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Pi Kappa Phi


A Message from the

Supreme Archon It has been my privilege to serve the fraternity in the capacity of supreme archon for nearly four years. You have no~ hoinored. me by elect ion to officde for a thirdÂŁ tihme. Tb.his . . act10n can mterpret on 1y as an en orsement o t e o Jectives of sound organization and constructive brotherhood which I and my fellow supreme officers have constantly set before the fraternity, and as a challenge to me to guide you consistently along the path which will lead to their attainment. I have always believed the college fraternity to be an integral part of the American system of higher education and a vital factor in the educational process. IÂŁ this be true, the fraternity must do its part in training its members to become community leaders in business and professional activity and in thought. The fraternity must contribute to the scholastic and moral well-being of its members. Fraternity life must not become a handicap to character building and to mental development as, unfortunately, has sometimes been the case in the past. Hence I have insisted that the chapters of Pi Kappa Phi must be organized and conducted on solid foundations and high principles scholastically, socially, and financially. In this period of depression and consequent uncertainty and nervous strain, it behooves us to adhere more steadfastly than ever to these ideals. It is our duty as citizens to live economically and to put forth our best efforts to perform faithfully and efficiently our tasks and duties. The same attitude must be carried over into our fraternity life. Supreme officers and chapter officers can lead. But the power to accomplish must come from a united membership, active and alumni alike. The challenge to pull together with a common purpose goes forth to every Pi Kapp. When we arrive at the end of the year, even more when, after two years have elapsed, we meet as a supreme chapter, let us be able to look back at obstacles surmounted, at problems solved, at progress attained. Then we shall be happy in the advancement of our beloved fraternity and we shall be better men because of having performed steadfastly and well the work which was set before us.

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Volume

THE STAR AND LAMP

Number

Of PI KAPPA PHI

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XVII

For OCTOBER, 1931 Application has been made for transfer of second class entry from Evanston, Illinois, to Menasha, Wisconsin. - 11 K •1•-

The Slflr and Lamp is published at Menasha, Wisconsin, under the direction of the Supreme Counci l of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, in the months of October, Decem· ber, February and May. - 11 K <1•-

The Life Subscription is $ 10 and is the on ly form of sub· scription . Sing le copies are 50 cents.

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Changes in address shou ld be reported promptly to Central Office, Box 382, Evanston, Ill. -11 K ·~-

All materia l intended for pub· lication should be in the hands of the Managing Edi tor, Box 382, Evanston, Ill ., by the 15th of the month pre· ceding the month of issue. - 11 K <I>-

Contents Page Presenting the H eads of the Fraternity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 4 Sixteenth Supreme Chapter Becomes Acceptable History Activiti es of Past Biennium Summarized by Report of Supreme Archon W agener . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Their D eeds Remain After Th em . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Convention Adds Attractive Song to the fraternity's Long List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 A H appy Convention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Pi Kappa Phi Enters Rensselaer Polytechnic ..... 15 By William Jo Berry Alpha Omicron Chapter Winner of Second Efficiency Contest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 20 Talbot Hartley Blazes N ame in Track History ... 22 By Ralph Snider Julien C. Hyer Becomes Biggest Lion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Pi Kapp Mothers' Clubs Are Active m the Fraternity's Interests . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 Under the Student's Lamp ........... 30 By Dr. Will E. Edington Press Publicity .... .................. . .. .. 32 Personals ...... . ..... . ... 34 The Ultimate Chapter ...... .. 35 Chapter Practices ... .. .. . .. 38 Observation and Opinion ........ .. 41 Key Notes . .. .......... . ..... . . . 44 Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity ... ... 45 0

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L. YouNG H o11orary Editor

RrcHARD

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Managing Editor ]on W . CANNON, JR . B111ineSJ i\f1mager

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THE COVER • The Memorial Union Building, Oregon State College, one of the handsomest and most completely appointed buildings of its type on the American campus. It is the center of the campus activities, providing a place for all and sundry. . • Professor Starker, Greno, and Peacock of Alpha Zeta combined efforts to persuade the editor to "show the East that we also have some fin e buildings in the W est, " or words to that effect. The persuasion was not difficult. The building pictured is representative of the breath-taking manner in which the West equips its universities. Too, the atmosphere of the photograph is beautifully seasonal and timely: the leaden skies, the fallen leaves, the darkened sheen of evergreens, all mean that melancholy fall is here again.


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Presenting-

The Heads oF the Fraternity -Biennium I93I-33

SUPREME ARCHON A. PELZER WAGENER For the Fraternity: One of the seven original members of Alpha Chapter; instigator of chartering of Xi Chapter; district archon of Virginia; past archon of Alpha and Xi Chapters ; past supreme treasurer; third consecutive term as supreme archon. Personal Data: Born, Charleston, S.C., 1887; A.B., Charleston, 1906; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, 1910; Fellow in Roman Archaeology, American School of Classical Studies, Rome, Italy; instructor Greek and Latin, Williams College, 191213; acting professor of Latin and Greek, College of Charles-

ton, 1913-14; professor of Latin and Greek and director of summer and extension courses, Roanoke College, 1914-26; head, Department of Ancient Languages, West Virgtnia University, 1926 - 29; head, Department of Ancient Languages; William and Mary College; 1929-. Member American Philological Association, Archaeological Institute of America; frequent contributor to classical journals; member, Phi Beta Kappa, Eta Sigma Phi, Scabbard and Blade; captain infantry, Organized Reserve; Mason. Married; two children.

SUPREME TREASURER J. WILSON ROBINSON

For Jhe Fraternity: Member of and responsible for the establishment of Eta Chapter; district archon of Michigan and 9th District; conductor of Round Table, Charleston convention; donor of Michigan scholarship cup; one of the organizers and past archon of Detroit Alumni Chapter; general chairman of arrangements, Detroit Convention. Personal Dala: Born, Detroit, Mich., 1892; C.E., University

of Washington, 1915; asst. engineer on construction of tl~e Liberty Twin Tube Tunnel tn Pittsburgh in 1919; four years assistant engineer of Carnegie Steel Co.; field engineer of W. J. Rainey, Inc; chief engineer of Everett Winters Co., 1922-29; chief engineer of Walbridge, Aldinger Co., 1929· 31; at present owner and man· ager of the Robbie Robinson Company, Sales Engineers, Detroit. Married, three children.

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SUPREME SECRETARY LEO H. POU For the Fraternity: Member of Omicron Chapter; district archon, Alabama; installing officer of Alpha Iota, Alpha Lambda and Alpha Pi Chapters; originated Alabama conclave of 1927 and tri-district conclave, 1930; past supreme historian; History and Directory published under his regime. Personal Data: Born, Waynesboro, Miss., 1897; LL.B., University of Alabama; member law .firm of Gray and Pou, Mobile, Alabama. Member Phi Alpha Delta, Alpha Phi Epsilon; winner Sommerville Prize for best thesis as senior law student; .first vice-president, Kiwanis Club; chairman of board, Dauphin Way Methodist Church of Mobile; Mason. Married, two children .

SUPREME CHANCELLOR ALBERT W. MEISEL Fo,. the Fratemity: Member of Alpha Xi Chapter and responsible for ~~ establishment; director of Alpha Xi Chapter of ~i Kappa Phi, Inc.; chrector of Psi Sigma Realty Co., the realty corporatiOn ot the chapter; f apter adviser; district archon, .first district; delegate, Interfraternity Conc~r~nce, 1929 and 1930; secretary of Committee on Endowment Funds; parrtnan, legislative committee. Iersonal Data: Born, Brooklyn, N.Y., 1881; A.B., Brooklyn Polytechnic tnstitute, 1902; M.A. and LL.B., Columbia University, 1905 and 1906, Cspectively; attorney, New York City. ~ 11ember, New York State and United States Bars; president, Alumni ~ ssociation of the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn; president, Brooklyn ree kindergarten Society. 11arried, two children.

• SUPREME HISTORIAN- J. FRIEND DAY

For the Fratemity: Member Eta Chapter; chairman of committee for revision of rituals; primarily responsible for present revised form and the addition of supplementary rituals; chairman standing committee on ritual and insignia; Supreme Chaplain. Personal Data: Born, Middlesbrough, England, 1887; A.B., University of Toronto; received Governor-General's Medal for outstanding attainments; Ph.D., University of Chicago; assistant professor of economics, Emory University, 1924-25; assistant professor of economics, University of Alberta, 1926-29; associate professor of economics and commerce, University of British Columbia, 1929-. Member Executive Council, Church of England in Canada; member Political Science Association of Canada; unmarried.


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Sixteenth Supreme Chapter

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(Photographs on pages 24 and 25)

LICKING as a unit like a well -dr illed football team in mid-season, the Sixteenth Supreme Chapter held at Detroit, August 25-28, has entered history w ith a halo of accompli shment about it. Small in numbers but notable in events, it recogni zed in the first the looming shadow of depression but showed in the last that economic depression did not necessarily mean a lowering of the spirit of progress and effort. The summer convention has proven its worth in permitting more time to be applied to the affairs of the fraternity; but whether or not it is due to increase the attendance w ill have to be answered by future years, w hen personal resources are not so meager. Some one hundred and twentyodd registered. A beautifully organized convention it was, and bespoke in its results the painstaking care spent on its plans and the excellent direction of the preliminary activities. To General Chairman J. Wilson Robinson and his cohorts-}. 0. Blair, Bradley Case, Bernard Helmrich, G. M. McMillan, Cecil Reed, W. C. Brame, Ralph Goodall, and the many other Detroit men that assisted them-the fraternity is greatly indebted for a convention that equalled, if it did not surpass all previous ,gatherings. And it was accomplished without the finances showing the red taint of an undesirable deficit, which is something to take pride in and mention with gratification. Registration took place on Monday night and Tuesday morning. At ten o'clock A.M. of the latter, without any great preliminaries, Supreme Archon Wagener formally called the Sixteenth Supreme Chapter to order, and it plunged immedi ately into th e great amount of work before it. The reports of the Supreme Officers were heard and convention committees were appointed. From then on it was a case of rolled-up sleeves, conferences, and sonorous speech. However, not all of it maintained the level of the serious and .the unimpassioned, for at times individuals soared in words that h ad behind them extraordinary feeling, or others dropped sentences that convulsed the gathering in deep and hearty laughter. Probably the greatest source of amusement was the self-appo inted committee on proper English, dubbed by someone " the purification committee," made up of J. Friend Day, that startling and likable wordwrangler from the West.

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Outstanding Accomplishment The main duty of the Chapter consisted in h e~r­ ing, discussing, and adopting the work of the legiS· lative comm ittee, which presented needed amendments to the constitution and a redraft of the supreme laWS· The committee h ad been working si nce the Charleston meeting to prepare an acceptable code, and the ref suit was everything that could be expected. One 0 the most tedious and exacti ng of duties, the frater· nity owes. much to the committee, represented. at thJe convention by Albert W. Meisel and Wilham · · en Berry, both of Alpha Xi Chapter, and L. H. ThaiS of Upsilon Chapter, for their excellent work. As ~ result of their effo rts and the sessions of the Suprernc Chapter, the frate rnity is now in possession of a code that is revitalized and applicab le to the present needs. With few exceptions the presentation of the comfll 1t· tee was adopted in its entirety. The convention committee on time and place of thC Seventeenth Supreme Chapter reported to the meet· ing their recommendation that New York be chosen as th e location of the next national gathering.'Wheth:r the letter of the urbane, nonchalant Mayor Jimfl11 e Walker had any influ ence or not, it suffices to .saY that the report of the committee was adopted \\11 th· out dissent from the floor. The fixing of the place for the 1935 meeting promises to bring forth the pyr~· technics of sales manship, for, working on the baSI~ that a word beforehand is conducive to satisfactor~ ultimate results, representatives of three cities sho~t~ for consid eration in that year: Roanoke, Virg1n 1 ~' New Orleans, louisiana, and Seattle, Washington· New Orficers

Menti~ned

by the nominating committee or pred sented from the floor, the following men were electe to lead the fraternity for the coming biennium : so· preme archon, A. Pelzer Wagener, Alpha; supre!ll~ treasurer, J. Wilson Robinson, Eta; supreme secretarl: leo H. Pou, Omicron; supreme ed itor-chancellor, bert W. Meisel, Alpha Xi; and supreme historian, J . Friend Day, Eta. .e Those retired after many years of affectionate servJCd were: Supreme Secretary E. N. Turnquist, who ha . served in that capacity for six years; Supreme Trea5 urer John C. Johnston, who was elected at Charleston

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Amendments to Constitution and Redraft of Laws AdoptedSocial Affairs Enjoyable

• after having served almost a full term previously as a Council appointee; Supreme Editor Richard L. Young, ;ho has for the past ten years or more been the guiding Pint of The Star and Lamp. This is Supreme Archon Wagener's third term in ~ffice which is in itself evidence of the sincere respect Or the man and his work held throughout the organization. The others assume their positions with enVIable records of fraternity service and great experience behind them. Entertainment

The relaxation offered by the Detroit committee \vas in every respect enjoyable and perfectly adapted to the needs and desires of the moment. Nothing \vas left undone to provide the visiting men and Women with affairs calculated to give the greatest Jleasure. The wives were well taken care of in bridge Uncheons and theater parties offered by the local ~mmittee of feminine entertai nment headed by able rs. J. Wilson Robinson. At other times they joined t~e male contingent in their social affairs. The social ~Ide was introduced by an informal dance at the btatler, Tuesday night. In an attractively decorated allroom a reception for the officers was held, fol1 0\Ved by a get-acquainted dance. The music was exCellent for the tripping, and its liveliness worked in \ve]] with the spirit of the group present. Enthusiasm ran rampant. On Wednesday night came the "moonlight" on the steamer Tashmoo down the Detroit River. It became actually a "moonlight" for a few minutes only on the return trip, by the grace of the fates; but at that time the full moon, nestling in mantling clouds, ~.ade up for its diffidence in the earlier part of the tip. Besides, moon or no moon, the crowd was out for enjoyment, and got it. It danced on board, it danced on a pavilion at the terminus of the trip; and, in the meantime, lost many nickels in slot machines and \vent to see a moon thaf was not. It is questionable Whether the moon was desired. Thursday night occurred the formal ball. Probably ;orne of the southern men would term it "formidable," Or most of them were introduced for the first time to. the old northern custom of program dances·. De5Plte the fact that it seemed lese majeste to their own custom, they did as the "Romans do" and enjoyed an-

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other spirited occasion. Toward the end the gates were Jet down and the southerners told to enjoy the dance as they were wont. Resounding cheers greeted college songs. The grand march, led by Brother and Mrs. Cecil Reed, was participated in by all with great enthusiasm and finally ended up as a diamond, after the favors had been distributed en route. The favors made an instant hit -green and black pendants mounted with the coat of arms. "Chan" Johnson, Chi, again sang the beautiful song written especially .for and dedicated to the Sixteenth Convention, "Sweetest Girl of My Pi Kappa Phi ," in his attractive way, and all was complete. The Banquet

A toastmaster whose tongue had the facility for wit that even Chauncey Depew would have envied; · inspirational addresses; an excellent program of entertainment ; singing, formal and informal, the latter referring to the impromptu leading of Euc Reeves and confreres; the thrilling introduction of the author of "The Legend of Pi Kappa Phi" and "My Sweetest Girl of Pi Kappa Phi': ; delicious food; and lastly, the herring that was so forcibly thrust down the seal's throat, brought to a satisfying finish the Sixteenth Supreme Chapter. The aftermath was the only sad part of the entire occasion, when good fellows must part. The afternoons were given over to sightseeing, with the exception of Tuesday and Friday. These trips included visits to automobi le plants and the Ford vi ll age of Greenfield. The latter was especially enjoyed. Thursday afternoon the group went to Bell Isle for a picnic supper, and it was good. Friday afternoon was left as a free period. The Round Table

Tuesday afternoon and the early morning hours of the following three days, the delegates ·and all others interested gathered into an appoi nted place for exceptionally valuable diSEussions of chapter problems, under the direction of Gene Dunaway, Alpha Eta, district archon of the Second District. Introduced at the Charleston meeting for the first time, this discussion group has developed into one of the most important phases of convention program. It bids fair to become the most important in future years. Many subjects were talked up and down during the allowed time, new ideas expre~sed, old ones given new clothes; the total result being that all delegates went away with something concrete in the way of methods to improve chapter conditions. Minutes were taken of the session and a digest sent to each chapter.


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Activities of Past Biennium Summarized organization of the Central Office has thuS I N ACCORDANCE with the provisions of the beenThebrought to the point where it can perform ef· Laws, I take pleasure in presenting to the Supreme Chapter my report upon the activities of the fraternity during the past biennium and upon its present cond ition. Condition of the Order

The condition of the fraternity is, in general, sound . Our chapter roll has grown to forty-one through the installation of Alpha Rho at West Virginia University on May 16, 1930; Alpha Sigma at the University of Tennessee on January 24, 1931; and Alpha Tau at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute on June 13, 1931. Several preliminary petitions are on file and one formal petition, that from Pi Kappa at the University of British Columbia. A vote upon this has not yet been called for. Alumni chapters have been installed at Cleveland, Ohio, Athens, Georgia, and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Our membership has increased to 5,438 with 743 initiations during the biennium. There have been several expulsions which will be announced by the supreme secretary. Supreme Council

The Council held a meeting at Evanston on June 11, 12, 13, 1930. All members were present except Supreme Treasurer Johnston who was kept at home by sickness. A second meeting was held in Detroit on August 24, 1931. All of the officers have performed the duties of their offices without interruption. I wish to express my personal appreciation of their interest and cooperation. The Central Office

Executive Secretary Leake has continued in office and has performed his duties vigorously, efficiently, and with the sp irit of a constructive leader. In the summer of 1930 the organization of the office as planned by the Council was completed by the appointment of J. W. Cannon, Jr., Eta, as assistant secretary, and Miss Alice Lindbloom as stenographer and office assistant. At the same time an additional room was rented to take care of activities connected with the publication of the Star and Lamp. This was made a part of the work of the Central Office and beginning with the issue for October, 1930, the Star and Lamp has been edited from the Central Office. Financially the change in method of publication has been an unqualified success. The fraternity in general must pass upon the literary and journalistic qualities of the numbers which have been issued.

fectively the functions which belong to it. I believe that the results secured during the 1930-31 sesS 10 ~ have justified our present system. Expense has 0 course increased. While our Star and Lamp fund haS grow n by the addition of the sums provided by JaW, our surplus has not expanded as in previous years. \X'~ must remember, however, that the past year and a hal has been a period of general economic depression. 'lfl_e should be happy that we have passed through thiS trying period free from debt. This has been made possible only by the painstaking and unselfish wor~ and self-sacrifice of the executive secretary and hiS assistants. 1 A review of fraternity organization in genera shows that Pi Kappa Phi is now being run in ac· 1 cordance with the best accepted practice, but on ' comparatively conservative scale. The present force employed by Pi Kappa Phi is the minimum possi~le; We should look forward to the early expansion wh 1 ~ 1 will become imperative with any further increase Jll chapters. We are fortunate, indeed, in being ab le t~ secure the type of officers that we have at the smal salaries which we pay. We must now look to the uw recompensed work of district officers for the major part of our chapter inspection and supervision. In tl~e very nature of the case such supervision is uncertal~ and often unreliable. Effective chapter supervision iS the very essence of the fraternity system and without it a fraternity might just as well disband.

