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0.11r ftr ant( Luny The Official Journal of the PI Kappa Phi Fraternity

Vol. 5

SEPTEMBER, 1919

No. 5

Cattirtith The Problem of Reconstruction

77

George Odgers, Nu '16, a Benedict

83

The Georgia District Banquet

85

.4-Tarry Faison Shaw

85

/John Theodore Monroe

87

William Joel Brown

88

Interesting Letter from India

89

News of the Graduates

93

Editorials

99

Chapter Letters

102

Exchanges

107

The Star and Lamp is published by W. S. Bolt, Eminent Supreme Journalist, at Otterbein, Indiana. All material intended for publication should be addressed to him. Application made at the postoflice at Otterbein, Ind., for entrance to the mail as second class matter.


A Ji1r #uhsrription tø ftt* anti Kamp at

$ 25.00 Payahtr in tot srmi-atuutat ituitallntrnts of $2.511 rad!

#ettit pour suburription In

J. COSBY BYRD Business Manager of The Star and Lamp

Columbia, S. C.


BUSINESS DIRECTORY MIXSON'S High Grade Seeds The W. H. Mixson Seed Co. Charleston, S. C. L. Harry Mixson, Mgr. Alpha

John D. Carroll Lexington, S. C.

Attorney at Law Sigma

Wade S. Bolt EVERYTHING

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Tor tli /Kappa rill Nratrrititg Founded at College of Charleston in 190

GRAND CHAPTER Eminent Supreme Ac/iron JOHN D. CARROLL Lexington, S. C. Eminent Supreme Deputy Acheron CAPT. ROY J. HEFFNER Radio Branch Air Service, 6th and B Sts., Washington, D. C. Eminent Supreme Grapher JOHN L. HENDERSON Burlington, N. C. Eminent Supreme Thesaurophulax J LAWTON ELLIS, JR. 1501 Dime Bank Bldg., Detroit, Mich. Eminent Supreme Journalist WADE S. BOLT Otterbein, Ind, Eminent Supreme Historian BOBO BURNETT Spartanburg, S. C. Eminent Supreme Counselor J. BOYD OLIVER San Jacinto, Cal. Eminent Supreme Chaplain J BLANTON BELK Columbia, S. C. Eminent Supreme Thurepanioiktes CECIAL A. CARLISLE Culloden, Ga.

SUPREME COUNCIL For the East

JULIAN WALKEN

Jessup, Ga. For the West

LELAND G. LANDERS

Norfolk, Neb. At Large

ANDREW A. KROEG Charleston, S. Carolina


THE STAR AND LAMP Editor-in-Chief :\V ADE SMITH BOLT P 0. Box 383, Otterbein, Ind. Managing Editor Louis Y. DAwsoN 320 W. Peachtree St., Atlanta, Ga. Business Manager COSBY BYRD j. Columbia, S. C. Associate Editors ISAAC NEWTON EDWARDS Lander College, Greenwood, S. C. REYNOLD C. WIGGINS Trinity College, Durham, N. ALPHA College of Charleston, Charleston, S. C. GAMMA University of Colifornia, Berkeley, Cal. ZETA Wofford College, Spartanburg, S. C. ETA Emory University, Oxford, Ga. IorA Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Ga. KAPPA University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, N. C. LAMBDA University of Georgia, Athens, Ga. Mu Trinity College, Durham, N. C. Nu University of Nebraska, Lincoln, Neb. Xi Roanoke College, Salem, Va. ()MICRON University of Alabama, University, Ala. Oglethorpe University, Atlanta, Ga.


1,4

YOUR CHAPTER

Should Have the official chapter stationery. Iota is the only chapter supplied at present. The officers have approved the design and authorized same to be issued as the official stationery.

Send your orders now for letter heads or envelopes. Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity FOUNDED

IN

1904 AT THE COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON

CHARTERED UNDER THE LAWS OF SOUTH CAROLINA

WADE S. BOLT Eminent Supreme Journalist OTITRBEIN

INDIA .1


HARRY FAISON SHAW See pages 85 and 86


WILLIAM JOEL BOWEN See page 88


ftt* aoh ifiatitp The 011iela! Journal of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity Vol. 5

SEPTEMBER, 1919

No. 5

THE PROBLEM OF RECONSTRUCTION By THOMAS A. CLARK, Dean of Men, University of Illinois The student army training corps had been ordered demobilized, all the preparations were being made for discharging the student soldiers, and we were thinking of the future and making preparations for meeting it as intelligently as possible. A young sophomore fraternity man came into my office quite evidently with something seriously on his mind. "We fellows are getting a little anxious about next quarter," he confessed. "We want to get the fraternity into the best possible shape, and we wanted to ask just how soon after the University opens you think we could give a dance. We want to get on to a good working basis as soon as possible." His idea and the idea of his friends was that the main thing necessary in the reconstruction of fraternities is the re-establishment of social conditions and social functions upon the same basis as existed before these matters were interrupted by the epidemic of influenza and army officers incident to the coming of the S. A. T. C. The year 1917-18 was very disastrous to the organization of fraternities. Following the declaration of war, many upperclassmen went at once into the service. The opening of college in September, 1917, found the active chapters of fraternities with few juniors and fewer seniors. The most of those who were left were sophomores, and these were rapidly added to by a long list of freshman pledges. Occosionally during the year fraternities increased their numbers by new men chosen from among the uppperclassmen who remained and who had not previously accepted fraternity membership, but such instances were only too rare. It is one of the most difficult matters to make a fraternity man believe that anyone who had been overlooked during the mad scramble of rushing in the fall is worth giving consideration to later. He is pretty generally convinced that such a man must


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of necessity have something vitally wrong with him, or else his good qualities would certainly have been discovered by some astute Greek during the first two or three weeks of his college career. Even after they become convinced that men beyond the freshman class are worth while, many fraternities lack the courage of their convictions, and hesitate to pledge such men. For these and other reasons, many chapters of Greek-letter fraternities went through the year 1917-18 with few men in the active chapter excepting freshmen and sophomores. The result of this situation was that few fraternity men in the present sophomore class received much discipline last year or much idea of what normal healthy fraternity life is like. There was little stability in fraternity house management, little of the old time order and control, and much less respect for fraternity officers than formerly. The new men in many cases ran wild, in others lived a sort of "boarding house" life quite unlike the normal fraternity life to which before the war we were used. In not a few cases the number of freshmen in the active chapters,far out-numbered the total number of members in the other three classes. There was little likelihood of satisfactory control in such cases. Another difficulty which arose through inxperience and the lack of proper management or through the undue reduction in the numbers on the chapter roll was a financial one. Many chapters ended the year with bills unpaid, and with no special plan in mind to take care of the deficit except that "somebody would find a way to pay it." Youth generally has faith that the future will present more favorable financial conditions than the past has done, while we who are more practical through the experiences of years have learned to "trust no future howe'er pleasant." We know that bills are met with as great difficulty next month as this. Following all these experiences came the discouragements and the uncertainties of the student army training corps. In many colleges chapters were for the time being wiped out; even under the most favorable of conditions they received a setback that will require some time from which to recover. The conditions of pledging were difficult, the possibility of the men of the active chapter living together entirely eliminated. In some places chapters were prohibited from holding meetings of any sort, and in others were more fortunate in having a chance to get together at week-ends and to develop a sort of chapter life. In any case, however, the conditions of living were unsatisfactory and unsuited to the deevlopment of strong fraternity spirit. Fraternity life was of necessity made subordinate to the best interests of the army, and no one was especially to blame excepting the kaiser or whoever was responsible for starting the war.


