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Pi KAPPA PHI P. 0. Box 4608 Charlotte, N. C. 28204

THE STAR AND LAMP OF PI KAPPA PHI

Second Class Postage Paid at Charlotte, N. C.

Jerry Matthews to be Assistant Executive Director

Jerry Matthews, Alpha Eta Chapter at Samford, returned to the National office in June to assume the duties of Assistant Executive Director of Pi Kappa Phi. Jerry has considerable experience, having served two years as a field secretary and one year as Director of Student Affairs for the National Office. Ile left the National Office in 1971 to become Assistant Director of Residential Programs at the University of Oklahoma. In the last year, Jerry has been asgociated with an alumni relations finn in Dallas, Tex. He will essentially replace the dual directorships which were established in 1970. Since early 1972, Director of Alumni Affairs, Jerry CaIlups, has functioned as an undefined assistant executive director due to the departure of Chuck Cummings as Director of Student Affairs. Now it is felt that a two man office (as opposed to three) with a large field staff can best serve the chapters and alumni. Jerry Matthews is the ideal man for this job: He has the depth of knowledge necessary and the dedication to Pi Kappa Phi that will be o great benefit to the fraternity as a whole. Jerry and his lovely wife Sue, who is a former Sigma Kappa field representative herself, will make their home in Charlotte.

CLARK NAMED CHAIRMAN OF SCHOLARSHIP COMMITTEE

Jeff Clark, Delta Alpha Chapter, has been named Chairman of the Pi Kappa Phi National Scholarship Committee. He succeeds- Fluker Stewart, Chi. Chapter— Stetson, who recently resigned. Jeff will be in charge of the Nationill Scholarship Committee and will be responsible for selection of Pi Kapp Scholars for the fraternity. Jeff is a Ph.D. candidate at V. P. I. where he has been Chapter Advisor, since their chartering.

SUMMER 1973

FRATERNITIES BACK?

Taken from the Cincinnati Enquirer 4/3/73 Five years ago, when the campus protest movement seemed to be at its peak, the National Interfraternity Council disclosed a significant and perhaps portentous statistic: the 50 college fraternities affiliated with the Council showed a net loss in membership from the previous year. That datum, combined with the fact that Greek-letter fraternities epitomized to many protesters much of what was wrong with the U. S. college and university system, suggested that the fraternity was on its last legs. More recent surveys suggest, however, that the social fraternity is enjoying a new crest in popularity. Perhaps because the protest movement has exhausted itself or perhaps because the fraternity system has demonstrated a new utility in

today's mammoth colleges and universities, the fact is that fraternities are no longer on the defensive. Dick Benson, president of the student body at the University of Texas, explains the campus mood in these terms: "There is a great big energy void out there. Everybody seems worn out by the volcanic change of the past few years. The mass energy pools just aren't there for any more demonstrations." If the volcanoes of the 1960s left in their wake a new commitment to education, fraternities are taking advantage of it. A recent University of Detroit study shows that members of social fraternities and sororities are scoring higher academic grades, on the whole, than non-members. Even when the fraternity sfstem was

PI KAPPA PHI PROPERTIES EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE MEETS On May 19, 1973, the executive committee of Pi Kappa Phi Properties met at the National Office of the fraternity in Charlotte, North Carolina. In addition to the members of the Pi Kappa Phi Properties Executive Committee, National President Ted Scharfenstein and -National Treasurer Lonnie Strickland were present, along with the national office staff and several visitors from different chapters around the country. Among the items discussed at the meeting was the creation of a new office of paid administrator to Pi Kappa Phi Properties, Inc. It was determined that this administrator was vitally necessary to the future of the corporation and that a committee should be assigned to establish 'criteria for the job and begin a search for a qualified individual. This move will take the administration of Pi Kappa Phi Properties out of the national office and will give Properties its own administrative arm. This will free the national office to better serve the chapters and will, at the same time, give Pi Kappa Phi Properties the much better direct attention it needs.,

In other actions, the executive committee heard reports on assorted property around the nation. It was determined that repairs to the "castle" at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York, would be undertaken pending current mortgage negotiations. All the major properties were discussed and direction given by the executive committee to individual members and committees to take appropriate actions. Members from Beta Eta Chapter at Florida State journeyed to the meeting to present their case for the purchase of a new house and after considerable discussion it was decided that Pi Kappa Phi Properties would do all in its power to secure the house in question for these members and a member of the field staff was dispatched with them back to Florida to help the chapter adjust to this possibility. Pi Kappa Phi Properties now holds title to fraternity houses at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Western Carolina, University of Oregon, Memphis State, Florida State, Georgia Southwestern, University of Georgia, Old Dominion, Troy State, East Tennessee, East Carolina, Samford University, North Texas State and Michigan State University.

at its nadir of respectability, its defenders argued with some validity, that in today's complex, often impersonal campus life, the fraternity had something to offer the individual student that he could find in no other quarter. The fraternity itself has changed dramatically during the post-World War II years. Returning veterans were less interested in frivolity than in education, and most fraternities adapted their practices accordingly. Not many reverted to the old fun-filled days. By its capacity to change, the fraternity system has won itself a new lease on life in America, and the young men and women the traditional fraternities and sororities are serving are likely to be the beneficiaries.

NATIONAL TREASURER STRICKLAND TO SHAPE FUTURE OF ALABAMA Dr. A. J. (Lonnie) Stickland III, of the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa's School of Business and Commerce and National Treasurer of Pi Kappa Phi, has been named executive director of the Management Planning Group of the Governor's Cost Control Survey for the state of Alabama. Lonnie is "on loan from the University for the summer months", said Governor George C. Wallace in announcing the appointment. He will report directly to the Governor on the future of the state's economy. A group of state employees will work with Lonnie and will be responsible for investigating the progress made toward the implementation of the survey team recommendations.

IN THIS ISSUE GOLDEN LEGION .

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CAREER WEEKENDS. page 2 NATIONAL OFFICE NIGHTMARE . .

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MR. PI KAPPA PHI . 'page 3 ZEBRA STEAKS? . .

