Page 1

The 路 ta,r 1\:7

4

andLt\mjJ

9f

Pi Kappa Phi FEBRUARY, 1925

IN THIS ISSUE ~lpha-Zeta Chapter Installed

at Oregon State English and English Founders' Day Celebrated Throughout Fraternity

No. 1


............................................................ . ... . . . .....................................

..,..,

PLEDGES "A Book for Modern Greeks" will be sent to you on request

I

1)

路~ Ill

BURR, PATTERSON & CO. SOLE OFFICIAL JEWELERS TO PI KAPPA PHI ROOSEVELT PARK Oppoaite Michigan Central Station

DETROIT, MICH. vi 1 1 I 1 1 1 I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I I ,_............ , I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I

I .,..,


The Star and Lamp of Pi Kappa Phi VoL. XI

FEBRUARYJ.- 1,925

No. I

i)

路~ Ill 路c, Editor

6:, N.C.

f I

I

Members of the Fraternity are invited to contribute special a?'ticles or news items, especially pe?'sonal 110tes concerning the activities of the alttmni. All conf1'ib1ttions shMtld be mailed direct to RICHARD L. YouNG, 2 Ashland Avenue, Midwood M a.nor, Charlotte, N, C.


The Star and Lamp of Pi Kappa Phi VoL. XI

FEBRUARYv 1925

RI CHARD

L.

YouNG,

No. I

Editor

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

Members of the Fratemity are i11vited to contribute sp ecial articles 01' news items, especiall-y personal 1wtes -concerning the activities of the alumni. A ll cont?'ibutions shMtld be mailed direct to RICHARD L. YouNG, 2 Ashland Avenue, Midwood Manor, Charlotte, N. C.


What Constitutes a Fraternity Man?

ZINI

By William H. Thomas, Chancellor The Delta Theta Phi Law Fraternity (Reprinted From Sigma Chi Quarterly)

First-a clean heart beating beneath a fraternity emblem and a clean, broad-minded conscience recognizing fraternity obligations and the rights of men. Second-as Cleanliness is next to Godliness 路so is the same exemplified by the member through care in toilet and personal appearance.

, ext wh for

cat wi1

. the:

Third-as apparel oft proclaims the man so should the personal attire create in the community the fact that a Greek and a Gentleman are synonymous.

' ou: ' ror ; th(

;, COl

an wi

an,

And lastly-as the term gentlemen combines all the quali-

lig as Be

ties of cleanliness, dress, thought, and proper deportment, so may the Fraternity Man of America be ac-

'

cepted as the prototype thereof.

"stE

is the

Oi

11

11 1 11

11 1 11

II I II

II I II

II I II

11 ! 11

!Ill(

II I II

II!

!I

!Jill

lJ!JI lJ!JI lJ!JI U!JI

( IJ ! f( lJ ! fl )J ! f( )J !f( \J !f(

U

! fC

\l !f( \l !f( \I![{ \l !f( \! ![{ )J !f{ lJ![( )J!ft )Jif{

)Jif{)Jif{\Jif(\J!f{)l !f()Jif{)l !f(\11!0!1t01


~e

~ ;M

THE STAR AND LAMP 1

ONTHs

OF

O CTOBER,

E NTERED

AS

CONGRESS APPROVED

F O CTOBER 3,

~

STAR AND LAMP 1917 ,

MATTER

M ARCH

OF THE 3,

L I FE

A LL

MATERIAL

.N OVEMBER, J ANUARY, IN

SECOND

I NTENDED

IS

A PRIL

19,

$ 10

AND

FOR

AND

M AY,

CLASS

AT

AT

O F THE

THE

POSTOFF I CE AT

SUPREME C OUNC I L

OF THE

Pt

K APPA

PHI

FRATERNITY

IN

THE

N. C .

C HARL.OTTE,

A CCEPTANCE FOR MA I LING

1 879.

SUBSCRIPTION

UNDER THE D I RECT I O N

F EBRUARY,

A UTHOR I ZED

T HE

CHANGE S

IS PUBLISHED

D ECEMBER,

AT

CHARLOTTE,

SPEC IAL

RATE

OF

N . C.,

POSTAGE

IN

ACCORDANCE

PROVIDED

FOR

WITH

THE

SECT I ON

IN

A CT

11 03,

OF

A CT

192 1. IS

THE

ONLY

PUBL I CAT I ON

FORM

SHO U LD

BE

S iNGLE COPIES ARE 40 CENTS .

O F SUBSCR I PTION . IN

T HE

HANDS

OF"

THE

E OIT OR- IN •CHIEF

BY

THE

1 5TH

OF

SEPTEMBER,

AN D A PRI L . ADDR ESS

S HOULD

D&

PROMPTLY

ol. XI

RI!PORT I! D

TO THE

EXECUTIV E

SECRETARY .

U SB

FOAM

IN

TH E

BACK

OF TH E

MA G •

No. 1

FEBRUARY, 1925

EDKTOR S COMMENT 9

:To

Howdy, Oregonians

Pi Kappa Phi's ever-increasing chain , was forged another link on December . 21, 1924, when Delta Phi Sigma at the Oregon · ~gricultural College, Corvallis, Oregon, was ' tnstalled as the Fraternity's Alpha-Zeta : chapter.

The heart-felt welcome of the Fraternity is extended to this splendid group of westerners who have measured up to the standards set for admission into our Order. From all indi• c~tio.ns, our newest chapter takes its place Wtthm our ranks fully equipped for the tasks ' that face ~t as a part of a national organization. : The right hand of fellowship is extended to , our new brothers of the far western state of roman·c e and achievements and with it goes ; the offer of fraternal help. The fraternity is " confident that its trust has not been misplaced ; and that the brothers of Alpha-Zeta will bear : with distinction the mark of Pi Kappa Phi ~nd that their chapter will stand as a beacon ' ltght set on a hill, shining bright and strong as Pi Kappa Phi's lone representative in the ' Beaver State ~ With the .comf.ng of Alpha-Zeta, another • ~tep in Pi Kappa Phi's Pacific coast growth ~ ls made. The Fraternity's third chapter at the University of California was for years our ~ only outpost in that ! great country of the ~ Pacific. Last year Alpha-Delta came to keep

company with Gamma and now Alpha-Zeta is installed in one of the great northwestern universities and Pi Kappa Phi's representation in that section is materially increased . So we bid you welcome, brothers of AlphaZeta. Accept your share of responsibility and work in Pi Kappa Phi and neither you nor the fraternity will be losers. ~"~

~lb

-.,\1~

~~~

E xpansionist HERE are interesting figures of the lapse of time between installation of chapters T by the fraternities with at least five chapters in a recent issue of "Emerald" of Sigma Pi. The 43 fraternities listed, are divided into four groups, ultraconservative, conservative, expansionist, and rapid expansionist. Pi Kappa Phi, which is listed thirty-third, is placed in the third group. Our average lapse of time between chapter installations is given as 7.967 months, figuring the number of chapters and age of the fraternity in November, 1924. We have always considered our expansion policy to have been sanely conservative and these figures are clearly indicative of that position. We have averaged one new chapter a little less than a school year. Surely that is a conservative and sensible policy, insuring the assimilation of new units and the


================================================~~ ~ T

11 1~

S 'l'

A R

AND

LAMP

welding of all chapters into a firmly-knitted whole. These chapters have been added during the formative period of our life and at a time when the ground work of our organization was be~ ng laid. Now, that we have a firm foundation we can easily add: to our chapter roll. This is not to mean that we should begin to prosecute our growth too rapidly. That has never been our policy and will never be. But when desirable locals knock at owr doors for admission this is not the time to deny them entrance simply because another has recently been admitted. In the figures, many of our older and larger associates in the 路 Greek world are 路s hown to have maintained a shorter interval between installation than Pi Kappa Phi. Among them are Sigma Chi, Alpha Tau Omega, Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Sigma Nu, and Kappa Sigma. ~~~

.:}1~

~~~

~~~

f or FEB

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

In spite of this plan whereby every brothel initiated becomes a subscriber of the maga zine there are 900 of our members whos1 names arel not on its mailing list. The cell tral office has made the proposition that an) alumni whose name is presented will be sen two copies of the magazine without cost This is done in order that the older brothers who have been out of touch with the frater nity for years, may have some idea of th1 scope of our present publication. Again, those brothers who have not corn pleted payment on their subscription unde the old plan, will be given an opportunity t1 pay the difference and be credited with ful life subscription. These two schemes ought to receive th full co-operation of those who are not no' regularly receiving the magazine. Others rna: help by sending Brother Sheetz the names o brothers who would be interested in receivinr the sample copies and possibly subscribing.

Our Subscription P la1z

.!}IJ.t..

T the editors' dinner of the recent Interfraternity Conference the entire discussion centered on life subscription plans for fraternity magazines. The most popular plan reported was the collection of the subscription at the time of initiation. Eleven fraternities made veports of such plans and each endorsed it most heartily. This is the plan which is followed by Pi Kappa Phi and has been most proEtable for our fraternity. The life subscription plan has been in effect since the Charlotte Convention, which named the price at $10 and authorized the payment of a fourth of the subscription at initiation, and the remainder in three years. After two years this method was found lacking and at the Berkeley Convention in 1921, the full payment of $10 was reqt:ired at initiation. In these short years a fund of nearly $10,000 has been built-up and that fact alone is ample indication that the plan is highly feasible. In not many years the interest from the principal of this fund will go a long way toward publicat:on expense of "The Star and Lamp."

Sit:..

~!~

~~~

A

),

R

A Member Worth While HE editorial on the worthwhile membe in the October issue of "The Star an Lamp" seems to have struck a responsiv chord in the hearts of far-distant brothers. In this issue are admirable articles b Brother George Odgers, who is in Indil Brother Odgers wrote the editor that he sa down and typed the articles for the magazin after reading the editorial. A few days later another letter came frof Brother Otto C. Seymour .i n Edinburgh, Sco1 land, who said he was constrained to contril ute to the magazine after checking over tb items in the make-up of the worthwhile merf her. He offered to write several articles an these will doubtless be received in time fc the next number of "The Star and Lamp." These letters were splendid indications c fraternity interest and greatly cheered tb edi.tor. We wonder why the brothers in th good old U. S. A., accustomed to frequef fraternal contacts, did not respond?

T

[ 4]

lf Jl

he fie

ill (

St< 18

Cc

A1

nf

th, b fe kn lllt

to< rh so cv cv \V;

li t

"d ''z

an ri' liT

W;

ll]:

la 1 :e "s th su vi, th th no

c~1

()


~~=========================================== '1'

n E

STA R A N D LA M P

f or

FEBRuARY,

192 5

)tM

aaga ·hosl By ] . Bovn OLIVER, r cetl : anl T WclS on November 18, 1924, th at I re- F rancisco . A bri ef ketch of the hi story of 0. setl cei:ed a w ire from our go?d b ro~h e r George A. C., is to be foun d elsewhere in thi s issue. But cost D n ve r, Su preme A rchon, mfonmng me that I may say in pass ing that thi s in stitu tion has the hers h.e was ve ry pleased to appoin t me installing of- highes t stand ing of any agri cul t ural school in ·ater fleer of th e new chapter at 0. A. C. Thi s came th e west, an d p robabl y has no superi or in t he : th 1 more or less as a bolt fr om th e blu e and it rather entire country. staggered me at f irst· fo r the tru th of t he matter Llu t to get back to t he matter of in stall a ti on, I is that a lthoug h I am. a membe r of th e Supreme le ft San F rancisco on F riday night, th e 19th, cotll Coun cil by v irtu e o f the fac t th at 1 am a Past a nd being in somewhat o f a hurry to get away, mde Archon of Gamma, I have not Leen ver y active I did not pay mu ch attenti on to weath er reports . ty tl nf late in th e council s o f t he fraternity and As a resul t, I a rri ved at Corvalli s very poorl y 1 ful therefore felt a bit rusty in t he work. leverthe- prepa red to meet the extreme cold weather which less, I decided to take a chance. Of one thing I I encountered. U nl ess you we re bo rn " north of th f It rea onab ly ce rtain , the boys at 0 . A. C. .;7" and have spent some tim e bmwsing a roun d no\ knew less about th e wo rk th an I did. F urth er ma: more, I f ig ured to get away before they asked in the a rctic circle, you w ill not be abl e to appreciate th e sensations whi ch I experienced in es o too many questi ons, and in all p robability none of stepping o ff of the tra in at Corvalli s, in someivin! rhem would ever see anoth er cltapter in stall ed, thing .like a foot of snow, in my low shoes and ng. so th ere seemed littl e chance th at they would d . V . D .'s. Coming as I did f rom th e warm and ever f ind out just how little I kn ew and might balmy cl imate of San F rancisco, you can read il y even go on to th eir dying day beli ev ing that I un de rstand t hat my ar do r was somewhat chill ed. Was a r egul ar in stalling o ffi cer. H oweve r, the g reeting of P hil Begue, w ho met So af ter considerable correspondence and no me at th e train , and later the wa rm recepti on mbe ~:t,tle delay, Sunday, D ecember 2 1, was fi xed as and co rdia l hospita li ty o f t he boys at th e house, : an ae r tag" and two o'clock in th e a ftern oon the more t han made up fo r the inclemency · of the "zero hour. " weathe1·. 1nsiV I~ would be too ha rrow ing to recount the P hil Degue met me at the station w ith hi s rs. s b a~l Xt ou s hou rs I spent while waiting for the ar- machin e . and drove me at once to the chapter [ndii ~ Wal of the necessa ry docum ents whi ch had been house, where I fo und abou t t wenty of t he boys wa iting to g reet me. Th eir reception was so te s~ lllb.·t~sted to t he air-mail , and whi ch J fo und Wa ttmg f or me 111 . my 01nce rc. . . 111 a n F.. ranc1sco whole-hearted and fri endly t hat J at once felt ;azitl 1 ~ P?n my return from 0. A. C., a fter th e in stal- at home. T hey a re a regul a r bun ch of fe ll ows fror .atlOn. To tell th at I broke into Gamma's Chap- and I fo und th em very easy to get acq ua in ted Scot ;,er JT ouse in De rkeley a nd " jimmied" their with. Af ter an exchange of several round s of ntril ]strong box" ( ?) and ''borrowed" their copy of stori es, we decided to ca l.l it a day and pre pa re . ual, etc., tmgh . t t le .Con s t 1't ut10n . and B y- L aws, R'-1t for th e strenu ous p rogram which had been out~r th s~b) ect me to crimin al prosecuti on. So on adlin ed fo r Sund ay. merr \:l ~e of couse l I refu se to answer and will close s atl The next morning we a ll had breakfast tote fc tlnls Part o f th e na rrative w ith th e statement ge th er at nin e o'clock and went en masse to the 1 • t lat I got t 1e papers and how I got t hem 1s M ethocl ist Church, where we attended serv ices lp." nobody's business. ' and li s tened to a ve ry able Chr istmas sermon dens I Fo r tl1e 1)ene f 1t ' of those who are not inform ed, livered by their loca l pasto r, who in cid entally i tb [ . Wtll say th at 0. A. C. stand s for O regon Agri - devoted abou t f ifteen minu tes of his time to n th Coll ege, whi ch is located at Corvalli s, extolling the virtues of college fraterni ties gener quer c(·)~lltural reg · on, approxnn ately 700 mil es fr om San ally, and th ose of P i K appa P hi in particul ar,

J[

s

[5]


~

~ T

I-I

r,; S '1'

A R

A N

o L

A M P

f o 1' F E B n u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5 an the j

serhot W< Un tri c we Pi abc old AlJ bo' fo r

M< Dr CO! 0. :J

Yc

0

tre in c I v by

0: (!)

z

0

1-

<(

.J .J <(

1-

111

~

P.le

<(

1-

w

N

..(

:t

a.

.J <(

i路

I~

I

j_ ne. ga gn Ca ga i\II

un 111

Dt ga by 9,

[6]


-

a.

:J

0

a:

t:l

z

0

1-

<{

.J .J <(

I-

VI

z

T r-r E S 'l' A R AN o LAM r for FEB and concluded by pronouncing a benediction on the .local chapter. t two o'clock in the afternoon the regular service of in tallation was held at the chapter house. l acted as installing officer and Brother v~a.l ter _Jones of A lpha-Delta, of Wash ington u.n tverstty, and inspector of the fourteenth clistnct, acted as master of ceremonies. Together '~.c ~xpouncle~ the principles and doctrines of lt kappa Pht and explained its mysteries for about two hours, and in clue course declared the old Delta Phi Sigma local, to be duly installed as Alpha-Zeta Chapter of :Pi Kappa ] hl. Just before the ceremony of installation, the boys assembled on the front steps of the house for the picture which is reproduced herewith. l\ lost of you are familiar with the features of Brother Jones and wi ll therefore be able to recognize him in the center of the first row. Your tru ly is the short, fat gent near the ex~ret~le right of the picture. The squi nt, which tndt.cates that I am seriously considering whether I wtll stand another raise on three aces is caused by the glare from the snow. ' On my extreme left is P hil Begue, the new lyP.lected Archon of A lph a-Zeta. He hai ls from

R

u A R v, 1 9 2 5

southern Cali fornia and is the hero of the bedtime story about the man from southern California who attended the funera.l of an unknown man, who had been killed in a railroad accident in the middle west. When the minister asked if there was anyone in the audience who had anything to say, P hil is said to have risen in the back of the church and said: "If no one else has anything to say, I wou ld li ke to say a few words about southern California." Just back of me, in the picture, wearing glasses, is Doc Irvine, a faculty member and head of the University hospital. It is he who dishes out the pills and argyrol for the boys. The other facu lty member is Professor Thurman J. Sta rk er, assistant to the Dean in the department of Forestry. His likeness can be found at the top of the picture, fittingly framed by the door-casings. In conclu ion, I wish to say that the AlphaZeta crowd is one of the finest bunches of fellows 'that it has been my privi lege to meet, and concede that Pi Kappa Phi is to be congratu lated both on the character of the men individually and coll ective ly as well as on the type of institution which they represent.

<(

1-

w

N .( J:

a.

.J <(

By JosEPH WrLcox, A

A

LPHA-ZETA Chapter of Pi Kappa I hi came into existence Septembe r 22, 1921. A group of men drawn together by the need of brotherhood and for the purpose of organizing a club was headed by Wi lfred D. Lovegreen. Men in this group were Anthony D. Cannavina, Ernest E. Fisher, Gilbert D. Mor~n, George 1. [. Jackson, Earl G. Davis, and arshall VI/. Stone. A club was soon organized . . . . under the r u 1es per t ammg . to sueI1 orgamzat10ns 111 the 0 regan s tate A gncultural . . College. The

Del~)h i Club was the name chosen by this organtzation and was officiall y recognized as such by the committee on student affairs November 9' 1921 · 'I'!1e men prev10us.ly · . mentiOned were

z

the charter members and Emory D. Roberts was chosen as faculty member and adv isor. In the first year of its existence, the Delphi Club lea eel a home in which facilities for dining were not adequate. This not being a very satisfactory arrangement, plans were soon under way to lease a more suitable house in wh ich the members cou ld have their own dining table. T he fa ll of 1922 found the organization in a newly located house leased and furnished by themselves. The organization had increased to some twenty members at this time and plans were under way to• obtain recognition as a local fraternity. It is the col.l ege ruling that a club to become a local fraternity must make a scholastic average of 83 per cent for one year.

[ 7]


~=============================================~G* T

H 1~

S '1'

AR

A N D

L

A M P

f

o r FE B

R

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

A

On Feb ruary 15, 1923, the Delphi Club was In the fall of 1924, we started our fourth yea given perm ission by the college authorities to in our own home at 31 Torth Twenty-si:xtl organi ze a local fraternity. Accordingly, the street, whi ch is convenientl y located near tht local Delta P hi Sigma fraternity came into ex- coll ege campus. On September 28, 1924, VI' istence at this time with charter members num- received the off icial notif ication that our petitio! bering twenty-four. With the g ranting of the had been accepted and that we would soon b local charter, the fratemity was then in a posi- install ed as the A lpha-Zeta Chapter of Pi KapP· · tion to look up a suitab le national fraternity to Ph i. . gati• petition. After a careful investigation of the December 21, 1924, marked our indu ction tnl1 1 1ea1 . national fraternities, Pi Kappa P hi was chosen Pi Kappa P hi' under the direction of Brother J van and the coll ege auth oriBoyd O li ver, Gamm3 cess ties gave us permission installing of-ficer, ant par 1 to petition. George \!\falter R. Jones, Alpha the ~aby Expresses Tlzanks All en Odgers, N u, in Th to 1 Delta, ass1sttng. following men were in ,ves spected ou r fratern ity the Alpha-Zeta and baby at this time and greatly chapter of Pi Kappa Phi, itiated at that time a: gro 1 wish to e:rpress our thanlls to the aided us in drawi ng up members of A lph a-Zcb bui l fratenl ity as a 7.Vhole and to indiour petition. Our first of P i Kappr wes chapter v·i duals of the f1·aternity for the petition to P i Kappa P hi P hi: Thurmon J. Sta r Coil welcome and feeling of friends.h.ip e:rlended to us at the time of OU1' was submitted in the ker, Harry S. I rvine tion installation. Our ho1•1te is always spri ng of 1923. P hilli p Begue, Nelson J ·C open and we insist on any Pi Kapps Hohl , Earl G. Davis coil. Starting its third year within our state bein,q 01U' guests. ln. the fnt~we OU-1' aim shall be to of existence in the fall Felix A. Subj ect, Mar 0. fulfill the trusts a,nd e.-rpectations of 1923, the local frashall W. Stone, A nth on). 1 of o1w fraternity and work towm·d ternity was enthusiastic D. Cann avin a, Edward 111 the advancement of that f1·atemit·y B. Dregni e, Joseph W il· buil over the possibility of every way possible. cox, Frank L. Howard the obtaining a chapter of Ralph R. Small, Charle£ canP i Kappa P hi . During A. O lsen, Ralph T. Ure an : thi s time the local fraC. Jones, Arthur L. Sliffe, George T ht S idn ey ternity was inspected by Roy J . Heffner, then Supreme A rchon, and Harold A. Parma, repre- Jackson, Robert E. \i\filliams, Curtis E. Price flort senting Gamm a chapter. O n February 18, 1924, Kurt A. Keesler, Thomas L. Carter, Gilbert h e 1aw after having satisfactoril y completed a year as D. Mo rgan, \i\f ilfred D. Lovegreen, and Josephe. VI( a local fraternity, the coll ege authori ties again B. Hoag. p. gave us permission to petition for P i Kappa P hi . P ledges are: Max H. England, Angus lf. beit O ur second petition was subm itted in the spring Griffin , Harold E . Conklin , Wi llia m 'f. Welch· to 1 of 1924. On Ma rch 31, 1924, a house owned and Stanl ey A. Blaue, M il orad ]. Angelich, lhrold a s occupied by the Delta Ups il on fraternity was Harder, and Donald Campbell. the purchased. plat pos the wa1 WOLFE IN EUROPE CLARVOE HAS SON 1

1

WE,

I•

Brother Frank A. Clarvoe, Kappa, who is assistant manager of Pac if ic Coast Division of the Un ited Press, in San F ranc isco, is the proud possessor of a young son, born November 22.

Brother Tom Wolfe, Kappa, who for so111e in c] time has been a member of the E ngli sh facultY ph a of the U ni versity of the City of New York, re·en~ cab ce11tly sa il. ed f or E~ urope.

[8]


~G*=========================================== T

H E

S '1'

AR

for FEB R u

A N D L A M p

A R Y,

19 2 5

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------WI

iti ol

b

1

T

:tp]J· .

By J osEPH W ILCOX, A Z

1IE locati on of the O regon Agricultu ral ~o ll ege is in Corvallis, a city of 7,500

mhabitants, situated at the head of nav iintt gation on the W ill amette river. It is in th e ~ r J hea~·t of th e W ill amette vall ey, famous for its 11113 van~d and abund ant r esources. Cor vallis is acan cesslble by steam and electri c rail ways from all pha parts of the state, one ra il way taking you to Th the Cascade mountain s on th e east and a noth er ! in to the ocean some fifty mil es di stant on the o a~ west.. Cor vallis, althoug h a small city is steadily -Z t gr~w ~ng and every year sees a number of new ~ e buil d , mgs. ']..'!1e coll ege is located about a mile app• west of tl · · ,, 1e city and 1s often spoken of as " I he , . ,~a l ~oll ege on the H ill ," as it is at a hi gher elevav 111C tlon than the city proper. ll1 J ·Corvalli s has proved an id eal location for a · d'1cated by the enormous g rowth of av1·s co ll ege, 1n \l[ar 0. A. C. 1'11e f 1rst ' 1011) . building on the campus was erected

va rd In . 1 ~85. Thi s is th e present admini stration Wil· bu!ldmg, and has served for th at purpose during ·a rd the whole peri od. F rom thi s one building, the u-le! campus has g rown to thirty-fi ve buildings and Ure an average attendance of 3,800 stu dents a term. orge T he coll ege g rounds cover three hundred and . ety-one acres of wh1c . I1 f orm n.ee fo rty-nine ac1.es, nm · the cam bert pu proper and Is covered by a well -kept ;eph lawn . · T!1e 1)eauty of 0 . A. C. has always been ev ident because of the large campu s. ' · Il b .A ne w a del ltiOn to th e 0. A. C. , campus now C l11g parti cipated in by th e students is a drive 11 •1c 'to · ' - Jd ra ise half milli on doll a rs for the erection of ro ~ student uni on building. T his will house all t ;e student organi zati ons and be an adequate Pace fo r a ll th e social fun ctions. Its ma in pur. for pose is to bUl'Jd a monument a nd memonal 1 h e fa llen soldiers of th e Spani sh and World Wa rs. . Th e wo rk at 0. A . C., covers a broad field

) !11

e1nclu d·mg techm·cal courses in th e different'

It" Phases of . • agn·cu 1ture, forestry, home economtcs, e· engmee rin · · r . g, mmmg, commerce, pha rmacy, voCati onal eel ucat'1011, 1111·t 1tary · . stact1.cs, and mdu

Ll ;

tri al a rts; with the necessary training in the basic subj ects of math emati cs and the na tural and physical sciences; and also the general t rain ing in language, li terature, hi story, economi cs, poli tical science, civics, and phys ical education, whi ch consti tutes an essential part of a li beral educati on. In college .life and activiti es th e O regon Agri cultural Coll ege is well organi zed with 23 nationa l fraterniti es and 13 nati onal sorori ties, and in additi on 12 local f raterni ties and three local sororiti es. T-Ionora ry and professional f raterni ties in the vari ous schools number 23. I n add ition th ere a re the other societies, as in fo r ensics, dramati cs, mu sic, language, a rt, a thl etics, relig ious, and class organi zations. Th e co.llege paper, T he Daily Barometer, is one of th e best orga ni zed of th e daily coll ege papers in th e country. O th er publi cati ons published by th e students! are th e Omnge Owl, the hum orous magazine; T he 01·egon Count1·ymnn, a monthl y magazin e publi shed by th e students in agricul ture and home economi cs; The Oregon S tnte T echnical Rec01·d, publi shed by the engineering students; T he 0. A. C. Direct01·y, by the School of Commerce; T he A uuual Cntise, by the School of Forestry, T he Beave1', the all-school annua l, and the 0. A. C. Alwmnus, publi shed by th e alumni. The student body assembly is an organi zation of th e entire student body working un de r a constitution and by-laws approved by the faculty and having general authority over student en te rpri ses. O ffi cers a re elected annu ally a nd consist of a p resid ent and secretary, chosen f rom th e senior class, and three vice-pres idents, one each from the junior, sophomore, and f res hman cl asses. The fi ve offi ce rs consti tute the executive committee of th e student body an I have general supervision over all affa irs of in tere t to th e s tud en ~ body. C lass room work and college activities are govern ed by the honor co de system. Thi s system has been in operati on for three years and has proven successful.