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I have gone thus into detail to show clearly what confronts t1-.e fraternities in solving the serious problem of reconstruction— for to me it is a serious one. Important as social training and social activities are to fraternity life, and I think they are important, the last thing which fraternities need at this time seriously to concern themselves with is the re-establishment of social life. The

thing they need least in order that they may put themselves upon a sure footing is social standing. They have suffered little or not at all, in my opinion, by the brief elimination of their social activities. These may be re-established without difficulty and almost at a moment's notice whenever the chapter in question elects to do so. There are other things more necessary and more difficult. In recruiting its membership, also, the social star, the clever boy who makes a hit with the women, is not under present conditions a particular asset to a chapter. Even in the good old days when it was possibly justifiable for a chapter in choosing its men occasionally to sacrifice brains to appearance, the fusser was of doubtful worth unless he had other "selling" qualitieg ; but under present conditions he is absolutely no good; he may much better be thrown into the discard. He will be only a handicap. What is needed is the man of character who will pay his debts without having to be sandbagged or backed up in the corner and robbed in order to get the money out of him. What is needed is the man with organizing ability who knows how to control men and to work successfully with them. Fraternities need a more aggressive and a more energetic type of man than they have previously had. The loafer, the chair warmer, the fusser, the entertainer, the fellow who is willing that the others should pay while he has a good time is of little use to fraternities in these strenuous times of reconstruction. For problems of the fraternity at this time are indubitably problems of organization and finance. The greatest difficulty is one of leadership. The majority of the men who will form the active membership of fraternities as they re-establish themselves are young; they know little or nothing of fraternity management: they are not likely to appreciate all that it means to control or direct an organization like a fraternity with all its attendant responsibilities. Most of these men have been soldiers, but many of them had little real discipline. They will not all submit readily or kindly to control nor know well how to exercise it. In choosing their leaders fraternities should pay little attention to former precedents unless these are likely to prove helpful. Neither age nor class should in themselves determine the choice of a man to lead a chapter. I have in mind now how one fraternity


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in which the oldest man is without moral ideals and the only senior is a weakling and yet one or the other of those two men is likely to be chosen president of the organization. Such a choice would be a grave mistake from which the fraternity would not recover for years. It has strong men among its number, it should choose one of these, for never before in the history of fraternities will strong leadership count for more than at the present time. The efficient head of a chapter in this crisis will need tact and backbone, he will need to know men and to know how they may best be organized and managed. Most of the men upon whom he must rely for aid will be young men inexperienced in fraternity matters and yet in many cases so familiar with college life that it will be difficult to convince them that there is much left for them to learn, but they will all the more need conviction. It is argued by the optimistic that the opening of college will bring back to their undergraduates work many former college men who have recently been released from military service and who will have obtained through their military experiences a different and more serious view of life. There will be many of these, without a doubt, and they will help materially in the reconstruction of fraternity affairs. I have already seen many such men, and I have been gratified at their attitude of mind and at their evident intention to take hold of things in the right way. But the men returning from the service are unfortunately not all of this sort. There are those who have been in the service too short a time to have received any real discipline, who are tired of the routine, of the early morning reveille and the early evening taps, and who in the future will have none of it. Such men will need a strong hand to guide them; they may not easily submit to the influence of gentle words; they may not have learned willingly to respect authority. They will be difficult problems to solve. Some men have learned discipline through their army expetience, but unfortunately not all. The efficient leader must have an appreciation of the ideals of his fraternity, and more than this, even, he must exemplify these ideals in his own life. We have been coming gradually during the last decade to a keener appreciation in fraternity, life of good scholarship, of temperate habits, of clean speech and a clean life. The leaders of our national army have stood for these virtues more strongly, perhaps, than army leaders have ever done before, but war has seldom been a teacher either of virtue or of self restraint, and though without doubt many of our soldiers have learned these lessons well, there are many others who are ignorant of their real meaning, and some of these will be returning to college and to their fraternities. They will need to be con-


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trolled and directed in the right course if the ideals of the fraternity are not to go on the rocks, and the very life and future of the fraternity demands that they should not do so. The ideals of no fraternity are likely to rise higher than the personal ideals of its leaders. The efficient leader, will need to be an organizer. No matter how strong a man he is, no matter how high his ideals, he will be inefficient if he works alone. The brothers must co-operate, they must bear their part of the responsibility, they must support his policy and follow his directions even at the sacrifice of their own pleasure. If there are factions and cliques, if there is evasion of responsibility and disregard of rules, then disorganization follows. I had an experience only a few days ago which illustrates my point. A young fraternity leader had had difficulty with his men. They were loafing, and cutting class, and contrary to the regulations of the college and of the fraternity, they were drinking. Finding that they refused to submit to regulations, he reported them to the authorities and they were disciplined. They were furiously angry, they thought him very unbrotherly and swore they would get even with him. I called the chief offender and talked it out with him. "Nobody could have any use for a brother who would give you away," was his plea. "But you'd broke your word," I said, "you'd broken the law of your fraternity and of the university, and you intended to continue to do so. Were you helping your chapter? Were you standing by your leader?" "0, I suppose not," was his reply. I put it up to him to put his shoulder to the wheel or get out of college, to help the man who was doing his best to be a worthy leader or to move on. All the, men in the organization had to help, bad to get into the game, or the chapter would go to the dogs. The reorganization of fraternities at this time will require rather careful financial leadership. Many chapters are already in debt, living expenses and rents were never before so high, and the wages of the commonest laborer are soaring skyward. It will need some thought and more than careful management to adjust past deficits and to meet present obligations. Fraternities cannot afford to make their expenses so high as to shut out the man of moderate means. He •is often their bulwark. They must live more carefully, they must scan their house expenses more intelligently, they must be conservative in their social activities. The war has emphasized nothing more strongly than the necessity of economy, the duty of conservation. There will often be need of sacrifice and the necessity of going slow.


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Many chapters will need immediately to increase their membership in order to reduce expenses. The same old cry will go up that there is scarcity of material. There is little to this assumption. Excepting in colleges where A large majority of the men registered make fraternities, there are any number of men available for pledging quite as desirable as*those who have already been taken. The effort should be made to find them. Both in the selection and support of a proper leader and in the conduct of financial matters a well chosen alumnus advisor would in most cases be very helpful. He should be a man on the ground, agreeable to the chapter, sympathetic and possessed of character. His advice should be asked, and it should more often be followed than active chapters in my experience are wont to follow the advice of their elders. Wise counsel and interest by alumni were never more needed by the fraternities than in the present crisis of reorganization. But counsel will not always Tie enough. In many cases the alumni will have to put their hands into their pockets and help meet the obligations, help to put the house in order and to keep the bills paid until the chapter gets onto its feet again. "Why do you always have to ask us for money?" an alumnus asked me not long ago. "Are we no good except as we come across with the coin'?" "Well," I had to admit,"that is not your only Virtue, but it is your principal one," and it is going to be one of the principal great opportunities to help which the alumnus will find in the present crisis of reorganization. A chapter crippled financially is in poor shape to get on, and there is no one in so good a position to help out of a financial difficulty as the alumnus. The solution of the problem of reconstruction lies, as I have tried to show, in strong leadership, a conservative social policy, careful attention to finances, and by utilizing the help, financial and advisory, of interested alumni. If everyone pulls together, we'll soon find smooth sailing.—Banta's Greek Exchange.


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GEORGE ODGERS, NU '16, A BENEDICT A copy of "The Indian Witness," issue of April 30, 1919, is on our desk. This is a sixteen-page publication issued weekly at Lucknow, India: Contained therein is an account of the marriage of George Odgers, Nu, to Miss Doris Slater, of Lincoln, Nebraska. The article is herewith reproduced: At six o'clock on the -evening of the 25th of April, in Thoburn Memorial Church, Calcutta, the Rev. George Allen Odgers, only son of Richard Henry Odgers, Esq., Davenport, Washington, to Doris Bessie, eldest daughter of Mr. Charles J. and Mrs. Slater, of Lincoln, Nebraska. The church was effectively decorated. The choir was screened by Kentia palms and the altar was banked with ferns. A massive brass urn of pink and white lotus stood in front of the pulpit. After a pipe organ solo, "Schubert's Serenade," Miss Ruth Fields sang "Beloved It is Morn." As Mrs. Davies played Alendelssohn's Wedding March little Miss Helen Manley slowly led the bridal party into the church. Carrying a basket of pini: anticonium and ferns, she was fairy-like in her dainty white frock. The maid of honor, Miss Lulu Boles, attractively gowned in Belgian blue crepe-de-chine, carried a bouquet of white lotus and tuberoses tied with ribbon of harmonizing color. The bride was most graciously and tenderly accompanied by the Rev David Hiram Lee, D. D. She was charmingly robed in white crepe- dechine with a butterfly jacket of St. Gali Filet Venice lace and a tunic of white Georgette crepe dropped with medalions of St. Gali Filet Venice lace. A veil of Bridal Illusion, caught up with a spray of white anticonium, was worn in the toque style with streamers of gro-grained ribbon. The bride's only ornament was a necklace of crystals set in silver. The bride carried a white velvet-bound Bible, and an exquisite and distinctive shower bonquet of white anticonium, lilies, tuberoses and maiden hair ferns with streamers of daintily narrow white ribbon. The groom was attended by Dr. Claude G. Hitt. The ceremony was solemnized by the Rev. George Smith Henderson, D. D., assisted by the Rev. David Huron Manley, D. D. The full ritual was read and ring ceremony used. As the wedding party left the altar Miss Fields played the finale "Benediction Nuptiale."' The register was witnessed by Mrs. Ada Lee, the Misses Boles and Porter, and Dr. Hitt. Among the guests were several outof-town friends, Captain R. Y. Anderson and officers of the S. S. Kum Sang.


