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o/ Pi VoL. XI

Kappa Phi OCTOB~R,

1925

No.3

IN THIS ISSUE

Q<9 to ehicaQ<9 eomplete 'Details of 'Thirteenth Supreme ehapter vrceeting

~eves Supreme C(5reasurer


PLEDGES

"'A Book for Modern Greeks" will be sent to you on Request

BURR, PATTERSON

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CO.

SOLE OFFICIAL JEWELERS TO PI KAPPA PHI ROOSEVELT PARK

Oppoi!Jite Michigan Central Station

DETROIT, MICH.


The Star and Lamp of Pi Kappa Phi VoL. XI

OCTOBER, 1925

No. 3

,1-

R1 liARD L. YouNG, Editor

CJlARLO'l'TE, N. C.

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Members of the Frater11ity arc iuvited to contrib1tte special m-ticles or news items, especially perso11al 11otes co11cer11i11g the activities of the alHnmi. rill contributio11s should be maâ&#x20AC;˘iled direct to Rrcli.\RD L. YouNG, 2 rlshla11d Ave1111e, ~1idwood ~Ma11or, Charlott e, N. C.

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Uo c?tll Ti Kgpps: IT H the reopening of the colleges comes again greater opportunities for fraternal growth and service in the Fraternity. I extend greetings particularly at this time to our undergraduate brothers, now assembled for the work of the school year 1925 -2 6. Need I urge you to try to make the year a most successful one? You are now either (( looking over" or have taken in many new men. There lies your greatest personal responsibility ; be sure these are given all possible encouragement and help in order that they may develop into leaders and good citizens, with good results to them selves, the Fraternity, and mankind. Let our record be one of accomplishment; strengthened by new and alert men, let every chapter stand out as a model of manhood, courage, and energy among the fraternities on its campus. Fraternally,

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'tHE STAR AND LAMP IS PUBLISHED UNDER THE DIRECTION 0=' THE SUPREME OF OC To £ BER, D E CEMBER , FEBRUARY, AND MAY , AT CHAR L O TTE, N . C .

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_. NTEREO AS MATTER OF THE SECOND CLASS AT THE POSTOFFICE AT CHA RLOTTE, N . C., IN ACCORDANCE WITH THE ACT OF CON~ "'PPROVE D MA RCH 3, 1879. ACC EPTANCE FOR MAILING AT SPECIAL RATE OF POSTAGE PROVIDED FOR IN SECTION 11 03, ACT OF OCT O·

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~~========================0=c=TO=B=E=R=,=l9=2=5===========================To=.=3 The New Year

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is the beginning of a new year for the llJif colleges and universities. It is another i•h·estone in the illu strious career of Pi Kappa lhe\r\Vhat_ it will mean in the advancement of act· · atern rty will d pend largely upon the men IVefy . . ter a socrated rn the undergraduate chap-

S l{egardless of Il acJn llprell1e ffi . . . era] ,

how far-vi sioned are the . . how trreles they are m the IJ ro lrnr stration of the Fraternity the real aclllp]" l , / nity i~, ~lllents, those things by which the 1~ rater/ LJate b. Jttdg d, must come from the uridergradrothers 'J' 0 . them i entrusted the reSJ)Onsibility of I ·e ecr ~'r rng those who hall becom a part of the atern it 'I'!11s . .rs all .rmportant, for what t l1e I' rat . )'. 1/ 'llen ~~lrty w~ll next year depend u!)On the tion ought 111 thrs year. Extreme care 111 selec11111 ll1ust t be. exercised. Level-headed thought ' 'I'! govern rn the pledging of new brothers. this lOse chapters without their hou ses should 1 hip Year sta rt on the path that lead to ownerby tl of property. Rapid strides have been made the le Fraternity, through energetic chapters, in or )acquirement of real estate. The ownership ~at/ roperty reflects the tability of any organiby on and Pi Kappa Phi must not be outstripped any. Scholar h. ~~·e 'I must be guarded zealou ly. Let b ry chapter resolve that thi year will be the est in its scholastic record. Study and the ac-

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quirement of knowledge gives Pi Kappa Phi, and all fraternities, the reason for their existence, for if young men did not go to coll ege, there would be no excuse for their establishment. Pi Kappa Phi was organized to erve th se young men away from home but let us not lose . ight of the real reason for their being away from home. L'pon the shoulder. of th e officers of the undergraduate chapter falls the re ponsibility of the chapters' records of classroom achievement and scholarship mu t be kept paramount in the mind s of the undergraduate brothers. l'i Kappa Phi, at the various institutions where it is repre ented, has maintained enviable record s but the best is yet to be attained . 11 Iake thi s year outstanding for our scholarship.

Looking Toward Chicago

W ITHI

just a few hort months, the Thirteenth Supreme Chapter of the Fraternity will be convened at Chicago, where wi ll gather repre entatives from Pi Kappa Phi's undergraduate and alumni chapter in all ections of the country. This is the biennial foun tain head of the fraternity's enthusiasm, which caught up and concentrated in one place, hows the fraternity as it is in four corners of the earth. At the Charlotte, Berkeley, and AtlantaSupreme Chapter every si ngle undergraduate chapter of the Fraternity wa repr sented and this is no time to break the chain. Every chap-


THE STAR AND LAMP of ter should now be preparing to send its official delegate to Chi cago. L:nder our arrangement of fin anci ng, which is just and fair to all, each chapter bea rs th e same amount of th e expenses of all the delegates. Each chapter should be setting asid e a sum to meet th e expenses of its del egate. By thi s plan , it will not be hard for any one g roup. The editor can not urge too strongly upon the chapter office rs th e importance of giving thought and action to this qu estion . A n assessment, lev ied each month upon each member , is not a bad arrangement, and di vides th e total so that it is not burd ensome upon any man. ,\IV

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Our New Treasurer RO'I' I-ll~ R J. CHESTER REEVES,

t\ lph a, has been appointed by the Supreme CounciJ to fill out the un expired term of our lamented brother, Willi am Fogarty. The editor bespeaks the fullest coope ration of the fraternity with B rother Reeves, who has a difficult post at best. His is no easy task and without the helping hand of those in th e underg radu ate chapters, with whom most of hi s work li es, the job will be all the harder. 11rother Reeves is a man thoroughly imbued with the glorious spirit of Pi Kappa Phi and is eve ry inch a P i Kapp. His election to the Supreme Council of the Fraternity, for which he has labored for year s, is an honor well bestowed and ri chl y . deserved.

Four New Homes 0 · R chapters begin the 1924-25 school year with new hom es of their own: Tu at th e Uni versity of Nebraska . O micron at the U niversity of Alabama , Psi at Cornell U niversity, and Alpha-Beta at Tulane U niver ity. These chapters are to be congratulated and the editor extend s best wishes for a larger and more useful life beneath their own roofs. Thi s is a reco rd th e Fraternity might well be proud of, for it indicates greater stability and permanence. Nothing stamps a man as a worthwhile citizen as the ownership of hi s own home. lt is no less true for a Fraternity chapter.

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Want to Invest?

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NY brother Interested 1n mvestmg-

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mortgages, beanng etg ht per cent. mteres • It communi cate with Broth er Ceo. E. Shee .' Executive Secretary. J l e has a busin ess proposJ· ftl' tion for those in a position to inves t, fully P tected and guaranteed.

Inter-Chapter Relations

times it crosses my mind that in _tl1~: § OME ru sh of chapter activities, brothers lose Slg

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ro 11 to so me ex tent of the pread of our chapter i1•er· and the fa ct that others in colleges and ut1 . .. . santt sttt es throughout the country chensh the dO thought toward Pi Kappa P hi th at the)' 'th them elves; that is we become too obsessec our own affairs, too lo ca l in our vision. h· . pnn . ctpally . I.t ts on that account t11at 1ve pll a li sh with each issue of TH E S'l'AR AND LA?>{P ~ ganize . cot~lp 1ete up-to-date _cit rectory. of th e or . rela· ,, untts of the Frater111ty; that mter-chaptet 1 . s may be ca rn.e d on dtrect . 1y an d regular,. t10n ]tail' A bove a ll , such correspondence should be . . forJ1lH died promptly, particularly req uests for ttl ,o.~~ 1 11 , tion about prospective pledges. One of t1e ear commendable custom s establi shed in late Y d; . car · 11as been that of sending around greettng ·al soct• at Christmas, and announcements o f a· events. Thi s might be extended to include "'51 . h . 1 ·ntere• • nous ot er thmgs to heighten mutua 1 . dec0 among all our chapters. For in stance, t11 !d ra ting the new hou se, or redecorating the °er f otl1to' one, why not write around to a number o chapters for pennants or banners, or even phO 11 r yo graphs which might fittingl y be hung on ,, of chapter hou se walls-as "visible reminders jrit broth ers in other states? Build up such a sP 110 1 of intimacy between chapters that members ~f( tran sfe r to other schools need not stra)' ail · · 1)Ut wtl· 1 go f'trst of 'p· mto strange terntory where they can affiliate with a Pi KapP c_l~~al ter. A ll these contacts help. Kuild the natt 1 ~, . . E Sfflir; sptrtt as well as your local one.-GJ~O. '· E.1·ec·tttive S ecre tm·y.

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CJew GJacts about ehicago, c&he cpi I(gpp eanvention eity

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By ELMER . TuRNQUIST Archon of Chicago AlHmni Chapter

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I'rt.:A TED in the very heart of the world's

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important and enviable position, in that no other city in the U nited States can offer more attractions for amu ement and diversion. This city i a natural playground a well as an industrial and educational center. Let us stop and study the city from this angle. Railways: Chicago i the largest railroad center in the world. Thirty-nine railroads, including twenty-three trunk lines, terminate in Chicago. Forty per cent of the railway mileage of the nited States radiates from this city. It is the final de tination of every· train that enters its boundaries, no road running through Chicago. In every twenty-four hours, 1,. 339 passenger trains arrive and depart from the Chicago stations, carrying 200,000 passengers. Cli111ate: Chicago's weather is an invaluable asset. Lake Michigan moderates the effect of heat and cold wave , and the breeze from the lake are rich in ozone: th ir effect i bracing and timulating to body and mind. It will, however. be well to bring you r flannels and a heavy overcoat, 'cau e we never know when it's apt to get windy or tart to rain. Pa.rks and Bouleva.rds: Leaving the hotel we go acros the loop and land on M ichigan Boulevard. It may be pos ible to reach Michigan Boulevard via the new \r\Tacker Drive along the river by the time we are ready. This drive is now under con truction at the cost of millions .of dollars. It was nece ary to demoli h the old South \Vater Street if arket in order to make way for " acker Drive. Here' hoping that it is fini heel o we may enjoy it. After leaving the hotel or \Vacker Drive. the fir t point of interest i the new "Boulevard Link Bridge." which spans the Chicago river and wa opened to the public in May, 1920. With the completion of the Link bridge and its one hundred and thirty-five foot wide approach, the chain of boulevard from Jackson Park on the

lll.ost fertile and prosperous vall ey, at the Ea 1 natural crossroads between the industrial ing ~and the agricultural \Ve t, the ore-producing 'lh:tl~ and the cotton-growing South, possessand ll C~leapest water transportation on earth it at le ftne t railway facilitie in the world, is ty Wond I I. . lhirt] lar er _t 1a~ t ltS ctty has grown to be the Jlect f ge t Ctty tn the world, with every prosated ~ becoming the world' large t? Incorporarea l835 with a population of 3,297 and an 0 2 Yeat· -41 quare mil es, it ha grown in ninety a1 a· ~0 a population of over 3,000,000 and an 0 250 square miles. Chtcag 111e . (X)o 000 ts the center of a population of ~0,0f th Pe?ple, or nearly one-half the populatiOn ride. e It 1~ 1 ted State .I ive within an over-night's board a ts _a notable fact that more people can C01·,.. tram at their home town and arrive at -.ago . I to any ~~ttlout change of train than can travel 0 'I' 1er city. here are th'trty-seven state 111 · t I1e U mon · '"ho < Chi e Population i less than that of the City of cago 'rl . lota] · 1ere are only eleven tates havtng a Pop I · lhe. e . u ~bon large r than Chicago and one of 15 a,110 n Tlltnois which rank third in population g the states.

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Proof of Chicago's contention of being the · · the 111e CJtest cotlVenttOn center tn . S. ., Iet 10 t'onv ~e the following figures: More than 700 entto 11 5 • : together wtth hundreds of small er ~roup 'l'he teet111gs, a re held in thi city every year. C'hiet,,d Phrase of "Doctor, Lawyer, Merchant, 0j. can well be used in de cribing the cosC:hica tlan characte r of the crowds that come to Ia, te gt~ each year to hold their meetings and \Vinct le. Chicago brand of hospitality. The a]] th7 Ctty opens its heart to vi itors so that tnk of Cl. . . :\ side l~cago as tl:e "Fn~ndly Ctty." . ho· Pit . from tts strategtc locatiOn and genwne a1tty • Ch'tcago enJ.oys another and equally

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L111coln Park and Sheridan road on the nOrth 'I'I ' Was no longer a dream but a reality. Iitio le Work involved the partial or total demoof n of many costly buildings, th total amount award f . • ·Pg or property as e sed and taken be1ng 67 IJr~ ~ • 1.00 and the whole cost of the im\elllcnt $13,115,558.00.

II hav Oth the bridge and the avenue at this point

fie etl tw 0 1evels-the lower one for heavy tra f • lc u . entr Pper one a a light traffic way and ma111 ance thorough far to the tore and office

buildings. The approaches to the two-level section are very gradual slopes and one hardly realizes that he is pa ing from the city grade to the upper level. A one stand at the outh entrance to the bridge, we ha\'e on our left the new London r\ccid nt & Guarantee Insurance building and at

our right the site of the new $20,000,000 Agricultural Mart. On the opposite side of the bridge to the left stands the Wrigley Tower and directly aero s the DotLlevard the magnificent Gothic

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stru cture known as the Tribune Tower. It has been sa id by those who know that nowhere in America or abroad has this beautiful sky-reaching stru cture been equall ed for its architectural beauty. Leavi ng the bridge we have, turning east on Grand avenue, the Muni cipal P ier, and as we

of L in coln Pa rk with its Zoo, Bathing Beaclte' Bridl e Paths, Tennis Courts, Golf Links, Base cau路 ball Diamonds, and Yacht Harbor, and St. ' den 's famous statue of Abraham Lincoln. h Encircling the city, the boulevards lead throu~. . . . conse Humbold t Pa rk, Garf1eld Park, mto 1ts de; vatory-the largest in the world-which incltt

travel furth er north we pass very close to th e new .F urniture Ma rt, a building having more floor a rea than any in the world . Then comes the Gold Coast, and finally we enter the portals

many Park turns name

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tropical trees, plants and fl owe rs; J)oL~~d and vVashington Parle I-:lere the 11 o~' and run s along the famous M id waY ,, ol. is derived from the great "Side Sho'"

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the \Vorld 's Fair, the Midway Plaisance, where in 1893 lived more different races of men than probably ever were gathered together before or si nce. At the right as one is about to enter the famous Midway stands the Fountain of Time, scu lptured by Lorado Taft and showing the passage of humanity in its journey from mystery into mystery before the si.lent shrouded reviewer, Father Time. A little further clown to the left will be seen the beautiful buildings of the University of Chicago. Jackson Park, scene of the \Vorlcl's Fair, is reached next. The ruins of the German building, the Fine Arts building, and the Japanese structure on the wooded island are about all that remain. The way north leads through Hyde Park, down Drexel Boulevard and then over to South Parkway and finally over the Illinois Central tracks and down the outer drive. This outer drive is built on entirely newly made land and has been accompli shed at the expense of many millions of dollars. Eventually it will consist of a beautiful park a long the shores of Lake Michi gan. Along its path located to the left stands the stadium which at present is on ly half

comp leted. When finished it will have co~t · 11 ~~il.lion dollars and will seat 125,000 pe~i; I hen come the Field :M useum of I atural . 0 tory and finally the Art Institute and Michtga Bou levard, and the Convention Headquarter~. The Chicago spirit is the sec ret of the cit)~; greatness. It wa the Chicago spirit that 111 \ 1 possible the many activities for the advance 111 \ 1 of the city. It built the drainage channel, :hi parks and boulevards, the forest preserves, h r libraries and museums and the numerous 0 \ ~­ achievements and places of interest. Chicago '' f shown its greatness most clearly in times .~ . disaster. In October, 1871, the heart of the C';r was wiped out by the great fire and the mant;hl in which Chicago laid the foundations ~f of magnificent metropolis of today in the nuns d• tee · that autumn day, ranks among the great c of the cities of the world. To think that in three-quarters of a centtt~­ Ch icago has grown to a city of three million pe 1 pie and an area of more than two hundred sq~a~t· miles, we must concede that it is an accomPh\. ment which has no parallel in rapid and perrtl• nent growth.

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Side Lights on the ehicago Supremv ehapter By ELMER N. TuRNQUIS1' Geneml Chairman, Convention Committee .

ID I hear some one say that "thirteen" is an unlucky number? If you think so, you'l l know you are unluckier sti ll , when the boys come back and tell you about the "Thirteenth Supreme Chapter," which they all attended in Chicago, December

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Why are we so cock sure about thtS thing? .1 .. ' why. We have gathered righL I1e.re blc'' Heres the Windy City, the liveliest and most so.ctathe gang of Pi Kapps to be found anywhere 111 , 10 0. A. and they are working night and da) ,c· . . . tS st ma I<e t I11s conventton a grand and g I onoL cess. cotl~' Furthermore, we are in a position to ac d to modate every member of Pi Kappa Phi an .\11 satisfy hi s tastes, wherether high or loW· .~ 11 5 members are urged to make their reservat'·tal \'1 ear.ly. Don't linger, for he who lingers on a eP' question as this is surely suffering from sle ing sickness.

'Cause this is going to be the greatest epochmaking convention known in the annals of Pi Kappa P hi . No stones are to be left unturned, which might add to the comfort of visiting brothers. Oh, no, don't worry, you won't gather any moss on your feet from standing around in hotel lobbies, or street corners- not on your tin type. [ 10]

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. ~ach and e1•ery member wi ll be mailed a re er1 atlon bl I . a an ( 111 the ve ry near future. oon Yo/ou get it, it down and fill it out. In case 1 att shou ld make a mistake and say you can't ;,, end.' don't let that deter you, come anyway e WI]] t k , do , a ·e care of you. Yes, siree, and we nt , mean maybe. · · tcr l'he W or lei' F"amou s Convention IIeadquar1 Irot 1ave been elected . 'Tis no ~t h er than the lllen~ 1 herman, Chicago' best. The man~ge­ anc] a gt~arantees to take care of all reservat1ons IV'tl ~ ~ gn each member a room in accordan ce I 1 hi I . at c 101ce. You will hear from the hotel an early date. co Tier. e •s t 11e program, look it over and let your 11 Clence be your guide:

th A.li Upreme Chapter ifeetings will be held in caehconvention ha ll at 10 A. M. and 2 P. 1. of c day. · 2?t]Regi t ration take place on un day, December 1 A.]] and until 10 A.M. Monday, December 28th. ta · l11en1bers should register immed iately and ob111 <>i the official badge. The social program be.,n a and ' . oon a you regi ter, so take my advice reg1ster. like to tell you w hat the com11/ 1 • ure would · ste1 tee 1la m store for you, from the time you th p off that train un ti l 10 A. l\ r. Monday, but le]]ey ,wo n 't even tell me, so how in heck can I lh . )ou? . II I know is that if they live up to . . leftClr pa s t reputat1on, there won' t be anyt I1111g ~I for the imagination. You' ll be urprised. )'/ advice to come early and find out for llr elf.

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.A. M. Monday, December 28th: Let's see. )·cs su· II the Pi Kapps are here, and the conl'e . • a ntlon open

of P1

K APPA

Prr1

chairman of this committee, you wouldn't miss his selection. 'Ti no other than W ild Bi ll l~ lli ott. Read what he has got to say about it. O n Tuesday between meetings we have our group entertainment, such as visiting the pit of the Stock Exchange (be careful so you don't fall in), the Board of Trade, Field Museum, Tribune Tower, U nion Stockyards, Iunicipal Pier and dozens and dozens of world famou places- too numerous to mention. .-\h-and on Tuesday evening-comes the formal dance in the Louis XVI room of the Hotel Sherman. George K uhl is chai rman- nuff said. George know how. Read what . he has to ay about it. Just to make you pikers who don't come, more orry for staying away, the dance will be broadcast via tation \V -L- Chicago. Just put on your old ear muffs and you wi ll hear the Solem O J' Judge cry out in his musical voice-''And now, Ladies and Gentlemen, you will be enterta in ed by the mu ic of the Pi Kappa Phi Dance, which is being held in the Louis XVI room. \ \' e have with us the member of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity from all ections of the country, who are attending their Thirteenth Supreme Chapter here at thi Hotel Sherman. \V -L-S Chi cago, broadcasting." . \fter the final meeting on \ Vedne clay, comes the banquet and J. E. Brightwell , the chairman, tells me that it' completely full of urpri es. \\'ait and see ! If you are o unfortunate a not to be seated at the banquet table, set your dials on a wave length of 345 meters and through the ether will come the peaker ' voice , making you till more sorry that you were o dumb as to stay away. The first convention in the history of Greek letter organizations to have it entertainment broadcast via radio and it's in the city of Go where evtrybody goes and very few leave. 11ring the wife if you like- he is welcome. Respond to the re ervation summons early. \\'atch for the broadsides and above all . don't forget to come to the Thirteenth Supreme Chapter, the best to date. ·

id:\·e ju t received word from President Cooltis e, regretting th e fact that he couldn't be with · to <Is . sound the note of welcome, but hi s noble ~-~ \~a~t, "Hell and Maria" Dawe wi ll be there. )) Wmg Dawe comes ou r notable :'If ayor C\'er I . th . 11 111 elf, who will tu rn over the keys of e City llt1 accompani ed by a bucket of red paint. 1 You' ve got to bring your ow n brushes. . . " He[\ . veen meetmgs on :M onday we take a s1ghtNotify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Chair~elllg . Parks tnp through the world 's mo t famous man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50th co and boulevards. A nd then in the evening Place, Chicago, immediately that you are I1Je tI1e theatre party. · If you on ly knew the coming.