[9]


>

z 0

\0 N t.n

AOMINIS"TR,._.TION BUILOING--0REGON AGRICUL"TUR,._L COLLEGE


TH:: LiBRARY-OREGON AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE


,,

===========================================~~ T

H

E S T A R A N D LA M P

f o 路r FEB R u A R Y, 1 9 2 5

als By GEORGE ALLEN ODGERS, N OME t ime ago when go ing through my fil es of THE STAR AND LAMP, I came across an article by t he above title, written by Brother Bolt. It was wri tten when P i Kappa P hi had fo urteen active chapters. Curious to fi nd out what the present situ ation was, and who are our p resent associates, I took my Baird's and recent copies of Banta's Greek E :rcharnge, and began to scratch Greek letters and tally marks over five or six sheets of paper. T he job is done, an d my curios ity has been satisfi ed. T hinking that others might be in te rested, I pass on the resul ts. P i Kappa P hi now has twenty-six chapters. W ith one exception, each of these lives in a community of chapters of other national, social fraterni ties. T he foll ow ing compilation shows which f raterni ties P i Kappa P hi meets most often, and those whi ch we meet but seldom. In those cases where the chapters of one f raternity with which P i Kappa P hi comes in contact is th e same as that of another, the frate rnities are listed in alphabetical order. T he right hand column designates the num ber of chapters of the fraternity with whi ch chapters of P i Kappa P hi live :

1. Kappa Alpha (s) ............................................................. .20 2. A lpha Tau Omega ........................................................... .18 3. Kappa Sigma .................................................................... 18 4. Sigma N u .......................................................................... 18 5. Sigma A lpha Eps il on ..................................................... .1 7 6. Pi Kappa Alpha ............................................................. .1 6 7. P hi Delta Theta ............................................................. .1 5 8. Sigma Chi ........................................................................... .1 5 9. Delta Tau Delta ............................................................... .1 3 10. Sigma P hi Eps ilon .......................................................... 13 11. Beta T heta Pi ................................................................... .1 2 12. Lambda Chi Alpha .......................................................... 11 13. Delta S igma P hi .............................................................. 10 14. P hi Ga mma Delta ............................................................10 15. P hi Kappa Sigma ............................................................ 9 16. P hi Kappa Ps i .................................................................. 8 17. Acacia ................................................... ~.... .. . ... ............ ........ 7 18. Chi P hi ................................................................................ 7 19. Delta Kappa Epsilon ...................................................... 7 20. Sigma Pi ............................................................................ 7 21. Theta Chi .......................................................................... 7 22. Delta Upsilon .............. _.................................................... 6

23 . Alpha Sigma P hi .............................................................. 24. Delta Chi ............................................................................ 25. P hi Sigma Kappa ............................................................ 26. A lpha Delta P hi ................................................................ 27. Chi Psi ................................................................................ 28. Psi Ups ilon ........................................................................ 29. T heta Delta Chi ................................................................ 30. Zeta Ps i .............................................................................. 31. A lpha Chi Rho ................................................................. . 32. Kappa Delta Rh o ........................................................... . 33. P hi Kappa T au ................................................................. . 34. Alpha Kappa Lambda ..................................................... . 35. Delta P hi ............................................................................ 36. Sigma P hi ........................................................................ .. 37. Sigma Phi Sigma ............................................................ .. 38. Tau Kappa E psilon ........................................................ .. 39. Theta U psilon Omega .................................................. .. 40. Kappa Alpha ..................................................................... . 41 . P hi Mu Delta ................................................................... .

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20.

21. 22. 23. 24. 25. Thus it is seen th at our t wenty-six chapter 26 路

are associated with three hundred and twenty-on 路 chapters of forty-one nati onal fraterniti es; all ou P i Kappa P hi is now in contact with all of th ch: social fraternities listed by Baird 's, except tho! tee whi ch limit their membership to some sect, rac1 dr, or professional college. W hen Brother Bolt cot1 tio piled hi s stati stics, our fraternity was associate f t'f with one hundred and thirty-eight chapters o thirty-six national fraterniti es. Kappa Alph a(s) , A lpha T au O mega, K apP Sigma, Sigma Nu, and Sigma Alph a E psilO rank as th ey did in 1920. P i Kappa Alpha steP in ahead of P hi Delta Theta, whi ch is still fol lowed by Sigma Chi. Delta T au Delta slips ot1 from behind Beta Th eta P i to foll ow Sigma Ch whil e Sigma P hi E psil on keeps next to Beta. Five years ago, X i at Roanoke College was otl lone-star chapter. A t that time our chapter thef ] was being watched with great interest by the fr~ ternity world. Many predi cted that we too waul an withdraw, as had others. But we have stayet fr: and now X i enj oys th e fellowship of chapters o 111 , Sigma Chi and K appa Alpha(s) . T oday P hi i ]o, our lone-star chapter, and we hope th at befor long she will have th e association of chapters o PI other nationals.

[ 12]


=~~========================================== THE

~

STAR

A

for

D LAMP

19 2 5

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------The following table gives the number of nationals met by the chapters of Pi Kappa Phi :

H~~I:,,:. )-

The so rority statistics are: 1. Chi Omega ........................................................................ 12

lll7

7. Rho ...................................................................................... ..

l 7

· Eps tlon

. ~· ~~~:~:; '{" i t ; :

23. Xi ...................................................................................... 2 24. Pi .......................................................................................... 2

1ptef

FEBRuARY,

~~: ~:~: - : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : _:_: :~: : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : ~

y-o~ What about th e fair maid ens? One-half of ; an our chapters are in institutions where there are

•f th chapters of national sororities, and in these thirtho! teen colleges and universities there are one hunrae< cl_red and thirty-two chapters of twenty-two nacon· tJonal sororities. A total of four hundred and :iate fifty-three chapters of sixty-three nationals. rs o

2. Alpha Xi Delta .................................................................. 3. Kappa Alpha Theta ........................................................ 4. Kappa Delta .................................................................... .. 5. Pi Beta Phi ........................................................................ 6. Alpha Omicron Pi .......................................................... 7. Delta Delta Delta ............................................................ 8. Delta Zeta .......................................................................... 9. Kappa Kappa Gamma .................................................... 10. Phi Mu ................................................................................ 11. Alpha Delta Pi ................................................................ 12. Alpha Phi .......................................................................... 13. Delta Gamma .................................................................... 14. Alpha Chi Omega ........... :................................................ 15. Alpha Gamma Delta ...................................................... 16. Gamma Phi Beta .............................................................. 17. Sigma Kappa .................................................................... 18. Zeta Tau Alpha ................................................................ 19. A lpha Delta Theta .......................................................... 20. Beta Phi Alpha ....................................... - ....................... 21. Phi Omega Pi .................................................................. 22. Pi Sigma Gamma ............................................................

8 8 8 8 7

7 7

7 7 6 6 6 5

5 5 5 5 3 3 3 2

In addition, we meet Alpha Epsilon Phi at Tulane, Cornell, and Illinois; and Theta Phi Alpha at Illinois. Gamma, Upsilon, and i\lpha Delta are each associated with twenty-one of the twenty-two li sted; Nu, sixteen; Alpha Gamma, fourteen; Psi, twelve; Omega and Alpha Beta, seven; Omicron, six; Lambda, M u, and Chi, three; and Kappa, two. PAKAUR, BTITAR, INDIA.

:apr

)SilO

steP

1 fol s ott

. Ch s ott ther

Our Assocnat6es 9 The Honorary anJ Pro=~ fessnon.aR F ralfernilfies

H

AVING comp.leted my investigation of our a~s.ociates, th~ social fraternities and soronbes, I was mterested to know who ,raul our associates, the honorary and professional ayel are frat ·· ernthes. I therefore continued to spend spare rs o >hi j moments with Baird's and Banta with the following results: ' efor· rs o Let us consider the honorary fraternities first. P hi Beta Kappa is still the honorary par e:rcel-

! fr~

l

lence with 99 magnificient chapters. Her honors are open to the undergraduates of 13 chapters of Pi Kappa Phi: those at Alabama, Corne.!!, Nebraska, California, North Carolina, Illinois, Tulane, \Vashington and Lee, Georgia, Washington, Trinity, Oklahoma, Davidson-the order being that of the order of <I? B K, charter grant. Sigma Xi, the goal of all scientific students, meets Pi Kappa Phi at Nebraska, California, II-

13]


============================================~G* Tn

1·:

S 'l' A R

A

n L

A M P

linoi s, ·w ashington, Purdue, and orth Carolina. Phi Kappa Pi, th e other great honorary, is the prize for our men at F lorida, Georgia Tech ., and Cornell. These three honoraries are open to some of sixteen of our chapters. P i Kappa Phi meets four forensic honoraries: Alpha Phi Epsi lon at A labama, Emory, Stetson, Florida, and California; Delta Sigma Rho at Illinois, Nebraska, Cornell, Oklahoma, Washington and Lee, and California; Pi Kappa Delta at Tulsa, \iVofford, P. C. S. C., and 'California; Tau Kappa Alpha at North Carolina, Trinity, Washington, Alabama, Purdue, Roanoke, and Emory. Two agricu ltural honor organizations occupy the field, A lpha Zeta and Pi Sigma Delta. Our land ed gentry members strive for the former at Illinoi s, Cornell, Nebraska, North Carolina State, California, Purdue, Georgia, and F lorida; and for the latter at Nebraska and IlJ inois. Bizad Pi Kapps striving for honors look to Deta A lpha Psi at I11inoi s and ·w ashington, and to Beta Gamma Sigma at the two mentioned and Cali fornia and Georgia. Illinoi s, Californ ia, and 'vVashington possess th e second, third, and fourth larges t T\izad colleges. There are four engineering honoraries, but it eems that Tau Beta Pi and Sigma Tau are the real ones. Tau Beta is at I11inois, California, Cornell, and \i\Tashington; Sigma Tau at Nebraska, I.llinois, and Oklahoma. Illinois is the third largest engineering college, and Cali fornia fourth. Purdue is second. Epsilon Kappa Nu is at Illinoi s, Purdue, Cornell , and California; and Pi Tau Sigma at Illinois and Purdue. For students of education, Phi Delta Kappa is !he honorary, and has chapters at Cali fornia, \i\fashington, Nebraska, Illinois, and Oklahoma. Kappa Delta Pi, an organization for both men and women, has chapters at Il.l in ois, Oklahoma, Purdue, labama. Now that Pi I ambda Theta is firmly established, it seems as if K. D. P. ought to di sband and turn her members over to the other two organizations. As it is there are too many honoraries in the same fields, and it is to be hoped that the time is not far off when consolidation and amalgamation will begin. The Order of the Coif is the lone legal honorary, and has chapters at Illinois, Nebraska, and Cornell.

f o r FE n R u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

fon Other honoraries which Pi Kappa Phi meel Sig1 are: Phi Lambda Upsilon, chemistry, at Illinoi· han Washington, California, Purdue, and Nebraska fon Phi Sigma, biology, at California and Nebraska Gee Pi Delt a Epsi lon, J·ournalism . at Illinois, Cal Ill i1 fornia, Georgia Tech., and Emory; Tau Signl lan< Delta, architecture, at Illinoi s and California Scabbard and Blade, military, at Purdue, Jllinoi· A:r: \ i\Tashington, Florida, Georgia, Georgia Tech PI ; Nebraska, Oklahoma, North Carolina State, Cal for fornia, and Emory; Xi Sigma Pi, forestry, ~ Ala \iVashington; Sigma Delta Psi, athletics, at Okll llli1 homa; Sigma Upsilon, literary, at Georgia, Nor! Del Carolin a, Trinity, Emory, A labama, Washingtor an( Davidson, and Washington and Lee; and On11 Tu: cron Delta Kappa, "The Circle," at Washingto 1 and Lee, and Davidson. Pi The following tabulates the number of nation~ Ph· honoraries in Pi Kapp institutions: Ga: 1. 2. 3. 4.

Jllinois ................................................................................ ..! D · California .......................................................................... ..! Le. Nebraska .......................................................................... ..! e< Washington ...................................................................... ..! No

~: g~:~~~,;u~.~l-~:~ . : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : :

Cal

7. Alahama, Georgia ........................................................... . ton

8. North Carolina, Washington and Lee, Davidson, Flc Emory, F lorida ................................................................ Si~ 9. Trinity, Georgia Tech. .................................................... Ge 10. Tulane, N. C. S. C........................................................ . 11. Stetson, Tu lsa, Wofford, P. C. S. C., Roanoke ... ..

Charleston, Oglethorpe, and Mercer are nc blessed ( ?) with national honoraries, as far as know. Dut since this is the period of rapid ej pansion of existing nationals, and the national ization of locals, their blissful state may ha'' been destroyed, and others added to those prl viously mentioned in the other twenty-three Kapp colleges and universities. Professional fraternities are more numerot1 than honoraries, and they are rapidly multiplyin· and expanding. Ten years from now a Pi Kapl wil l be writing his master's thesis on Our AssO ciates, the Professional Fraternities, and I prop11 esy that it wi ll fill a shelf in some university Ji ~~ The largest group of professional fraternitie is that devoted to medicine. Pi Kappa Phi meet ten of them. (I am not sure but that some o those which I list are racial and sectarian. They are: Alpha Kappa Kappa at Nebraska, Cali

[ 14]

r

Ca no fo J< AI fo lllj Pi lSI O: D, 111

Cl clt

R A tic ti : m


:~~=========================================

--

T n

~~

S 1'

AR

A N D LA M p

for ni a, Oklahoma, T ul ane, and Geo rgia; Chi Sigma Chi at Georgia T ul ane E mory and Okl anol' ' ' ' hom a; Kappa Psi at Illinois, Nebraska, Cali tsI<3 f . tskn ornt a: North Carolin a, W ashington, Alabama, Calt Georgta, E mory, and T ul ane; N u Sigma N u at ignt Illin ois, Cornell, California, Nebraska, and T urnia lane; Omega Upsilon P hi at California; P hi inot· Alpha Sigma at Cornell and T ul ane; P hi Beta 'edt P i at Illinois, Alabama, T ul ane, Oklahoma, CaliCal fo rni a, Nebraska, and E mory ; P hi Chi at T ulane, 1 y, Alabama, E mory, No rth Carolin a, Californi a, ) kl! Illinois, Neb raska, Corn ell and O kl ahoma; P hi Jorl D It E e a .. p il on at Cornell , IJJinois, and T ulane; gtor and I hi Rho Sigma at Illin ois, Nebraska, and Ontt 1'ulane. 1gto T he legal professionals ranks next in number. Pi Kappa P hi meets six of them : Delta Th eta :i on~ P hi at Neb raska and California; Gamma Eta 1 Gamma at Illinois and California · P hi Alpha 1 ~elta at the two just menti oned, w:shington and 1 Nee: Washin.gton, Nebraska, Stetson, Oklaho~11 a, ....... 1 0 1 th CaroJm a, and Alabama· P hi Delta P ht at California, Co rn ell , Nebraska, 'Illin ois, Washington, ·w ashington and L ee, Okl ahoma, T ul ane, son, F~orida, North Carolina, Alabama, and Georgia; Stgma Delta Kappa at Washing ton and Lee, and Georgia; and Sigma N u P hi at Stetson. ;! ..... . T he tooth-pull ers rank next: Alpha Omega at Ca~i fornia; Delta Sigma Delta at Californi a, Illi · as nots, Tebraska; Psi Omega at Illinois and Cali d e;i for nia; and X i Psi P hi at Illinois, Californi a, onal Iebraska, and T ulane. The Bizad profession als, ha'' 1 1 ( P ~a Kappa Psi at Illinoi s, Nebraska, Cali pre . or111 a, Alabama, O klahoma, Washington, Wash~e m_gton and Lee, and Georgia, and Delta Sigma ~ 1 at Illinois, Teb raska, and Californi a. J ournalerott tsm, Sigma Delta Chi at Was hington, Illin ois, Iyin o Hat ' lOn1 a, ebraska, and Co rn ell, and Alph a [(a pi Delta Sigma at I llinois and Washington. P har4ss0 ; 1a_cy, Deta P hi S igma at T ulane, and P hi Delta roph ht at Cali fo rni a, Nebraska, O kl ahoma and P urty Ji 1 ~ue. A rchitecture, Scarab, at IIJin ois, and Alpha 1 ~: ° Chi at the same uni versity. O ratory, P hi 1itie . pha Tau at Nebraska and Okl ahoma. E ducanee! tt_0~1· Kappa P hi Kappa, E mory. Gradu ate ScienJe o t! ftc, Gamma Alpha, Illin ois and Californi a. Draian. mati c, T heta Alpha P hi, Stetson and Tul sa. Cali

ne~l

r

f or FEB R u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

Music, P hi Mu A lpha, Okl ahoma, Washington, and Nebraska. E ngineering, T heta Tau, Cali forni a, Illinois, Jabama, No rth Ca rolina . A total of 37 professional fraterniti es in 17 in stituti ons. T he number of each in the different P i Kapp uni versities is : 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

7. 8. 9. 10.

Illinois ................................................................................ .21 Califo rni a ............................................................................ 20 Nebraska ............................................................................19 Oklahoma ............................................................................ 13 Tulane ................................................................................ 12 Corn ell ................................................................................ 8 Geo rgia, Alabama, Washingto n .................................. 7 E mory, No rth Carolina .................................................. 5 Stetson, Washington and Lee ...................................... 4 Georgia Tech., Purdue, Tulsa and F lorida .............. 1

Is it any wond er th at our chapter letters look li ke a hash of th e sports page, the society column , and the Greek alphabet ? But athl eti cs, social intercourse, and the honorary and professional fraterni ties all have th eir place. It is well f or each man to wear at least one other pin besid e that of P i Kappa P hi , and if he can possess two pin s and a key, so much the better. These associates of ottrs are here to serve you. Every P i Kapp ought to make the best use of the one in hi s special fi eld. PAKA U R, BIHAn, INDIA .

ALPHA-ZETA GIVES INSTALLATION DANCE P i Kap pa P hi entertained with its formal install ati on dance Saturd ay evening. Corsages made up of the fraterni ty £.lower, a rect rose, and the colors, gold and white, were worn by all the gue ts. 'l'he house was decorated with gold and whi te streamers and palms, and lighted by J apanese lantern s. Patrons and patronesses were P rofesso r and M'rs. T . J. Starker and Dt·. and M rs. Ha rry 'S. Irvin e. Th e guests were M rs. F rank L . Howard, J-Ian·iet Brun skill , Greta Cleveland , Lois Cade, A li ce M urphy, Thresa O lson, Irene Kentta, Lois Scroggin, Beryl F loyd, Margaret McCoy, L ucille West, and Hazel Smith .-0. A. C. Baromet c1'.

[ 15 ]


=========================================~ ~ T

H E

S 'I'

AR

A N D LA M P

f or FEB R u

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

to An cur syn By J. N. H OLCOMBE, Z It ~ 0 USI N TOM was a P i Kapp of the th at such advantages could not exist without cer ous earli er days. H e had been out of col- tain obli gati ons whi ch they owed the fraternit fig, lege several years, and hi s fa mil y and in return for th e advantages th ey enj oyed. The. f ra busin ess cares cla imed most of hi s time. I was, neve r mi ssed a pa rty or dance the chapter gave in fac t, rath er surpri sed to lea rn th at he was th ey enj oyed the social prestige th at membershi: llly to 1 still in terested in the fraternity and in hi s old in I i K appa P hi con fe rred; and, whenever the. gav cha pter. went to a new place, t heir pin gave them intro Wat I-1e came to v isit at our house whil e I was th ere to spend th e Chri stm as vacati on of my ducti on into th e elite circles. Dut the strange! f res hm an year at school. W hen he fi rst saw my thing about th e who.l e busin ess was th at thos pin, whi ch I was at considerabl e pain s to di splay birds expected th ese pri vil eges to come as a mat rath er consp icuously on my vest, he gave me a ter of course-with out money and without pri ct " These fellows were always on hand whe lecture whi ch made me think pretty hard. A nd, favors were passed a round, but were hard t after th at, eve ry tim e we we re alone for a litfind whenever th ere were a ny ta sks to ass igt tle w hil e, he made a practi ce of throw ing ou t Th ey made me kind o' tired, even though the bits of oracul ar advice to me. were my broth ers; but I suppose th ey were siJll O ne a fternoon onl y Cousin Tom and I were pl y not th e sort of fell ows to be tru sted wit seated before th e fire in th e li ving room. He alanything big or important. A t any rate, since \I ways was rather dram atic . . That aftern oon he left school, I have noti ced that those members o kept gazing into the fire whil e a suggestion of the chapter who shirked th e tedium and monotoll twc a smil e pl ayed around hi s mouth ; he seemed to of the routin e work of th e chapter, while the ber be li ving ove r in reve rie some pl easant experi ence were in school, somehow haven't got very f~ WO ! of past yea rs. in th e business world. I t was just their m i~ a n P resentl y I was aware that he was looking at fortun e, I suppose, and not th eir fault. It's th byt me. cha same out in th e world as it was in coll ege-war "J ack," he began-Cousin Tom always call ed T h, me th at-" how many freshm en did the chapter just sort o' gravitates to the fell ow who can atl nar will. pl edge thi s year ?" act "As a rul e, those men who hold places o "Eight," I replied-"Counting me." honor in th e chapter a re the men who have give Per "W ell , I guess it's kind o' like it was when I ext was up th ere some years ago, " Cousin T om th eir best to th e chapter all through th eir coll e# of mused. "About fo ur of you join ed P i Kappa career. Th ey a re th e kind who just naturall 1 thi: P hi for what you can give to it, and the other cop th e biggest pri zes anywhere. O ne of tl tho fo ur of you joined for wh at you can get out of fell ows who was a rchon during my senior ye2 spl it. vVhen you get to be seni ors in school, t wo is drawing fifty thousand a year, and is in ]itt soc of you will be doing most of the work of the to head hi s company when hi s boss retires. It chapter, t wo of you will be standing by, ready all a big game of 'put and take'-with th e ell to do anything when you are call ed upon, and ment of chance left out. Th e more we 'pttl wh four of you will be concerning yourselves more th e more we will 'take' when favors a re eli: flnit OI with wha t P i Kappa P hi can do for you t han tributed. "A n d , m . my cay, I too, some of th e fell ows h ~ do w ith what you can contribute to P i Kappa P hi路 路 mat qu, th at is, if th e old law of percentages hold s goo d. a f unny concepti on o f a goo d fratermty 'rl . . 1ey seemed to thmk th ey were expected to g' n ~ " Th ere a re many advantages th at go with membershi p in a good coll ege fraternity; but it was drunk about three nights a week, sit in on ~ Lan l l'( hard f or us to make some of the fellows r ealize the poker games of th e campu s, and generall

C

IE

[ 16]


~ ~================================================== Tn

E

S '1' A R

AND

LAMP

to lead a life of 'riot and roaring dissipation.' And study-that did not enter into a Greek's curri cu 1um at all. In short, they belted . the 1deals • symbolized in the pin they wore on their breast. It seemed, too, that thev conceived these en ·one:er o~s ideas after they had. been initiated. I couldn 't 1it ftgure out who was at fault- the man or the he: frater nity. .vc ;hi he tro ge:

"Well , Jack, I guess I wasn't exactly a saint myself during my coll ege days; but I tried not to prove a disappointment to those fellows who gave me my bid. I figured that, if the bunch wanted a eli fferent type of fellow from the type

for FEn

R

u

A R Y,

192 5

I was when I got my bid, they would have given it to some other fellow, instead. A nd it usually was the case that these fellows who turned out different were the very ones who cloclgecl all the work and responsibility they could." "But say, Cousi n Tom," I interrupted. "I thought just then you were describing one of the most inAuential men in our chapter. He is just exactly that type of fellow." "That isn't the point, Jack," Cousin Tom answered qui etly. "The question is, 'How much more good might he be able to do for the chapter, if he were the sort o' fellow he ought to be?' "

l OS' 11 at

ric< ,he

1t ;igf the silll

wil e '\

B

By VAL IRION, A B

ROTH~R

POU opens hi s interesting and persuasive article in the last issue of ~s 0 t TFIE s'l'AR AND LAMP with a reference to 'ton bwo membership rolls, "one of the active memthc ers, the other the inactive or the alumni ." I fl wonder if there isn't sti ll another roll kerJt · J·ust mi! a 111 tl · ' Y ~Ical roll , perhaps, but a roll , nevertheless, ; til b}'I whi ch th ose w 110 carry on .th e work of the NOf chapte1· jt1d 1'! ge upon whom they can ca11 for help. an lough somewhat illogical on its face the best na~le to describe this roll seems "the Active-I ns o active-U . ncIergra d uate Roll." It has been my ex·vt Penence tl1a t t h'IS roll exists . ~~ to a greater or less ll ed extent in all . . . w1th . t 11e 11ope ' t of . . organizations. I t IS ratl tl . seemg 1ts member ship diminish that I add ress ' til tl11 S lette 1· t o t 11ose who may now be on it, to . t owar d 1t . an d to t I1at Y e~ 10se who are s ]'1ppmg 1 lii1 sp endid body of freshmen who' a re now or It soon 1·n ' I _w be, full members of P i Kappa P hi. eJr _t IS needless to talk of the solemn obligation ' I W1liCh e ptt . very p·1 Kapp took to serve hi s fraterli' nity no. 1 o f t h e duty he owes hi s chapter. Fo r c · 11 ' dot /n.ly do a11 know it, but preaching would 0 ; h~ Jttl e or no good. But maybe an imper sonal question . . mal or two, coupled with a r emmder of the J gr need of the fraternity for our active aid, and 11 earnest ca11 to arm s wi11 sti r within so111e 11 3 al. 'rot]1 · ' :ratl er that latent resolution to give all to Pi

Kappa P hi . If it does, I shall feel myself repaid. I don't believe there's one of u s who would not fight for the Gold and Wh ite, but will we work for them? But is there a separation, a lin e of demarcation between fighting and working? I think not. Fighting is a different kind of work, that's aU, and work is a different f<in d of fighting. W hil e the fraternity doesn't need us to fight, she does need us to work, and if we app roach that work with the proper spirit and the proper v iew, we wi ll see that it is really something akin to fighting. In the struggle within the fraternity for something finer, something better; in the friendly and honest rivalry between chapters of P i Kappa P hi, or between the up-to-date, active chapters on every campu s, th ere is a continual battle and a persistent call to arms. There is so much to be clone, such a field within w hi ch to wo rk, that it is difficult to see how, anyone can fail to find some congeni al activ ity within the fraternity circl e. If someone would go into each chapter meeting and ask the fu11 meri1bership of each chapter how m any of them would feel like men if they a llowed a few of the chapter pick up the balance and carry them on their should ers to and from school, not one woul d answer in the

[ 17]


========================~================='~ ~ T

II E

S

'l' A R

AND

LAMP

for FEB

R

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

of

affirmative. Yet is it not just as shameful to all ow a few of the brothers to "carry" the full responsibility of the chapter on their shoulders? W here is the spirit of fair-play, the honest, straightforward desire of Americans to pull their own weight in the world, to carry their own burdens? How many of us are giving of our best to the Fraternity? One of two reasons is usually given for not doing more for the fraternity. First: "I don't seem to fit in ." But the members should remember that they were chosen because the chapter thought they decidedly did fit in, and it is usuall y clue to a lack of real effort to find just the proper channel that causes thi s pessimistic attitud e. A talk with one of the older members, or with the A rchon wi ll remedy thi s situ ation. Second: "I haven't time." This is more diffi cttlt to correct, but often that statement is too

inclusive, for because th e individual expressin him self thus has a particularly ha rd course, h is led to believe that all others a re crips. I-l should remember that in hi s leisure hours, an all of us have some of these, there are ways t ser ve the fraternity whil e still having a goo time, and resting the old bean. These are problems for each one of us I solve for himself. No one can do it by blanket set of "don'ts" or "do's." But we路 can a find a way an d time to help lift the banner c P i Kappa! P hi high, even though our efforts i1 cl ivicluall y a re compa ratively insignifi cant. Fe we mu st remember that the obligation is neVI paid. Neither time nor money can obliterate i If we a re men, we must meet our responsibil ties, we mu st carry on. Let us resolve, 1 Kapps, to find ourselves during 1925 and mal thi s our banner year.