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Members of Delta Beta Chapter at North Georgia College are shown above returning from their 73 mile run from Atlanta to Dahlonega, Ga. They raised $700 for the Third Annual Marathon run for Easter Seals. They collected money along the road and accepted pledges from merchants and individuals along the route. The money went to the Georgia Easter Seals Society. More than 35. fraternity members and little sisters of Delta Beta Chapter participated.

SAN FRANCISCO, HERE WE COME!-- AUG 18-21,1974


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Robert O'Donohue Named Sloan Fellow

ROBERT O'DONOHUE, Robert E. O'Donohue, Alpha Xi at Brooklyn Poly, presently Acting Assistant Director of Defense Research and Engineering in the Office of the Secretary of Defense, has been selected as a 1973-73 Sloan Fellow. The Sloan Fellows program, established by the former Chairman of General Motors, is a 12-month program leading to a degree of Master of Science in Management. Some 45-50 young executives from the U.S. and abroad are selected each year. The applicants are from 32-38 years old with from 10-15 years experience in business and with some 25-30 years of significant professional contributions ahead of them. Bob's present assignment at the Department of Defense places him in charge of planning and directing all "Defense research and development activities related to U.S. Navy and U.S. Air Force tactical systems to perform the air superiority, strike, defense suppression, electronic warfare and reconnaissances missions." In short about $1 billion of the Defense budget. He lives in Arlington, Va. Bob has a long line of accomplishments behind him and the Sloan Fellow award points a bright ray to the future.

Career. Weekends Will Help PI KAPPS Find Jobs

For many years Pi Kappa Phi has tried to find a *ay to aid members in finding employment. Thanks to a recent decision by the National Council we can now offer a unique form of employment aid— free. Lendman Associates of Norfolk, Virginia has agreed to tailor an employment search program for the members fo Pi Kappa Phi. Career Weekends, a program sponsored by Lendman around the country, will now be open to Pi Kapps. This well known and progressive organization was formed by Ernest M. Lendman in 1963. He was an ex-Navy seaman who became discouraged with the help he received from ordinary employment agencies in his search for employment. The Career Weekend idea was first tried in 1986. At that time Lendman brought 100 job applicants and five hiring companies together. Today Lendman sponsors more than 70 such programs each year, representing hundreds of companies and thousands of applicants. The positions represented at Career Weekend are at, or bordering, the entry level, so that applicants with more than five years of work experience are usually not interested in attending. But men with from one to five years experience (the most mobile of employment groups) usually find this to their advantage. There exists an unusually strong demand for applicants with technical backgrounds, MBA's, accounting graduates, as well as for men interested in production management and sales and marketing assignments. In addition to representing more than half of the major companies listed in the Fortune 1000 list, many smaller firms are also represented.

Career weekends attract many large national compan ies looking for young executives.

An applicant fills out a resume which is filed with the Lendman office. He then receives notice of Career Weekend meetings near his home or in his special interest area. He may attend as many of these as he chooses until he finds the right company offering the right job. THERE IS NO COST TO THE INDIVIDUAL. His only costs are those of his hotel, meals and travel while attending. The Lendman Career Weekend is a well-planned meeting which permits approximately 200 job candidates, with college degrees, to hear representatives of 20 participating firms describe their job opportunities. Between five and six programs are held monthly in luxury hotels located in .principal cities nationwide. After listening to information about jobs available, the prospective employees schedule interviews with those firms of

greatest interest. Thirty-minute interviews take place on Saturday and Sunday in the company representatives' hotel rooms. Those applicants who travel in from another geographic area receive special reduced rates from the hotel. It is hoped that this service will be of great benefit to Pi Kapps looking for employment. In the next few months, alumni who have been out of scho61 from one to five years will receive a special invitation to enter this program. This program is intended as another of the expanding services of your National Office. If you do not receive one of these special mailings and you are interested in the program, more information may be obtained by writing: Stephen Ni.

Campbell, Lendman Associates, P. 0. Box

14027, Norfolk, Virginia.

NEW FIELD SECRETARIES

CHUCK BARNARD

LEO FITCHKO

TRAVIS JULIAN

PI KAPPA PHI

1924 Vail Avenue, Charlotte, N. C.

Founded at The College of Charleston, S. C.— December 10, 1904 —FOUNDERS— SIMON FOGARTY, JR. ANDREW A. KROEG, JR. L. LARRY MIXSON NATIONAL COUNCIL ' President—Ted Scharfensteln

1837 Laurel Rd., Birmingham, Ala. 35216

Vice President—John Wilson

5124 Scarsdale R., N.W., Washington, D. C. 20016 Treasurer—A. J. Strickland, Ill P. 0. Box 4555, University, Al. 35486 Secretary—Ron Krebs, Standard Underwriters, Inc.,7730 Carondelet Ave. St. Louis, Mo. 63105 Chaplain—Phil Tappy, 55 Hunters Ln., Rochester, N. Y. 14618 Chancellor—Vacant Past President—Jack Steward, 4375 Pearl St., Eugene, Ore. 97405

NATIONAL HEADQUARTERS Executive Director—Durward W. Owen Director of Alumni Affairs—Jerry Gallups Field Secretaries—Joe Mci.een, Mike Trull,

Chuck Barnard, Leo Fitchko, Travis Julian

11-071 An Educational Quarterly

AUGUST 1973. VOL. LVIV NO. 3 Durward Owen Editor-in-Chief Jerry Gallups Managing Editor Changes In address should be reported promptly to National Office, P.O. Box 4608, Charlotte , N. C. 28204.

THE STAR AND LAMP is published quarterly by the National Council of the PI Kappa Phi Fraternit 1924 Vail Ave., Charlotte, N. C. In the months y, of February, May, August and November. The subscription is $15 and is the only form of life subscription. Publications Office: 1924 Vail Charlotte, N. C., Second Class postage paidAve., at Charlotte, N. C.

Chuck, a 1972 graduate of Northeast Missouri State University in Kirksville, Mo., joined the staff on Dec. 10, 1972. Chuck is a native of Oskaloosa, Iowa, where he and former Director of Student Affairs Chuck Cummings were childhood friends. It was under the urging of Cummings that Barnard attended the 33rd Supreme Chapter in Chicago in 1970. After that convention, Chuckles, Jr., as he become known at the National Office, transferred from William Penn Junior College in Oskaloosa, Iowa, to Northeast Missouri State with the intention of starting a Pi Kapp chapter. Well, he did, and became the #1 initiate of Delta Delta Chapter. Ile served as Archon, Historian, Rush Chairman and IFC representative. He is spending the summer at Iowa State in graduate school and helping rebuild Alpha Omicron Chapter.

