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Why not reuse the Olympics lanes for high occupancy vehicles?

North America has a long habit of car pooling, mainly for commuting trips, dating back from World War II and 1973 oil crisis. In 2005, around 10% of American workers commuted to work by carpool (1). Recently, Greater London has actively promoted car sharing programs. These programs help reduce traffic congestion, parking pressure and trafficrelated air pollution. In some locations, specific lanes are reserved for high occupancy vehicles (more than 2 people). Sources: (1): Ridesharing in North America: Past, Present, and Future, Chan & Shaheen, University of California, Berkeley


Why not add some intelligence to our roads?

Intelligent traffic systems can be implemented to improve road congestion issues and facilitate pedestrian traffic. In London, UK, the rephasing of the traffic signals to allow greater pedestrian crossing time contributed to a 35% reduction in pedestrian road deaths and serious injuries (1). The city or Portland, Oregon (USA), has optimized traffic signal timing at 135 intersections on 16 streets in the city. It is estimated that this relatively low-cost investment saves over 1,750,000 gallons of fuel per annum, equivalent to 15,460 tonnes of CO2, each year (2). This represents the amount of carbon sequestered by around 400,000 trees grown for 10 years. Sources: (1): Greater London Authority, Information London, 2008, p.31 (2): www.c40cities.org/bestpractices/transport/portland_traffic.jsp


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Car short-term rental

Autolib self-service electric car rental system in Paris, France

In the USA, short term car rental exists since 1994. Studies have shown that this helped remove between 4.6 to 20 cars per hared-use vehicle from the transportation network, either from users selling their own car or avoiding to buy one. It also leads to increased use of alternative transportation mode (walk, bike, public transportation‌) and a reduction in parking demand. Similar systems also exist in several European cities, such as Berlin or Paris.

Sources: (1): North American Carsharing: A Ten-Year Retrospective, Shaheen, Cohen, Chung, University of California, Berkeley, 2008


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Bike Rental System

Add picture of RED Bike in BJ The bicycle capitals of the world: Amsterdam and Copenhagen As many European cities, Beijing has now its own public bike scheme since 2012. In 2011, the Beijing Municipal Commission of Transport announced that it expected it to raise the bike share of urban commuter journeys from 20 to 23 per cent by 2015 (1). In Northern Europe, Copenhagen is seen as one of the most (if not the most) bicycle-friendly city in the world, due to its continuous effort to improve cycling comfort and safety in the past decades. In 2012, 36% of its citizens used bikes for their daily trips (2). In 2011, the Municipal council adopted a new strategy for 2011-2025, which main goal is for the modal share of the bicycle to reach 50% of commuter trips and to make Copenhagen the best cycling city in the world. To achieve this, the city plans to further develop the existing 340km long cycle tracks, build specific bridges over busy streets, increase bike parking spaces and improve cycling safety.

Sources: (1): "A push for bicycles", South China Morning Post, 11 Jan 2011- http://www.scmp.com/article/735345/push-bicycles (2) @Copenhagen Bicycle Accoung 2012@, City of Copenhagen, May 2013


How do you go around in Beijing?

Between 2005 and 2011, Beijing population increased by 31%, from 15.4million to 20.2 million. At the same time, the use of bicycle has significantly dropped from 33% to 18%. The part of the subway in the daily trips increased from 4% to 14%, mainly due to several subway project expansions which brought the number of lines from 4 to 15 and the total length of the subway network from 114km to 372km. Since 2008, Beijing has implemented a regulation to keep private cars off the roads one day per week which has helped maintain the part of the private car below 35% of the daily trips, in spite of the increase of the total number of cars in Beijing.


©Seoul Development Institute

©Kim, 2009

Can we take drastic action?

above: Reviving the Soul in Seoul – A joint case study by GIZ and KOTI, Case Studies in Sustainable Urban Transport #6 below: Transportation Demand Management – Training Document – April 2009 – GTZ / Federal Ministry for Economic cooperation

Between 2005 and 2011, Beijing population increased by 31%, from 15.4million to 20.2 million. At the same time, the use of bicycle has significantly dropped from 33% to 18%. The part of the subway in the daily trips increased from 4% to 14%, mainly due to several subway project expansions which brought the number of lines from 4 to 15 and the total length of the subway network from 114km to 372km. Since 2008, Beijing has implemented a regulation to keep private cars off the roads one day per week which has helped maintain the part of the private car below 35% of the daily trips, in spite of the increase of the total number of cars in Beijing. Sources: (1): http://www.c40cities.org/c40cities/seoul/city_case_studies/seoul-car-free-days-have-reduced-co2-emissions-by-10-annually


Park/Park installation

During our visits to Dashilar we observed at first hand the problems and difficulties caused by cars. We noticed that residents sometimes used belongings (bicycles, carts, tables etc.) to ‘protect’ their parking spaces whilst their car was away. As a result, moving the car took a long time – causing congestion. Meanwhile, we saw that landscaping features in other parts of the hutong were blocked off by parked cars. This led to an idea of a device to facilitate essential parking whilst contributing to the streetscape. The initial prototype Park / Park, shown at Design Week, consists of two steel frames that can rotate to block and unblock a parking space, lockable by the homeowner. It can be used as a bench for pedestrians to rest on, as a secure bike rack for residents and visitors – or even a shelf for placing plants and flowers to brighten the hutong in summer.


Design Process

Arup’s Beijing office assembled a young team of engineers from all discipines to take part in the Dashilar Pilot Study. The team studied and visited the hutongs and interviewed residents and visitors to gain an understanding of the main issues affecting the district. They then brainstormed ideas, developed initial concepts (including individual underground parking spaces and art installations) and oversaw manufacture of a prototype installation. Others looked in more detail at the real traffic conditions in Dashilar to identify whether improvements can be made. It is hoped that this work will be further developed in the future. What you see at Design Week represents our first response to the Dashilar Pilot: we hope it is a useful first step towards improving the traffic situation in the hutongs.


停 / 亭设施

在访问大栅栏胡同期间,我们察觉到胡同里的首要交通问题和难点是由汽车引起的。 我们注意到,当居民的车离开时,他们有时会使用物品(自行车、汽车、桌子等)来 占用车位,因此其他车辆行驶或通过时需要花费大量时间,结果导致拥堵。 与此同时,胡同的某些地方的美化设施被停泊的车辆挡住使其隐蔽。 以上就是引致我们构想通过一个装置的摆设来解决胡同交通/停车问题的初始原因,既 可以保障必要的停车需求,又可以美化街景。 在设计周展示的最初模型Park/Park, 包括由房东拥有可自行控制的旋转装置来占用和 开放停车空间的两个钢架组成。它可以作为供行人休息的长椅,居民游客停靠自行车 的支架,或者是夏季摆放植物鲜花为胡同增添光彩的架子。


记录的设计过程

奥雅纳北京分公司集合来自各个领域的年轻工程师组建了团队参与大栅栏胡同的 试点研究。 该团队人员多次参观视察胡同并采访当地的居民,从而更认识和了解主要影响胡 同里交通问题的症结 ,通过集思会,提出了最初的概念(包括独立地下停车空 间以及艺术摆设的设置),及后期方案选定后于制造商讨论和协调制造原始模型 等事宜。 团队的另一批人员研究大栅栏胡同确实的交通情况来辨识是否有可以改造的空间。 希望这项研究工作可以在未来进一步继续发展。 您现在所看到的设计是我们对大栅栏胡同试点的初始概念设计,希望它可以成为 改善胡同交通情况极为有用的第一步。


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