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ehicago CWelcomes cpi I(gppa cphi By

FRED

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Chainnan Recep tio n .Comm£ttee NUMBER of yea rs ago, a gather ing of boys had plann ed to have a hot time in Chi cago. T he story goes the cow kicked ove r the lantern in a cowshed whi ch started the g reat Chi cago f ire. T he evening reall y resul ted in a hot t ime, but not the kind of a hot tim e we are going to have at th e P i Kappa P hi conventi on during the holid ays. \Ve

Chi cago fro m tra in s fro m the fo ur co rners of 01 these United States. O n a memorandum ; 0 T urney's desk you will f ind a li st of names l brothers who will meet those t rains, thei r coat lapels decorated with a large red r ibbon so tha you can't mi ss th em and their hands out· I a,•e stretched to welcome you. T hese brothers 1 been in stru cte d to lose no tim e in bringing yotl

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have herd ed the cows out of the city, the lantern has been rep lace d by the brightest lights you have ever seen in your li fe, and the cowshed is now a caba ret , where the visitors a re welcomed with w in e, women and song . T he calenda r hanging before the desk of Brother E. N. T urn quist, chairman of the Chi cago Convention Committee, has a bright circle of red drawn about the date of December 27, 1925, the date on which P i Kapps will unload m

to the Hotel Sherman where Turn ey and hi s cO~ 1 ha rts a re camped. The hot tim e is alJOttl comm ence. 't ........ Th e convention hotel of the conventi on C1 Y . th at is th e reputati on the Hotel Sherman I~a~ 1 r1tJ held fo r many year s. So g reat has its poptt a to become that a new addition was necessarY meet th e constant demand. Thi s new buildil~~· 1 ready for occupancy early in December, is in ; se lf la rger than t he old, and makes the .f{ote

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·. herrn an one of the large t in the country. It ' ccu·1 . . I PPecl wtth conventton halls banc1uet rooms I can ' ' lvh·ce floors, a radio broadcasting statton, of tch w . . . c e ate prom tsed the u e, and all the !tttle 0 nvcn· c tcnces which are so important to the suc5 cf of a convention. Pi Kappa Phi will be one 0 lh f e trst to enjoy its many facilitie . Ju. t stop with me one moment as we enter lhe .lobby of the Hotel S herman on DecemJet· ll '1 le lw nty-seventh. There is no question as () 1\'h 0 . . i ts tn posse sion here today. The place s You it .rs- the banner on the opposite wall admits · · :--.;ow all you boy with weak hearts limb tnto lh . e tocal elevator for we are taking the exPrc fa to the twenty-fifth floor and we go up t. No need to call your stop for all l i Kapps

of Pr

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are located on the same floor- r ervations guaranteed for every man in the Fraternity. After you have recei\'ed the glad hand from the reception committee, and paid your re pects to Brother Driver, we will take a glance about the hotel. You are in the midst of the world famous Loop, the bu iness and amusement center of Chicago. Right here in our hotel is the College Tnn with :\I auric Sherman's famous orchestra; a few steps and you are on 1 a Sall e street, the \\'all street of the \V e t, two blocks in the other direction and you stand on State street, unparalleled as a shopping district; while theatre and movie palaces ar found on every corner. There is no denying the fact that it's an ideal location for the greatest convention of a great fraternity.

My Pin of Pi Kaopa Phi

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tender a mother, to her new-born babe In bedding it down for the night, As true a the tar in their effort to serve, As g leaming, they shed out their light, As joyous at streams clown the mountain ide, Gurgling their way to the sea; Rose of the heart of Pi Kappa Phi You're ju t what my pin means to me. C. . J.\CK ON, JR., Eta, '20.

.\!'dear as the sun to the budding red ro e A. 'Y 1 ~' ho e ki ses its petal all open, , 10 ~' 1 ng as one who wi ll lay clown hi life 'or · f nencl, · '\ cl let his body be broken; sl ·soot!' 1tng · as hand to a fevered brow, • 1 a. t1e 1 mountam · ,s pure atr, · .\ fands· coo sweet a the ong of the lark in the ky, 1 ·Caving the world to its care·,

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NEW $20 .000 .000

UNION STATION

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GJ3i9 Show to Cffeature Supreme ehapter

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By LLOYD D. ELLIO'l"l' Chairman, Committee on Amusements .

0 O'l'li ER city outside of New Yor k

can o ff er the va ri ety of hig h-grade theatri cal enterta inment to be f ound in Chi cago. N ightl y th e world -f a mous Loop is a bl aze with th e electric-li ghted fronts of a sco re of theatr es pl ay in g to capacity house . Chicago is f ull o f theatre-lov ing people an d their gene rous patronage ma kes it prof itabl e fo r theatre m a nage rs to bring th eir best p roducti ons to Chi cago. .December a nd J a nu a ry a re always reel letter mont hs in our th eatri cal di strict. D uring th at season we always have the best shows of the

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ent1re yea r . A t a ny t1111e you can always 1 111 heavy dram a, comedy, f a rce, mu sical comedy a , t1it bur.l csqu e. 11u t rig ht at th e time when 1 0L' t1preme C ha pte r w1'11 meet, t 11e ve ry creall, 1 . of our yea r's cn terta mment w1'11 1Je av a i!'lbC ' ht' 1 A' egoti ations a rc we ll und e r way to reserve ·h ma in fl oo r f or th e best mu sical comedy "'hit will be pl ay ing in Chicago a t th a t tim e. . 1 \1\'ithin a few days we shall know exact)' . 01 whi ch show is go ing to be g iven th e ho11° 1 k' putting on th eir stuff f or us. Ri ght now it.ltlO 1 1 li ke F iorenza Zieg feld 's "Folli es" is th e 5110 . . •tS1ll wh ic h will num ber eve ra l hun dred enthL1 51' ·

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p·I I<ap . . da ps Ill th eir audi ence on th e night of Monl•'~i· December 27th . A dvance bookings for the 1cs have not been made yet, but if th ey are 1101 11Cre tl ''S 1at n1.ght th en we'll see George \Vhite's ''!..canch! ' s" or E' ' dd1.e Cantor's popul ar show, 'wl Bo·ots."

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of the side of the coaches because the traffi c m Chi cago travels f ast and aw full y close.

lt~.·l ayb c some of you have never seen a real 111 th Sica! comedy in Chi cago. \\'c!.l. if yo u haven' t. ti e one. you 'II get to see at th e Ch1.cago onvc n01 111e1 ti]J be a liberal educati on in itself . ReI /~lJe r th at lin e of 1-.: ipl ing whi ch goes , "A nd sc e~ rn e cl about women from her! " Th at same . ntun . .· ent app 1·ICS very aptl y to any o f t I1e I)Ig 111 llsic·tJ . Chi , ' co medi es as th ey a rc produ ced In lieeago. l'a rti cul a rl y is thi s true of th e l~ol IVhs..._fo . r as you kn ow Zi egfelcl is a tru e a rti·st 1 1.t co mes to "glorifying the American girl.'' 1 IVh,~ts Impossibl e to give _rou tl: c faintest idea o f ' Pou· these . hows a re !tke with out the use of l·e· I?ht, jazz orchestra and a few hand-pi cked · ati(I es t11at make up th e cast of the b'Ig mu si· caJ a con1cd ies. Uut rest assured that you'll see c rea} .cIlO rus of shapely girl s, some of th e best 01 Putnecltail S o f wo rld renown and dancers th at 'II. can on some new twists and turn s whi ch you ing l~y out at th e Conventi on Ball on th e followIVi(} l1Ight. F or days your mind w ill be haunted lh is1 a coupl e of th e tuneful melodi es and bes ides . You will ca rry back home three or four snap! th lY jokes that will make you the life of · any crowd. \ Vh at we want to do 11oe Pait . • Y In 1V IS t . ce you that when you come to 0 the c' . convin best hicago Conventi on you're going to see th e say show in town-one whi ch will make you ent 1111 ~1 esitatin gly you enj oyed a full evening's ertam . ment th at could not be beat. 1'! · · cha rge t I1e stg . Il tsee · 115 co 111mtttee al so has m 1ng t . rtp whi ch will take you ]\[on day aftert1 0011 Chi over the pa rks and bouleva rd s of whi ch . ta ~~ .IS so proud : T en of th ose grea t btg, 0111 hee y l'ullm an Coaches of th e Gray Lin e have 11 rlriv chartered for th e trip. Pil oted by expert . way 1n . a11r1 ers wl1o Im ow how to threa d t I1eir 0 lll of · carr congested tra fft c, these coaches w1'II co 111: You ove r six ty mil es of boul ev ards whi ch · of beautlfuJ · · · II llart ect 'a ch am parks 1y1ng 111 a 5 Vide of th e city. Spec ial guid es will be pro1 · out all th e 1mportant . lerestc to POint pl aces of ·tn Yo11 · As a safety preca uti on T want to urge not t o stt·c.;: 1 your head or a rms too f a r ou t

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Cene1'al Chairman, Entertainmeut Comrnittee REA' I' preparations arc under way to mak the Grand Ba ll of the Chi cago , upreme Chapter the most brilli a nt social event of the three-day gathe ring. Spec ial care has been taken in the selection of the time, p.lace, mu sic a nd the gi1'fs. Eve rything is being arranged to make this affair stand out as a shin ing exampl e of w hat can b done in the way of

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mittec found no place whi ch could eqU:'' I thi· ~~~· magnificent ball room . The Hotel S hcrl1 1'';\joil· just compl eted a three-million dollar adc ' 011 1 a nd a g reat wad of this mo ney was SlJC il the Louis XV T ballroom. , ncin~· Folk . her e in Chi cago a rc keen on cia cl;~il~'' a nd because of th e g reat dema nd fo r good [Jell mu sic there has been built up one of the

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BALLROOM IN WAITING FOR NIGHT OF DECEMBER 2 9TH

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cittertainment, whi ch will be fitting for such a gathering as our Thirteenth Sup reme Chapte r. ] f you are in Chi cago on Tuesday ni g ht, December 29, that elate wi.ll mark one of the high spot of yo ur lif e. Of course, the affair will be formal, a nd it's go ing to take place in the famous new L,ouis XVI ba llroom of the I l'otel S herma n. Ce rta inl y Chi cago is famous fo r its hotels, cou ntry clu bs and dance palaces of all kinds. And after sea rchin g a ll over the city, the com -

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o rgani zations in the coun t ry composed 0 ;td 11'1 in the rendition of terpischorean mu sic. r\. atio'' . ·gant Z• have engaged thts fa r -famed Benson ot ' .tinf to furn ish the snappi est, jazzie t, most tot~ 5111 tO ling mu sic th at eve r caused th e old rh euma ]oil~ wriggle out of your legs. ·No matter ho~" oil ;I it has been sin ce you 've skidd ed aroun frO'' dance floor, we have a written gua rantee ,.err the Renson people that they w ill in sp ire edattL' one of you with an un suppressibl e urge to

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to 1 e.x laustio one f n. If by any chance you should be Many of you marri ed men are going to give 0 th e f your wives a treat by bringing them along to and b ew who fail to attend the biggest . est con . the Chicago Convention. If you can by a ll means Ju t vent10n ever held by our fraternity tun e i 11 . ' kick on Rad1o Station \V -L-S and you'll do it because she'll have the time of her life. A Yourse lf f . ous tl . or not bemg numbe red in the joy- special committee of which Mrs. Elmer N. 1Iang d . . Turnquist is chairman, is making great plans for •\rr ancmg ll1 the Lou is X VI room. thi· daneangeme n t s 11ave been made to broadca st the th e entertainment of the wives of all visiting Pi Kapps. Mrs. Turnqui st is a rranging for teas, ha' e 111usic R . . C\'er p· over '-ad10 StatJOn VI/ -L-S so that bridges and matinees. Her committee is also 'tiOli· y 1 K . . lunit · app 1n the land wil l have a n apporplanning to see that the ladies get to visit our t oil Y to hear 1. lhe bi ' som et 1mg of what's going on at noted shopping centers. It is always a treat even , g convention. for women who live here in Chicago to visit Let , · . heck you can 1lOW m enjoy You re won d ermg tores like Marshal Field & Co., Mandel Bros., hn'-llr" au the wonderful dance mu s ic so ft lights Carson, Pirie, Scott & Co., and many of the IOus d . . ' . .' lhe lo . . avenports wh1ch wlll be prov1ded m smaller shops which deal in m er chandi se that . U! s XVI .f . g1r[ the . . room 1 you don't have the nght can only be found in large cities. a11 ent·' e With you. Well, sir, we have devised f 1rely . . Urnis} n ew scheme wh1ch IS caJcu lated to l<nowi~, You with just the kind of girl you like. Square and Compass at Lexington A t its last general co nvention in New Orleans Your g ~~lat we can't upply each of you with 0 in December, 1924, Square and Compass voted to datwn best girl," we have figured out a plan , e yo to establish its national office at Lexington, Vir~early u l~p with o ne who measures up as In a as poss1b le with her specifications. \iVith- ginia, where it was founded in 19 17. Thi s or1 rt lim e ganization is an inte rcolleg iate fraternity of askingSlo . a quest1onna1re . . . you w1"JI r ecetve Master .M asons that has been estab li shed at . lo w <ll11ong o tl· 1er t I11ngs your preference as 0111e 11 I . . . fifty colleges and uni ve rsiti es throughout the IIke ' t makes no d1fference whether you United States. As the charter s of thr e squares I1 em t 11 :unette- a , or sl:ort, thin or fat, blonde or have been revoked, the Fraternity now has 47 ~'lded . were gomg to see that you are prosqua re with a membership of approximately t With J. t o Ilia! us exactly that type of young lady 3,200. Faculty members as well as students arc Stlpre <e th e evening enjoyable at the Chicago 111 eligible to apply for membership, the Fraternity don't f e Chapter Ball. But for o-oodness' sake using the Masonic system of application for 11 Org t o ack 1 e to t ell your wives and sweethearts members hip rather than the coll ege syste m of tl I lon,e y lat t1ese are all nice girls. ''bidding" or invitation to join. Tts official publl 0 Ll can 1 le girl fe< c e_pet:d the com~11itt~e to handl e lication is The College Mason, now in its sixth ftll fasl . llt11 e m tht s convention m a maste ryea r. Tn college circl es, Square and Compass ent·Ire'· lton · ·rn som e cases we have conscripted . is characterized as a professional fraternity. 'I'here sor .· · . Ottttes for the main social event. membership being open to members of th e genChicag\Vtll be girls from Northwestern o-irls from eral Greek-letter societies. fl 0 . ' b ~oast ' gtrls from Illinoi s girls from the Gold , I''. ,, t·ta co 111and . g·lr Is f rom the choruses of two musi( c eclte \H Chi Phi at Washington · 11. ' • o,,,e f s. 'v e know that you fellows who 'n lhe rom •th e S out11 and \ Nest part1cularly . Delta Sigma, local fraternity, organized at uo. II are 1 1 ~f 1~'on1 e labtt of associating with good-looking Washington in 1920, was indu cted into the 11 tr h~re in. c0nd for your information we who live national body of Chi Phi as the twenty-eighth oil~ n1ne Pul 11 ~ago have pretty good ideas of femi- chapter of that organization last May. Jl ;I 1 See that c lrttude ourselves. Therefore, you can Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Chairroil' for a cl our efforts to satisfy your requirements " de . ance I) t man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50th erl t' S1re to ar ner are prompted both by our 1 1 Place, Chicago, immediately that you are nee : 0n as Pease you and also uphold our reputacoming. a good judge of women.

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C&he Cffinal Cffeaturu By

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Cha innan of Ba nquet Committee \S it S hakespeare who a id , "the best is a lw ays sa,;ed for the last," or was it Cha rl es Darwin? It sounds ve ry much like a theory of evo lu tion, but it is going to be demonstrated at the Chicago Supreme Chapter. Ou r worthy brothers w ho formed the tradition of end ing a conventi on w ith a banqu et understood w hat they were abou t, and th e tradition is not going to suffer on the evening .of December 30, 1925. Now, if the on ly thing we had to offer was the selection of after dinner speakers it would be a great evening. T o li sten to the men who visualized a g reat fraternity and m ade that vision a reality at any place or at any time wou ld be a treat; but to sit in the Tiger r oom of the Hotel Sherman, a gem of a rch itectural beauty, and feast of the best the J-:T otel's renowned chefs prepare, and then sit back in your lux uri ous armchair and listen to the sto ri es of the past and dreams of the future- ah, that is an occasion to be rem em be red. En terta in ers, you sha ll not want for them. M r. Benson has promised us the best on hi s circuit. M ll e. O lin ska is s.lated to g ive us some-

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thing novel in the way of dancing, and a qua.~e: of vocal a rti sts is now being engaged. Best ~j th ese. Chuck Boehn er, Upsilon, who with putt. Kyle has been making quite a hit in radio enter. 11 tainment, wi ll be on hand. Thi s array is guara . li,•e1I teed to suppl y any neeeded pep for a · even ing. ·kfl Of course it wou ldn 't do to ca rve the ttll ·{ so far ahead of time, so we will leave a Jot tJil 1 th e Jittl e deta il s wh ich are going to ma I<e 00 evening m emo rable as a littl e surpri se to l' ; 0 Radio Station W-L-S will be on the job and l' ~ ra, g who have to toast your feet at yo ur ow n '·e 3' . I .11' de . f tres on t h at cvenmg ca n pt.e.;I out t1e length on which you hear the olemn old Jtl. ~ say, "we wi ll now turn the microphone ovel . the Tiger room where the P i Kappa P hi Frater.. nity is holdin g its Thirteenth Supreme Chapter, and li sten in, for you wi ll get some idea of ~ fitting climax of a wonderfu l conventi on.

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Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Ch~i~ man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 5 t e Place, Chicago, immediately that you ar coming.

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By GEn. b . S 11 m~·t·z, £.rec utive Secref01"V I o~~ IFTY milli on people live within a night's we learn that "Chicago is th e actual and ac ' n . rid e of Chi cago. Chi cago convention s at- edged center of a ll human activity on tI1e conne tain reco rd attendance at minimum ex- tinent. Chicago's retail e ta bli shments lea d t ., . (10 · pense. Chi cago hotels eq ua l world's best. Chi- world and are an in spiration to all. Ch 1ca,. , 1 cago is an all season conventi on city. T wenty- publi c pa rk s, boulevards and gardens a re. a J~~ eight g reat railroads center there. Liberal stop- to VISitors. Chicago is espec ially a ttractive 10 ove rs all owed at a ll times. Chi cago con vention s convention visitors. Hospitali ty call s yotl _.... find eve ry needed service develope d to max imum Chicago. Meet in the center of th e continent efficiency. CT·:IJ CAGO." e 5 So reads a formal in vitation from th Chicago Chicago inv ites you, P i Kapps. Offer th~al Assoc iation of Comm erce to Pi Kappa P hi to incentives to trave l without regard to the espe~or n~ eet this year in ''The W indy City." Con tinuing, urge every P i Kapp mu st feel to be there

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Supreme Chapte r. You will read elsew here . S tssue of th e pl ans being made; here our onJy co ncern ts . . t ransportatwn. ~ve ry Pi K app should a rrange, if poss ibl e, to arn . S ve 111 Chi cago not la ter than th e a ft ern oon of Ltnday, December 27. "get-together" at th e 1 /ote] Sherm an is pl anned and nobody can a fOre] to miss it.

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gath ered from th e north a nd the south and th e eas t and th e west, a half-fa re re bate will be reape I by eve ry holder of the coveted certifi cate. Th e inform ati on desk of your r a ilroad s tation is t he pl ace to appl y. Don't fail to attend to thi s detail , and don 't let th em tell you no! Spec ial ca r will be ope rated fr om any central po int w here as many as t wo dozen P i K apps cong regate. Get your r ese rvati on slips in earl y, stating what route you will ta ke, so such g roups may be organi zed and special coaches appli ed for . Several ca rs are expected to leave A tl anta and the railroads a re off ering every cooperation in organi zing oth er g roups. You will probably r ece ive schedul es and full information f rom th em direct ; if not and any detail is not clear, drop a lin e to 'L'h e Cent ral O ffi ce. Vve not onl y g ive advice now, bu ~ we do our best to g ive service ! GO To Cm c.\ GO !