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The wedding reception was given by Dr. and Mrs. Lee in their home on 13, Wellington Square. The drawing-rooms were beautifully decorated with potted flowers. The bride cut the delicious wedding cake, which was served by the Misses Kingly and Snyder. After the reception the bridal party sat down to a choice dinner. The evening was concluded with the hymn, "God Holds the Key of All Unknown." Mrs. Odgers is a graduate of the University of Nebraska, where she was prominent in student activities and a member of the Upper Class Woman's Honorary Fraternities. Since graduation she has been teaching in the Nebraska High Schools. She is a life member of St. Paul's Methodist Episcopal Church. This church has the honor of being the first Church in Methodism to unfurl a Christian service flag. The first two stars of this flag represent Mr. and Mrs. Odgers. The groom was a student in Willamette University for two years. He then entered the -University of Nebraska from which with his bride he was graduated in 1916. Immediately after his graduation Mr. Odgers sailed for Rangoon, Burma, where until his transfer to India he was Headmaster of the Methodist Episcopal Boy's School. At present he is Superintendent of Muttra district and City Mission Boy's Schools. After a short honeymoon Mr. and Mrs. Odgers returned to Muttra for a few days before proceeding to "Wildwood," Mussoorie, for the hot season. The Rev. and Mrs. Keislar met the newly wedded couple at Hatras Junction and motored them to Muttra. The party arrived late in the evening and were welcomed with illuminations and cheers from the assembled students and workers. Appropriate wedding festivities were enjoyed by all. Their friends wish them many years of blessed service in India.


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THE GEORGIA DISTRICT BANQUET On May 3, 1919 representatives of the four Georgia Chapters of the Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity held a banquet

at the Ansley Hotel at Altanta, Georgia, Georgia Iota Chapter, Georgia School of Technology sponsored the banquet and made all the arrangements. The expense was shared by the chapters, according to the number of men that they had present. Almost sixty men were there, including alumni in the city. The tables were arranged in the form of a big "T" and were very tastefully decorated in white and gold. The officers of the various chapters were seated at the top of the "T." A very attractive folder also printed in gold and white, was used as a place card. The folder contained, besides the menu, a list of all the men present, listed in chapter rolls. After all that was edible, had disappeared from sight, a business meeting was held. Every man present gave a short informal talk. It was then moved and passed that "The four Georgia Chapters of Pi Kappa Phi should form a district to be called the Georgia District of Pi Kappa Phi and that Alabama Omicron should be invited to join." The object of this district will be the promotion of a better and closer relation between the chapters concerned. The District will be governed by a committee of two representatives from each chapter and three alumni representatives. The following are the officers for 1919; J. W. Setze Jr., President; C. C. Nall Jr., Treafer; anti Graham, Secretary. Several plans were discussed and the District pledged its support to them in the National Convention. Among these was the nomination of National Officers, a different system of accounting, an identification card to be given each man upon initiation, but not to replace the present "sheepskins" and several other matters of importance to the Fraternity. The meeting was closed with a prayer by the chap. lain of Iota Chapter, for Supreme Guidance for the Fraternity, during this period of reconstruction.

•

IN M EMORIAM OF HARRY FAISON SHAW, EPSILON Harry Faison Shaw was born in Wilmington, North


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Carolina. He entered Davidson College with the class ot 1917; but dropped out and returned the following year. He did not stay until he graduated. He was very prominent in scholastic activities and played on the base ball team. He was very popular and well liked by the student body of Davidson. While in college he became a member of the North Carolina Kappa Chapter of Pi Kappa Phi. When the war broke out he enlisted in the United States Naval Reserve Force as a first class seaman. After training at Wilmington, N. C. Naval Station, he was detailed on board of a Section Patrol Boat. He served for borne time on board this boat and then was admitted to the Officers' Material School at Charleston, S. C. He received his commision in August, 1919 and was ordered to the U. S. S. Eclipse, a S. P. boat, operating with Savanah, Ga. as headquarters. In November, 1919 he was order to the Brooklyn Navy Yard to await his ship, a transport. While here he became known for his cheerfulness, prompt obedience of orders, and his popularity among his men. At this time the "Spanish Influenza" was raging all over the Country. Harry was taken ill with it and was sent to the Naval Hospital. Here he was given the best medical attention possible. He, however, failed to rebpond to the treatment and bronchial pneumonia developed. On Dec. 19, 1918 he passed away. He was buried in the Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington, North Carolina. A detachment of sailors from the naval station acted as pallbearers. The Commandant of the Brooklyn Naval Hospital wrote the following to Mrs. Shaw; "He was a typical American and was loved by all the officers and men who were associated with him." Harry Shaw was a splendid type of manho-(1. lie had a wonderful personality, which attracted every 01:e who came in contact with him. To know him was w love I im. He vâ–  as a true gent!.!man, a Chribtian, a f- lend who 1!.te way would never forsake you. An athlete and a map Saw Harty for good too be could thru. No, praise The Pi Kappa Pl Fraternity suifered a gmat lost when Harry Shaw was called to the "(heat P,yond" for Pi Kappa Phi had no more loyal supporter and truer brother. We feel sure that he will receive fitting reward in the "Place Beyond the Skies."


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JOHN THEODORE MONROE Ever mindful of the qualities of his fellowmen and forgetful of their faults, always considerate and thoughtful, always courageous and faithful to conviction, John Theodore Monroe, better known simply as "Theo," was an illustrious example of the highest type of Christian manhood. A charter member of S. C. Zeta Chapter, a member of the Supreme Council for two years, loyal and devoted to his fraternity, usually present at all of its meetings, with his genial smile and cordial handshake, with his characteristic optimism and lofty ideals, 'always willing and anxious to have a part in the building of his fraternity and the moral and intellectual uplift of his brethren, he was no less a red-blooded, patriotic, wholesouled American citizen, and when the call to arms first sounded he quickly placed himself at his country's command. Disappointed in his efforts to win a commission at the First Officers' Training Camp at Ft. Oglethorpe, Ga., he returned home and enlisted in the Navy. He was ordered to Hampton Roads, Va., and reported for duty July 21, 1918. It was while in the .discharge of his duties at this post that he was stricken with influenza, later developing pneumonia which caused his death at noon on Tuesday, October 8, 1918. His body was laid to rest at his home, Marion, S: C., on the afternoon of October Toth. After a brilliant career covering his whole course, Theo. was graduated from Wofford College in 1913 with the degree of A. B. He immediately entered the Farmers & Merchants' Bank in his home town, where he remained until he heard the higher call to duty, and where his sterling qualities had been recognized and rewarded with rapid promotion. I shall always bless Pi Kappa Phi if for no other reason than that it brought me into contact with such a spirit as this. I consider his friendship an honor and association with him a benediction. His mind was pure, and as he thought, he lived. Here indeed was one whose life should be a pattern by which to fashion ours, whose high ideals and devotion to duty we should emulate. He has a brother, C. A. Monroe, who is a member of Zeta Chapter, and to him, and his parents, and his other brothers, the fraternity which he loved and which lie helped to make a moral force in the lives of its members begs leave to extend its deepest sympathy, and to assure them that his great sacrifice is felt as keenly by those among whom he worked and played—his brethren —as by those whose name he bore and honored, and we can't help


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but remark in passing that, tho somewhere in France, he's not lying, nor even neath Italy's sad, what a glorious thing was his dying for Liberty, Country, and God!

JOHN

D. CARROLL.

WILLIAM JOEL BOWEN, JR. Oh, Death, why claim one so young, Who just to Life had really sprung; But since you've taken him away, Comfort our sad hearts every day. —C. A. W., JR. College of Charlesthe of William Joel Bowen. Jr., a student ton's classes 1914-16, died at his home at Mt. Pleasant, S. C., October 13, 1918, while attending the Medical College of Charleston. How we remember our dear "Brother Bill"! Lovely, lively, intelligent, affectionate, ever displaying a thoughtfulness beyond his years, and to lose such a promising man truly brings a deep and heavy shadow; but remember, brothers, that light some time will break through, and there will be a glad and happy reunion in. the great beyond. Bill's death has filled the heart of every one who has heard of his sad end, and we feel that he would have been a great figure in the medical world had not death claimed him. Although we regret the early demise of our young brother, we must not question the works of God. "The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power, And that beauty and all that wealthy e'er gave, Await the inevitable hour; The paths of glory lead but to the grave."