I NETEEN hundred twenty-five is Convention Year! The biggest and greatest convention in our hi story is on the program! At that time we shaiJ reach our majority. In keeping with this, th ere a re ce rta in things we should begin to con si der. P i Kappa P hi has 27 chapters. It is entering its 2 1st year. Due to its earli est conservatism , it can average an expa11sion of four chapters a year. But how long shall thi s continue? That brings up this question, "How large do we want our fraternity to be?" W ith the present number of chapte rs, at least in the South ern part of th e country, the P i Kapps a re scattered just enough to make one feel delighted to meet a strange broth er. You are all familiar with the attitude whi ch some of the large fraterniti es have created in their members. Again, how la rge a fraternity do we want ? To my mind 45 chapters or thereabouts, geographically well located, constitute an ideal fraternity. The objection to thi s statement that w ill probably be raised, from an altruistic standpo int,

acr th e gn als gn rec pn is that the benefits of a fraternity should not l get denied the rapidly in creasing numbers of collef 'ja students, and the consequent increase in mtmb' ha of instituti ons of higher learning. My conte1 ch: tion is that what the coll eges need are more a1 ch: not la rger academ ic fraterniti es. The other o ye: jections will be th at we shall be denying ot1 b e' se lves good oppo rtunities and good men. ~j ab contenti on is that, at the same time, we shot! be路 be permitting our fraternity to become unwield and to become of such size, th at proper supe th: vision will be impossibl e: W itness certain cha be ters of la rger fraternities. 110 Considering the foregoing it appea rs that W( would be of benefit, and to the best interest 1 a1l ou r frate rnity to either limit the numbe-r 1 ha chapters, or to so legisla te, th at a fter a ce rt~ be number of chapters had been reached, the prese' 111 . system of voting on new chapters be chang' f u to a unanimous vote of the convention. ltf. There is something else of vital interest to tI fraternity whi ch needs a more strict regul atiO be T hi s is the matter of th e wearing of the insigr1

N

[ 18]

va

mi

SO I

of ha pi!


~ G*========================================== 'l'

H E

ST

AR

A N D LA M P

;io of ~ur fraternity by girls. It has been my obserh va_tlon that occasionally even the pin will be J-1 nusplaced by some unthinking freshman, or by ao ome moon-struck upper classman. One mistake s t of tl11·S nature does the fraternity more ;oo h~rm than one might think. The wearing of Pills by members of the fair sex has been so s t

f or

FEB R

u

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

ridiculed of late by comic magazines and others, that it becomes an open question whether or not "the pinning" of a girl is adducive of benefit either to the man or to the fraternity. Would it not redound, ultimately, to the benefit of our fraternity, if the right to wear the pin Were restricted to members 0-N -L-Y?

•Y na r I

Fraternity Attacks 9 Their Causes anJ Rem.eJies

s il

Fe ,eve

te 1 ibil

,

J

11al

ott

)! Iei

mb' .nte' ~ a1 r o ott :r,l hot.! ield upc ch8

1at !St 1

!1"

1

~rta

·esc

lllg' 0

d

atiO ;igil

R

BY

MYBERT

ECENTLY while reading some communications addressed to the editor of a great metropolitan newspaper, I ran alcross the statement that "fraternities contain aiJ t 1e real 11 • . _ len on t 1 1e college campus" of a certam 1 g eat university. The author of this opinion said " non- f ratern1ty . men may be classed as a1so that c greasy grinds and uninteresting muckers." This recalled to me a statement that I have encountered previously. A fraternity man said to me: "We can get , . what we want. A man must have plenty of ~ac 1<' or be a cracker-jack athlete, or we won't lave him." MentaiJy I compared the active c lapter of wI11c . h I1e was a member with the same 1 c lapter as I knew it during my undergraduate years. Th e po r1cy h e I1ad stated had ev1dently . b een adopted and enforced and as far as I was able to . I , b . see, Jt 1ad not reacted for the particular eneflt of that chapter. _It seems to me that fraternity men need to thmk of tllese t h"mgs. The college fraternity has b een under fire at various times, and it is not now safely established by any means. Just this ~eek I encountered in a news item the fact that 1 Ia college fraternities in a small college in Illinois 1ad b bee n a bo1·1s 11ed by order of the college faculty eca~Jse of adverse public opinion in the com· w h"1c11 th1s · college was located. The fl1lun1ty 111 · cIepends largely uuture. of tl1e co II ege f ratermty Pon 1ts own actions. b Among the sins with which fraternity men have een charged are snobbishness, aristocratic ex-

E.

BROOM,

y

elusiveness clannishness and prejudice against non-fraternity men- all of which, it is urged, react to the disadvantage of college democracy and college extra-curricular activities. Perhaps the solution of the whole situation lies with local chapters. If the chapter selects "good men and true," all will be well. The qualifications for fraternal brotherhood should not be limited to personal wealth, or unusual political, athletic, or social ability. These last are important for the success of the chapter in its service to its alma mater and to its fraternity at large, It is true, but the prospective pledge must possess in a high degree the distinctive qualities of manhood above all other things. Of course, the alumni must keep these facts in mind also. Frequently it happens that an alumnus of the chapter may call the chapter's attention to some particularly good prospective pledge. His recommendation should be guided by the same considerations as that of a member of the active chapter. The chapter should be open-minded in considering prospective pledges. An effort should be made to make the group typical of the school which it represents. Democracy is as important as outstanding ability in determining the worth of the chapter. If fraternity men will put this thought into their creed and reAect the doctrine in their deeds, many of the attacks upon the fraternities will disappear for lack of sufficient cause to warrant an attack.

[ 19]


====================:====================~Q T

H E S '1' A R

A N D LA M P

f or

FE B R u A R v ,

19 2 5

------------------------------------------------------------~

-

A Pi K app F amiliy By T. R.

WAGGONER, M

OMETIMES it is the case that several brothers belong to the same f raternity but ra rer is the case where t he eligible members of practicall y the entire lin e of a fa mily are taken into the same fra terni ty. \ iV hen I came to tl anta in 1922 one of the f irst friends and br others whom I met was Brother J ames Chester R eeves, aff ectionately kn wn to all P i Kapps of thi s part of th e country as "Ches." T hat same "Ches" has been my room-mate fo r the past year. H e has held pra ~颅 t icall y every offi ce w ithin the A tl anta Alumni Association, representing the chapter at th e Cali fo rni a Conventi on in 1922. The P i Kapps of fa r and near know of hi s kindn esses to th e visiting br oth ers and hi s generosity towards I ota Chapter of whi ch he is an honorary member. "Ches" is a g raduate of Cha rl eston Coll ege and a membe r of A lpha Chapter. Drother Kenneth Earl Low man, A lpha, of Staun ton, Va., is a cousin of the same line. He was gradu ated from the Co ll ege of Charl eston and later f rom the Medi cal College of South Carolin a. B roth er W illi am F letcher Fairey, Jr., Zeta, of O rangeburg, S. C., was g raduated from U ni versity of South Carolina. He is a cousin of the same fam il y who was initi ated into II K <Jl. 1 rother E uchlin Daleo R eeves, E ta, is now a law stud ent at E mory U ni versity. "Euki e" is th e champion pledge r, hav ing pledged fifty odd men to our f raternity. W hen he swoops down on a f reshm an other fra terni ty men give up. He is a brother of "Ches." T he most r ecent a dditi on to our nobl e ranks of II K <1> from thi s family is Broth er Hazard Earl Reeves (Iota), of W ilmington, N. C., who is now a student a t Georgia T ech. O n the wall of our palati al qu arter s, whi ch, by the way, are located in the f ar-famed, Peachtree section, West Peachtree, hangs th e coat-ofarm s of th e Duke fa mil y. T he fi ve broth ers mentioned above bear th e arm s of this distin gu ished fa mil y. Now all. the fellows of M u,

where the writer cl aims an alma matership, n' supposed to stand and ~ive three husky yel for th at name. For th e benefi t of those brother who li ve in th e more di stant states let m e s3 tha t T rinity, th e home of M u, is now D uke l]o ve rsity. T he Duke family, of tobacco fame, h made ve ry generous contributi ons to th e upket and expansion of th at school. M r . J ames 1 Duke has recently donated $6,000,000 to th at i stituti on as well as 32 per cent. of th e a nntl income from $40,000,000. T he name of tt school has been changed in memory of Mr. Duke fath er, V\Tashington Duke, who was on e of tl coll ege's first benefactors. M r. B . N. Duk broth er of M r . J. B. Duke, has also made gene ous contributi ons to th e school. Trinity Collel w ill still be maintain ed as the coll ege of liber a rts. T o P i Kappa P hi I say, "we are proud to ha' these boys," and to "Ches" and hi s cousins 11r broth er, I say "bring on some mor e." 1

rr th ar.

se 111

th

A pi liJ th a le. 111

th fa

es al

].; 1

pi

a1 sc

HELP WANTED

T

O ne of th e most valuabl e sources of infornt路 tion for the Hi story of P i Kappa P hi are the ol s numbers of th e magaz ine. .1;: A ny one who will help us to locate, or retttf II to th e Central O ffi ce direct, old copi es of 'ftl Sl tl S 'I'A R AND LAMP o r T n T\ PT KAPPA PHI J ouRN路' prior to Volume VII will do th e F raterni ty real se rvice. So f a r no copy of th e first mtil ber of T he l 01trnal has been located. Y..Then compl ete fil e has been established, th e differer volumes will be bound and preserved as p ermanent recot:d. Can you help ? Send copies to Ceo. E. S heetz, 11 Exchanl Bank Building, Charl eston , S . C.

\\

li

,, d 11

s

a r

OLIVER OPENS OFFICES Boyd Oliver ann oun ces th e opening of offi cf for the general practi ce of th e Law at 1215 F ir Nati onal Bank building, San F rancisco, Cali

[ 20]


=~ ~==================================================

--

THE

STAR AND LAMP

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------By

p, ar yel othe: te sa ! l)r1 e, h

pkel tes I tat it tnntl ,f tl

)ukc )f tl Duk ~ene

:ollel liber

GEORGE ALLEN ODGERS, N

T

HE English .language is threatening to cover the earth as the waters cover the the seas. .E~1gli sh is the official . l~ n guage. of 560-odd mliiJon people of the Bntrsh Emp1re, and. of the United States and her far-flung possess ions. That is about one-third of the estimated population of the earth. Then there are the A 111 other . millions of Euror)e , sia ' Africa , South • ~ n ca, and Oceania, who are studyi ng or are l~Icbng up at least a few words of this great 1111 91ta franca.. In the most out of the way places, there is su1.e t o bc some one who speaks at least a few words of Engli sh, and who is eager to Iearn more . I 'I . , w 11 e many f ore1gners spea I< our mother t ongue more pure.ly and more fluently than many of us can. f

B~~~

there is Engli sh and Engl ish. vVe are all

amll~ar with British and American Engl ish, and

) ha1 especially with American slang, wh ich is probIS af'

for FEBRUARY, 1925

~bly

the most racy and stimu lating Engli sh 1 '~ own. Mo t people have also heard of the Pidgin En g I'IS I1 o f. tI.1e F-< ar East. Many Japanese and Chinese use perfect English, but there are ;~m~ like the baker in Tokyo whose sign reads, . ln,, BIGGES'l' LOAFER IN TOKYO.

. In India we have another variety of English. mce the famous Educational Minute of Macau·~ay, Engli sh has been the medium of instruction ·ettlf In the high schools and colleges of India and the 'fri stud Y o f the language has been carried 'on from TRN·1 the third g rae1e upwar d s. 'f he result is that the Jity \~ell-eclucated Indian is as much at home in Eng. . I. nurt Ish as h c IS 111 11s own vernacular. But as else· I n d'1a, many children . hen where so 111 sta rt to school :erer Who cl·o 1 P out along the way. These men, and too , re t a m . a f ew words or phrases, and as c1Women . ehght to use them. One evening a middle-aged man step pe d up to me and sa1d, . "Good mornmg. . . Sir; the crow i black," and then bowed him self . away 0 · n anot11er occasiOn, a stranger stopped me on a . .1 • . c 1a1 way station platform, and sa td , "I saw you tl11s . mornmg. . " I spo I<e to h1m . 111 . Eng• 1 :fict '1~sh, and he replied that he had used all the EngFir .1sh he knew. \i\lhere he had picked it up there IS no telling. ' =:ali

1

[ 21

Many of the Indians never master the Engli sh sounds, intonations, and rhythm; but Indianize as much as possible. Many times, unless one li stens very carefully, he fails to recognize E ngli sh as it is spoken . Many of these speakers are office clerks or secretaries to whom the honorific babu is given . Hence, we have babu English. She is a lmost never used. II animate objects are he. The speaker seems to object to saying sh, preferring to· aspi rate the s as he does in hi s vernacu lar. The other day several goats broke into my garden, and I had the gardener capture and tie them up. During the afternoon, a college student came for one of them. I asked him which one he wanted, and he said, "The white, see goat; he is mine." Th, sh, and ch, they will not say, but t, s, and c. The labials also distract the Indian. Often he mixes his E ngli sh with his vernacu lar, and we get such examples as Jab Goven1111 Cllf do11ble-1'ail raldtega., to accident bah1~t mim'mi:::e howcga. Many times he translates literall y, as did the Mohammedan shop-keeper in Agra, whose sign reads, GOD HELP US & CO. More often when w riting, the spelling is likely to be as "she ounds." For a Jong time, there was on Dharamtalla Street, Calcutta, a shoe-repair shop with this sign-"Hell and Sou ls Repared Hear." But what gives one a thrill is to receive a letter like this: Honoured Sir, Having been amputated from my family for several months, and having complaints of the abdomen con] led with great conflagrations of the internals with entire prostration of all desire for work, T beg to be excused from orderly .work for ten or nine days, and in duty bound, T w ill a lways plead for the salubrity of your t\'!mper and the enlargement of your fami ly. I have the honour to be, Sir, Y9ur most obedient servant,

A number of the daily newspapers, owned and ed ited by Indians, are published in Engli sh . Among these is Mr. C. R. Das' Forward, the mouthpiece of the Swarajist party. Like many of its contemporaries, this paper "perpetrates some g hastly E ngli sh," and cove rs its pages w ith

l


=================================================~ THE

STAR

AND

LAMP

hashed metaphors. Recently, in commenting on the new ordi nance again st v iolence, which Government has promulgated for Bengal, Forward declared: " Th e pen that has dared to strike clown the sacred, personal liberty of millions has also drawn a reel herring ac ross the number of clays the Empire is yet to live and fl ourish here in India."

T he printer of another paper recently made the cross-head above the following glowing passage from a speech delivered during the course of a fiery debate in the Calcutta City Counci l read "Young Pitty of the Corporation":

for

FEBRUARY,

1925

"It has been directed against Subbash Chandra Bo' the idol of the citizen's of Calcutta, the young P itt ' the Corporation administration, the app le of the eye all Nationali st workers, the boy, who, as a high ]\l[ur cipal officer told me, stirred out with the cockcrow r hi s minicipal work, did his outdoor business ti ll ten th e morning, then went straight to his office witho morsel of food for his crying bowels or a drop of clrir for his parched lips : clruclgecl there till one in the nor then adjourned for half an hour to his residence f, bolting his breakfast a nd then again came back to J. bour some time till twelve strokes in th e clock remindc him that midnight had stolen on his self-forgetful di charge of duty."

w fi tl

Ir

" "a

Ci

\1

W hat a pity, Engli sh is not English. PAKAUR, BIHAR, I NDTA.

tl a

AJlpha-DeJlia anJ the U niversiiy <D>f W ashingtt<D>n By

GORDON

HE University of Washington has quite a unique system of checking up on the grades of the organized fraternities on the campus, through its offices of the Dean of Men and Dean of Women. Each house appoi nts a personnel officer, whose duty is to check up the standing of the stud ents in his hou se and attend meetings of the personnel officers, where house standings and grades ar e discussed and plans laid to overcome difficulties that confront these officers. The Dean of Men presides over the meeting for the men 's hou ses, whil e the Dean of Women over that for the women. Five g rades are given, onl y four for credit, viz.: A 96- 100, B 86-95, C 76-85, D passing 70-75, i.e., Excel lent, Good, Fair, and Satisfactory. E, below 70, is a flunk and must be repeated before grad uation. At mid-term, i.e., six weeks after each quarter starts, exams a re given and the grades are given to each student on the house grade cards signed by the instructor or professsor. . In this way th e house has a check on all of its students. If a student falls below 70, i.e., a pass, he r eceives a blue card from the registrar, who politely informs him that he is below pai路, and that he will have a terribl e time getting through hi s finals six weeks away. Then if a student falls below two-thirds of

T

C.

ALLEN

hi s hours, C, he is put on probation for a quartt and if he falls below 70 and at the same time h1 total is below two-thirds, C, he is kicked out c school and has to petition the Board of Deail for re-admission, which may or may not 11 granted. On top of that the admission for eP trance r equirements are such, the high schoC student must have a B average or he cannot gai admission to thi s institution, that from a schola' tic standpoint only the best students, on paper ~ least, can have the honor of gracing our wortll portals. By sending out warnings the universit hoped to eliminate much unnecessary flunking b jolting the student before it was too late. VI' r eceived a card from the Dean of Men this wee with the following notation written on it: ''f Kappa, Phi is the only fraternity not receivi11 a warning." This came in a letter to the persoP nel officer and to u s it is of the greatest signif1 cance, and we. are out to raise our standpoint j: the finals a month from now. In view of th fact that there are thirty-five fraternities, most!: all national s, on this campu s, besides six indr pendent hou ses, wh ich are always includ ed ir with the fraternities as organized men's hou se! we feel that we have made a fairly good star this fall and hope to be able to keep up the goO'

[ 22]

c

11

11

s

11

n

11

e f

tl

,,c

,,

I路 a

'


=~

~================================~~ T Ill~

Bo' ' itt eye Mtu JW l

ten ·ith drir : no< ce f, to I. 1inclt

.11 di

Jart' 1e h •ut c )eati Jt I •r et: .chol : gat 1ola' >e r ~ orth ersit ng It

,,

wee "/

:

!ivht : r so~

o-ni fi• :> in t !' f th wstl: indf ~ d it n1se~

star goo·

S '1' A R

ANn

LAM r

work. Last fall quarter we were well within the first ten f raterni ties and we a re out to better that record. . Our basketba ll team did not get going· in the mtermural knockout tournament fo r the first week but we f inished second in our division. A t cross-country, whi ch banner we won last year, we are several points ahead of all the frate rniti es and have a goo d chance to repeat again thi s year. W hil e some of us are working our way through school, by working half a day and attending classes the other half, practi cally ever y free man was on the job today and seventeen ran over the course whi ch has a back-breakin g hill to climb for tlle f mal ' . three-q ua rters of a mile. I ntra-mural athletics a re games, etc., organi zed amongst the organi zed men's houses on t he ~am pus, Greek boxing, and ind ependent, and ~nclude basketball , cross-country, w restling, boxmg, baseball , relay tenni s foul shooti ng horse 5I ' ' ' lOes, etc., and th e house that win s the greatest · ·111 t 11e aggregate IS · t I1e mter· number of pomts mu:al champion for the year. T he first six are major g roups and have indi vidual trophies as Well , th e fraterniti es and independents hav in g each one to battle over. T he di sciplin e of th e frate rni ties and independent houses is vested in the combined rep resentatives of the student board of control, th e Associated S tudents of th e Uni versity of \1\!ashin gton. the D ean of Men (and :omen for the sororiti es) and ind ependent lOUses, and th e I nter-Frate rnity Coun cil. T hey are directly under the supervision of th e U ni ver ity d an any compl a ints from residents even are forwarded fro m the city to the U ni versity !Jefore an · · ta 1<en on the part of civic · · Y action IS auth · · . on ti es ( maybe because the Chi ef of I olice a "grad" 11 owever, it is a recogni zed fact lere_ that if a ni versity wants an a ll -uni versity affatr or 111a tt er put over t 11ey get 111 · touc11 wit · I1 the frat · 't · f Irst, ' · goes, beca use c et 111 Ies and over 1t they a . re so well orgamzed that th ey can be reached immedi ately, and second, because they are so well organi zed th at their united forces ~ re ab.!e to sw ing the rest of th e U nive rsity, not ecause of numbers, but because of well -concerted and united action. T he f raterni ty houses are scattered amongst adj oining residents and mu st compl y with r egulations of th e U niversity,

;s

r

f or FEn R u

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

i. e., fraterni ty and so rority houses may not tJe adjoining one another, etc. T he residents of tl:e U niversity di stri ct can and do demand their r ights as citi zens and taxpayers and so between all these restrictions, laws, friends and crabby, cranky neighbors, the Greek houses have come to stay and be a bless ing to the di str ict, for, have th ey not made it possible to have a district, and, do th ey not compose by fa r the g reater part of it ? We, as f raterniti es, a re not stuck on ourselves, but if the U ni versity wants anythin g clone they call on the f raterni ties. T he t ime we spend on U ni versity matters is v ital to the uni ve rsity, yet the Dean of men and some others give us no credit for such accompli shments . \ 1\fe are out to beat the in dependent reco rd bu t we hate to have it continually ru bbed in . I t is no uncommon thing to get a letter from the Dean of Men, or some oth er off icial of rank, pointing out this fac t to us, who already kn ow it onl y too we.l l, and we are not at all surpri sed, fo r it is only one of th e many meth ods used to pep up Greek lads to greater endeavors. I venture to say th at the f raterni ty representation in the purely scholasti c honora ry fraterni ties is eve ry bit as goo d as the independ ents in p roportion to th eir num bers. T hat in itself proves my point. Do not misconstrue my idea. We have come f rom the bottom in two years to the pos ition we held las t year, whi ch is no mean accomplishm ent fo r any fraterni ty, if from the top thi s year eith er. \1\fhat I wish to give, though, is perhaps a li ttl e better understanding of the fraternity ideals and standa rd s, as well as their requirements along th e scholastic lines, as fa r as th e campus and th e U niversity of Washington authoriti es are concern ed. No one is more interested in the standing and reputation of P i Kappa P hi than A lpha-Delta, who is just a bit jealou of her predecessors who have .li fted our fraternity to th e lofty pinn acle wher e she now reposes.

BROTHER BYRD WEDS The marriage of B roth er J. Cozby Byrd , I ota, to M iss E dna Margaret T ind al, of Washington, D. C., occurred J anu ary 17. T hey will be at home at 435 \iVes t 119th Street, New York City. B roth er Byrd is an a rchitect of New York.

[ 23]


·=======================rt; ~ T n E S '1' A R A N n LA

M P

for FEB

R

u

A R Y,

192 5

pr tl p

By GEo. E. SnnE'l'z, A

OUBTLESS many Pi Kapps read recently in the January 6 number of the American Legion Till eekly of the work undertaken by Brother George D. Everson of Chi, but a great many more probably did not see thi s number of the liVee ll ly and we call attenti on again here to the work that Brother Everson is now doing. O ut of the thousand s of supporters and worke rs that the Legion has all ove r the country, Broth er Everson, together with six other loyal legionn aires, has been selected as one of the vangua rd to put across the I egion's plan to raise an endowment fund of $5,000,000. For sometim e he has been in Chi cago preparing for thi s work. J-Ie has now compl eted hi s course of training and is at present avail able to carry out special duties in the three States where work is un der way, at the same time help ing p repare for the campaign in other states. Vve are proud that Brother Eve rson has been selected for this work. It is fu!Jy in acco rdance with th e record he has establi shed as a worker for Pi Kappa P hi . He was one of the charter members of C hi Chapter and since the fraternity has, been establi shed in F lorida he has been one of its most loyal boosters in his native state. As Chapter Inspector for F lorida hi s work has been beyond criti cism and he has cooperated with the other off icials of the fraternity in every way desired. We feel confident that the same will be true of hi s work for the A merican Legion and that he may depend upon the membership of his fraternity, as the fraternity has depended upon him , to help him put hi s part of the progra m across. T he accoun t in The Legion W eeldy is as fol lows:

D

"The actual work of rai sing T he A merican Legion's $5,000,000 E nd owmen t Fund for di sabled men and the orphans of veterans got und er way with the beg inning of the new year. Seven Legionna ires, a ll of them chosen for their r ecord s of accomplishment in the Legion, a re now serving as fie ld sec retaries to ass ist the depa rtment and post officia ls of the first three

States whi ch have been selected for the open ing o' the Legion's nation-wide campaign. These three statr are Illinois, Kentucky and Indiana, with Cook Cou n!i Illinois, the seat of Chicago, regarded as a separat• unit. Plans for beginning the rai sing of funds in al' other States are rapid ly nea rin g completion. "The seven fie ld sec reta ries now at work hav e al ready completed the cour se of instr uction. They art Ra nd olph Gar land B ishop, of La P lata, Maryland George 13. Everson, of Palatka, F lorida; S. Reau Kenll of Bloo mington, Illinois; J arvi s Beach Price, of 'f!t peka, Kansas; Philip Bra un Stapp, of Greens bu rl Indiana ; Fred Edward Bury, of Danvi lle, Illinois, all· Lyle D. Tabor, of Detroit, Michigan. "Each of these men has made a thorough study o' the purposes for which the Legion is rai si ng the ctr dowment fu nd. He wi ll place thi s knowledge at th< di sposal of the officials of the Legion depa rtm ent ir which he serv es during the ca mpai gn. Each depart ment will have charge of the collection of funds withi1 its boundaries, and the field secretari es wi ll act largcl' as adv iso rs. The efforts in the first thr ee States ar< expected to affo rd valu able lessons that will be utili zcl in the remaining departments as the ca mpaign is e$' te nd ed. "Field sec retaries are now working with departmell' and post officials of T he A merican Legion and th1 America n L egion Aux il ia ry and intervi ewing lead itl, citizens of com muniti es. In each State the prelim i n ;~r! work of the campaign wi ll occupy a number of week and th e actual solicitation of funds in most cases i· ex pected to b(l ·confined to a single week. "Mr. Bishop as f ield secretary fo r Kentucky ha' es tabli shed headqua rters at Louisville. Mr. Ke mP who will se rve hi s home State of Illinois, w ill haV 1 hi s headquarters in Bloomi ngton. Mr. Stapp will ha1'1 headquarters in Ch icago and wi ll ass ist in the cat11' paign for all of Cook County. Mr . Price, f'eld secre· tary for Indiana, has hi s headquarters in Tn d ianapoli> Mr. Everson, Mr. Tabor and Mr. Bury are at prese111 avai lable to car ry out special duties in the three States where wo rk is und er way, and at the sant' time are helping prepare for the campaign in the other States. Mr. B ury w ill conti nu e to act as ad mini stra· tive director of all the field secretaries and ass istat 11 executive sec retar y of the E ndowment. "N a tiona! Command er James A. Drain is elated hi the favorable reception of the an nou ncement of th 1 Leg ion's pla n to rai se th e $5,000,000 endowment fun d W ith President Coolidge serving as Chai rman of th 1 Honorary Executive Comm ittee which wi ll direct th 1 rai sing of the fund, witl1 a dozen other of the most

[ 24]

ti d

I

b

p I

v

d

L (

c


:~ G*=========================================

-lg 0

statt >UI11J .arat' in nf ·c al y art land Cen1r

: 'J'O ;b ur~ '

;111

ly

(1

T

II E

S T A R

A N D

L

A M p

Prom:nent · . tl11. men 111 Ame n ca n public life members of s committ ee, t 11e country obviously has been imI) rcssed b tl . II Y le c11aracter of the Legion's effort. Pract tca Y eve r · nt Amer ica n new spaper has end or ed th e Y Importa I .. . enc ow ment-ra 1smg pla ns. Scores of citizens have · wntten to th e National Commander pledg-

PI MOURNS BROTHER'S DEATH passing of Robert M. Jackson, who died 0 pneumonia December 22 1924 Pi char)ter has 1 . ' ' ' . . . ost one of 1t most active and most PI OnliSing 1 )ers. But the loss is not only to P 1. char)ter mem · a loss to th e fraternity. He · I t IS Was a worl (er f or 111s . chapter, but hi s activities

KNte

1

e ell t th1

nt ir ~ part

vithi1 1 rgcl s art

f

or

FE B R u A R Y ,

19 2 5

in g their assistance in the ca mpa ign. The ft: ll amount of the endowment so ught would prov id e a yearly income of $225,000 or mo re, suffi cient to enable the Legion to carry on its activities for di sabled and needy childr en of veterans without the necessity of a yea rly appeal for funds."