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A.s we a re un ab le to guar an tee to the passenger assoc · t ' . ta ton as la rge an attend ance at Chtcago as IVas tl1e ca e for our last meetmg · ·tn A t Ianta, we ~e not able to off er redu ced fa res to Chi cago. •L~t, When you buy your ra ilroad ti cket, do1i't at/ to sec ure a. co nveutwn · · Jt may cert1·f 1cate. save you I1alf your return fare. lf a su ffi ctent . ntlinJ lh )er o f th ese certificates a re ma rshall ed by the transportati on committee in Chi cago when e broth ers a nd their w ives and sweeth ea rts are

t

7Vhy We GJ-ea1Je Supreme_; ehapter ctJYCeetings · By

\\1{ Y II Y

KARL

a ll thi s expenditure of tim e, money, and energy fo r a Supreme l. hapter meeting? Th e qu estion must l tese l . n ttself to some of th e yo unge r broth ers · alld th Perhaps some of th e more recently in stall ed it apters have asked it as a body. A t any ra te of ts not out of pl ace to con ici er bri efl y a few lhc benef its to be derived therefr om.

tO tO

GTBBON

I 'icr-Chair111a11 P ublicity Co mmittte

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Rr nefits to th e Fra te1'11ity '1'1 a le most obvious and easily the most impo rt'f llt rea f o r a conventwn · J'tes tn · t 11e neces tty · c on Or the large body of men making it up to hav sa 111 . a e mea ns o f gove rnmg themselves . \ Vhere 1 c arge numl er of persons a re working fo r a 0 ~nlOn pur[)OSe laws mu st be made, acts passe d 011 . . ' . ~ Jlldt ciall y and indiv idu a l empowe red to 'at·1 ' . .·y on th e admini strative work whi ch the body 1 'tttn . . s g as a w hole would fmd ttself too cumberOt1le to accompli sh .

A ide from the obvious fun cti on of gove rnment t he con venti on a ff ord s th e means fo r deve loping a conception o f unity throughout the fraterni ty. A P i Kapp fr om F lorida receives the g rip from a P i K app from \iVashington and goes home to teU hi s broth ers that th e cha pter they have heard about is a rea lity, and wha t is more, th at it is made up of real Pi Kapp s. A lpha through one of its brother s enj oys th e f Jlows hip o f di sta nt Ga mm a and each is mor closely bound to th e other . S peaking sti11 of th e national organi zati on we may say th at th e conventi on is the social fun cti on o f th e wh ole body; it is to the na ti onal body w hat th e a nnu al prom is to th e local chapter . No one w ill deny th e g reat part our social life plays in th e activ iti es of the local chapter, a nd th e conventi on rig htfull y g ives the same benef its to the national organi zation.

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Benefits to Local Chapters The convention floor is th e open market for the exchange of ideas. Each del egate should come with a stock from hi s local chapter and return loaded with good suggestion s obtain ed from hi s brother delegates. Iota Chapter has developed a scheme for financing th e building of a chapter house which is presented to the convention and its del egate obtains some helpful hints for more effective chapter di scipline. In like mann er a delegate may bring the problems with which the chapter has found difficulty and learn from a brother how such has been avoided by a different arrangement. No brother who has taken an active part in the affairs of hi s chapter fails to appreciate the importance of real enthu siasm on the part of every member and pledge. It is the quality which determin es whether a local chapter leads or brings up the r ear. The success ful convention is a fountain of enthu siasm at which each delegate may drink hi s fill and return to encourage hi s brothers to do g reater things for hi s fraternity. ]" u rth er the local chapter may have a g rievance. The convention furnishes an opportune time to have it redressed. The local chapter may wi sh as a body to perform some brotherly act to a noth er chapter much as one brother would assist another in hi s own chapter . The convention g ives the opportunity w ith sympathetic broth er s to help. Thus, the convention is the assembly of the chapte rs as the chapter hall is the meeting place of th e broth ers. Be nefits to Individual Brother W hether he attend the convention o r not, each Pi Kapp is goi ng to be benefited by being a member of a better national organization and a better loca l chapter . J-{e wi.ll also indirectly, through the brother who attends, in a way participate in the many advantages found there. But to the Pi Kapp who is present fall s the lion 's share of the good things w hich a convention brings to the individual. He cannot be present without becoming a better P i Kapp. I-:le cann ot meet and tall( and work with men who a re g iv ing freely of their time and energy to the fraternity, ofttimes at no

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small sacrifice, without placing a higher eva!ua· tion on hi s membership in the organization. rr.e 1 cannot take part in the transacting of the bt1~ : 1 ness of the fraternity an d assist in making . t' laws and regulation s without becoming more 1nterested in what th at business consists of and thC P roblems to which those laws relate. He tht1> 't, becomes a more valuable man to the fraterl11 ) and a more capable man in other walks of life. In addition the particular individua l who ~~­ tends, whether a delegate or not, enjoys benefit~ of a social nature, which nee d not be elaboratec ,en! upon here except for a word of encouragen . ]115 to the broth er who has not fully mad e up . mind to attend the Chicago Convention. A visll to the second largest city in the tates and 011.c which is but a few hundred from the third } ~II' gest in the world, is in itself a rare treat even though a great frat~r.nity were not making eve.:): e ffort to see that v1s1t an un equal ed opportL1 111.) 11 to view the city's wonders and taste of : amu sements. The fact that a great hotel h~: thrown open its doors and pleclg cl its best e 10 forts to in sure a royaJ entertainm ent is not be lightly considered when you weigh the qu.e~­ tion whether you will make that intend ed " 1 5 1 ~ now o r later. You will eventuall y see Chicago' you will never have a more pleasant occasion· 'J'I1e convention . . g1ves you t hese bene f't 1 s-whY not g iv e it your presence?

Aids College He Never Attended Rec· :.Vf ost of the $2,300,000 e tate of Edward to r, noted patent attorney, has been will.ed It~ De ·Pauw U ni versity, Greencastle, Incl., wh1ch ~e never attend ed. Annual scholarships at . 1 Pauw for every hig h school in Indiana were nclud ed in th e bequ ests. . f)e S in ce 19 14, when he became interested 111 Pauw, Mr. Rector had made numerous giftS to it and. at the time of hi s death 500 of its 5:~~ dents were being educated at hi s expense. was a trustee. Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Ch~ir~ man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 5 t e Place, Chicago, immediately that you a! coming.

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c;J3rother ~eves Supreme C(9reasurer

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JB ROTHER J. CHESTER REEVES, A lpha , t

has been elected by the Supreme Council 0 . the position of Supreme T reasu rer, succeed~~g the late Broth er W illi am Fogarty, A lpha, who ted at Cha rl eston, S. C., last ·M arch. Brother Reeves whose address is 441 Peachtre. e S treet, Atl a nta, ' Ga ., has already assumed 1118 duti es and has und er ta ken hi s work with a ~eal and enthu siasm that insures the further staility of the f raternity's fin ancial poli cy. Br1'he love of P i K~ppa ~hi . s_e~m.s in?orn in other Reeves and smce ht s 1111ttat10n mto the () I'd er through A lpha chapter 14 years ago he 1 la~ been a tireless wo rker in P i Kappa P hi 's advancement. Th e new Supreme Treasurer was lor11 an d r ea red in O rangeburg, S . C., where he ' ~ecei vecl hi s prelimin a ry educati on, g raduating 01 / 11 th e hig h school th ere. H e was g raduated 0 111 th e Coll ege of Ch arl~ston in 19 16 with the cegree of Bachelor of A rts. It was whil e a S!ttd t en at the venerabl e Coll ege of Charl eston, '~' h e r H e fl'1 1' appa ]1111. began her caree r, that t·oth er Reeves came within the pale of the sta r and lamp .

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Be spent 18 months in the United S tates A rmy cIltri 1 . ng t 1e \Norld vVar. 14 of whi ch we re spent 111 the A. E . F., with th e 82nd division. . I-Te '"ent to A tl anta in 1920 and became cas hi er and

secretary fo r th e T hompson Bonded \Narehouse. Broth er Reeves is an enthu siastic f ratern ali st, being a member of the Scottish R ite Body of 32nd degree Masons, and of Yaarab Temple, S hrin e. He is a lso a member of All Sain ts Episcopal church. H e was the first a rchon of the A tl anta a lumni chapter and rep resented that g roup at the E leventh Supreme Chapte r at Berkeley, Calif. As cha irm an of the transpor tati on committee, Broth er R eeves pl ayed an important par t in the prepa rati ons for th e Twelfth Supreme Chapte r at Atl anta two years ago. He is also an honora ry member of I ota chapter and has g iven of hi s tim e a nd energies for the upbuilding of the fraternity's Geo rg ia T ech chapter. Four members of hi s fa mily also pledge allegiance to P i Kappa P hi : Kenneth Ea rl Lowman, Staunton, Va., A lpha; Euchlin Dalcho Re.eves, O rangeburg, S. C., E ta; W illi am F letcher Fairey, Jr., O ra ngebu rg, S. C., Zeta; and Hazzarcl Ea rl R eeves, W ilmington, N . C., I ota.

Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Chairman of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50th Place, Chicago, immediately that you are coming.

Howard Men Initiated

Odgers on New Job

C' 'l'hroug-h specia l di spensati on. J asper C. H utto, NlaucJe E. Ca rr, and S. \V. H a ll, of Cha rl otte, .' C., all members of the loca l Psi Delta frate rIlt ty f\l at 1:..1owa rd College, _in_s ~a ll ed _last S [~ ring as 11 I~h a-hta chapter, were tmtt ated mto P t Kappa ht by E psil on chapte r at Davidson Coll ege the eve · ntng of October 15. 'l'h e im press ive ritu ali stic ceremoni es were ably ~onctucted by the underg raduates of E psil on. ~:Others Warren MoiJl ey, J. R a lph Rone, and 'Chard L. Young, of th e Cha rl otte A lumni chaptet· , wer e present.

B roth er Geo rge X . Odge rs, N u, '16, in addi tion to being principal of th e Calcu tta Boys School, Calcutta, Indi a, has accepted th e appointment as p rin cipal and headmaster of Collin s I nstitute, of w hi ch he is also a tru stee. Coll ins is a second ary school for I ndi an boys with an annual enrollm ent of 625 . I t is end owed and is one of the leading high schools r ecogni zed by the U ni ve rsity of Calcutta. Plan now to attend the T hirteenth S upreme Chapte r meeting, December 28, 29 and 30, at Chicago.

[ 21 ]


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[ 22 ]


THE

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School Life zn Edinburgh University j

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Cu:vJZr.AND

SEYMOUR, II

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a rti cle. is not a cri ticism of Scottish the nation and to the world have p ut back of l.Jnive rsity life, such a paper I am not it a p roud hi story and ma ny noble t raditions. e competent to write. ] n studying abroad Th e backward glance at the t riumphs of other 011 t·a naturall y makes certain obser vations of t he years does not becloud the vis ion of the possi• I sc I100 I-room act1.v1t1es, .. . re- b'1l·1t1es . . ~'ie111Pll s cLn( an d t I11s wait1ng to be accomplishe d. T l1e sto ry 1011~v dea ls, fron1 a persona l point of view, w ith of the pa t is dear to the hea rt of eve ry Scots\t·ha~ _of them, and no one is responsible for ma n. Jt in spi res him to be wo rthy of hi s heri Pco 15 here written other tha n myself. Other tage. J think, if I may j udge fro m personal ~la~}~e ~tudy ing in the s.amc Uni\~ers ity. woul d obse rvation, the pri mary ideal of the Scotti sh j di ffe rent observat10ns, recetve clt ffere nt uni versity is different th an th e basic idea l of 111 Press · . . T - IOns and, come to dt ffere nt conclu swns. 1 j e~t . one would under stand the spi ri t of t he presIJas1111 ~,c~t l ~ncl one mu st know something of her l'e ·. I h1 s IS likewise t ru e in regard to the U ni al2tty.. I n studying the li fe of a school one is isj <~ys 111 terested in the city in w hich t he school Ca~~atecl. O n thi s page is a pi cture of E din burg h i~al! e a ~oun d whi ch the "Old Town" was orig\ug Y buti t. ] am using t he v iew of the Castle to the ge.st to th e im agin ation the picturesqueness of hanc~tv. "He~u ty, bes~owed by nature and en~di , d by art, IS th e un challenged endowmen t of in ~ 0 ll rg-1>" T he heart o f Scotl and is not fo un d h.ct 1e· iaYtsh g ifts of nature but in the spirit of th. ltstory and the wond er of her romance; in THE EDINBUR G H C AS TLE A ND R oss F O UNTAIN · of other days and countless legends Of' St0 rtes 111 llte ell1ory; in th e t radi tions of bygone achi eve- the university in A meri ca. I venture the statents . the p resen t desire to add to th e ment Scotti sh uni ve rsities were at f irst designed lau 'an d tn lva;~lis of t he nation's li fe. T he Castle was the fo r t he special benefit of particul arl y bright tho 111e home of the Sovereigns. T he place was young men . O u r A meri can coll eges and univer~eo~en. because of its strength and securi ty. T he sities were des igned not so much for the needs ian ogtca l fo rm ation of the rock te ll s in p rophetic of brilli an t boys an d g irls, bu t to meet t he needs 1[[~~age the fascinating story of its destiny. of th e average stu den t. O u r ideal is to make ~oy:l of Scottish histo ry has to do with t he learning possilJle to ali, a blessing to all. It has great Castle. Here the seeds of Scotland's been the custom in Scotland when a boy, who k110 ness we re planted in the remote past by un - gave promi se of aptness in Latin and Greek, was the- \Vn 1lands. Here rul er s were bo rn, spent fo un d by the "Old Schoolmaster," a ll members l td Q11e ays, passed on to t he un seen world. Mary, of the family worked and sacri ficed in order that the ~1 of Scots, was th e last rul er w ho lived in he mi ght have a chance to receive coll ege t ra in asue. ing and ma ke hi s mark in the world. T he p rin COt! cipal of one of the coll eges in t he university lent and has long been fa mous fo r her exce.lasked me one evening if ou r system of afford'i'he ~h ~ol s. S he has fo ur g reat U niversiti es. ing every boy and g irl opportuni ty to secure 111 fav . versity of Ed inburgh has been highly 0 coll ege t ra ining did not lowe r the stand ard of Of tit eel in being located in the hi storic cap itol cholars hip. My rep ly was that it might have le land. Centu ries of notewor thy se rvice to [ 23 ] .

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THE STAR AND LAMP of Pr KAPPA PHI a tendency to lower the standard of scholarship in the technical sense of the term but it widened the scope of the blessing of learning. Is not education for the common good rather than the special benefaction of a few? The buiJdings of Edinburgh U ni versity are in various parts of the city. Some of them are very old, others are modern. The picture below is a snap of the "Old Quad," as it is affectionately called. This is the oldest part of the schoo.l. It is built around a block, the interior forming a court. One misses the spacious bui ldings and the beautifu l campuses so much a factor in American university life.

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the degree of Doctor of P hilosophy. Thts , . I1 ongmate . . d 111 . Germany as a high 1.l gree, w h tc ue Jll technical degree, has not reached the vog . Scotland with wh ich it is favored in Al1lencaD arc I am toJd the degrees, L itt.D. and LL· · . 1 . r ts tl more coveted. T he professors a re specta 15 ·c1 rab1e their departments. They devote const e ' . . fell' time to research work. They teach but a e Sont hours, say five or six hours per week. , 1 1 leS'' may teach more than this, others may teac I am not prepared to state. .• 1 T he principal departments of the Univc~\~ are Law, Medicin e, Divinity, P hilosophy, \1 · · and Sc1ences. The aun of the curn·cu 1u111 1 f 5Ul' thoroughness rather than a wide range 0 .t 11 r 11 e jects. In fact the courses are extremely 111 11 . t~ 1 in number. Stud ents do not carry more c t [I1 ten to twelve hours of work. At pres en 1 . . 1-noWI· Med1cal School ts probably the best '. . ~ . . l a tn1JII~o Class tcs are popt_tl ar. Psychology ts c . ed a.1 mu h attenti on. \ Villi am James is recof?11 z is the g reatest pioneer in this field. Soc1 olog~ .. . . . . ]I ,C a neglected subJ ect. Home Econom1 cs 15• itt wise. Economi cs and E ducation are g roW 111 g popularity. 1 'f. he stud ents a re not organ1zed . . . chsse-· mto ' t1 0 . • Th ere are no green caps, no rings and P111.5• ,, 11 senior canes, no junior pipes, no class fJg\r no lin e of distinction between the f irst YC<ol 1 st udents an d the last year stud ents. '1'11e sc 10kS yea r is divided into three terms of ten w~e sc 0 each. Graduation exercises a re held at the c ~f of each term . Students graduate at the cl ~:~ere any term when they have sufficient credits. J 011 , are no class activities, no baccaJaureate sern\ 5• I he gra dua tes ' rc no comm encement address. '' sembl e in McEwan Hall where the degrees ~~~ conferred and the certificates are granted. a11 11 ceremoni es combined will not take up more t pc· an hour and thirty minutes. I a ttended a ~ ce p rtt cia! commencement for H. R. H., the. ith of \Vales, when the U ni vers ity honored bun w10t 1 th e LL.D. degree. Commencement does 1eu 1 . w mean much to the stud ents, just a t1me arc ce rtificates a re handed out, when degrees ' 11 d conferred, and when prizes, fellowshipS I :rtl award s are announ ced. So far as I could elllt)' there was nothing to create a feeling of Jo)' 111e d so to the school. O ne man who graduate

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1

THE OLD QUAD

For many centuries Scottish scholarship has been accorded a high place in the ranks of learning. One on ly has to read the li st of professors to discover many famo us names. The present faculty includes a number of eminent men. An atmosphere of scholarsh ip surrounds the U niversity. T he professors always wear academ ic gowns when in the class room. The faculty members are chosen largely from the alumni association. One notices very few of them have

[ 24 ]

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~~~~==========~======================================================= ~ TnE S'I' A R AN D L AMP of I I KAPPA Pnr twent f. . Y- tve yea rs ago told m e he did not know 1 11 ' ' an who g ra duated a t the time he did . There are 110 lass r uni ons to bring th e students together · . · ' no organt zcd athl ett c contests to mRu ence 111 11 ~ back to their lma Mater. . 'he tud en ts a re la rgely young m en. Acco rd 'll"'" to the p resent reco rds the ra ti o of men to ~l'onlen is a bou t f our to one. Women student .tre · Increas ing in number. Th e first wom an to gradu . 'ate f rom a cottts 11 mver stty recetve d 11er d1Pio, itt t~a 1ess t ha n three decades ago. A lack of 1\'centt ve fo r co-educa ti on is appa rent. E ducated / 111 en have nothing to do. A ll of the profes'O ns . r> • are crowded . Many of the young men who ~radu at . L a w a nd Medi cin e mu st leave th e co ' e 111 1111 · · p ro f ess ·ton. '1'11e teac 11in try t o practtce t 11e1r lrg-· Profession ca n use only a limited number of at nect teac he rs. O n the w hole the situ ation is 11 thO[ su ~•11 as to encourage young women to attend ap~ll~llltve rsiti es . In a less degree th e same thing Jlle tes to young men. Many _of th e :Young peoC! go to Canada a nd A ustralta to m a ke homes. ar taract en.stt.c o f th e Sco ts p eople, the stu de nts <ltt~l not qui ck to m ake fri end s w ith stra ngers, lh Yet when one rea lly knows th em, one finds Ita~~ arc a co rdi al, wa rm -hea rted people. M a ny ho '0ns a nd races a re represented in t he stud ent 1 fi,~ y. During the past year t here we re thirtyItt e Ameri cans a ttending th e Univers ity, being beOstf y Nl edical a nd Di vinity students . Tt m ay era seen th e stud ents ma ke up a cosmopolitAn lh IVd. Royalty a nd H ig hl a nders stroll throug h a me hall s, over the same campus a nd, listen 10 e11 1 <I e same lec tures. T he la te E dwa rd VII was 8 tuctent a t E dinburgh U niver sity. lir No e f f or t is made to create a gene ral soc ial cb e. O ne mi sses the class p a rties, receptions, «nee lttt · · p roms, concerts a nd t he like. Last au nn . . to a gener al receptiOn brought the students ~cth er for a short time. W e sepa ra ted not to ag . Of et ll ' am unl ess we happened to be members itie le same lecture g roup . T here a re no so ror de ' no f ra te rniti es, no social clubs. Th e stuor'lls are organi zed into m any different clu bs Ca]]Vari ous kind s, but th ese clubs a re not specifi llta( so:: ial in nature. The Scots work alone, IVa \tng little o f coopera ti on. In a circum scribed the U niversity Comm ons f or m en a nd the tve rst'ty Con1t11ons f or women prov1'd e som e

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socia l Jife. As it n ow is the social side of U ni ve rsity li fe is not such as to interfere with t he more . eri ous busi ness of coll ege days. O ne is in da nger of not mak ing coll ege fr ien ds a nd it is a g reat mi sta ke not to in ve t in coll ege f ri end sh ip . O ne mu st ma ke oneself kn own or rema in unkn own. T hi s type of life va rie so much f rom A me ri can ca mpus li fe we are li kely to mi sj u dge it. \ Ve a re p rone to ee the meri t of ou r own sys tem. \ A/ hat is good for Scotl and may not meet the needs in America, and 'l'ice versa. O ur

·

THE SC O TT MONUM EN T

social li fe may be carri ed to the extreme. I n Scotla nd no one goes to t he nivers ity to be pledged to a Greek-letter organi zation. \\'e have no right to pass ha rsh judgment upon th e way they do t hings. O ne m isses the social li fe rega rd ed as a pa rt of our coll ege li fe, still , thi s is no reason one should claim to have t he best of everything, as some tactless A merican do. 'vV hat we have m ay be be t fo r us, to ma in tain it is best fo r othe rs, is overstepping good judgment. Some Ameri cans a re quick to f orget w hen studying away fro m home that the li fe of the people where they a re shoul d be judged by their own sta nda rd s, rath er than by ou r standards.