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INTERESTING LETTER FROM INDIA A few weeks ago we received a very interesting letter from George Odgers, Nu '16, who is a prominent man among Methodist Missionaries in India. The letter, while a form-letter directed to Methodists for the support of his school, appeals to us as being of interest. It follows: Dear friend, The other day a fond parent wrote to me, saying that I was 'the father and mother cf all the Christian boys in Muttra District.' Literally, the statement is not true. But, since I am the Educational Secretary of the District, and have the supervision of the three schools here in Muttra city, I do function as a parent. Is not the modern American conception of a school teacher that of a school parent? It is my duty to teach these lads not only to read and to write, but also am responsible for their spiritual lives and their morals. Not only that, but I also feed and cloth them. And it is a great pleasure. A year ago to-day I arrived in Muttra. Previously I was in Burma. Headmaster of that large High School of ours in Rangoon. Then a year ago last Conference, Bishop Burt transferred me to Muttra. This year has been a very happy one. The happiest one of my life. There is a great joy in service. I was in Muttra only two months until the hot season came on, when we are all forced to leave the plains. I went up to Muss:orie, and was there four months, studying in the Language School. The last week of August I returned to Muttra, and since then have been most busy with my school work. The Rev. Keislar has now turned over the management of the schools to me. He has doubtless written you of this change, made at the Conference this year. In many ways this past year has been an eventful one for the boys' school. The terrible prices due to war conditions have made the financing of the school very difficult. Then came the awful influenza pandemic. It found the people all in a weakened condition, because of the famine. The Health Commission reported to the Imperial Council last week that over 6,000,000 had died of influenza. The people died like flies after the first killing frost. They withered and faded away. Unable to burn their dead, the Hindus piled them on the river banks. The screaming of the jackals at night made life hideous. The vultures ate until they could eat no more. The riverside is white with bleached bones. There were over 300 cases on the Mission compound. At one


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time we had 200 girls and boys in bed. And I am glad to report that not one of the boys died. There were seven deaths in all among the school people. All our missionaries survived. The boys' school was closed for over a month. We are far behind in our work. Many of the boys are still too weak to do good work. The mid-year results were not at all satisfactory. But we are hoping that we will be able to make up some of the lost time before the school closes in May. The next exciting event was the "Victory Day" celebration. The boys nearly went wild for joy. They too had brothers and fathers who were at the front. When the news of the cessation of hostilities came, we rang the school bell for an hour. That brought all the Christians together, so we had a service of Thanksgiving. The boys had a big dinner, and in the afternoon we all went to the sports, which had been arranged by the British officials. Some of our lads entered the races and two won first prizes. In the tug of war we lost. One afternoon soon afterwards an aeroplane flew over the city. It was one that has gone from London to Egypt. Thence to Bagdad, to Karachi, to Delhi, and on to Calcutta. The people acted like luatics. Some were afraid to look at the machine. Later I found some boys trying to fly. Indian boys are very much like their American cousins. This week ends a month of special evangelistic work. Preparatory we had meetings for cur Christian people. One Sunday was made a special day of prayer. The Church was open all day, and the boys and girls came and went. Some stayed at the altar a long time. They needed it. Several of the boys had been behaving very badly, and had been a source of great concern to me and to the Headmaster. We were very happy when they sought forgiveness at the altar, and asked Jesus to give them new hearts. I was never happier in my life than I was that day, as I knelt with my arm around those dear lads. They are my little brothers. I never had a brother of my own. These boys are taking his place. The month has been a wonderful one. From all sides have come glowing reports of the work of the Spirit and of His manifestation. Great crowds have listened to us as we preached on the streets, or taught in the different quarters of the city. The Spirit is doing a mighty work in India, and we are most thankful for what He is doing here in Muttra. A new day has dawned for India, and for this sin-cursed, heathen city. We hope soon to begin work on our new $10,000 hostel. We have the funds in hand, and the Government is considering granting us a substantial amount to help us. The new building will supply a longfelt need. The boys will then have a nice home. It is the only home


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that some of cur boys know. The Municipality has finally consented to lease us a tract of land adjoining for a play-ground. Eventually we hope to be able to purchase the property. Then we will have an ideal boarding school plant. The day school in the city continues to grow, and this year we were greatly pleased when the Inspector said that he considered it the best school that he had inspected, and that it far surpassed the big Government High School here. We have every right to be proud of our school. It is exerting a great influence for Christ in this stronghold of heathenism. When the school was opened 30 years ago it had to face the bitterest opposition. But to-day the parents of the strictest castes are anxious to have their sons taught by Christian men, and no objection is made to the boys receiving Bible teaching daily. These people recognize the fact that a Christian school can give their sons something of character that a government or nonChristian cannot give. The school is no longer an infant. More like a youth, who is still compelled to wear his short pantloons and small shirts. There is more of him than there is of his clothing, and he sticks out everywhere. The building erected 25 years ago can no longer accomodate the enrollment. The school house is crammed full of squirming, wiggling boys. They flow out of the doors and windows, and we have been compelled for several years to lease a small building adjoining for the non-Christian boys in the primary department. The Christian boys are sent to the Normal Practice School. The Mass Movement educational work is bringing in many Christian boys from the villages. There are increasing applications from non-Christians for admission. What are we to do? Conditions have forced us to make plans for the erection of a new building with room for 480 pupils. The need is so pressing that I have been compelled to send out an URGENT appeal for funds for the erection of a building that is to cost not less than $40,000. We have secured the option on a piece of property a few yards from the present school house. As soon as funds are available, we will begin the new building. Government has been urging us for several years to erect a new school house on our compound near the Cantonments. But we feel that we must stay in the city, knowing as we do the great influence that a Christian school can exert for Righteousness. The present building is to be made into an Institutional Church. The proposed new school house will be a three-story structure of brick and concrete, with stone trims. Of the latest and most approved type of school architecture. One that will endure for years. The kind of a building that any person would be proud to have named for him. I am hoping that some person or family will give a


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be made a memorial. sufficiently large gift so that the building can person who gives Every . rooms It is also planed to have memorial A marble room. a g namin of ige privil $1,5000 will be given the slab will be placed in the room. t on your prayer I am hoping that you will place this projec may have more we that pray Also, daily. list, and remember us needed. much so are Christian teachers for our schools. They It is quite an es. pictur boys' the The photographer is busy with graphers are photo and boys, of lot a graph undertaking to photo that I will hope I . slower in the Orient than they are in the States s. If letter boys' the with soon you be able to get the pictures to me. But and , e-man pictur the blame can you they are delayed e to land in Calcutta please be kind to me as I am expecting my fiance her. This is a long meet to off be to have almost any time, and will are all but wild with deferred event, because of the war, and we would creep in. it but , joy. I tried to keep this out of the letter Sincerely yours, Geo. A. Odgers.


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News of the Graduates GEORGIA ETA CHAPTER Jack Rogets, Alumni Editor Lieut. Roy H. Bazemore is still in the service. He is doing his best to get his discharge and is hoping for it very soon. Eugene H. Sanders is holding down the job of Professor of Sciences at the Central High School of Waycross, Georgia. He plans, at present, to return to Emory in the fall to obtain his M. A. Degree. When he last wrote us, Brother Lancaster was in France and held a commission as a Second Lieutenant. George Murray has been wounded twice in action, while fighting with the Marines. One of these wounds was very serious and it was thought that he might not recover. However, you cannot kill a Griffin product and he has fully recovered now. He is the holder of one of the A. E. F. Scholarships at Toulouse University. Previous to the winning of this scholarship, he was with the marines at Coblenz, Germany. Brother L. V. Powell, that live wire who founded so many chapters for Pi Kappa Phi, has married and settled down. He is a cashier of one of the banks of Bessimer, Alabama, and is making his home in that town. Brother Sam Shephard has taken unto himself a partner for life. His home at present is at Waycross. Ga. Brother J. W. .Griffith is now a married man. His wife is one of Georgia's fairest peaches. He is in Winder, Georgia, at present. He and his lovely wife were present at Eta's recent reception. Brother H. C. Hancock is in the Aviation Corps. When last heard from he was with the American Expeditionary Force in France and well and happy. Brother B. S. Pemberton writes that he has just arrived from overseas and is with one of the casualty companies. He expects to return to his old haunts as :Joon as he can procure his discharge. Brother A. P. Whipt le has been serving on a transport as a pharmacist's mate, and has made many trips across the Altantic. Upon receiving his discharge he went


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year. He immediately to Oxford and matriculated for next home. is now at his Brother E. C. Pharr is stationed on board the subas her marine chaser No. 109. S. C. 109 has Charleston base. Brother Bob Rheud is in New York, N. Y., at present. He has made a wonderful success as a Short Story writer. in Brother Henry McCord Shaver, '13, is working Co. hone Telep Bell Atlanta, Georgia, with the Southern a, Ga. His address is No. 263 West Peachtree street, Atlant isadvert the in ng worki is Gunn R. W. E. er Broth planis He . tution Consti ing department of the Atlanta soon. He ing to return to the fold of active alumni very will be a great asset.