In Atlanta and Georgia, he was always a gobetween th e chapters in working out plans for the fraternity's betterment. He never mi ssed a banquet or a Pi Kapp meeting. He was known in every chapter hou se in th e state. He was one of the first to put hi s shoulder to the wheel to put th e Atlanta convention over big, he was one of the hardest workers during th e convention, and made many friends throughout the delegation. Bob Jackson was a prince of a fellow, a good pal and buddy, and a brother to every P i Kapp. But Bob is gone. What a loss ! But hi s influence is still felt throughout the fraternity.

:ilizct s c~

tmd

OUR NEED OF A BUILDING FUND

1 th 1 actin

By

tin ~ r )

;eel<' ;es i· ' h~· Cen11' h~l·f h~l·l

can,. ;ecrc· 1poli. ·esel11

thrc 1 san11

other istrn· .istant ~ ct }i)

f till fund f thl :t th 1

most

did not t

• • s op at home. His interest and persond1lty wa f 1 ]) 's e t everywhere. H e was never too u Y to c1 ·

0

°

a good deed for , Pi Kappa Phi. At 1 get 1lOrpe he was a leader in activities-though not an tl I at ]] . a 1 ete, he wa an ardent supporter of 1 etJc o and f 11 . .. f f Colle~ l'f o a act1v1t1es or th e betterment . ge I e. Always on th e alert he brought lnany 1 d ' P e ges to hi s chapter and the fraternity.

°

SHELr.:r;:v S. SANSBURY, 0

Our fraternity has reached a stage in its development in which it becomes necessary for it to devote its seriou s attention to certain matters. There are two suggestion s I should like to put before the fraternity. The first is: a bnilding fnnd. Some means mu st be provided for the assistance of chapters which will be chartered in the future. We cannot expect all the chapters in th e fraternity to be able to construct a home to meet their needs. If each of our present chapters were assessed so much per month and if a few dollars were added to the national initiation fee, we should soon have a respectabl e fund, which could aid young chapters in building a house. The second suggestion is: The establishment of a unified bookkeeping system simpler th an the Inter-Fraternity System, for those chapters owning or renting a house.

[ 25]


======================================~ T

II

B S '1' A R A N D LA M P f or F B B R u A R v, 1 9 2 5

By

R I CHARD L. YOUNG,

K

AMES B. DUKE, tobacco kin g and power magnate, of New Yo rk and Charl otte, N. C., star tled th e educati onal world in December with th e. announcement of hi s gift of $40,000,000 to edu cational, chari table and religious instituti ons in Nor th an ct South Carolina. As th e resul t of th e gift, T rinity Coll ege, at Du rha m, N . C., whi ch has been favo red by th e Duke f amil y with large benefactions for years, changed its name to Duke U ni ve rsity. In the ind enture Mr. Duke specif ied th at a straight-out gift of $6,000,000 woul d be made to Trini ty Coll ege if th e tru stees would change th e name to D uke U ni versity in honor of hi s fath er, \iVashington D uke. Meetin g a few days after the ann ouncement, tru stees of Trinity accepted th e gift wit h the sti pul ati ons and changed the na me of th e in stituti on to Duke U niversity. Th e name T rinity, however, will be pr ese rved as pa rt of th e univers ity, for th e coll ege of L iberal A rts w ill be kn own as T rinity Co ll ege.

Th e Durham instituti on will receive 32 per cent of $2,400,000, th e annual in come from th1 $40,000,000 of stock in th e Southern Power Company. This will mean th at an annual ap propri ation of $768,000 will be made for th1 coll ege. Three other Carolin a educati onal in stituti on路 were benefi ciaries of th e Duke g ift. Dav ids01 Coll ege, a P resbyteri an college near Charl otte N . C., will receive fi ve per cent, or $120,00: annu all y whil e a like amount will go to F urmaf U ni ve rsity, a Bapti st in stituti on at Greenville South Ca rolina. J ohn son C. Smith U niversity, a college {or negr oes at Cha rl otte, N. C., will r eceive fot11 per cent. or $96,000 annually. It was specifi ed in th e indenture th at 20 pe: cent of the annual in com e f rom th e $40,000,00: will be withh eld until th e reserve fund shnl have reached $40,000,000, doubling the princl pal of th e original gift.

0 . U. PI KAPP GRID STAR

He is fi erce on both th e off ense and defenst and is an un excell ed interference runner. Jirl has been the stell a r tackle on the 0. U . teaf1 for three years, but will g raduate at the end o th e semester. O f cause, Alph a-Gamma r egrets to loose hit11 H e is always active in fraternity affairs and iJ instru cting th e pledges how to becom e good r Kapps. But thi s is not all, he is a member O Alpha Kappa Psi, hon orary economi c fraternit)

J

Oklahoma U ni vers ity football team will mi ss B rother J ames Penj ck at tackl e when it begin s

POU ENTERTAINS PI KAPPS

to train next yea r. He carries 197 pounds around on th e fo otball field with the speed of a sprinter.

Hrother L eo H. Pou, O micron, '2 1, was h O~ to th e Jasper, A labama, P i Kapps at a dinnc party a t the Hotel Cranford in J asper on th' evening of December 30. Those present were B roth ers Neilsen O 'Rear and L acy E llis, ail' P ledges Geo rge O'R ear, E d ward H a milton at1' R obert Argo, all of O micron Chapter .

l26]


~

-

~=================================== THE S 1'

ti otl' dsol .ottl ),Q(J -111 ar

ville for fot11

) pe:

),00. sh ~l

r·inct

A

R

ANn

LAM:

The Interfraternity Conference T

HE sixteenth annual Interfraternity Confer . ence was call ed to or der by A. Bru ce BielaskJ , chairm an, at the J-l otel Pennsylvania, New Yo rk City, on November 28th, 1924.

1'he P i Kap pa P hi delegation consisted of Geo · E· Sll ee t z, execut1ve · secretary · J. Cozby Byrd, fo rmer busin ess manager of 'T HE S'l'AR AND LAMP; \Valter Measday, Jr. , president New Yo rl · 1 · ' a umn1 chapter . Broth ers R alph W . Noree n. anc1 T,( urt C. Lauter, chapter in spector fo r New Yo rk, served as alte rnates. I regret that I have not been abJ e to prepa re

~ compl ete repo r t for publi cati on on th e happenensl

Jill

t eat1

Jd

0

hit11 ld jl

,d r er o ·nit)

mgs and impressions received at the Conference· the actu a 1 d'1scuss1·ons and r ecommendati ons of' the Con fere nce will appear shortl y in detail in th e mint1tes , cop1·es o f wh1ch · · be 1ssued · · wlll to each chapter and off icer of th e fraternity. In them ve r . t . . . . Y 111 er estmg general fratern1ty mforl11atJon will be presented. In t he meantime, I should 11 1· . l a ,e ment1·on of the very m asterful and Inspiring address delivered befo re the Confer· ence by Bishop H a rri s, of the E pi scopa l Diocese ~f Marquette; th e di scuss ion of honorary mem)e r hi p promoted by "Colonel" Leve re of S. A. E., termin ating in the decision that it was not pr~per fo r the Conference to take any definite acti on i tl · . . . n 11 s regard, but w1th th e exp ressed 0 1111 P 0n tha t membe rs should not be ini tiated except d as un erg radu ates and the recommendati on 1 t lat Where desired faculty adviso rs be appoin ted ; ~,h e Conference reiterated its condemn ati on of rough stuff " in initia ti ons; the committee on

p

for FEB R u

A

R v, 1 9 2 5

Social Hygiene outlin ed an ambiti ous progr am of work in its report whi ch, if success ful , as it should be, will be one of the real accornpli shments of th e Conference; the r epo rt of th e committee on chapter house a rchitecture ev idenced considerabl e thought and investigation and was intended as a preJ iminary step in the prepa rati on and issuance of a book by th e Conference on th e subj ect. Thi s should be of g reat help to chapters contemplatin g building. T he central idea was to a rri ve at some fo rm of distinctiveness or indi vidua li ty fo r chapter houses, and to have them plann ed so as to prov id e both economy and com fo rt for th e occupants. Brother Cozby By rd, Iota,. ' 19, one of our delegates to th e Confe rence, is secretary of thi s committee, and has expressed hi s willingness and desire to be of any ser vice poss ibl e to th e chapters of P i Kappa P hi , in preparing suitable plans for new chapter houses. T he new officers of the Conference elected at th e last sess ion were: Chairman, Dr. Walter H . Conl ey, II ~ K ; V ice-Cha irman, H. R. J ohnston. t:. K E; Secretary, Dr. H . S. Baketel, B ® II ; T reasurer, \t\fm. R. Dayes, <Jl t:. ®. D on R. Almy was elected chairma n of the I nter-local Fraternity Conference, succeeding Ju dge Bayes. Th e fin est thing about th e whole affa ir was being th ere and see ing and meeting so many veterans in the cause, and reali zing afr esh that whil e we a re proud to consider ours a g reat and vital organi zat ion in itself, we can do a g reat deal of goo d, not only among ourselves, bu t anywhere and everyw here that coll ege men get together.

[ 27]


================================================~ T n E S T A R A N D LA M P for FEB R u A R Y, 1 9 2 5

Lost Pi Kapps

More Alumni Subscribers

Si nce a number of our lost brother s r e-appeared as a result of our las1J "ad," we are publi shing herew ith a second li st of names and a ddresses from which letters a nd copi es of THr-: STAR AND LAMP have been returned to us Wl.cla:imed. P lease ma il co rrection s or inform ation to the Central O ffi ce, addressed to the executive secretary.

Every member of the fraternity should be · life subscriber of THl~ S'L'AR AND LAMP. \\'< have always wanted that, and always will. T[er< is anoth er thought on the subj ect. There are ap proximately nine hundred alumni members wh1 a re not now receiving T nr·: S'l'AR AND LAllfl' That number will not increase as the presen· life sub cription pl an will take care of new met11 bers, but by far the greater part of thi s toP of nin e hundred is composed of th e older mett who have been members of th e fraternity fo' years and hav e watched it grow and expanr from its infancy. They are the ones whose in terest we want to retain. Most of them a re no! on th e mailing li st and for many of them '~' do not have correct addresses, but we feel sur< that if the new S'l'AR AND LAMP, th e magazit1' we are proud to call the official publi cation o~ Pi Kappa Phi, is placed in their hand s for t1V' or more consecutive issues, to bring th em it touch again with the doings of the fraternit: and ma ke them appreciate that a life subscrip tion at $10 is r eally a good investm ent, that : number of new life subscription s will r esttl from these valued alumni. The central offic< therefore makes this proposition: It will sell' w ithout question to any nut-m.ber of the frM enlit' n ot n ow 1·eceiving THE S1'AR A D LAMP, on r qu.est, a, copy of the maga:::ine fo1· two conseC11 five iswes, provided the request is received i time so that a sufficient Sltpply of extms ma.y b· secured, after w hich the recipients of sl.tch copir will be ask ed to subscribe. TH E STAR AND LAMP is our best means o keeping in touch with our alumni-our bei and only advertisement to the general member ship. For the next seve ral month s, therefor 1 and as much longer as is necessary, every prei ent life subscriber is asked and expected, to hell us place a copy of the magazine in the hands O eve ry member of the fraternity, who ought '' be getting it-but isn't. Send us th eir names O place thi s notice before them; show them th~ THE S1'AR AND L AMP is worth $ 10 of anybod)' money for life, no matter how long or ho'' short hi s life may be. We want to build up THE S'l'AR AND- LAllf' savings fund (which now amounts to close ''

Percy App leby, 247 New York Hall, Loui svill , Ky. ] . H. Barrett, K ings ton, Georgia. Oneal W. Chaud en, 198 Boul evard, · Ath ens, Ga. F . D. Cline, Wilson, N. C. Jack Conlin , American Hotel, St. Louis, Mo. R. P. Cur eton, Box 12, Miami, Florid a. Kenn eth Dogan, 729 Clayto n Street, San F rancisco, Cali fornia . L. W . Foster, West Point, Ga. James P. Hollars, Tulan e U ni ve rsity, New Orleans, Loui siana. Richard Beck Holmes, 605 E. 21st Street, Indianapoli s, Indi ana. E lm er G. Krause, 203 Eas t E Street, Belleville, Ill. Berkeley D. I am bert, Stetson U ni ve rsity, DeLand, Flor ida. Chas. Frederick Lawrence, Conway, S. C. N. R. Miller, Ticonderoga, New York. R. B. Morr is, 273 Juniper Street, Atlan ta, Ga. John. E. Patton, Jr., 230 St. J ohn s Street, Brooklyn, New York. Ca rl J. Peterson, Beaumont Hotel, Kansas City, Mo. 0. S. Pou, Traford, T exas. (No such Postoffice.) Ralph Pulliam , Route 7, Box 17-A, Tulsa, Okla. R. P . Stacy, 902 South Avenu e, Wilkinsburg, Pa. Cecil C. Strimple, 3507 Harvey Street, Omaha, Neb. R. R. Wallace, 328 Datura Street, West Palm Beach, F lorida. ] . E. White, 92 Capital Squar e, Atlanta, Ga. W . E. Wilkins, 519' Hampton Ave., Greenville, S. C. D. E . Woods, %Western E lectric Co., Stanton, Calif.

Help Wanted O ne of the most valuable sources of information for the hi sto ry of Pi Kappa P hi are the old numbers of the Magazine. Anyone who will help us to locate, or return to the central office, old copies of THE STAR AND LAMP or the Pi ](a,ppa Phi Jo u1'nal prior to Volume VII , will do the fraternity a real se rvice. So far no copy of the fir st number of th e J ou.rna.l has been located. When a complete fil e has been established , the different volumes will be bound and preserved as a permanent rece>rd. Can you help?

[ 28]


~======================================= THE STAR AN D LAMP f or FEBRUARY, 1 925

)e .

,,.,

Ter• : atl" wh• \!If I'

:sen· 1ent tot~

,,eli fo: )ani ~

iil

: nol I

II''

sur tziO' 11 ol

t1Vf

it rnil: cril1 1at : esul 11

$10,000) to the point wher e its income will take care of the magaz ine expense. \Vhen this is done it may be possible to reduce chapter dues and assessments. Figure it out for yourself how long it will take and what nin e hundred new life subsc ribers would do for it. Several years ago, under the old plan, a number of men signed notes for payments to comI:lete the $10 .life subscription. The opp orttmity IS still ope n for these mem bers to complete their ~a3'1ne11ts and be placed on the perma ne1 1f mail11/g li-st.

me know. Book ings sh01tld be placed soon, however.

nee the step is taken and the subscripti on made it will never be regretted and Tm~ S'I'AR AND LAMP will follow them as .long as their correct addresses are on file in the centra l offi ce. '1'111. . · S I not a case where Geo rge or a ny other one individu al can do it a ll but the indi vidual effort of every member o/ the fraternity will soon enabl us to consid er, insteacl of nin e hun dred · . miscell aneous membe rs, that more in sp irmg phrase, N I NE T-1UNDERD EW UFE SUBSCRIRERS.

Time has lipped by quickly sin ce P i f appa Phi m et in Atl anta in December, 1923. Th e convention to be held in Chicago is already less than <!; yea r di stant. Each chapter must reali ze that it should have under way at the present so me stabl e system of financing its shar e of the convention expenses. Every member should b ~ paying right now a monthl y assessment in tl~e amount suffi cient to advanc to the chapte r s delegate the expense money he will require. Th e usual adju stment will be made after the convention but th e fact r emain s that it is unfair for th e 'entire burden to fall upon the men who will be in the chapters next December. The way should be prepared now. No one can afford to mi ss the big meeting and each chapter will be r eq uir d to have a delegate present. Convention plans will be unde1' way soon. This is just a prelude, a hint- a -zoord to the wise.

.{fie<

Who Wants to Go to Europe?

sell

There being a scarcity of off icial bull etins for publication this time I am taking advantage of some of the space r eserved for that purpose to turn loose generally some of my random thoughts. Recently several steamship lines and touri st ?ureaus have been sending me literature relatl11g to the special E uropean tours being conducted and the exceptional opportunities offered to make a really worthwhil e trip to the continent at low cost. Two or three of the larger and more reliable lin es a re offering a special thirdcia .s accommod ation with the guarantee of con~ental fellow travelers, as th ey especially soli cit ~e patronage of teachers, students, and profesSional people generall y. O ne folder reads: " To Europe and return $162, tourist third cabin, the succ~ss of 1924." Others present equally attractive figures and schedul es. It stru ck me ~hat there might be a number of Pi Kapps thinkIng of this ve ry thing, but lacki ng enough of a crowd to make it intere ting. Possibly I could ~lelp, suppl ying add ition al information and bringmg members into touch with one another. Let

1'11it: n rt secl1

?d j J.y b' opir. 1S O be~

nbef :for 1

pres . heJi ds o ht jt es 0 th ~

odY hO''

Win Scholarship Cup A lpha-Epsilon i to be congratul ated llpo.n winning the scholarship cup offered ~t the Un.Jversity of Florida by th e Pan-Hell eni c Coun.c1l. The cup was awarded ju st before the Chn stmas holidays.

Chicago, 1925

A letter came in the other day bearing an E ngli sh stamp which on being opened proved to be from Brother Kennon Mott, who is now located in Toronto, Canada. B rother Mott, having li ved in Atlanta, the Coca-Cola City, is now boosting th at delicious and r efreshing beverage with th e Coca-Cola Company of Canada, Ltd., and may be reached at No. 90 Broadview Avenu e, Toronto. His position is that of assistant to th e managing director. ~~~

~~~

;~~

~~~

Brother Geo rge Allen Odgers writes from India that he has been elected again to his old job, the principalship of the Calcutta Boys' School , and took charge in December. H is address is 72, Corporation Street, Calcutta, Ind.ia.


=============================================~ ~ T

H

E S '1'

A R

A

n L

A M P

This Pi Kappa Phi cross-word puzzle is the product of Brother Henry G. Harper, Jr. , Kappa, of Charlotte, N. C. Try yo ur hand and sec how mu ch you kn ow about your fraternity. The so luti on w ill be published in th e next issue of "The Star a nd Lamp."

f

o r FE

BR

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

Can you b eat Brother Harper ? Construe a puzzle, usin g as man y r efer ences as possibl' to our own fraternity, other fraternities, atl' colleges. Send them t o the editor and he wil publish the b est one in the May issue of th' magazine.

[ 30 1


~ ~=========================================== 1'

11 ~~

S 1'

AR

A

u

LA M P

f or

FEB R

u

A R Y,

192 5

HERE'S THE GUIDE TO BROTHER HARPER'S PUZZLE:

true ;sibl

ao• : wil f th

1. 7· 9. 10 ·

HORIZONTAL Brotherly welcome ( plu). On account of Thoroughfare.(ab).

VERTICAL

I. 2. 3. 4.

Our Supreme Secretary. Former title fraternity officer (a b). Latin for "and." Georgia Tech chapter. 5. Nebraska chapter. 6. Our Executive Secretary.

Ohio Univer ity (ab).

11 · Personal pronoun.

14 · 15 · 16. 17.

Home of Supreme Archon. Our second chapte 1·. Tore move seeds from cotton. The I one w 1o sends you checks. l8. Ejaculation. 19 · Member of a dramatic club. 22. What d D ay ecember 10, 1904, signifies. 23. Railroad (ab). 24 · Our Supreme Archon 27 . . · Zunch Council (ab). 28. Preposition. 29· Preposition. 3 1. Then (contraction).

7. One of our founders. 8. 12. 13. 20. 21. 22.

25. 26. 30. 32. 33. 34. 35.

16 ' · A well-known fraternity (ab).

38 · Perdue chapter. 39. Chapte t U · · r a nJvers1ty of Washington (ah). 40. The n f ame o our magazine. 4 6. A southern state (ab). 47· To proceed. 48. To Ilie 'I e 111 · ambu h

so

37.

40. 41.

42. 43. 44. 45. 46. 49. 52. 53.

.

· New York University (ab). 51. Nickn f ame o one of our founders. 53. Four corners of baseball diamond. 54. A con ·· · 1P0 Slhon m English class.

'f!We_ believe that "the ladies have it on us." 1 1 T/ e eport of a midnight initiation is nade in . te Crescent of Gamma Phi Beta., held durIng the · G nat1onal convention of that organization. · amma Ph 1 · year celebrated her go! den . 1' B et a t11s annl ver ar d b . oasts fifty-one chapters one better tl1c Y an1 ' an a c 1apter per year.

1, ~l11ong the announcements of engagements in 1 Delta we observe that Miss Mildred A li ce

t

oore, Delta Mu (Alabama), has announced her engagement to Brother Clayton A lbert, Omicron.

A labama chapter. City of Psi chapter. Nickname Governor of Texas. A brief poem. Transportation system (a b). Niger River (ab). Tmpersonal pronoun. Printers measurement. Preposition. Flower of our fraternity. Editor THE STAR AND LAMP. Disturbes slumber on class. State with f ive Pi Kappa Phi chapters (ab). A motor club (ab). Artfu l in doing things secretly. N. C. State chapter. Accomplish. Location Omicron Chapter (ab). Chapter at Duke University ( ab). Prefix meaning "I efore." Indefinite article. Well known fraternity (ab). Part of verb "to he." Preposition.

The chapter roll of Delta Sigma Phi is marching right along, with Alpha Sigma at Maryland and A lpha Tau at A lbion as the most recent additions.

It is a good sign for a chapter to remember at Christmas that there are twenty other chapters of the fraternity. -Garnet and. TtVhite (AXP). We hearti ly concur in that-and make that number twent;t-seven!

r 3t 1


=================================================~ T

H E

S 1' A R

A N D LA M P

for

FEB R u A R v,

19 2 5

Founders' Day Celebrated Throughout the Fraternity--- Other Li"ve Alum-n i News BOSTON PI KAPPS ORGANIZE B 'y KENNE'rH McCANDLESS, N

E it known to all Pi Kappa Phi brothers, that we, who have passed out into the profane world (New England) carrying with us that spark of brotherly affection kindled at our chapter hearth s, celebrated Founders' Day, 1924, in Boston under the full effulgence of the Star and Lamp. In witness of thi s sublime event, which, as our "ramblin' wreck" president, Jimmie Setze, sa id at the dinner, will go down in history along with the landing of the Pilgrim fathers, we append this clipping from the Boston Tmn-

B

script: The first alumni chapter in New England of Pi Kappa Phi, national coll ege social fraternity, was organized at a dinner in the Copley-Plaza last night in observance of Founders' Day. A theater party followed. James W. Setze, Jr., Georgia Tech, former supreme secretary of the fraternity and at present division superv isor of in struction for the metropolitan division of the new England Telephone and Telegraph Company, was chosen president. Other officers follow: Vice-President: Philip N. McCombs, University of California. Secretary: Kenneth McCandless, University of Nebraska. Treasurer: Karl M. Gibbon, University of Illinois. Chelcie G. Arant, Emory University, was appointed chairman of a committee to arrange for an All-New England reuni on next spring.

S imilar notices appeared in The Christian Science 11! onitor, The Boston Herald-Traveler, Globe, Post, Telegram, and American. Formation of this Boston Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi came about more or less by spontaneous combustion. The three Nu brothers and Phil from Gamma drove a .lizzie through the night clown to New Haven for the annual Yale-Harvard mud scrimmage. \i\Tith so many of us for a nucleus we wondered how ma11y more there might be on this stern and rock-bound coast.

A week or two later my phone tinkled and'' Southern voice said: "Hello, Ken, this is Jimnti' Setze." And that's how it happened. Jimnli1 and the approaching December 10 did the rest No doubt most of you fellows know all abott: thi s, our former supreme secretary, but will adD that he is getting along right smart here amonf the shrewd Yankees and rates a deferenti~ "Very well, Mr. Setze," from some thousands 01 employees in the N. R T. & T. Co. A wor' from him and one of the nicest lil' room s in th• Copley-Plaza, near the music, an' ev'rything, w~· reserved and the boys given an opportunity tr dig the moth balls out of the Tux. Aside from Mister Jimmie, who looked lO' cute for words, you should have seen Duke Wei lington with the new "mustache'' he has gro,,·r and cultivated since planting his pin in Lincolr last spring. A reg'.lar bronco bustin' Apoll• from Montana, he wears a huge beaver coat ir tme Harvard style. He is regi stered as a speci~ student in the Harvard Graduate School of La'\ The other boys as far as we know wear their hair. as they always did nor have their naOl' been connected with police items. Bob McCand less, Nu, '24, is running true to form. He is ' radio engineer with the Wireless Specialty M paratus Company which puts out the RacJiol· super-hets for the Radio Corporation. Bob stil moans at every cold wave and swears that nd clay he will pack up for Miami or Key West. Eel Watkins from Pi and Karl Gibbon, of UP silon, are grinding out cases in the Harvard G(<l1 Law School while Arant from Eta and Ph1 from Gamma say each night is about nine hottr too short for them to do justice to the problet1r handed out at the Harvard Grad Business School Ken McCandless is petting his typewriter aloJ1~ as reporter for The Christian Science Manit~ and having lots of fun swinging around in th 1 Boston culture.