[ 25 ]


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'l'he University of Edinburgh has no 01;ganized athl etic activities, no specia l physical director, no football coaches. This does not mean the U niversity is w ithout sports. The students are enthusiastic sport supporters. A t the Rugby and football games there is no cheering, as ide from individual yelling. One who is in the habit of attending American fo tball games and basketball games and giving vent to one's lungs will feel depressed at the glances of reproach from the eyes of n earby spectators if one unexpectedly lets out a screaming yell , because they do not participate in noisy outbursts at regu lar intervals. The University Rugby teams have no organized support from the students. During the winter international football games attract more attention than coll egiate sports. Golf is the most popul ar game in warm weather. Bowling on the g reen has its followers. Most a ll of the prepar atory schools play lacrosse and R ugby. A student spending a yea r in a foreign Uni versity is the recipi ent of certain benefit . Travel, as · a factor in education, should not be lightly valued. It enl a rges one's sympathi es, cultivates intell ectual, nationali ti c and racial toleration and, broadens one's outlook in life. A second benefit is that of becoming acquainted with new books, new magazines a nd new currents of thought. One makes new menta l friend§. One clay I went to the A merican History Department of New College Library to find some information on the subj ect of the American Indian. Strange as it may seem I had to cut most of the pages of the books I read. The niversity

· · aJthough . L tbra ry has no Amen can magaztnes, ' .. al one will find a few of them in the r.fu~tciPin l,ibra ry. Among the liter ary men who ]tve of 5 Edinburgh at one time or another the nat11~ , \' Qutnce. Scott, Burn s, Stevenson, H ume an d D e ,v re· deserve special mention. The picture on the P e· . page of the Scott Mon ument ex·press . i>' ced mg Scotl and 's affection for him . A third b~neftt of the acq ui siti on of new friends. The ctrcl~ ief friendship is enl arged: This is one of the 'been blessings of foreign study. As has already JuC· indi cated foreign study has a great cultural "~ nal · g tvmg · · "f'mt·s11" t o educattO. j; I t I·S I1eIp f u1 m 11 training. The last benefit I sha ll mention, and •1111 . d . tl t foret&· not the leas t of the bene f 1ts note , 1s ~ a 'rhe , study should make one a better A m encai~ · the Scotsmen do not grow weary in sing'.11 g 1 eir 1 p raises of Scotland . This sp irit of pride 111 t • ~ · the ti country encourages one to apprec1ate e 0 11 greatness of one's native land. It is not that 11 d shot should love Scotland less, but that one eir 1 love Ametica more. The Scotsmen Jove t 'r)' . t ]listo · past. We want A menca to have a grea her;. The foundation was well laid by our forefal ter Let's build upon it a castle of national characof . ·~ an l life strong enough to endure the stol 1 1·~· 1 '' time. May we love our country, honor 1er the stitutions and, do something to contribute to sum -total of her greatness.

Library Service

Working Through College. ti· . 1 1ns An average taken from 175 ed ucatJOna p~r 4 tutions in the U nit ed States shows that 411' ,ft; . !l cent of the student s are self -supporting. t)Jli· Coll ege ranked first w ith 85 per cent, the ent ve rsity of V/ashington secon d with 68 pe~ cthf of the stud ents being self -supporting an eo!· Unive r ity of Chicago is third with 60 perc

Copies of THE S·rAR AND LAMP are mai led regula rly to the L ibrary of Congress, in Washington; the New York City Public Library, the Unive rsity of I llin ois L ibrary, the igma A lpha Epsi lon F raternity L ibra ry, Evanston, Ill., and will be sent to a limited number of others on request, where visiting P i Kapps may have access to th em. A compl ete file of both Tm~ S'l'AR AND LAMP and The Pi Kappa. Phi Jou.r11al is being deposited with the Charleston Library Society, Charleston, S . C., whil e a si mil ar file is preserved at the Central Office.

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Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General 50 t~ man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. are Place, Chicago, immediately that you coming.

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Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General man of Convention Committee, at 556 E. Place, Chicago, immediately that you coming.

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T r-rE S T A R AN D L AMP of P r KAPPA Pr-rr

Lookjng ·GJorward By GEORGE ALI.EN ODGERS, N

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R I T I NG under the above titl e, in the Febru a ry number of T HE S'l'AR AND it is . LAMP, Broth er Shelley Sansbury, 0 , of tntroduces a subj ect which must increasingly ief 1 ; ngage th e attenti on and consideration of the een Sraternity, and especially of the members of th e 1uc. f llpreme Council to w hom th e fraternity looks 111 al or guidance. How lm·ge do we wan t our fratis tentity to be? ig!l 'I'he last Supreme Chapter of the fraterni ty 'he , ~dmirably revised the Constitution and Supreme the aws . Our house is in or der. 'vVe are now readY to expand and to develop our present eir . ,,e chapters. In doing the former we mu st not 1ne neglect th e latter. Vve mu st have numbers, but .tid of sup reme 1mportance · · qu a 1·1ty. JS eir P i K appa P hi has established 30 chapters in 2. 0 Years. O f these 27 are active, and are in r)'rs· tnstituti ons of stability. A ll of these acti ve :er cfhapters ought to be in existence fifty years of rotn now. In the meantime, how many more chapters shall we charter ? And where? We have before us the examp le of several rapid expansioni sts in the fraternity fi eld. There a:e also the examples of older, mature, but f' Vtril e and growing orders. Is P i Kappa P hi :ll to become a chaser after number s? O r a re we ·e to set a goal as far as numbers a re concerned, ~ncl then devote all of our effort to th e realizatton of our spiritual ideals, and to the advance111 ent of fratern ali sm and the Christ Spirit by a?opting and supporting a worthy piece of soCta! service? Brother Sansbury suggests 45 as the ideal 11 11111ber of chapters, prov iding they are geographi cally well located. Vve have been cha rteri 11 g a bou t three chapters a year, dunng · t 11e f: st four years. A t that rate we shall have I e 45 by 1932. A nd then ? Shall we stop ? for one am decidedly in f avor of the three---

sses

7(-

a-year-six-year program, and the adopting of a conse rva tive plan whi ch will p lace us in the same cl ass with Delta Kappa E psilon, Theta Delta Chi , and Delta Upsil on, as fa r as expansian is concerned. P i Kappa P hi has in t he past been careful , yes conservative, in her expansion. T he fraternity as a body beli eves in a comparatively small membership. We are commi tted to certain ideals, which if lived up to, will always force us to maintain high standards. Mushroom growth will be impossibl e if the fraterni ty is to remain P i Kappa P hi . L ikewise, we shall never try to compete with the Masons and Odd Fell ows for th e reco rd number of chapters. 1-Ve canno t d o z·t.

1

l*1' hi s interesting arti cle was written before th e inStall·<I t'ton of A lpha-Eta an d A lpha-Theta chapters at 1; owa rd and Michigan Sta te and th e fi gures therefore (I0 11 0 t . mclude th ese chapter s.-EDITOR's NoTE.]

W here th en shall we expand ? I nto what states? Into what instituti ons? We now occupy 15 of the 49 divisions of the u ni on. O f our 27 chapters, 18 are in 7 Southern States-our Solid South. T he remaining 9 chapters a re in 7 states, strung fro m coast to coast, with considerabl e space between. In the D ecember, 1924, S·rAR AND LAMP the editor showed us " where we fli cker and where we shin e." To solidify and uni te our southern and nor thcentral states, we must enter Penn sylvania, Maryland, O hi o, Kentucky, Tennessee, M issouri , Kansas, and Iowa. If we beli eve in coloni zati on, here is our territory . T hen, on into M ichigan, 'vVisconsin, M innesota, the Dakotas, and west into Colorado. For th e present we need not consider the eight plateau, and the New E ngland States, as fields fo r expansion, but deal with such petitions as may be sent in from these sections. Vl/e ought, however, to definitely cultivate the states previously mentioned. We will be f oolish, if we don't. Ways and means of doing th ese can be considered at another time. U ndoubtedl y, a defini te progra m of expansion will be presented at the Chi cago meeting of th e Supreme Chapter. Let us be p repared for its consideration.

[ 27 ]


===========================================================~ ~ THE STAR AN D LAM P of Pr KAPPA Pr-rr In all di scussion upon expansion, we mu st bear in mind that higher education in A merica has not as yet r eached its ultimate form o f organization , that there a re signs of coming rad ical changes. \iV itn ess the junior college movement, the lowe r and upper divisions of the undergraduate liberal arts and science coll eges, J ohn s Hopkin s' new program. It is becoming in creasingly ev ident that m any of the small colleges will be forced to junior coll ege rank, and th at the arts and science coll eges of the g reat uni versiti es wi ll a dmit only those students who have compl eted the junior coll ege course. ]t is possibl e that in time we shall have junior fraternities, as we now have juni or so rorities, and that some of th e present fraterniti es will become "junior" while others will turn over cer tain of their chapters to the juni or organization:-;. In this conn ection it is interesting and informative to scrutini ze th e enrollm ent and endowments of the 27 P i Kapp coll eges and uni verSiti es. '"' e find that 13 are state institution s, therefore, whil e th ey may not be flu sh w ith fund s, cf assured existence, 7 of the priva-.~ coll eges each have more than a million doll ars endow ment ; and 7 less than a million each ; 16 have more than 1,000 studen ts, 11 Jess than a thousa nd; 7 have less than 500 students. O f the 11 , which have less than 1,000 stud ents. 7 possess small endowm ents. There is a possibility th at some clay these chapters may become ina cti ve.

which . .. li st of th e Associatio n of A meri ca n U nJversJtJes, . 111 · tent possess end ow ments of $1,000,000 or its eqluva . . e stucIent enr o liJ11CI11 tax rece1pts, and have a ful !-tim of not less than 1,000." is

O f the coll eges recently entered, 1VI ercer_f. h J• the only one which does not meet th ese qua 1 . cations. H er enrollment, how eve r, IS no t muc I · 1 ·n a below 1,000, and her endowm ent wil l w1t 11 few year s r each the milli on mark. t11e The following P i Kapp coll eges are on . I D "d Duke, A . A. U. approved l1 st: Cornel , av1 son, . Tul ane, A labama, California, F lorida, Georgia, ] llinoi s, Nebraska, No rth Ca rolina, Oklahot11~ VVashington, ·w ashington and Lee, Purdue, an Emory (w hi ch has just been approved). f lf my sugges tion regarding . quali fications ~ e co ll eges were adopted, th e followin g wou ld · · · s 1n · t h e sta t es nam e cJ w111·ell wou c t11e mst1tUt10n

:I

qualify: OccuPn:n STA'J'J:;s R ns· New Yo rk-C. C. N. Y., Columbia, Syracuse, e selaer. Virginia-Virginia, Wi llia m and Mary. Indiana-U ni ve r sity of Indiana, DePauw, Bu tler. tll"n ois-Chi cago, No rthwestern . Washin gton-State College. O rego n-U ni versity of Oregon. California-Sta nford. UNOCCUPIED STATES

penn-

Pennsylvania-Lafayette, Ca rn egie, Lehigh, .State, U ni versity of Pennsylva nia, P ittsburgh. OhiO Oh io-Den ison, M iami, Ohio State, Ohi o, Wesleya n, Western Reserve. Maryland-Uni ver-s ity of Maryland . Kentucky-U ni ver sity of Kentucky. Tennessee-Uni ver sity of Tennessee, Vanderbilt. A rti cle VI, Section 1, of our Constitution Missouri-University of M issouri, Washington. reads: Ka nsas-University of Ka nsas, K. S. A. C. "Underg radu ate chapters shall be established onl y at Iowa-University of Iowa, Iowa State, Coe. colleges and uni ve r sities of hi gh stand ards a nd we ll · Wisconsin-Univer sity of Wisconsin, Lawrence. es tablished rep utati ons whi ch have no laws prohibiting Minnesota-University of Minnesota. sec ret f raternities ." North Dakota-University of North Dakota. In the Supreme Laws I fail to find any interSouth Dakota-University of South Dakota. Montana-U niv ersity of Montana. pretation of this. There should be a definite 1daho-Univer•sity of Idaho. standard decided upon by the Supreme ChapColorado-U niver sity of Colorado. ter. O ur last eight chapters have been estabU tah-U ni ve rsity of Utah. li shed in outstanding in stitutions, all of whichA ri zona-U ni versity of A ri zona. with one excepti on-?ossess over $ 1,000,000 enTexas-University of T exas, Rice. Vermont-U niver sity of Vermont. dowment or its equival ent, have enrollments ex1"t"• Massachusetts-I-T arvard, M. I. T., Boston u nJ· V~· ceeding l ,QOO students, and are on the approved Tufts. li st of th e Associa ti on of A meri can Uni ve rsities. New Hampshire-Dartm outh . I suggest that we embody in our Supreme Laws: Maine-Unive Psity of Maine. "Und crgratu ate chapter s shall be establi shed onl y at Rhode I sland-Brown. collegeo, and uni versities w hi ch are on the approved Connecticut- Yale.

.

l 28

]

II

q

a

a

n


Tr-rE ich in )ill

is fi· ch

STAR

AND

of Pr

LAMP

KAPPA

Pnr

If Pi Kappa Phi confines her chapters to these institution s, and to s uch as from time to time wi ll qua lify, she wi ll be assured of a strong and permanent chapter ro ll , and wi ll have automatica ll y set a firm check upon her expansion. Having a firm foundation , let us build th ereon a temp le worthy of our ideal s.

Tn the seven "occupied" states li sted above, there are 1 -~ "unoccupied" institutions which qua ]ify. Jn the 24 "unoccupied" states, there are 44 institution s. A total of 58, which is surety a large enough field for expansion for so 111 e time to come. Some of the co ll eges are at Present well occupied, but many of them anct especiall y the state universities are in dire need of more chapters.

CA I,CU'I'1' A, JNDTA.

:e, ia,

c5l :J\(gw CJraternity eensus of

By

be

Jd

io

C.

\NILLIAM

LlWERE

( ln T!te Record o f Sigma A lph a E psilon )

O

NE of the most significant fraternity studies of recent times is a compa ri son of h

G

I

.

.

I

two t e census of reek- etter societies ta <en th ~e~rs ago and one now made. It reveals _at It Is a normal condition for college £rater?!ties to increase and g row, even as all other liv111 g things do. The first twenty fraternities enun · cha ;eratecl in the census of 1923 then had 1,247 12 ers. Today these same twenty number 2 chapters, an increase of 45. As a further illustration, if the last twenty CIlapt I . . f ers of the earJ ier census are ta <en, It IS t ounct that in 1923 these twenty had 231 chapers, whi le now they count up 272 chapters.

t

tl 'l'o look at it from another angle, of the fiftylree f . . d . ratern1t1es reporte two years ago, SIXteen I . . h . tl1 lave mcreased 111 number of c apters smce en, three have stood sti ll , and one has lost a c1lapter. ' ]'

· he results of the recent census are here presentect ·

~ign1a ~lpha

Epsilon .... Sigma ................ s~11 Delta Theta ............ A.;gn,a Nu ...................... 13 Pha Tau Omega ........ S~ta111 Theta Pi.. .............. D~ a Chi ...................... l a1 tab Tau Delta'............ f>hill cia Chi A lpha ........ J:li I<Gamma Delta ........ J:> a~Pa

Ka

95 94 93 90 84 84 83 71

67 66

Delta Upsilon ................ Phi Kappa Psi.. ........ ...... Delta Kappa Epsi lon .... Theta Chi ........................ Phi Sigma Kappa .......... Delta Sigma Phi... ......... Acacia .............................. Phi Kappa Sigma ........ Zeta Beta TaLL ............ Theta Delta Chi.. ............

49 48 45 42 41 36 33

31 31 30

appa Alpha............ 65

Ch i Phi .......................... 29

SigPPa Alpha (So) ........ 56 111 a Phi Epsilon ........ 52

Delta Chi ...................... 29 Phi Kappa Tau .............. 29

Pi Kappa Phi ................ Sigma A lpha M u .......... Theta Kappa Nu .......... Zeta Psi .......................... Alpha Gamma Rho ........ Theta Xi ........................ Alpha Delta Phi ............ A lph a Sigma Phi .......... P·si Upsi lon Chi Psi .......... :::::::::::::::::: Phi Beta Delta ................ Sigma Pi ........................ Alpha Chi Rho .............. Tau Kappa Epsilon...... f' N ;:~f~~~appt~ :::::::::::::::::::::: Phi Sigma Delta ..........

29 29

29 29 27 27 26 26 26 24 24 23

21 20 17 17 17

Delta Phi ........................ Sigma Phi Sig ma .......... Alpha Epsilon Pi .......... Tau Delta Ph i................ Theta Upsilon Omega .. Phi Mu Delta ................ Phi Pi Phi.. .................... Sigma Phi .................... Beta Kappa .................. Kappa Alpha (No) ...... Chi Tau .......................... Delta Psi ........................ Delta Sigma Lambda .... Phi Kappa Delta............ Phi JVTu Chi .................. Eta Omega Delta..........

16 13

12 12 12 11

10 10

9 8 7 7 6 5 4 3

Tt was contended two years ago that if the sma ller fraternities were encouraged to grow and answer the appeal for fraternity fellow ship which comes from coll eges so crowded with fine material that much of it lost out, because the char)ters were already overcrowded, that at Jeast to an extent the move for more new fraternities would be unnecessary. These 86 new chapters have added an estimated increase to the fraternity world of at least 2,500 men. The contention has been justified and the manner in which the fraternities responded to the suggestion, w hi ch appeared in practically every fraternity magazine publi shed, has been an amazing justification of the apr)eal. Whi le the number of chapters has changed in all cases but one, in the leading ten fraternities it is interesting to see that their relative posi-

[ 29 ]


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tions are un changed except in the cases of the last two. P hi Gamma Delta, w hi ch has ranked ninth with sixty-five chapters, is now in the tenth place w ith 66 chapter s, w hil e Lambda Chi Alpha has taken the ninth place with an in crease of five chapters. S igma A lpha Epsi lon, which led with ninety-four chapters two year s ago, now leads with ninety-five chapters. Kappa Sigma, which was second then w ith ninety-two chapters, retain s its place w ith ninety-four chapters. P hi Delta Theta is still third with an increase in its number of chapters from nin ety to ninety-three. Delta Tau Delta has had the largest g rowth of

of Pr

KAPPA

Pnr

. t e1.g I1t f rate rmt1 . .es, It . I'ISt 111crea . si ng frot11 tl1e f 1r sixty-s ix to seventy-one. . . I advJsa.h N o matter w hat one believes about t 1e bility of fraternity in crease, these figures furms f 0 a fascinating study and .lead to many avenues_ g . th111 conj ecture. Everyone w dl agree on one . . f. ternltY and that 1s that the clear old college I a . . . .. . t ma1n· system has not lost Jts v mhty or powe1 tain itself.

°

Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General C~~i:~ wan of Convention Committee, at 556 E. e Place, Chicago, immediately that you ar coming.

Sewell, c?tlabama's Greatest c?tthletv R OTHER J OE SEWELL, O mi cron, last spring was electe d through popular 'vote as th e g reatest li ving athl ete of A labama, and by hi s selection earn ed a place in A labama's l..,ivi ng fl ail of Fame.

B

A special di spatch from the ni ve rsity of A labama, lo the Bi·r mingham Agc-He·rald, had Lhe following to say ap ropos of Brother Sewell 's selection: " '!'h e university is plea eel w ith th an nouncement that Joe Sewell , one of the state in stitu tion' s noted athletes, has been elected to A labama's living hall of fame as the state' greatest liv ing athl ete. "T he sto ry of Sewell 's rise from shortstop on a co ll ege team to shortstop on the world 's champions of 1920 has been told and retoJd so often that every sandlot youngster feels he is in ignorance if he does not know it. "Sewell , captain of the labama Crim sons in 1920, left along abou t mid-season of the Southern league and join ed the New O rl eans Peli cans. l--Ie made good from the start. While not the best fielder in the leagu e, he hit ha rd and timely. He had played shortstop for the Crimsons for three years and was considered the peer of a ll D ix ie shortstops.

'"1'11en came oppo rtunity . Imoe 1ong . a t the door, . w1th the fatal ba ll of Carl Mays that I<1·n ed Ra)1 · thn Chapman, l ncl ian shortstop, ju st at the tl!lle . ch 111 the Cleveland ers were bearing down everY 1 Jllcl on the home stretch for the pennant. A n d' n r . S eake to the surpn se of everyone, Manager P n1 bought the kid co llegiate player, Joe Sewell , fr~ 1 e the Pelican s and shoved him into the game t moment he arrived. eJ]. " What happened afterwards is known too 11 e made good and has improved each Y ]Iii S ince hi s first year with Cleveland, he haS ell 1 .300 each yea r with the exception of 1922,_ ~~~~~~ he fell one point below that average. ] liS for yea r was in l 923 w hen he led the league r· al'c many weeks and finally ended up w ith an ' age of .353. !l, "Sewell will be 27 yea rs old on October i11 hav ing been born at Titus, A la., on t hat datec:r 1898. He married Miss Wi lli e Veal, of 'rus at loosa, in December, 192 1, and now Jives ' Tuscaloo a. ·· hi' "Sewell's coll ege career rests not alone on alibaseball act iviti es. He ea rn ed a letter as a 11 'tl11 back in football the year before he ente red 01 ranks of 1 rofessionals and was also p res1'dent 11 mal . the student body. He was a member o f

[ 30]

':a!'·


::;:;.

