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PHOTOGRAPHERS

75 PICTURES FROM

LOOKING AT

THE PILARA FOUNDATION

PHOTOGRAPHS


AS A WAY OF BEGINNING, ONE MIGHT COMPARE THE ART OF PHOTOGRAPHY TO THE ACT OF POINTING. ALL OF US, EVEN THE BEST-MANNERED OF US, OCCASIONALLY POINT, AND IT MUST BE TRUE THAT SOME OF US POINT TO MORE INTERESTING FACTS, EVENTS, CIRCUMSTANCES, AND CONFIGURATIONS THAN OTHERS. IT IS NOT DIFFICULT TO IMAGINE A PERSON—A MUTE VIRGIL OF THE CORPOREAL WORLD —WHO MIGHT ELEVATE THE ACT OF POINTING TO A CREATIVE PLANE, A PERSON WHO WOULD LEAD US THROUGH THE FIELDS AND STREETS AND INDICATE A SEQUENCE OF PHENOMENA AND ASPECTS THAT WOULD BE BEAUTIFUL, HUMOROUS, MORALLY INSTRUCTIVE, CLEVERLY ORDERED, MYSTERIOUS, OR ASTONISHING, ONCE BROUGHT TO OUR ATTENTION, BUT THAT HAD BEEN UNSEEN BEFORE, OR SEEN DUMBLY, WITHOUT COMPREHENSION. JO HN SZ ARKOWSKI


PHOTOGRAPHERS 75 PICTURES FROM

LOOKING AT

THE PILARA FOUNDATION

PHOTOGRAPHS


AN-MY LÊ on

Lewis Hine, Two 7-year-old Nashville newsies, profane and smart, selling Sunday, 1910 Lewis Hine’s work speaks to me because he was both an influential activist and a gifted visual artist. A social reformer whose photographic work profoundly changed child labor laws in the United States, he was trained as a sociologist. He discovered photography while teaching at the Ethical Culture School in New York and was primarily self-taught. His intention was to use his photographs as evidentiary tools in his reform work. Nothing predicated they would also be exceptional works of art. This photograph has the wonderful title Two 7-year-old Nashville newsies, profane and smart, selling Sunday. It was made in Nashville in November 1910. Newsies were one of Hine’s favorite subjects because he could photograph them openly as well as interview them, whereas surreptitiously photographing children at work in factories required him to dress in disguise as a fireman or Bible salesman and sneak around. Here Hine captured his subjects in an almost empty street—newsies routinely started work before dawn and finished late at night. By using a Graflex with a waist-level viewfinder, Hine was able to photograph children from a lower and more approachable, equanimous vantage point. Indeed, Hine’s “profane and smart” newsies are poised and confident. His use of a shallow depth of field provides a sliver of sharpness that spotlights these seven-year-olds. They are enveloped by an out-of-focus, otherworldly cloud on an empty cobblestone street lined with topsy-turvy poles. In the distance looms the silhouette of an unknown man, looking on. One can’t help but imagine these young boys tussling and scrapping their way toward a future full of uncertainty and adversity. That such complicated, layered, and ultimately powerful stories can be found in this photograph is ultimately due to Hine’s intuitive understanding of the ways form conveys content.

16


LEWIS HINE (American, 1874–1940), Two 7-year-old Nashville newsies, profane and smart, selling Sunday, 1910, gelatin silver print, 4 ¼ × 6 ¼ in.


JACKIE NICKERSON on

Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936 Documentary photography has had an enormous impact in the United States, both politically and socially. This mesmerizing image was taken by Dorothea Lange in 1936 as part of a commission by the Farm Security Administration (FSA) to document farm workers who had fled the drought of the Dust Bowl and migrated West. One of the most iconic photographs ever made, it shocked the nation when it was first published, catalyzing a federal effort to provide relief for millions of families. It continues to symbolize the human impact of the Great Depression. The goal of the Information Division of the FSA was to “introduce America to Americans.” Florence Owens Thompson was a mother of seven and destitute. Lange found her waiting in a makeshift shelter in a pea pickers’ camp in Nipomo, California. Exhausted after a long road trip, Lange didn’t have the usual lengthy talk with her subject prior to taking her picture; they had only a brief exchange. She later said of Thompson, “I was drawn to her as if by a magnet.” Lange made only six exposures of the family. It is perhaps ironic that Thompson—the symbol of poor, white motherhood—was Native American. It could be that we, as observers, feel comfortable scrutinizing Thompson’s image because she seems so remote and unaware of the camera. She appears bewildered, withdrawn, and in shock. Her circumstances, in addition to the dependency and helplessness of her hungry children, seem to have pushed her right to the edge. We have exceptional sympathy for her and her hopeless situation.

32


DOROTHEA LANGE (American, 1895–1965), Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936, gelatin silver print, 22 5/8 × 17 5/8 in.