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The Chapters

This brings us to the consideration of the chapters themselves, from which principally come the fu~ds which make possible the running of the fratern1tJ'• for which the fraternity primarily exists, and f_or whose welfare we shou ld be primarily concerned. tJersa, the individual chapters would have no stand· ing and in fact could not even exist without the na· tiona! organization. The adequate support of the latter should, therefore, be a vital concern of the chapterS· I note with pleasure the building of new homes by Alpha Mu, Alpha Gamma, and Alpha Zeta chaPd ters, the purchase of a house by Alpha Delta, an the purchase of lots by Nu and Alpha Omicron chW ters. This brings the appraised value of propertf owned by the fraternity "to $604,246.09.

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Chapter Visitation

Chapter inspection and visitation has been more thorough and effective than ever. There have beell

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numerous visits to chapters by the executive secretary, the assistant secretary, supreme officers, and district archons. I wish to commend most heartily the work of the present group of district archons. We have, I believe, the most efficient group of district officers in the history of the fraternity. Outstanding among them have been archons Meisel, Dunaway, Price, Houser, Burton, Gass, J. Wilson Robinson, J. H. Robinson, I<:iffin, and Jones, whom I desire to thank especially at this time. District conventions have been held in Districts 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 12, and 14. The meeting for Districts 2 and 3 was a joint one in Roanoke, while Districts 5, 7, and 14 met together at the University of Alabama as guests of Omicron Chapter. At the latter convention eleven chapters were represented, and three district archons and two national officers Were present. I have great hopes for the benefit to accrue to the fraternity from such district meetings.

ters. When this work is completed it will be printed for binding in a loose-leaf cover. This manual has been much needed by our chapters .and should be of incalculable value to them in organizing their activities. Such subjects as the fraternity organization, duties of chapter officers, chapter accounting and budgeting, rushing and pledging procedure, have been treated . Kroeg Scholarship

Two installments of the Kroeg scholarship voted by the last Supreme Chapter have been paid, a total of $500. Official Jeweler

The Supreme Council renewed its contract with Burr, Patterson, and Auld as sole official jewelers on a basis quite advantageous to the fraternity. It was a cause of regret that the price for badges was raised. This was inevitable, however, and wou ld have occurred regardless of contract. The royalty paid by the official jewelers constitutes, it is true, an indirect tax upon members. If it were not for this, however, a raise in dues and initiation fees would be inevitable and, under the present arrangement, the burden is divided among the greatest number of individuals. Recognition Button

Publications

The issues of the Star and Lamp for February and May, 1930, were edited by Supreme Editor Young While those for October and December, 1930, and February and May, 1931, were published under the editorship of Executive Secretary Leake. The d1ange in method of publication was unanimously approved by the Supreme Council. Brother Young deserves !Instinted praise for the service which he performed in editi ng the Star and Lamp for ten years and in bringing it from a condition of instability to its present high standard. I know that I voice the sentiments of the entire fraternity when I extend officially the thanks of the fraternity to him. A new songbook of sixty-four pages has been published, thus adding another attractive volume to the list of Pi Kappa Phi publications. Only one issue of the Fokromix has been issued because of the desire to reduce the expenditures. However, frequent bulletins have been sent out from the Central Office. Ten sections of our chapter manual have been issued in mimeographed form and distributed to chap-

Your attention is called to the fact that a new recognition button has been finally adopted by the Supreme Council. The design consists of a white star upon a gold pentagon crossed by two swords. Chapter Publications

Many of our chapters have continued the publication of their chapter bulletins. I wish to commend particularly Epsilon, Alpha Zeta, Alpha Mu, Alpha Xi, and Alpha Omicron chapters for outstanding papers. All chapters are urged to adopt this very valuable activity as a means for publicity, and for promoting chapter spirit and alumni interest. Expansion

There has been less expansion than in any recent similar period of time. Our expansion should always be conservative. I have been particularly pleased with expansion in District 1. The Eastern and New England states have many splendid colleges and universities and yet this territory has been largely neglected by us. We shall have, I hope, in a few years,


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Endowment

Alpha Alpha Repeats

The committee on endowment also carried over from the last Supreme Chapter, ha; continued its stu~Y and wi ll make its report. In the present economiC situation it has been out of the question to inaugurate any actua l campaigns. I trust that we can take some forward steps here to bring nearer the realization of our hopes in regard to endowment. Scholarship

The increased interest in our schola·rship awards, upon which a report will be rendered by the com· mittee . on scholarship, is gratifying, although the effect upon general chapter scholarship seems to have been so far negligible. A certificate has been prepared for presentation, together with the pendant, to ead1 winner.

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Efficiency Contest

The cup that will adorn the mautel of Alpha Alpha (Mercer) for second consecuti'Ye year. It is the scholarship cup awarded ranking frater· uity. The yearly a'Yerage of the group was 1.723, which was .46 abo'Ye student body a'Yerage.

severa l more strong chapters in that section of our country. I commend to you the serious consideration of possibilities in the Middle West. Prospects appear to be excellent for our needed expansion .on the Pacific Coast. I wish again to state my belief that we do not desire an unwieldly mass of chapters, but that . we do need a well-knit organization with a sufficient number of chapters to assure an income large enough to support our legitimate activities on a solvent basis. Legislation

The legislative committee carried over from the last Supreme Chapter has inade a carefu l study of our supreme laws and will present for your consideration a complete draft, phrased in approved legal terminology. The work of the committee has been thorough. Few radical changes are proposed. I desire particularly to commend the revision of the laws relative to discipline and disciplinary procedure. Such definite laws have been long needed and their lack has seriously handicapped the administration. I trust that, after due deliberation, this body will adopt the proposed. revision.

A chapter efficiency contest has been conducted for the past two years and the results have been good. The award of one hundred dollars went in 1930 to Omega Chapter. The 1931 award will be announced in the October issue of the Star and Lamp. The effect of the contest has been to impress upon the chapter officers the necessity for accurate and prompt reports ; and to show how the chapter efficiency may be in· creased by the attention to duty and to the per· formance of their tasks and obligations by the individual members, while it may be destroyed by the indifference of a few. Persona I Activities

I have during the past months maintained as close personal contact with chapters as possible through correspondence and visits. It has been my privilege to visit the chapters at the University of North Caro· !ina, North Carolina State, Duke University, Brook· lyn Polytechnic Institute, Howard College, University of Alabama, and Pennsylvania State College. I at· tended district conventions at Tuscaloosa, Roanoke, and State College. I was present at the installation of Alpha Rho and Alpha Tau chapters. I attended all meetings of the Supreme Council and made one ad· dit.ional visit of inspection to the Central Office. May I say, in conclusion, that it has been a pleasure and an honor to serve Pi Kappa Phi as her supreme archon. I shall always remember these years, particu· lady because of the many delightful associations which they have brought to me with my fraternity brothers old and young in all parts of our land. I trust that I have been of some service in advancing our frater· nity along the road which will lead to the goal of perfect brotherhood-which we do not doubt that she will in the end attain.

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Their Deeds Remain After Them -An AppreciationT~REE members of the old Supreme Council have gtven place to the new. Those that will not be present in the future conferences of that body, who have turned over loved portfolios to their successors, are Richard L. Young, Kappa, supreme editor; Elmer N. Turnquist, Upsilon, supreme secretary; and John ~路 Johnston, Theta, supreme treasurer. They are listed tn the order of the number of years of service they have rendered the fraternity. The Dean of the Council Paraphrasing a few words of a famous poem: Dick Young has seen members of the Council come and go but he himself has continued on. He became a membe~ of the Council in 1920 as supreme editor, apP?tnted, and remained a member continuously until hts recent retirement, a total of eleven years. This is easily a record and wins for him the title, Dean of the Council. Bis is a record of service of very tangible character. D~ring the war the fraternity almost lost its entity. 'Wtth the loss of communication and contact loss of leadership and supervision, because of the call of the 0 ~~ers of the fraternity to the co lors, almost complete dtstntegration set in. Following the war, desperate e.fforts were made to gather up the threads and continue the pattern cast aside in the emergency. Comrnu.nication and contact were the major devices by Whtch such was to be accomplished, which meant, in the main, the magazine. In the crisis the then incumbent editor resigned, and the remaining members of the Council looked about for a man to fill the most 1 lllportant position in the fraternity. They chose Dick. Be did not fail them; he has never failed the fraternity. He took a magazine that was such more in name than anything else. In his hands its metamorphosis Was exceedingly rapid. It was published regularly, its for~at became more attractive, it became comprehe~stve, vital, interesting. In viewing Pi Kappa Phi ~t tts present height, one may wonder if its very being ts not due in the greater part to Brother Young. One may only wonder, may never know; but it is known t~at his part was essential to the life of the organization. Be was never allowed to retire from office路, there \\r as no question as to who was to handle the Star and Lt~mp, as convention succeeded convention. It was the trend of the times, proving of greater efficiency, that fraternities were placing their periodicals in their central offices. Dick himself recommended to the fra-

Richard L. Young, Kappa Past Supreme Editor

ternity such a procedure, and in doing so made a great personal sacrifice. It was almost like giving up a member of the family. But he did it g ladly. To the Charleston convention was made the proposal to change the title of supreme editor to that o.f supreme chancellor, since it had been definitely dectded to place the publication in Central Office. Dick at .this meeting sang his .first "swan song." A legisl ~ttve battle took place over an alternative organizatiOn of the Council, with the result that nothing was changed; but which placed Dick in a position analogous to the king that had no kingdom. Again at Detroit Dick sang another song, and this time it "took." The Supreme Chapter adopted an a.mendment to the constitution that changed the positiOn of supreme editor to that of supreme chancellor; and Dick is a newspaper man, not a lawyer. Indicative of the man is the message he brought. In part: It has been a pleasure-it was part of my very life-to serve as the editor of the magazine. I enjoyed every minute of it, and this period of service to the fraternity will always stand out in my memory as a bright spot in my past. And as I leave behind all official connection with the fraternity, I . hope that I will still have the opportunity of doing my b1t for dear old Pi Kappa Phi. The transfer of the magazine to the Central Office was


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Elmer N. Turnquist, Upsilon Past Supreme Sccrctary

a move that should have been made. The new plan stands for progress and will mean greater advancement in the further improvement of the magazine. We all know that every function of the fraternity should be closely knit together under one supervision, and I hope that nothing will be done to interfere with this program. So now this is all for me. My work, humble as it has been, is done. I step aside in the march of progress, but in so doing I wave a cheery greeting and Godspeed to those who are carrying on in my place. But as I say farewell, it is not good-bye but only "so long" until the next time we meet.

STAR AND

a member of that unofficial board of directors made up of past officers who are always available when advice and aid is needed. Turney was a successful salesman when he was elected; he is now a successful manager of a manu路 facturing concern that is partly his own. The qualities that lead to success, which he has in great quantities, he brought to the Council. His business sense h~ 5 been of great value to it in its deliberations and 1n shaping its policies. This quality has led to favorable contracts; it has always been available to the Central Office, with which he has been near and in close con路 tact. He has never returned a "no" when his fraternity has called. Turney came into the fraternity via the installation of the local that became Upsilon, of which local he was one of the founders. Besides his supreme office and the handling of the convention, he has served and been identified with the fraternity closely through active affiliation with the Chicago Alumni Chapter and various inspections of locals. He is at present the archon of the Chicago alumni. That organization had been in a slump for a number of years until he took over the leadership. In the movement to revive the chapter, nothing would satisfy the members but that Turney take over the job. He did, and again he succeeded. There's a man. (Continued on page 40)

Three Terms a Secretary

Elmer N. Turnquist (Turney) went to the Charleston convention firmly convinced that it was his desire to retire to the sidelines and permit someone else to step into his shoes. One's personal convictions are one thing, the convictions of a hundred or more persons are another; and when the convictions of the many combine to insist that the conviction of the one be changed, it is rather difficult to resist. Anyway, the result was as might be expected: Brother Turnquist again became supreme secretary. This was his third term, something rare in the annals of the organization. In 1925 Turney was general chairman of arrangements of the Chicago convention. Under his direction it was an unqualified success, and the Supreme Chapter decided that it would like to have his ability on the Council. He was re-elected at the Birmingham convention. He is now

LA~

John C. Johnston, Theta Past Supreme Treasurer


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Miss

Mrs.

Mildred Zimmerman

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Convention Adds Attractive Song to the Fraternity•s Long List ing words of appreCtatron and goodwill and ushered • • • her from the room with sustained and prolonged One of the Highlights of the Social Events Was the Introduction of a New Pi Kappa Song Written by Two Attractive Detroit Women and Dedicated to the Convention

• • •

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HOSE who were present at the banquet and participated in the recognition of Miss Mildred Amelia Zimmerman as the author of the verse of the new Pi Kappa Phi song, "Sweetest Girl of My Pi Kappa Phi," and the "Legend of Pi Kappa Phi" will agree to three observations: that Miss Zimmerman is attractive as well as talented ; that "Chan" Johnson, Chi, is a born showman and publicity man; and that the fraternity is to be congratulated for beautiful additions to its songs and anthology. The music was written by Mrs. Johnson, and it was unfortunate that she could not be present for the ceremony and receive a part of that dramatic ovation accorded Miss Zimmerman. Following an excellent reading of the "Legend," Brother Johnson introduced Miss Zimmerman and presented her with a large bunch of red roses. E11 masse the convention arose to its feet and indicated their appreciation and the popular appeal of her song by singing it for her. They remained standing during her short and appeal-

applause. A musical family, those Johnsons. Mrs. Johnson's ability as a musician is proved to the fraternity by (Colltinued

011

page 14)

LEGEND OF PI KAPPA PHI Dedicated to the Detroit Convention The Gods sat in discussion On their high and mighty thrones , Talked of a weighty matter In deep, stentorian tones . They nodded heads of wisdom And at last were of one mind, " Earth needs a new fraternity The best one of its kind." They talked of names and symbols, And a birthplace of renown , And finally then settled On a lovely southern town. "Pi Kappa Phi," they said, In single vo ice, "wi ll be its name; May all who come unto its fold Give honor and acclaim. "They' ll have a lamp to light their way, A star to 11uide them by, A diamond pm to wear always. These things to signify . "A deep, red rose wi ll be their flower, Their colors-gold and white. Because these speak of nature, And sunshine and of light.'' And so one day, long years ago, This town awoke to find A. new fraternity was born, The best one of its kind. The Gods had spoken wisely, So we greet them there on high , For well we know none greater is Than our Pi Kappa Phi. Copyright, 1931 -

MILDRED

AMELIA

ZIMMERMAN


THE

12

Sweetest Girl of

My

Copyright, 1931, Pi Kappa Phi

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Pi Kappa Phi

Fratcn~ity

MILDRED AMELIA ZIMMERMAN

~,d1(.;f~'1 .'" o.\1 th': ~··lA. ~ 10 bro"j'" ,.·,,.J_ I' wool~ ,~.(r "'""'" 'B!o~ J•1• ~ ;t ,.£t c,uSit -to lo:>c·

MRS. C. F. JOHNSON


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PHI

Written for and Dedicated to the 16th Convention

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THE STAR

Convention Adds Attractive Song to the Fraternity's Long List (Continued from page 11)

her beautiful interpretation in tune of the poem by Miss Zimmerman. Her life has been filled with recognitions of her talent. At thirteen years of age she was the paid organist of a church. She graduated with honors from the Stetson University Conservatory, at which institution she was a member of Pi Beta Phi and Phi Beta, national professional women's organization in music and drama. She has a natural gift of transposing at sight, a talent that has received the acclaim of important critics. Other musical activities have been !aid aside in the concentration on accompanying. She is well known in radio circles as an arranger and an accompanist. Brother Johnson's excellent tenor voice helped im-

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mense!y in familiarizing the convention with the song. His rendition at all times brought forth enthusiastic applause. If the convention should be termed a "singing convention," and it could well be described as such, the reason for it lies in the leadership and inspiration furnished by Johnson. Miss Zimmerman's attractive personality needs no description to those that met her personally or as a member of the group at the banquet. To this is to be added a wealth of other admirable qualities: a talented poet, an efficient business woman-she is secretary to the superintendent of works of the Cadillac Motor Car Company- , an enthusiast of sports of all types. Johnson says he has constituted himself her business manager. Casual opinion would state that he has available talent in his wife and Miss Zimmerman which, combined, should lead to a successful entrance into the song market. His flair for publicity should be of great aid also.