[ 32 ]


~

-

~================================ T

I-I E

S

T AR

A N D

L

A M P

It is imr)oss t"bl e 111 . cold type to testify . t o the ~O~d ~i Kapp fell owship which we found again et e 111 B t os on. Old scenes from th e chapter h ouse we re . . r agam 1llumined in memory and brilJant mon t f len ·s at conventi ons recall ed- chuckl e rom Set· . ze as some one satd : "Remember out 'at Berk 1 you e ey when Henry Ha rper pleaded, 'I tell "D~ fellows, you haven't any sentiment?' " O r, You remember K nox Burn ett down at A tIanta '" tl · . and so on till the dinner adj ourn ed and 11 d le taxicab Ottr l-J ' s ro e up to the musical show w here arva 1 · d s. whose necks have begun to curl f rc g nn 01 otl . ~warc1, had a chance to relax them in the let direction Our c1 . · · . We lapter roll now coun ts brothers e1ght. P lan to meet th e fir st F riday evening eve ry 111 1 Nont , · If any o f you know of any broth er in ew Eng! d ton Cl~ an not on th e list, please tell us. Boslapter now in cl udes · ehelcie G A. E . . bri d M · 1ant, "' ta, 30 Per kms Hall , Ca mge, ass Karl M G.· C . ·· tbbon, U psil on 17 Sumn er R oad, ambn dge , M ass. ' I(

f or F

E BR

u

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

Early on a New Year's morn in 1922, Brother

Vv. E rnest Saund ers, Jr. , of Lambda, bestowed

upon Ma rcus A. Cook, Jr., and Rud olph G. H anson, t wo Columbus boys, the honor of wea ring the Gold and W hite Diamond of P i Kappa P hi . Shortly after th e first rays of the Star and Lamp had shown on these boys, several P i Kapps moved to Columbus, and with th eir co-operation P i Kappa P hi in Columbus has been brought to :Jd ! its present standing. T here now are: six pledges, 1111ic four und ergradu ate members, and eleven alumni 1111 ir in the Columbus group. res! It wi.ll be of interest to th e "old tim ers" to bottl meet again the f oll ow ing broth ers: ado R ob in H . Woods-Woody- was once th e nonf freshes t freshman at Geo rgia and as f resh as ever nti~ at the T hi rd Nati onal Bank here. Is ol .vor'· \iVm. P. R obinson-B ill-who finished Tech 1 th' with th at memorable Class of ' 17, is expounding w~· hi s learning to the students of the Indu stri al H igh :y ~ School. J oe S. Beaii- Farm er- is showing the boys at I LO· the same insti tution the mos t sc ientific way to A enneth M cCandl css N u 215 Huntington wc1 venu e, Roston ' ' till th e soil. r 0 11'f Roben M Ve rn on H ogan-Hogan-another of our bankBack B · cCandl ess, Nu, 11 H avil and St. , , colr . ay, Roston. ers, is with the Muscogee Bank. P h1lip N M poll' Olli e C. Brannen- Doc-has just made it Dr. · cCombs, 203 Cragie Hall, Cambric] at jr ge, Mass. and M rs. and has our hea rti est congratul ations. •ecia C J ames W. Setze Jr., I ota, 48 B rattle Street, Doc is peddlin ' pills for a profess ion. ambridge , M ass. ' La'' R obt. M. J ackson-Bob--is salting hi s sugar E dgar W 1 · their bridg M at (Ill ~, Jr., P i, 56 Wed nell, Cam- with th e Sta r Salt Co., in this territory. at11t e, ass. Chas. A. J ackson, Jr.-Charli e- after several ~and Robert R W 1 . Camb .·c1 ~ . e hngton, N u, 12 F ar well P lace, years of interpreting the If's and And's of science 11 ge, Mass. is· at th e Camill a High School, is making it easier M for the public to see why the said salt is better diol ~~~ ~~ ~~~ -=~~ for their health. stil Chas. T . H ill, Jr.-Charli e-is th e third of our COLUMBUS ALUMNI CLUB nd N the n·1g It 1 o f June 14, at J oe Brown's T ea pmmising bankers. H e is with the LaGrange ur Colttn,R.boom, in the beautiful and hi stori c city of National Bank, of L aGrange, Ga. us G . LeR oy G. Parh am- Doc-is now the p romi of th p· ' eorg1a, twelve enthu siasti c members 1 "ole .;, Kappa P hi Fraterni ty met to ti e on the nent M. D. of Chipl ey, Georg ia, when he has th e . A fter tim e to spare. severL"'eed Bag " an d get better acquamted. 1 I:Ienry C. K imbrough- Jug-is doing things to Reel ~.p ro l onged political battl es, ranging from 1 th e tun e of "Down on the Farm" .in Chipl ey, fo r th ~nge .to A ndy Gump, it was decided th at bus e )~st mterest of the F raternity in Colum - Geo rgia, and having a merry time with th e boll · · for , and 111 tl11·S sect10n of the state to petit10n weevil. an Alu · Cl . ' . Marcus A. Cook, Jr.- Marcus-hasn't had his Supr mn 1 1apter, with th e sancti on of the eme Council. chance to cast hi s wares to the ever wa iting pub-

M

O

[ 33]


========================================~ T

II

E S '!' A R AND LAMP for

li e yet. He has another year at T ech to worry ove r such trifles. Rudolph G. Henson-Ruddy-is trying to gain fame and fortune with th e Central of Georgia Railroad, with ve ry littl e success. vVe expect to be better organized after th e Chri stmas holidays. But we can wish you a Happy New Year without there being any doubt in our rn inds that we are doing the right thing. ~~~

~ll!..

~~~

=~~

LINES ON XI ALUMNI ROTHER EUGENE OULD, X i, '24, was marri ed November 12 to Miss Thelma A rnold, of Bri stol, Va. They are now li ving in Norton, Virgini a. Broth er Carl Dickey became very much encouraged after hi s brother E rnest's marriage and stepped off shortly afterward. After attending John B. Stetson U niversity, the call of Florida was so great that he has taken hi s newly-acquired spouse and return ed to Florida where he will go into business. Brother Karl Mock, X i, married Miss Barger, of Mendota, Va., just before the American Leg ion Convention in St. Paul. Drother Mock was appointed a delegate to thi s conventi on and he thought the trip would be too long and lonely to go alone. Brother I-I. E. Erb, Jr., Xi, '20, was elected president of th e Roanoke College Alumni Association for the present year. This is an expression of P i Kappa P hi's standing at Roanoke College. Brother J. W. Fix, X i, is now located in Knoxvill e, Tennessee, with the Burroughs Adding M achin e Co., 205 W. Clinch Street. Brother E. R. Moo re, X i, '20, is located at Appalachi a, Va., being cashi er of the Peoples Rank.

B

add to our many features of interest and enter tainment for those in this section. We wer· ve ry fortunate in getting the cooperation of th alumni throughout th e state, which has made 1 possible for us to get out our second issue o the B irm·i nghmn A lumni. In getting out thi s issue, we hope to keep th men in Alabama famili a r with the activiti es o the 'nation al fraternity and to keep them post~ as to where th eir old college chum s are locate• and to their interests. Regardless of how fa' back we are able to look, we a re interested i those that we knew in coll ege and especiail. those that were tru e P i Kapps. This issue i also doing every thing in its power to intere' tho se alumni in adjoining towns to form ~ active chapter. In doing this, we have an ass0 ciate alumni chapter formed that any Pi KaPI can belong regardless of th e chapter or st~ 1 he is from , and can remain a member unt: there is an active chapter formed where he c~ be directly connected. o doubt but what oth1 chapters are experi encing the same thing th• we are, and that is, one or two men in sott1 towns, and it will take them years to get enott~ men to organize an active alumni chapter, so i the meantime we want them to join us and wor with us for the progress and betterment of th fraternity. A lthough our chapter is made up of men frof fi ve chapters, we have given considerabl e spar in our issues to assist Omicron in building h1 new home. Vle only hope we can assist other in the same way. The home problem with d : chapter is an immense one. Every chap!f should have a home of its own and there ' scarcely any other feature that will mean al1 more to the fraternity than being well housc1 for then th ey have greater opportunities to st more of each other which will mean greater cr operation. It is our fond hope that some clay we c~ have club room s or a home of our own so th•· when we are fortunate enough to have Pi KaPI' visit us, we will th en be in a position to ma~ them feel more at hom e and make their st:t more pleasant. Thi s is probabJy a dream at pre' ent, but th ere are such things as dreams coJ11il1 true, so watch our smoke.

ACTIVITIES OF THE BIRMINGHAM ALUMNI By J-TMN Hmw H E Birmingham alumni have every r easo n to look for ward to the year of 1925 as b ein g the g rea t est year in our hi story. Alth ough we are young and have only a limited number of men, we expect to double in size and [ 34]

T

FEB R u A R v, 1 9 2 5


=~ ~''================== ,----

T

n

J~ S 'J' A R A

N

n L

f

A M p

or F

E

nR u

A R v,

19 2 5

----------------~------~----------

! Otef

wer• ,f th 1de 1 ue o :p th es o lO S t~ , cat~

,. fa ed i :ciaII ;ue 1 t ere:

m a' asse Ka!1 stat u11t: ,e ca

oth1 : th· sot11 :lOtlg

so f wor )f th fro' spac tg hi

othet eac 1 apte ere 1 n alt ousC' to se er co 1

e ca

th· Kapl'

0

m a~

r st:t

: pre= omi11

W . 111 , Los Bimingha , s ant Ad Section

i'

state App roxim ately 100 Pi Kapps in the 0 broth S hould you know of any , Alabama. er 111 the of our s t a t e t h at ther e isn't any chance . 1 . t o, ta I<e f tve ' . Write lavtng run 111 tmnutes and us about h'1111 W . get · • e are very anx tous to 111 touch wit!1 I11111 . or stat • regardless of what chapter e 1le ts fra n1 T l · ter is es . 1e secreta ry of each chapt o cI1ec I< I11s . I'tst .for men . pectall 111 thi s . y asl·ed " sectiOn so tl1 t . them an . a we may get tn touch with 1 tntrod c 1 their , uce t 1em to all th e P i Kapps in respecttve towns FOOND· F 1'f . . <"1 lu mni . · " ty copt es of th e B irmiughm·n , tssuec] by th · 1 tI1e Ja ts c 1apter and left over from a copynuary number. We wiJ! gla dly send you on request. ~IJ.,.

~It,.

,\It-

~~~

POUNDERS' DAY IS FITTINGLY OBSERVED AT CHARLOTTE By R ALPH R oNE M Chapte.1 1 ' nspector f o·r Nort.h Carolin a the e · lotte PiV~ltng of December lOth a ll Char Pledges of E ~pps as well as th e members and Chamber of ,g stl on chapter assembl ed at the P hi 's tw . ommerce to celebrate P i Kappa d . Ilonor to entteth birtl · 1 ay anmversary, and to do I-I our founder s. arcl ly ha d th f · · · Majesty tl e estt vttt es begun when Hi s fo r th le 1aw stepped in and r ead a warrant arrest of 1 Graceye A. our 1onorabl e broth er, vV. M , 11on of E ·1 · ' t c . hm1 . Wtth b . pst on ch apter cha rg mg 1 ng th e . rea(l d I ' etther th . sp ee aws and demanding, · Gracey' e tmmed ia t e possess iOn of Broth er s corpu s 0 1. f 1'f 0 Pon lea1. . ' ty cold doll ars in its stead. ing tl . c ntng that t here was smaJ! hope of rais. lt s amount 0 f POckets 0 f money from th e combm ed sentec] t every one p resent, Hi s Majes ty con' . good Ia o accept a g oo cl c] mner msteacl so after a f c ug 1 , on the A 1. I I , . Orward d c 1on t 1ere began a leanmg • • and a laying an a leani ng 1)ac 1<an c1 a cl espothng W ith ;aste ?~th e good things in sig ht. 1'oastm le knt vtng and fo t~king out of the way y oung to aster Bill N ea I· ca II e d on Broth er Dick' Young t t~ll th e purpose of th e meetitw , B rother 0 1904 r ?< us back to Charl eston in"' th e year ' ev th e f oun d mg . to]ct of . tewed . of th e fraternity tts tcl eal 't . , s, J s truggles, tts g r.owth and

ON

developm ent, and ended by paying tribute to those three first brothers who are responsible for the fo undati on of our frate rnity. Next Brother Gr acey, A rchon of E psilon, was call ed on to make a report f rom hi s chapter . F irst he spoke of th e glori es and accompli shments of Epsil on of oth er clays a nd how thi s high mark is ever befo re the members of th e new Eps ilon who have combin ed th eir determin ati on to do all in their power to uphold th e stand ard of P i Kappa P hi at Dav idson College. Next B rother R alph R one, Chapter Inspector for the third di strict, embracing the four chapters in North Carolina, was call ed on to tell of the conditi on of those four chapters. He sa id that he felt th at eve ry P i Kapp in North Carolina could well be proud of th e four active chapters iu thi s state, that in th em existed th e ve ry best ~p i rit and they were all at work f c"· th e upLuilcling of th eir fraternity. In view of the fact that although th e Cha rl otte A lumni Chapter had been in ex i stenc·~ for sever~ ] years it ha d neve r obta ined a charte r. Brother H enry Harper made a motion th at the nece sa ry steps be taken fo r securing a char tel'. This motion was seconded by Bill Cunningham, put before th e meeting and carri ed, and Barnett Garri son, Secreta ry-T reasurer, was given the task of coll ecting the fund s and making appli cation . W ith every one agreeing that th e evening bad been a very pleasant one, Bill Neal , who had been elected a rchon of the chapter, ended th e progra m with a mighty blow of hi s teaspoon. ~\ll;.

~·l;.

~· l;.

~~~

FOUNDERS' DAY AT OMAHA By

C.

H.

CoLLINS

ECEMBER 10 the O maha Alumni Ch ap~e r held a banquet a t the Metropolitan Ca fe a t whi ch all members of th e chapter we re present, except one. T o get clown to se rious business we had a ve ry success ful and interesting meeting. Brother Wetth erbee acted as toastmaster in his usua l inimitabl e way. Th e principal address of th e evening was deli vered by the Supreme A rchon, Broth er Geo. D . Dri ver (our own George) . He gave a ve ry won-

D

[ 35 J


===============================================~ Tn

E

S 1'

AR

A N

n L A M P

f

o r F 1~

BR

u

A R Y,

19 2 5

---------------------------------------------------------------------~

derful talk upon the development of Pi Kappa P hi and of f raterni ties in general. He dwelt on th e fra terni ty spir it and the pr omotion of broth erl y love between all men. He gave us very vivid wo rd pictures of what the fraterni ty means in later years a nd gave examples of great m en who cherished the memory and associations of their fraterni ty above all else save their family. T o hear B rother Driver is to be in spired and li fted up above th e common level. T he meeting lasted fa r into the night a nd we a ll went home fee ling that it was trul y " the end of a perfect cl ay."

ROANOKE ON UP-GRADE By R. R. R usH JJ E Roanoke A lumni Chapter has recently expe ri enced a revival o f in terest whi ch promi es g reat things fo r the future. At a meeting recently, when some of the brothers went out in the by-ways and gathered in th e gang, we had eight brothers p resent. It was weJJ to see t he old gang together again but it was hard to do any real busin ess fo r talking. But we are convinced th at we made a good start by selecting offi cers, and dec idin g on at least one meeting ni ght every month . T he meetings a re to be held r egul a rly on the f irst Wed nesday night of each month at 6 :00 P. M. at th e Meiringen Tea Room. We exlend th e invita ti on of th e chapter to any itin erant P i Kap p in thi s territory to meet with us and eat with u s. It has often occurred to me that there a re many times when I i Kapps a re in the town of oth er P i Kapps a nd pass on throug h with no attempt to find th eir broth ers. B roth er Comer is in the National Exchange Bank, Broth er M use is in th e Boxley Building, and the writer is in th e Shenandoah L ife Building. T he other brothers woul d be ha r der to f ind so look us up fir st and we will show you some things about our to wn th at strange rs mig ht not know. A ll ow me to take thi s oppo rtuni ty to cong ratul ate the Birmingham A lumni on th eir spl endid publi cati on and th e sp irit th a t prompts th em in their enterpri se. If th e in stigator of th at idea

T

happens our way will he kindly drop in and gi~e us a "shot."

OMAHA PI KAPPS TAKE ON LIFE By C. H. Cor.. LINS HE O maha A lumni Chapter has agai11 cot11' to life. A f ter the big dinn er and theatfl pa rty given in Septembe r fo r hig h school g rad· on their way to L in coln and we hoped N u ChaP ter, th e enthu siasm was spent fo r a tim e. I-Toweve r, th e Christm as spirit seized us ani we put on a big festival. Chas. Reed acted Iik' a real Santa Claus (we picked on him becatt'' Santa needs plenty of w ind and Cha rli e has it The re was a big tree bedecked in streamers, fc: toons. and orn aments of every description to s~' nothing of the hundreds of lights th ereon. 'I'h' pa rty was put on in the la rgest hall avail able j: th e Masoni c Temple, rent for which cost th' chapter $100 for th e evening. I n fact, th e whol affa ir was a knockout. Th er e were presents fot every one from a brand new baby doll fo r th• A rchon, B roth er Wetherbee, to a sil ver cak' p late with a la mp in each handle for the Secrc ta ry, Brother Chas. H. Collin s. T hi s cake plat< se r ved a double purpose be ing a we del ing presel.i' as well as a Chri stmas gift, as B roth er Charh' had on Novembe r 26 taken unto him a life c0111 pan ion. We now have four benedicts in th e chaptc and we have started a bridge club of four couplr. and a r e starting to make the rounds each mont! f rom home to home; the first pa rty was a t th' home of B roth er Wetherbee. We are w illing I' in crease th e size of th e club at any tim e so cot11' on you mave ri cks and get roped. O n S und ay, J anua ry 4, th e chapte r met for ' big feed at the E lks Club at which th ey enter ta in ed a bunch of active and alumni from Siottl City, I owa, a nd L in coln, Nebraska. A fter dinnc! th e questi on of a house for Nu Chapter w~' threshed out and we will probably have a hot11' of our own soon, at L in coln, Tebraska. We r egret that our good B roth er F loyd Ne11 com, of A r lington, Nebraska, was call ed home I• hi s etern al r est a short time ago.

T

[ 36 ]


-~ ~===============================

=~Ji

-----------------T-I_I_E_·_S__T_A__ R__A_N__D__L__ A_M__P~f_o__r__F_'_E_B__R_u__ A_R_Y~,--1_9_2__5________________

'E

con~

t eat~

rrrad·

:"haP ; alit :1

Jikl

cau'' s it

, fc~ o sal 'J'h< Jle jr t th< Nhol< ts fo! •I' th<

cak' :ecrt pial'

esd wrli< con1

Also our d b McCool N goo rather, Grant C. \Vatkins, of loved w:f ebraska, suffered the loss of his be1 e recently We great! . sympat] Y regret these untimely ends and our 1Y goes t l11easure. ou to the bereaved ones in full

of whom do not receive this publication and for that reason only learn of the fraternity's problems through talking with members from time to time who happen to have a little advance knowledge. It is thought that if TnE S'l'AR AND LAMP could be placed in every member's hands for a period of one year the cost and expen e ~~ i\ would be doubly repaid by the benefits that ANOTHER VIEW OF OUR ALUMNI wou ld be derived. PROBLEM The a lumni are the assets of a growing fraternity. Our strength depends largely on how B'J' R.w K SMA'l'lll!Rs, H they are used in the working organization. H.O!v! time t 0 · . As I stated in the beginning, as a general rule '1' 1 S time art1cles have appeared in . . !!~ 'l'AR AN L .. . . . . bv1ty of D AMP cntiCISII1g the mac- the alumni are inactive but every one has a de. our a! · cou ld all b ~ umn 1 members. If these articles sire to do his part in some way. Now, the . . ctrt1cle ·t e gJ ou peel ca 11 d ones I1ouJd analyze each question of placing Trm S'l'AR AND LAMP in or les; \ _.w_ould be found that they all are more these members hands. To do this the writer I . CIIVJngattl . 1as een b . le same thmg. As the writer wou ld suggest that contributions b.e_ received · that Y this constr uc t'lve cnt1c1 · · · · t0 h1111 sm 1t appears from the a lumni each year, and that subscripshould not . th_e fault of the a lumni inactivity tions to TnB S't'AR A ' D LAMP be given to all f erent to md1cate th a t our a 1umn1· are mdlf· · those who have contributed . In making these ward the f t · 10 t interest. ra ermty or that they have suggestions it is taken for granted that the central office w ill handle and provide way.s and 1'here 1· · · . a questio 11 111 my mmd lf the a lumni means of soli citing these contr ibu tions. The are not at c a 1oss to 1 · • can serve tl <now 1n JUSt what way they word "contribution " is used not to signify beI.1eve it le fraternit . Y· A s a general rule I a lumni dues, but voluntary contribution s. 11 Now, for the way to secure these contribubers of tl Wfl be found that the a lumni me;llle raternit 11 and the g Y rea Y appreciate its worth tions: Place Trn: S'I'AR AND LAMP in the hands 1 Younger oocb that 1't can d o. more than the of every alumnus, and at the same time build 111 t d em ers • Tlley I1ave IJeen through the up an endowment fund. The writer wou ld In ergra 1 benefits tchuate days, they have received the sugge t a "Loyalty Fund," and that each year to b 1 · 1·11 the f. at are . e c enved from membership our alumni be given an opportunity to make ty d I atern 1 a 1un1nus a d . ' an there shou ld be in each contribution s to this fund. Contributions of a from the f. es lre_ to repay for benefits received certain amount cou ld be asked, or to make it on l-Io 1atern1ty. a more voluntary basis, members might be al. w can the a! can be a 1 umnJ help? If this question lowed to subscribe whatever amount would fit I I lswered and d f .. )elieve tl . a e 1n1te program adopted their pocket-books. Besides giving these contrib. . lat we w 111 f'111 d . \Vllhng to d . our a lumn1 more than utors Tm~ S·l'.\R AND LAMP, it strikes me that 0 duty of their part. I believe it is the first it would be proper to give a card certificate of t our alumn i . I a Present t • ' especla ly the ones who are proper size to carry in a card case. This certi1 Working . a <mg so much activity to outline a ficate shou ld state that the holder, giving his Ptogra f ' one should ..c m or the rest of the fellows. If name, is a member of the Loyalty Club and has lltight ra· attempt to outlin e a few things that contributed to the Loyalty Fund for the year ISe alum 111.. Wou ld . mterest, TnE S'l'AR AND I AMP indicated. Pe1 11aps a) J -< o f getting . c I I ear to be the way and means The wr iter recognizes the fact that such a 111 But here . touch with our inactive members plan wou ld somewhat confli ct with the present t0 anses anoth bl · Provide er pro em. \ i\1 e have first plan of financing THE STAR AND LAMJ>. We the hands af way of placing our publication in now allo w life subscriptions for the price of $10. o these members, a large majority In order not to conflict with this present ar-

F

[ 37]


===============================================~ '1'

11

E STAR AN o LAMP for F B B

rangement it should be provided that members who had contributed to the amou nt of $ 10 would not onl y be members of the Loyalty Club, but would also have life subscription s to THE S'l'AR AND LAMP. This "Loyalty F und " would not on ly provide ways and means of pla cing Trm S't'AR AND LAMP in the hands of our a lumni members, but at the same time would go toward building up an endowment fund whi ch would take care of the g rowth of our fraternity and the expense involved. W ilh Trn~ STAR AND LAMP in the hands of all of our members, there is no li mit to the good that we can do. The magazi ne would be a reminder of the alumni 's duty to contribute to and help build an endowment that wou ld place ou r fraternity where it belongs in the realm of America n co ll ege fraternities. J f we a re to compete with the older fraternities we must first put our organization on a, sound financial basis. 1 a rt of this endowment could be used for building chapter houses, providing quarters for our und ergr ad uate members and to be used in a thousand ways for the cause of coll ege ed ucalion which, afte t• all , is one of the ma in aim s of fraternities. The alumni 's interest in our fraternity is a different kind of enthu sias m from that whi ch wi ll be found w ith the undergraduates. It is my belief and obse rvation that our alumni want to help, but that they a re waiting for someone to blaze the trail and show them how they can become a cog in the wheel. It has been noted that simil a r "Loyalty Clu bs" and means of receivin g alum ni contributi ons have been used by other fraternities to a great advantage. Some of the la rger fraternities receive Loyalty Fund contributi ons of $5 per member each year. These same fraternities educate their alumni in ways of helping the fraternity. They try to get their members to give something or do somelhing, no matter how li ttle. O ne instance in particu lar, a nd it might not be I ad for us, some of the larger fraternities enco urage their alumni not to forget their fraternity in their wills. 'J'hey put it this way: "We reali ze your first duty is to your fami ly and your dependents, but do not forget us-at least w iiJ us your good will if you cann ot leave us anything else."

R

u A R v, 1 9 2 5

In this way these fraternities are encouragini their members to give something and in a I~ of cases these littl e things are offset by M things that mean much wealth to them. ~· "t..

.S'l!..

.S.''-!.

~~~

NEW YORKERS TO CELEBRATE B·y \iVALTER Mr·:ASDAY,

\]1

J IE ew York A lumni Chapter of I Kappa P hi wiiJ soon celeb rate its fir' anni versary as a chartered unit of the fraternit) It was ori gin all y started in the fall of 1920 a the Komos Club of Jew York, and composed 0 alumni members of the Kosmos F raternity 0 Cornel.!. Charles Karsten was its first preside~~' A year later, Komos became the Psi Chapter 0 Pi Kappa P hi , a nd the club changed its nan: accord ingly, a nd acquired a number of old 1 Kapps li ving in the city. U nder the leadershL of Ralph Nor een the next president for the nC) two years, the organization continu ed on 11 merry way. Last spring it was granted a ch~ 1 ter as an alumni cha])ter, and \iValter Measd~'( . Jr. , was chosen as the first archon. Kurt Lauler has serv ed as the very efficient secretaf of the unit throughout all the variou s slag" Lauter is, in cidentall y, the district inspector 1 the first district. The chapter meets on the first ·w ed nesdaY v each month at informal dinners. In Decembt a new custom was sta rted of dining at variO': local co ll ege clubs. when through the courte' of Cosby Byrd, the chapter dined at the U nil'er sity of Pennsylvania Club. B rother Geoff S heetz, executive secreta ry of the fraternity, ,,·~ the guest of hon or. In January, Inman pad gett played mine host to perfection at the Coht11: bia Univer sity Club. The next dinner will 1 held on Wed nesday, February 4, at the Corttt Clu b. The present members of the chapte r ar• Ralph oreen, from Gamma; Cosby Byrd, It man Padgett and Charles W. } ran klin fr 01 I ota; JT enry Mason Bonney, from Eta, t1 11 Fritz lfke, "B ugs" Bal lou, "Joe" DeAndre· Charles Karsten, "Hank" Ka rsten, "Casey" Lal ter, Irving Martewick, "Walt" Measday, F~ Ostergren, Carl Ostergren, "Bill" Pettig, L0 11 Reck. and "Tommy" Thompson, from Psi.

T

[ 38]


=~ ~·~================================== agitlf a IOi I bif

T

H

~~ S 'I' A R

A N D

L

r

A M

,f r fir: .rnitl 20 a· ;ed 0 .ty 0 :icletf ter 0 nat11' .Jcl r ersh1 _ nc) mil c h ~r

asdal .trt t

retar ;tagc· tor 1

lay 0 en,bt a riot: urte' ·n ivet ;eorf

y, ,,.,. P8d :oltltr ~ ill ,,

:on'c .· art

cl, )I frOI t,

a':

nclrC·

, L8r

,

F,

Loti ; t.

or F

E BR

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

-----------------------~----------~------------1'BE DAY AT CHARLESTON

By c. M. BLACKMON A ECEl'v£RER 10 . ' sig 'f' · '' 1924, P t Kappa P hi 's most · 111 tcant elate 1 • ll1anner b a ll . • was o )Served l11 a fitting celebrat' y P t Kapps in Charleston, and the 1 honors toni lel.d. reflected still more brightly the anc, pnvtleg 0 f b . fraternit I es etng a member of the brother y. t was a brilliant occ:1sion. The P. M s gathered at the Hiberni an Hall at 9 ., and talked b exchanged .d a out ~ur great fratemity, brothet·hood.l eas, , and enJoyed the spirit of

D

E

f

The banquet f Broth . was eatured by the presence of ers Sunon Fo t . our two r . ga r Y and L. Harry Mtxson, silent t tvmg founders. At the beginning a . oast was . founder B g tven 111 hon or of the absent be rt K ' • rother A ndrew Kroeg. Bro th er Ala 1lt s was t t Foga rty oas master. Brother W illiam committe Was chairman of the entertainment e, and uncle 1 · . d td di r lt S management a splennner was had f . began. • a ter wht ch the speeches 'f! le following . "D program was gtven: oes an D nderg cl SUpporte. ra uate Chapter need A lumni 1 -Will ' s and How S hould They be Secured?" tam A H . · "p· · . a ttz. 1 · Kappa PI11· A ssociation s of 1904 and Their Influ ence Fogarty. on O ur Early History."-Simon ''Twenty Yea

A rs fter-Alpha Chapter as She IS and Ho t B " "p· pes o e. -Harold Ham. 1 ent-~ay(al~pab P hi-He r Early Ideals and P res. nroth . ro TJ lems ."- L . T:I - a n y Mtxson. et ,- art's c1 active n1 < wo r s were welcomed by th e tc rs cle ) end. He said that underg raduate chap1 en on th · 1 · a closer . etr a umm, and that he hoped . 1atton bet t e I . . cIlapters ween t 1e acttve and alumnt would be eff t d . h B roth . s· ec ·e In t e near future. . et tmon Fo t tng talk garY gave a most entertain· £or its ' · one .that ev et·Y acttve man remembers smcenty d I of the b an c eep ea rn estness. He told • t 11at ex isted and that 1ay so one! of fr·ten d s 111p n c1eeply in I ,.i I<a . eac 1 man in the early days of PPa P h 1 1 · d CJuality ' anc remm eel us that it was this ' true f ri et I I · 1 · 11 f ounded l Cs P, t 1at·. P1 Kappa P hi was upon "Fro th' 1 lllents . · m ts t 1e other developgamed f.10111 b . .1 . . conc0111 1·t tot 1erly assoctat!On a re ant," he sa id.