~

~============================================ rl' U E S 'l' A R AN D LAMP 0 f PI KAPPA I II I

---

frot11

organization s on th e ca mpu s, including Jaso ns, senior honorary soc iety, and is a membe r of the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity.

visarnish es of

" ewe l.l spend s th e winte r in Tu sca loosa

thing

rnitY ain-

n

lace \\' ade in getting the Crimsons into condition before he reports to the Indians each spring. ··nut despite hi s man y honors and wonderful reco rd he has mad e in the big leagu es and the f act that he i the lead ing shortstop of both maj or circuits, ] oc rema in s exactl y w hat he was when he was a stud ent at the Capstone-friendly a nd co rdi a l to everyone."

I

\Vhere he plays lots of golf, watches the footbailers in practice, ta kes a great interest in hi s Younge r broth r, Tommy, a nd aids Coach \Val -

hair50th are

)

door J{a}' thHI jnch 11uch ~aker

frotH e the well. ~, e(lf·

s

]Jil

whetl ]Je~l

• for ~ ,,cr-

•r n.

~e

jtl

uscil' •S :tl

The Girl of Pi Kappa Phi 11atch

with gold that gleams on the scroll , 'I'he go ld of her g li stening hair, And the white o f our goal with th e white of the soul

\\'ith th e red of her heart match th e ruby red rose, And the sta r with the star in each eye, A nd the lamp with th e .light th at her smil es expose, And there's a girl who's a Pi Kappa Phi.

C. A.

l'hat's unbl emished a nd spotlessly fair,

[ 31 ]

J ACKSON,

JR.,

Eta, '20.


THE

S'rAR

AND

LAMP

of Pr

KAPPA

Pr-rr

cAnother George 8 'y L1·:o II. Pou, o, '21 R ESENT at the in stall atio n of A lph aEta Ch apter at Howard College last spring were three Pi Kapps, all of whom h old national offices in the Fraternity, and all of whom are named George. They were affectionately referred to and photo0Tap hed as "The Three Georges," and their picture was published under that caption in

P

th e last issue of 1'IIE S'l'AR AND LAMP. Moreover, our Supreme Archon is a ·George, several chapter officials are Georges, and it would appear that our Fraternity is almost entirely run by "George." Thi s story is about another George. He holds no office in the Fraternity, yet probably does as much serious thinking for the good of the order as any of those who d0. He is prevented by his

1 1

residence on the other side of the globe fro ~ knowing and associatitig with his brothers bacK in the States, yet he is known to most of the!11 as a frequent contributor to TnE STAR p!D LAM r. He li ves in Calcutta , India, apparent~Y · S Ill too far removed to keep up with happe11111g . 1 the Greek letter world, but a single issue of 0.u magazine (December, 1924), contained more Interesting statistics on fraternities in general, compi led and cia ri fied by this good brother, th~n . . I. Ill c::tn be had even in the books which spec1a 1ze furnishing such in formation. , \Jien 1 refer, of course, to llrother George 1 Odgers, student, teacher, preacher, missionary, . n· author, traveler, husband, father, fraternity ma · one of the most interesting personalities I ha\'~ . discovered among my brothers of Pi Kappa Phi, .h as well as one whose character and acco!11P IIS ments merit mention as one of our most distinguished members. · September, 1893, 111 . a Nebraska '' sadB orn 111 dy," George lived on a cattle ranch until nearlY seven, then moved with the family to \Vashington State because of his mother's ill health. }le graduated from the Davenport, \ Vashington, high schoo l in 1910, taught a rural schoo l th.e following winter, and entered \Villiamette l]nl•·for versity at Salem, Oregon, in 1912. There . two years," he says, he "majored in college ]t~e and minored in studies, never participated. 111 athletics, but mixed up in oratoricaJs, dramatics, journalism and politics," and among other canlpus honors won by him, he was a member of a local fraternity. He "also got entangled i~ a chicken-stealing escapade, many apple ra~ds, bully-bulletining of the campus, numeral painting and freshman kidnapping, including a chase by the university president." 4 His mother's death in the summer of 191. • ]1JS seems to have caused an entire change 1n plans and purposes, and he returned to his native Nebraska that fall and entered the state university, from which he was graduated tWO years later with a B. A. degree. At Nebraska

[ 32]


T HE

·k 111 'P

)'

n II'

,_ I, !1 II

"

'• e I,

S 'f A R

AN D

L AMP

he refu sed two bid s to we ll established fraternities and j oin ed the U ni on Clu b, whi ch a fterWard became N u Chapter of P i Kappa P hi , with Odgers as a so rt of elder broth er and pilot. Sin ce th e days at W illiamette he had been thinking of the " miss ionary proposition," w hich \Vas first presented to him by hi s Greek professo r, and he continued to consid er it along 1 With hi s confli cting des ires both to be a coll ege Professo r and to enter the mini stry. During Chri stm as week of hi s seni or year at Nebraska he and hi s cl osest fri ends gave furth er thought to the fi eld of foreign service, as a resul t of Which he sig ned the S tudent Vo lunteer's declaration. Soon a fter g raduati on the foll owing sum 'ller, he sa il ed from San F rancisco, bound for p . \angoon, nurma, there to take th e appomtment a.s headmaster of the Meth o li st Boys' H igh School ; from which he was promoted in 19 18 to be 1)rinci1.) al of the No rm al School and th e ]i' . lora Blackstone Boys' School at M uttra, and ~~so Superintend ent of th e \ i\Tm. E . Blackstone 1raining School and of the M ilton Stewa rt Hoardin g Schoo.l at the same place. Th e following yea r he was elected P rincipal of th e Calcutta Doys' School, at Calcutta, Indi a, which !~os iti o n he still holds and expects to reta in un lil hi s nex t furl oug h, which begin s in the spring of 1931. All of th e in stituti ons nam ed are foslerec] by th e Meth odi st Church, of whi ch Brother Odgers is a faith ful member. Th e Calcutta ;:oys' Schoo l was found ed in 1877 by Bishop 1.hoburn , one of th e g reatest mi ssionari es of all lin1es, was endowed by S ir R obert L a idl aw, has at present a pl ant worth over half a milli on dollars, a student enrollment of over two hundred. drawn chi eAi y from the sons of th e E uropean ~ 0 n11nunity resident in Calcutta, and has a teach~ng sta ff of fifteen. George w rites of hi s job 'n a humorous vein , th e following being qu oted from one of hi s recent letters to th e writer : "In addition to Briti sh and A meri can and Anglo-Indi an ( mixed bl ood ) boys, we have In dian Christi ans, H indu, Mohammedan, J ewish, f\rmeni an, Chinese and Burmese boys. f-Ie re in my littl e L eague of Nations and Races, T reign supreme. I am not onl y th e pedagogica l head, but I am also father, brother, f ri end, fath er-confesso r, doctor, lawyer, merchant, po-

of Pr

KAPPA

PHr

]iceman, con fidentia l adv iser, chi ef janito r, etc. I have to li sten to everyone's woes, have people weep on my shoulder, despa iring J ews hang on to my k nees, and others grasp the hem of my trousers. I am su pposed to be able to make th e sun stand still, and to turn brass into gold, as well as make sa in ts out of li ttle dev il s." In T hoburn Church, Calcutta, on April 25, 19 19, B rother Odgers was married to a sweethea rt of hi s Nebraska schooldays. T hey had become engaged whil e classmates at Nebras ka, and she proved herself true by journ eying half way roun d th e ea rth to become hi s compani on and helpe r in th e noble work in which he was engaged. T hey have one child , Cha rl otte F-fcnri etta, now four years old . \\ 'e lea rn from the prospectu s of the Calcutta School th at it is in sess ion a.l l the yea r round , except for three short inter vals, the longest of w hi ch, th e summ er r ecess, commenced this yea r on :M ay 8 and lennin ated on June 20. Thi s peri od is th e only rea l vacati on Brother O dge rs a nd hi s fa mily have during th e year, and they usually spend it at Da rj ee ling, a reso t·t pl ace fa r up the llim alayas from to rrid Ca lcutt a. Th e foll owing account of th e trip to the vaca tion site last :M ay is taken f rom one of hi s letters: "You will probabl y be interested in Da rj ec ling. It is a bout 19 hours from Calcutta. You entrain at Sealdah stati on, and ride all nig ht. At 5:00 the nex t morning you hurriedly j ump in to some clothes, make yourself look half-way sane, and roll -up your bedding, lock your small trunk, and count your 32 1 pieces of luggage ( the compa rtment is always jammed w ith such like). T he train pull s into Parbati pur, and you g rab several coolies, and hurry your things ac ross the pl atform to your rese r ved compa rtment in the meter-guage tra in. A fter seeing th at th ey are a ll there, you leave a cooli e in cha rge and scamper for th e refreshm ent room, find a seat or seats, and enj oy your tea and toast. A clang of railway iron, and everyone makes a rush for hi s or her compartment. Four hours across level rice and jute fi elds, dotted with clumps of feathery bamboo or mango groves, and the trains stops at S ili gurgi. O ut again , and more g rabbing of cooli es, and getting

[ 33 ]


'r n E

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into the toy, moun tain gauge tra in , a nd br a k- the next mo rnrng, it wa good to be here, just · was good to have been up t 11e re wr'th the as rt fa t of ha m a nd eggs. gods of th e I rome of the Thund erbolt." " Then tha t little eng ine, w hi ch is onl y a littl Hi s first furl oug i1 , a fter s ix years in the ta lle r than a ma n, begin s it six-hour pull up to a lm a t 7,000 fee t. By din t of much steaming O ri nt, coming on in 1924, B rothe r dgers ca~n~ 1 a nd puffi ng a nd throwing o f a nd u pon t he back home a nd took hi s if. . wo rk in E nglrs tra ·k, it snakes a! ng, a nd over, a nd un der, and a nd educat ion a t the LTniversity of \ ashington, a nd th ere pil oted th e local Chi psil on Chi into betw een, but eve r up th e mounta in s. mounta in I ' i K appa l'hi, to. become our A lpha-Zeta Chapwhi ch suddenl y spring up out of th e pl a in , moun te r. Thi s is but a sing le in tancc of hi s unflagla ills cove red with dense jungles except whe re . . rest rn . t 11c -r. • d urrng . a· 11 the they have been clea red t make way fo r th e g mg mte ,~ ra termty .. tea pl a nta ti ons. O ne moment you I ok down into yea rs . ince he was fo r a short time one of rts a deep va ll ey, th en you a r sw itched a round a acti vc membe rs at N braska. curve, a nd you to k ou t ae ro. s a n me ral d vel:\l y main obj ect in writing thi s some what p~r­ vet ex pa nse shot with win ling silver threads. so na 1 sketch of Geo rge O dgers is not to prarse nothe r turn , a nd you sec the ma jesti c pea k him , even though he is de e rv ing of all th~ o f Kin chenjunga. Four-th ir-ty a nd you raltl to worthwhil e things T coul d say; bu t ra ther to c~. 1 a halt und er th e co rrugated sheet iron roo f o f to th e a ttenti on of the thousand s o f other th e Da rj eeling sta ti on, a ft r hav ing had your Ka pps the wonderful life of sac rifice a nd devoli ve r shimm ying for ·ix hour . ti on thi s, our broth e r . is living ; and hi s con stant ·'Da rj ee ling. next door to th e top o f th e world . loyalty to Pi IZa ppa . Phi, in pite of conditions buil t on a crescent range, ae ro the valley from a nd experience tha t would cause ma ny of u 't r K in chenjunga ! Da rj eeling, a pa rk-li ke city, w it h to fo rget th ere eve r had b en a fraternr ) · bea uti f ul tone pa lace , charming rose-ern bow- Geo rge O dge rs i not liffe rent in hi s make-UP red ·ottages, love ly churches, c.l ubs, movi e . tea- from the re t of us. He is just a regular felloW . room s, rae -cours s, go lf link , school s a nd col - a broth er 's broth e r, a ma n's man . Surely when lege , g ra nd hotel , row of E uropean hop , we of th e alumni a re prone to feel tha t the fra more row s of na ti ve shops a nd a g reat bazaar! te rnity means nothing to u any more, Georg~ .\n cl uch fa cin a ting li ttle ha t-box shops in :-\ 11en O dger ' exam pi houJd et us a right an which a re endless va ri eti e of bra , copper and in pire us to a new a rdor and a renewed loyallY· ivory curi os whi h tempt ! Rug , furs, s ilks and embroid eri es ! Cool, refr eshing, deli ghtful Da rj eeling ! Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Chair~ ' ' \\ 'e le ft on t h ret urn trip on Jun e the fi f- rr an of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50t teenth, at 8: 15 A if., and four hours later we Place, Chicago, immediately that you are were stew ing. B ut when we reached horne ea rl y C"'-' ing .

To Celebrate Founding '!'h e founding o f the G reek letter fra te rnity system a t L'ni on o11ege 100 year ago wi11 be c leb rated with f itting ceremoni thi f all. '\'ea rl y e \·e ry national Greek lette r orga ni zat ion wi11 end repres nta tive to pa rticipate in the centenni a l fe ti v iti es. '!'h e l a ppa A lph a , S igma P hi a n I D elta Phi a 11 were formed a t U ni on Coll ege. Kappa

. \lpha, whic;:h cla im to be the old es t of all the .· was country's na ti ona l G reek letter fr a ternru es, . begun in 1825 , and igma Phi a nd D elta Phi we re in stituted two y a rs late r. In connection . . · · will wrth the celebratron th e e three fra ter111t1 e rect a memoria l gate at the entra nce to J ack· on ' Ga rden on the north s id e of th e Union campu s to commem ra te the founding of the fraternity system.

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ct9ate Is c5\ssistant cAttorney ..Qeneral

I(APl)S in genera l, and pa rticul a rly those le· of O micron Chap ter, w ill be p.l eased to . r· arn o f the appo mtment of Brothet· Robe rt •ray 'I' . ate to be ass istant a ttorn ey-genera l of 11 1 ~.n 1·; 1 '~ 1,lla . '!'he a ppoin tment was made in Jun e 1 •rather Tate assum ed hi s new duti es on

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outhern Coll ege. H is academi c course compl eted at th e last-named in tituti on, he ente red the ni ve rsity of Alabama, from whi ch he was g radu a ted with th e degree of Hachelor of Laws in 1920. I li s class mates say he was a brilli ant la w stud ent. and certa in it is that he was a ve ry popul a r stud ent and amassed quite a string of hono rs. It was at . \ Ia bam a that Grey became a member of Pi Kappa Phi , and he was one of t he main stays of O mi cron Chapter during th e trying clays of its in fa ncy. S ince g rad uation he has ma inta in ed a keen interest in fra ternity a ffa irs. and is a member of the Hi rmi11gham alumni chapter . A fter aclmis ion to th e ba r 11roth er ' r ate was appoin ted assistant soli citor of J effer on Coun ty. Alabam<L. by hi s father , J oseph R Tate, who was at t hat tim e soli citor, and who is one of the mo. t promin ent and success ful lawyers in B irming ham . Th e young ba rri ster acquired valuabl e expe rience and acgua in ta in ceshi p through the office of prosecutor , and became a pa rtn er with hi s fath er when th eir terms of offi ce expired at the .end of 1922. Th ey enj oyed a splendid practi ce and appeared in many important ca es. As ass istant soli citor young T ate had apparentl y attracted the attention of A tto rn ey-General Harwell G. D av i , and hi s appointment to fill the first vacancy in the latter's offi ce ca me as a natural consequ ence. Brother Tate was ma rri ed in 1922 to Mi s My rtl e E li zabeth 'I cLaug hlin , an alumnae of Agnes Scott Co ll ege, A tl anta . ..::,\1~

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Another Pledge from Jasper

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. • ht s office being at the sta te capi tol at oOmery '[' . . 1 '''hGray ate, as he was kn wn to ht s fe lows en '"a 8 a student at the C ni ve rsity of laba ma, lv] bo rn on November 5, 1899, in Birmingham , 1er 1 l•a e le a f te rwa rd atte nded the publi c schools, 1 li Trayne High School and Birming ham~I

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Leo H arben Pou, Jr., is the name o f th e youngster w ho a rrived at the home of Brother and M rs. Leo H. Pou in J asper, Alabama, on July 9, 1925. H e was p romp tl y pledged to O mi cron Chapte r by the I cal P i Kappa P hi Club.

Notify Elmer N. Turnquist, General Chairman of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50th Place, Chicago, immediately that you are coming. ]


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cpi Kapps CJorm eamp ehapter By

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H E following brothers will please step forward and look intelligent. However, before giving the reader the pleasure of a mental picture of this dashing group of officers, let us explain that we endeavored to get an actual photograph of this crew, but clue to the fact that l~ rog Reames and Fritz Carothers insisted on ''being in ,'' the picture was a total failure. Anyway, allow me to introduce, the fo llowing young oi'fice rs: G. R. l11aloc1<, Beta; R. R. Carothers, Omicron; C. T. Chipley, Zeta; W. L. Dickson, l ~ta; \\'. II. Dendy, Beta; Hami lton, AlphaEpsi lon; \\ 'm. Fisher, Alpha-Epsilon; J. E . .Furge rson, Beta; S. N. Hughes, Deta; F. P. wings, Zeta; :-1. F. Palmer, Tau; C. F. Reames, Zeta; Tl. H. Redwine, Tau; J. F. Rogers, Zeta; J. B. Stapleton. O micron ; C. I. Woodsides, Beta; C. II . Yarbrough, l~ta; ]. P. Young, Beta. Th ese brothers were unfortunate enough to have signed up fo1· ·'a vacation at the government's expense." Consequently, they found themselves, on Jun e 12, at Camp McCle ll an, Anniston, A la. For a time, eve rybody was occupied with getting acquainted. but finally we got the bunch together for a forma l meeting. On the night of June 29th, we held our first meeting, and, after electing officers, we decided to meet every Monday night. At this meeting the fo llowing officers were elected: Yarbrough, Archon; Carothers. Secretary; Young. Treasurer, and Stapleton, Chaplain. \Ve reso lved to make thi s group of Pi Kapps, so we ll rep resentativ e of our fraternity, into a temporary chapter, as nearly like a regular chapter as possible, and to render every possible aiel to our brothers in the city in lining up men for next yea r and in getting ourselves establi shed in Anniston. The following brothers from the city immediately fell in line and rendered invaluable assistance: A I Bains, A lpha-Eta, and R. C. Wi.lliam s. N. S. Morgan and H. H. Hooten, all of O micron. Vve began to make p lans for an 111-

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formal banquet which was held at the

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nusiness Club of Anniston. d Captain Charlie Yarbrough took charge, al~·. • "1)0,1 after carefu ll y selecting the most tempt1ng 'd 1 1 tion," ordered us to "fall in," and that we ~ • . gu1e· as one who knows a rmy "chow" can well 1111a . fell After Brother tapleton had offered a . g words of prayer, the "big guns'' of the evenlll for a began to "exp.lode" between courses, and ·n · rc 1 Po good while thereafter. The speeches we 'nr· the military order of camp life. Brother ~i·r;l brough , of Eta, as toastmaster, answe:ed He call , and put us in the right frame of mmd· dg<' also welcomed the Ann iston brothers and pic ,1. 11 Prater of Omicron. Brother F isher, of AIP ' ~ 5 11 Epsilon, answered assembly, and gave us. ~ excell ent thoughts along that lin e. as apphe r 1 fraternity li fe. He was fo.llowecl by BrotJC ]Of'' D<'ncly. of Heta, who answered the call to co 1. and cal led us to the Gold and \Vhite in a ver. d ·iur· sk illful and eloquent manner. Brother Re 11 d of Tau. when ca lied for guard mounting. stressle. jl( the importance of mounting guard over . , ·nl 1)· sec rets and the good name of our fratel ~~· Then drill ca ll , or "work," was answered. ;. llroth e r Chipley. of Zeta, who stressed the '~\. portai1ce of work from the standpoint of the dll, b \· clividual, the chapter, and t he national 0 ·11 Brother Stapleton. a nswering taps, urged us~­ to take a mental check of what we will be P 1 1 pared to report when the final taps is IIJ 0''' r· Brothers Morgan . Hooten, W illi ams, and Prater: 011 all of Om icron, gave us a few words of enC Y agement and advice w hich were ver y much_ preciatecl. Pledge Prater, of Omicron, sal f r 0 few words in a manner which 1 romises well 11 the future of Omicron. lJrother Reames. upf~J· being urged, elucidated in the manner of a er 11 ture president f or a few minutes, moving Brot '{ d to sa.er TT ughes to such an extent that he manage 11 a thing or two of very sound value. ~r~\ ed "Fritz" Carothers . was unleashed and f1n 151 , up the evening i1~ a glorious burst of ?rato~;~ A vote of appreciation and thanks was g1ven t

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c0111 nlittee responsible for the even ing's enj oyl11ent, and B rother Stapleton dismissed us with a Prayer. \Ve think that there was not a P i Kapp among

~s Who did not feel that hi s appreciation of hi s

•·

taternity was a whole lot stronger after having

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known the brothers w ho were thrown together in thi manner for six weeks, and who did not fee l a deep regret at having to g ive the parting g ri p to twenty-one brothers, who, a lthough from seve ra l d ifferent states, are still true brothers in the bonds of Pi Kappa Ph i.

and 'post· did. 1 tgine·

:J\(y c:Brother Star GJ-eurler

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l3 rother E r win Domeier, who is the proud e in j Possessor of the coveted "N" sweater, is anx-

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swamped Iowa State Agricultura l Coll ege to the tune of 14-2. li e led the attack both from the mound and at the plate. He a llowed two ru ns in the first inning but 'nary a man reached second t hereafter . Jn all he stru ck out seven batters and al lowed onl y 5 scatte red hits in nine innings. In the fourth, he stole some of "Babe Ruth's" stuff and scored three men ahead of him self with a wallop ove r centerfield wal l. li e started another rall y in the seven th a nd Neb raska scored seven men before A mes cou ld halt the ons laught. li e is a Junior in the College of Business J\d ministration and has two more years of coll ge ball unless he accepts some of the major league offe rs which he has rece ived during the past season. Nebraska placed second in va ll ey standings last year and is bidding for first honors this spring. Everything looks bright and she shou ld experi ence littl e difficulty in doing it for she has a team of veterans w ho wi ll "do or die" for the "Scarlet and Cream."