I I

General Chairman Robinson Says It Was

- A Happy ConventionT

HE Detroit Convention is now history, and as genera! chairman I want to express on behalf of the Detroit alumni our very deep appreciation for the most splendid manner and fine spirit shown by all the delegates, members, and visitors attending this event. To you undergraduate chapters, I want to take this opportunity to congratulate you on your selection of delegates. The conduct of these men, without any exceptions, was above reproach. The Statler Hotel management reported that they did not receive a single complaint from other guests in the hotel and were most highly pleased with the fine conduct of our men- quite a contrast to the experience of one of the other Detroit hotels with a fraternity convention held early in August. Unfortunately, some fraternity conventions !eave in their wake· bad impressions of fraternities as a whole, not only with the outsider but with many of the undergraduate delegates themselves, who for the first time are attending a national convention of their fraternity. The Detroit convention committee was a bit concerned about the prospective general conduct of the convention and the impressions that would be carried back to the chapters by the attending delegates.

You can, therefore, see that the responsibilities of a convention committee are not only great, but are in the main two-fold: first, it is their duty and re· sponsibi!ity to see that the convention is a success, that the convention is conducted in a wholesome and congenial atmosphere, with the result that the undergraduate delegates return to their chapters with happY memories and inspired with new ideas, and with hig~ ideals of Pi Kappa Phi indelibly impressed upon thetr minds; second, it is the duty and responsibility of the committee to see that the financial phases of the convention are so conducted that the fraternity is not left with a staggering debt, with the resulting heavy drain upon our national treasury, and from which it may take several years for the fraternity to recuperate. Facing fully these charges, the Detroit convention committee made their plans; and we are mighty grate· ful for the many fine letters received from various brothers, upon their returning home from the con· vention, indicating in a great measure that, as far as atmosphere and surroundings were concerned, the convention was a success. Leo Pou, our newly elected supreme secretary, writes from Alabama, "I have never known a more (Conti11ued on page 26)

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The Installation Banquet Head table, left to right: Dr. Robert K. Paltcrson, Professor William ]. Berry, District Archon Albert W. Meisel, John A. Pearlrcc, Supreme Archo11 A. Pc/:ter lVagencr, Professor Homer H. Nugent.

Pi Kappa Phi Enters Rensselaer Polytechnic Many Events Mark Establishment oF Alpha Tau at World's Oldest Continuous Technical Institute By WILLIAM J. BERRY, Alpha Xi FRIDAY and Saturday, June 12 and 13, O N1931, the Rensselaer Technical Society of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute at Troy, New York, Was installed as the forty-first on the list of active chapters. The Chief Installing Officer was Albert W. Meisel, Alpha Xi, archon of the First District. His assistant was William J. Berry, also of Alpha Xi. The initiating team was composed of the following Alpha Xi members: J. Fred Boette, Walter S. G. Casell, 1-Ienry E. Weingartner, George F. Blasius, Frank Crotty, and Arthur Hansen. It gave Alpha Xi special pleasure to be charged with the duty of inducting the new chapter. Not only are they neighbors, but the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and the Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn are schools of similar character. 'the initial contact with R.T.S. was made through Christian H. Steffan of Alpha Xi, and the Brooklyn chapter has watched with sympathetic interest the successive steps which have finally brought the Troy local into the bond. The importance and solemnity of the occasion were ernphasized by the presence of Supreme Archon

Wagener, at whose hands the new chapter received its charter. The ceremonies were opened quite unintentionally and altogether unofficially, by Rudy Vallee, who on Thursday night, over the radio, gave a recital of Pi Kappa Phi songs and a brief resume of the fraternity's history. All the events except the formal banquet on Saturday evening took place in the spacious chapter house at 4 Park Place, Troy. At one time the private residence of a prominent and wealthy family, the house, with its large rooms and lofty ceilings, with the gracious dignity of a vanished era, lent itself admirably to the exigencies of the ritual. The work of the initiating team was impressive in its smoothness. At two o'clock on Friday afternoon the solemn pledging of the undergraduate chapter took place. Beginning at four o'clock and continuing until after eight, occurred the formal initiation which brought thirty-three new brothers into the fellowship of Pi Kappa Phi. The officers elected by the new chapter are: John A. Peartree, archon; William H. Bruder, treasurer;


16

THE

The Installing Team Frot~t row, left to right: George F. Blasius; William ]. Berry, tlSsistanl irutalling ofliccr; Albert W. Meisel, chief irutalling officer; Henry E. Weingartner; J. Fred Bocttc. Rear: Frank Crolty, Arthur

Hansen, Jr., Walter S. G. Carel/.

Richard Y. AtLee, secretary; William E. Simms, historian; F. Mortimer Clifford, chaplain; and N. Douglas White, warden. They were duly invested by the Chief Installing Officer with the insignia of their respective offices. Later in the evening the installing officers and the initiating team were entertained at an informal dinner. Saturday morning a model chapter meeting was conducted by the visitors from Alpha Xi for the information and guidance of the new brothers. At this time Alpha Tau chose its representative to the Supreme Chapter at Detroit, electing as delegate the archon, John A. Peartree, and as alternate, Albert V. Willett. After the meeting there was a tour of the campus. The weather was glorious and the grounds and buildings of the Institute were seen under the most favorable conditions. It was commencement day at Rensselaer, and though duties incident to the installation prevented the visiting Pi Kapps from witnessing the exercises, they could not fail to catch something of the spirit which prevailed upon the Hill. In the late afternoon twenty-three R.T.S. alumni were pledged and initiated. Among them were two distinguished members of the Rensselaer faculty, Grant K. Palsgrove, professor of hydraulic engineering, and Frederick M. Sebast, associate professor of electrical engineering. Alpha Tau is fortunate in having the loyal interest and wise guidance of these brothers. Pi Kappa Phi is honored by their presence in the fraternity and extends to them a hearty welcome. Of course, the climax of the installation: festivities was the formal banquet on Saturday evening. Some seventy-live persons sat down in the largest room of

STAR

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the Hotel Troy. The newly elected archon of Alpha Tau, John Peartree, was the toastmaster. The speakers of the evening were Supreme Archon Wagener, District Archon Meisel, Dr. Robert K. Patterson, and Prof. Homer H. Nugent, representing the Institute, and Frederick M. Sebast. Between the speeches the toastmaster read a large number of telegrams congratulating the new chapter and welcoming it into the fraternity. District Archon Meisel announced the appointment of Grant K. Palsgrove as chapter adviser for Alpha Tau and he was thereupon called on for a speech. William J. Berry also spoke. Abundant good fellowship, short, witty speeches and the singing of R.T.S. and Pi Kappa Phi songs made the banquet a most enjoyable affair. Joseph T. Van Voorhis, Alpha Rho; Herbert A. Kuehne, Alpha Omicron; William C. Hurt, Jr., Alpha Iota; Sidney Miller, Alpha Kappa; Julius E. Breckwoldt and Edwin Vosburgh, Jr., Chi; William F. Jacob and Robert A. Linoki of Alpha Xi, all of whom are working in Schenectady, made visits of varying duration during the two days that the installa tion lasted. A motorcade from Brooklyn, bearing Alfred J. P. Wilson, Cyril R. Davidson, Frank J. McMullen, Christian H. Steffan, and William R. Berger, all of Alpha Xi, reached Troy on Friday evening. Rensselaer Technical Society

T

HE Rensselaer Technical Society, generally known on the campus as R.T.S., was founded April 26, 1906, and incorporated under the laws of the State of New York May 14, 1909. It is thus only a few

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Officers of Alpha Tau Front row, left to right: William H. Bntdcr, treasurer; Jolw, A; PeaTtrce, arc/ron; Richard Y. AtLec, secretary. Rear: F. Mor/lntc Cliflord, chaplain; N. Douglas White, worden; William E. Sim"U' historian.


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17

The Home of Alpha Tau

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Years younger than the fraternity of which it has now ~ecome a part. During its quarter-century of continuous and successful existence as a local, it created for itself an important place in the life of the Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, established its own ~raditions and acquired a large body of loyal and Interested alumni, many of whom, it is hoped, will follow the active chapter into Pi Kappa Phi. As its name implies, R.T.S. was originally planned to be a society at whose meetings serious minded students of science and technology might discuss problems of Interest connected with the subjects of their classroom study or with the professions for which they Were preparing. Consequently the scholastic requirements for membership were high and have always been kept so, though in recent years more attention than formerly has been paid to athletic, social, and Other extracurricular activities. In the twenty years from 1910 to 1930, forty-nine members of R.T.S. have been elected to the Rensselaer chapter of Sigma Xi-35.8 per cent of the total number chosen during that period. This in itself is a measure of the fide lity Which R.T.S. has manifested to the ideals of its founders.

As might have been anticipated, this close association and eager cooperation of men with common aims and common interests spontaneously engendered a truly fraternal spirit. The technical society gradually assumed all the characteristics of a local fraternity; and in 1915, when the Interfraternity Council was formed at the Institute, R.T.S. was a charter member. The single room for meetings, long inadequate for the expanding needs of the society, gave way to a house which could care for the needs of fraternity life. In addition to its present house downtown, opposite the Russell Sage College for Women and next door to the residence of Dr. Palmer C. Ricketts, president and Director of the Institute, R.T.S. (or Alpha Tau, as it must now be called) owns a splendid corner lot on Sage Avenue, directly across from the campus. Here it is planned some day to build a modern chapter house. During the installation period some of the legal questions raised by the change in status of the organization, particularly those connected with the holdings of real property, were met and satisfactorily settled with the advice and aid of Albert W. Meisel, the district archon. As a local, R.T.S. took a prominent place in student


18

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Walker Laboratory, Rensselaer Poly

affairs and was represented in every form of under- broadened, its prestige increased, and its physical graduate activity, notably in swimming. Since the equipment enormously developed, Its buildings, for introduction of that sport into Rensselaer in 1919, the most part gifts of groups or individuals, bear mute R.T.S. men have eight times captained the team. evidence to widespread appreCiation of its work and Reference has been made elsewhere to the telegrams worth. of welcome and congratulation received at the banThe campus of about twenty acres is situated on quet. These are but a few tangible evidences of the pro- a high ridge, two hundred feet above the level of the found satisfaction every 路 Pi Kapp must feel at the Hudson River. The ground falls off very steeply to incorporation into the fraternity of this well organized the west and at the foot of the escarpment lies the and closely knit unit with its long and honorable his- business district of Troy. The approach to the campus tory. As we extend our hands in greeting to our new 路 from this side is by way of a monumental flight of brothers it is with the confident expectation that Al- steps. The ascent is toilsome, but the view from the pha Tau will carry on all that was fine and splendid campus is magnificent, embracing a wide sweep of in R.T.S. with credit to themselves and honor and country including a part of the famed Hudson River glory to our beloved fraternity. valley. Here are administra.tion building, library, laboratories, lecture halls, shops, gymnasium, dormiThe Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute tories, and dining halls. The winding, tree-shaded LDEST of American technical institutions, with walks, the sun-lit playing fields and the ivy-covered a longer 路 continuous existence than any other buildings make a very attractive picture. The present school of science and engineering among English- dormitories will house only a part of the student body speaking peoples, the reputation of Rensselaer Poly- of 1, 700, but a program of expansion is under way and technic Institute is world wide. It was founded at a number of units are actually in course of construcTroy, New York, in 1824, by Stephen Van Rensselaer, tion. The grounds and buildings are valued at a distinguished citizen of the neighboring city of Al- $3,511,000 and the additional productive endowment bany, and two years later received from the state is $5,697,500. The sixteen national fraternities which existed at legislature the power to confer degrees. In the more than one hundred years of its history, its scope has Rensselaer prior to the nationalization of R.T.S. are:

0


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Two Prominent Engineers Members of Alpha Tau

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Grant K. Palsgrove, M.E.

Frederick Martin Sebast, E.E., D.Eng.

Professor of hydraulic engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute; licensed professional engineer of the state of New York with a considerable practice as consultant engineer in the hydraulic and mechanical fields. Listed in ''Who's Who in America, .. ''Who's Who in the East, .. "Who's Who in New York, .. and .. Who's Who in Engineering ... Fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science; member of A.S.M.E., American Academy of Political and Social Science, Society for Promotion of Engineering Education, Society of Engineers of Eastern New Y ark, of the last past president. Member T B II, <I> r llf, 1: ::!, Square and Compass; Mason, Knight Templar, and member of the Shrine. Member board of directors of R.T.S. since 1912; president 1921-27; chapter adviser, Alpha Tau Chapter.

E. E., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 1913; D.Eng., 1916. Appointed instructor in Department of electrical engineering in September, 1916; assistant professor of electrical engineering in September, 1920; associate professor of electrical engineering in September, 1926. Test department, General Electric Co., Schenectady, N.Y.; standardization laboratories of General Electric Co., oscillograph work and iron testing; Pittsfield Works' Laboratory of General Electric Co., specia l investigations; laboratory and consulting work in private capacity and as assistant to Dr. W. L. Robb; research laboratory, Brooklyn Edison Co., on high vo ltage dielectric measurements. Member A.I.E.E., 1' B IT and 1: ;::. Published with Dr. M. A. Hunter and G. L. Gray, papers on the electrical resistances and temperature coefficients of various al loys. Director of R.T.S. Incorporated, and for the past few years president of the board. Associate professor of electrical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute.

Theta Xi, Delta Phi, Delta Kappa Epsilon, Chi Phi, Delta Tau Delta, Theta Nu Epsilon, Theta Chi, Phi Sigma D elta, Kappa Nu, Alpha Phi Delta, Phi Lambda Alpha, Alpha Tau Omega, Phi Kappa Tau, Phi Kappa, Phi Mu Delta, and Sigma Zeta. There are three recognized local fraternities and two not recognized. Incidentally one of the recognized locals is called Pi Kappa Pi . Fraternity men constitute slightly more than 42 per cent of the student body.

With the add ition of Alpha Tau, the First District now has four active chapters: Psi, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York; Alpha Mu, Pennsylvania State College, State College, Pennsylvania; AI ph a Xi, Polytechnic Institute of Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York; and Alpha Tau, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York. There are alumni chapters in New York and Philadelphia and th ere is the nucleus of one in Schenectady.


20

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Alpha Omicron Chapter Winner of Second Efficiency Contest

T

HE end of another year of competition finds Alpha Omicron, Iowa State, the winner of the Efficiency Contest, with a total of 7,705 points. This year each chapter was given 1,000 points to which was added the total number of points gained through the various activities. Alpha Omicron received a great portion of its points through its excellent cooperation with Central Office, prompt collections, and efficient handling of all chapter duties. Also, it published twelve issues of the A/micron and was responsible for the Twelfth District Conclave held at Omaha, Nebraska. Omega is to be congratu lated on its complete cooperation with Central Office, and for the promptness with which each member paid his obligations. They have some forty-odd men, but delinquency in accounts was exceptionally rare. They are also credited w!th having two Pi Kappa Phi Scholars and being tenth place out of thirty-nine fraternities in scholarship. Alpha Xi, a close third, also deserves congratulation on its cooperation with Central Office. Their scholarship was above the student body average, and they were the winners of a scholarship cup. They deserve mention also for their excellent write-ups in the Star. and Lamp. Omicron, placing fourth this year compared to 28th place last year, is due congratulation on initiating the conclave at the University of Alabama. They are represented on the campus by a president of the student body, ten men having positions on publications, and many men in honorary organizations. Also, their scholarship was above the average of the student body and they are credited with having one Pi Kappa Phi Scholar. The following chapters sent in all reports on time: Alpha, Zeta, Sigma, Omega, Alpha Alpha, Alpha Delta, Alpha Theta, Alpha Omicron, and Alpha Sigma. Many chapters were at a disadvantage due to the fact that the secretary failed to send in the final report of chapter activities and honors. Because of this, it was necessary for the office to obtain the information from the Star and Lamp letters and chapter publications. This item in itself explai ns in certain instances the remarkable betterment of chapter standing, as indicated in the ratings of the year 1930-31 compared with those of the year 1929-30, just as it

will explain also some of the unusual changes for the worse. Omicron's rise has already been noted. Along with it should be mentioned Alpha Zeta and Iota chapters. The following is a summary of the salient honors of each chapter: Alpha: President of athletic association; manager, varsity basketball; president, senior class; president, junior class; two members on staff of annual; president, pre-medical club of South Carolina. Beta: Editor, college yearbook; business manager, col路 lege weekly; managing editor, college weekly; editor-inchief, Pac-Sac (annual}; circulation manager, Blue Stocking (weekly) ; manager varsity track; four members, varsity football squad; lettermen in football and baseball; president, Y .M .C.A.; secretary-treasurer, student council. Gamma: Captain, crew; captain-elect, ice hockey; junior baseball manager; junior track manager; junior crew manager; alternate manager, track; chairman, Senior Peace Committee; chairman, Senior Pilgrimage Committee; chairman, Vigilance Committee ; four lettermen in major sports. Delta: Two business managers, athletics; two members, publications staff; president, glee club; member, student council; eleven honor students; two student assistants. Epsilon: Junior baseball manager; baseball man ager; managing editor of Yowl (annual) ; president, Panhellenic Council ; news editor, Davidsonian (weekly); managing editor, Davidsoniarz; editor-in-chief, Handbook; two members on staff of annual; one member, Phi Beta Kappa; historian, senior class. Zeta: Alternate captain, football ; manager, football ; assistant manager, football ; winner of scholarship cup; art editor, editor-in-chief, and advertising manager, Bohemian (annual) ; business manager, sports editor, assistant circulation manager, Th e Gold and Black (weekly); five members, Blue Key. Eta: Member, ath letic council; member student activities council; president, business administration college. Iota: Manager, band; business manager, glee club; earnpus editor, circulation manager, seven members on staff, Technique (annual) ; live members on honor roll; two members, Alpha Kappa Psi; four members, Kappa Kappa Psi. Kappa: President, ath letic association; assistant manager, boxing; president, junior class; president, Freshman Friendship Council; chairman, editorial board of Daily Tttr Heel; Chairman, student committee of Human Relations Institute; two members, varsity football and track. Lambda: Captain, football team; captain, baseball team; Jive football lettermen; editor-in-chief, weekly ; assistant business manager, weekly; exchange editor, weekly; three members, glee club.