GEORGIA I OTA CHAPTER Louis Young Dawson, Jr., Alumni Editor A. J. Little, ex-'20, was unable to get a satisfactory at Tech this year; however he expects to return ule sched with a in the fall. At present he is warking in Virginia firm. g actin contr When last heard from Bert M. Filber, ex-'20, was in He the naval hospital at the Philadelphia navy yard. F. R. N. S. U. 2c, holds the rating of electrian, Brother Lawrence Metcalf, '15 has received his reactive service in the navy, where he held a from lease from commission an ensign, U. S. N. R. F. He graduated now is He J. N. en, Hobok at l schoo g the engineerin Minn. s, apoli Minne with the General Electric Company, Elyea D. Carswell, '18, is now killing time and lathat metropolis of Chattanooga, Tenn. in dies Charlie Franklin, '14, has received his discharge• Ga., be from the army and is now resting up in Atlanta, n ElecEdiso the with on fore returning to his old positi Brcoklyn, tric Company in New York. His address will be York. New n W. L. Wooten., '16, is working with the Ediso and 15th is ss addre His York. New in any Comp Electric Irving Place, New York, N. Y. Lawton Ellis, '17, has just gotten his discharge the from the signal corps of the army and is now with


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General Electric Company, in Detroit Michigan. His present address is 1503 Dime Bank Building, Detroit, Mich. J. Cosby Byrd, ex-`2(?), has been discharged from the army. He is now working with the Nat. Gailliard Walker firm of Architects in Rock Hill, South Carolina. Irwin W. Wilson Jr., ex-'17, has secured his release from the navy and is working in Atlanta, Ga., in the Cotton Insurance Association. His address is 1137 Hurt Building , Atlanta, Georgia. Clyde K. Byfield, ex-'17, was discharged from the army sometime ago and is now at his home on Highland Avenue, Atlanta, Ga. He is a manager of one of the d3partments of the Morris Company of the same city. Fletcher B. Martin, ex-'22, is working with the Cash-Melton Hardware Company of Chattanooga, Tenn. His address is 420 Oak Street, Chattanooga, Tenn. T. V.( "Smut" ) Hyman, ex-'19, has received his discharge from the army and at present holds the position of purser, on one of the steamship lines running out of Norfolk. Harry L. Lyle, ex-'22, is attending the district A. M. School in an effort to better his prep school work . He expects to return to Tech in the fall. Wiliiam J. Taylor, ex-'21, is working in Terrell, Texas. M. H. Powell is a professor in one of the high schools of Cairo, Goergia. Victor M. Sturgis, ex-'22, is working in that metropolis, called Augusta. His present address is Augusta, Georgia. Paul C. Thomas, cx-'21, has returned to Spartanburg, South Carolina. He is holding down a position in one of the banks in great style.

NORTH CAROLINA KAPPA CHAPTER C. P. Spruill, Jr., Alumni Editor Lieut. R. E. Young, 'IF, has returned to Charlotte, N. C., having secured his dizenarge. He was biationfA at Camp Lewis, Washington. He is working with the Charlotte branch of the Southern uell Telephone all., Tâ– .,le graph Company. Frank Clarvoe, '19, has resigned his commission as


The Star and Lamp second lieutenant, U. S. A. He is now a reporter on one of the newspapers of Seattle, Washington. in First lieutenant, H. H. Perry, 18, is now KA the American Expeditionary Force in France. He has been awarded an A. E. F. scholarship at the University of Lyons, France. First lieutenant Carlisle Shepard, '19, has returned from overseas service with the Sixth Balloon Company. He expects to return to college in the fall.

NORTH CAROLINA KAPPA ALUMNI NEWS R. L. Young, Charlotte Alumni Editor "Bob" Bryan is out in Shanghia, China, where he ii making his home. He is a partner in a law firm. Wilbur Curry is running a big lumber company, which was formerly the property of his father but now is his. From all reports, he is making a wonderful success. His address is Carthage, North Carolina. H. G. Harper Jr. is now holding down in fine style the position of assistant chief clerk with the Goodyear Rubber and Tire Company. • Rupert Crowell held a commission as second lieutthe United States army. He has received -his disin enant charge and is working at Asheville, North Carolina. E. H. Griffin is working with his father who is the owner of the A. T. Griffin Lumber Company of Goldsboi North Carolina. W. H. Howell is working out in Oklahoma with the geological field survey of the Standard Oil -Company. When last heard from he stated that he liked his p ;3:t)a. very well and that he was satisfied in every wdy. Edward Marsh graduated from The Central Officers Camp at Camp Taylor as a second lieutenant in the Field Artillery. He wao iischged soon afterwards and is now in Valpariso, Indiana pracilsiag law. R. L. Young received a second lieutenaiicy in .:.1k3 Field Artillery upon his completing the course at Camp Taylor, Louisville, Kentucky. He has since received his discharge and is working for the Southern Telephone and Telegraph Company of Charlotte, North Carolina. He is alumni editor for Charlotte and we are expecting great iesults from him.


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GEORGIA LAMBDA CHAPTER Alumni Editor; Louis Merritt "Buck" Parham, formerly with Daniel Brothers, Altanta, Ga., is now traveling for the Brunswick-BalkeCallender Co. Ills dis'a .et is Alabama and biruliti gham will be his headquarters. Edward Lassiter, '18, has been rclea i from the army, where he was serving in a machine gun outfit, and is now resting up at his home in Cordele, Georgia. Johnny Mitchell, ex-'2(?), has been working with his father since his discharge from the army. He will be glad to see all Pi Kappa Phis who stop in Dalton, Ga., at Mitchell's Pharmacy. Lamar Murdaugh is working for the ltei icdi Company of Altai].La, in the day time and stialyirig law at night. He is the live wire in the establishing of the Georgia Alumni Association. Robbins Woods is working in Atlanta, Ga., but expects to leave there shortly to take a job with a firm up north. Inman Padgett,'18, is a first lieutenant in the 309th Infantry, which is on duty overseas. He has been severely wounded twice and when last heard from was still in France recuperating. Lucius Tippett, '18, holds the rank of sergeant ii the Motor Transport Corps. He has been in France since the early part of January, 1918. "Bill" Coleman, ex-'19, is in Sparta, Ga. Since the death of his father, he has been managing his inheritance. John C. Longino is a captain in the regular army, Field Artillery Corps. He is overseas; but his home is at Fairburn, Georgia. Henry Robinson, ex-'18, is in the regular navy. His present address is unkown. His home is at Watkinsville, Georgia. Reid Doster has married and has a little Reid Jr. He is running a big farm of his own at Rochelle, Georgia. From all reports he is making a big success. Richard F, Harris, '16, is in the insurance business at Athens, Georgia. He is married and has a son. Wright D. Mitchell, ex-'16, is with the base hospital unit No. 69. This unit is in France. His home address is Dalton, Georgia.


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D. K. Young, '18, is a second lieutenant in the Quarter Master Corps. He was one of those unfortunate ones who never got across. His home is in Tyty, Georgia. J. A. Osborn, '18, is practising law at Watkinsville, Georgia. The following notice appeared in the papers: "Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Doroughty Willoughby announce the engagement of their daughter, Martha Leila, to Mr. John Ashley Osborne, of Watkinsville, the wedding to take place in June."


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Editorials WE PERMIT NOTHING BUT SUCCESS TO GREET US

Our magazine merits success and will meet with success. Every man of you must get behind the publication and make it a success. There is certainly great encouragement for the editor in the promptness of the majority of the chapters in sending in Chapter letters. Your editor-in-chief is only a custodian of space. The magazine is yours, both to read and to contribute to. Back in years gone by, when Past E. S. J. Hamer was at the wheel, the present scribe was pestering said Brother Hamer with a line of dope that was almost volcanic. Some of it went to the waste basket, more of it ought have, but that which got by his blue pencil Vi e are now able to realiz was of at least a little assistance to him We want more contributions from the alumni, more discussions of live topics from the chapters, a word now and then from the members of the national chapter. An issue that is ground out by the editor-in-chief himself is one-sided to say the least. There is nothing we enjoy more than compiling the magazine for the printer, but it is more pleasure to blue-pencil the literary productions of others than to make an editorial machine of one's self. The March issue of your magazine appeared at last, although quite behind its scheduled date. Due to no fault of the editor, directly, but to a great number of coinciding causes. Copy was delayed, proof-reading was delayed, printing was delayed and there was but one action that was instant—mailing. Your journalist had the copies expressed from the printer to his office directly upon their being bound and personally mailed the issue. This was an increased expense, but insured less delay and more certain delivery to the men of the fraternity. In accordance with the publishing dates, this issue must be dated June, 1919, although it will not be mailed until in September. T h e issues thereafter will be gradually brought up to promptness of mailing. Men, there is one thing to bear in mind—the success of the magazine and the factors which will contribute to its success. You must assume a portion of the responsibility personally. There is but one reason—the men of Pi Kappa Phi have never been known to fail their fraternity.