Leo is a Social. Sciences and Humanities Major at Drexel on a five year Co-op plan. He has worked in computer centers, cost accounting sections for chemical companies, as a lab assistant at a medical college and as a lab technician (beer tester) for a brewing company during his co-op years. He now adds the experience of being a Pi Kappa Phi Field Secretary to this list of unusual jobs. As a member of Alpha Upsilon Chapter at Drexel, he was house manager, rush chairman and Archon. Leo (his real name is George but he likes Leo better) was active in all sports and the IFC. His unique brand of humor and love of the people who make Fraternity work are great assets to the staff.

Travis, born in Birmingham, Ala., graduated from Minor High School in Birmingham in 1969, where he was named to the first all-conference football team and was voted the most valuable lineman. A 1973 graduate of the University of Alabama at Tuscaloosa, Travis has a B. S. in marketing. He was Archon, Member Education Director and director of the house redecoration committee for Omicron Chapter. He was elected to one of three student chairs on the board of directors of the Alabama Community Co-operative Purchasing Agency. Travis also served on many IFC committees. His interests include all sports, water and snow skiing, camping, history and philosophy.


SUMMER

John Stephenson Named Rotary Graduate Fellow John Stephenson, Gamma Chi at Jacksonville, Univ., has been named one of the 1973 Rotary Graduate Fellows and is studying International Law in Australia. John is a junior at the University of Florida Law School and is on a nine month leave to study in the land "down under". On his way to the South Seas, John stopped in Hawaii, Japan, Hong Kong and Indonesia. He was very excited to discover snow three-quarters of the way up Mt. Fuji in Japan. This twenty-three year old Florida native, whose home is on the beaches near Jacksonville, had never seen snow. He had to go to the other side of the world to accomplish this feat. John, a dean's list student at JU, has many civic and scholastic accomplishments to his credit. During college he served as an intern in the city government of Jacksonville while managing to put Gamma Chi Chapter together and serve as Archon at their chartering. John is excited about Australia and has inquired if Pi Kappa Phi would like a new colony at Queen's College, University of Melbourne. He's probably just the guy who could pull it off.

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SUPREME CHAPTER SAN FRANCISCO AUGUST 18-21, 1974 Start planning now for the most exciting Pi Kappa Phi national convention in decades. We will all gather at the Jack Tarr Hotel in San Francisco and enjoy the delights of America's "Baghdad by the Bay". There is also a side tour to Hawaii in the planning stages!!! Tell the wife to start packing now.

a

FOX BRUNSON MR. PI KAPPA PHI 1973 The National Council of Pi Kappa Phi at its February 3, 1973 meeting in Charlotte, North Carolina named Area Governor, Fox Brunson, to receive the highest honor in Pi Kappa Phi, Fox, who is Omicron (University of Alabama) initiate 404, has been Area Governor of Area XV (Alabama and Mississippi) for more than fifteen years. He has served on national and regional committees and has been a great help to organizers of Supreme Chapters and Pi Kapp Colleges for many years. Fox and his wife, Jean, and their four children live in Mobile, Alabama. The official resolution was presented at a meeting of Pi Kapp alumni in Mobile. National President Ted Scharfenstein, who was chapter advisor to one of the Area XV chapters before his election to the National Council, presented the award. The text of the resolution follows Mr. Pi Kappa Phi /973 WHEREAS, Fox Brunson, Jr., Omicron initiate 404, has distinguished himself as an outstanding member of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity in both his personal membership and in leadership capacities he has filled and WHEREAS, Brother Brunson has, through the years of service to his fraternity on the chapter level, area level, and national level, added to the brotherhood of Pi Kappa Phi, and WHEREAS, Brother Brunson has presided over the rapid growth of Area XV, and WHEREAS, he has been instrumental in the conduct of Supreme Chapters and Pi Kapp Colleges for many years, and WHEREAS, Brother Brunson has served as an example for all members of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity through his devotion and loyalty to Pi Kappa Phi, BE IT THEREFORE RESOLVED that on this third day of February, 1973, Brother Fox Brunson was named Mr. Pi Kappa Phi for the year /973 with the gratitude of the National Council and the membership of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity. 6/ 42 .?" 44211> ' National President Ted Scharfenstein

National Secretary Ron E. Krebs

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SUMMER 73

Scheffer Named To Presidential Commission Victor B. Scheffer, Alpha Delta Chapter at Washington, has been named by President Nixon to be Chairman of the new Marine Mammal Commission. Scheffer, retired senior scientist at the U.S. Marine Mammals Laboratory in Bellevue, Washington, has spent his life in an effort to protect ocean mammals ;from being huOted to extinction. He has written many books about whales, seals and the beauty of nature. This new commission will serve as a civilian review board under the Federal Marine Mammal Protection Act to coordinate the policies of all federal agencies which have jurisdiction over marine mammals. Brother Scheffer said, "There has been a growing sentiment, particularly on the part of young people, that wild animals should be preserved for their own sake. They have more value as living animals than as products." The two big issues facing the commission at the moment are the killing of porpoises by tuna fishermen and control of the Alaskan fur seal industry.