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-Runner-up oF Previous Year Comes Through with Slight lead -Outstanding Honors Possessed by Chapters-

Mu: Assistant manager, boxing; secretary-treasurer, Panhellenic Council; president, sophomore class; four lettermen in track and football; sports editor, weekly. Nu: Lettermen in baseball and basketball; member, business administration executive council; winner of Citizenship Award Loving Cup from Alpha Kappa Psi; associate editor, Cornhmke1· (annual). Xi: Captain, football; captain, baseball ; captain, freshman basketball; one member, Blue Key. Omicron: Assistant business manager, summer edition of Crimson-liP'bite (weekly), six members on staff; assistant editor and associate editor of university annua l ; assistant editor, Ramm er-Jamm er (humorous); editor, student directory ; editor, freshman handbook; president-elect, student body; president, Freshman Education Class; one Pi Kappa Phi Scholar. Pi: Captain, baseball; president, student-faculty council; assistant business manager, year book; president, sophomore class; three members, Blue Key. Rho: President, junior class; senior academic president; two members, varsity football squad. Sigma: Captain, football; captain, track; manager, baseball; president-elect, honor council; business manager and associate editor, Gamet and Black (weekly) ; vice-president, junior law class; assistant coach, football department; president-elect, sophomore class; three members, Omicron Delta Kappa . Tau: One senior honor student; captain, football ; two freshmen honor students; one member, Phi Kappa Phi. Upsilon: Secretary, Interfraternity Council; assistant editor, Tech11ograph: staff members, Daily 1//ini; president, military council. Chi: Captain, football; manager, football ; captain, baseball; president, seni or class; president, sophomore class; treasurer, sophomore class ; president, student body; five members, Phi Alpha D elta . Psi: President, college architecture class; president, Hellenic Club; member, senior class endowment committee; member, class day committee; art staff, Cornell TVido w (humorous). Omega: Two Pi Kappa Phi Scholars; assistant business manager, Agric11lt11re; member, junior editorial staff of year book; circulation manager of Pm·d11e Enghzeet·; organization editor, the yearbook; two members, Eta Kappa Nu; five members, Tau Beta Pi. Alpha Alpha: Winner of scholarship cup and highest average on campus; president, Panhellenic Council; president, senior law class; president, sophomore class; vicepresident, senior class.

STANDING OF CHAPTERS IN EFFICIENCY CONTEST 1930-31 1929-30 Alpha Omicron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Omega ........ ...... ... .... . ......... 2 1 Alpha Xi ...... ... ...............•.... 3 5 Omicron . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 28 Nu ........... .. , .. . .. ......... .... ... 5 16 Alpha Theta ... ...... , . .... , . . . . . . . . . . 6 6 Alpha Zeta . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . • . . . . . . . 7 27 Iota .......... . ......•............. . .. 8 25 Delta ...... .... ...... .....•.... .. ... .. 9 9 Alpha Delta ........................... 10 18 Epsilon ... . ....... . , ..... .... .. •...... . 11 4 Alpha Nu ............................. 12 17 Alpha Mu . . . .... .. ........ , ... .... . . . 13 10 Alpha Iota ....•......... . ......... ... 14 22 Alpha Alpha . .. .. .. .. ...... ..... 15 8 Sigma ..... .. . .. .... .. . . ......•....... 16 32 Alpha ... . . .. . . ..•. .. ....• . ......•..... 17 23 Eta ..... .. ... ... .. , ........• .. ........ 18 34 Rho ......... . .. .. ... ...... • .......... 19 33 Alpha Rho ..... .....•... .. ...•.. ...... 20 Gamma ................... . ......... .. 21 36 Alpha Sigma .... . ....... . . . ........... 22 Mu ... . ........... ...... • . ...•........ 23 15 Upsilon ............. .... .• . .•.. . .. .... 24 7 Alpha Lambda ........................ 25 21 Alpha Beta ............• .... . . . .•...... 26 38 Zeta ... ..........•.•.. ....... . ........ 27 14 Lambda ..... ....... . •..•.•.....•...... 28 37 Pi ............... ... ....... . ... •.. .... 29 24 Alpha Kappa .... ... , .. . .............. 30 19 Alpha Epsilon ....•.......... .. . . , ...... 31 26 Psi ...................•.... .. •.. .. .... 32 30 Xi ........... . ... . ......•............ 33 12 Chi . .. ....... .. ................ .. ..... 34 29 Alpha Gamma . . . . . ....... 35 13 Tau ... .. .........•..• . ... . . . .. . . .. . . . 36 20 Kappa ............. .. ......... ·........ 37 31 Beta .. ......• ... .. ...... ..... .. . .. .... 38 3 Alph a Pi . . ... .... .. . .... ......... ... .. 39 11 Alpha Eta ............ . ............... .40 35

Alpha Beta: Eight members, Phi Chi; one member Alpha Omega Alpha. Alpha Gamma: One member, Phi Beta Kappa; four lettermen in sports; editor, news editor, sports editor, university daily; two members, publication board; five members, Sigma Delta Chi. Alpha Delta: Captain, track tea8'1; vice-president, sophomore class; president, Y.M.C.A.; two members on honor roll; three members, Phi Beta Kappa; four members, Alpha Kappa Psi; editor and associate editor, daily; editor, Wash ingtoll Law R eview. Alpha Epsilon: Lettermen in football, baseball, basketball, track and golf; member, Honor court ; member, athletic council. Alpha Zeta: Captain, varsity hurdle team; captain, senior crew; collection manager, daily; two third vice-presidents, student body; four members, Alpha Kappa Psi; one member, Phi Kappa Phi. Alpha Eta: Most valuable student on campus; studenttreasurer; assistant business manager, the Howard Crimso1z (weekly); business manager, the Howm·d Crimson; recipient of gold Honor Award. Alpha Theta: Treasurer, sophomore class; member, student council; member, Phi Kappa Phi; rwo members, Tau Beta Pi; president, band club; manager, varsity track; two lettermen in sports. (Contin11ed on page 37)


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Talbot Hartley Blazes Name in Track History By Ralph Snider, Alpha Delta

Talbot Hartley, Alpha Delta

OME stars have their name blazed across the en-

S trance to theaters, some have theirs scattered to the four winds by radio, and sti ll others have theirs

printed across the tops of newspapers. Talbot Hartley, A .6., has had his across the tops of large newspapers. The brilliance accruing to this young star is from his outstanding successes on the cinder path. It is not very often that a man who flashes during his entire high school career has the ability to carry on and reach even greater heights in college, yet that is exactly what Brother Hartley has been able to do. One glance at the mantel will convince you that he is a real champion. He has enough trophies to set up a good jewelry store and have some left over. Ribbons, as every one knows, are usually the fruits of high school competition, and he has harvested twenty-seven, .all told . Of this number, twenty-two are for .first place; three for placing second; and two are for third place. Most of the second and third place ribbons were won during his freshman and sophomore days. The twenty-two first place ribbons were those that came to him during his junior and senior years at Puyallup (Washington) High School. In the state high school meet held in May, 1927, h e ran circles around the other men competing, to

take the large loving cup annually given to the high point man of the meet. In order to get his name en路 graved on that cup it was necessary for him to win first in the 440, a second in the 220, take third in the broad jump and be a member of a winning relay team. When one is competing against the best, it is an honor in itself to place in one's particular event, let alone place in every event entered. In winning the quarter mile at that meet, Talbot set a new state record by running the distance in the exceptionally fast time of 49.6 seconds, thereby breaking the old record of 50.6 which had stood since 1916. Incidentally, it might be well to mention that his record has stood unquestioned since that day in May, 1927. Leaving the state meet with a new record, he went to Chicago for the national high school meet where, with another fast runner, he showed his heels to the other entrants. He tied for first place honors. After such outstanding times as these were made, it was natural that colleges all over the United States should seck his favor. The University of Washington becY.oned ~he more strongly. The spring of his freshman year 1 ~aw him leave the varsity runners behind, and the coach smiled as he looked forward to the future meets in which this man would be an outstanding star. Colleges were not the only ones who desired to have this man within their ranks, for it seems that fraternities also desire this type of member. After much deliberation he chose Pi Kappa Phi as his college home and has been a most loyal member. College meets were very much to his liking; in fact, he thrived upon them so well that he insisted on breaking all the records available. During his last year of varsity competition he was unanimously chosen to captain the team. Immediately following the close of the school term he became a member of the Washington A.C., where he has been competing since. In the A.A.U. meet held in Lincoln, Nebraska, on July 4, he placed third in the 440. While looking through his strong box one day this summer, he discovered that he had 13 medals. Thir路 teen being an unlucky number he decided to change the number to 14. The Canadian Pre-Olympic Invita路 tiona! meet, held August 22 in Vancouver, British Columbia, gave him his chance, and he made good


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Julien C. Hyer Becomes Biggest Lion Zeta Man Elected President oF Lions International at Their h I路

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Recent Toronto Gathering T THEIR last convention, Lions International elevated First Vice-President Julien C. Hyer, Zeta, Fort Worth, Texas, to the position of president of their powerful civic organization. At the same time Prof. Robert Phillips, Omega, was returned to the board of directors. In all, six thousand delegates and visitors attended the gathering in Toronto. His hometown club presented Brother Hyer with a silver set as evidence of their pleasure, while the clubs of the district gave him a gavel set with stone from the historic walls of the Alamo and with a handle made from a tree on the famous battlefield of San Jacinto. A Canadian club brought him a beautiful Canadian flag; El Paso offered a handsome Mexican serape; and the California club gave him an enormous cake decorated in appropriate colors. There are few offices in the organization that Hyer has not held in his twelve years of service. He has held successively the offices of direc~or, vice-president, and president of his local club; director, third vice-

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by placing second, close on the heels of a Canadian Olympic runner from Winnipeg .

The best time made by Hartley in the 440 is 47.7, which he set while running as anchor man in a mile relay. The following write-up appeared in the Seattle Daily Times after this performance: Father Time took the worst beating he has received in years on Northwest tracks, when records fell I ike leaves before an autumn wind. Talbot Hartley furnished the greatest performance ever turned in by a Northwest runner when he ran a 47.7 quarter mile to de liver a 3:17.7 relay record for Washington after his teammates had paved the way for a wonderful race. Never before in Northwest track history has a runner traveled under 48 seconds, yet three watches caught the star at 47.7 today, thus leaving no doubt about his having run it that fast. An hour earlier he ran a 48 Bat race to win the quarter mile. This 48 second race was a new record, his 47.7 a marvelous performance that cannot be excepted. He ran like a man possessed, never faltering until he had broken the tape in the fastest quarter mile race ever run in

(C/1icago Daily News Photo)

Hyer (center) receives congrawlations of president of Chicago Liot~s in the presence of Melvin Jones, founder of the organization.

president, first vice-president, and president of the international organization. He is a graduate of Wofford College and received his LL.D. at Georgetown University. His practice in Fort Worth has been outstandingly successful. He .represents his district in the state legislature. In one year of foreign service during the war, he rose from a private to the rank of captain. This led to his election as post commander of the Fort Worth American Legion Post, largest in Texas. He is an excellent orator and has an enviable reputation as a wit and story teller.

the Northwest. The old relay record had stood since 1916 at 3:22.

According to the records of the A.A.U. this was the second fastest mile relay run this season in the United States, the fastest time having been made by a Stanford relay team. Because of these performances he has been requested to train for the Olympics, to be held at Los Angeles in 1932.

Vallee Broadcasts Pi Kapp Songs In line with his custom of introducing college fraternity songs, Rudy Vallee broadcast over a national hook-up of the Fleischman Yeast Hour on June 11 several songs of Pi Kappa Phi. Introducing them by a short accoun.t of the history of the organization, he sang " In the Land Where Good Fellowship Reigns," ""Rose of Pi Kappa Phi,"" and 路" Pi Kappa Phi , We Love You."" To Lawrence J. Bolvig, Alpha Xi, is due the credit for this event.


PI KAF"PA PHI FRATERNITY

CONVENT I ON

SANO U ET


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At Alpha Tau Installation

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Gamma Chapter Underway with Nine Pledges Secured

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By John Knowles

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UE to the early opening of the University of California, Gamma Chapter returned to the campus on the seventh of August to continue the rushing initiated during the summer. In spite of the depression, which seems to have hurt many houses, Gamma pledged nine men: Douglas Climm, Henry Buckholz, James Barrie, Roland White, Michael O'Leary, Fred Peddy, Gus Kerhulas, Robert Tuck and Theodore Courtney. With classes well under way, activities are starting to claim the time and attention of many men. Four sophomores are members of the Vigilance Committee, which keeps the lowly frosh where they belong: Lloyd Piller, who made his numerals in football, Walter Michaels, James McManigal, and James Barrie, who made their numerals in baseball. Barrie was captain of the freshman team. Jack Downer and Ed Hadden are working for managerial posts in intramural sports and football respectively. Lee Valianos and Lloyd Piller are turning out every day for pre-season football training and, according to experts, will show up well when "Navy Bill" Ingram steps on the field the fifteenth of September. When California lines up against Santa Clara in the first game, we expect to see both out with the varsity, Lloyd as tackle, and Lee as halfback. Tuck, Cohn, Courtney, and Kerhulas are also working out every day. Bill Woodward, former archon, was elected honorary crew captain of the California varsity that rowed to third place in the Poughkeepsie Regatta last July. The fall informal was held September 12. The success of the dance was due largely to the arrangements conducted by Jack Downer and Ted Grassi.

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Visiti11g Pi Kapps Front row, left to right: Joseph T. Van Voorhis (AP), William F. Jacob (A'Z), A. Pe/ter Wagener (A), Cyril R. Davidson (A'Z), Frank J. McMullen ( A'Z). Rear row: Alfred J. P. Wilson ( A'Z), Herbert A. Kuehne (.AO), William C. Hurt, Jr. (AT), Christian H. Steffan (A'Z), William R. Berger (A'Z) .

General Chairman Robinson Says It Was a Happy Convention (Continued from page 14)

enjoyable meeting of any kind, and I believe I heard enough of the delegates express themselves to say that they derived more pleasure and enjoyment than have delegates to other Pi Kappa Phi conventions." Gene Dunaway writes from Virginia, "I consider the Detroit convention the best in every way held by the fraternity and hope that all future conventions will use the last one as a model as to entertainment, hospitality, and behavior." Dr. Wagener, our re-elected supreme archon, writes from Virginia, "I am sure that everyone enjoyed himself and went away from the convention filled with happiness and inspiration." Dick Young writes from North Carolina, "I am fully convinced that the Detroit meeting was the best we have ever had." The Nebraska Pi Kapps from Nu Chapter write, "We want you to know that the mention of the word 'Detroit' will always bring to mind the most pleasant memories of a real Pi Kapp convention." This is part of the evidence we have of our success in measuring up to what we considered our first responsibi lity. As to our second, it gives me great pleasure to state that financially the convention was also a success, to the extent that our national treasury will benefit in a small degree, in spite of the fact that we are going through a period of depression.

â&#x20AC;˘ Eta Scroll Appears After considerable absence, the members of Eta Chapter were greeted recently with an issue of the Eta Scroll. George Williams, of that chapter, has presented a good piece of work. He promises the succeeding issues each six weeks of the school term. Of interest was the plan to ¡ be worked out of obtaining from each member of the chapter since its inception a photograph and personal data for the files of the chapter.

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Pi Kapp Mothers' Clubs Are Active • •n

the Fraternity's Interests

Mothers' Day at Alpha Zeta. (Inset) Mrs. T. W. Hammond, president of mothers EDITOR 's NOTE: Many chapters hz the organization hatJe a valuable som·ce of inspiration and aid in the form of an auxilial')' organization composed of the mothe1·s of members of the chapter. "Our best friends" are working indefatigably and loyall)' f01· the betterment of living conditions withhz the chapter, and this department is in the nature of a slight recog11ition of otw appreciation as well as a reSIIlt of Otll' deep interest hz their activities. As long as our mothers are behi11d us. u•e ha11e no fear of jail11re hz OM endeavol's.

Alpha Zeta Mothers' Club, Oregon State President, MRs. T. W.