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A friend was talking to the editor the other day about war records and matters relative thereto. The friend was a man who saw service in the Civil War. .He stated that there was a certain sense of freedom in knowing that, as one stepped upon the street, there would not be the finger of scorn pointed in question of loyalty. Likewise, there is a great sense of satisfaction for our fraternity in the service records. Gamma chapter is almost extinct, Nu was given a severe blow, Lambda gave up her chapter house, and we could go on to tell of the loss each chapter suffered by the exodus of the loyal sons who went forth at the first call. In our last issue, and by personal letter to some of the chapters, we called for a list of chapter memberships noting service records of the members. Some have been received, and we are publishing them in. this issue, with quite a little pride, too, for one must bear in mind the fact that Pi Kappa Phi is but fifteen years old and has less than a thousand members active and alumni. It is so easy to be kind-that there is no denying the fact that you do a real injury when you withhold a 'kindness that would help or encourage another. It is likewise so easy to step in and do your bit to promote a good cause that it is a sin to idle away hours that would prove of benefit when properly devoted to that cause. What a pity that any man should ever neglect an opportunity to exercise either of these privileges, and such opportunities present themselves almost daily. Cultivate the habit of being just a little kind to some one every day, of giving a lift here and there, be it in your local chapter or the national welfare of Pi Kappa Phi, and it will not be long ere you know what it is to be thoroughly happy. Public opinion is regulated principally by conditions. No real four-square college man, be he fraternity or non-fraternity in his convictions, will complain of fraternity life and influences when he sees the proper fraternity spirit manifested. If you would be a real Pi Kappa Phi, a real Greek, labor toward higher ideals and standards. Don't withhold your support of the proper Alumni, there is a business directory in the back of your magazine. There is also a price for card space in the same that is far from prohibitive. Let the Business Manager hear from you. You will have nothing to regret. The page should be filled ere another issue has appeared. The lasting impression of proper fraternity spirit depends upon the culture, conviction and honor with which it is framed.


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WHAT ABOUT IT Our idea of the most efficient service with the Magazine is a more frequent issue. With the beginning of the college year we favor one issue each month—September, October, November, December, January, February March, April and May. In July a Midsummer issue of larger size and scope than those of the college months. The monthly issues could be of fewer pages—but of more value to chapter, member, alumnus and the fraternity in general. For the news, the notices, and the entire issue would always be "fresher" and more acceptable. The cost of publication would not increase sufficiently to cause the argument of expense to be considered. We have dated this issue September, hoping that our idea would meet with general approbation. Write us your feeling and opinion. The Convention is something to begin to think of and plan for. The mere thought of the personal privilege of being there to enjoy the few days of fraternal spirit moves your editor with thumping delight. Count on our being there—even though the H. C. L. may force the use of a last year's hat, shoes, collar and suit. Meanwhile, as we srtive to collect sufficient simoleons to command the new "duds," you should be making your plans to be there also. And, as you plan to go, make it a point to go prepared to offer something for the welfare, progress and advancement of pi Kappa Phi. Our President toured the country in favor of his personal view of the League of Nations—thinking his plan of vital importance to the welfare of both our country and the world. There are some points that we certainly would like to visit the chapters and alumni to exchange views concerning. These points are of vital interest to the fraternity—we'll present some of them at the convention. Chapter correspondents will please observe Iota's heading in this issue. Follow this form in all future letters, please. Give date of establishment, name of university, address, active membership, total membership and meeting night.


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Chapter Letters ETA CHAPTER, EMORY UNIVERSITY Chapter Address, Oxford, Ga. Founded 1912, J. P. Tomlinson, Historian Dear Brothers: Eta, about to close a most successful year, extends her greetings and best wishes to Pi Kappa Phi. At present we are in the midst of final examinations, but are still happy over the success of our annual reception on May the tenth. Besides about twenty-five local girls present there were forty others representing nearly every female college in Georgia. By unanimous assent the visitors and local social leaders recognized the seventh annual reception of Eta as the most brilliant and thoroughly successful fraternity function at Emory this season. Eta has been awarded this distinction for three consecutive years and we are going to work hard to make it characteristic of Eta in the future. Among Eta's alumni present were: Brothers L. V. Powell and J. W. Griffin, accompanied by their charming young wives, W. L. Bazemore, J. T. King, J. C. Adams, W. P. Whipple (now on board the U. S. S. Fredrick Wilhelm), and D. B. Lasseter, who, during the war, was a major in the British Army and is now a member of the American Consulate in China. We were also very glad to have with us Brothers Setze, Dawson, Seanor, Tucker, Carreker and Johnson from Iota; Wilson from Pi; Clare, Merritt, Rourke, Edward Lasseter, Varnadoe and McWhorter from Lambda. Brother J. L. Graham, our present Archon, graduates this spring and leaves at Emory a record of which we are all justly proud. While at Emory brother Graham has held the following offices: President Pan-Hellenic Council, Business Manager of the Emory Annual, Vice-President of Few Literary Society, Captain of Baseball Team during his junior year. He received a Second entf_Nrant's Commission at Plattsburg last summer and during the fall was stationed at the University of Pennsylvania. Next fall, four of Eta's alumni, Hearn, Sanders, Tyler, and Hale. will be back at Emory doing graduate work. We expect to get off on the jump then and make the year's work really mean something to Pi Kappa Phi. We have already begun our summer campaign to raise enough money to build a chapter house on the new campus in Atlanta. Our


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plan is for each alumnus and active member of the chapter to pledge twenty-five dollars a year for ten years, thus enabling the chapter to become firmly established. Eta heartily reccomends this plan to all the chapters of PI KAPPA PHI, for then the whole fraternity would be on a much stronger and firmer footing. Fraternally, Oxford, Ga., J. P. Tomlins3n, May 30, 1919. Correspondent.

GEORGIA IOTA CHAPTER Georgia School of Technology, Established 1913 9 East North Avenue, Atlanta, Ga. Total Membership 94. Active Membership 35 Meets every Friday night at 7 o'clock Iota has had the most successful year of her career. Forty efght men have been on our roll this year. We have been able to pay off all of our debts, except that to the Supreme Chapter. This we hope to square before long. This is the best financial condition the chapter has ever been in. A very undesirable class of people have recently moved into the houses on each side of us. They are "crabby" and fuss at the slightest noise. For this and other reasons we have decided to move from our present location. We are busily engaged in looking for a new house at present and hope to be able to announce our

new address ere long. We earnestly request that all PI Kappa Phis make our chapter house their headquarters while in Atlanta. Several have favored us Ga., lately. Broos. Dillard and Edward Lassiter of Cordele, have been our guests while in Atlanta for the famous Tech-Georgia series. Many Eta, Lambda, and Pi men have visited us and we beg that they keep up the good work for we have enjoyed their visits very much. Iota gave a dance at the Capital City Club on May 2, 1919. Brothers from the neighboring chapters honored us with their presence and helped to make the dance a success. We wish to thank Omicron for their kindness in lending us their electric Pi Kappa Phi Badge. This made a big hit with every one. All present seemed to have a good time and we have received many compitments on the dance. Iota sponsored the banquet given by the Georgia Chapters at the Ansley Hotel on May 3, 1919. There were thirty of her men at the banquet. Here the men aired their views on 1mprovemen13


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needed in the fraternity and discussed plans for getting the convention held this summer. A district was formed, in which Eta, Iota, Lambda, Omicron and Pi are members. Iota has chosen a method of acknowledging its appreciation of

the services rendered by its Archon. As every Archon goes out eâ–  office he is presented with a small loving cup, engraved with the names of all the offices he has held in the chapter and also a few words of appreciation. This year is the first time that It has been tried; but it has been highly successful. In student activities, we have taken our part. Brothers Lowndes and Taber made the "Civil Crew" and Brother Rodriguez was elected treasurer of the same organization. Brother Barnett was elected to the Soph society, "Skull and Keys." Brother Williams is the star pitcher of the scrubs. Brother Nelms and Dawson made the Y. M. C. A. cabinet. Pi Kappa Phi was the only fraternity at Tech to have a perfeet attendance at the Bible Study classes, conducted by members of the different fraternities at their chapter houses. Brothers Alden and Dawson were our leaders. By having a perfect attendance, we won a banquet which was offered to all classes thus qualifying. We are looking forward to an early convention, at which we have many things to bring up, which we think will be for the betterment of Pi Kappa Phi. Here's hoping to meet all loyal Pi Kappt. Phi there!!! Louis Young Dawson Jr., Grapter, Iota Chapter.