IF YOU DON'T NOURISH THEM, NOTHING WILL GROW. The fruit of the human body is the mind. If it's left to lie uncultivated, its contributions wither. And something, somewhere dies. That should frighten you. Because college sponsored research and college-trained minds have helped us bridge the gulfs between human needs and cold reality. We live longer, richer lives today. And we have even more to hope for tomorrow. But what if the money runs out? What's going to happen to our doctors? Our businessmen? The engineers of our hopes and our plans for the future? Every year colleges go millions of dollars deeper into debt to educate our young. Now their red ink is throat deep. And the only thing that's going to prevent them from-choking to death are your dollars. Protect the promise and the progress of our college-trained heritage. -

Give to the college of your choice. Now. Advertising contributed for the public good..

ar Council for Financial Aid to Education, Inc. AF,6 East 45th St., New York, N.Y. 10017

CAN A PI KAPP BE HAPPY ON ZEBRA STEAK? Can a Pi Kapp from Birmingham, Alabama, find happiness in the middle of Africa on the side of a 15,000 ft. mountain eating Zebra steak and Wildebeest stew?? John McCullough, Alpha Eta Chapter at Samford, is spending two years finding out. He is a "Journeyman" for the Southern Baptist Convention Foreign Mission Board teaching English and Physical Training in Arusha, Tanzania, East Africa. , John, an outgoing young man, wanted to do something of value for the world when he picked'up his AB in history at Samford in 1972. After seven weeks of intensive training in how to cope with a foreign environment, he joined several career missionaries at the "International Baptist Seminary of East..Africa" to help train ministers for the Baptist of Uganda, Tanzania and Kenya. John,writes: "The Seminary is located in Arusha, Tanzania, exactly in the middle of Africa. Arusha is the headquarters for the East African community. The Seminary itself is on the side of 15,000 ft. Mt. Menu on the edge of the Masai Steppe. We are 45 miles from Mt. Kilimanjaro, highest peak in Africa. We. are in the heart of the hunting area of Africa and the game is very tasty once you learn the cooking secrets. There are wild animals all around the school. Three elephants were killed on the grounds last year. "The primitive Masai tribe is abundant here. They live in mud and cow dung huts, and drink a mixture of cows milk, blood and urine. "I live in a small three-room house and have a fulltime house servant. My transportation is a Land Rover which is very necessary for travel in this area. In my spare time I read, hunt, play tennis, and try to beat the natives at basketball. "I have learned to do my own cooking and enjoy the wild game meats. Zebra and Wildebeest are the best." John, Who was well known at Samford for his concern for his Brothers and fellow man, says he does not know what life holds for him after he finishes this two year,assignment in the summer of 1974, but he hopes to remain in a field where people and not things are the important consideration.

John talks with one of his students outside the seminary.

JOHNSON PUBLISHES BOOK .

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.411k

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This land rover is the best transport for the roads of Tanzania.

Elmer C. Johnson, Alpha Phi chapter at Illinois Institute of Technology, has published his third book, Survey of American Law. The book, published by Exposition Press, is aimed at college seniors and entering law school students. Brother Johnson, who holds both a Ph.D and a Juris Doctorate in law, has Written two other books, Glimpses of Democracy and Science of Living-Applied Psychology. Since 1933 he has been an attorney and counselor in applied psychology in Chicago and Oxnard, Calif. He and his wife, Clara, still maintain homes in both cities. Born in Woodhull, Ill., in 1898, Brother Johnson has taught in the Chicago public schools and in several colleges in the Chicago area. He served as an Education Specialist on the Federal Board of. Vocational Education)und has been active in encouraging the study • of basic law as part of every college course.

Kansas State Names Building For J. A. Shellenberger J. A. Shellenberger, Alpha Delta at Washington, has retired as head of the Crain Science Department at Kansas State University and the University has 'honored him with the title of Dintinguished Professor Emeritus and with his own building. The new five story Milling Industries Building has been renamed Shellenberger Hall in honor of this distinguished Pi Kapp. Dr. Shellenberger, after receiving his chemistry degree at Washington, did graduate work at Kansas State and the University of Minnesota and received his PILD from the latter in 1939. He taught at the University of Idaho and the University Minnesota before returning to Kansas State to spend 26 years as head of the Grain Science Department. Brother Shellenberget has done considerable work for the State Department, the' Department of Agriculture, the Argentine Government and many private companies doing business abroad. He has published more than 200 scientific articles and papers, co-authored a book Bread Science and Technology and is a frequent contributor to encyclopedias and scientific books.

He is a past president of the American Association of Cereal Chemists and the International Association for Cereal Chemistry. His list of American and in-

ternational honors would fill a 'small volume. He is ,,considered one of the world's foremost authorities in Cereal chemistry.

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Dr. James A. McCain, president of Kansas State, admires Dr. Shellenberger's portrait at the dedication ceremonies for Shellenberger Hall. The portrait of Dr. Shellenberger (center) was donated by former students.


SUMMER

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Each 'Pi Kapp listed below has given fifty years to fraternity membership, all were initiated in the 1920-21 school year.

Alpha

Rho

JOHN EDWARD ROYALL ADOLPH CHRISTIAN LESEMANN, JR.

ARCHIBALD HOWELL McLEOD GEORGE WILLIAM SUMMERSON DIGBY CLARKE WEST

_ Beta

Tau

JAMES EDMUND FERGUSON ROBERT ADAMS, JR. WARREN M. SIMS

THOMAS MORTIMER HARRIS EDWARD ALLWARDEN ROBISON NORMAN THOMPSON SMITHWICK EDWARD ARMANIE SUTTON

-Gamma HOWARD AUGUSTIN BLISS LOUIS MASON BULLOCK • CHESTER LEE KLUCK LOUIS WALTER WRIXON HENRY ERNEST ERDN1AN THOMAS CHRISTIAN QUAYLE CARL ENGELBREKT HANSON ' HERSCHEL YOUNG HYDE

Upsilon 1b,

E. B. Powell, Eta Chapter, and his granddaughter, Marie Truitt admire his Golden Legion award. Her father is also a Pi Kapp.

Zeta

Phi

FRANKLIN GIRARD BOINEAU, JR. CLAUDE IRVINE CHIPLEY JOSEPH TAYLOR HUDSON FRANCIS PRESTON OWINGS CARROLL FREDERICK REAMES

JOE TUNNELL TRIMBLE LAURENCE SPURGEON McLEOD EARL LEROY BARRETT GEORGE MATTHEW DILL EDWARD GEORGE FIKE, JR. TED GETTINGER HAYDON WILBURN McDONNOLD GEORGE PAUL TODD HAROLD FAY HIXSON

Eta ROBERT ALAN FLOURNOY WILBUR LaFAYETTE DICKSON

Iota ROY EUGENE BREEN MARCUS ALONZO COOK, JR. THOMAS LITCHFIELD KENNEDY HARVEY DUARD McLEAN JOHN HALE NUNEZ WILLIAM GORDAN MERIWETHER, JR. JOSEPH JOHNSTON WIN1BERLY HENRY BEVERLY GARDEN WALTER SINCLAIR HE1DT JACK AARON STEWART STEWART ANDREW MARSHALL, JR.