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HAMMOND

N SUNDAY afternoon, March 16, 1930 three Pi Kappa Phi mothers met at the chapter house and, following the suggestion of Mrs. Art Miller of Seattle, founded the Mothers' Club of Alpha Zeta of h Kappa Phi. The other two founders were Mrs. Luia Briggs and Mrs. C. D. Richey. The object of the Mothers' Club is to help the chapter in making their new house more like a real home and to intensify the interest of Pi Kappa Phi mothers

in their sons' college lives. It was decided that through organization the mothers could help their sons in achieving and maintaining the standards of Pi Kappa Phi on the campus. A fee of two dollars a year for each mother was decided upon. This money is to be kept in the bank under the name of the club and each year a present is to be given the chapter. It was decided 11lso that in September, 1930, when the new house was opened, the individual mothers would give the boys a shower: pillows, ash trays, vases, and other little things useful for the new house. These gifts were sent before the formal open-house. Mrs. Art Miller, who was living in Seattle, was elected president and Mrs. Lula Briggs secretary-treasurer. Through the cooperation of Robert Peacock, then archon of the active chapter, a list of names and addresses of the mothers of all of the active and alumni members was obtained. Letters were written to all the mothers asking their membership. A committee, consisting of the officers and Mrs. C. D. Richey of Pendleton, Mrs. Chas. M. Peacock of Walla Walla, Wash-


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Mrs. W. D . Tr11esdale

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Upsilon Mothers' Club, Illinois President, MRs. Z. A. PARKHURST

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President, Omega Mothers

HE mothers of the members of the Upsilon Chapter of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity met on Sunday afternoon, May 24, 1931, at the LaSalle Hotel. The meeting was called to order by the president of the club, Mrs. Z. A. Parkhurst. A motion was made and carried that the organization be called the Upsilon Chapter of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity Mothers' Club. The club is to meet once a month, from September to May inclusive, on the fourth Wednesday of each month. Dues are to be two dollars a year. Many plans were discussed which are to be carried out during the coming year, if possible. The next meeting was held at the home of Mrs. J. G. Wishart, 7419 Stewart Avenue, Chicago, September 23.

ington, and Mrs. T. W. Hammond of Portland, Ore路 gon, wrote the letters. . At the end of the summer the membership of the club consisted of nineteen mothers. The $38.00 in the treasury purchased a fireside set for the living. Alpha Ga mma Mothers' Club, Oklahoma room in the new house. Pl'esident, MRs. THOMAS B. LOSEY During the Christmas holidays of 1930, Mrs. HamAY I express my appreciation of the courtesy mond with the help of the Portland mothers, sponof your invitation to tell something of the sored a rummage sale for the Mothers' Club. The profits from this purchased two floor lamps, one table Mothers' Club of the Alpha Gamma Chapter, Pi Kap路 lamp, a tapestry wall hanging, an end table, a pair pa Phi, of the University of Oklahoma (writes Mrs. of brass candlesticks, a set of book-ends and a table Losey). For the past several years it has been my pleasure cover. These were presented to the fraternity just before their formal open-house. The Mothers' Club al- and privilege to be a guest, with other mothers, of so presented the house with a beautiful basket of Pi Kappa Phi at Norman, Oklahoma. These happy gatherings bring together women from over the enspring flowers at this time. Twenty-two Pi Kappa Phi mothers gathered at the tire state, mothers having a common interest: the wei路 chapter house on Mothers' Day in 1931, and the fare and happiness of a son. At such times we are welc<>med by genial hosts, resecond annual meeting was called to order. The mothers in Portland decided that another rummage sale new old acquaintances, and make new friends. We are would be held in Portland sometime in September served an excellent dinner, and with dessert, listen of 1931, and a fine new gas range would be presented to chapter songs in which every man joins heartily. Out of this delightful program and association has to the house from the profits gained from this and the dues. It was suggested that mothers of alumni and grown our Mothers' Club, its members realizing that students in the college should visit the chapter house M1路s. as often as possible and that any assistance asked for A. Parkh11rst by the boys of Pi Kappa Phi should be rendered if possible. The mothers expressed their thanks for the wonderful week-end and kindnesses given by the chapter. Deep appreciation was expressed by the mothers and chapter to Mrs. Art Miller for her fine services as p.resident of the Mothers' Club in 1930-1931. Mrs. Thorne W. Hammond of Portland, Oregon, was elected president for 1931-1932 together with Mrs. W. W. Lawton of Portland as secretary-treasurer. A very successful year is expected under the guidance of President, Upsilon these officers and the wonderful cooperation of the Mothers many Pi Kappa Phi mothers.

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in the formation of such an organization ead1 mother learns to know her son's daily associates; he, in turn, all the mothers. Such a relationship shou ld develop greater fraternity spirit, finer ideals, and a stronger Alpha Gamma Chapter. . It has been difficult for our club to carry out all that tt has wished to do. The time between meetings has been too long, and the fact we meet in the spring When the activities for the year are about over is a drawback; perhaps, too, most mothers hesitate to lllake personal suggestions. However, now that Alpha Gamma has a commodious new home, we have interested ourselves in the care and furnishings of this handsome building. We make it a custom to remember the house each year with some gift which will add to its permanent furnishings. At no time has it been our policy to direct or supervise our sons as a chapter group; rather we want them to know we are interested in them and most happy to cooperate with them and with their house lllother. We are planning an early autumn meeting, after rushing and enrollment but before the home-coming &~me, in order that we may make definite plans for Wtnter and spring. In this way we believe we can be practically helpful to our own Alpha Gamma Chapter, and through them, lend some influence worth while to the national organization.

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Gamma Mothers' Club, California President, MRs. BERNARD MILLS

activities of the Mothers' Club in the past five years have been quite regular in character. . We endeavor to give three or four card parties dur~ng the year; and until two years ago we had given, tn addition, a theater party and a Father and Son banquet annually. Each semester we entertain the lllothers and sisters of the members with a tea, thereby enabling them to become better acquainted. We raise about $100 each year which we present Lo the boys for the purchase of something for the house. We are very happy to say we raised enough money last year to make possible the purchase of a new dining table, which the house needed rather badly. We mothers feel greatly the loss of our beloved lllember and past president, Mrs. Freytag.

Omega Chapter Mothers' Club, Purdue President, MRs. W. D. TRUESDALE

THE

Mothers' entertained at "What a thrill to the chapter and

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Club of the Omega Chapter was the chapter house on Mothers' Day. arrive for the first time as guest of find such hospitality as that group

Mrs. Charles L. Freytag

Gamma Chapter grieves the loss of one of its dearest mothers- Mrs. Charles L. Freytag. Mrs. Freytag had been president of our Mothers' Club for several semesters. She had given much of her time and had accomplished a great deal for the members of the house. Our Mothers' Club president was loved by everyone, and she made the new pledges' mothers always feel welcome. We are going to miss one who has so suddenly been taken away from us, and we realize that we will never be able to find anyone who can exactly fill her place. - S. PETER GRASSI, Archon

of boys offered, a group that we feel cannot be surpassed by any Pi Kappa Phi chapter! The home was turned over to us to enjoy as we wou ld, and this gave us an opportunity not only to meet and know each other but also to anticipate the scope of work open to the Mothers' Club. We are still a new organization of only a year's existence, but, as there was quite a lot of interest and enthusiasm shown, we feel we wi ll grow into a healthy and robust maturity. We have made few plans for the ensuing year. As we grow in experience, we hope we may be of assistance in many ways that go to make a strong and outstanding chapter for our boys. We would like to feel that by our cooperation with and interest in the boys and their welfare in college and in their fraternity we may be an inspiration to them to attain the highest for their fraternity, their college, and, most of all, for themselves.


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* * * * * * * * Pi Kappa Phi Scholars for 1931 Certificates Distributed Work of Committee Reorganized Changing Value of College Education

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Under the Student's Lamp By

Dr. Will E. Edington, Upsilon

Pi Kappa Phi Scholars For 1931

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HE fifth annual list of Pi Kappa Phi Scholars has been determined after a careful analysis of the records of a number of members who have attained high scholastic standing in their respective institutions. In fact, the number of candidates was sufficient to permit the making of the maximum number of scholarship awards that may be given in any one year, namely nine, for the first time; and the records of several brothers, who at present are entering upon their senior year, are being held for consideration in next year's awards. Following are the names of the Pi Kappa Phi Scholars for 1931: Paul R. Alderman, Jr., Epsilon; J. Cleve Allen, Iota; William C. Askew, Alpha Alpha; George G. Fassnacht, Omega; W. G. Fassnacht, Omega; Chalmers W. Gilbert, Omega; William A. Howard, Alpha Beta; Carl Olson, Jr., Alpha Omicron, and Robert E. Williams, Alpha Zeta. It will be observed that for the first time three men in one chapter have been honored with the award, and of these three two are blood brothers. However, one who has followed the scholarship record of Omega Chapter will find that of the 50 honor graduates out of the 510 students who graduated at Purdue in June, · 1931, four are members of Omega Chapter. There are approximately 45 social fraternities and sororities at Purdue, so that Omega placed four times as many men on this honor list as would be expected, assuming that the 50 honor graduates were all members of fraternities, which is by no means the case as probably not over sixty per cent of the seniors belong to fraternities. Such scholarship cannot be denied! Two of these four brothers are A. H.

Bostater and E. H. Sherwood, who were Pi Kappa Phi Scholars for 1930. The formal awards of the scholarship pendants and certificates will be made to these brothers on Founders' Day, December 10. Also on this date the respective chapters of the above brothers will receive certificates of award; which, when framed, will make excellent additions to the walls of the chapter room. The records, activities, and pictures of the Pi Kappa Phi Scholars for 1931 will appear in the December number of the Sta1' a11d Lamp. Scholarship Certificates Distributed

Through the combined action of the Scholarship Committee, Supreme Archon Wagener and former Supreme Archon Driver, certificates were awarded to the Pi Kappa Phi Scholars for the years 1927, 1928, and 1929. Also, the chapters which these men represented have been presented similar certificates so that the work of these former brothers may be re· membered in the chapter rooms. Scholarship Committee Work Reorganized

The advisory work of the Scholarship Committee has been divided and assigned specifically to the mem· bers. Brother Winter will have immediate charge of the scholarship supervision of Districts 1, 2, 3, and 8, and Brother Petry, will be the adviser for Dis· tricts 4, 5, 6, and 7. The chapters in the remaining districts will receive the attention of the chairman· As in the past, however, all scholarship records and reports should be sent to the chairman from whose


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office the other committee members will receive such information as is needed for their district work. The members of the committee invite correspondence from chapter officers and individual brothers concerning their scholarship problems.

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Richard Taylor Prominent Member of Alpha Pi Chapter By

Charles

H.

Douglass

Changing Value of College Education

ALPHA PI started off the year with a total of

For the .first time in many years a large number of colleges and universities are confronted with the problem of analyzing the purpose and value of the college degree. The economic depression has forced upon them the recognition of the fact that their graduates are numbered by the thousands among the unemployed. Graduates from teaching, engineering, commerce, business, law, medical, and dentistry schools are finding it increasingly difficult to secure positions s~fliciently remunerative to justify the expenditure of time and money required to fit them for their chosen professions. Only the most efficient can hope to succeed. And the future affords no hope of any immediate adjustment, so that the college degree, which has largely become a vocational or "bread and butter" degree, is losing its value as such. With the great majority the degree has meant simply the stamp of approval of the college of the ability of the holder of the degree to earn a living in the professions. Success has been largely measured in terms of money, and the Value of the college degree has been advertised by numerous tables and charts as lying largely in the ea_rning power of the college graduate as compared With the earning power of those with more limited training. Accordingly, the colleges have been crowded With those desirous of being led into this "Promised land." Practically all cultural and spiritual values have been lost sight of, except in a few of the smaller colleges which make no pretense of preparing their students for the battle of life in the professions. And now, with the destruction of the golden calf, the college degree must be revaluated. Without doubt ~he future will restore to the college degree more of Its cultural and scholarly value and add to its spiritual values. Except in the purely professional schools, and even there eventually, the college degree will lose much of its present selfish aim and carry with it more of the spirit of sacrifice and service.

r \ thirteen members re-entered at Sewanee. The

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Martin Wilson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Wilson of Lower Naches, was last week elected president of 1he knights of the Hook, a society composed of members of the various fraternities represented on the campus of the University of Washington. Young Wilson is a sophomore, the president of his class, and a member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. - Yakima (Wn .) H e1路a/d.

majority of these returned to the Mountain before registration day, and were able to get everything in order for a big year. Charles Eby returned to take his place as archon. Pi Kappa Phi is well represented on the football field with seven members on the squad. Four of last year's freshmen look mighty good for the varsity this year; Thompson and Clark are in line for regular guard positions, with Dyer lined up as second stringer ; and Thompson is working for a berth at end. Eby, Underwood, and Robinson look good for the backfield. We were glad to have Assistant Secretary Cannon with us during several days of our rush season. He assisted us greatly during his short stay on the Mountain. Richard Taylor, who is one of Sewanee's student proctors this year, has gained quite a few honors for himself and great distinction for Alpha Pi. He became a member of both Phi Beta Kappa and Omicron Delta Kappa last year, and is editor of the 1932 Cap a11d Gown. Frank Pulley was elected ed itor of the Sewanee. Pu,.ple at the close of last year, but has had to give up this work because of conflict with his studies in the theological department. George Copeland, who was graduated last year, has been with the chapter during rush season. James Jennings, Rho Chapter, has also been with us, and has helped greatly with the rushing. The Committee on the State of the Fraternity, of Phi Kappa Psi, reported at its recent convention that the following matters were giving trouble here and there: scholarship, finances, unbalanced classes, alumni indebtedness, the loaning of the badge, violation of the Eighteenth Amendment and the By-Laws of the fraternity prohibiting the use of liquor on chapter property, and Jack of hospitality. Don't get your fraternities mixed; this did happen to be Phi Kappa Psi. What queer troubles some people have! - Tbe Rainbow of Delta Tau Delta

Beta Chapter of Theta Xi in a recent ceremony jointly initiated John J. Raskob, Sr., and John Jacob, Jr. Pi Kappa Alpha has adopted the insurance plan as the means to a national endowment.


32

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Press Cl~b~~ne Man f o Enter Contest For Congr~ss In Fifth

,JACKS_ON

PATTERSON AT EMORY

Aflcr their baltic over .lhc rain•10a ked Berkeley Country dub coune yesterday, the winner and j op in the dub'• charn pionahip tournament received the ir lrophiu . L.ft lo ri\ht, aboYe, " ' VEF

PECK, club mana1cr, awu din1 the champiQ4Jbip cup to C. L. LAWS, while E. E. HAU.. the finah, acccptt hit trophy from H. E. H£RON, cl.airman a£ tht touma'rM.nt committee.

.

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de'f1'

-Tll/BUNi?.

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p

Parker (0) is written up in Birmingham "News"; Patterson (H) mentioned in Tallassee "Tribune"; "Believe It or Not" features Sewell (<0); Fulmer and Brownlee (M) rate Durham "Herald"; Harris (.A.) listed in Athens (Ga.) "Banner-Herald"; "human interest" story of McKenzie (.A. .t.) from Ellensburg (Wash.) "Record"; Kelley (0) and fish from Mobile "Register''; Laws (r) and award shown in Oakland "Tribune"; Woodward's (r) captaincy carried by San Francisco "Call-Bulletin"; Slater (K) recog niz.ed by Norfolk "News-Leader''; Hovater (0) returns, Birmingham "News."


OF

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33

Publicity

Therefore, when hi s own fraternity laid •t s pl:tn s he turn ed loose his fund of factl'!, logic and per· s U:asi\'t powerA 1n fa vor of all-lumber con!ltruction :to such ~oOd effect that hi s idtas pre,•ai led . The ,res ult is that the Pi Kappa Ph i hoys :tre nQw housed in a large and substantia l three-s tory home in .whi~h WQQ<I~of mnny kind!! ,h:wc contributed' to the beauty, clis tiuction and durability of the struc· ture. Ten. different wOods hav"· been used in bui lding nud dccoratinJ:" this northern colonia l type fraternity home, a ll but l\\'0 o f which nrc grown and manufactured on the P11cific Coas t. These ten arc Douglas fir, wes tern hem lock, noble fir, big leaf rn:t.ple, StWar pine, sitk:t s pruce, blaek walnut, western reel

'~~a~;v~e~,.~~ f~~~~:~~ilfl:~~~ ~t~~~g:r~~ 0 ~nly

the

IA !Iof l!:" 1". L \ 'W'Ctl raduata or lhfrphy H/Jh in tr.ll, 1m1d editor of tha Rammn J4m· ltr, humor publication of tha Unl· 4 ralty or Alabama, Ia tha aon ol r, Jamr. r. and lira. t 'annla c. )'nc:h. who /lvu at 3 South Scott f i l l. Lynch ,.. .. prumlnenlly tntlfled In varloua atud,nt I CUvl· u whlit at hllh aeh~M~ I hut. rank Allen, formerJ,r of Joloblle, ~ • .,rve u hualntu m•najlu. ~neb .,·aa an •nlllant editor th la a r Ia Allen Wll ahltllnt bual• N mln&~er. Lyndl Ia a mc~ruber Pi KtppaPhl fral tmllyand will ter th1 11nlor law ela,. t hla .ar. II• baa llrved •• humor edl· r Hltor or the Corolla, atuden l nu al,, a.nd on tha Crlm1on-Whtte . ~If a.t1d Glee clUb, 1141 auccud-

Detroit " Free Press" con'Vention publicity; Harper gets plenty of space in Richmond "Times-Dispatch"; Culbertson ( t.) rates Spartanburg " Journal"; Brinson's (II) honors mentioned by Augusta (Ga.) " Chronicle"; nice spread for Jackson (0) in Uni'Versity of Alabama " Crimson and White"; " West Coast Lumberman" and " Western Wood Worker" feature Alpha Zeta house; Hill (.AP) gets excellent write-up in Morgantown " Post" ; Paxton (P) honored according to Richmond " N ews-Leoder" ; Mutispaugh (.A E) Plant City (Fla.) " Courier"; L ynch ( 0 ) honored, Mobile " R egister."


THE

34

PERSONALS

II

J. Frank Fletcher, Omicron, is re-located in Birmingham, Ala., 906 Pioneer Building. He recently received promotion to the assistant managership of Southeastern Compensation Rating Bureau. Ross G. Hume, Alpha Gamma, is practicing law as a member of the firm of Hume and Hume, Anadarko, Okla. He is local attorney for the Frisco Railroad. Mybert E. Broom, Upsilon, was the recipient of a Ph.D. degree at the last commencement of the University of Southern California.

Glenn E. Potter, Upsilon, successfu l coach of Marysville, Calif., union high school for the past six years, has accepted a coaching position with the junior college of Yuba County.

Walter M. Morgan, Alpha Delta, recently obtained his Doctor of Medicine degree at the University of Oregon. He is now an interne in the Seattle General Hospital. Amos Martin, Jr., Pi, 1930 captain of baseball at Oglethorpe, is now playing professional baseball with Atlanta. Dawson Hall, Rho, successful young attorney of Chattanooga, was recently appointed assistant county attorney of Hamilton county, Tennessee.

Prof. T. J. Starker, Alpha Zeta, former professor of forestry at Oregon State College, has accepted a like position with Penn State College.

Marriages Malcolm H. Hardy, Alpha Eta, to Miss Frances Pitts of Birmingham, April 27, 1931. At home, Blackstone Apartments, Birmingham, Ala. Ellis M. Brydia, Alpha Mu, to Miss Mabel Harpy of.Utica, N. Y., November 17, 1930. At home, 2707 Sunset Lane, Utica, N.Y. Dr. Alphonso R. Sims, Alpha Beta, to Miss Dorothy Owens of Covington, Tenn., April 15, 1931.

