, 1 – 4 p.m & special appointments. (910) 2954817, www.broadhurstgallery.com. The Campbell House Galleries, 482 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. Monday-Friday 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. and every third weekend of the month from 2 – 4 p.m. (910) 692-4356, www.mooreart.org. The Downtown Gallery inside Cup of Flow, 115 NE Broad St., Southern Pines. Everchanging array of local and regional art, pottery and other handmade items. (910) 693-1999. The Gallery at Seven Lakes at the St. Mary Magdalene building, 1145 Seven Lakes Drive. Just nine miles from the Pinehurst Traffic Circle up 211, this gallery is dedicated to local artists. WednesdayThursday 1 – 4 p.m. Hastings Gallery in the Katharine L. Boyd Library at Sandhills Community College, Pinehurst. Gallery hours are Monday-Thursday 7:45 a.m. – 9 p.m., Friday 7:45 a.m. – 5 p.m. and Saturday 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m. HOLLYHOCKS ART GALLERY, 905 Linden Road, Pinehurst. Features artwork by local award winning artists, Phyllis Andrews, Betty DiBartolomeo, Equine Sculptor Morgen Kilbourn, Diane Kraudelt, Carol Rotter and artist/owner, Jane Casnellie. MondaySaturday 10:30 a.m. – 9:30 p.m. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. Meet the artists on Saturdays, 12 – 3 p.m. (910) 255-0665, www.hollyhocksartgallery.com. Lady Bedford’s Tea Parlour, 25 Chinquapin Road, Pinehurst. Features local artist Nancy Campbell’s original oil and watercolor paintings. Tuesday - Saturday 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 255-0100, www.ladybedfords.com. The Old Silk Route, 113 West Main St., Aberdeen. Specializes in Asian original art, including silk paintings, tapestries, Buddhist Thangkas and Indian paper miniatures. Monday, Thursday-Saturday 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. (910) 295-2055. Seagrove Candle Company, 116 N.W. Broad St., Southern Pines. Showcases art of the Sandhills and Seagrove area. Monday, Wednesday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., (910) 695-0029. SKY Art Gallery, 602 Magnolia Drive, Aberdeen. Tuesday-Saturday 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. (910) 944-9440, www.skyartgallery.com. Studio 590 by the pond in Dowd Cabin, 590 Dowd Circle, Pinehurst. This historic log cabin is the working studio and gallery of artists Betty DiBartolomeo and Harry Neely. Fine oil paintings, commissions and instruction. (910) 639-9404.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013P��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


PineNeedler Answers

ca l e n da r White Hill Gallery, 407 U.S. 15-501, Carthage, offers a variety of pottery. (910) 947-6100.

Hours vary. 288 Alston House Road (10 miles north of Carthage), Sanford. (910) 947-2051.

Nature Centers

Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum. 1 – 4 p.m. Wednesday-Saturday. Group tours can be arranged by appointment. (910) 944-7558 or (910) 603-2739.

Sandhills Horticultural Gardens (32 acres of gardens). The Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are handicapped-accessible. Daylight hours year-round. (910) 695-3882. Weymouth Woods Sandhills Nature Preserve (898 acres). 1024 Fort Bragg Road, Southern Pines. (910) 692-2167. VILLAGE ABORETUM. 35 acres of land adjoining the Village Hall on Magnolia Road, Pinehurst. (910) 295-1900.

Historical Sites Bethesda Church and Cemetery. Guided tours for groups by appointment. 1020 Bethesda Road, Aberdeen. (910) 944-1319. Bryant House and McLendon Cabin. Tours by appointment. (910) 692-2051 or (910) 673-0908. Carthage Historical Museum. Sundays, 2 – 5 p.m. or by appointment. Located at Rockingham and Saunders streets, Carthage. (910) 947-2331. House in the Horseshoe. Open year-round.