Now ·

1-Iarold Ham, a n active brother, outlined in an interesting manner Alph a's future hopes and policies. He sketched briefly the last few years of A lpha's activity and pledged full support and cooperation to the alumni g roup . .Brother L. Harry Mixson next gave a significant talk. He reiterated the valu e of true friendship and illu st rated strikingly its relat ion to fraternities. "Pi Kappa P hi is the biggest thing in my life," .Brother M ixson said , "I only regret that twenty years of thi s association with fine young men, have gone by so quickly." He then toJd of the fraternity's early struggles, its second and third chapters, and the first difficulties of expansion. "We have our present-clay problems but we are meeting them in true Pi Kapp sp irit as we have always done. Vl/e wi ll m ainta in our position and advan ce. In the ea rly clays precedents were being made; now we have thenl) to go by, and should hold to them." .Brother Mixson then called attention to the size of Pi Kappa P hi, its growth, and its illustrious alumni. He then closed by renew ing his pledge to P i Kappa P hi . "I wish to renew my pledge," he said, " my obligation to the fraternity, pledging eve ry ounce of energy, ab ility, and love I have for the further advancement of Pi Kappa P hi ." B roth er M ixson's talk was impressive, revealing a depth of sympathy and earnestness. The brothers afterwards went to the chapter rooms w here they sang songs and ta lked late.

BYRD ENTERTAINS COMMITTEES The members of the Tnterfrate rnity Conference Committee on Chapter House Architecture were the g uests of B roth er J. Cosby Byrd, committee secretary, at a dinn er at the U ni versity of Penn sylva nia Club, New York City, November 18.-

E ci-"I am look ing for a book that would mterest a univers ity co-eel." Clerk-"Very so rry, sir, but we a rc out of that type just now. You see, we have already been raided twice thi s month."-liflhirlwind.

[ 39]


================================================' T

H E

ST

A R

L

A N D

By

A M P

WADE

FRATERNITY EXPANSION VERAGE lapse of time between in stallation s of chapters of those fraternities having at .l east fiv e chapters. (Thi s tabl e is computed on the total number of chapte rs, that is, the sum of the active and in active chapte rs of each fraternity, to the age of th e fraternity 111 November, 1924.)

A

GROUP 1. Na111e

1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

or

FE B R

S. BOLT)

u

A R Y,

192 5

~

38. 39.

S igma Alpha Epsi lon ---------------------------- 6.592 montl Sigma N u -------------------------------------------------- 6.569 month· GROUP 4. RAPTD ExPANSlONJS'J' 40. Kappa Sigma -------------------------------------------- 5.884 month 41. S igma P hi Epsi lon ---------------------------------- 4.525 month 42. Lambda Chi A lph a -------------------------------- 2.727 month 43. Theta Ups ilon Omega -------------------------- 1.200 month ---"Em e·ra ld of Sigma pi.

Ur.TRACONSF.RVAT IVE Average Period be tween installations

Kappa Alpha ............................................... 9.892 Sigma P hi ...................................................... 8. 139 Delta P hi ...................................................... ..4.845 Delta Psi ....................................................... .4.092 Psi Ups ilo n ......................................................3.367 A lph a Delta Ph i............................................. .2.788 Alpha S igma P hi -----------------------------------------.2 721 Ch i Ps i -----------------------------------------------------·------2.456 A lpha Kappa Lam bda ----------------............... .2.11 7 Zeta Psi ------------------------------------------------------------2.095

years years year s years years year·s years years yea rs year s

GRouP 2. CoNSERVATrvr·: 11. Kappa De lta Rho ------------------------------------------1.780 12. Delta Upsi lon ------------------------------------------------1.765 13. Theta Ch i -------------------------------------------------------- 1.759 1'4. Theta Delta Ch i --------------------------------------------1.674 15. P hi Kappa S igma ----------------------------------------1.542 16. Chi P hi ............................................................ 1.400 17. P hi S igma Kappa ........................................ 1.396 18. Delta Kappa Eps ilon .................................. 1.385 19. Ta u Kappa Epsil on .................................... 1.395 20. A lpha Chi R ho ....................................... :......1 .334 2 1. S igma Ph i S igma ....................................... .1 .275 22. Sigma P i ....................................................... .1.153 23. Phi Kappa Ps i ............................................. .1 .053 24. Delta Ch i ........................................................ 1.031

year s years years yea rs years yea r s yea rs years years years years years yea rs years

25. 26. 27. 28. 29. 30. 31. 32. 33. 34. 35. 36. 37.

f

GROUP 3. ExrANSTONTS'l' Phi Gamma Delta .................................. 10.087 Beta Theta Pi ........................................ 9.813 P i Kap pa Alpha -------------------------------------- 9.444 Kappa Alpha (S) ---------------------------------- 9.333 P hi Kappa Tau -------------------------------------- 8 920 P hi Mu Delta ------------------------------------------ 8.889 Delta Tau Delta -------------------------------------- 8.495 Ph i Delta Theta -------------------------------------- 7.982 P i Kappa P hi ---------------------------------------- 7.967 S igma Chi -------------------------------------------------- 7.849 Acacia -------------------------------------------------------- 7.454 Delta Sigma P hi ------------------------------------ 7.293 Alpha Tau Omega -------------------------------- 6.836

month s months months month s months month s months month s month s month s months month s months

APPROACHING CENTURY Those fraternities whi ch have passed th' ninety-year mark a re: A lpha Delta P hi , Dell· P hi ,· Delta Ups ilon , Kappa Alph a, Psi Upsi1°1 and S igma) P hi _ The universiti es havi ng the greatest m1t11bC: of Greek-lette r organizations are: U ni versity of M ichigan with 102 U ni ve rsity of I11in ois with 96 Corn ell U niver sity with 88 U niversity of Penn sylvani a with 86 O hio State U nive rsity w ith 84 U niversity of California with 82 U niversity of W iscon sin with 79. -Emerald of Sigma p i.

T hi s fraternity is one that boasts of its alu111~ lun cheons in vari ous citi es. O ne often sees 11 the lobby of hi s hostelry a placard giving dire' tions to an a lumni lun cheon. But, P hi KaPI' Ps i, w ith a lun cheon in mid-ocean, has gone thet; all one better. The A merican Bar Associatio: j ourn eyed across the water to London last stt 111 mer. Fifteen of the members of the associatiof traveling on the Bere11geria) were P hi Psi a]un1t1' They held a Phi Psi luncheon July 17.

M rs. Eva Webb Dodd, one of the founders 0 Delta Gamma, was present at the biennial cor vention of the fraternity, which was held at Este Park, Colo. The $50,000 birthday fund dril was oversubscribed $7,000. The Delta Garnt1'

[ 40]


~-~============================= '1' u

E

S

'1' A R

A N D

L

f

A M P

Scholarshi F . t . P und wtll be enhanced by the larger 1111 , w11tle the . I . . three sut Pus wtll be used to establtsh 1 three f)O t-graduate fellow. hips in memory of the oundcrs. ~j~

~1':E.

~\·~

=h!~

0ntf0ntt on!~ 0 ntP

pi.

tl )ell iJO

De.lta G Delta amma and Delta Epsi lon of Delta Tau 11 Kent kave been installed at South Dakota and uc y re . lllake ' specttvely. These recent additions a total of · · ternit stxty-nme chapters for the fray. ~1~

~!E.

=

s

tttll

5

t

!ret •PI' ]tC

,ti ttl!•

:iot' ttl

~·~

~·b

=~~ Another D 1 D loui e F· eta · elta Delta dean is Mis R. College 'ttch . · M'tss Dean, graduate of Knox 5 " iwasl~, ~~tc: of the famous George Fitch of ha b tctton, and past editor of Thf' Trident een chose d ' College \V n ean of wom n for \Vhitman 7 ' alia \\alia, \iVa hington. ~~~

~

~\·~

~

Our Execuf1 a bull t' ' ve ecretary has seen fit to issue e tn warn· · pr 0111 i ' mg agam t and oppo ing the cuous buy· f . , of the f . mg o J welry. 1 he members cia! . raterntty should pur ·hase from the offi. . . . Jewelers T! . · P 11 rpte C. · let c ts an cd ttonal ttl last Ap nl 's entitled "Jieen and Gold of Lambda Chi A lpha out ta d,. ewelry Law Protects 11." The one 11 · th editorial was: "Aln1o t · •ng state ' men t tn tn alent · · · dignity f ttnposttton on the authority and 0 · tn the f the £rate·1 n 1·t Y · . . h as appeared rec ntly through orm of a circular distributed widely offered Ottltt Lambda Chi Alpha. This circular lightly 1e 'offi ial' w 11o1e p arl badge at a price 1 sole offi .~ss .than that charged by the fraternity's eta! L am b da Cht. Alpha has a 1· Iaw wh· . Jewc le." 11 1111 0 of ])at tc P es a fine upon any cha1)ter guilty ' ronage 0 f I \\' Ut d ot 1er than the official jewelers. . 1 er tancl th t s· ntties h a tgma u a nd other £rater. ave the sa I . . Jewelry b me c ass of legtslatton against uccaneering. ~·~

~·to-

~1M

!\\lb:

""

Says The T·· . . .11 a~ of Acacta, the Washtngton, Tllinois and are pi . Mtchtgan chapters of the fraternity Viduatc~ng the entire alumni lists of their indiTriad cF~pter on the circulation roll of The · '111e. f.or tl1e magazin , honor to the chapter for 1 plin1ent t 1etr mterest and spirit. But what comcan be passed to the alunmu~ who is so

o r FE B

R

u

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

uninterested as to permit of his chapter having to subscribe to his fraternity magazine for him?

Two of Phi Gamma Delta's past grand treasurers have lost their lives during the past year, according to The Pu,-ple, Crf'en and Gold of Lambda Chi A lpha. Ka rl Lemmerman, national treasurer from 1917-1923, died in July a a result of injuries suffered in the Lorain, Ohio, cyclone. Dr. \Villiam Christians, a member of the same fraternity and national trea urer for fifteen years, was killed last fall in an auto accident. The writer, in attenda nce at the home-coming festivities of Omega (Purdue) on November 22, met Mrs. Christians, who was a guest of Brother Simmons. Tier remark concerning Omega of Pi I appa Phi were highly plea ing, and favorable criticism coming from one who (i n company with her husband) has v isited practica!Jy all of the chapter houses of a large national fraternity mean much.

The first haternity chapte r hou se of Phi Kappa Psi, and most 1 robably first in the history of fraternities. wa located at Penn ylvania College. It was erected in 1882.

\Ve tern Lambda Chi lpha's are proposing a Lam Chi mountain camp in Colorado. The proposed site is northwest of Boulder a nd southwest of Fort Collins, in the St. Vrain district, ncar the village of Peaceful Valley.

The Garnet and White of Alpha Chi Rho complains at "the crust" of an S. A. E. hou se at Dickin on for hanging the picture of the Virgin Knight, Sir Gallahad, in its front parlor. If we are not mistaken, our mother-in-law has one of the same pictures hanging in her dining room and probably had it there years ago. Admitted that it is a custom of Alpha Chi Rho chapters to hang the picture in every chapter house or meeting room, is there a patent right to the practice?

[ 41 ]


====================================================~~ ~ T

I-I E

S '1'

AR A

n LAM P f or FEB R u A R Y, 1 9 2 5

.._ 'I'h as the

Gamma Has Mothers' Club- Eta Initiates Eight- Iota Hard at ~~ Work- Nu Chapter A ctiv e- Tau Shows P ep - Alpha-Delta ler House Improved - Alpha-Epsilon Wins Scholarship Cup ~~ ALPHA'S COLLEGE LEADERS By c. M. BLACKMON VERY acti ve A lpha man is doing something in,· the coll ege thi s year, and doing it well. Broth er Peti t, as captain of basketball , is keeping things li ve ly. Broth er W hi telaw, arti st fo r the annual, is slyly caricaturing the facul ty. Broth er J-:T am is preparing for a bi g debate, whil e Hamil ton works out for th e varsity basketball squad. Brother Lesemann is conn ected with the annu al also, and in addition to leading in scholarshi p, is doing good work for our book. Brother Taylor is a varsity man on the basketball team also. Brother Frank Hay, fo rmerly of Beta, is perh aps our most popul a r man, and is generall y voted a "good fell ow." We a re p roud of our newest brother, Colson VI. Barfi eld . A lpha has two pledges and plans to have a reception fo r them at an earl y elate.

E

BETA RETURNS FOURTEEN By T. H. GRAF'l'ON ITH the return of fo urteen P i Kapps f rom the Chri stmas holid ays, Beta is settling cl ow n for th e tasks th at confront her. E lections for offi ce rs to hold off ice during th e spring term r esulted in th e fo llowing choices : Archon, Woods ide; T reasurer, Young; Secretary, l31alock ; Chaplain, Bright; Co rresponding Secreta ry, Grafton ; A lumni Secretary, Ferguson ; Warden, Glover. O n Founders' Day Beta celebrated with a memorabl e banquet. Twenty membe rs of the f ra ternity were present. Toasts were made by Brother McM illi an, on th e hi sto ry of the fraterni ty; Brother E ichelberge r, on the hi sto ry of Beta Chapter ; arid Drother Sturgeon, on th e P i Kappa P hi sp iri t. A commi ttee consis.t ing of Brother Woodside a nd B rother Grafton has recently been appoi nted

W

to wri te a connected histo ry of Beta Chapte W ith Bid Day set for J anu ary 28, Beta is loo\ ing fo r ward to the cl ose o f her rushing seaso' 'vV e hope to pledge several leading men from tl F reshm an Class. We have received good reports from sever• of our alumni. Brother Batchelor, who '11 initi ated near th e close of last year, is p reach~f at \i\f hitmire, S . C. Broth er L ewis is worktV in a bank at th e same place. We recently pledged Bynum Poe of R<l' , H ill, S.C.

an, of

leg fo 1

sq,

ba·

tea tst 011

Br

th(

Gr sit·

MOTHERS SERVE GAMMA MEN By HA T. HA R'rZ AMMA celeb ra ted Founder's Day witl' turkey dinn er, hav ing all the fi x ings was a real dinn er prepared by th e moth ers' of Gamma. T hi s was the second banquet o semester that the Mother's Club has put on ,. th e boys and we sure Jook for ward to the!11· nt Th e old grads were back to reacquaint the , selves with the house and meet th e new meil· bers. A nd, of course, fath ers of the boys ,,,er th ere to see that th e boys got the best of foO" Th ere were abou t six ty present and the chaP 11 house was full. D uring th e banqu et an orchestra, compos~ of members of th e chapter, played several sele• tions. Cards were enj oyed a fter the diniler All in all Gamma fittin gly obser ved Founder Day.

do Int

G

re~

ot:

kr th a1: cl"

] EPSILON PLEDGES EIGHT By H . L. SHAW, JR.' PSILON has cl osed a most successful rust ing season. E ight new men have ~e< added to th e fold and whil e all th e men cJestf' '\'( have not been pledged, still Epsilon has rece',1: her full share of the best of th e class of '

E

[ 42]

\1

a

r


~~ t~~================================================~~~ T n 1~ S 'l'

A R

A N

n

LA

M p

f or FEB

R

u A R Y, 1 9 2 5

__.-/

' at

apt'

lool

easor tt

, 111

r.

eve '

>

111

~chif

Jrkif< :RO<

1 'he pledges are t airly well trained by now, so ahs ~ou read th eir names th e follow ing will make t Cir b . est bows : Hamilton Boul ware, '28, Lake1 ~nd, F la. ; J oe Bowers, '28, Washington, N . C.; Bowers, '28, Washington, N. C.; J ohn K ugIertis '28 H' , Washington, N . C.; J ack U pton, '28, v· ~nderson, N. C.; Chalmers Carr, '28, Moores' le, N. C.; Bi.ll Glenn, '25, Spartanbu rg, S. C., anc of om Hamilton, '27, Dav idson, N. C. A ll these men are interested in some line of col1ege a f . f c IVIty. U pton pl ayed with the F reshman sootball team and is on th e F reshman basketball . also on th e F reshman basketbquad II · Kugler Is t a squ ad and is sure of a pl ace on th e baseball ealll th i . C . . d . . 1 isr s sp rmg. a rr IS Intereste m JOurna Ic Work. H amilton is a versatil e performer 0 n tl \i :p le iV ildcat's Glee Club. D rospects fo r spring sports look good. tJ rothers Simms and K ugler will be scrapp ing for 1 e Wildcats on the baseball team. Br other racey · sit Is captain and " big smoke" of the vard y track team. All of the broth ers a re settling in~wn to the sport of studying with th e serious 1~nt of copping th e schola rship cup. Brothers nston, Gracey, Lewi s and Brown a re all rat. seni or exam exemption s because of th eir 1 class wo rk. T he chapter is working, and reh.JJ on th e wa.y to accomplishing something Y Wo rth whil e. In a f I ot] ma word Eps il on wants to ask the .. ler chapters to tell us of th e good men they ~~nnw t 0 b t11 t a a sta ...e coming to Dav idson next year so apl . · rL. can be made at once. T his request 1 ch ) Ics to th e a Iumni , of course, as well as the aPters B . . is E . · est wtshes to P 1 Kapps everywhere ' PSil on' w ish for th e New Year.

·r

c

;N ;vi t~ ~s

·'' 0

>n ,. 111·

the'''

rne''; ,,,er· £001 )ar11

~~~ EIGBT INTO THE PALE AT ZETA By ]. N. HoLCOMBE

JR..

ESUMP1'ION of wo rk after th e Chri steight nllas holidays found nin eteen P i Kapps and Who \) edges back on th e campu s. Brother Swett, an 0 eft coll ege just before 1 hanksgiving for Pe1·a t'IOn, return ed. 0 Ut· 1 Phi . P edges cro ss th e threshold of P i Kappa 11nn,ed' t I . troclu· Ia e Y after the holidays. Let us mcc th em :

K in ard J ohn son, famili arl y known as "Sheik," hail s f rom Liberty, S. C. T he di stincti on of being th e "Beau Brumm el" of the F reshman class rightful.l y belongs to him . He is very popul ar with hi s fellows and-well, they say that he wades se renely through th e wailing hearts of those whose weapons a re words, and whose persuasives a re tears. We record the rumor without comment. W illia m Kell ey, of Lake City, S. C., is kn own fa r and wide by reason of the dulcet harmonies that he coaxes f rom hi s saxaph one. T he pipes of Pan may have been sweeter, but Bill's mu sic sound s all right to u . He is already assured a pl ace on th e ColJ ege Glee Club. \iVarren Derri ck, the son of a Meth odi st mini ster of D illon, S. C., is the orator of hi s class and the future spokesman of the chapter on occasions which require a man skilled in the witchery of wo rds . We a re looking to Wa rren to put us on the map in the realm of forensic activities. Carroll P layer is the chapter's future contributi on to the coll ege baseball team. He comes to W offord with an all -state repu tation, whi ch we confidentl y expect him to maintain. K ingstree, S . C., cl aims the honor of being hi s home town. W inn Blanton, of O rangeburg, S. C., sails under the ob ri quct of "Bud ." H e was our contri bution to the F reshman foo tball team, and we a re looking to him as a fu ture Wofford sta r. He is qui et, dependabl e sort of boy-the kind th at no chapter can afford to be without. Cecil Reames, of Bishopvill e, S. C., is a brother· of "Frog." A lthough Cecil doesn't play footbalt as hi s fa mous brother does, it is quite generall y conceded that he surpa:ses. "Frog" at lea t in poin t of pulchritude. Cecrl w1ll make us a valu able man. Keitt Smith is the son of a local physician. \iVe considered ourselves ve ry fortun ate in pi e lging Keitt. He is since re and generous-a boy we a re glad to entru st with the honor of P i Kappa P hi. . W right Nash, of Spa rtanburg, IS a younge r brother of Boyd and E d Nash, tw.o of ~ur mo~t loyal alumni . We won't be d1 sapl~omted If w right vv ill only maintain the reputat iOn estab.lished by his two famous prototypes; and, from

[ 43]


==============================================~~ Tn

B

S 'l'

AR

A N D LA M P

present indi cations, we belive we have reason to expect the best. Zeta united with the Spartanburg A lumni Chapter in observing Founders' Day on December 10. The undergrad uates, the alumni , and the pledges gathered a rou nd the banquet table in a clown-town hotel. After the eats went around, short talks were made by ] lamer for the alumni, II olcombe for the undergraduate chapter, and Derrick for the pledges. The chi ef event of the evenmg was an address by Brother John D. Carroll. B rother Carroll delighted us with an add ress th at was instruct ive and in spiring, as well as highl y entertaining.

ETA INITIATES TEN MEN By

w.

N. NEWSOM

E are proud of the fact that not a single Eta man failed to r eturn after the Christmas holid ays and we consid er ourselves all the more fort unate because of the return of Brother 1,. K. Bilbry, who was out last quarter. Counting the new men who have just been taken in, our roll now includes thirty-two active men. all working for the betterment of Pi Kappa Phi. t recent initi ations P ledges Carl Lippold , Reagin Jones, Joe Fisch, Cla ude Frederici.;:, George Cook, Yancy Chewni ng, Gordon Bennett, Jack Langford and W illi am Blalock were taken in and are now "true and faithful brct·hers amongst us." Accord ing to the Freshmen, they enjoyed the initi ation to the fullest and the upper classmen all feel confident that they were given enough to make a lasting impress ion. Just a word or two in regard to ou r new faculty brother who was initiated on the twelfth of December: Professor J. F ri end Day ( he lives up to hi s middle name) comes to E mory from Chicago where has was teaching a nd taking post gradua te work in economi cs. Hearing through some Emory men of the wonderful schoo l we have here in the heart of Dixie, he was favorably im pressed and was persuaded to take a place here as ass istant professor in the department of econom ics a nd business admi ni stration. It was

W

for F

B

nRu

AR

v, 1 9 2 5

in this capacity that our members began to kn°' and app reciate him. Professor Day is a g raduate of Trinity Colleg~ of the Uni ve rsity of Toronto, and hi s specialty,. political science. Tre was the coll ege prize man in this course all won the Governor-Genera l's medal for the high est A. B. degree. l:_Iowever he is not the "cligl~1 fied" professor who is af raid to unbend and 1111' with us common mortal but rather it is a hobb' of hi s to culti vate social contact between facuil' members a nd students. This is ev id enced by th' fact that he has frequent get-togethers with Ill' students in hi s office and generally tea and cakC' are ser ved. W hy the tea? Well , to quote professor Day, he is "a beastly E ngli shman, belo!lf to the pestilential race of the Engli sh," and te· parties is another of hi s hobbies. P rofessor Day is certainl y "end owed w ith t.l~ necessary qualifications" and we a re glad to 11' traduced him to all P i Kappa Phi's. At a recent meeting the following men wer elected to carry on the chapter activiti es forth' com ing year: Archon, Robt. A. F lournoy; Seer; tary, E ldridge B. Powell ; Treasurer, H enrY : Trost; Historian, W. N. Tewsom; Pan-He11e111 Representative, Ed C. B ruce; Chaplain, B. 1' Bilbry, a nd Warden, Jack Langford. Each h,. pledged himself to do hi s best for the chaP11 and we feel ure that we have an excell ent yr·~· ahead of us. Founders' Day was app ropriatel y observed b~ . r m embers of the Atlanta chapters. There 11'' nearly 100 per cent. attendance by the three chaP ters, Eta, Iota and Pi. Brother George Scheetl Executive Secr~tary, was the principal speak~· of the evening. Short talks were made by repf' sentatives of the Atlanta A lumni Chapter and 111 active chapters of Emo ry, Oglethorpe, and Ge~r gia Tech. It was ce rtainly a splendid gathef11" and speaks well for the fratern al psirit of 11; three chapters. The fall issue of the E ta ScrO 'I hot off the press, was distributed at this meet111' Droth ers "Eel" Bruce, "Pete" Stil es, "ChiC~ II ughes, "Ray" N ixon a nd "Euc" Reeves h ~~ just returned from a tour of Geo rgia and f]ofl (}! with the E mory Glee Club. A ll repo rt a 111 enj oyable time, especially "Euc," who plays 11. . " 111 . one o f t 11e s1<Jts. . "-r:<'!ll part o f '"f oots1e P

[ 44]


~============================~~

:!IP

------------------1-'-II__E__S_·_r_A_I_t__A_N__n__L__A._M~-~r~f~o~r~F-=E~B~R~U-A~R~Y~,~~~9-=2~5~--------------­

e all high Iigt~ 1 I tJII 10bh1 tcttll' )y th• :h ]tl cakl'

prtr !Ionf td (I·

,,.er or tl' Seer' trY ~ ell ell'

B. I; :h It~ ;~a pte

t ye~'

·ed b' e ,,·w chal' ·heel' '

'•II

Jea~

repf' ,d tl ceor 1erirt, . f ,,, )

I

~crth

•etitt'

:hie~ ]13'

JoriJ 11 to· {S

ti

'£tti

Illakes an e I pro[J xce lent Rapper and he reports several osa 1s from Fl "d b on a achelors who seemed to like th e cut of h" , . At pr ts · · . . well, lets say chm. . . A t Ianta cI1apters are makltlg [Jl esent the tl1ree ans for a d b . . ance to e gtven 10 the near future vv· is inte;lded tth tl~e three chapters cooperating it ea 011 .fthat tt shall be one of the best of the so I YOL1 • • • your [J ate 111 our netghborhood make it urpose to attend.

men present. Brother Cecil Lemon, president of the Atlanta Alumni Chapter, was toastmaster and as our principal speaker we were fortunate in having 1 rother George Sheetz. Archons of Pi, Eta, and Iota were call ec1 on for the latest news from their chapters and all reported 1 rogress. Eta chapter produced one of the best speakers of the evening, when they called on their latest pledge * * ':' * an Engli shman with everything but a monocle, he used so many big words that he reminded us of a crossword puzzle but he really had a keen sense of humor and we know that' he will be a big help to his chapter. We are going to cal l on him at our next gathering for a slow-motion speech and take our dictionaries a long.

ANNOUNCE IOTA, PLEASE By R. L. MAcDouGALL

.

B~UEVE

it or not, brothers, but Iota is sti!J mong those lected t . present even if we have negthree · o send 111 a c 11apter letter for the past tssues \A.!e t d a lot of · · s arte I the fall term off with 1lard worl· d tl "H brought ' an 1e appy New Year" 1 I· old Pi rtc' a ll_ ~f our fold with plenty of the , app sp tnt. 1 o begin wit! I I . 1 back tl . we 1ac on ly twenty acttve men lts year a d d d 11 We got < nee e at least thirty, so 1

twe]v Jfusy and placed the White Diamond on e o the be t s men on the campus. These new pi 1 erate, efcges cou ld easi ly be call ed a "conglomburly, or we have < among t 11e group: social lions, . at 1lletes at1d tl are f < 1e studtous type. A ll of them care me h all round f e II ow , and with the proper 1 . b rothers of whom we will b ou d matu re mto IJro d · e E . u tn the future. arly tn De I house d cem Jer we gave a very successfu l near f ance and are plan ning another for the uture and Cotnm itt c as we 11ave the same dance vance. ee, we are assured of its success in adOur interest 111 . . on 0 . athletics at present is centered Ut annual cup i . cross country run. A silver loving teanl g;vcn to the fraternity having the best 1 event ~~a~ Y~ar, and a fraternity winn ing this 11 ee ttmes · permanent posses ion of the cu gatns p. We are · · t 111s, · cup, for we alreacJ h gomg to wm Y ave two I · d · Year led b . . egs o~1 tt an our team thts ~'ver 11a d Y Bt other Poe ts the best that we have 'I'hat ti1e f\ . spirit tlanta P t Kapps have the proper our Fwas shown by the splend id attendance at D ay B anquet at the Georgian 1'enace . ounders' H , otel, for we had over two hundred

, \IV

~I t,..

~\1~