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1

Joseph Dekle, Pi, to Miss Marie Rowland of Atlanta, Ga., April 22, 1931. At home, 1110 Boulevard Northeast, Atlanta, Ga. John E. Maynard, Alpha Delta, to Miss Vera :M. Luse of Spokane, Wash., March 26, 1931. Amos Martin, Jr., Pi, to Miss Doris Taylor of Buford, Ga., December 7, 1930. At home, Norcross, Georgia. Nicholas Dawson Hall, Jr., Rho, to Miss Owene J. Lynch of Chattanooga, Tenn., May 25, 1931. Ray E. Hall, Nu, to Miss Harriett Louise Nelson of Albion, Neb., on June 3, 1931. At home, Petersburg, Neb. Herbert F. Geier, Alpha Xi, to Miss Georgiana Ruth Armstrong, June 12, 1931. Paul C. Wimbish, Kappa, to Miss Zelia Francis Bouchelle of New Smyrna, Fla., May 31, 1931. Robert A. Youngblood, Upsilon, to Miss Jetta B. Yerkes, of Des Moines, Iowa, May, 18, 1931. Ralph M. Snider, Alpha Delta, to Miss Frances Rawson, of Puyallup, Wash., May 29, 1931. J. Louie Buchanan, Alpha Alpha, to Miss Anne Pearl M'Kensie of Rossville, Ga., June 25, 1931. James Harmon Carter, Alpha Alpha, to Miss Bess Thomson Eison, June 27, 1931. At home, Selma, Ala. Dale G. Wilson, Alpha Omicron, to Miss Bertryl Merrill, June 26, 1931. William Ernest Parker, Iota, to Miss Katherine Lotspeich of Chattanooga, August, 1931. Walter Frederick Kuehne, Alpha Omicron, to Miss Ruth Ellen McConnell, of Chicago, Ill., June 12, 1931. Charles H. Yarbrough, Eta, to Miss Bertha Mason, July 3, 1931. George Claus, Lambda, to Miss Willafy Watwood of Chicago, Ill. Dr. Robert Nathan Little, Pi, to Miss Kathryn Gordon Wheeler, July 23, 1931. Robert Russell Carothers, Omicron, to Miss Minnie Massee of Marshallville, Ga., August 25, 1931. Fritz Otto Myers, Eta, to Miss Myrtle Spratlin, August 25, 1931. Donald Arter Rittenhouse, Upsilon, to Miss Florence Louise Leyendecker, September 5, 1931. Henry Stilwell Brown, Psi, to Miss Louise Rappleye Chadwick, September 14, 1931. Herbert Spencer Schroeder, Upsilon, to Miss Dorothy Hinman, July 25, 1931. At home, 754 Eighth St., Niagara Falls, N.Y.


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John leighton Ames, Jr., Gamma, to Miss Mary Catharine Stevens, August 2, 1931. b Hugh A. Groves, Iota, to Miss Anna Frances Helmolt, July 25, 1931. At home, Milledgeville, Ga. Harry Lee Shaw, Jr., Epsilon, to Miss Marie Louise Ragsdale, August 12, 1931. Harwell Goodwin, Alpha Eta, to Miss Margaret Newell, August 15, 1931. . C. A. Rusler, Alpha Nu, to Miss Ruth Finch of lima, Ohio, July 15, 1931. Ross G. Hume, Alpha Gamma, to Miss Gladys Elizabeth McDonald, June 22, 1931. At home, Anadarko, Okla. Weldon Ferris, Alpha Gamma, to Miss Ruth Smith, September 1, 1931. George Russell, Alpha Gamma, to Miss Lottie Mae Bughes, June 22, 1931.

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35

Engagements

Barnard Bee Lewis, Jr., Iota, to Miss Sally Welsh Fulcher of Atlanta, Ga. Richard Nix, Alpha Alpha, to Miss Martha McArthur of Marks, Miss. James Nicholas Grant, Iota, to Miss Esther LaRose of Lagrange, Ga . Births

Born to Mr. and Mrs. Julian S. Pinkston, Eta, a son, Julian, Jr., on July 31, 1931. Born to Mr. and Mrs. P. S. Showell, Alpha Delta, a son, Philip Sidney, Jr., August 8, 1931. Born to Mr. and Mrs. Carl Hobbs Lippold, Eta, a son, Carl Hobbs, Jr., May 21, 1931.

THE ULTIMATE CHAPTER Beautiful Memorial Service Conducted

by

II

Supreme Chapter

e

s

A S IS its wont, the Supreme Chapter designated a .

n

specified time for gathering together to honor those members of the fraternity that have entered the chapter eternal since the last national convention. Supreme Historian Pou led the ceremonies, assisted by ]. Friend D ay as chaplain and Supreme Treasurer Johnston and R. L. Harper, Alpha Rho, as vocalist ~nd accompanist. The ritual was performed in a very Impressive way, and the fraternity bade affectionate and reverent good-bye to those men whom death has taken from the ranks in the year and half gone by: DoNALD L. BARTLETT .... . ... ... . Alpha Nu Chapter EDWARD CHARLES CURDTS, }R.......... Iota Chapter HARRY 0TTICE FERGUSON .... ....... .. . Nu Chapter RALPH GORDON MILLER ....... Alpha Alpha Chapter DYER HAMIL TON HARMON . . ........ .... Xi Chapter )OHN FRANKLIN BOWMAN ........ Alpha Xi Chapter THOMAS ANDERSON JOYCE ........ Omicron Chapter WALTER F. McWADE ............. Upsilon Chapter PAUL CONROY BRADLEY ...... Alpha Epsilon Chapter CHARLES FRANKLIN BARLOW ........ . . Zeta Chapter CHARLES GILMORE McELROY .. .. ...... Rho Chapter UWRENCE ORR BRUCE . ... ......... Alpha Chapter RALPH L. BRENIZER .............. Alpha Pi Chapter WILLIAM CooPER ............. . ...... Tau Chapter SEYMOUR C. }ONES, JR ....... . .. ....... Mu Chapter lAWRENCE LAWLESS ... . .............. Mu Chapter GEORGE MAcKLIN O"REAR ......... Omicron Chapter

The memorial service was concluded with the reading of a bit of verse, written by the father of Brother Lawless and addressed to Larry's brothers of Mu 路 Chapter. It was beautiful and appropriate to the occasion. Larry! Can you forget Pi Kappa Phi. The giant frame that housed the manne r mild And gave it sweetness 'luring every child? Can Mu forget the ever kindly eye, The gentle smile, the graciousness, the sigh He had for weakness, and the strength he piled On Manhood's own where Manhood was defiled ? The honor it was his to typify ? 0

Brotherhood of friends! 0 dean-lived men Ambitious to achieve Olympian heights! ' The Reaper has removed him from your ken! But ye, whose Lore knows life is but a span, Know love in each your loyal hearts requites These virtues of a Knightly Gentleman!

J. To the gentlemen of

Mu Chapter from Larry's Daddy May, 1931

T. LAWLESS


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---------------------------

Lawrence Lawless, Mu

Seymour C. fones, Mu

Lawrence Lawless- Seymour Jones

bereaved parents, and of the fraternity, is the Joss of the world.

A tragic and unavoidable automobile accident near Duke University on Saturday morning, May 9, deprived Mu Chapter of two of its most prominent and loved members and plunged the entire campus in mourning. They were returning from a dance in a car driven by R. N. Hoggard, also a member of Mu, who was momentarily blinded by a wrongly parked car suddenly turning on its lights, and who in trying to avoid it could not prevent the car from overturning in the sudden swerve. Brother Jones was instantly killed and Brother Lawless died Monday morning without ever regaining consciousness. The car causing the accident drove away immediately and no clue to its identity was ever found . Members of the chapter accompanied the remains to the homes of the men. Seymour resided in Okolona, Mississippi, and Larry in Norfolk, Virginia. As an indication of the position of respect and affection which they held in the hearts of their college mates and faculty, many of these also attended the final ceremonies that marked their interment. Supreme Archon Wagener attended the funeral of Brother Lawless. Both were campus and fraternity leaders. Brother Jones was eleCted the chapter's delegate to the Detroit conyention, and the delegates assembled paid tribute to him at Detroit. Both were prominent in many of the representative organizations on the campus. Mu Chapter has been terribly shaken by the tragic happening. Both were of the highest type of manhood, dean, thoughtful, considerate, affectionate and Joyal; they were leaders in the best sense; and the Joss of the

George M. O'Rear The sudden plunge of a large bomber from the height of 200 feet took from the fraternity a member beloved of all those whose privilege it was to knoW him: Cadet George Macklin O'Rear, Omicron '28Along with a companion, who was also killed by the accident, he had taken off from Kelly Field, Texas, on a cross-country training flight and was approach路 ing a landing when the control of the ship was lost. He had just recently graduated from primary train路 ing at Brooks Field with high rating. . While at Brooks Field, George was elected prestdent of his class and played on the baseball and basket路 ball teams of the training school. At Alabama he was outstanding in the work of the glee dub and the string band and other activities. He was an exceptional leader in fraternal activities also. In October, 1930, he received his notice of appointment to the air corps. On November 24 he was permitted to take the plane up for his first solo. June 15 he reported for advanced training. On July 1 he was assigned to the bombing squadron, and twenty路 six days afterward the Great Commander called hirn "West." He was buried at Jasper with full military honors, an escort accompanying him to his resting place and planes from the Alabama National Guard dropping wreaths as his casket was lowered. He is a brother of Nielson B. O'Rear, also a member of Omicron. The following strikingly and beautifully describes the man that was George. It was taken from the

rn, th

sc]

Pr

tn as

si, th

hi.

he in


2!_

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PHI

Folded Wings

37 became an Eagle, now he has soared high again- and gone ... .

Recently reported was the death of Henry Tharp Carter, Alpha Zeta '31. He was killed in an automobile accid ent in Portland, Oregon, on August 10.

Alpha Omicron Chapter Winner of Second Efficiency Contest (Contil111ed ft路om page 21) Alpha Iota: Alternate captain, football; circu lation staff, sports editor, the Plainsman (weekly) ; business manager, the Glom era/a (annual); three members, Blue Key; two members, executive cabinet; historian, junior class; treasurer, junior class; president and business manager, glee club. Alpha Lambda: Chemistry assistant; class edi tor, annual staff; assistant circulation manager, annual ; staff of law journal; three members, Phi Eta Sigma; finance committee, Y .M.C.A.; assistant, English and botany. Alpha Mu: Winner of freshman scholarship cup; mem ber, Phi Beta Kappa; president, Pre-Vet Club; two members, glee club. Alpha Nu: Two members, varsity fencing; one member, varsity polo; one member, varsity baseball ; one member, freshman track.

e

Alpha Xi: Winner of scholarship cup; two lettermen in sports; editor-in-chief, Polytechnic Reporter (weekly) ; feature ed itor, Reporter; assis tant editor, Polywog ( annual) ; member of student counci l ; member, evening student council; treasurer, freshman class; treasurer, sophomore class.

v

Alpha Omicron: Assistant associate editor, Iowa State Student; editor, Farm and Home; three members on staff, Iowa Agt路imlturist; circulation manager, yearbook; one member, Phi Kappa Phi; one member, Sigma Xi. George M. 0' Rear, Omicron

Alpha Pi: Editor, Mountain Goat (humorous); editor, annua l ; editor, freshman Purple (weekly); one member, Blue Key; one member, Phi Beta Kappa; two members, glee club.

letter of Supreme Secretary Pou, in which the informa路 tion of George's death came. May the liberty be pardoned:

Alpha Rho: Captain, track team; news ed itor, Athenaeum (daily) ; two members on annual staff; one member, Phi Beta Kappa; one member, Tau Beta Pi.

路 .. I was proud of that little colony of hand.picked Pi l<apps at J asper. They were my personal pledges. I remember how proud I was to place the White Diamond in the lapel of little George's coat, whi le he was sti ll in high school- and sti ll in short trousers. And I remember how Proud he was too. Before that he had been in my scout troop, and he was my real buddy from the day he enrolled as a tenderfoot. He and Robert Argo were generally considered the best scouts in the entire Black Warrior district: they were the first two to earn the coveted Eagle badge, the highest honor in scouting. George was that way in everyt hing_ When he drove a car, he drove fast. When he had a friend, he was a fast friend in return. And as in scouting he soared to the heights and

Alpha Sigma: Vice-president, treasurer, Y.M.C.A. council; managing editor, Tem1essee E11gineer; business manager, Mugwump (humorous); one member, Phi Kappa Phi; one member, Tau Beta Pi.

Preliminary Reports on Pledging The following are the results g iven in the preliminary reports of pledging: Gamma, 9; Epsi lon, 11; Zeta, 11; Eta, 10; Iota, 20; Lambda, 12; Nu, 15; Omicron, 13; Rho, 11; Alpha Alpha, 8; Alpha Beta, 9; Alpha Eps ilon, 20; Alpha Eta, 15; Alpha Iota, 14; Alpha Pi, 6.


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C H A . PTE R PRACTICES Omega Recognizes Endeavor lJV e introduce with this excellent article by Brother Aylesworth a new department that will be devoted to chaplet· practices that are unmual and have proven eff ective in improt;ing chapter standm·ds and morale. CotltributimiS are desired. EDITOR's NOTE:

MEGA CHAPTER, Purdue, makes two unique awards to outstanding members that are well worth working for. The first of these is the Junior Award, and it is based wholly on scholarship. It furnishes a stimulus to avoid that mid-term slump. The award originated five years ago when Purdue built its football stadium and sold life seats at $100 each. The chapter purchased one of these seats and devised this means of using it: The seat goes to the man making the highest scholastic average in his junior year and is for his use in his senior year. Some keen competition has developed among the members of the junior class for this coveted award for it means a free seat on the 50-yard line at all football games. In last year's class of twelve juniors, five men turned in a point average for the year of 5-plus for all credit hours. Comparing with other grading systems this rating means an average above 95 per cent. The Junior Scholarship Award has been won by the following men since it was originated: P. F~ Aylesworth '27, W. H. Prichard '28, W. H. C. Higgins ' 29, R. B. Daniels '30, and A. H. Bostater '31. Three of these men are winners of the Pi Kappa Phi National Scholarship Award in the four years that it has been awarded. The other award, known as the Freshman Award Trophy, was made possible by the Omega Alumni Association. It exemplifies their interest in the work the active chapter is doing and is intended to stimulate a well-rounded development. A wall plaque with the Pi Kappa Phi crest and bronze plate for engraving the winners name was selected as the trophy. The plaque will remain in the chapter house and have the winner's name engraved on it each year. The announcement of the winner is made at the homecoming banquet in the fall. The award goes to the outstanding freshman in the first semester of his sophomore year. This means

O

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P. F. Aylesworth 1 Omega '27 that a man must be back in school to be consider~ in the ratings. The following basis of award is used: scholarship, 50 per cent; activities, 30 per cent; and cooperative ability, 20 per cent. The points are divided by the number of freshmen, the men ranked in order under each division, and the points given each rna~· For example: In ranking according to scholarshtp suppose there are 10 freshmen; divide the 50 points by 10 which would give a differential of five points between each man. The man with the highest grade would get 50 points, the second highest, five points less, or 45 points. Information on which award is based: Scholarship: Both semester grades are taken, and the University point system used in figuring the average. Activities: The archon of the chapter keeps a record of all activities and accomplishments and ranks the men accordingly. Cooperative ability: The senior executive committee ranks each man according to his cooperative ability and house loyalty. The method used is the one in vogue in athletic circles of selecting the most valuable player; i.e., each committeeman ranks the men according to his idea of who should be first, second, third, etc., by writing 1, 2, 3, etc., after the man's name. The total votes are then added and the man having the smalle$t total is given first place, second smallest, second place, etC· The award was offered this last year for the first time and was won by Vernon J. Pease, M.E. ' 33, with a total of 82 points out of a possible 100. Of the twelve men who competed, he placed first in co· operative ability, third in scholarship, and fifth in ac· tivities. This method of award is given somewhat in detail in the hope that other chapters may see the value to be gained from some recognition of this sort. The value of this award lies in its stimulus to well-rounded development and the placing of the responsibility of award on practically the whole chapter. The ac· tivity chart kept by the archon is a constant source of interest and far reaching in effect. The rating of men by the executive committee lends its due share of interest in the award.


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39

Delta Has Honor Man

0

NE of the highest honors that can be attained by a student at Furman was recently won by James W. Culbertson, present archon of Delta Chapter. He was selected by the faculty as the most outstanding scholar in the senior class and was awarded

bating team, business manager of the glee club, member advisory board of the Greater Furman Club, and secretary of the I.R.C. He .is taking a pre-medical course. A total of nine men, over half of the membership of the chapter, was placed on the honor roll of the last session. They were: James W. Culbertson, Green H. Cleveland, William 0. Self, Thomas F. McAfee Jr., James R. Scales, William E. Phelps, Jr., Sid Martin, A. Elbert Adams, Jr., and Marcus G. Crump, Jr. Duane B. Snider and Green H. Cleveland were successful in the last elections and take their places in the student council this year.

w:

d d >(

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p

Magazine of Sigma Chi Celebrates Anniversary

ts s

around him the editors that comGATHERING pose the midwestern regional group of the Fra-

le James Culbertson

the President's Scholarship. In winning the scholar-

d e

·d

~e

ic

:h

~hip he has been recognized as fully filling the follow-

tog conditions: 1. The student must have taken all Work at Furman University. 2. He must have shown himself to be of sound moral character and worthy ambition. 3. He must be in the judgment of the faculty the most outstanding scholar of his class. The award ts made to a member of the junior class. Brother Culbertson led the junior class last year With 180 quality credits, rating second in the entire student body. Besides being an excellent student, he is president of Tau Kappa Alpha, member of the de-

ternity Editors' Association, Chester W. Cleveland, editor of the Magazine of Sigma Chi, played the part of a perfect host on an occasion designed to mark the celebration of the fiftieth anniversary of that excellent publication and, incidentally, the tenth anniversary of his appointment as editor, The editors were his guests at a banquet at the Palmer House, June

6, 1931. Present and extending felicitations and congratulations on the part of Pi Kappa Phi were Executive Secretary Howard D. Leake and Assistant Secretary Joe Cannon, Jr. The Magazine of Sigma Chi is considered one of the most outstanding of the fraternity journals, and, likewise, Chester W. Celeveland is a recognized leader in the field.