From page 111

North Carolina Literary Hall of Fame. 10 a.m. – 2 p.m., Monday-Friday, at the Weymouth Center for Arts and Humanities, 555 E. Connecticut Ave., Southern Pines. (910) 692-6261. Shaw House Property. Open 1 – 4 p.m. Tuesday-Friday. (910) 692-2051. Tufts Archives. 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., MondayFriday, and 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m. Saturday. (910) 295-3642. Union Station. Open 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Located in downtown Aberdeen. (910) 944-5902. Sandhills Woman’s Exchange Log Cabin Open 10 a.m. – 3 p.m. (910) 295-4677. PS To add an event, email us at pinestraw@thepilot.com by the first of the month prior to the event.

••• • •

Key: Art Music/Concerts Film Literature/Speakers Sports

• • •

Dance/Theater Fun History

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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TVOE_Pinestraw_April13Final_Layout 1 3/5/13 9:34 AM Page 1

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen 28th Heart ’n’ Soul of Jazz at the Carolina Hotel Featuring the Preservation Hall Jazz Band Saturday, February 16, 2013 Photographs by Al & Annette Daniels

Aliza Sir, Sam Gerstle Judy Silver, Betty Clemens, Marie Hopping Jim & Nancy Nemeth

Pete & Cookie Kremer

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Al & Kathy Howard, Laura & Tylon Browner

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Brenda Lyne, Sharon & Carnie Lawson, Mary-Stewart Regensburg

Emily & Paul Davis, Erica & Christopher Buckley

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Front: Terry Strohl, Heather Funk, Christine Pritchard; Back: Gary Strohl, Gil Pritchard

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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7th Annual Penick Art Show & Sale Preview at Penick Village’s Grand Hall Village House Friday, March 1, 2013 Photographs by Al & Annette Daniels

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April 2013 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen

Dr. Rebecca Estes’ Downton Abbey Birthday Party to Benefit Companion Animal Clinic Monday, March 4, 2013 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Rebecca Estes

Donna Kamalbake, Tayloe Compton, Katie Walsh, Marcia Bryant

Carol Butler, Aggie Cohen

Diane Brown

Deborah Wilson, Linda Hoover, Dr. Cindy Eaton Floreen Maroncelli, Cindy O’Reilly, Carolyn Maroncelli

Debbie Thomasson, Kay Whitlock

Jim & Dr. Lori Heim

Cindy Pagnotta, Marci Quist, Amy Brown Cindy Shepherd, Rhonda Dretel

Taniya Smith, Wendy Preble

Jan Van Fossen, Peggy Baldwin

Marilyn Neely, Denise Baddour, Raney Rogers, Frances Wilson

Carolyn Maroncelli, Wanda Silas, Marged Harris

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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EPISCOPAL DAY SCHOOL’S SUMMER CAMPS Episcopal Day School Summer Day Camp offers educationally based recreation in a safe and caring environment for children ages 3 – 11. Full day Summer Camp 8:00 – 5:00 Monday – Friday $150.00 Half-day Summer Camp 8:00 – 12:30 Monday – Friday $100.00

Week 1 - June 17th – 21st – Bible School/Summer Fun (after Bible School) Emmanuel Episcopal Church Bible School 9:00 – 12:00 (no charge) Please contact church for info 692-3171 Week 2 - June 24th – 28th – Community Helpers Week 3 – July 1st – 2nd – Proud to be an American (Closed W/TH/F) Week 4 - July 8th – 12th Animals Week 5 – July 15th – 19th – Drama/Stories Week 6 - July 22nd – 26th – Fitness Fun Week 7 - July 29th – Aug 2nd – Nature Week 8 - Aug. 5th – 9th – Around the World Week 9 – Aug. 12th – 16th – Heroes For more information or registration form visit www.episcopalday.org click on summer programs or contact Episcopal Day School at 910-692-3492 340 East Massachusetts Ave., Southern Pines, NC 28387

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April 2013 i����������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


SandhillSeen Moore County Hounds Hunter Trials Saturday, March 2, 2013 Photographs by Jeanne Paine