Chi CHARLES THOMAS HENDERSON E. GALE HUNTINGTON EVALD THEODORE PETERSON MILTON CHANDLER STITH CHARLES BUSHNIELL GARNSEY, JR. SLEDGE T. TATUM Lawerence S. McLeod, (center) Phi Chapter, accepts the Golden Legion Certificate from Alpha Gamma Alumni Chairman Jeff Hanrahan as Marc Cadwell, another University of Oklahoma member, looks on.

Kappa JOHN NELSON COFFEY ARCHIBALD RILEY BROWN JAMES HARDIN COUNC1LL PAUL JENNINGS SMITH WILLIAM HENRY MURDOCK

HENRY KARSTEN JAMES FRANKLYN FICKEN FLOYD BENJAMIN ALLEN EDWARD JAMES ELLIOTT HAROLD STEPHEN LEWIS HENRY CHARLES HELLER JAMES THOMAS OWENS WILLIAM ROBERT AMICK HOBART WARFEL BEHR NOAH NOLAN CLINE FREDERICK EDMUND HARRELL JOHN RALPH GASS EDWIN BRENT McCORMIcK FLOYD LUSE McDONALD LLOYD CHESLEY SKELTAN BERNHARD FREDERICK TELLKAMP JOHN ANDREW TIMIvIONS

JAM ES WILLIAM N1cGAUGHY OLIVER COOK WIMBISH WILLIAM ALBERT FOSTER,'JR. N1ALCOLM NASH

Mu COURTNEY DOYLE BRIGHT, • WILLIAM RUSSELL MORECCK RAY E. DOWNEY THOMAS LIONEL TUCKER HARVEY BELTON JOHNSON

Alpha Alpha

Nu Steve Ryder, treasurer of Gamma Chapter at Berkeley, presents Dr. Claude Sutter's 50 year award. Dr. Sutter is an Initiate of Nu Chapter at the University of Nebraska.

Xi GORDON CARROLL WHITE SCOTT H. ROLLER SAMUEL FRANCIS DAVIES RICHARD SLOAN WRIGHT, JR. PALMER SAINT CLAIR RUTHERFORD HARRIS NEWTON ROWZIE CURTIS GORDON DOBBINS GEORGE FREDERICK POTEET

JOSEPH LOUIE BUCHANAN WILLIAM ADOLPHUS BUGG LEWIS CONNELL COBB CORRY WAIAER LYNCH WILLIAM LAFAYETTE MOORE PASCHAL MUSE CLAYTON HARRIS BUCHANAN

Alpha Beta JOSEPH OSCAR BAUGHMAN STEPHEN VINCENT D'AMICO JAMES VALENTINE EGAN IRION OTT CULLATT MILAM JAMES GORDON SCOTT HAROLD NORMAN WALSDORF EUVNE JULES BERGERET

Omicron

Alpha Gamma

ROBERT KING PERKINS WILLIAM ERNEST PRESCOTT JOHN MONROE COUNTS NORMAN SNOW MORGAN JOHN ADAM DREHER, JR.

Pi CLYDE JACKSON WALLACE COKE WISDOM O'NEAL JOHN BROWN FRAZER CALHOUN HUNT YOUNG ROBERT OGDEN BROWN

Psi

Omega

Lambda

RAYMOND GERALD LEWIS CLAUDE EDOVARD SUTTER

JAMES TURNER COATSWORTH HARRIS WILLIAM JONES LISLE WILLIAM MENZIMER HERBERT SPENCER SCHROEDER LELAND CLARE JOSEPH STEPHEN WILLIAM ALBERT VOIGHT FRANK HENRY WICKHORST

Curtis Dobbins, Xi Chapter at Roanoke, is shown receiving his certificate from a group of local alumni who surprised him in his office.

BELSUR BRISTOW BYRON T. DAWSON HAROLD R. HULPIEU CLEO CECIL INGLE MARTINDALE KILE BENNIE ANDERSON McELYEA FOSTER FRANCIS MURRAY MONAHAN ROY ELLSWORTH NEWMAN THOMAS GRANVILLE NORRIS WILLIAM PRATT SCARLETT ESTHMER HALLAM SKINNER CHARLES EUGENE SPRINGER


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NATIONAL OFFICE PJIGHTMAR

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Breathlessly I found myself in a room with dirty white walls of sagging plaster. In this room I found a desk, a typewriter, another girl in a sweater, and a telephone which began to ring. The girl picked up the receiver and began to punch the Phone buttons. She finally found the party. When she had finished she looked at me and said, "Do you know that we cannot get lights on our phone because this place is so old that it would cost several hundred dollars just to rewire the phone?" I nodded in agreement with her rambling words,.and went out to a foyer .

I. Dear Brother: Recently I had a wild dream. Now don't get the wrong idea. It wasn't anything nasty. In fact you might class ify it as a harmless nightmare. In this dream I drove my car to an old house. I followed the driveway to what I thought was a parking lot. Whe n I rounded the building I found nine cars packed into an' area not large enough for six. After much twisting and turning I finally got the car tucked into that little lot, but then four secretaries and sever guys came to the back door and scre al amed in unison "you've blocked my car in and I can't get out". Well, to continue with the dream, I got out of the car, uttered something like "Godfrey Daniel" and stormed up the back steps to the door. Being a rather heavy individual, I was a little leery when I noticed that these steps were beginning to rot in several places, especially where they were pulling away from the house. But, I was undaunted—I felt I was there for a purpose. I pushed the door open, there stretched out before me was a large room filled to the ceiling with shelves and the shelves were covered with all manner of debris, files and papers— piled mo"ntain high. I gave a sigh and said, "Whe re have I gone wrong. Mother always warn ed me about fire traps".