Miami Group Chartered The Supreme Council announces the chartering of t he M iami, F lorid a A lumni Chapter on June 4, 1925. petition for an a lumni chapter is now under consideration from Bo ton, Mass.

10

Usly a wa iting the call of spring and the conse{[Llent diamond activity. ' 1::<

.:!.rve" made his bow to Valley fans when he

Notify Elmer N . Turnquist, General Chairman of Convention Committee, at 556 E. 50th Place, Chicago, immediately that you are coming .

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Omega Pi Kapp Wins Title

Let Rent Money Buy the House

The lndiauapolis ta•r of Jul y 29, 1925, carried the following story of 0 . . Kinzer, Omega, who won the amp K nox boxing championship in the middleweight cia s of the R. 0. T. C. tournament:

By FuRMAN R. GREssr,:'I'1'E

" 0. A. Kinzer, a enior in the Purdue school of me hanical ngin eering, won the Camp Knox boxing champi on hip in the middleweight class by decisively d £eating A be Stros nid er, of Den-

ill • • ent · expansiOn, scholar h1p, and govern 111 d't 1 and we have solved them notably and with ere. d wltl1 to P i Kappa P hi, but w~ are now conf ronte r a problem that will in time mean much to 0~~ 1 Fraternity. Thi s problem is our building con. ; tion. Thi is the time fo r discu sion on this vita . f or convention . . . 1 a fell. questiOn; t1me IS on y months away, and it is then that such question' as thi ar solved. \\ .e have several young chapters t I1a t need chapter houses of their own, and could pay for one in ten or fifteen years with the rent the~ are now payir~g. I know of one chapter tha. could build a $40,000 house if it were to salt its rent mon ey for fifteen yea rs. Ts there not some way that the alumni can assist in estab· 11 li hing a building fund, whereby money can . e loaned to the chapters; or can we not raise enough to have a fund to take care of all of our building at the variou s colleges? With the r~nt from these house built by th e Fraternity belll~ 11 pa id into the treasury of th e Fraternity, it woL1 . not tak ve ry long for the chapters to own thetr own hou es. \ Vith ou r alumni back of the building funcl favorably agreed to by the F rate rnity, we ca 11' not help but go forward as we have been sint:c our ince1 tion. Let our chapters have as thC'r slogan in thi s matter, "Let th e rent money btl) the house." . I. . ,tl 0 t h er s o f you 11aye v1 ws on t 11s que twn, · let us have them, as this i our pro b.! em to . oh't'-

W

E have had our perplexing proble111 5

Brother Wilson Weds n1son L' niversity, in the final of the R. 0. T. C. tourn am nt. Kinzer was picked at the start of th e tournament by th ose in charge of organization athl etics a the lik ly winn er of hi s we ight eli vision .

Brother Ralph \ Vi lson, J appa and Tau, ,,·:t' . d to M.1 TY 11Ieen 1"yer • :tld marne us1e -''-at Thomasv ill e, N. C., June 6, 1925. Brother an Mrs. Vlfil son are making their home a t J all; napoli s, r. C., where Brother\\ il son is connectec with the Cannon Manufacturing Company.

"His prowess in the ring won for him a host of supporter other than tho e from P urdue. Kinzer was presented with a go ld medal by Brig. en. J. R. Lind ay, camp commander."

R. Gilbert Henry, Beta, '25, is now g raduatt assistant in physics at the U niversity of Ken· tucky, Lexington.

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News of the Birmingham Alumni- Notes on Omega and Psi AlumniOther Liue Alumni News

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Activities of Birmingham Alumni

vital fell' ;tions

By\ V. H.

only a m otor cop ca n f or ce on a nyon e. r..:I owever, he dese rves a grea t deal of credit f or anyon e wh o w ill travel 50 miles th rough th e coun try a nd then have to put up with th e sad story of a n unpleasant m:otor cop, to show hi s loyalty to th e fra te rnity, you can readily say t hat he is a tru e P i Kapp.

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N ·w edn esday ni ght, July 15, th e Bir mingha m alumni w ith th e hearty support of th e b1Pha-Eta men of Howa rd Coll ege, two loyal Broth ers fr om R ho Chap ter , one from A lp ha. eta, and two from O micron, gave a most enJoyabl e dance. ~

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l·'I'he broth ers enj oyed th e pri vate use o f the ·/:ger Longer Lodge fr om 6:00 to 12 :00 P. M. f hi s Lodge is a p rivate cl ub over the m oun ta in rom Birming ham and is loca ted on the crest ~f Shades Mounta in whi ch overl ooks th e vall ey or mil es, and a fford s scenery tha t ca n't even 1 le matched by the scenic v iews of the mountain s Of North Caro.lina. You can p icture a g roup of 25 Pi K apps repreSenting fi ve chapters, with their ladi es ga th ered together in a cozy lodge way up on the moun tain 10 P with the w ind w hi stling through the pin es as they da nced to the spl endid mu sic of a fi vePiece orchestra. Some say "give me th e g irl a nd the seashore on

~ moonlight night a nd leave th e rest to me,"

lttt ask D oc Prescot if t he m ountain s on a cool Sttmnl er evening wi th p lenty of cozy nooks a nd a good orchestra doesn't add t we nty years to the life o f a young p ill p eddl er . Getting back to th e m ore seri ous a ff airs of the evening, ever ything ran smoothly un til 10 :30 IVhen the crow d gathered round th e long ta bl es Provided f or a waterm elon cutting . 1t h:.1 d been 111 any a day sin ce a nyone had seen such a n ou t!ay of m elon s. Even "Cy" B ro wn, our noted 111 Surance agent, ha d to p ut corks in hi s ears to Prevent seeds interfering with hi s hearing . Soon th e mtt sic began a nd time p assed rapid ly until we were p leasan tly surpri sed to see one Of O micron 's m en rid e up to the club w ith a broad g rin on his face, one of t hose grin s th at

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Psi Chapter Notes ROTHER MAC CLARK is still w ith the Monmouth County Board of Agriculture as ass istant county agent. H is address is Cou rt House, F r eehold, N. J. Di ck Fa rnha m is doing big things in the la ndscape departm ent of the Fa rr N ursery Co. l li s address is 541 P enn Avenu e, West Reading , Pa. A de Blume recentl y announ ced the birth o f a son, A dri an F ra nkl yn, Jr., born on Ap ril 6. He h as purchased a fa rm of a bout eighty acres nea r !( rum s Corn e rs, whi ch is just off th e m ai n road bet ween I thaca and Truman sburg- address, R . D. 6, I th aca, N. Y. No rm M ill er, who r eceived hi s M. E. deg ree last year a nd sta rted wo rk w it h the \ 'Vesting house Company in P hil adelp hi a, has been t ransferred by that company to the ma in wo rk s at P ittsburgh. H is new address is 1318 Singe r Place, vVilkinsburg, Pa.

B

Larry Shedd is sti.ll w ith the newspape r in Troy, N . Y., but he w rites. that he is se ri ously contempl a ting acceptin g a p os ition in the f oreign se rvice department of the Standard Oi l Co. H e lives at 225 1 6th Avenu e, T roy. Casey Lauter made a fl ying tri p to Ithaca a couple o f weeks ago . H e arri ved on e m orn ing a nd lef t th a t evening. B ill O lsen is still instructor in E ngli sh a t th e Uni versity of North Ca rolin a, Chapel H ill , N . C. Th e f ell ows who went south during t he spring

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Brother 0. K. ~feulendyke i still in th e ca nning business in Roche ter, N. Y.

Ray :M angels has taken over. hi father's busJ· ness at Fullerton but expects to enter the Nebras· ka Medical College the second semester. Carl Peter on, N' ebraska' A ll -Ameri can cen· ter in 1922, i head football and ba eball coach at Augu tanna College, Rock J stand, Ill. J-Ie reports a host of materia l and is working out a winning combination. Bernie ] oods is coaching high school athleticS at Beaver Crossing. Le Craig i in Kansa City, ~fo., but hopes 'I to return the second semester and take a wh 1r at th e basketball quad. Jack Kendall is office manager and credit 111all with !len Simon and Sons, Lincoln, Nebr. "Kewpie," Pharm. '25 , pulled one over on 11 when he kept hi s wedding a . ecret for three weeks last spring. The truth was that he 111ar· ried Miss Nellibee Baker of Winnetoon, Nebr., April 18. he was a former University of e· braska tudent and is a P hi Mu. Carrol Thompson, Law '24, wa married June 26 to Mis Pauline Gilmore, ex-'26 of Pullert011 • ebr. She is a lso a member of Phi ~ ru SororitY·

11rother George R. 1 fan selm an, '23, is still in tructing in the machine design depa rtm ent of Sibley. H and 1\1 rs. Hanselman spent most of the summer in E lmira.

Omega Chapter

recess stopped off to see him, and they tell us that he' th e same old Bill. Sam II owell is still in st ru cting in public speak ing at the U niver ity of Iowa, A mes, Iowa. Sam \ ainwright left Cornell Medical Department in Februa ry to take up work in the Bellevue Hospital, New York City, where he is specializing in children's di seases. I-Je may be addressed there. Prof. Paul \ Yo rk is away for thi term on Sabbatic I ave. IT e repo rts that he and Mrs. Work and the children are delightfully situ ated in a fin e comfortable hou se among the apple trees on }erry's Seed Farm, about 24 mil es north of Detroit. TTi s add ress i. Box C, Rochester, ~I ichigan. fiat 1\Jills is now ettled in Riverhead, Long Island, where he is doing research work in connection with th e Unive rsity's extension department.

Nu Chapter '· Kewpic" Me iillan ha tak n over the active management of the McMi llan Drug store, Genoa, Nebra ka. Sutton Morri s is in Shreveport, La. lie will be remembered for hi s leads in many of the Uni versity plays among wh ich was the Kosmet Play, as well as for many other things he has accompli shed. Last year "Tut Tut" was written and produced by Brother Sig Coomb under the ausp ices of the Kosmet cl ub of J ebraska. ig, who has been active in both fraternity and school affairs, is now principal of a high school near Madison, Nebraska.

n. }. Tellkamp and R. E. Worstell, E. E., •z5. arc with th e a tiona! M azada Co. at Cleveland· M . F. chonefeJd, E . E., '25, is loca ted at ft. \ Vayne, Incl., with the Indiana Serv ice Corpora· tion. l-.. D. McCo rmick, C. E., '25, is with the Jn· diana Highway Commis ion at Anderson, Jnd· R. ]. Chance, g., '25, is located in Florida· l . E . Simmons, C. E., '25, is with the merican Bridge Co. at Muncie, Ind. J . A. Fulks, E. E., '25, i located in Chicago with the Western E lectri c Co. L. W. Yagle, Ch. E., '25, is with the J roctor & Gamble Co. at St. Louis. J. R. Darby, g., '25, is with wift & Co. at Chicago. L. R. Bridge, E. E., '25, is an in tructor at Cornell U niversity, care Pi Kappa Phi House, Ithaca, N. Y .

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Alpha-Delta Chapter

Ralph Pippin Married

Rumo r has it th at J oe X. S im son, ex-'24, and erstwhil e Van couverite, has recentl y celebrated th~ first annive rsa ry of hi s empl oyment in th e sh1Pping firm of S im son, Dalkwill & Co. A.t Mt. Vernon, \i\Tash. , there is a young chap:~r . of P i Ka pps. B rothers Patterson, '25, h1pps, '27, a nd Ba rn es, '24. I r. F reel :rvi cM ill an is the head o f th e De!l:trtlll ent of Chemistry, Coll ege of l' uget Sound , 1 acoma, \1\fash. Ori on McGary, '27 is teachin g school at T aylor, n. c. Jack Mayna rd , '27, is al so teaching school, but llcar hi s home a t Mo rse, Saskatchewan. Deral Phillips is soon going home to DavenPort, VVash ., where he will become th e prin cipa l of the Davenport high school. II . i\ 1. " Don" Hassell , ex-'25, is now wi th the .\ Iarin e in stall ation depa rtm ent of th e R adi o ~Orpo ration ot A meri ca, San J~ ran ·i sco. He and ~ f 1·s .. ITassell live across th e bay at Larkspur, - lann county. nroth er Cec il West, '23, formerl y th e politi ~al bo s of th e Chem hack has left Montrea l and 1 ~ on hi s way to th e metropoli s of the Great ~c rth west. "Cec" has been at l\fcG ill U ni ver~i ty for th e past yea r w here he claim s th at he 18 trying to in ve igle th em into giving him a 1 'h.D. "Cec" says that Vic S ivertz is also bound fo r these pa rts very shortl y. a fter a yea r in th e sa111e sort of endeavor.

O n June 22, 1925, at H enderson ville, T. C., 11rother R alph P ippin, Kappa, was ma rri ed to M iss E mmie Carolin a Sam s. Th ey a re at home at H end er on vill e.

Thompson-Gilmore f'lrother Ca rroll Th ompson, N u, was ma rri ed June 26, 1925, to M iss Paulin e E. Gilmore, a 111 ember of P hi M u at th e U nive r ity of ~e­ bra ka. R roth er and M rs. Thompson a re making their home at F ull erton, Teb., w here he is an attorn ey a t law.

Boren is Inspector Due to th e resignation of Ferlys W . Th omas as Chapter In spector for the Thirteenth Distri ct, the Supreme A rchon has appointed B rother P aul S. Doren to thi s office, which has been accepted.

Shepard-Slaughter Nuptials llroth er Ca rl yle Shepa rd. Kappa, was wed to M is. Leah Slaug hter, at Gold s! oro, N . C., Jun e 27, 1925. Th ey a re ma king their home at Chapel Hill, N. C., wh ere Brother Sheppa rd is pur uing hi s cour. e for an tf . A . degree at th e U ni versity of North Ca rolin a and a member of th e coaching sta ff at th e C ni ve rsity.

13roth er II enry Hi! man Perry, Ka ppa, who was recentl y· ma rri ed, is located at Bryn :M aw r, Pa., where he is part owner of th e F iber l roducts Company, importer s, manufacturers and dealers in rayon.

Ru sse ll J. J oig, I'si, '23, is now acting as in structor in in orga ni c chemi stry at St. Laurence U ni ver ity, Canton, ew Yo rk. George A rchi e Ma rtin , Al ph a, '2 1, will be mar ri ed on ctober 22 to M iss J o ephin e \i\Ta lk r. of Cha rl es ton, S. C. F ive P i Kap ps will pa rticipate in th e wedding, in cluding th e g room . F rank S. Hay, Beta, '25, was ma rri ed on October 6 to M iss J ane Chapman, of Cha rl eston, S. C. H arold R. IIul pieu, A lph a-Ga mma, was elected to Gamm a lpha Scientifi c F rate rnity at J ohn Hopkin s nive rsity last Jun e.

F rank P etit, lpha, '26, pl ayed th e leading pa rt in " Th e Dev il 's Di scipl e," wh en th e D rama tic Society of the Co ll ege of Cha r.l eston success full y produced Be rn ard Shaw's noted play last May.

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PULSE OF T! E FRATERNKTY Four Chapters Enter New Homes-Eta Expects Banner Year- Seventeen Pledged at Iota- Twenty -two Return to Alpha-AlphaAlpha-Theta Starts Well Beta Loses Seuen

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pl eti on in numbers, hav ing lost seven men e ith er by g radu ation or failure to return. But th re are till othe rs to uphold the bann r of Pi Kappa Phi. Tommy and rthur Grafton, from S ha ng hai, Ch in a, ha ve set the pace for s ·holar hip in th entire stud ent body. Tommy, a junior, had the hig h st ave rage in the coll ege last year, a nd A rt hur won the scholarship cup offered by Beta for the highest gene ral average in the Freshman Class. B rothe r Young is editor of the ann ual and ma j or of the R. 0. 'J'. . unit. He also took first hono r in the Junior Class last year. It may be seen from th is tliat Beta stand s very hig h schola tically, having taken three of the four first honor . Hughes ha been elected president of the Senior Class. Roberts who was the Freshman miler last yea r is showing up well tn cross country.

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Epsilon Starts with Fourteen B)l JA y

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PSll Q;\ begins a new school yea r with fourteen men to take up the work oi the fraternity. he lo t five men through g raduation: Brothers C. P. Johnston, C. if. Brown, K. L., ew i . \11.!. S. G lenn and . R. llunter . Brother \V. M. G racey, who fini heel with the class of '25, returned to take post-graduate work. r\ sicle from last year's seniors, only o ne man failed to show up this fall, Drother Jack Cpton, but he expects to be back next yea r. Rush season opened f o rmall y with th e Preshman Reception, afte r w hi ch ome fifteen or

, . £ ,. Jr JlJtj, twenty J~ ros 11 were g uests o 1 t '-appa d 1 There a re prospect of a good eason ahead, an_ the whole chapter is working to th e best of thetr ab ility to see that none but the best fresht11en come our way. thC llroth e r " 11uck" S haw has been elected to 1 position of Ed ito r of Quips a11d Cra11ks, the co_· lege year book for '26. llrother S haw was P1·e'a: . . sentor dent of the J umor Ia Ia ·t year, a n d ts representative on the student council. Brother Frank Kugler mad e hi s le tte r in baseball ~~~~ sp ring, a nd Brothe r John Kugler, after cap t attl' ing the Freshmen through a good baseball sea· son, is ready to work hard for a place on thC vars ity thi yea r. ~\1/"-

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Zeta Returns Twenty By C. I. CJTJPLEY ETA open the year with twenty ac ti'·e 1 men. 11rothers Blant n and R eames, C. I · did not return. \\'e are glad to have B rothe~ Dave }.Janly, who forsook the alligators an transferred to Zeta. Brother Holcombe has beett elected Arc hon for the first term. l•ootball now holds the potlight, a nd we are represented on th e varsity by B ro ther s Reames. \Vest, Swett and S mith . \ Ve opened with-~ ,·ictory of 8 1 to 0 over P iedmont College, satk . core be ing largely clue to the pectacular wor of Brot her R eames, assisted by Brothers \\'eS~ a nd S mith . An injured foot i keeping Brothel Swett out at pre ent. Ou r A rchon eems to be the ma n of the I10 \.1 rf being ed ito r-in -chi ef of the annual, president 0 . r)' the Honor Council, I. R. ., one of the lttera . soc ieti es, a nd so man y other things that we heS~~ 1 late to tart naming th em . Hroth er Lanclrtttll ' manage r of the G lee Club.

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Emory Glee club and orchestra, which sa ng befo re Pre ident Coolidge in \i\f ashi ngton last sp ring and is goi ng to Europe next summer. Eta had four letter men in athl et ics last year and all of them are back this fall to win new laurels for Pi Kappa Phi. Officers of the chapter for the present term arc: A rchon, Ed llruce; treasurer, Emory Smith; secretary. Geo rge D. Patter on, Jr.; A lumni secretary. I renry E. Trost; inter-fraternity representative, l\ I a ri on Ca mp.

Eta Expects Banner Year

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By Gr,onc1·: D. T'A'L"l'BnSON", Jn.