Beth Dowd, Gary Lergner

Claudia Coleman, Jayne Nelson

Katie Walsh, Dr. Jock Tate, Dick Walsh Dr. Fred McCashin, Cameron Sadler. Babs Minery

Cindy Pagnotta, Laura Lindamood

Reina Tiffany Teeter, Wendy Hopper, Tia Chick

Dr. Nick Ellis, Tayloe Compton, Sassy Riley, Effie Ellis

Blair Spencer, Mary Dembosky, Janie Boland Erin Kirkland, Dick Webb

Ellie Dembosky, Mel Wyatt

Alicia Rosser, Neil Schwartzberg, Landon Nesser, Mike Russell

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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Equestrian

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Kristen & Steve Groner

Episcopal Day School Fundraiser at Forest Creek Saturday, March 16, 2013 Photographs by John Gessner

John Fessenden, Carolyn Giltzow, Jessica & Fred Trost Jenni & Ed Soccorso Sally & Buck Adams

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PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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T h o u g h ts f r o m T h e Ma n S h e d

The Fundraiser

By Geoff Cutler

When we were little, and it

was getting close to dinner, she was on the phone. She had a desk in the kitchen, and on it were piled her papers, her personal phone book, her lists, her calendar, and her ashtray. If it was after six, it was likely there was also a cocktail glass full of ice, and a bit of Early Times resting close by.

I am quite sure that our pork chops, which had the consistency of not such good shoe leather, the spinach, simmered for an hour, and lacking taste and much needed nutrients, and the potatoes . . . the potatoes were fine . . . hard to screw up a potato, all might have been tastier had she not been on the phone while our dinner over-cooked. Now, my father never criticized my mother. Never had a mean word to say, and certainly, never criticized her food. He furled up his eye and looked angrily at us if we winced because gnawing on the chops hurt our teeth, but all of a sudden, we had a cook, and my mother was freed to be on the phone. My father went through a string of cooks that way because none of them were much handier in the kitchen than my mom was. But that’s another story. She was on the phone with friends, Merge, or Rose-La, that’s true. But most often she was on the phone fundraising. She raised money for whatever organization, charity or political candidate she had volunteered to help. And she was good at it. Very good. There was the symphony, or the hospital, the attorney general, the school’s new hockey rink. Whenever and wherever money needed to be raised, folks called on her. And too often, and with help from her friends, she would raise much of the money by planning parties around her fundraising efforts. Nights would begin with cocktails at the house where we grew up. Its size and grandeur, with the huge pillars out front, just lent itself to

wonderful parties in the Gatsby vein. And cars would roll up under the porte-cochere. A valet would hold open the passenger side door to elegant ladies in beautiful gowns who would emerge with a swish, and wait for their husbands to meet them on the landing. They were equally smashing in their tuxedoes and soft leather pumps, their hair slicked back from their clean-shaven faces. Couple after glamorous couple entered the house until literally hundreds filled its halls. We peeped through the banister railings and saw the waiters, trays filled with delicately arranged hors d’oeuvres, champagne and cocktails, working their way through the crowd. And we heard our mother’s laugh above it all. And then as quickly as they’d come, they were gone. All nicely escorted and packed into their cars, they drove downtown for the main event of the evening. The ball. They danced to the music of an orchestra, and the party carried on into the early hours of the following day. And when her head had cleared, she sat to add up what they had done for others. Over the years, she raised millions of dollars as a fundraiser, and when she came to Southern Pines, there was a theater that needed her help. She sprang into action, along with Norris Hodgkins and David Woronoff, and did what she did so well. In early May, a dinner dance, much like those my mother held when we were little, will be held at Broadhearth, her home here in Southern Pines. She will not be able to attend, but she would love to know that this was being done for an organization she and so many others love and care about. There is no better way to continue supporting a theater like ours than to dress up, be with friends, dance, eat and celebrate it. PS Geoff Cutler is owner of Cutler Tree LLC in Southern Pines. He is a regular contributor to PineStraw. He can be reached at geoffcutler@embarqmail.com. ———————————————— Invitations are sent to theater donors and others on a Sunrise list, but the theater would be happy to have anyone who wishes to attend the gala do so. Invitations are available by calling the Sunrise office at (910) 692-8501.