~~~

NU BROTHERS ACTIVE By ELDON KrFFIN U CHAPTER is now rounding out the first semester of the present school year. We a ll hope to keep away from the Dean's Elimina./ ion Formal. The freshmen are all working hard both to maintain a clear record in school and to make their grades so they can be initiated into the bonds of Pi Kappa Phi. Brother C. L. Coombs, ex-'23, Nu's amateur theatrical writer, has again shown his ability by having his show, "Tut-Tut," accepted as the 1925 Kosmet K lub production. Each year the Kosmet Klub sponsors a production written by a student at Tebraska and produced by a student cast. This is "Sig's" third production to be accepted in as many years and is a record that wi ll be hard to beat. Not only docs he write the play but he a lso composes the music for these musical comedies. As a tribute to 1 u Chapter he has written a new "Pi Kappa Phi Sweetheart" song which we hope to nationalize soon. P ledge Frandsen had another honor bestowed upon him last week in his elect ion to Sigma Delta Chi. His work in that department speaks for itself and he has a bright future. A number of Lincoln and Omaha a lumni met January 4, at the Elks Club in Omaha, to dis-

[ 45]

N


=================================================' '1' n E S 'l'

AR

A N D

LAM

cuss plans for the future home of N u. Several active men also attended. Plans were di scussed for in co rporating our alumni association, as well as so me planst for th e coming year in rega rd to new men. There is to be another meeting in Lincoln, January 25 and one February 1. Th e spirit of Pi Kappa Phi still burns regardless of miles and duti es. Brother Paul Walker, Supreme I-l istorian , has paid N u Chapter a couple of short visits since coming to Neb raska. He has located at I-·I astings, Neb raska, and Nu is proud to have him so near us and hopes he can make frequent visits to Lincoln. We have received communications from both Brother Carl Peterson and Brother Walter Wheeler expressing th eir intention of reentering school the econd semester and N u Chapter surely welcomes them with true brotherly spirit. A number of our alumni have fall en into the sea of matrimony in the past year. Among them are: Allan Wilson who was marri ed to Miss Vera Irwin, a member of Alpha Omicron Pi, on A pril 5, 1924. Burgess Shumway and Miss Zora Wunderlich were married October 13, 1924. Ea rl "Skeet" Ayers and Miss Dorothy Faragher were marri ed ovember 12, 1924. Ve rn e "Pooch" Thomas somewhat fooled the boys when he kept hi s marriage' to Miss Marga ret John son, a Sigma Kappa at Nebraska, a sec ret for over two month s. Stoddard M. Robin son finally took the fatal step when he married Miss Marion Moody, a Delta Delta Delta, November 27, 1924. Last, but not least, Charlie Collins, after having the brothers believe he was a confirmed bachelor, took unto him self a brid e in the person of Miss Mary Adams. N u wishes these brothers all the best luck possible but still hopes to have them visit us often. New officers were elected January 19. Broth er "Chick" A dams, a faithful standby of N u, was elected to the high honor of A rchon. Brother Vl ehmill er was reel ected to stewardhip as was Brother Kendall, Bill's assistant, to the office of cashier. ·

P

f o r FE B R u

AR

v, 1 9 2. 5

Brother ( Red ) McMillan was given the ho11° of keeping the record s. Eldon Kiffin was elected correspondi 11' secretary. Ray Hall was elected to the position of chaP lain. Monty Kiffin, (Eldon's little brother) 11'1 elected to the position of warden and was e) plicitly instructed to keep the brothers fro~ creating a mob scene. Brother Ray Lewis was reelected to reprt sent us on th e Inter-Fraternity Council. 1 lJ roth er Morris, retiring Archon, remains wi1. 1 us and is still lending a helping hand. He busy formulating plans at the present for t!t' Nebraska Glee Club trip to Kansas City, Nit' souri to compete in the Missouri Valley conte;! and on to New York if they win first honor· at Kansas City. ~~ ~

~~~

~ ~~

~~~

OMICRON'S PROSPECTS BRIGH'f By STERLING McGAULY MICRON started the year with sevente11, old men and eight pledges. Soon aftl school started, Harvey Pugh, Oshkosh, Wis., 311' J. M. Kimmey, Elba, Ala., were taken in. 'fit pledges are: Robert Argo, Jasper, Ala.; Georg O'Rear, Jasper, Ala.; Ernest Marbury, Doth•1f Ala.; Clyde Pierce, Troy, Ala.; Robert Par~' Troy, Ala.; William Young, Cullman, AI~· Robert Ramsey, Dothan, Ala.; Dick l-laJ11iler Fayette, Ala.; Ed Hamilton, Jasper, Ala. Brothers O'Rear and Munroe accompanied 1;' Pledges Parks and Young represent Omicron J' Alabama's Million Dollar Band. Pledge pic Hamner was captain, quarterback, and also 11 star of the "Baby Tide" which won the champi 011 ship of the Southern Intercollegiate ConferC11' for freshmen. Our other fre shmen are engag~ 1 in numerous college activiti es. Brother H. \1\fhitaker represented Omicron on th e varsitY 1 half-back and was one of the main springs of 11;, "Crimson Tide." Brothers Young and McGatt. are our basketball men. Brother Luke Sewell, of the Cleveland Indiatr . once more acttve . but we regret to say t hat ]f ts will only be with us until mid-term when he gel

O

[ 46]

(


:o/P

~"""'================== -----------------1-'_II_E_~___T_._'_R__._'_N_n___L_._,_~_r_P~f_o___r __F_J_~_n_R__u_.\__R_\~·,__1_9_2__5________________ ]'

5

c~

fror

r

liS degree B rother Joe Sewell , however, is married at d · . ' 1 spend I . . 1s alw eac 1 wmter m Tuscaloosa and ays willing t 0 d 1 · b . Hrother R. o 11s est for the fraterntty. ha n uss Cureton, of Chi and Eta chapters ow transfer d 0 m1cron . ' have a re to and we also not 11er Eta n 1'he lo ' man, . rother Frank Meacham. ss to these t I Brothe.1 p wo c 1apters has been our gain. au! Walk chooJ ' er pa1·d us a v1s1t JUSt after opened and . I . . been e1 . . smce t 1at tJme Om1cron has lJOymg the f · much rults of that visit for he gave needed ad . B Rho , · . vtce. rother Dill Hellier of • " 1ted the c1 " ' At that t' lapter on Home-Coming Day." tme we en te t · d quet. · r ·a me our alumni at a banBe ide t I·· sity Br tl a ' 111 g regular courses at the Un iver' o Jer TTa. p . Professor f . ' 1vey ugh 1s head coach and 0 111story t ,, \\1e are . . a .t u caloosa High School. for Pi y.expectmg to have a good ba ketball team for the appa_ ~hi this year and one is needed · · 1·- very 1oppos1t 10 n ll1 mter-fraternity basketball 'een flefore 1 · · Omicro 11 c -~smg we would like to announce that 1 ~n 1Iarc h '~ ~;;art buildi~~ a new $20,000 house tng in s ' - 5· to be ftn1. hed in time for rush, eptember. ~I t?JE

~ ~

,,,~

-=~~

PI STILL GOING STRONG

B·y KEl~LS M.

pr

.r Ill

tr J]l

IX

C! fAPTER men - '- suffered the greatest Joss of 1 teen. Of ~ t year than ever before, lo ing eigh1 . t 1liS numb 1. t )etng: p . e en were graduated. These \\' I' don ''others Eel gar D av1cl, . \?\falter Gordy, 1 O'N Harry'!' eal, Jake Morris Ralph Sinclair ''!) easley " J , B ' ' ' \ed" F. . ' ug rown , Can ell r Campbell I azler and "F' I " . , cIergradt ' me 1 Scruggs. The unE. PPs Stor lates who f 'I C al eel to return are: Brothers ltam Be tly, Iyd. e \\ allace, Bill Brazc.lton \\ ii, Jack Cona ey' "R u dY" Hen son, Wyatt iforris, 1'easley · way ' and "S ammy " M onroe. Brother IS now ffir ter at 1' a Ia ted with Alpha-Beta Chap111 . u 1ane wher h . . . ed1cine. Br e e IS pur umg h1s study of \Vith the other Sto ry went to West Point. 1o s of tl · · 'Xteen number there were 11Jcn to rett .liS great th cl e chapte . 11 n, an two transfers, making 1 nrothers ~~ I eighteen. The two transfers are: · · Stacy from Tota Chapter at Geor-

7

gia Tech, and Keels M. Tix from Zeta Chapter at Wofford College. Tine fre hmen were pledged at the beginning of the year, all of them now being brothers as they were initiated early in ovember. They are: "11 rt" Scoggins, Gaine vi ll e, Ga.; An el Me eil, Union, S. C.; Harry Lyons, Roswell, Ga.; J. \V. \\ itaker, Bill Perkins, Charlie Roley, Bob Pitman, Tommie Ioffitt, and l\f arion Anderson, al l from Atlanta. Seven more pledges have been received since and they will be initiated very soon. J...et us introduce: \Villiam Shands and I Jarold Askew, of Union, S. C.; O liver Lowden , of avannah, Ga.; "Red" Brinson, of Augusta, Ga.; Joe D lcle, of Pelham, Ga.; "Andy" Redding and Freddie Poptham, of Atlanta. Pi i very proud of these fifteen men and we are sure they would . be a valuable asset to any chapter. Having seven regulars on the Oglethorpe football team of '23 we were only repre ented this year with two. " utty" Campbell played his second year at quarterback, and "Ca ruso" Hardin his second year at guard. Roth of these men arc sterling "gridders." '·Coonie" Young was also on the squad, playing end. Winning the S. T. A. A. championship, this past season was the most successful Oglethorpe ever had. On the freshman team we had "Red" Brinson, "Andy" Anderson, Joe Dekle, Bill Perkins and Jimmie \\atkin . The G.lee Club is hard at work rehearsing for the tour that is not so far off. In this organization we have: Shaffer \i\ imbi sh, Oliver Lowden, " a ru so" Hardin, "Nutty" Campbell , Mar hall Verner, Ansel lc eil, 1'. J . Stacy, Frank Everett, Bill Shands, and Harold Askew. On the taff of The Petrel, our weekly publication, Tom Caldwell is 11usiness Manager; Shaffer \Vimbi h, Assistant Business Manager; Du Pre Jordan, Associate Editor; William hands Exchange Editor; Tom Moss, Circulation Manasistant Circulation ger, and Frank Everett, if anager. Brother Stevens, one of our Atlanta boys, failed to return to school after the holidays. "Pat" has accepted a position with A. G. Spalding and Bros. "Pat" is also the star forward for the Atlanta Athletic Club basketball team.

[ 47 I


==============================================~~ Tn

E

S '1' A R

A N D

L

A M P

The chap ter has already begun making plans for a dance whi ch we w ill g ive in about two months. There are many of our alumni whom we have compl etely lost track of, and we would be very glad to hea r from th em conce rning their welfare, etc.

RHO LEADING FIELD By

J. T.

S'l'ALLTNGS

ITH th e Christmas holid ays rapidly fad ing into the vagueness of pleasant memori es brother. of Rho have about gotten over th e old "spirit" of th e occasion, and are fa st settlin g clown to the " real business of liv ing" once more. Eve ry m mber of th e chapter is back with the excep tion of one of the pledges, C. H. D eZevaloss. M id -winter has ushered in the basketball season for u s here and Brother Rudy Lane is back at hi s regul ar position at forward on the varsity. Tn the games so far thi s season, he has di spl ayed a sterling brand of playing, which, if continued , bids fair to land him a position on the A ll South Atlanti c team if not even better. With spring " just around th e corn er," we are looking for ward with g reat interest to the baseball and track season s, also. Brother I ane again comes into th e lim elight in th e cap:tcity of outfield er de luxe and he is looked on as a sure bet to ma ke the team thi s year. Brother Summerso n is already in training in anticipation of a good year with th e track team on which he was a consistent winner in the clashes last year. Although the first year rul e prevents the freshmen from engagin g in varsity spo rts, several of them a re baseballers of no mean ability and will no doubt ca rry the colors with the Freshman team this year. Brother Summerson has also been successful in winning a place on th e varsity wrestling team , a r emarkable feat for a man of hi s slig ht build . P ledge Powers was a lso on th e freshman cross country team. In other fields of activity, Rho is equally well rep resented. O n the publi cation side we have the business manager of the Caly-t:, year book,

W

f or

FE B R

u A R Y, 1 9 2 5

Broth er Rex, and on the R iug-Tum Phi, selli weekly paper, we have the managing ecW Broth er Stallings, not to mention Pledge Garr . I son, who was recently successful 111 th e tryot for the reportoriaJ staff. Brothers Rex ar Leake are members of Pi Delta Eps ilon, nation journali sti c society. Broth ers Vandiver and Bishop are membersr the school orchestra. Two of the brothers, Rosborough and 1\'r a re helping to uphold the scholarship side of tt fraternity here, as both a re spo rting scholarsllil for th ir excell ent work last year. Brothers W borough and R ex were recently elected to J11C11 ber hip in Alph a Kappa Ps i. Brother Lane a member of two social clubs on the caJ1lP11 Kappa Beta Phi and Pi Alpha N u, while Brothc G. L. Powers is aJso a member of the latter chi The building fund is gradual ly being addâ&#x20AC;˘ to and it is hoped that in the very near futu r 11 Rho will have a house all its own. As it is have one of the best and most admired house on the campu s and we are ju stly proud oft: many complim ents we have received on it. Sttl owning your own is not only more economic 1 but it also adds to th e standing and general reP 01 tation of the group and it is for these reaS that we are so zealously pushing on ever for tl needed sum for building. n D ecember 10 we fittingly observed f0 111 ders' Day in the chapter with a series of speecht on the founding of the fraternity, its aims, ide~ and future outlook. Although we were disaf 011 point d at th e la st minute in not having schedul ed speaker, the older member s of th e chaf ter took up th e torch and indeed carried it ott such a mann er as to leave nothing but revere 11' for th e name of our founders and the great ~ tiona! which has come as a r esult of their wor I...ast meeting we had our semi-annual et ect~C of officers and the following were elected to g1111 the chapter the rest of the year : C. Vv. JZC) Archon; W. R. Bi shop, Secretary; D. C. We' Treasurer; and J. T. Stallings, Alumni Secreta( In addition we wish to announce w ith pleastl' the adding of Hervey H enline, of Bradford, 0 to our li st of pledges.

[ 481


~~ ~~==================================~ ----

'I' n

8

ST

A R

A

o L

f

A M P

o r FE

B R

u

A R Y,

19 2 5

----------------~------~---------

TAU SHOWING REAL PEP

one of those agreeable fellows always ready to do something for somebody else and we know By H. H. REowr E he will do it for Pi Kappa Phi. Brs letter f" 1 h0 . me s al.l of us back from the 1tc1ays start" George Ho.lbrook, better known as "Simple," 1 · new yea r. mg t 1mgs off lively for the comes from outhern Pines. "Simple' " father . mce our I I is a preacher so therefore he is real quiet. 111itiated t ast etter we have pi dged and At the last meeting before the holidays we had who, ca me t o S tate f rom Carolina. . 1'h ey are: wo ]. M our election of officers for the second term. They Jr. 1'! · Edward, Jr., and W. A. Cooper ley are b0 tl1 R ' are as follows: Archon, E. A. Sutton; Secresider th ~aleigh boys and we contary, H. H. Redwine; Treasurer, E. A. Robison; Brother eEmdto be of great help to Pi Kappa Phi. \Varden, J. M. Edwards, Jr.; Chaplain, W. A. · 1oo 1<mg · lllan b k• wards ts good on the Freshas etball t • Jr.; Alumni ecretary, J. H. Kluttz. Cooper, forward . . eam, 11oldmg down one of the Brother B. Vl. \Villiams has withdrawn from D POstttons. ue to the pi d . chool to go in business in Greensboro. We all furni h tl e gmg rules we were unable to wish him great success. le names of I d our P e ges before so will now introd D. W"J uce to you our future Pi Kapps: B e WasJ son Dzzle • w I10 I1a1"I s from \Vil son Mills. 01 juries the ~~ for football but on account of inUPSILON STRONGER THAN EVER show trst of the season he was unable to 1111tc,1 stuff By R. A. WILLIAMS Jack E. Brant!. 1· p ILO is now in full fling with activities Bope, . C aey ~ from the big city of Spring anybody · J ck ts one of those boys whom and with the spirit for achievements in like his lea;, get along with even if you don't sc hola . tic standing among the fraternitie on the 00 Freshma f<s. Jack was the main tay on the campus. \Ve sta rted the semester pledging nine n ootball t tlle end 'po "t· eam, holding down one of men who have already aided the chapter in comSJ IOns. petition along athletic lines, as well as having Marvin Wau . 1llan tea h ~ <m, the other end of the Fresh- good reports schola tically. 'l'he pledges are: . m, at! from H d ts a! o out f . en erson, . C. Marvin V. E. Bergholtz, Aurora, Ill.; J. C. Brown, Her01 late this t basketball but due to coming back rin, Ill.; G. W. Chambers, Anna, Ill.; G. A. up but . erm h: has not been able so far to show Chronis, \Vilmette, Ill.; R. A. Hibner, Chicago, JUst Watt h "II Whistle ha bl e WI be there when the last Ill.; IT. \V. Miner, Bloomington, Ill.; F. Teegar1' s own. den, Wilmette, Ill.; C. E. Walker, Anna, Ill.; .. N. Spence b tt I star for,, d ' e er mown as Hooker is the T. W. \\ inton , Chicago, Ill. •ar of th b ' psilon ha participated in a number of inOther on f e asketball team. IT e is an\Ve1I on tle o the loc a J chaps. Hooker is going tra-mural activities this fall with very gratify· I le 1)asketball t le will wi • eam and we feel sure that ing results, giving an assurance for a greater f . n 1lts numeraJ program next semester. The first entry was in anon S! . I . the basi tb ltr ey, another future Pi Kapp on playground ball in which psilon, although not . <e a II t · ' S htrlcy winner of the division, was at the top, playing a 1 eam IS from Farmville N C d ' . . oo 1<s r al game and giving tiff competition. ur he ha that g?~ at guard and from indications posttton cinched next entry was in volleyball and we fared in Ja Illes ·d · derson bel~ ney Harris, the little boy ft-om IT en- this as in baseball. Our latest entry has been in 1 ' teve tl t b . . . c: lance of h . . la emg athletic rum a man's ba ketball and as the schedule does not call for of wh 0111 w et~;ng the fair ex. Jimmie is a boy games until the beginning of next week noththat he is fe .a are proud for the simple reason ing can be reported. \t\'e have six men back do u good nendly to a 11 an d we know he wtll . who played on la s~ year's "varsity"; Brothers w 1lerever he may be. \Vra TT ouse, !sen, Talley, Thomp on, \\' ickhorst, · Y ettles 110 1 · and Werden. \Ve have exceptional basketball IS helping J" '_w latl from vVinston-Salem tmmte wit!1 tl1e s I1eti<Jng. . . W ray is, talent among our new men who show great

T

U

·eP so tl

eil'

[ 49

J


==============================================~~ T n

E

S 'l'

A R

AN D

LAMP

promise m playing the game up to th e Upsilon standard. P ledges Bergho.ltz, Chronis, M in er, \iValker, and \ Vinton are th e new recruits and with all th is materi al to work with it is certain th at Broth er T hompson, acting as athl etic manager, will be able to turn out a team to win for U psil on another cup to grace the mantel along with th e rest of our t rophi es that were also won through ou r achi eve ments and successful attempts. \ i\fe have basketball , baseball, interscholast ic circus and th e post exam jubilee stunt to look forward to and as we won a cup in baseball and th e circus along with th e others that we succeeded in winning, th e cards look stacked for us thi s season to w in again, with every one back thi s season who participated last year. In th e jubilee we have entered a quartet, two piano players, a dance r, two char acter actors and a chorus mad e up of the boys here at U psil on, all mold ed into a sketch arranged by Brother K uhl. 'J'hi s is not presented until Febru ary 4. U psil on boasts of a number of men who have gain ed prom in ence on the campu s through achi evements in variou s activ ities and who have put P i Kappa P hi up w ith th e foremost frater niti es on thi s campus. Brother Charl es Tall ey is a member of the track squad in the capacity of hammer thrower, throwing the hamm er 140 feet regularl y. Brother Talley is sure to place in all meets thi s yeat路 judg ing from hi s performance las t yea r in the meets w ith Chi cago and M ichigan. We look forw ard to everything for th e best in thi s year's competiti on for Chuck. Brothers \Nickhorst and Thompson played on the Illinois football team thi s fall, W ickh orst at gua rd and T hompson at quarter. The form er pl ayed in th e renowned Illinois-M ichigan game for a period in th e second half, a stone wall on defen se and opening the needed gap on offense. Brother Thompson pil oted the varsity a number of times on week-day scrimmage, although not playing in any of th e games. Marty is a sophomore at th e university and shows remarkable prom ise to a ttain a berth on th e team in hi s junior and seni or years. \Nith a la rge number of thi s year's football squad graduating next summ er, Brothers Wickhorst and Thompson ap-

f or

FEB R

u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

pear to have encouraging prospects as regula~ on next season's eleven. Brother McCoy, who did so well last year w restling when he was a freshm an, is no coming to the lim eli ght in tryouts for thi s year varsity. McCoy co mpeted in th e tryouts lJ路 evening to determin e th e men for th e opett~f meet with Pu rdu e and he received th e deci>t' ove r hi s man. Ups il on had aspirants along dramati c ar mu sical lin es with lJruth er \Ni.lli a ms as one the leads in the campus fa ll play, "You and I Brother K uhl attain ed th e honor of making par t in the light mu sical opera, "Oh Boy,'' tt fall mu sical show. Possibillities for furt h' part icipation in campu s prod uction s a re ,.er bright for th em and we tru st th ey will be ' 11' cessful in their future attempts. Brother Coatsworth entered the seni or h01 parade and, dressed as the "Prin ce of Wail' He won th e cup for fir st prize through his al pea ran ce. This cup also ado rn s th e mantle th e chapte r house. Brother Malmer is on th e staff of th e Sirt' the hum orous campu s magazin e, and things ~~ full of pep around the press when Al setl' through hi s lin e, a lin e that A I and A l onl y c~ origin a te, whi ch continu ously keeps all in cot vul sions of laughter. A number of Ups ilon Pi Kapps have bel given commi ssions in the military departt11ctt Brother Inman has the rank of major. Broth' Wi nton is a captai n, Brothers Schroeder, Chart hers, and Spear hav e receiv ed commi ssions ' li eutenants. 'vVe contemplate founding an order of 1 ~ Deneclicts among U psi.l on broth ers, who h~~ an nounced their betrothal to several of the fa sex. T he beneclicts in order are: Brothers ft man, Menzim er, W illi ams, Chroni s, McCoy, V' r I-:Touten, Lathrop, M iner and Brow n. We t~r. thi s new ord er, if it is instigated, will in tJtl send to Upsil on the pledges of the fttl 111 chapter. W ith things going on at Upsilon as related can be seen we are among the active chapters' P i Kappa P hi , and are continuall y g rowing n101 and more into a broad er field of the vari 01 activities on the campus and accreditin g 011

[ so]

c a a

t:

I

e

g t

e

1-


:~ ~~===================================== _.../

:ula

·- - - -

'J'

II

r~ S 'l' A R

A N o

L AM

p

f

o r F 8 B R u A R v, 19 2 5

------------------~-------------------

·elves clS . real p· I 1 (apps. \ Ve at Ups il on a re very ])r d ou of ou 1. tt . . . adele 1 · • a a mm ents wht ch g tves us c tn centtve t 0 mor e and a broader in te rest in th . . e vano us f lei I . . . t:on it te s anc a cl estre for pa r ttctpa1 as many as possible.

summ er cl own here. But for th e leafl ess t rees, we woul d ha rdly know th at it is no longer fa ll. :ar But time has passed, and the archon says J]O B rother Young is a-hungering fo r anoth er of ye~r my " mental offerings" which must be served up ~ I~· ~\1'-!, ~''~ "'.V hot by J anua ry 20. T here's not mu ch tim e left, ~~~ ,enir and examina tions a rc swooping clown upon us, cist' "DPs AND DOWNS" AT PSI "casting their shadows before." But, then, there B'J' T-IgR tn:wr ]. MuLLER isn't much to tell. : ~r Th e li st of officers who took ove r the chapter IITNcs h , 1 . )1 C e )een gomg a long p retty evenly a ffa irs at th e opening of school has neve r been f Ot. Pst. a'\ V I td I our setb . · ' e lave our problems and even publi shed, so let's devote a li ttle space to th em. ac 1<s but tl ·ing . '. l e~e a re onl y to be expected and H enry M. ("Pete") Robin son was chosen a rchon ; ' Pat tcal . . "tt are in di .adox t ' as tt may f trst appear, really J ames A. T hompson, treasurer ; Cha rles N. ' ca tons of h II .. . . _~rth' ts not to 1 a ea t 1y conclrtr on . Yet thr s Cla rke, secreta ry; Ha rold N. Walsdorf .. alumni Je constru c1 ) ,.er 1 si has · . e as an apology fo r fa il ure; sec reta ry; Val Iri on, chaplain ; and ]. Avery · )1 Jts cl.rfficu lties b u t 1'1 · · · ~ stt· tnu . 1 <ew rse rt has .rts 1111 lS,and tt rsf lt tl Leeper, warden. I .. early · 1 e 1at t 1e promr smg outlook Pete and Val were selected to represent P i tn t l e seaso I . )Jol Founcle. , D n las tn no way been dimm ed. Kappa P hi in the I nte rfratern ity Coun cil th is 5 ; ail' lively. 1, 1' ay was observed simply but effec- yea r. to tall · le boys gathered in the evening to li sten .is al Four P i Kapps have been furni shing qui te a 's on the e 1·] 1 · . ttlc the Part ) j a. Y lt story of P 1 Ka ppa P hi and bit of news lately, not only locally, but, due to th e genera] i-~~ecl tn coll ege li fe by frate rni ties in Associated P ress, in New York and P hiladelphia. 11 Sifl' the m e~tin ~ .was fo ll owed by songs, a fter which Th e Tul ane D r amatic Club's prod ucti on of ,.:rs ar elaborat ~ tsper secl. Nothing very formal or "Adam and Eva" on th e night of the annual Ano,t]e-~ Jut the sp iri t was th ere. 5ett• " J ollification" fo r th e " R olling Green Wave" I let house c1 ly C•' With the label " ance 1as passed in to hi sto ry used Pete as leading man, and in th e sup port were the best eve r. " I t was made Val, Wayne S tova ll and P ledge J ohn Seiler. T he really 1 co memorabl b ·I house 0 1. 1 e Y t l e presence of our own play made quite a hi t, and th ey are taking it to c lestra wl10 f . 1 1lusic urnt shed as exhil ara ting Baton Rouge J anu ary 12 under the auspices of ! bel 1las e. ' F as . t nlctt <nowing th . ' er tempted the feet of m an. the L . S. U. Dramatic Club. etr effo rts . · rotht We t e apprecratecl th e boys PIayec] tl · Fraternity basketball season opens soon, and 1 t . letr leads off c1 I . . , c hatl agrous. All . . • an t 1e sp trtt was con- we a re looking for wa rd to a more successful sea111 ) !15 ' known · all Jt was a huge success: wha t is son than last yea r. A n in terfrate rnity dance will 1 ve.1 111 he I Psi' . nacu ar as a " hum dinge r." be g iven, too, in the near fu ture, acco rding to .1 s Warn e rs . I . . ) f ~~ 11 Pre[)a . a t e a ready g trdmg th eir loin s our Pa n Hellenic rep resentatives. ratt an for tl f hat exams. le ast approaching mid-term Dr. S tor k recently paid a visit to th e home of .te Ia Chapter In spector Clancy Latham, Al ph a Beta, :rs rr ~'~'-f: ~"'-!. '''-V '23, and the youngster is to be known as Clancy ~~~ v~ {, A bern athy, Junior , if you please. 1'1-IINGs ~ trtr \ Ve celebrated "Founders' Day" with a banquet HUMMING AT ALPHA-BETA titf 1 attended by nearly all alumni, active members B'J' CrrARI,Es N . CL.\ RKE fu tl'r and pledges. Before the banquet Pe rcy Albert HA"'b t eautt. · w] · f ul, sunshmy clay last autumn on P hillips and I-:Tenry \Varmoth Rob in son were . , tc11 I wrot tl d ated ts. lte se e 1e o ts for th e December initi a ted. en1 s only 1 ters 1 Ilave th' a wee< or so ago. For not onl y Seve ral P i Kap ps, both active and alumni, betngs be . d :r ntOI ay_ altl en movmg so r apid ly but this came members of P hi Alpha Delta Law F ratenity , 1ough 1111'd . · ' ,ariO' great atl d • -wJn ter most all ove r these w hen the O mega Rho Law Club of T ul ane Unig 1ono u · ott us nt tecl Sta tes-is balmy Indian ve rsity became Martin Chapter of the national. ,

T

T

Cf

[ 51 ]


~

!:::: !=: '(fJ

8

> ~

>

z 0

r

>

;;:: Ul

1-0

N

'-+. 0 ~

~ r-1 c:l ~

c > ~

~><

...... \0 N Ul

The football season over, members of Alpha-Beta, along with the other thousands of Tulane students, turned their attention to dramatics. The picture shows a scene from Bolton and Middleton's clever three-act comedy, "Adam and EYa," in which Brothers Robinson, Irion and StO\·all, together with Pledge John Seiler, had parts. The play was produced first at the "All Tulane" celebration in honor of one of the South's best football teams, and later was giYen at Louisiana State University, at Baton Rouge. Brother Irion i.s \)resident of the Tulane Dramatic Club. ....