L/ 1'11 OUCH somewhat deplted in numbers Ch b~ gradt~ati on and for other. reasOt~S, ~ta . apter IS settlmg down to work w1th all mdl catlons . . Pomtmg to a banner year. \Ve a lready have ten , .. exce.1lent pledges, howeve r, and from the ~, tore of recommendations which we now have on lal I lC we expect to get a number of other neophytes. 'I'

)\ . hose g rad uating in Jun e were: Dr. A. A. 111 ght, fr 111 the School of 1\ Jeclici ne, with first 1 Bnors, and Robert F lourn oy, \Villi am D. I{ llghes, \Villi am T. ] elcher, J oe Graham, and aylllond Nixon from the College a nd School Of]' . 'llsme s Ad mini stration . i· •\nother old -tim er who has left us and w ho ~~ g~·eatl y mi ssed is B rother E uclin D. Reeves, . le Illimitab le "Eucie" who has gone to 'Nash~ . ' gton and Lee. B rother E r win Glausier has re . J;' glstered at the U niversity of A labama. B roth er 1 low ry has decided to drop out a year and .,~ke a milli on in F lorida real estate, and Brother h· ' loor" Walker writes that he must postpone 18 e.ntrance into the School of Med icine another tIVcJ ve month s. Brother George Cook is another One I W lO has succumbed to the F lorida fever. . Our pledges in the class of 1929, to date, are: Jack c 1 . k ate 1111gs, Atlanta; A lfred Cumbie, Roa11 o e, A la.; John Gewinn er, tlanta; James Jenk· " ' Jn s, Columbu s, Ga.; J ack Johnson, Calhoun, ''a. Gorcl on Kettles, Dalton. Ga . ; Joe P uett, ~a· • ~:- tlllan, Ga. ; Charles Robertson, Valdosta, Ga.; !!, p I'· ), Smith , Jr., Eastman , Ga.; Laurence Tom111 on, Lake \tV a les, F la.; John \tViJson, Caving!on 1' ' · enn ; Sp ringe r \tVood, Cedartown, Ga. r Eta i back in a house on the old fraternity ow tl11.s fa II, afte r a year's absence in another I> tart of the campus. A new room has been added '~h~he house and other alteration are being made 1 , ,ch will improve the place cons id erably. 1 I( he chapte r may be smaller this year, but P i tappa Phi is holding its own in all branches of °liege activities. A mong our campus "notai.Jies" 11 i lay be menti oned Brother Joe Graham, ed itor1)11-ch·Je f of the Ph oe n£,~-, li te ra ry monthl y; (Other Emo ry Smith , president of the student aOdy in the School of Business Ad mini str ation, lld Drother Ed Bruce, manager of the famous

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Seventeen Pledged at Iota B)'

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SI-n JG and pledging is over at Tech! The gran I finale came Sunday, September 20, at 12 o'c lock. Iota came out with f lying co lors and seventeen pledges. Let us present: AI Caesar, Jersey City, N. J.; Wi lli am G. chalJ, Dodge City, Kan as; Tom Gram! in , St. Petersburg, F la.; Wi llia m Hackett, Atlanta, Ga.; Donovan George, Lexington, S . C. ; ]. Harlan Lloyd, M iami , F la.; E. F. Powell, LaGrange, Ga.; M. A. Eze ll , Cha rl e ton, S. C.; A . ]. Stone, Jr.; Doerum, Ga . ; Ed Curdts, Greenvil le, S. C.; ]. L. Hammond, J r., Savannah, Ga.; Frank Fiegal, Atlanta, Ga. ; \Vi lbur Powell , Chattanooga, Tenn.; D. . Martin , Atlanta, Ga.; Robert Moreland; Lamar Bras we ll , Atlanta , Ga.; and Francis Plumb, Atlanta, Ga. New rulings at Tech make it im possibl e to take in any F reshm en un ti l after Christmas when they will have passed one term's work. However, among our Jist of pledges there are: Eel Curd ts, who comes to Tech from Clem on as a junior; Frank Fiegal and \Vilbur Powell , who we re pledged last year; and Francis P lumb and Lama r Hrasswell , who are a ll eligible to be taken in now and before the next issue Iota wi ll have welcomed five new wo rthy brothers into the fold . At the beginning of the schoo l, Tota was hit hard by eight of ou r last year men not returning in add ition to the ones that are absent now clue to their grad uation last June. Iota's 1 henomenal success w ith "prosp cts" was clue to a systematic program and especially

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with the help of the alumni. The sooner all chapte rs rea li ze the necessity of hav ing a well organi zed a lumni associati on th e better off they will be. Then to, the alumni associations of other citie were in strumenta l in our getting excellent men by r comm end ing them be fore schoo l had actuall y sta rted . At th e last meeting of th past term Iota elected th e foll ow ing office rs: C. V incent H eck, Archon ; \ Villi am Lownd es, Trea urer and H ouse · fanage r ; Willi a m L . Go rd y, Secreta ry; W illi am P. Dunn . Chapl ai n, and J ohn Foley lVIercer was elected to have cha rge o f th e th at'lkl ess bu t im porta nt " position" of " running the mess." Jota hapter inv ites all visiting P i K apps to he wi th us at ou r Chapter H ouse at 17 East F if th street, "Right-across-f rom-the-B il tmore," whe11 t hey come to A tl anta.

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Dobby W ilk ins, W eston Bruner and J oe Bob· bitt spent the vacation in ca mps-\ Vilkins as~ . 'Camp 11.on d amm . 111 western ort coun ct.1or 111 CatnP Ca rolin a, Druner a gym in structor at Sapphire, and Bobbi tt a qua rtermaster at r:~)· cout ca mp in \\' inston-Salem and Rot ) :\foun t, r. C. ttl \Vm. H a new inckel Jr . cla im s he went ' ' ~ Canada for a vacati on, whil e \ !\forth E by venlll 1·, · an th at he bought lumber in 1 orth ern Geo rgta South Ca roli na for hi fath er. J eff Fordh~~::; 11 1 pres id ent of th e Carolina tud en t body, along . :\furdoch, '·Rooney'' noone, all repot·t colt!' lltll pa rati vely qui et vacati ons. thC " Pop" Sheph erd , beloved gua rdian of ,, t . J e ull fl ock, trod the path o f matrimony 111 un ' d return ed tO take Up hi s :\ r. r\ . degree work a.J~. resume hi s position a f reshman track and lJ,I ketball coac h. . . t r of Btllt e Co per has been added to the ros e . d h<l' ka ppa cha pter from T. C. tate chapter an ., been welcomed to Carolina through its membe\ Pl edge Charli e H unter also return ed to schoo · F re hman pledge date is still a matter of con; troversy between th e I an-H ell eni c council an' fl' th e fa culty, but activities in th e rushing line a 1 1 not bothered by that. Th e la rgest frcs~ 111 a , class in th e hi sto ry o f th e C'ni ve rsity furnish~·~ a wea lth of good mate ri al f rom which to sel~~­ repre entative P i Ka pps and no efforts arc_ , ing spared to round-up the e men. Jndi catr oll· a re for a ~ u cces ful year at K appa! r

Fifteen Back at Kappa By ]01, R.

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fiftee n Kappa men who reported back to th e Uni ve rsity of No rth Ca rolin a thi s fa ll. a fter recounting a va ri ed and sundry Ji st of summ er activities and exchanging " hell o's," fell right into wo rk on the Jli Kapp house on Hende rson street and et the old house li tera lly on fire with their cleaning acti vity. Paint was purcha ·eel whi ch no w adorn s th e outsid e a nd interi or woodwork, !he summer's suppl y o f g rass and weeds we re removed from the law n, and a regul ar "spring clea ning" in dul ged in . O f the fifteen P i Kapps who regi tered with " T ommy .T." seve ra l br ught back interesting ta les ("b ull " or otherw ise) concerning t heir vacations. H erbert Dra nd house manage r , made t wo t rips to E u rope as pur er ' clerk on th e JlJ ill llrkhdn. ''S nub" Poll a r I, Go rd on L a tham and Dan Moo re tou red Ameri ca, v isiting th e central west and ta king a look at Yell ow tone Pa rk and "Frontier Days" in Cheyenne, \\ yo. J ohn F razie r Glenn , Jr., accepted a pos ition in his fat her' ta lc min es in north ern Geo rg ia where he reports mee ting severa 1 Pi K apps fr om oth er Southern chapters.

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best yea r that the chapter has een 111 '_ 1 long tim e. R ad ia nt and enthu sia tic from an el t · 1 ure3 joyabl e vacation , the old men a r back wrt 1 "' d pl ans. Th e epa rati on of th e summ er has caus~ 1 1 a g reate r app reciation of P i Kappa P hi , both_ ~ · ut ~ meeting men from other chapter and 111 155 tho e from Mu . ·1 · I1 f I"f teen olete \\ .e sta rt o f f t 11e yea r ' wo r k w1t men back. Broth rs Ba rl and and Bishop 111 ac 1 anc ice cream for ri va l compa111 e in Durh a111 'd, nrother n un ) repor t a very coo l summ r.

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stayed in Farmv ill e, hi s home, working for the ;!?re. Broth ers I right, S. W. I ickens and M . I. Blckens were in Durh am m ost of th e summ er. brother J ohn son played professional ba ll fo r '\a ] . \: e1gh and later for Chattanooga. Brothers he t and C. H. Pegram were is summ er school. rather A ll en Pegram made ·w inston hi s headqt~arters w hil e 1 rather Cald well did th e same ll'lth Cha rl otte. B rother Ma recock return s th1.s Year from NeWJ)Ort News a fter staying out a }'e . f' ar. ] rothers S hipl ey and Co lt also spent p rollab]e vacation . \ ~vfu has three men out for va rsity football. Bnd it mig ht he of interest to note here that rather Caldwell made the first touchdown for ~team representin g Duke U niver ity. B rother •1. I. P ickens is pl aying r egul a r at cente r on the l·a . . rs1ty and 1 rath er Parker is rapidly rounding Into a fast backfield man. B rother Bun dy is Cttt['1 11g capers as a cheer leader thi s yea r.

N u Purchases House B'V

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N u chapter assem bled at ixth, with the llhcipati on of a home of th eir own and fo r th e Rteatest ru sh week in our hi story. Jl ~llr new house has been a source of constant ;Ide to us and we a re eagerl y awa iting some ~e of our successful house parti es. . he new officers who are guiding N u' destmy ;;e: Ray L ew is, a rchon ; Eldon K i ffin , ec reta ry; A.ed F rogge, cashi er ; R ay H all , hi stori an ; Chi ck ~ daz~1 s, interfraternity council representati ve; Domeier, warden, and Harold Zinni cker , c apJain. . 'I'he chapter has an acti ve roll of 32 men a nd ~~ght pledges. The p.l edges a re: H enry Dei ong Omaha. He is a g radu ate of O maha Centra l and · · · Iaw. A. Iton c·) rencor I .f to f P· i s maJ0nng m i azrfi eld , w ho is maj oring in chemi cal eng in eer.ng; Sawyer 'A bbott of Genoa is a drumm er and IS a Promi sing candid ate for th e band . ll e is an en . . gllleer. Byrum J ohn son a lso of Genoa zs a 10 ~ 1llbone and violin arti t, who also expects to · ake the band . Carleton I-:Tutchin s of F ranklin 18 a candidate on the F rosh .football and baseball

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sq uades be ides tooting a saxaphone. Bill Campbell who hail s from Oakl ey, Kas ., is ta king business a dmini stration. He a lso toots a "C melody" a nd feeds us about Kansas. Kenn eth Mangels, of F ull rton, i ma joring in journ a li sm. Tle is Ray's younge r brother. Holton A damson of O maha. i a promi sing candid ate on the F rosh footba ll quad. He is the younger brother of B ill Adamson of A lpha-Zeta, who is also at Neb ras ka thi yea r. O f tho e w ho were not here last yea r, we have Reuben Maas ke who is a trong candi date at t h end po iti on, so watch out you Illini . F urthermore he has v isions of hi s " l " in baseball and basketball. D uke We llington who was a t Harva rd law college last yea r is fini hing up hi s lega l work at Neb raska thi s semester. H erm an vVeig le who has been coaching for th e past three years is back. N u chapte r placed first national Greek socia l fraterni ty in schola rship last year and was fi f th on th e campu . Thi s award is made on th e bas is of small est per cent of defi ciencie for the two semesters preced ing the awa rd, in th e spring. O n th e football squad we have besi des Maaske, Monte Kiffin , who is rated as a sure lette rm an . and Bosco Zu ver who was regu la r F ro h cente r and experi enced li ttle diffi clu ty in winning hi s num eral. E rve Domeier, who made hi s debu t in ~fi sso u ri vall ey by defeating Ames 14-2, is back and zs keeping hi s a rm in shape for next sp ring. ,\ll.-

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Omicron in New Home By NmLsEN B. O'REAR the schola tic year, 1925-26, m erge in to a reali ty, O mi cron chapter faces the world with hopes, prospects and ambi tions perh ap un surpassed in the hi story of the chapter. Many new faces a re welcomed to the brotherhood and too, some of th e old "stand -bys" have depa rted to we ig h th emselves in th e scales of thi s intri ca te a nd mysteri ous thing call ed life. Th e electi on of the foll owing office rs took pl ace Jast spring: J ames B. S tapleton, A rchon ; Norman S. Morgan, Secretary; Clarence \Vil li ams, Treasurer ; A . P. M ize, Jr., H istorian;

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Rho Forging Ahead

L. 1arbury, Chaplain and VI/. B. Young, Warden. By \ iVJLTON M. GAnRJSO r !though th e ru shin g season is not closed the d following pledges are announced : Hoyt Prater, JTH the opening of th e one-hundred and Anni ston; Sylvanu s Hami lton, J asper; John eventy-six th session of vVashington at;h Green, Gilberton; George Bennett, Mobile; Calla- Lee University, Rho Chapter began it sevet\d han Leeth, Cullman; Guy Poun cey, E nterpri se; year of successful fraternal ism. N ineteen E dward Carothers, Oak Hill, and Nathani el men return ed, Brothers McLeod, \-'l est, Come~;~ Chestnut, Oak H ill . Dowling, Ament, Bishop, Branham, Hill, Sta . The most prominent achi evement of Omi cron ings, Farrar, Bullard, Garrison, Powers,. sun~ at thi s time is the construction and occupation of merson, Lane, Henline, JdcvVilliam , Towtll ~ 11• 1 a new chapter house. Suffice to say that this \\, ilson answering to their names at the ft~'e house rests on the apex of a long, bitter struggl e, chapter meeting. Rho lost by graduation in t \ in which every loyal 1 i .Kapp at Omi cron for class of '25 Brothers Rex a,nd RosborougI1. 'a!1°. th e past eight years has joined, working faith- Brothers Leake, Mimms, Vandiver and powe~; full y towards one def inite encl . Now that it is fail ed to return. By th e transfer route we hal £rone1 compl eted. we have ampl e reason to be proud added to our chapter, Brothers E uc R . eeves of it. Eta . H. N. Joyce from Kappa, and Frank l\'Ioor 1 Omi cron has assumed leadership on th e U ni - from Chattanooga, who returned to hi s ;J/III' versity of A labama campus in relation to th e Mater again. 11 proposition of hou se mothers, or matrons. M rs. Rho considers that it has ten of th e best 111 ~d Sca rborough, of Tuscaloosa, has consented to on the campus in the followin g pledges: Dona, ser ve in this capacity and will occupy a suite of S. Hostetter, Va rnville, S. C.; vV. N. HollowJa)• Jr. , Durham, N . C.; J ohn A. Simmons, r.. rooms in th e hou se permanentl y. Brother Hulitt ·w hitaker, one of the main - Miama, F.lorida; Paul E. Myers, Birminghat1'1: stays o f the Crimson Tide of Jast yea r, graduated Ala.; N. Dawson Hall, Jr., Chattanooga, _1'enB: in the sp ring. Brothers Dreher and Perkins James M. Buford, Jackson, Miss.; Juhan have entered the real estate business in Bir- Black, Chattanooga, T enn.; J. Fred Crowder. mingh am. Broth er Roy Skipper is at present in Lake City, Fla.; William G. Sa rgent, Galvest~l1· Ozark, but hopes to return at mid-term. Brother T exa ; Fred C. Nowekk, Birmingham, 1\ 11ll· · have already been sta rted for t he ne. Shell ey S. Sansbury, one of the most active Pi i\feetmgs . s t> Kapps that O micron has ever known, is com- men and instruction and work in pledge clutte. a! ready in full swing. mandant of a mili tary academy in Georgia. 011 In athletics thi s year we are rep resented Brothers l-Toward Trawick and J rvin Glau01 sier, f E ta chapter, E mory, have transferred th e varsity football squad by Brother T owill ; ~ their memberships to Omicron. Brother Julian th e freshman football team by l ledge Hostetter' r'JsOII l inkston, Omi cron and Eta, who has been in the on the cross-country squad by Brothers _\i\ 1 r employ of the Central of Geo rgia railway for a and Powers; on the wrestling mat by Brothed . . 't an r yea r, has return ed to compl ete hi s work for a ~Summ erson, two- 1etter man Ill t 111 s spot track; on the basketball team thi s coming wint~­ degree at mid -tern1 . Brother "Red" Joyce, who last yea r rece ived by Brother Lane, main tay of th e Generals' brt' the appointment to junior manager of the foot- keteering tea m for two years. te" Brother Rudy Lane was recently electe d e 'le ball team, ha s this week been named as Major of the third battalion in R. 0. T. C. corps. cutive committeeman from the senior class, wht f Brother Bob Young also has been promoted to Brothers Towill and Garrison hold offices ~e the rank of first lieutenant. Bob made hi s let- vice-president and hi storian, respectively, of t ~e ter on the varsity basketball team last season and sophomore class. Brothers Reeves and JoY , . t Jail is ready to take hi s place in lin e again . Brothers were recent 1y p Iedgee1 to the most prommen all· Bill Young, Bob Pa rks and Red Hamilton rep- fraternity on the campus, as was Broth er St ings. resent Omicron in the Million Dollar Band. [ 46]

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In the publication line we are well r epresented, ing a dining- room. A year ago both of these having on the staff of the semi-weekly paper, were considered imposs ibl e, but through the efthe Ring-tum P hi, B roth er S tallings as assistant fo r t. of the P i Kappa P hi Clu b of lew Yo rk, and editor-in -chi ef, B rother Garri son as assistant and the enthu siasti c cooperation of al l the active and ;~lan aging editor, Br other P owers as r eporter a nd members, both were accompli shed. ventii •rother Tow ill on the busin ess sta ff . Four of O ur new house is an impo ing structure on a OtJr pledges ar e .li sted among th e try-outs fo r the hill overl ooking beautiful Lake Cayuga. I t is 1 old editorial staff . admirably adapted for a f raterni ty house, having . Offi cers are Rudy Lane, A rchon ; J esse S tall - la rge, well-lighted study-rooms, a spacious li ving uni· Ings, Secretary; Digby \t\fest, Treasurer, and room affording ampl e space for our dances, and and l\'ilton Garri son, Alumni Secreta ry. B rother above all , wha t a co-ed would call a darling li ttl e first George Summerson is house manager and is fire-place, so nece sa ry to the uccess of our bul L I thf Providing us with a high-grade of food and an sessions on th e cold win ter nig ht fo r whi ch and llP-to-date kept house. Ithaca is famous. vVe also have extensive veri g round s a round the house. ~~l:.. ~'j~ ~~ ~ hare We are a ll proud of our new home, and deeply ~-~ frofll g rateful to all our alumni who have m ade its oore Chi Pledges Fourteen purchase possible. The lead ing spirits in the 1/11111 campaign were: B rothers Lauter, D eAndrea, By C HAR LES JOIINSON 1'ET SON has g rown a lot thi s year and there and ] allou, a bly supported by the other memhas been much material. Chi chapter bers of th e P i Kappa P hi Club of New York. ~!edged fourteen men, as follows : Carl J acobs, B rother K. C. Lauter, our chapter in spector, t-ed Tyler, Paul Simmons, Stanl ey Wagg, "Bert" was the director of the campaign to raise funds. ~tl sti s, Bob Daniels, "Stan" Owens, Donald Notwithstanding Casey's well -known modesty, ~erbyshire, "Pete" V ials, Howard W il son, we are going to take thi s oppo r tunity to record Blondi e" S mi th, "Grapejuice" \ i\Telch, John in Ti n: STAR ; \ ND LAMP our g reat appreciation of hi s loyal and persistent work, not only in ll'eatherford and Harris Sims. making th e purchase of our house possible, but , Neophyte H a rri s Sims is publi city man for in making Psi Chapter one of the best a ll -roun d Stetson and .editor of th e C ollegia.te. George fraternities at Cornell. Clark, Jr., and Chas. J ohn son a re also managers Th e ru shing season has been on now fo r a 011 th e school pape r. week, and never befo re has there been such enP. Neophytes E usti s and Derbyshire, and thu siastic cooperation of the brothers. Every•roth ers F reeman and Be rn a rd are practically one returned a week before school opened in sure of pl aces on th e football team. B roth ers order to start ru shing w ith a bang. W ith sixty\ViJliams and Smith ar e hawing up fin e in fi ve fraterniti es all out after men we have to Practice. B roth er Layton, capta in of thi s year 's use in tensive methods to get the kind of men football team, decid ed to stay in M iami . we want. At thi s writing we have seven men ,\I V pledged, and school is just opening. T hi s is un ~~~ precedented, for neve r befor e have we been abl e s· to sta rt ru shing so ea rly. T he fo ll ow ing men Psi Acquires Home have been pledged: Tom L inster, '28; Ge raci By E DWARD J. ELLJO'l'T Pesez, '28; Carl Dra ndt, '29; Guy Youngman, THE year 1925 will und oubtedly go down in '29; Kenneth Perkin s, '29; J ohn O'Kain, '29; th e hi story of Psi Chapter as on e in which T:: ill hl son, '29. lh e most seemingly impossibl e things were atO n Saturday, Octobe r 10, the lay of the W il telllped, and successfull y achi eved. It will prob- li ams-Cornell football game, we gave a fo rmal II' ably rema in the g reatest year in ou r hi story, for, dance celebrating the opening of our new home. IJalllong other things, we have reali zed our two La t yea r we were fo r tunate in hav ing sevfondest hopes-owning our hou se and maintain- eral brothers from other chapters affili ate with

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us, a nd we a re glad to say that we have been equally fortunate this year. B ill Taylor from ::\~ u has won our hearts w ith hi s south ern ways . Lawrence B ridge from O mega is taking gradua te work here, ;111d h as a lready proved himself a goad-fell ow. As for Geo rge Dill fro m P hi he is now too mu ch one of us to deserve comment. ~~~

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'24 to M iss Caroline Serene Row land, and ' . fade· Brother Roy Magrude r, Ag., '22, to M tss fl. k c·tt. lin e Conner. Pesides these Brother C. E · Ba f . Ilt.S p111 . for sa d e has returned to school, leav tng 11 k eep ing with a membe r of the fairer sex:, ~ 1 B rothe r D. D. Crowell has yielded to temptatt~; a nd has failed to return to sch ool. He is wttl a surveying party in Florida.