NORTH CAROLINA KAPPA CHAPTER, UNIVERillY Ot

C

Chapter Address, Chapel Hill, N. C. • Kappa was very glad to receive the last issue of the Star and Lamp and especially glad to learn of the activities and progress of her sister chapters. This issue was particularly interesting because of its previous discontinuance due to the war. The chapters having maintained their Integrity so remarkably during the war, we look with eagerness to the new era of progress and extension of Pi Kappa Phi. Now with the coming close of the spring session Kappa looks back over its work with immense satisfaction when all of its handicaps after disbanding of the S. A. T. C. are considered. The Alumni Banquet which we held last month in Raleigh, N. C., was a great success and we feel that the new chapter house is an assured fact. A building corporation has been formed by


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which means we expect to be able to handle the finances without any difficulty. Our freshman feed was held just recently. It would not do to print the menu for it would hardly be fair to tease a man's appetite with the vision of all manner of tempting and inviting dainties. We have several good men lined up for next fall, and as many of the old men are coming back we are expecting it to be a banner year for Kappa. During junior week the Junior Oratorical Contest was held. Three days before brother Mobley, at the eleventh hour, decided to go in against boys who had spent two or three weeks working on their speeches. By working night and day he came off with the medal. Kappa has been signally honored since the last issue of the Star and Lamp went to press. Out of the five juniors chosen for the Golden Fleece three were Kappa brothers, Thomas Wolfe of Ashville, Nathan Mobley of Charlotte, and Corydon Spruill of Raleigh. The Golden Fleece picks the best all round men from the junior and senior class each spring. This year five juniors and two seniors were selected. Kappa feels quite proud of its achievement in this distinction for it shows that we not only stand for the social side of college life, but also for the fundamental factors. That our social life is not neglected is shown by the fact that two of our members are commencement dance leaders, brothers Hazelhurst and Bynum. Out of four seniors three will be back next year to take graduate and special work, while two of these, having proved themselves excellent scholars, will be instructors respectively in mathematics and geology. Brother Hazelhurst, holder of the Math, medal, will instruct in the former. Brother Bynum instructor in geology is making a trip to Yellow Stone Park for research work this summer with the Harvard Summer School. Brother Wilson, a senior "med" student, goes next year to JohnsHopkins to continue his course in medicine. Fraternally yours, W. P. Andrews Grapter.

GEORGIA LAMBDA CHAPTER Chapter Address, Athens, Ga. As the collegiate year of 1918-19 draws to a close, we hope that every chapter of Pi Kappa Phi can look back over the year's work with pride in what has been accomplished. PI Kappa Phi Is small but united, young but alert and progressive, and the year's


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work should have been a concerted effort on the part of every Chapter for the good of all. We should be a growing fratern:ty because we are at the right age to grow. The progress of Pi Kappa Phi has been noted particularly this :f car. We believe that it has 'ieen the best that she has had in her -.vhole history. At present Lambda has a chapter roll of seventeen. Florence L. Breen, of Thomasville, Ga., was the last man that we initated during the year. Seventeen, we admit, is rather small but unity and cooperation should be insisted upon rather than a large number of fellows. The four chapters in Georgia have been thrown together more this year than formerly. Th's coming together has made all the fellows feel more than ever that they belong to one big organization rather than to separate chapters situated at different places. Ever' year Iota and Lambda visit very freely, but this year since Pi Kappa Phi has been established at Oglethorpe, all the four chapters have intermingled to a great extent. During the little commencement at Georgia eight brothers from Eta drove over one night for one of the dances. And only last week five Georgia boys went down to Emory, at Oxford, to Eta's annual reception. At the reception, also were several fellows from Tech and Oglethorpe. We take pleasure in saying that the reception was a grand affair and does distinct credit to Eta and Pi Kappa Phi generally. At the Ga.-Tech games here in Athens this week Lambda expects fellows from the other three Georgia chapters to come over for the week-end festivities. Since Lambda's establishment at Georgia we repeat that this has been her best year. The men reached the highest standard yet attained. Finances have ben at the top. So Lambda is ready to start off like a whirlwind next September. We expect to return all of this year's roll except three seniors, which means that fourteen men will beback to begin the new year. On the eighth of April, last, Brother Mott suffered the painful loss of his father, Dr. Kennon Mott, Sr. of Atlanta. Dr. Mott was known personally by several members of Lambda and was highly respected and admired by them. The death of Dr. Mott was a grief and loss to the whole chapter as well as to his son, Kennon. The latter is back in school again and let it be added that he is playing regularly on the great Red and Black baseball team. We wish all the fellows of the various chapters a great vacation, and the seniors who graduate, all the success in the world after they leave college. Most fraternally, Hal McWhirter, Grapter.


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Exchanges For November—The Rainbow of Delta Tau Delta. For January—The Rainbow of Delta Tau Delta; The Beta Theta Pi; The Purple Green and Gold of Lambda Chi Alpha. For February—The Beta Theta Pi; The Sigma Chi Quarterly; The Key of Kappa Kappa Gamma. For March—The Kappa Alpha Theta; The Rainbow of Delta Tau Delta; The Phi Gamma Delta; The Signet of Phi Sigma Kappa; The Crescent of Gamma Phi Beta; The Alpha Xi Delta. For April—The Rattle of Theta Chi; The Phi Gamma Delta; The Lyre of Alpha Chi Omega; The Anchora of Delta Gamma. For May—The Kappa Alpha Theta; The Aglaia of Phi Mu; The Phi Gamma Delta; The Alpha 'Xi Delta "The Angelos of Kappa Delta. For June—The Alpha Tau Omega; The Shield of Phi Kappa Psi; The Beta Theta Pi.

The Freshman, the Fraternity, and the College By FRANCIS W. SIIEPARDSON, B 0 n Editor of the Beta Theta Pi From Banta's Greek Exchange. Recently I have had some correspondence with the president of a middle western college. He is studying seriously the problems of institutional social life. He hopes to have some dormitories conirtructed on the college campus. Nearby he plans to have the fraternity houses grouped. But in h's thinking there is included the idea that freshmen should not be permitted to room or board in a fraternity house. He is also considering carefully the question whether the table should be permitted in a fraternity house, or all students should be expected to board at the college commons. These are live questions of present day college life. His thinking is based upon the assumption that comfortable dormitories and satisfactory commons will be furnished by the college. Were such an ideal arrangement for a small college to be effected, much might be said in favor of his project for these are real questions which deserve most careful consideration. It would be to the distinct advan-


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tage of all were they to be discussed in the EXCHANGE for the benefit of college officials and fraternity workers. It is really surprising how often they are raised and how varied are the opinions regarding them. The fraternity men, particularly the undergraduates, always lay great stress on the value of the table. Around it fraternity sentiment grows strong. Here the songs are sung. Here the prospective members are entertained and often find their first introduction to the joys of brotherhood. Here the experiences of the days are discussed with that frankness which always characterizes the conversation of college boys. Here the ties of chapter life are strengthened. Here the town member finds his opportunities, particularly at the noon meal, to share with his brothers the pleasures of chapter-house life. There are few who would be willing to surrender these advantages unless, for the sake of college democracy, so called, there were provided a satisfactory boarding place where the entire college community met three times a day. There are so few institutions in the United States which have a suitable commons hall and which furnish wholesome and satisfying food with something of home conditions, that, until radical changes are made, the friends of the fraternity table apparently have the best argument. But it is about the freshman that there is the greater doubt. There are many college presidents and deans who are strong, in their belief that no freshman should be allowed to live or board in a fraternity house. They are sincere and earnest in their opinion. There are many fraternity administrators, equally sincere in their ideas, who believe that it is the finest thing in the world for a freshman to have the opportunity of the supervision which comes to him through living in a chapter home. Which view is correct? Are both wrong? Are both right? Is there any common ground of action? Certainly in the usual conditions which prevail in American college-life, the freshman does not secure much aid from the college authorities. He is registered by his dean, and he pays his bills to the proper official. Then he is turned loose to shift for himself. He tries to discover what the college customs and traditions are. If he fails to do this, he is quite apt to receive instruction ii the shape of some form of hazing, mild or severe. If he is naturally a boy of good home training and plain common sense he profits by his stupid blunders and his verdancy and in some fashion or other makes his way. There are few institutions where he finds any official or member of the faculty whose business it is and whose pleasure it is to advise him and direct him. If, happily, he avoids the pitfalls of temptation which come to one, perhaps away from home for the first time, it is his good fortune that protects him. If unhappily, he falls into evil