As I proceeded through the sagg ing old doqrs that connected this dismal room with an equally dismal little office heated by an antique gas space heater (the odor of gas was strong), I felt some thing hit my head. Glancing heavenward I saw an irregular circular design in the ceiling where some plaster had just removed itself. Fortunately, little of it had hit my curly locks. I squinted through the poor lighting and above the spaceheater I spotted the pictures of three old friends from Charleston, South Carolina. They look ed a little cold. I suddenly realized that in spite of the heater, the room was draft y and the young lday behind the desk was wearing a sweater. I sneezed. She told me there were some cold pills in the little drawer built into the wall. I opened it and was greet ed by the biggest ball of waste paper and have even seen. Inside the ball string I were two eyes. They stared at me in a coldness that let me know I had disturbed a happy home.

"Oh,that is just one 9f the mystic good ies, Little Durward. He builds a nest in there about once a month. We can't get rid of him. But he is nothing compared to the big one hiding in the closet behind my desk—we call him Little Jerry. Can't seem to get rid of him either. I think they are immune to DrCon", she said as she left her work and fled out the back door to move her car so another visitor could get in. I stumbled half stunned through what appeared to be a walk through close t, but it had mountains of paper, a posta ge meter, and a lot of boxes piled all around. I decided this was a place ,of dang er and quickly fled.

.ih. too I wandered past a room which I took to be a kitchen. But, instead of a stove there was a big grey printing press goin g "clickety, clack, bump, whine". The noise didn't bother me, but the fact that the floor moved on every other "clack" was a little unnerving. I noticed anot her young lady wrapping packages for the mail, on top of a stack of loose papers which were perched uneasily atop a counter which also held printing ink, coffee, a sink with a few dirty coffee elms and a stack of offset masters to be printed. I said, "good morning", she just smiled as her package slid noisily to the floor, followed rapidly by most of the papers. "Why don't you find some room to stack your papers so you will not have to do several jobs in the same place?" She left the room screaming something about Alka-Seltzer and headaches (I didn't have time to warn her about the rat in the first aid drawer, but she foun d him without any trouble).

From there I could see a formal parlor, or what must have been one when the. house was alive. All around the room were what appeared to be the archives of some organization. In one corner were dozens of large scrapbooks which appeared to be waiting for a good gust of wind to topple them from their crowded shelf. I listened for a moment to the squirrels who were busily building a nest in the old fireplace.

I heard a female voice crying from another room. "How can I keep up with thirty thousand addresses in a room no bigger than the average Volk swagen garage? And another thing, ever y summer when the nut in the office abov e me turns on his window air condi tioner, all my windows rattle!" Obviously I was wandering through a very strange land and I became anxious to leave. As I turned to do so, a great crow d of young men, obviously from out of town , began to push into the room. The sad looks on their faces seemed to spell disappointment and a little irritation at the lack of facilities (four of them were standing in line outside the "ladies lounge" trying to get in. Some one pered to me that the little close whist which served the ladies was having to be used by visitors because of some mino r malfunction in the men's room). I quietly slipped away from this group and found myself climbing some stairs. I couldn't decide if they were suspended or attached stairs. There was a half inch crack running all the way up the flight, between the steps and the wall. I tried to steady myself on the banister but it was not too steady. I knew that if I was to survive this place I must find a haven. I opened a closet on the landing; sever al picture frames filled with what hundred appeared to be archive materials fell at my feet. I ran on for fear that Fibber McGee would not be far behind.

My searching led me to an office where the radiator was making strange noise s and suddenly I realized that I had clim bed from a rather drafty and cold first floor to a tropical second floor. I pondered the type of heating system that could accomplish such a feat as I grop ed for a light hanging on the wall. It didn' t seem to work.. I met a fire inspector who looked at the light fixture, mumbled somethin g about "shorts" and ambled on down the stairs. I stumbled into a room which looked rather familiar. I tried to turn on the light. Finally I got one fluorescent light and a single lamp lit, but the room was still dark. But then I reasoned that the sun would soon be on that side of the house. It was so warm even though it was whiter, that I turned on the window unit air conditioner to counter- the radiator's wild heat. Sure enough, the cooling unit began to shake the windows. I reme mbered the poor lady below and turn ed it off,

I opened a closet door to hang my coat, but found this one full of what appe ared to be some sort of ritual equipmen t. After carefully tucking it all back inside, I sat down in the chair behind the desk. I looked over my head and realized the plaster was sagging about three inches from the ceiling line. I close d my eyes and thought what a horror show this place is. Then someone shook my arm. It was my boss, Durward Owen, Executive Director of Pi Kappa Phi. "Jerr y, you shouldn't stay out, so late. Dozi ng off in this building could be hazardou s to your health. What if the plaster let go, or something?" I had just gone through the morning arrival procedure at the national offic e. Yours in Pi Kappa Phi, Jerry D. Gallups


SUMMER

73

7

1972-1973 VOLUNTARY DUES SETS RECORD

During the 1972-1973 school year 3794 Pi Kapps contributed $45,500,24, a record amount, toward the progress of Pi Kappa Phi. Last year 2944 alumni gave $37,698.10. The increase is a healthy one and has given Pi Kappa Phi members an enviable giving record. These funds are used for the general operation of the fraternity and are responsible for a large part of the annual budget. It is through the generosity of the alumni that many of the progressive programs of the fraternity are possible. Below are two lists. The first shows how many alumni from each chapter gave to the fraternity. The second list shows the givers by state. 'Compare what your chapter and state are doing in relation to the rest of the fraternity. If you are not a contributor, consider joining this list of generous Pi Kapps during the upcoming 1973-1974 school year.