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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April PineNeedler

By Mart Dickerson

ACROSS 1 Expression of surprise 4 Indo-European person 8 Hurt with a knife 12 Cut off 13 Four, on a Roman clock 14 Takes a puff of pot 16 1st part of phrase 18 Dislike intensely 20 Tons 21 Take a gander 23 Not him 24 NC State team color 25 Evergreen in our area 26 Sail the seven ____ 27 Close the door hard 29 Hates 32 Grain 33 Units of energy 34 3rd part of phrase 38 4th part of phrase (2 words) 40 To suppose something to be true 41 Delegate, as a task 42 Stack of paper 43 Car fuel 44 Most humble, as a mouse 46 Motorized item on Pinehurst No. 2 47 Not difficult 50 Clock time (abbr.) 51 Make a mistake 52 Cleopatra’s snake 53 Hawaiian island 55 Stoneybrook events 58 5th part of phrase 60 Lounge around (2 words) 63 Many months 64 Deuces 65 7th part of phrase 66 Spic and _____ 67 Swerve, slide, as on skis 68 Cap

A DOG-GONE OPINION!

DOWN 1 Alack’s partner 2 Hospital (abbr.) 3 Contraption 4 Fathered, on Youngs Rd. 5 Tell a fib 6 Small island 7 Small, purple flowers 8 Normandy war town 9 Snatched 10 Alias initials 11 2nd part of phrase (2 words) 15 Former NY stadium 17 Gossip tidbit 19 Hesitations in speech 22 In debt 25 Bank thief 26 Former Soviet Union members 27 Tofu make-up 28 Country in SE Asia 29 Male bee 30 Jack, who could eat no fat 31 Swarm with 33 Rim 35 Put a glaze on, like donuts 36 Sharif, of the movies 37 Bird’s home 39 Covered with ice 40 Annoyance, like an insect 42 End products 45 British MPH 46 Clawed seafood 47 Dine 48 Pale-like, colorless 49 Double agents 51 Rub off a chalkboard 53 Gumbo veggie 54 Corp. 56 European monetary unit 57 ____on it!! Hurry 59 Catch some Z’s 61 Hole punching tool 62 6th part of phrase

Sudoku:

Fill in the grid so every row, every column and every 3x3 box contain the numbers 1-9. Puzzle answers on page 97

Mart Dickerson lives in Southern Pines and would welcome any suggestions from her fellow puzzle masters. She can be reached at martaroonie@gmail.com

PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . April 2013

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southwords

Hand in a Glove

It was just me and Willie Mays and a great big world

By Ed Peele

The other day I was killing

time in my man space (read shed that I share with spiders, leaves and a mouse named Toto) when I came across a small, nearly forgotten box in the corner. It was labeled “kitchen” and was one of those boxes we all have that we don’t see every day, but we always know where it is. And we surely know what’s in it. I love this box because every time I run across it I feel compelled to take a few minutes, open it up and fiddle with the contents.