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Alpha-Alpha Returns Twenty ,tW0

Hl~NDRI KSON

September 16 m a rked th e opening of P urdue for another yea r with a n enrollment surpassing th e record of last year. At present there are over 1,200 Freshmen on the campus. Need less to say P i Kappa P hi is keeping pace w ith the rapid expans ion of P urdu e. \1\f hil e we a re sti ll comparatively young on the campus we have again moved ' into larger quarters, located at 40 North Sali sbury Street, just west of the Beta Theta P i's and the Kappa A lph a Theta's on Littleton street and just across the street from Zeta Tau A lpha's. · The hou se is not only larger than the old chapter hou se but it is also splendidly furnished, hav ing been compl etely renovated during the past summ er unde r the able . A. K inze r. super vision of House Manager N ineteen old men returned to school this year a nd we already have some good prospective P i Kapps. They a re: H. K. ::\II. eye r, Crown ·Point, Incl., '29; D. J. K immel, '29, Lebanon, Ind.; 0. R. Neal, '29, Lebanon, Incl.; H. 0 . And erson, '29, Clayton, Ind.; F. Ca rl , '28, ] ndi a nar oJis; R. E. Zook, '28, Logansport, lnd. ; 0. R. Nelson, '28, Hammond, Ind .; P. W. Si lvey, '28, Tnclianapolis; D. E. Fultz, '29, Royal Center, Tnd .; M. McCammon, '29, Lets, lnd.; W. T. Ffiggans, '29, LaPorte, ] nd ., a nd E. \V. Brand , Dayton, Incl. Oh, yes, we h ave a nothe r neophyte who i goi ng to develop into a su re P i Kapp go-getter. O mega, a n E ngli sh bull pup, presented to us by B rothe r F. S. Kimmel's father. The past summ er has proved ve ry g ratef ul to ] i Kapps of O mega as a nn ouncements have been received of the marriages of Broth er George J. Haase, C. E., '22, to Miss Adelaide Loui se Kopitke; Brother Frederick E. Harrel l, E. E.,

By w. M. SMITH, JR . ~ . . 'tY found H 1-'. O])enmg of M.ercer ·u mverst . re· A lph a- lpha w ith twenty-two brothet s turned. We have seven n ew pledges. 1 Pledges a re H. A . N ightingale of O rlancaf F la.; Char les JT. Dav is a nd ·w alter Evericlge. vt11 e. Columbu s, Ga.; Robert Martin of Jefferson b)' Ga. ; W illiam A ll en of Braden town, F la.; Dar f 0 Cannon of Lavonia, Ga., a nd Clinton \ i\fil sOJl Pinehurst, Ga. hal'' A I]). h a-Alpha has a new house this yea r, ac· ing to move from last year's qu a rters on . of the school Board o f 'I' rtJstee,5 count of a ruhng p.lacing a three block limit from the camPti·· . JS . mce . ly fur· \·1~ r e I1ave a very m.ce home a n c1 Jt et1 ni shecl. At present there ar e abo ut twelve 111 . 1 11 in the house and mor e are expected to 1110 ve later. 'dirotl Our chapt r is well represented on the grt . . I . Butts. w tth four men on t he varstty. Brat 1et 1 who came up from last year 's Freshman teat1 1• showed up well in hi s first var sity game Ia~. week. l Te is holding clown a berth at halfba\: Brother Herndon also played hi s first varst : . d t' et· game last week, but he looked hke a n ol - 1111 • , f. Brothe r 1 eas ley showed up g reat as te lei mar·]! sha l in the fir t game. Brother F leming is stt playing hi s regul a r steady game at center. 0 11 Of ou r Freshm a n pledges w have three t I1e F~ reshman team. fT\L hey are: "D' nt Jl " AJietJ, Jge "Buzz" "t<'vericlge and "Red" N ightingale. p]eC ""' ·' f the Everidge was a lso elected v ice-pres id ent o Freshman class. h, a. I Brother Ralph T abor of T occoa, Ga., w 10 , t1 3· been piani t on the Glee Club a nd knoW ·e "Ki ng of the Ivories" sin ce hi s first year het ' was elected president of th e club this year.

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As result of our las t electi on the fo llowing 'llen hold offi ces fo r lpha-Alpha: A rchon, E. ~ewis Cann el, T empl e, Ga.; T reasurer, Glen B. . asty, Mari etta, Ga. ; Sec reta ry, Paul S. E th er~dge, Jr., A tl anta, Ga.; Hi storian, W illi am K. Otdan, Macon, Ga.; Chaplain , Clayton H. Buc1 ~:n~n , Dalton, G~.; \Varden, June J . Elli s,~ aeon, I) ·' Correspondmg Sec reta ry, \ i\T. M. Sm1 th, Jr ., oerum , Ga. Septemb er 25 th Me rce r met th e Uni ve rsity of Georg·1a 111 . f oo t1)all a a ded1•ca t10n . to Merce r's 0 ew $ 100,000 stadium . \ Ve had as our vi ito rs t1lat wee 1c-end a num be r of broth ers from 1 .-an1bda chapter. We a re always glad to welccn,e VISJtmg · ·· b rot11ers mto · our I1ome an d exten d 1 eve ry broth er in P i Kappa P hi a since re invi1ar10 11 to make our home th e:i r hea dqua.rters \Vhile th ey a re in Macon.

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LPHA-EPS ILON is back in f ull fo rce this yea r. \ i\Te had onl y a few g radu ates to 1 t~~ve us a nd th number of men who came back tll~ s year is surpri sing. \ Ve also have with u 11S yea r three brothers from other Southern COil , eges who have show n th e good judg ment to ~0 11 le to F lorida. Th ey a re B rothers Cook a nd ' teed from E ta Chapter and B rother Holbrook f I'Q " Ill I au Chapt r. . l<'lorid a has the la rge t enrollm ent of f reshmen 111 the history of the in sti tution and from these 1 ~'e 1 , , lave a number of excell ent new men pl edged. 1 hey a rc : Pi erce Daniels, Oca la ; T om Owens, Rllin cy; S id H erl ong, Leesburg; S. A. Leonard, ~ ~~llltstown ; J oe P ea rce, T ampa; Bob Scholz, ~I 1 allla; M artin ~ainey, Jacl~sonv ill e; Paul .aunclers, J ackson vill e; R oy Cnppen, J ackson~· ~.ll e; Bill Dodge, J acksonvill e: JT. n. Stone, De~,tnd , and Tl ill Swoope, Tcw S myrn a.

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L 'l'H OUGFI th e end of only our first term on the campus as a chapter of P i Kappa Phi is past we have already begun to feel th e a dd ed importance and responsibiliti es. T he in ter val between las t May 9 and th e clo e of that term saw several inn ovati ons and changes of whi ch we are extremely proud . Th e scholastic marks and ave rages have not as yet been all compiled so we have been un able to asce rta in our ranking among the fraterniti es bu t we fee l assured of a promin ent pos iti on. Last term saw the g raduation and depa rture of eight of our men as foll ows: Geo rge Q uigley, a rchon ; Manl ey B rooks, \i\filliam Baker, Louis Do rdeaux, R ussel Clew ly, Ru ssel Gaul t, Cla rk S inclair, and J ame Stevens. It is to the guidance and wise counsel of th ese men th at we owe mu ch of our present posit ion. Ju st prior to the close of the sp ring term election of offi ce rs was held with th e foll ow ing results: A rchon, O rson Bird; Treasurer, F ranklin Creage r ; Secreta ry, H a rry Smith ; H istori an, Th oma J ermin ; Chapl ain , F rancis Beeman ; \\'a rd en, \iValdo P roctor. Th e evening of Jun e 19 ma rked th e extremely successful fin a le fo r a n extremely success ful yea r. Deginning with the lea t important thing f irst, it marked th e close of th e coll ege year ; and second , it was the evening of our first pa rty as the Alpha-Th eta Chapter of P i Kap pa P hi . A b~ n q u et fo ll owed by dancing was held at the Meadowla rk Inn nea r J ackson. T he J ackson De 1[ olay O rchestra f urni shed the music. '.l'a lking a bout pin pl antings, we ha d two during th e last week of spring te rm w hen we had the opportuni ty of ex tending our cong ratul ati ons to ::H anl ey B roo ks and "Bud" W helan. Sin ce then it has developed that Clark Sin cla ir gave us th e sli p and is now happily ma rri ed and liv ing in Det ro it.

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DIRECTORY PI KAPPA I HI FRATERNITY Founded at the College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C., December 10, 1904. Incorporated under the laws of the State of South Carolina, December 23, 1907.

FOU

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SIMON FoGARTY, }R., 151 Moultrie Street, Charleston, S. C. ANmU:w ALEXANDER KRotc, }R., Chapter Eternal, February 8, 1922 LAWRENcE HARRY MrxsoN, 217 East Bay Street, Charleston, S. C.

GENERAL OFFICERS UPREME COUNCIL Supreme Archo11 GEORG£ D. DRIVER, N 1309 Telephone Building Omaha, Nebraska.

Supreme Treasurer CH~tSTtR Reevr.s, A .J.j I Peachtr e Street Atlanta, Ga.

Supreme Historia11 PAUL WALKER, T '1' Palestine, Ill.

Supreme Secretary GeoRG£ M. GRANT, o Folmar Building Troy, Ala.

Supreme Editor RICHARD L. YouNG, K 2 Ashland Avenue, Midwood Manor Charlotte, N. C.

J.

THE CENTRAL OFFICE

12 Exchange Bank Building, Charleston, S. C. GEo. E. SrrtETZ, Executive Secretary A II cO IIWt1111icati01zs of a general nature should be scut to tlz c Ceutral Office, aud 110t to individuals. PAST SUPREME ARCHONS *ANDRllW A. KRO£C, }R. CHARLESTON, S. c.

L. HARRY MIXSON 217 East Bay Street, Charleston, S. C.

Tnos. F. MosilllANN II Pitt Street, Charleston, S. C.

}OHN D. CARROLL Lexington, S. C. RoY ]. HEFFNER

1528 Channing Way, Berkeley, Calif. First District K. C. LAUTER 2640 Kenmore Place Brooklyn, N. Y. S eco11d District DR. A. P. w AC£N£R Roanoke College Salem, Virginia

DISTRICT CHAPTER INSPECTORS Sixth District Gto. B. EvERSON Palatka, Florida

.. t

Eleventh Dtstnc RALPH E. ANDERS~rl' '!dtllg 919 Terminal Bttt Lincoln, Nebraska

Seventh District

THos. E. BuNTIN Dothan, Alabama

Twelfth District DR. J. TJ .. RontNSOI< t Luke's Hospitnl . Cleveland, Ohio

Third District ]. RALPH RoN£ 3 Colonial Avenue Charlotte, N. C.

Eighth District CtANCY A . LATHAM 1201 Hibernia Bank Building ew Orleans, La.

Fourth District W . HAMP'I'ON MrxsoN, }R. 217 East Bay Street Charleston. C.

Ninth District WAD£ S. Bor;r Otterbein, Ind.

Thirtee11th District PAur, S. Bonr·:N 26 14 Dwight Wa~ Berkeley, Califortllll

Fifth District

T mth District V. R. FLEMING 306 orth State Street Champaign, Ill.

Fourteenth District W AI,TER R . JoNES A aue 7034 Sycamore ve Seattle, Washington

.T A. McCLAIN. }R. 1424 Lawton Ave. M aeon, Georgia •Deceased.

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~------------------------------------------UNDERGRADUATE CHAPTERS rh, I' NOTE :-The address following the name of the college or university in every case is the official address of the Chapter. '•tar lne following the address indicates the date on which the Chapter meets. Officers are requested to inform the Executive Sec· y Promptly o! any changes taking place, either in personnel of officers or in dates of meetings .

.\Lpi-IA, Disb·ict No. 4-College of Charleston

XI, District No. 2-Roanoke College Box 263, Salem, Virginia. Tuesday evening. At.Ftu,;n D. Hmn, Archon E. D. l\lvF.RS, Jn., Sccreta~·y

~harleston,

South Carolina. \aturday evening. j/·IIERT P. TAYJ.OR, r/ rchvu AVto C. HAtO'Il·: I,IJ, Secrrtary

at'!'

OMICRON, District No. 7-University of Alabama Pi Kappa Phi House, University, Alabama Wednesday evening. J AS. B. STAPr,r,;1'oN, A rclt on NoRMA N S. JV!ORGA N, Secretary

A., District No. 4- Presbyterian College

~{ South Carolina, Clinton, S. C.

G.on day

evening. ~;" 0 · R. Ht.AJ.OCK, .- Irchou 'Tfl.t·:s N. H UG H S, Jn., Secretary

GAM~ · 1A, Di strict No. 13- Unlversity of California ~6 14 Dwight Way. H~rkeley, California. D''RSCtH;t , Y. lfvo~:, Archon Al,t·: !II ll .L llll, Sccretar:~'

l~PSILON,

PI, District No. 5-0glethorpe University Oglethorpe University, Georgia. Wednesday evening. C. II. YouNG. Arclzou H. D. JoRDA N, Secretary Rl-10, District No. 2-Washington and Lee University I White Street, Lexington, Virginia. Saturday evening. E. R. LA '' · A rcltou J. T. STA!.LTNGS, Secretary

District No. 3-Davidson College

~hx 138, Davidson, N. C. \V Ursday evening. (' · M. GRAn: v, A rc/zon '· R. St M s, Secretary

, z~1·

TAU, District No. 3-North Carolina State College State College Station, Raleigh, N. C. Tuesday evening. E. A. SuTTON, Archon H . H. RtWWTN!l, Secret01"Y

A., District No. 4-Wofford College

~Partanburg, S . C. J uesday evening

C N,

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l iot.COMDll, Dt,;nntCK,

~'I'A.p·D·ts t net .

Archou Secretary

UPSILON, District No. 10-University of Illinois 106 East Green Street, Champaign, Illinois Monday evening. Gr;o. N. WrcKHORST, Archon KTRK A . WERDT,N, Secretary

N o. 5- E< mory U mverstty . . Kappa Phi House, Emory University, Ga. !{ ursday evening. R0 UT. A. Ft ,OURNOY, Archon '.. H. Powt,;t..~. Secretary

'I'h

101 'A., District No. 5- Georgia School of Technology

V.

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East Fifth Street, Atlanta, Georgia v\J'day evening, \ · l . Gtn:JlvEs, A rchou VM. Low No r·: s -TR ., Secretar'' I\PPA, District No. 3-University of North Carolina

.

~

~ Kappa Phi House, Chapel Hill, N. C. Wednesday evening. \V. B. MURilOCK, Archon · G. LATIIA~I, Secretary

l

1\MBDA, District No. 5-University of Georgia

~5.8 Dougherty Street, Athens, Ga.

AEo. 1

•l[lJ

S. JoH NSON, Archon G. V ARN!lDOll Secretary

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~Urham, North Carolina M0 ndav evening. j r' I. p, Kt,;Ns, Archon ~lJ

1\nvt,;v

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PHT, District No. 12-University of Tulsa Tulsa. Oklahoma. Tuesday evening. Gro. P. Tooo, A1·chon FRANK BunER, Sec1·e tary

JoHN SON

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' Dtstnct No. 11-University of Nebraska ~20 B Street. Lincoln, Neb. !{ 0 nday evening. E'\YMONo G. Lr;wrs. Archo1~ 'LDON W . KrFFIN, Secretary

CHI. District No. 6-John B. Stetson University Pi Kappa Phi House, DeLand, Florida. W ednesdav evening!. KEt!FOOT BRYA NT, Archon Eow. H. HENDERSON, Sccretm·y PSI. District No. 1-Cornell University 301 Eddy Street, Ithaca, N. Y. ~undav evening. S. G. PA1'f.RSON, Archou \V. E. WARREN, S ecrctar:~• OMEGA. District No. 9-Purdue University 40 N. Salisbury St., West LaFayette, fnd. Mondav Evening. F. L. McDONALD, A1·chon r. F. Avr.t>SWOR'rl-T, Secretary ALPHA-ALPHA. Di strict No. 5-Mercer University 1424 Lawton Ave, J\Iacon, Georgia. 'T'tu•sd~v evening. E. L. CoNNJlr, r,, Archon P. S . ETHERIIJGE, JR., Sec1·etar:1'

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ALPHA-BETA, Dtstrtd No. 8-Tulane University 830 Audubon Street, New Orleans, La. Monday evening. CHAS. D. P!lAVY, }R., Archon Ar,PHONSO R. SJMS, Sec1·etary ALPHA-GAMMA, District No. 12-University of Oklahoma, 537 Boulevard, Norman, Okla. Monday evening. Cr. vo!l M1u.s, Archon Lt .ovo STORY, Secretm·y ALPHA-DELTA, District No. 14-University of Washington, 5212 18th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash. Monday evening1. lRA PATTERSON, Archon Kt,NNETH McCANNEL, Secretary ALPHA-EPSILON, District No. 6-University of F lorida, Box 63, University Station, Gainesville, F lorida. Monday evening. J AS. W. CHAMBLISS, A rcho11 KF.R~tY1' W. CAT.LAHAN, Secretar3•

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· tltural ALPHA-ZETA, District No. 14-0regon Agrtct College, 31 North 26th Street, Corvall is, Oregon. Monday evening. NllLSON }. HOHL, Archon RAT,P H T. URE, Sec1·etary pi ALPHA-ETA, District No. 7-Howard College, l(appa Phi House, Birmingham, Ala. Ct.voE T. WARR·E N, Archon L. EAJH, CARROT.L, Secretm·y · J{aPP3 ALPHA-THETA-Michigan State College, Pt ORSON 1 . BrRD, Archon I IARilY F. MTTH, Secretary *DELTA ( 1908)-Furman University University anti-fraternity regu lation, 1912. *'I' II ETA (1913)-Cincinnati Conservatory of :r-Iu.si~ti \.Yithclraw n account professional stand ing of tn tution, 1915. *S l GMA ( 1910)-University of South Car tina. State anti-fraternity law, 1913.

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ALUMNICHAPTER§

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Alumni officers are requested to inform the Executive Secretary promptly of any changes in personnel and addresses, agreement as to time and place of meetings.

ATLANTA, GEORGIA E. D. CARSWEI;T., Archon 1115 Peachtree Street, Apartment G 10

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LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA }. LESTF.R ERICKSON, A rcho11 864 N. Orange Grove Avenue, Pasadena EW YORK, N. Y.

BIRMINGHAM, ALABAMA HAJN HuEv, Archo11 The A ltamont Apartments

W AT,n:R MEASDAY, }R.,

Archon

% Brooklyn Edison Club, Pearl and Willott

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by Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y. BRISTOL, TENN.-VA. A. KART, MocK, Archon

01\IIAI:'JA, NEBRASKA WETHERBEE, Archon 146 North 34th Street

HARLOW

CHARLESTON. SOUTH CAROLINA GEo. E. SHEETz, Archon 11 Exchange Bank Building CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA '0-,T. H . NEAL, Archon Charlotte Na ti onal Bank CHICAGO, ILLINOIS ELMER N. TuRNQUIST,

Archon

ROANOKE, VIRGINIA A. S. CRAF1', At"Chon 606 Arden Road, Raleigh Court ?I ll MJ, FLORTDA

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Archon 1912 Eighth Avenue

RuDOLPH

HENSON,

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SPARTANBURG, SOUTH CAROLTNA PAur,

556 East 50th P lace COLUMBUS, GEORGIA

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Archou 128 N. E. 25th Street

CHAS.

C.

THOMAS, . /rc·h on

Spartan Mi ll s SAN FRANCISCO, CALIF. BovD Or.TVER, Archo11 First ra tiona l Bank Building

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SCHOOL CATALOGS AND ILLUSTRATIONS

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Chas. H. Elliott Co.

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OFFICIAL ENGRAVERS OF P I KAPPA PHI CERTIF ICATES

Order through your Secretary

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Dance Programs and Invitations, Leather Dance Favors and Covers, Commencement Invitations, Class Day Programs, Class Pins and Rings

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THE LARGEST COLLEGE ENGRAVING HOUSE IN THE WORLD

J(>P~ I usic insti·

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communications r egarding failur e to receive th 3 m agazin e or giving notice of a change in address should be se nt dire ctly to him.

DO THIS AND GET THE MAGAZINE The Star and Lamp, being second-class matter, cannot be forwarded. Do not expect it to fo ll ow you about like letter mail. Whe n you change your address, fill out this form a nd mall at on ce to Geo. E. Sh eetz, 12 Exchange Bank Building, Charleston, S. C.

Nam e (Write Pla inly )

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I rtBJY the characteristics of the ~ human face one's qualities are often judged-and so it is with type faces. Being guided by this principle we always try to use only the type faces which are char· acteristic of the thing to be adver· tised. Good faces, either human or type, always create a favorable im · pression.

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In Our Skop for Your Service

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1925_3_Oct