)f 1, re

al

c. st :h

RECOGNIZED

1e

To William Burnette, Alpha Sigma, was awarded the Paul Kreusi award by the faculty of the University of Tennessee at the 1931 commencement of the institution. It is given to the student in the Electrical, Civil, Mechanical, and Chemical Schools of Engineering who has made the most of his opportunity and shown the greatest advancement. Burnette won it as a student of chemical engineering. He was a student assistant, member of Alpha Chi Sigma (chemical honorary), A.C.E., and dramatic club. He is now assistant chemist with the Aluminum Company of America, Alcoa, Tenn.

J•

Wm. Burnette, A l:


40

THE

Their Deeds Remain AFter Them (Conlirmed from page 10)

How he feels toward the fraternity, how he w ill always feel was expressed in his speech at the banquet, "The Part You Play." His theme was unadulterated fellowship for its own sake; and as he spoke, he has lived.

Services Commandeered

Chosen as a temporary substitute, John C. Johnston found himself a permanent supreme treasurer. He has served the fraternity in that capacity several years, and a good one he has been. His winning modesty would not perm it him to admit it, but those whose pleasure it has been to have associated with him in the official business of the fraternity w ill unanimously accord it. When Supreme Archon Wagener assumed his position with the West Virginia University, he happened one day to run upon a busy, attractive chap in the executive offices of the College of Agriculture and Experiment Stations. Conversation w ith him brought to light the pleasant fact that he was also a Pi Kapp, a member of the old Theta Chapter. When the then Supreme Treasurer J. Chester Reeves asked the Counci l to relieve him of the duties temporarily, th at body, upon the recommendation of the supreme archon, requested of John his services for the time being. Although had been out of contact with the fraternity many years, although he was already a busy man, he did not refuse; and he performed ably in his temporary position. He attended the Charleston convention. As in the case of the last convention, it was necessary that h e leave before the final day of the convention, on which day the elections take place. However, when it was known that J. Chester Reeves did not desire to carry the duties of the office further, he was promptly nominated. He carried the election without much opposition. For the last two years he has served the office most faithfully and thoughtfully. Under his instigation the present voucher system was Inaugurated. He declined to run for the office again, stating that the fraternity should obtain a man of greater physical stam ina. From a personal physical standpoint, the recent years h ave not been exactly happy ones for him, and he was wise in relieving himself of some of the load he was beari ng. He takes with him the gratitude and good wishes of the fraternity.

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The Price o' Popularity

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Sigma Chi asked the why of " Doin' the Sigma Chi " and was answered that it h appe ned to fit the rhythm, or something to th at effect ; and now we have the following, taken from the Shield a1zd Diamond of Pi Kappa Alpha: Philip Ritter, Jr., Alpha Psi '15, was calml y smoking his pipe one even ing recent ly in his home at Glen Ridge, N.J., when he was surprised to hear the strains of the " Dream Girl" pouring from the radio, sung by a tenor with n Southern draw l, who did himself proud. Ritter telephoned the station, WOR at Newark, to congratu late the performer, thinking he was a Southern II K A, but a connection could not be obtained. So Ritter, enthused, drove ten miles to Newark and met the gent leman in question. The following conversation took place: ''Good evening. My name's Ritter, Alpha Psi ." "Yeah ? Pleased to meet cher." "What's your chapter?" "Huh?" "Where'd you go to co llege?" "Are you kidding me?" "Why, no. From the song you sang a short time ago thought you might belong to the same co llege fraternity do, II A K." "Oh, hell! Is that what it is? I thought it was the song of some damn girls' sorority!"

Trouble has been experienced at the Univers ity of Minnesota-fraternity trouble of the sort which here Jed to the interfraternity council resolution w hich frowns upon hell week. Seven pledges of one of the Minnesota fraternities severed their connections a week ago, after havi ng been pledged during the regular rushing season. Too much paddling, too much fuss over weari ng apparel, and too much snobbishness on the part of the members of the active chapter were the reasons given by the freshmen for their action. The seven mailed their pledge buttons, with expressions of regret attached, back to the university. "We don't mind being treated as we think pledges ought to be treated," they said, "but things have gone too far." Upon receipt of the bu ttons and notes, the fraternity took steps toward recovering its lost sheep, and did succeed in convi ncing one to take his pin back. The others refused to do so. Actives of the chapter had no comment to make on the situation.-University of Chicago Daily Maroon.

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"I Phi Kappa Tau is the second fraternity to build a national h eadquarters. It is located at Oxford, Ohio. Rudy Vallee's original saxophone is now an exh ibit in the archives of Sigma Alpha Epsilon .

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OBSERVATION & OPINION

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The Alumnus-An Adviser Only By W. G. Schulz, An. EorToR.'s NOTE: Hat'e you a " pet pee t,e''? If ;•ou desire to ait· if, you have the P•·i,,i/ege of 1his department. if you take exception to statements made herein, we would like to know why yo11 do so. It must" be rmde1'Jtood, however, that Publication be•·ein does not ht any way signify that Stlcb Jtatements are itt accord witb the ideas and policies of the lilagazhte or of the national administration. Brothe•· Schulz states in a Iefier !hal accompanied this rtrtic!e that the opinions exp•·essed "repre.ren/s some se t,en )'em·s of obse1·vation" as m1 ac1i11e and as an al1111111;1s, both in his ou•n chapler and as a newspaper man who has bad lhe op porllmily to obse•·t'e cbetplers of olher frat emilies in 1 't'l·ious sec/ions of tbe couniiJ'· H e beliet,es tbat tbe majority of alumni ag•·ee wilh bim. b111 !hat an;• of his ".rlalemen/s are 0 Pen lo cballenge," which be u•ill be ,~ !.td /o accepl.

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human beings, and when seen in a throng possess no unusual earmarks or brands to distinguish ~hem particularly from other persons. But when sub. !ected to a dose·up, es pecially when they have dropped rnto their fraternity for a weck·end visit to look over the old campus again, their individual characteristics assume a more pronounced aspect. On such occasions these traits, good and bad , are always ca refully observed by the fraternity und ergraduates, and though the alumnus may be unaware of the scrutiny that is being made of him, such scmtiny is taking place, none the Jess. No trait is more readily observed by the boys in th eir alumni than that attitude of superiority, either natural or assumed (though more often the latter), Which causes the respected alumnus to launch upon a critical probe of his chapter. Sparing no words, this selfappointed inquisitor demands to know why this h as been happening, and why that has not been remedied; and after a rather ill-natured third degree of the chapter, promptly informs his younger brethren What to do henceforward and how it sha ll be done. l-Iis attitude throughout is that the boys are unable to rnanage the fraternity without the guidance and quite explicit directions of the alumni- those older and Wiser men who have dmnk deep of world linessand regard their undergraduate fraternity brothers as mere youngsters. Such visits and advice are always relished by the

boys of the chapter, both actives and pledges, about as much as a schoolboy relishes a cloakroom chastisement by an ill-tempered teacher. They do their best to profit by what their alumni brothers have advised them, but somehow it is hard to swallow. Not because these young fellows are unable to take a strong dose of medicine. Pledgeship has taught them to take the bitterest draught with a smile. But they are acutely conscious of a feeling of " being told what to do" by someone who, despite any apparently sincere interest in his chapter, is after all only trying to assert his authority. It has long been the contention of the writer, and still is, that the alumni do not own the fraternity, regardl ess of how much money they may have contributed to it. H e contends unreservedly that the fraternity is for the man in college, .first, last, and always. The writer held this opinion as an undergraduate. He holds it today, an alumnus of more than three years and a newspaper man of sti ll longer time, with even stronger conviction. It must not be supposed from this stand that the alumn i are expected completely to disassociate themselves from active participation in the affairs of their chapter. The fraternity forms the closest ti e that a college man has to his alma mater, and most alumni have strong sentimental attachments to th eir schools. The alumni always have the privileges of the house whenever they happen to be in town; and at alumni gatherings, reunions and homecomings, they are always kings for the day. Their positions as men of success and achievement are delicately recognized by the undergradu ates. But even so, whether the alum ni have given thousands of dollars to build a chapter house, or whether they are sti ll intimate with their chapter by retaining a close contact with it, they do not own the fraternity and should not try to hold the boys subject to their wi ll. The alumnus' major interest in his fraternity should be one of sentiment, as a place where he may always be a welcome visitor in the bonds of fraternal spirit. Any other interests are secondary. No matter how strongly he may sti ll feel the urge to direct the affairs of his chapter, such direction shou ld come on ly in the form of tactfully ad-


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ministered advice after a survey of the chapter's needs, and not as an iron command to be carried out to the Jetter. Any other attitude assumes that the fraternity is maintained for the alumni. Everyone will admit the absurdity of this. Alumni have finished with college, finished with major participation in the chapter's daily routine. They have their own problems to solve: problems of their home and family, of their work, their future, their success. No alumnus has the right to tamper with the machinery of his fraternity which, after all, has become quite outside the realm of his life and foreign to the affairs which claim his daily attention. The fraternity is for the man in college. It is his home, his training school for those four years, more or Jess, that he spends on the campus. It is bound inextricably with his everyday life. It leaves its trace on his character. He is spending several of the best years of his life there, giving as much energy and zeal to the management of its affairs as he would to the home of his childhood. He wants to live there with as much freedom as is consistent with discretion. The fraternity is his, his to superintend and uphold. Any serious interference from the alumni is an infringement upon his rights. The alumni had their day, when the fraternity was their home. But their day is over now-they are out. Let these new men, therefore, do as the alumni themselves wished to do when it was their abode. As a means of outside control to check the occasional rashness to which all of us are subject, every ranking fraternity has first of all chapter advisers who keep in touch with the organization. Next are the regional advisers or supervisors who possess still more authority and may officially take the reins of fraternity administration in their own hands, if circumstances require. And lastly there is the controlling body of the national chapter, to whom the individual chapter is strictly and regularly accountable for its welfare and proper functioning. Any tendencies of the chapter to Jag, to fall into debt, or to perpetrate rash deeds, are at once investigated by any or all of these offices. These forces, ~hen passive, permit the chapter the greatest of liberties and the broadest scope in the administration of its affairs; but their ever-watch ful eyes constantly serve to steer the chapter around pitfalls. Fortunately the number of alumni who would direct the affairs of their fraternity with a free rein is not large, usually consisting only of a small, unorganized group; but it is sufficiently large to be a source of discontent and annoyance to the active members . The actives would offend their alumni last of all; especially those who by contributions of money or by loans have done so much for their chapter's betterment and prosperity. But a loan from an alumnus

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should not be made if the donor's second motive is to obtain dominant authority over his chapter. If such a loan or gift is made, let the alumnus serve simply as an adviser along with the chapter's legally constituted and paramount authority, the national chapter and its recognized agents. The situation of the meddlesome alumnus finds an analogy in parents who, after rearing their children to maturity and giving them in marriage, still insist upon guiding the destinies of their offspring. Almost invariably we find disastrous results. Not content to have lived their own lives-unmindful, in fact, that they themselves spent their married years u~足 hampered by any material interference from their parents-these fathers and mothers still would shape the future of the young married couple. They may plead afterward that they were actuated by the best of motives, but motives do not repair the damage that once is done. Every man of initiative and ambition must and will live his own life. He can be advised by others who are wiser, or temporarily held in check, but not permanently harnessed or subjugated. That is why the alumni must realize that they may not be too domineering in their advisory capacities.

District Twelve Holds Interesting Conclave by Alpha Omicron, Iowa State, INITIATED thusiastically accepted Nu, Nebraska, and handled

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efficiently in its local aspects by .District Archon Eldon Kiffin, the first district meeting of the Twelfth District was held on the 16 and 17 of May in the Elks Club at Omaha. Present were some fifty-odd Pi Kapps representing the active chapters of Alpha Omicron and Nu and the alumni chapters of Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska. Also present were representatives of the local fraternity Sigma Phi Sigma, Kansas State and Executive Secretary Leake. On the evening of the sixteenth, all gathered for dinner at the Elks Club. This approached the full formality of a banquet and was well handled in all its phases by Toastmaster F. S. Pegler, Nu '18, archon of the Omaha Alumni Chapter. Following the hearty and enjoyable meal, all retired to the lodge room of the Elks where was witnessed a most completely organized and efficiently performed ritual ceremony as is possible to portray. This was done by members of Alpha Omicron Chapter. The group had breakfast together and then adjourned to a room for the roundtable discussions. These proved interesting and instructive and were well handled by Brother Kiffin. The matters that came up for discussion were: scholarship, rushing, pledging, budgeting, school activities, acquiring a new chapter house, expansion, and the next convention.


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Here's What Education Will Be Like In 100 Years What wi ll education be like 100 years from now? When the cornerstone of the new education building at the University of Chicago was laid recently, faculty members were asked to write out their prophecies of what education would be like in 2031, these forecasts to be sealed into the copper box, along with the usual copies of current newspapers, speeches, and other items customari ly placed in cornerstones. An ana lysis of the forecasts seems to show first of all that colleges and universities of the future will be run br experts; that the present-day boards of education will have been abolished; likewise state departments of education. Increased -interest in fine arts, in non-vocational education. Industries will largely take over technical training. Great development in adu lt education; age no factor. Longer and more intensive graduate work. Increased importance of state universities, with tendency

toward their becoming research institutions, with limited undergraduate enrollment. Undergraduates will be largely taken care of in public colleges and municipal universities. Children wi ll not be taught arithmetic, geography, and spelling. Methods of teaching will be based on knowledge gained from scientific experiment. Teachers wi ll have periods of practice under the guidance of educational experts, just as interns serve in hospitals now. Teaching will be a more expert and respected profession. Sound pictures, the radio, and television wi II be used in large educationa l centers to dispense lectures, music, and art exhibits. Students will be classified according to ability rather than age. Instruction wi ll be great ly individualized . Grades and marks wi ll be abolished. No long summer vacations; longer school year; longer school day; longer period of general education, from age 2 or 3 up to at least 25 . -Banta's Greek Exchange

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Out oF the Past Comes the following. While we may question its worth as poetry, the veracity of its message is undoubted. It was clipped from an issue of several years ago. The talent is that of J. N. Holcombe, Zeta, '24. D on't think becoz you wear th' pin, an' hold yer head up high, That you are worthy to be ca lled a true Pi Kappa Phi; Don't think that you've done reached yer goa l, when you are once tuk inYer ob ligation on ly sta rts, when you put on th' pin. If you're not true go ld, you won't hold out, fer such folks never do; If you wanta bring honor to yer bunch, you gotta be Joyal and true. You gotta be mighty careful 'bout how you talk an' actWhen you hurt yerself, you hurt yer frat ; no gettin' around that fact. You 'll find two different types of boys in every bunch, I guess: Them that do their bit, and them that leave it to th' res'; There ain't no room in a Pi Kapp fold fer loafers, drones, an' suchYou can always help a little bit, if you can't do very much. You'll see a feller now an' then, th at's been out o' school a whi le, An ' when he sees yer Star an' Lamp, he'll say with a wistfu l smi le, " Look here, ol' chap, give me th' grip; when I was young like you, Up there a-doin' A. B. Stunt, I wuz a Pi Kapp, too!" Just put it down he ain't much force, if he beg ins that way, A-tellin' what he used to be, 'stead o' what he is to-day. He shoulda learned this long ago: A real Pi Kappa Phi, When once he's one, he's always one, till he lays him down to die. Then remember this, my firm good friend: A true Pi Kappa Phi Is avatar of all that's good, an' noble, an' true, an high. So hitch yer wagon to th ' Star, an' steer by th' Lamp's bright glow, An ' ten to one, you'll play yer role, as on through life you go.


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KEY N 0 T E S Welcome, Alpha Tau O A land of opportunity and of strugg le. W e know that it is stated rather oddly but, after all, that is what it is. An opportunity of service, an opportunity to w id en your friendships, and a struggle to attain the heights-this is your fraternity. It demands much of you but is not slow to rewa rd in accordance with merit. For nothing it offers nothing, but for something it offers in exchange intang ibles that are the most precious values of life. Together we will make mistakes that w ill hurt ; together we w ill forget the hurt in the knowledge that has been broug ht to us and in the faith in the ultimate end ; together we w ill face discouragement and success. But it will be together.' Therein li es th e thrill that brings warmth to the cockl es, stirs the blood to a faster pace. Th e stars are never reached, but in the attempt is found that something that makes it more than worth while to continue the reaching. To you in full faith and affection we offer a .firm g rip of friendship.

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Change the TitleOf this arti cle if you des ire, was the message that accompani ed the copy of " A H appy Convention." "H appy" is a word that is overworked. Ordinarily we 路avoid it because it smacks of child stori es or the ending of some slushy romance. But it has its place, and w hen we lind it, it seems more outstanding in meaning than its cousinly uses mention ed above. W e found th e titl e good . H ap py the convention was and h appy it should be des ig nated. Pour into the crucibl e effective end eavor, accomplishment, a smoothly functioning organization, attractive relaxation; app ly the fl ame of permanent insp iration ; and the result is bound to be happy. CongratulationsAre due to many: To the fraternity for the results of the convention To Alpha Omicron Chapter To those men w ho have been selected as Pi K appa Phi Scholars To those chapters that have mothers' organizations behind them To those alumni who do not think a period of depress ion is any time to forget D an Cupid.

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Partial FailureWill be acknowledged by the fraterniti es if and when they adopt the resolutions of the deans of men of the universities that request of them the power of supervision over chapter finances . Such will be presented before the coming Interfraternity Conference. How the truth does hurt! Local control by competent supervisors is certainly the solution. With a few exceptions of course, distant control is similar to a child pushing a wagon from the rear and attempting to keep it on the sidewalk by ignoring the steering device and eve ry now and then stopping to proceed to the front to straighten the wheels in the direction it is des ired to go. Offi cials stop at a chapter for a while, straighten out accounts as best possible, indicate what should be done to attain des ired financial ends, and then leave to continue the control , if it can be ca lled such, from a distance and at interrupted intervals. A continued touch is needed, a knowing touch is necessary. To the sleepless nig hts of the deans of men there may be add ed others. Convention Classics What in the deuce was a certain banquet speaker trying to ge t over? We wonder if a certain lad from the South has yet learned what the G.A.R. is. J. Friend D ay has tossed as ide all egiance to red for . that of g reen. Suppose that green blazer has any reference to a certain famo us hang ing celebrated in song? It is perfectl y all right to ask A! Meisel for a Chancellor cigar anytim e you meet him . H e's made a promi se. There is no depression among D etroit tax imen. One time when wo rds failed him- F riend D ay and the feminine entertai ner at the banquet. Wonder if Jimmi e wi ll still be in the saddle w hen we reach New York. We are convinced that dead lang uages are not moribund. Nebraska men must send faceti ous telegrams . G~ea t

Meeting! D o not intend to miss the next one.