What’s inside never fails to take me back in time. No matter what the stress of the moment I find I can relax and let it go. Four old and somewhat reconditioned baseball gloves wait for me when the top is folded back. They are of no historic consequence whatsoever and to the unknowing look only like a good place for dust or Toto’s winter hideaway. They are, like most baseball gloves, just leather hand coverings, meaning nothing to the world and everything to the owner. That is, until you slip a hand into the stitched opening and wiggle your fingers up into the oversized slots, then reflexively you do what everyone always does, you ball up your free hand into a fist and pop it into the palm of the glove. Two or three times. This is the signal for time travel to begin. The first games of baseball were played in the vacant lot behind Abner Doubleday’s house with no hand protection at all. Players just reached out and grabbed the ball as best they could, followed by a few seconds of shaking their hands to relieve the stinging and get feeling back into their fingers. It is no surprise that a catcher was the first to come up with the idea of some sort of covering to reduce the pain. The first use of gloves was actually frowned on because it was thought to be “unmanly.” Comfort soon won out over pain, and the baseball glove industry evolved into what it is today. Millions of huge hand extenders that enhance the ability of some great athletes are sold each year for hundreds of millions of dollars. My own first baseball glove was a Wilson which Willie Mays personally signed on the outside of the last finger. I don’t really remember getting the glove, just remember having it. When I put on my glove now I feel like I am 10 years old again, walking onto the field to try out, then waiting to see which team was destined to be my home for the next four years. Playing baseball was a rite of passage in my small town; everybody I knew played Little League. The competition and prestige of winning the season was intense. There was no lack of enthusiasm on the field and in the stands. In fact the first real fight I ever saw was two grown men going at it after one particularly close game. Local civic clubs sponsored teams, each with a unique team color and profile. The Rotarians — color: yellow — included a mix of city and country boys who

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were strong with glove and bat. The Kiwanis team was primarily city boys who “played hard” and intimidated me quite a bit. Deacons (green) represented the churches and seemed to be the perpetual losers, in a very kind way. The Jaycees had blue hats and were made up of kids from Doodle Hill. They were tough and loud, my earliest version of an arch rival. I claimed the dugout of the Lions, and along with the likes of Snookie, Bubba, Booger, Danny, Mike, Laurence and Roy, we competed with royal purple colors and the hearts of the club we were named for. As I remember, we competed every year for the local title. I would like to report that I contributed mightily to our victories with my prowess in the field and dominance over the opposing pitchers, but that would be a lie. The fact is, in hindsight, I know I played so many positions as a result of my coach trying to spare my parents the embarrassment of having a benchwarming. The notion of not having a career in baseball dawned on me during a game with Jaycees. The game was tied as Willie Mays and I trotted out to center field. I could hear the shouting and jeering coming from the blue dugout as it had all night; recognizing most of the voices and being glad I was way out in center field and not in the infield. As the first couple of batters reached base I leaned with my hands on my knees and shouted, “Hum baby, hum baby, throw it in there Mike,” all the while whispering to myself, “Please don’t hit to me, please not to me,” to which somebody in the Jaycees dugout started chanting “Cen-ter-field, cen-ter-field!” The crack of the bat put my feet in gear as I began searching the night sky for a little white dot. There it is. I see it. I know I can do this as I wave off my teammates by shouting, “I got it, I got it.” I move back and to my right until I can feel the sandspurs that have grown up in the fence brushing against my shoe tops. I move into position, raising Willie Mays up into place to stop a very well-hit ball. But Willie and I have moved just a split second too slow. The ball snips the top of my glove and hits me squarely in the head, bounces another 15 feet in the air and over the fence, along with my hat. A home run, game over. For just a few seconds I can’t hear anything and I think, or rather hope, it might be the result of the ball off my head. Then I realize I have silenced everyone on the field, two dugouts, an aluminum bleacher full of fans, a parking lot and the fast food restaurant across the street. If you were wondering, I did in fact survive that night. I pull out those gloves from time to time and just laugh out loud while thinking what that scene must have looked like from everywhere except under the ball. The collective gasp and stifled guffaws of the crowd must have been difficult to contain. I also smile and reflect on so many more good and memorable moments from that period of my life. So strong are those memories that from time to time I will buy an old glove from a yard sale or junk shop, slide my hand in and wonder about the memories of some other childhood. For now I just rub a little glove oil into the palm and pop it hard with a bare fist. Anybody want to play some catch? PS Ed Peele is a frequent contributor to PineStraw. Illustration by Pamela Powers January

April 2013 i��������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������������� PineStraw : The Art & Soul of the Sandhills


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Profile for PineStraw Magazine

April 2013 PineStraw  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

April 2013 PineStraw  

The Art & Soul of the Sandhills

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