School College of Charleston Presbyterian Univ. of Calif.—Berkeley Furman Davidson Wofford Emory Cincinnati Georgia Tech Univ. of North Carolina Univ. of Georgia Duke Udiversity Univ. of Nebraska Roanoke College University of Alabama Oglethorpe. Washington & Lee Univ. of South Carolina North Carolina State Univ. of Illinois Tulsa Stetson University Cornell Purdue Mercer Univ. Tulane Univ. of Oklahoma Univ. of Washington University of Florida Oregon State Samford University Michigan State Auburn Univ. of Michigan Old Miss Penn State Ohio Brooklyn Poly. Iowa State Univ. of the South Univ. of West Virginia Univ. of Tennessee Rensselaer Drexel HT Univ. of Miami Indiana University University of Oregon Newark Coll. of Engineering Florida Southern Louisville Drake Univ. Missouri Simpson Florida State Arizona Univ. of Toledo Georgia State Univ. of Tampa McNeese State Houston Central Michigan Northwestern State Eastern Michigan Clarkston Northern Illinois Valdosta Univ. of Virginia East Carolina East Texas State Tennessee Wesleyan East Tennessee State Livingston Old Dominion Troy State Memphis State Western Carolina West Virginia Tech Athens Univ. of N.C.—Wilmington Louisiana State Univ. Georgia Southern Univ. of Missouri—Rolla Belmont Abbey LaGrange Georgia Southwestern Bethel College Northwestern State Lander College Armstrong North Texas State Oklahoma State Univ. of South Ala. Jacksonville Augusta College Univ. of Montevallo V.P.I. North Georgia Univ. of Nebraska—Omaha Northeast Missouri State Jacksonville State Appalachian State Morehead State Mars Hill Middle Tennessee State Pembroke State

Chapter Alpha Beta Gamma Delta Epsilon Zeta Eta Theta Iota Kappa Lambda Mu Nu Xi Omicron Pi Rho Sigma Tau Upsilon Phi Chi Psi Omega Alpha Alpha Alpha Beta Alpha Gamma Alpha Delta Alpha Epsilon Alpha Zeta Alpha Eta Alpha Theta Alpha Iota Alpha Kappa Alpha Lambda Alpha Mu Alpha Nu Alpha Xi Alpha Omicron Alpha Pi Alpha Rho Alpha Sigma Alpha Tau Alpha Upsilon Alpha Phi' Alpha Chi Alpha Psi Alpha Omega Beta Alpha Beta Beta Beta Gamma Beta Delta Beta Epsilon Beta Zeta Beta Eta Beta Theta Beta Iota Beta Kappa Beta Lambda Beta Mu Beta Nu Beta Xi Beta Omicron Beta Pi Beta Rho Beta Sigma Beta Tau Beta Upsilon Beta Phi Beta Chi Beta Psi Beta Omega Gamma Alpha Gamma Beta Gamma Gamma Gamma Delta Gamma Epsilon Gamma Zeta Gamma Eta Gamma Theta Gamma Iota Gamma Kappa Gamma Lambda Gamma Mu Gamma Nu Gamma Xi ' Gamma Omicron Gamma Pi Gamma Rho Gamma Sigma Gamma Tau Gamma Upsilon Gamma Phi Gamma Chi Gamma Psi Gamma Omega Delta Alpha Delta Beta Delta Gamma Delta Delta Delta Epsilon Delta Zeta Delta Eta Delta Theta Delta Iota Delta Kappa

Number of Contributors 62 50 68 25 57 57 46 0 101 84 98 57 43 98 139 18 53 61 74 91 7 86 67 126 21 7 31 43 132 46 67 85 105 10 15 112 17 63 59 7 10 62 45 84 72 11 36 15 35 29 11 29 9 3 63 2 19 26 43 7 4 16 15 2 1 4 15 10 17 6 16 18 16 14 26 13 20 33 14 25 4 9 11 6 11 16 3 5 7 6 5 7 7 5 3 4 1 9 1 1 4 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

State Alabama Alaska Arizona Arkansas California Colorado Connecticut Delaware District of Columbia Florida Georgia Hawaii Idaho Illinois Indiana Iowa Kansas Kentucky Louisiana Maine Maryland Massachusetts Michigan Minnesota Mississippi Missouri Montana

Number of Contributors 251 2 18 9 197 13 34 9 17 430 334 9 2 139 87 33 11 37 33 3 61 20 93 14 19 23 2

State Nebraska Nevada New Hampshire New Jersey New Mexico New York North Carolina North Dakota Ohio Oklahoma Oregon Pennsylvania Rhode Island South Carolina South Dakota Tennessee Texas Utah Vermont Virginia Washington West Virginia Wisconsin

Wyoming Canada nnany

Number of Contributors 14 6 3 127 6 159 263 3 85 30 34 138 2 189 1 99 103 3 3 198 44 26 17 1 1 1 1

4.6., tdm491.4■44"145 ,

NEED A NEW PI KAPPA PHI MEMBERSHIP CARD? You may have lost or simply worn out

your original membership card. If so and you want-it replaced with a new plastic card, send your name, chapter, chapter number and 50 cents to: Pi Kappa Phi National Office Box 4608 Charlotte, N. C. 28204

PI .KAPP COLLEGE August 12-16, 1973 will see the arrival of several hundred Pi Kapps at Roanoke College in Salem, Va., for the 8th Pi Kapp College. These days will be filled with learning exercises, fun, food, fellowship, and excitement. Experts in many fields of leadership and education training will conduct worksbops, seminars and lecture presentations for the benefit of the undergraduate and alumni members present. The undergraduate membership has already signed up and will be present,

but if there are any alumni who will be in the Salem, Virginia area during this week and would like to attend, please feel free to do so. We are always glad to see a good Pi Kapp drop in and participate in these meetings. Since its inception Pi Kapp College has grown and benefited many young men not only as members of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity, but as young growing leaders. This year promises to be another step forward in this educational process.

4


8

SUMMER 73

,

EMPLOYEE NEEDED DIRECTOR DEVELOPMENT!FINANCE

t) l)

t) Qualifications should include either: l) (a) an MBA, specia lizing in real estate or finance or both, l) t) l) t) OR (b)four years on-the-job experience in real estate, finance :1 t) or both. l) 1) t) Age 20 to 65 t) Send resume, which should include salary history to: t) t) 0 t) Durward Owen l) Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity V P. 0. Box 4608 — Charlotte, N. C. 28204 Remuneration negotiable.