Re:ad\.n';:!. hom \e.h. \.o -.:\11;,'n.t.. \.no<'.e \.u t.'n.e <'.Ce.ne. axe.·.

~'

"""-'"'

:'\..-:. T

•• ..,.,.,

<:"".T-:..._,, .. ,,~

~ ... ,.._.

' l> "-"""'.'""' ''"''

<"""...,~ ,.,. '-"'.

-

M\"'"' Lou\<;.e_ 'Jo\n,e.-.:. ~'"""" "Be.--y\ Mo-.:-.:\<;.. 'Ja\ 1.-.:'-on, '-.Va-yne. ~t.o-.....'\.".._11;,

,,.,..,..,.....,.

¥-

.,...._,,...._. . ..._,

'-'-"~

,~ ..... •

2

"'"

PJ

......._,, •

--

"

'\., •. ,,.

' 0

"<

.,.., ..,

'

.'\.

••

~•-,'\.•'


~· ~========================= -----------------1-'-It_I_~_S

A_M_· _p~f_o_r___F~E~I~B~R~U~A~R~Y~,~1~9~2~5----------------

__T_A__ R__A_N __n__L__ Active membe rs · · · V a! I rio mttt ated were Wayne S tovall ' the alu 111n,· and E ugene W'IJJ Iamson, and among, nt were B I1 . . . S amuel J , rot el s Henry Vv. Robmson, 1 Brother J·-· ennant, and Clancy A. Latham li on w · (p resident ) of a~ _c1lOsen as t he first Ju sti ce vall is its Mat tm Chapter, a nd B rother S to'l'l marshal. . le National I l C . ll lty, "S . n er- oll eg1ate Masonic Fraterllr quat e and C " . 1 ~ cw Orl e . ompass, at tts conventi on in ans m De I Latha111 f . cem )er, promoted Brother \ '"ICe-Presid l on, . Nac ti ona I 'I' reasurer to National 1'1 ent. . . le 1' ul ane D. It shed cu t I amatt c Clu b broke a long estabs om when 1.t e.! d a thi rd a ecte Va l p res ident for nnu al ter 111 T l notes that . • 1e T ul ane Hnllabaloo "When .the t' 1111 ca111e the. e fo r th e election of office rs . te we re ha lf I society 0 11 tl . . a cozen members of th e 1 f · or Presid ent.e11 Hfee t s ee 1<lng to nomin ate I ri on He has also b .e was elected un animously." orary Span· I ee~ elected a member of the honA teneo Espa ii ol. " c ts 1 soctet \ 'Vayne h y, "El ~ GJendy Burke as Dbeen . elec t·ed to membership in Wee" Bess t ebatmg Society, a nd pledo-e "Pee o membersh · · 1 o A, \ ·vhil e not t . · tp 111 t 1e D ramatic Clu b . B t s rtctJy cha t b . e ans would 1'1 P er usmess, we Alpha1 garding tl <e to say a few good wo rds reAl le paper pub)' I1 I b llll1ni cl ts ec Y the Birming ham h0 1apter. I t . . . llse, and · IS a welcome v tsttor to our S IS always d . . outhern P i K rea wtth mter est. If any cheating tl1 apps ar e not subscribing they are ' en1 selves of some real entertain ment.

pull ed down fourth place in the scholarship race, with an ave rage of 3.4. I believe this has acted as an incentive to spur the fell ows on, fo r we have a lready decided on first place next semester. A t p resent th e gloom of final exam inations has spread over the campus and every one is studying but we have decided to keep goi ng un til th e gloom li fts. D uring foo tba ll season Brother Jim Penick represented Pi Kappa P hi on th e varsity team. 1Te participa ted in eve ry game of th e season at th e pos ition of tackl e. B rother Bennie McElyea, after a series of strenuous elimin ation matches, has been chosen to rep resent O kl ahoma on the wrest ling team in the 135-pound class. Brother McElyea won a lett er in thi s spo rt last year, a nd feels confident of a second this year. T he I nte r-Fra terni ty Coun cil basketball season is drawing near and B roth er Dick J ones, who is showing up good on the vars ity, gives th e team aspirants a daily p ractice. B roth ers Gideon, Ba rrett, and Metcalf consti tute pa rt of the pe rsonn el of the U ni ve rsity Glee Club. B rother Metcalf appears on the program as "The Gr eat Magician," which name he rightly earn s by his a llusive sleig ht of hand perform a nces. T he most inAuential position on the campus is held by B rother O r ville P riestl ey as ed ito r of the 0/dahoma Daily, U niversity of O kl ahoma's school paper. T hi s position is sought by many but attained by few. Spring track season is looked fo r ward to by !J rothers McElyea, Corn eiJ son, and W hi te. After FULL SPEED seeing th em work out it looks as if A lpha-Gamma By BYRON D AWSON has a cinch on three letters this spring . A lPHA-GAMM ' 4:l\. and · . A ts still go ing at full speed T he one big event of thi s yea r was the Found· I)] edges wl IS carry tng Wtth her a fin e bunch of ers' Day Banquet Decembe r 10. T he banquet tl ' 10 a re aJI · ley are I<a c anx tous to be abl e to say th at was ar ranged at the house and eve rything was they are ver PPs,ffi and · drawmg · . as th a t t'tm e IS nea r set for 7 :30 o'clock. A t that time the doors we re !let result ~ lCient in thei r pl edge duties. T he thrown open and every fell ow was in his place, senlester nett o Idush wee!< a t t I1e begmnmg . . of the in cl uding as many alumni as could possibly atcrea d e ten neoi)I I . - tend. A fter the feast, Brother L loyd Story 1 t . se to fift Y es w 1 0 have been m ts on1y a f een. A s tlle second semes ter rush sta rted the speeches in which th e old P i Kapp ca 111Pus ;o r ;~ weeks off we are combing the spirit was broug ht forward, and you couJd see . Out of f'f u ure P i Kapps. tha t it had a telling effect upon th e pl edges. tn tl t teen di ffe t f . . ren raternttt es which a re A fter smokes and a few jokes th e bes t meeting 1e Int F er- ~ raternity Counc1·1 A lp'ha-Gamm a that Alpha-Gamm a has had this year broke up.

r

[ 53 ]


==============================================~~ '1' 11

~~

S '1' A R A N o LA

M

A.-D. HOUSE IS "SPRUCED-UP" By

P ni L I P S. SI-IOWBLL

L P LI A-DEL'l'A'S chapter house is a t present a hi ve of industry, for th e pledges, soon to be initi ated, are engaged in redecorating alm ost t he whole house as a part of their ini tiati on wo rk . A lph a-Delta has reaso n to be proud o f last qua rter's reco rd and a t the sta rt of a new qua rter we hope to do even better. 13y winning the inter-f raternity cross-country bann er , w ith a com fo rtable ma rg in , we made it two straight, and in the nca r f ut ure a la rge bann er awarded fo r thi s accompli shm ent will be hanging on our wall s. Th e team wi ll be in tact fo r next year and t here is every reason to hope we can repeat. IJes ides leading in in ter -fr aterni ty athl eti cs, we a re a lso p roud of our scholasti c record for last qua rter . W hen the g rade averages we re computed, t he chart revealed A lpha-Delta ranking f ift h out of thirty-seven fraterni ties, one g rade poin t below Acacia, whi ch ranked f irst. W hil e still on th e qu esti on of scholar ship, we a re proud to ann oun ce that B roth er h·an k Woll aston, w ho acted as schola rs hip officer last qua rter, was recentl y elected to Tau Beta P i, honora ry eng in eering f ratern ity. At Chri stm as two of the broth ers we re lost through g raduati on. B roth er Dave A nderson rece ive d hi s B. S. in eng in eering and is now working with the P uget ound Power and L igh t Co mpany in Seattle. W hil e B roth er George Darn es is in Los A ngeles. B roth er Barn es r eceived hi s degree of .B . S. in for estry.

A

,.

~\t/~

~"'~

~~~

~~~

ALPHA-EPSILON WINS CUP By vVu. T.I AM McKAY

r fo r FE n R u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

during th e fir st year of its existence as national. I t was indeed a happy day for th e chaP1' when th e result was announced by th e facttll. a nd every member is wo rking hard to hold 1 ~ cup fo r another year. . commi ttee is a t work selecting a suitab pr ize to be given to th e freshm an neoph yte ha' ing th e hig hest ave rage in hi s semester work 1 Phi De lta Th eta g ranted th e local !Jeta cha pter a cha rter during t he Chri stmas h olid_a~· T hi s brings th e number of na ti ona l f ratern 111' to ten at F lorid a. T he holid ays were producti ve o f many lo' •CI affairs to those of our chapter w I10 1\ amorou sly incl ined. levc rth eless, we a re gl' to report th at a ll a re aga in back in school ft th ~ tim e being at least. W e a re looking with interest to th e wo rk 1 • organi•zmg • our b rot11 ers at l\'n·Ji•aml• 111 an a Iun' chap te r in th at city. vVe hope th at there 11 a lso soon be one in both J ackson vill e and 'l'ai111 a nd severa l oth er citi es ove r the state. It was a real pl easure to have Brot hers Uught Stil es, B ru ce and R eaves of the E mo ry Gil Club, for a visit. A lth ough their stay was sh& we learn ed of severa l oth er broth ers throtll them. Th e U ni versity is now constructing a Jll~ building and basketba ll court, whi ch will ready for the spring high school to urna ment. 1 P lans have been made by the chapter for second annua l In sta ll ation Ball , to take pia• about Februa ry 20. A lpha-Ep il on has received seve ral chaP1' pape rs fr om differen t underg r adua te ch aP 1 ~ and alumni chapters and has hopes of publi sh'' one by th e end of thi s semes ter. ~" ~

~\ 1/~

~" l.t..

~~~

A

U' Il A-E PSI LON Chapter has been awarded the In terfraternity Con fe rence Schola r ship Cup fo r the p reced ing year, and will be ent itl ed to hold it for one school yea r . T hi s cup is awa rded by th e fac ulty of th e U ni versity o f F lori da to th e national f ra ternity hav ing t he hig hest ave rage in coll ege courses. Al th oug h thi s cup has been won by f ive different fraterni ties during its life of eig ht years thi is th e first time th at it has eve r been won by a fra ternity

WIRELESS AIDS "CRIBBER" The use of w ireless as a means of "c rib biil' by a young medical stud ent at S tras bou.rg, Fra'~~:· has horrifi ed th e whole faculty o f the L" ve rsity. It appea rs th at th e as piring A l sa 1~ in stall ed a wireless teleph one receiving set t1 11 th e tabl e at whi ch he was due to undergo a cf. cia! w ritten test, a nd that a fri end coached 11' fr om th e outsid e.

[ 54]


:l/t

~

--

----

as

T liB S '1' J\

R

A N D

LA M P for FEn R u

A R

v, 1 9 2 5

DIRECTORY

apt :uli.'

PI KAPPA PHI FRATERNITY

cl t.

rounded at the College of Charleston harleston ncurporated under the laws of the · iate of "outh

itab h3 ·k.

. C., December 10, 1904. aroJina, December 23, 1907.

FOUNDERS SIMON FOGARTY, ]R., 151 l\Ioultrie Street, Charleston, S. C. ANDREW Ar.EXANDER KROJ,G, J 11., Chapter Eternal, February 8, 1922 LAWRENCE; HARRY MrxsoN, 217 East Bay Street, Charleston, S. C.

ta da.1

GE ER L OFF! ERS

lljt.

SUPREl\IE COD CIL Supreme Archo11 GEORGE D. DRTVER, N 1309 Telephone Building Omaha, Nebraska.

lo

,,·t· ul

I"i• ·k tJJII II

Supreme Trea.ml'er W TI,[,JAM FOGARTY A 90 Broad Street Charleston, S. c.

Supreme Hist01·iat1 PAUL WALKF.R, T 'I' Box 116 Greenup, Ill.

Supreme S ec1·etary GEORG£ M. GRANT 0 Folmar Building Troy, Ala.

Supreme Editor RICHARD L. YouNG, K 2 Ashland Avenue~ Midwood Manor Charlotte, . C.

Jill

TH£ CENTRAL OFFICE II Exchange Bank Building, Charleston, S. C. GEo. E. SHEETz, Executive Secretary A ll commuuicatious of a gene1·al nature sho1tld be srut to the Ceutral Office, aud 1101 to i11dividua/s. *ANDRTiW A. KROEG, ]R.

PAST SUPREME ARCHONS L. HARRY MrxsoN 217 East Bay treet, Charleston, S. C.

11 p· Tnos. F. MosrMANN Itt Street, Charleston, S. C.

J)f

Jorr N D. CARROLL Lexington, S. C.

RoY ]. HEFFNER 1338 Shattuck Ave., Berkeley, Calif.

Ia Fi,·st District 2640K C. LAU'!'ER B Kenmore Place rooklyn, N. Y.

pi' jl

D Second District ~ A. P. wAGJ>NER Soaanoke <;ol!ege lern, Vtrgmia

tl

J Third Distl·irt 3

CRAT~Pn

RoNE Cholontal Avenue arlotte, N. C.

W y:{ourth District 2t7 Art'I'ON MrxsoN, JR. ast Bay Street Cllarleston, & C.

College

J Fifth District ·r A. McCr.A rN, JR. 0

;n--eceased.

MLaw, Mercer University aeon, Georgia

DISTRICT CHAPTER I SPECTORS Si.rth District GE:o. B. EvF.RSON Palatka, Florida Scveuth District THos. E. BuNTIN Dothan, Alabama Eighth District Cr.ANCY A. LATTTA,M 1201 Hibernia Bank Building Tew Orleans, La.

Eleventh District RA!,PH E. ANDERSON 919 Terminal Building Lincoln, Nebraska Twelfth District ]. TT. RomNSON University IT ospital Oklahoma City, Okla.

Ninth District WADE S. Bor,T Otterbein, Ind.

Tllirtccuth District FF.RT,YS w. THOMAS R:verside Company Moreno, California

Teuth District V. R. Fr,EMTNG 306 North State Street Champaign, Ill.

Fourtceuth District WAr,TER R JoNr;s 7034 Sycamore Avenue Seattle, Washington

[55]


========================================~' TuB S '1'

.\ R

AND

for FEB

LAMP

R

u

Au Y,

192 5

UNDERGRADUATE CHAPTERS NOTE :- The address foJiowing the n ame of the coJi ege or university in every case is the official address of the Ch'1, Th e line foJiowing the address indicates the date on which the Chapter meets. Officers are requested to inform the Executive· rctary promptly of any changes taking place, ei th er in J)Crsonnel of officers or in dates of meeti ngs.

XT, District No. 2-Roanoke College !:lox 263, Salem, Virginia. Tuesday evening. RM.PII Ht\LINI\R, A1·chon I..•O IWO N C. WHJTI\, Sec1·etary

ALPHA, District No. 4-College of Charleston Charleston, South Carolina. Saturday evening. FnAN K M. PI,Tl'r, Archon A. C. LESEMANN, Secretm·y

0 UCRON, Distl'ict No. 7-University of A labant 3 Pi l(appa Phi House, University, Alabama Wednesday evening. S. S. SANSBURY, A1·chon N. S. i\IIORGA N, Sccrctm·y

BETA, District No. 4-Presbyterian College of South Carolina, Clinton, S. C. Monday eve ning. R. Gn;nER't' HE NRY, Arc/1on S. N. HuGHES, Jn., Secretar)'

PT, District No. 5-0glethorpe University Oglethorpe University, Georgia. vvednesday evening. T. P. CAr,DWI•: I,r,, Archon F. C. EvERI•r·r, ]R., Secretary

GAMMA, District No. 13-U n[v ersity of Cali fornia 2614 Dwight Way. Berkeley, California. BovD W. RGA, Archon CHESTI\R L. Kt.UC K, Secretary

RHO, District o. 2-Washington and Lee Unil•er 1 White Street, L exin g ton, Virginia. Saturday evening. C. W. RI\X, Archon W. R. BtsHor, Sec1·etar3•

EPSILON, District No. 3-Davidson College Box 138, Davidson, N. C. Thursday evening. • Wr. M. GnAcEv, Archo11 E. T. Pur,r.EN, Jn., Secretary

TAU, District No. 3-North Carolina State Colle~· State College Station, Raleigh , N. C. Tuesday evening. E. A. Su•l"roN, An.·hon l-1. H. REDWI NE, Secretary

ZETA, District No. 4-Woffo rd College Spartanburg, S. C. Tuesday evening. M. L. BANKS, Archon W. L. RtvF.ns, Secretary

UPSILON, District No. 10-University of Illinois 106 East Green Street, Champaign Illinois Monday evening. ' G!lo. No. WTCKHORS'r, Archon KIRK A. WERDEN, Secretary

ETA, District No. 5-Emory Univer?ity . Pi Kappa Phi House, Emory Umverstty, Ga. Thursday evening. Ron'!'. A. Fr.ouRNOY, Archou E. B. Powf:r.r,, Secretary rOTA, District No. 5-Georgia School of Technology

I' · '

17 East Fifth Street, Atlanta, Georgia I- rid ay evening, W. B. GnEGVJ,s, Archo11 H. A. McKF.w, Secretary T<APPA, District No. 3-Univen.ity of North Carolina Pi Kappa Phi House, Chapel Hi ll, N. C. Wednesday evening. C. C. FonnHAM, Jn., Archon H . Nr. ]oYo:, SeC1·etary LAMBDA, District No. 5-Un iversity of Georgia 158 Dougherty Street, Athens, Ga. MAI ,COI.M NA~ II, Archon A. S. V ARNAnm:, See1·eta·r y MU, Di str ict No. 3-Duke University Durham, North Carolina Ill o nday evening. ]. E. DeMrsn:R, A1·chon Mi. I. PICKENS, S ec1·etm·y NU, District No. 11-University of Nebraska 1548 R Street, Li~coln, Nebraska Monday evening. Su'l"rON MoRRIS, Archon DAYTON' DORN, Secretary

PI-TT, District No. 12-University of Tulsa Tulsa, Oklahoma. Tuesday evening. W. 0. OsBORNE, A1·chon G. A. FosTER, Secretm·y CHT, District No. 6-J ohn B. Stetson University Pi Kappa Phi House, DeLand, Florida. W eclnesday evening!. Lr.ovn L11 V't'ON, Archon CnAs. T. HI\NDllRSON, Secretary PST, District No. 1-Cornell University 301 Eddy Street, Ithaca, N. Y. Sunday evening. Ron't'. P. MASON, Archon DoNAT.D A. PnocroR, Secretary OMEGA, District No. 9-Purdue University 128 Wigg in s Street, West LaFayette, Incl. Monday Evening. W . R A MTCK, A1·chon F. L. McDoNALD, Secretary ALPHA-ALPHA, District No. 5-Mercer 362 Coll ege Street, Macon, Georgia. Tuesday evening. ]. L. BucHANAN, ]R., Archon Gr,l\NN B. HASTY, Secretm·y

[56]


~·~=============================~

='

'II

lJ '•' "'

s "1 "

R

,\ N D

[ ,\ M l'

ALPHA-BET 1228 A, 0 •stru.:t No. 8-Tulane University ?. Arabella St fonday ev . reet, New Orleans La. HIINRy M Rlllg. ' CnAs. N · C 08 INSON, Archon · r,ARKJI, Secretary

f0r

l~ H B U U 1\ U Y,

192 5

ALPHA-DELT A, District No. 14-University of Washington, 5212 18th Ave., N. E., Seattle, Wash. Monday evening~. N. L. FR!Zl>MAN, Archon GoRDON K BuRNS, Secretary

ALPBA-GAMMA n· . ho1113 ' •stnct No. 12- University o f Okla537 onna n Okla Monciay e Bo~llcvard, 0Rvnn,; p vcn,ng. , . BvRo~· D RlfiSTu:v. A1·chon AWSoN, Secretary

ALPHA-EPS ILO N, District No. 6-University of Florida, Box 6.3, University Station, Gainesville, Florida. Mo nday even ing. ]: M. P !ZARCII, Archon BYRON L. EnoY, Sec1·ctary

ALP II A-ZETA, Distri ct No. 14-0regon Agricu ltura l College, 31 Torth 26th Street Corva llis, Oregon. AIon day evenin g. ' P111r,1P BJ,cur., Arc/ion F J!ANK L. HowARD, Secre tary

ALUMNI CHAPTERS

Alumn· II' I o leers are re ue . t as to time and q sted to mform the Executive Secretary promptly of any changes in personnel and addresses, or of ' P1ace of meetings

agrc<:!rnen

\ 1'LA

1

.

NTA, GEORGIA C11crL ?.I L 1!2 EIMON, Archon ac ltree Place lliR?.fTN B CHAM, ALABAMA A!N Hu· Th e Arclzo n tamont Apar tmen ts BRISTo L, TENN.-VA

LOS ANGELE , CALIFORNIA L£sT£R E RI CKSON, Archo11 864 N. Orange Grove Avenue, Pasadena

Pe

AI'

is

B. E. ERn J

NEW YORY, N. Y. W AT, 'I'(R M 1;ASOAY, ]R., Archo11 % Brooklyn Edison Club, Pearl and Willoughby Streets, Brooklyn, N. Y.

·

t' R., Arcli o11 a ronal Cash Register Co. CHARLES To CEo. E Srr: OUTH CAROLINA 11 ·Ex hllE'l'Z, A rclion c a nge Bank B lll'1d'lllg % N

Ol\ fA I-IA, NEBRASKA HARr,ow WeTrrERBI>l>, Archo11 146 orth .34th Street

c

fTARLOTTE N R ' . W. B ' '-f£-I CAROLINA . EAr A I First ., . rc zou atJonal Bank CHrcAc E O, ILLINOIS 'I.MJIR N T 556 E·ast SO~!~uPl:~e A1·chon

·r"c s goods not

liPrcmt: Council ...

ROA

OKE, VIRGINIA

R. R. Rusn, Arc/1011 608 Windsor Avenue SPARTA TB RG, SOUTH CAROLINA PAUL C. TnoMAS, Archon partan M ills

FRATERNITY SUPPLIES

of re(' b handled by tl •_ccommends the service and P'''><hoc t• of the firms advertised in THE STAR 1\ND L/\MP. For other •a le houses. •ese fo rms, chapter hall paraphernalia, table ware, etc., the entral Office should be consulted for the names

[57 J


....................................................................................................................................................................................................................,....,. School Catalogs and Illustrations

Fraternity and Class Stationery

The

Chas. H. Elliott Co. The Largest College Engraving House in the World OFFICIAL ENGRAVERS OF PI KAPPA PHI CERTIFICATES Order through your Secretary

Dance Programs and Invitations, Leather Dance Favors and Covers, Commencement Invitations, Class Day Programs, Class Pins and Rings Seventeenth Street and Lehigh A venue PHILADELPHIA Calling Cards, Menus

Wedding Invitations

...................................................................................................................................................................................................................,..., . ................................................................................................................................................................................................................./

ATTENTION, PI KAPPS! =The mailing list of The Star and Lamp is iu the hands of the Executive Secretary. All communications regarding failure to receive the magazine or giving notice of a change in ad· dress should be sent directly to him.

,.

DO THIS AND GET THE MAGAZINE The Star and Lamp, being second-class matter, cannot be forwarded. Do not expect it to follow you about like Jetter mail. When you change your address, fill out this form and mail at once to Geo. E. Sheetz, 11 Exchange Banlr Building, Charleston, S. C.

Name · ........................................................................................................................................ ~ ................................... (Write Plainly) ~ l ass

NumeraL .................................. Chapter.................................... Date ............................................................

OLD ADDRESS Street City and State ....................................................................................................................................~ ........................ .

NEW ADDRESS Street ............................................................................................................................................................................. . City and State .........................................................................................................................•.................................... ADD

ANY

INFORMATION

OF

INTEREST CONCERNING

YOURSELF

OR

OTHER

PI

KAPPS YOU

KNOW

. / ..................................................................................................................................................................................................................


..........

...../

' •

•11 d·

to ;Z,

,VJ

...........


.,

t'


~§§:§]==I @I==~§:§]==I @I ==~§§]==I @I==~§§J==I @I==:§§§=EI==l ~

II II

II II

II

Cl"he

II

II II

II II

OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE 1

II II

I

II II

INCORPORATED

CHARLOTTE, NORTH CAROLINA

II II

II II

II II

II II

Is one of North Carolina's old established printing houses. For almost half a century it has enjoyed an enviable reputation for the quality of its output. It never has, and it never will, cheapen its product to meet a competitive bid. It has always dealt in Service, Accuracy and Qualitynot bargains- steadfastly believing that anything worth doing at all is worth doing well.

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

CORRESPONDENCE INVITED II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

II II

The OBSERVER PRINTING HOUSE, Inc.

II II

" II

II II

Official Printers to Pi Kappa Phi " ~ ~

CHARLOTTE, N. C.

II

m==-

II II

-== =~

~§§lUI GQ=~=~m==II~==~§:§J==I 1:§:1==:§§§:=ill==J !:§:[==§§§§:=§J=€l ~ ==J ~


n K <I>

1925_1_Feb  

~lpha-Zeta Chapter Installed at Oregon State IN THIS ISSUE Founders' Day Celebrated Throughout Fraternity FEBRUARY, 1925 No. 1 English and E...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you