We hope that sea ls will not be permitted to esca pe from the zoo aga in.


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PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY Founded at the College of Charleston, Charleston, S.C., December 10, 1904. Jncorporated under the laws o f the State of South Carolin a, December 23 , 1907. FOUNDERS SIMON FoGARTY, 151 Moultrie Street, Charleston, S.C. ANDREW ALEXA NDER KROEG, Chapter Eternal, February 8, 1922. LAWRENCE HARRY MIXSON, 2 17 East Bay Street, Charleston, S.C.

GENERAL OFFICERS SUPREME COUNCIL Supreme Archon A . P nLZE R WAGENER College of William and Mary P. 0. Box 426 , Station A Williamsburg, V a.

Supreme Treasurer ] . W ILSON ROBINSON 20 14 Union Trust Bldg. Detro it, Mi ch.

Supreme Secretary LEo H. Po u Box 342 Mobile, Al a.

Supreme Chancellor AtREI\T w. MEISEl 140 Libert y St., New York City

Supreme Histor ian

]. FRIE ND DAY University of British Columbia, Vanco uver, B .C., Canada

THE CENTRAL OFFICE Suite 319, 636 Church Street Evanston, Jll. H oward D . Leake, Executive Secretary ]. W. Cannon, Jr. , Ass istant Secretary Telephone Greenleaf 7078 (A ll commu ni cations of a genera l nature should be sent to the central office, and not to individuals.)

DISTRICT ARCHONS First District Unassigned Second District Unassigned Third District R . L. PRICE 9 W. Third St. Charlotte, N .C. Fourth District T . A . HOUSER St. Matthews, S.C. Fifth District T . CROOM 'PARTRIDGE Atlanta Trust Co. Bldg. Atlanta, Ga.

Sixth District 0. FORREST MCG ILL 144 路 N. Orange Orl ando, Fla. Seventh District ]. C. BURTON 502 1st Nat'! Bank Bldg. Birmingham , Al a. Eighth District ]OHN R. GASS 384 3 Bowen Road T oledo, Ohio Ninth District Unass igned

Tenth District F. R. STURM 936 Baker Bldg. Minneapolis, Minn . Eleventh District ]ACOD B. NAYLOR Box 572 Rapid City, S.D. Twelfth District E. W . KIPPI N o Frigida ire Sales Corporation Omaha , Neb. Thirteenth District DR . ]. H. ROBI NSON Wes ley Memorial H osp ita l Oklahoma Crty, Okl a.

Fourteenth District CLANCY A. LATHAM 22 18 Penni ston New Orleans, La . Fifteenth District Unassig ned Sixteenth District Unassigned Seventeenth District WALTER R . ]ONES Oregon State College Corva llis, Ore. Eighteenth District Un ass igned

STANDING COMMITTEES DR. W. E. EDINGTON, Chairman DePauw University Greencastle, Ind.

SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE DR. R. L. PETRY University of the South Sewanee, Ten n. Advisory Architect ]AM ES FOGARTY 3102 Park Ave. Richmond, V a.

DR. ] . E. W INTER West Virg inia Universi ty M orga ntown , W.Va.

ADV ISER ON RITUAL AND INSIGNIA GEORGE E. SHEETZ 48 W . 94th St. New York City

R. E. ALLEN, Chairman Centra l Union Trust Co. 40 E. 42nd St. New York, N.Y. Term Expires Dec. 31, 1935

]OHN D . CARROLL, Chairman Lexington , S.C.

FINANCE COMM ITTEE L. C. GOULD E. A. Pierce & Co . No. I Ford Bldg. Detroit, Mich. Term Expires Dec. 31, 1933 COMMITTEE ON ENDOWMENT FUND HENRY HARPER A . W . M EISE L, Secretary 1225 W. Broad St. 140 Liberty St. Richmond, Va. New York City

GEORGE D . DRIVER 450 Telephone Bldg. Des 路Moines , Iowa Term Expires D ec. 31, 1931

R . ] . HEPPN ER 186 Mills St. M orristown, N.J .


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UN DERG RA DU A TE ICH APTE RS To Receive Notice, C~anges in Personnel Must Be Reported Immediately to the Executive Secretary on Form 6. NOTE: The address tn every case is the official address of the chapter. Following the ofhcers is listed the chapter publication. ALABAMA-Omicron, District 7. Pi Kappa Phi House, University, Ala. H. L. Carroll, Archon. C. S. Price, Secretary. The Omicronite. ALABAMA POLYTECHNIC- Alpha-Iota, District 7. 209 W. G lenn Ave., Auburn, Ala. H. B. Upchurch, Archon. J. P. Roberts, Secretary. The Alota BROOKLYN POLYTECHNIC- Alpha-Xi, District 1. 33 Sidney Place, Brooklyn , N.Y. J. H. Scharer, Archon. G. A. Carleton , III, Secretary. The Woodbird Alfred J. Wilson, '22, Chapter Adviser. CALIFORNIA-Gamma, District 18. 25 10 LeConte Ave., Berkeley, Calif. S. Peter Grassi, Arch on. A. 0. Gibbs, Secretary. The Gammazette CHARLESTON-Alpha, District 4. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Charleston, S.C. J. B. Watson, Archon. T. F. Mosimann, Secretary. Albert P. Taylor, '27, Chapter Adviser. CORNELL-Psi , District 1. 115 Ridgewood Road, Ith aca, N.Y. J. P. Donovan, Archon. R. E. Brimmer, Secretary. The Cornell Psiren Paul Work, '07, Chapter Adviser. DAVIDSON-Epsilon, District 3. Box 276, Davidson , N.C. P. S. Knox, Archon. W. B. Corbin, Secretary. The Epsi lonian Prof. E. A. Beaty, '2 1, Chapter Adviser. DUKE-Mu, District 3. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Durham, N.C. Alton Kirkpatrick, Archon. H enry Thomas, Secretary. A. H. Borland, ' 27 , Chapter Adviser. EMORY-Eta, District 5. 1290 S. Oxford Road, Atlanta, Ga . W. T . Edwards, Archon. K. A. Wilson , Secretary. The Eta Scroll Raymond B. Nixon, '25, Chapter Adviser. FLORIDA- Alpha-Epsilon , District 6. Box 2756, University Station, Gainesville, Fla. G. S. Coulter, Archon. M. W. Eastland, Secretary. The Gatorzette J, P. Wilson, '20, Chapter Adviser. FURMAN-Delta, District 4 . 4 Nona St., Greenville, S.C. J , W. Culbertson, Archon. G. H . Cleveland, Secretary. R. N. Daniel , '07, Chapter Adviser. GEORGIA- Lambda, District 5. 386 Hill St., Athens , Ga. S. C. Harper, Archon. J, W. H anller, Secretary. R. F. H ams, ' 16, Chapter Adviser. GEORG IA TECH- Iota, District 5. 743 W . Peachtree, N.E ., Atlanta, Ga. R. J. McCamy, Archon. C. D. Daugherty, Secretary. J. Lawton Ell is, '09, Chapter Adviser. The Iotan HOWARD COLLEGE- Alpha-Eta. District 7. Box 117, East Lake, Birmingham, Ala. Frank Fleming, Archon. Paul Gwin, Secretary. Alpha-Eta Grams Albert Lee Smith, '05, Chapter Adviser. ILLINOIS- Upsilon , District 9. 106 E. Green t., Champaign, Ill. D . A. Parkhurst, Archon. P. W. Leppla , Secretary. Upsilon Ups V. R . Fleming, '05, Chapter Adviser. IOWA STATE-A lph a-Omicron, District 12 . 204 Welch Ave., Ames, Iowa. A. K. {ohnson, Archon. Carl 0 son, Jr., Secretary. The Almicron James R. Sage, '12, Chapter Adviser.

MERCER-Alpha-Alpha, District 5. 1223 Oglethorpe St., Macon, Ga. R. W. Coursey, Archon. B. C. Teasley, Secretary. Alphalpha Hey j oseph A. McClain, Jr .. '24, Chapter Adviser. MICHIGAN- Alpha-Kappa, Distri ct 9. 1001 E. Huron St. , Ann Arbor, Mich. H . C. H otchkiss, Archon. J. W. Barnard , Secretary. The Moon and Candle F. Bradley Case, '25, Chapter Adviser. MICHIGAN STATE- Alpha -Theta, District 9. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, East Lansing, Mich. W. C. Whorley, Archon. R. G. Urch Secretary. The Alpha-Theta Stater Edward D. Clifford, '22, Chapter Adviser. MISSISSIPPI- Alpha-Lambda, District 7. Pi Kappa Ph1 Fraternity , University, Miss. Herman Eubanks, Archon. R. E. Gilder, Jr., Secretary. The Lambdonian James R. Simms, Jr., '23, Chapter Adviser. NEBRASKA- Nu. District 12. 1820 B. St., Lincoln, Neb. Ralph Trester, Archon. ]. G. Young, Secretary. The Nebraska Nu's H. C. Henderson, Chapter Adviser. NORTH CAROLINA- Kappa , District 3. Pittsboro Road, Chapel Hill, N.C. B. C. Moore, Archon . ]. H. Smith, Secretary. NORTH CAROLINA STATE- Tau. District 3. 1720 Hillsboro St., Raleigh, N.C. ]. W. Halstead, Archon. 1. C. Hubbard , Secretary. The Taulegram OGI.ETHORPE- Pi. District 5. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity , Oglethorpe University Ga. Alan Ritz, Archon. ' Frank Mackey, Secretary. Edgar Watkins , Jr., '23 , Chapter Adviser. OH IO STATE- Alpha-Nu, District 8. 11 8 14th Ave. , Columbus, Ohio. Merton Alvord, Archon. C. D. Hablitzel , Secretary. The Alpha-Nu's Alex Laurie, '14, Chapter Adviser. OKLAHOMA- Alpha-Gamma. District 13. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Norman, Okla. L. M. Edwards, Archon. E. F. Goins. Secretary. The Alpha-Gamma Star Edwin K. Wood, '23, Chapter Adviser. OREGON STATE- Alpha-Zeta, District 17. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Corvallis , Ore. Kenneth Martin , Archon. R. V. Greno, Secretary. The Alpha-Zeta News PENN STATE- Alpha-Mu , District I. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, State College, Pa. Harry Rodgers, Archon. R. C. Bildstein , Secretary. The Alpha-Mu News Eldo Frey, ' 29, Chapter Adviser. PRESBYTERIAN COLLEGE- Beta, District 4. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Clinton, S.C. Augustus Adorns, Archon. B. W. Covington, Jr. , Secretary. H. L. Swedenburg, Jr., '28, Chapter Adviser. PURDUE- Omega, District 9. 330 N. Grant St., West LaFayette, Ind. George Fortune, Jr., Archon. V. J. Pease, Secretary. The Omegalite Prof. G . W. Munro, '97, Chapter Adviser. RENSSELAER POLYTECHNIC-Alpha Tau , District 4 Park Place, Troy, N.Y. J. A. Peartree, Archon. Richard Y. AtLee, Secretary. Prof. G. K. Pa lsgrove, '11, Chapter Adviser. ROANOKE-Xi, District 2. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, Salem , Va. F. \Y/. Trimmer, Archon. Jack Harne, Jr. , Secretary. The Xi Bulletin C. E. Webber, '22, Chapter Adviser.

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PHI

SEWCANEE-Alpha-Pi. District 5. . E. Eby, Archon. P. B. Huntley, Jr., Secretary. Robert L. Petry, '27, Chapter Adviser. SOUTH CAROLINA-Sigma, District 4. ~807 Green St., Columbia, S.C. . 0. Bowden, Jr., Archon. Montgomery Morrow, Secretary. T. Meade Baker, "25, Chapter Adviser. T he Sigma Item F. G. Swaffield, Jr. , '27, Chapter Adviser. STET ON-Chi, District 6. East Minnesota Ave., DeLand, Fla. C. Z. Osborne, Jr. , Archon. C. H. S. Sharon, Secretary. The Chi-Cry Prof. Wm. E. Dud:witz, Chapter Adviser. TENNES EE-Aipha Sigma, District 5. 163! Laurel, Knoxville, Tenn. W. R. Rollins, Archon. E. C. Jackson, Secretary. J. G. 'tarboux, Chapter Adviser. TULANE-Alpha-Beta, District 14. 830 Audubon St., New Orleans, La. E. B. Robichaux, Archon.

47 Ross Fisher, Secretary . The Alphabet H. N. Walsdorf, '28, Chapter Adviser. _ WA HI NGTON-Aipha-Delta, District 17. 4532 19th St., N.E .. Seattle, Wash. Dean Arbogast, Archon . George Ruby, Secretary. The Alpha-Deltan Victorian Sivertz, '22, Chapter Adviser. WASH INGTON AND LEE-Rho, District 2. 85 S. Main St., Lexington, Va. K. M. Smith, Archon. 1. B. Burrows, Secretary. The Rhodian Ea rl K. Paxton, '1 0, Chapter Adviser. WEST VIRGINIA-Alpha Rho, District 8. 65 High St., Morgantown, W.Va. P. F. F1sher, Archon. A. A. Marques, Secretary. The Alpha Rhose Edwin C. Jones, "29, Chapter Adviser. WOFFORD-Zeta, District 4. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternit1, Spartanburg, S.C. M. A. Owings, Archon. P. A. King, Secretary. J. Cham 1--reeman, "24, Chapter Adviser.

Last Chapter Installed, Rensselaer, 1931. Total Active Undergraduate Chapters 41.

ALUMNI CHAPTERS Alumni officers are requested to inform the Executive Secretary promptly of any changes in personnel and addresses, or of agreement as to time and place of meetings.

ATHENS, GEORGIA Richard F. Harris, Archon. New York Life Insurance Co. Ralph C. onna lly, Sect.路 Treas. Peabody Hall, U. of Ga. ATLANTA, GEORGIA (Ansley Hotel, third Thursday, 7 P.M.) John W. Rourk, Archon. Jacobson Plastering Co. John C. Holder. Secretary. 916 Hurt Building. BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA (2016 4th Ave., alternate Wednesdays, 7:45 P.M.) L. S. Brewster, Archon. R. M. Mundine, Secretary. Tarrant City, Ala. C( HARLESTON, OUTH CAROLINA Second Monday) Albert P. Taylor, Archon. 6 Halsey St. Earl B. Halsall , Secretary. 651 King St. CHARLOTTE NORTH CAROLINA (Second Tuesday, Manufacturers' Club ) R. L. Young, Archon Care The Charlotte News. R. L. Price, Secretary 9 W. Third St. CHATTANOOGA, TENNESSEE Aubrey F. Folts, Archon 609 James Building J. R. Williams, Secretary. CHICAGO, ILLINOIS (Stevens Hotel , last Thursday) E. N. Turnquist, Archon c/o Pierce Mfg. Co. 625 W. Jackson , Chicago. H. D. Leake, Secretary Box 382, Evanston, Ill. CLEVELAND, OHIO (Allerton Club, Second Tuesday) T. S. Myers, Archon. E. D. Kiinzler, Secretary 1207 Cook Ave., Lakewood, Ohio. COLUMBIA, SOUTH CAROLINA (Green Parrot Tea Room , Second Monday) Dr. Glenn B. Carrigan, Archon State Hospital. T. Meade Baker, Secretary c/o Federal J.and Bank. DETROIT MICHIGAN (Statler Hotel, First Monday) G. R. Helmrich, Archon c/o Detroit Edison Co ., 200 Second Ave. Franz L. Rooney, Secretary 51 Hubbard Ave., Mt. Clemens, Mich.

LINCOLN, NEBRASKA Chas. F. Adams, Archon National Bank of Commerce Building. Knox F. Burnett, Secretary 525 South 13th St. LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA (Figueroa Hotel Coffee Shop, l Oth and Figueroa) Marvin G. Osburn, Archon Petroleum Securities Building. C. L. Taylor, ecretary 63 11 Lindenhurst Ave. MIAMI, FLORIDA Chas. B. Costar, Archon 502 N .W. 39th St. Wm. C. Ritch, Secretary 140 E. Flagler St. 路 MONTGOMERY, ALABAMA Clyde C. Pearson, Archon 21 Woodley Road. NEW YORK NEW YORK (33 Sidney Place, Brooklyn) L. J. Bolvig, Archon 610 Ovington Ave., Brooklyn, N.Y. Frank J . McMullen, Secretary 68 76th St., Brooklyn , N .Y. OMAHA, NEBRASKA (1st Tuesday, Elks' Club) Floyd S. Pegler, Archon 2315 N. 60th Ave. Don W. McCormack, Secretary 2306 Ave. B, Council Bluffs, Iowa. PHILADELPHIA, PENNSYLVANIA Lewis S. Shemery, Archon 820 George St., Norristown, Pa. Frank V. Magalhaes, Secretary 1429 Walnut St. ROANOKE, VIRGINIA E. E. Dobbins, Archon 512 Boxley Bldg. J. E. Comer, Secretary First National Bank Bldg. ST. PETERSBURG, FLORIDA (Homestead Tea Room, Wednesday, 12:15 P.M.) Virgil S. Parham, Archon 317 First National Bank Building. Jason A. Hailey, Secretary P.O. Box 3831. SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA John F. Connolly, Archon 1125 Taylor St. Francis H. Boland, Jr., Secretary 2843 Green St. SPARTANBURG, SOUTH CAROLINA (Second Monday) Paul C. Thomas, Archon Spartan Mills. ]. Cham Freeman, Secretary c/ o Elford Agency.


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