SAN FRANCISCO, HERE WE COME Think of it! Pi Kappa Phi on the fabled hills of San Francisco. Pi Kapps on cable cars, Pi Kapps on the Golden Gate, Pi Kapps on Nob Hill, Pi Kapps on Fisherman's Wharf, Pi Kapps at the "Top of the Mark", Pi Kapps in China Town, Pi Kapps everywhere!!!!! Think of the excitement of taking your family to the jewelled city of the West Coast—Baghdad by the Bay—San Francisco. Start planning now—Pi Kappa Phi Supreme Chapter, August 18-21, 1974, at the Jack Tarr Hotel in San Francisco. A trip you will never forget!! A town no one ever forgets!! Photo courtesy of San Francisco Visitors Bureau

YES, JERRY, I HAVE FELT LIKE RICHARD NIXON! I often feel this way, that whatever job I do is going to elevate somebody's blood pressure, that there's just no pleasing some people. I'm a feature writer for the Pittsburgh Press, formerly a copy editor, general assignment reporter and night city editor. In the latter two posts I handled many stories sensitive in nature, stories which burned the bunions of somebody's special interest group. These stories, however, had some merit or I would not have bothered with them or assigned them to another reporter. They had merit because they were news, a nebulous non-entity best defined by no less a journalist than Clifton Daniel as "anything you didn't know before." And death is news, if only because it is the only aspect of the human experience common to all men. Consider this hypothetical tale: a friend of mine ate a salami sandwich for lunch yesterday (I didn't know that before, but. no matter, it's not much worth -knowing.) My friend then ate five more salami sandwiches. (Interesting perhaps, but I know several gourmands who could top that.) My friend collapsed later in the day and was rushed to the hospital. (Oh, gee, that's too bad.) My friend .died and an autopsy revealed the cause of death as food poisoning from spoiled salami. (Well, I'll be damned. What brand was that? I sure don't want to buy any.) Notice how the listener's reaction became more intense as the story became more out-of-the-ordinary and personal. Doubtless this story would receive bigger play in the day's reports than the obituary of an elderly man who passed away in his sleep, assuming he had done nothing else to distinguish himself. Sensationalism? No, Jerry, just sound news judgment This is what dictated the play given the account of Fred Bronner's death. His death certainly was out of the ordinary— tie was a very young man; others were partially, if not totally, responsible; what began as a "prank" ended a horror. And if the news media had not report— ed this incident, sorry though it was, we would have been accused of "managing" the news, of "covering up," of "hiding , the truth." (Not unlike Watergate, eh?) Would national affiliation and its inherent "leadership" have prevented the " prank " which led to Fred Bronner's death? Possibly. But consider this story, paraphrased from The Pittsburgh Press: This past March 5, two 19-year-old fraternity pledges at Clarion State College here in Western Pennsylvania were hospitalized with serious injuries suffered when they fell 50 feet into a strip mine pit while participating in alleged initiation "war games" late at night. They were pledges Of Phi Sigma Epsilon , a national fraternity. National affiliati on didn't keep them frcim harm. Now peruse this time, quoted verbatim, from the April 29 Press: "Members of two college fraternities lost a few pounds but they raised $3,442 for Children's Hospital through the Press Old Newsboys Fund. "Alpha Kappa Lambda Fraternity at Penn State University raised $2,029 with its annual bike-a-thon, with members cycling from the campus to the hospital, asking donations along the way. "Sigma Pi Fraternity at Slippery Rock College raised $1,413 with its annual bunny hop promotion .downtown during the Easter break from classes." These both are national fraterni ties, too, but this fact was noted in neither story. Why? Because it was the acts, not the perpetrators, that were out of the ordinary. The Gestapo was a national organization; Richard Speck acted alone. Their deeds all were shocking and heinous. By the same token, we all know

wonderful "free agents" who have somehow enriched the lives of their fellows. • The fact they had no national affiliation doesn't becloud their brotherhood one whit. And if they had had, it would not have enhanced their kindnesses, either. Methinks the director of alumni idfairs doth protest too much. The fault (in -not having more "good" stories in the news media) may lie not with the journalistic stars but with ourselves. . Do the members of the national office who work with undergraduate chapters emphasize the importance of each chapter's having a public relations officer? Do the chapters themselves realize the importance of making sure the positive aspects of, fraternity life get due coverage? ..I would hate to think that any Pi Kapp would do anythYng for anyone else merely so he could revel later in a printed or broadcast ego trip, but I speak as a former night city editor that most newspapers are more than willing to include "good news" in the day's editions. Like any other story, however, we have to know about it before we can print it. We have police reporters on the beat and a police radio at the city desk so we can learn quickly of the day's negative unusual events. What we don't have is enough folks who will let us know promptly when .a positive unusual event is occurring. Check the chapter letters in the "Star and Lamp" in which your petulant diatribe appeared. You will see reports of many worthwhile service projects and acts of kindness to those less fortunate -than ourselves. Were the local news media informed of these projects? Or are they included in "Star and Lamp" only to spur the generosity of good old Brother Bigwallet? Sometimes you just have to blow your own horn. Good night, Jerry, and good night to irresponsible, self-righteous hand-washing harangues which leave a very bad taste in my mouth. Sincerely, Peter E. Bishop Alpha Sigma 388 741 Macbeth Drive Pittsburgh, Pa. 15235 EDITOR'S NOTE: We feel compelled to agree. with many of Brother Bishop's. words. Especially where they relate to chapter public relations and the fact that "there's just no pleasing some people." Wizen one criticizes the public media remember; they always over react and they usually get the last word-30— June 15, 1973 Dear Brother Jerry: Yqur editorial in the Spring issue of The Star and Lamp. deserves a comment. Not because of your reference to the Nixon administration. In view of the latest and still being revealed lies and deceptions practiced by his top aids, I believe he has earned . all of the bad press he is getting. But I wanted to comment about objectivity in newspapers and magazines. You have proven how difficult it is to write without bias. Your remarks about the acts of Brothers Morgan and Franks were certainly bigoted. I ask you to read again your editorial. Why did you find it necessary'to identify the race of' the rapists? Does the phrase "four teenage Blacks" add to the bravery of the two young men? Does it make any more despicable the vicious crime that was committed? Of course not. No to both questions. Sincerely, Frank L. Devine Alpha Upsilon 104 .7950 Loretto Ave. Phila., Pa. 19111131TOR'S ,NOTE: "Foto teenage , black's", was a direct quote from the public newspaper I was discussing. Thanks for pointing that out.


1973_3_Summer