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ways, he feels no restraining influence unt'l the disciplinary arm of the college reaches out to grasp hm and then perhaps, he receives the sentence of expulsion because his classroom work has not been satisfactory, or his personal conduct has been unfavorably reported. In a large number of cases there can be no doubt whatever that the blame for such an unfortunate ending of the freshman year, or term, or semester of it, should not be placed entirely upon the misguided student but should fall upon the shoulders of that more or less impersonal existence dubbed "the college authorities." The fratern:ty seeks to prevent such educational fiascos. The freshman upon being pledged is immed'ately put under supervision. lie is watched in connection with his cla7sroom work, his college activities, his personal deportment, his relationsh.p with his fellows, and in all other matters which bear upon the developm nit of one who must be an effective and valuable member of the fraternity after initiation. Many a man owes more than he can ever repay to this supervision and guidance wh:ch he received while he was in that fofmative period of his life, in college song referred to as that of "a verdant freshman." "A poor worm of the dust" today, tomorrow wearing a fraternity badge, he is far advanced over his classmates who have not had the benefit of this supervision, sharp criticism, and fr'endly discipline. There perhaps is crie of the grounds for objection, that all freshmen should be treated alike. But the fault certainly cannot be charged against the fraternities, since, in the nature of things, they cannot be expected to do for more than their own members. If the college authorities provided this s:rt of supervision for all of the freshmen there might be more of a question than there is. The college authorities do not provide it anywhere to my knowledge, and, while that condition lasts, it is extremely difficult for me to understand how they can find fault when, for some of their students, this needed training is secured. I have had the advantage of considerable administrative exper:ence as a college dean and in other positions where work has been done closely akin to that of a dean. I have also had years of training as a faculty official. I became a member of the fraternity before the days of the chapter house as it is now known, and before the present popular plan of freshman supervision was ever in vogue. I have known the rich joys of friendship in a small closely knit chapter. I have learned to appreciate the advantages of life where a large chapter enjoys a commodious home. I have tried to look at the subject fairly. In fraternity administration I have always insisted that the college must come first in the student's life; that no chapter could be desired by a fraternity unless it were in an institution where


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there was a splendid college sprit; and that, therefore, it was the fundamental duty of every fraternity man and every fraternity chapter to magnify and emphasize the needs of the college as a whole above those of any group,-no matter what its name or character. And yet I am unable to understand the viewpoint of those.who take the position that the freshman should not be permitted in the fraternity house. I still believe that that relationship gives to him a distinct advantage in furnishing him with a type of gu:dance which he greatly needs at the beginning of his college career. If that advantage works against college democracy, then I believe that on the college must rest the blame because it does not furnish to all the training which the fraternities provide for their representatives in the freshman class.

Kappa Alpha, Southern, recently entered Oglethorpe University at Atlanta. It also has a chapter at Georgia "Tech." Its magazine calls attention to the interesting fact that when Emory College departments are all removed to Atlanta, the fraternity will have three chapters in one city, probably a unique record in college fraternity experience.—The 'Beta Theta Pi. We beg to call the attention of Brother Shepardson to the fact that Pi Kappa Phi was the first fraternity to charter a chapter at Oglethorpe, and that we are also situated at Emory and Georgia Tech. Therefore, the record is first ours.


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Our Service Record This is the beginning of a service record which we hope to make more complete. In this issue you will find Iota, Kappa and Gamma represented by an almost complete itemization. Let every other chapter send in the names of their men at once. Those of you alumni who belong to extinct chapters, please send to the editorin-chief the names of any Pi Kappa Phis who were in the service, to-gether with their rank and branch of service, if possible. . We have. Alpha's list also, but have misplaced it in our files somewhere. It will appear in the next issue. Inform us of any corrections that should be made in the following list:

GAMMA Adams, Ernest, U. S. A. Brink, Henry, Sgt., Ord. U. S. A. Brown, Elbert McS., gas and flame section, U. S. A. Conkling, J. H., Spruce Div., U. S. A. Cook, Orin S., Lieut., Med. Corps, U. S. A. Fulton, W. I., U. S. Navy. Gwynn, Wm. M., relief Comm., Belgium. Hardy, Dave P., Capt., Coast Art. Hardy, Herbert, Lieut., marines. Hook, J. S., Av. section, U. S. A. Hurt, Tobe, Sgt., Inf. U. S. A. Milatesta, Stephen, Lieut., Eng., U. S. A. Mead, A. E.. Med., Corps, U. S. A. Miller, Hobart, Av. Corps, U. S. A. Miller, Wm. Vinton, Lieut., Mach. Gun, U. S. A. Oliver, James B., Lieut., Art., U. S. A. Oliver, W. D., Sgt., Art., U. S. A. Paull, Sheldon, Inf., U. S. A. Peterson, Wm. H., U. S. A. Phelps, L. W., Sgt., Eng., U. S. A. Prouty, Chester H., Lieut., Eng., U. S. A. Richardson, Doc., Ensign, U. S. N. Searless, Donald, Ambu. Corps, France. Smallwood, Walter C., Lieut., Med. Corps, U. S. A. Stack, Frank L., U. S. A.


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IOTA Alden, C. E., C. A. C. Barker, G. R., Maj., U. S. A. Barnett, J. H., A. S., U. S. N. Barnett, Keff, 2nd Lieut., Art. Byfield, C. K., private, Inf., U. S. A. Byrd, J. C., private, Inf., U. S. A. Campbell, W. W. Jr., private, U. S. A. Carreker, J. F., A. S., U. S. N. Carson, C. C., A. S., U. S. N. Cochran, D. A., Sgt., Q. M. C., U. S. A. Cook, S. A., M. G., C. A. C. Davis, V. S., A. S., U. S. N. R.F. Dawson, L. Y. Jr., Sea U. S. N. R. F. Dillard, A. J., A. S., U. S. N. R. F. Ellis, J. L. Jr., Had. section, Sign. C. Filbert B. M., Electr., U. S. N. R. F. Fouche, D. D., A. S., U. S. N. R. F. Griffin, G. C., ensign, U. S. N. R. F. Havis, E. H., private, U. S. A. Heyward, E. B., A. S., U. S. N. R. F. Hucks, W. R., private, Inf., U. S. A. Hutchison, J. B., Sgt., Q. M. C., U. S. A. Jackson, G. A., Corp., U. S. A. Johnson, T. L., private, U. S. A.


The Star and Lamp Isbell, G. R., Corp., U. S. A. Iske11, J. H., Sgt., U. S. A. Kohbruss, C. F., Lieut., F. A. C., U. S. A. Lilliott, R. B., Corp., U. S. A. Little, A. J., C. M. lc(A) U. S. N. Manning, G. E., Asst. Band Leader, U. S. A. Mauget, V., 0. M. S. Electr. 3c U. S.. N. Martin; F. B., Corp., U. S. A. Metcalf, J. L., Ensign, U. S. N. R. F. McAfee, II. E., Pvt., marines McCreight, J. S., Sgt., lc Q. M. C., U. S. A. Mc Farland, R. W., Pvt., A. E. F. Nelms, J. G., A. S., U. S. A. Partridge, A. D., A. S., U. S. N., R. F. Patton, J. E. Jr., Corp., U. S.A. Rice, D. D., Lieut., U. S. A. Rohlin, Pvt., U. S. A. • Shoemaker, G. W., Sgt., U. S. A. Spangler, A. D., Can. flying ocrps. Sturgis, V. M., Band, U. S. A. Taber, A. R., Lieut., U. S. N. Tucker, T. T., Pvt., F. A. R. R. A. E. F. °Walthour, C. H., A. S., U. S. N. R. F. Weaver, J. A., A. S., U. S. N. R. F. Welch, P. P., Sgt., S. A. T. C., U. S. A. Wilkins, B. H. Jr., Pvt., F. A. R. R. A. E. F. Williams, J. F., Pvt., S. A. T. C. U. S. A. Wilson, I. W., Y.1c., U. S. N., R. F. Wilbourne, J. G., Corp., S. A. T. C., U. S. A.

KAPPA

Crowell, Rupert J., Lieut., U. S. A. Clarvor, Lieut., U. S. A. Griffin. Elbert A., Sgt. Camp Jackson, S. C. Harper, Henry G., Sgt., Camp Jackson, S. C. Perry, Henry H., Lieut., U. S. A., A. E. F. Shepard, Fred. C., Lieut., A. S., A. E. F. Young, Richard L., Lieut., Art., U. S.. A. Andrews, Wm. P., Lieut., Inf., U. S. A. ' Bynum, Jefferson C., Lieut., Inf., U. S. A. Fulton, Howard E., Sgt., Camp Taylor, Ky. VanNoppin, Donvell, Lieut., Inf., U. S. A. Wilson, Ralph H., Lieut., Inf., U. S. A.

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1919_3_Sep