MATT LIPPS on

Consuelo Kanaga, She Is a Tree of Life to Them, 1950 [Let’s not kid ourselves . . .] I chose this photograph because it’s an image of a mother. [She’ll be gone six years in December. Did I really choose it, or did it choose me?] I have always been, and will likely remain, drawn to maternal figures, especially those of a certain age and affect, as they tend to make me feel at home in this world. [In a word: safe.] The mom in the photograph is unlike my Mom in several ways, but nonetheless I was drawn to her image about three years ago, when first I happened upon its reproduction inside the 1953 annual edition of U.S. Camera, edited by Tom Maloney. [She stares at me even now—standing on a shelf to the left of my computer. A slender, stoic figure, her two children and three cinder blocks still attached to her body—she carries them and herself effortlessly.] Entitled She Is a Tree of Life to Them, this portrait by Consuelo Kanaga captures a migrant worker and her two children working in the “mucklands” outside Maitland, Florida, in 1950. [I see Richard Avedon’s In the American West if the “townsfolk” were in situ. Katy Grannan’s Boulevard if the subjects/objects were allowed to look back at the camera! August Sander’s Face of Our Time if the specimens hadn’t been so . . . German?] Kanaga began as a newspaper photographer and was characterized as fearless in her approach and flawless in her printing. Alongside her commercial studio work, she made regular contributions to leftist publications, including New Masses, Labor Defender, and Sunday Worker, but it’s for her enduring portraits of black life in America of the 1930s through the mid-1960s that she is best remembered. [When remembered at all . . . how does one fall into and out of history?] She Is a Tree of Life to Them is by far Kanaga’s most celebrated photograph. It was Edward Steichen who gave the work its title when, in 1955, he included it in his landmark exhibition The Family of Man at the Museum of Modern Art, New York—it was one of 503 photographs by 273 photographers from 68 countries. “She” is the personification of wisdom, “and happiness comes to all that retaineth her” (Proverbs 3:18). [Is it wisdom I see in the mother’s eyes? What lessons has life taught her? Is it happiness I see in the children’s faces? My poor-quality reproduction of the photograph has rendered the little girl’s face in silhouette—is she happy in there? The mother’s skirt looks black, too.] The Brooklyn Museum’s exhibition catalogue for Consuelo Kanaga: An American Photographer (1992) includes several other photographs taken during Kanaga’s multiple visits with the family. One shows the mother and her two children facing the harshness of that day’s sun; the two children stare directly into the dark lens of the peculiar yet compassionate white woman taking aim at them. [In this image, Kanaga has placed herself down low, and Mom’s gaze is turned slightly higher than the horizon line in true Migrant Mother fashion! Her dress is actually plaid! But now I’m more curious about the safety pins; I hadn’t noticed them before.] There are two tiny safety pins pinned on the mother’s white sweater, close to her heart; they echo in space and number the children huddled below. I’ll never know the purpose the pins serve, and in that secret charge I find the punctum that haunts the photograph. [RB would swoon! Despite their safety features, they prick me! Puncture me! Rendered poignant by a mother’s wisdom.] However, it’s the look in her eyes that tells me I need not worry about the purpose of the pins nor the position of her children—that, indeed, everything is right where it belongs, at her side. [Thank you, Mom.]

44


CONSUELO KANAGA (American, 1894–1978), She Is a Tree of Life to Them, 1950, gelatin silver print, 13 × 9 1/4 in.


JOHN CHIARA on

Jim Goldberg, Joe Peterson, from the series Rich and Poor, 1977–85 From its early days as the locus of hopes and dreams during the Gold Rush to its development as an international port, the City by the Bay has drawn more than its fair share of fortune seekers. Situated at land’s end, San Francisco is also the end of the line. Today, gentrification and income inequality have risen to such levels that much of the homeless population is now living in tent encampments along the sidewalks. Exploding rents and systematic evictions have widened the gap between the city’s haves and have-nots. In the late 1970s Jim Goldberg started taking portraits of people in their residences. He then returned with prints and asked his subjects to write on them. It goes without saying that the resulting project, Rich and Poor, his formative social documentary book from 1984, continues to resonate some thirty-five years later. In giving its subjects an opportunity to voice responses to their portraits, Goldberg’s project did what perhaps the society in which it was made could not. In their responses, his subjects give us a document that speaks to the relations between a wide variety of people living in San Francisco in the late 1970s and early 1980s. We’re able to learn about their different dreams, concerns, and worldviews. I think of these texts as open letters. There’s a generous quality to what the subjects give us, even if what they are saying can come off as unsettling or unflattering. One woman is pictured embracing her Siamese cat in a well-appointed living room that has a panoramic view of the bay. “Poorer people’s lives are less complicated,” she writes. “They do not have to worry about running such a big house, the boat needing constant repairs or the servants wearing spotless white uniforms.” While I’m not a collector of fine art, the one purchase I have made is Goldberg’s haunting portrait of Joe Peterson. The adolescent qualities of Joe’s handwriting complicate the lyrical turn of phrase in his writing: “I don’t have nothing only $10.” This could be a line from a song on the radio, or it could be the desperate thought of a young man who’s out on his own. Even though the image is in black and white, I can see the paleness of Joe’s skin, his strawberry hair, and the browns, reds, and yellows in the patterned wallpaper behind him in this dimly lit SRO. Joe’s hand gently clasps his leg. With an intense look on his face, he seems a bit unnerved by having the camera focused on him. Joe Peterson reminds me of colorful people I have known. He reminds me of anarchist friends I ran with in the Bay Area who did not operate according to the normal conventions of society. Joe says so much with so few words. He fantasizes, with a hint of nostalgia, that some giving person or some service will somehow come walking through that door, yet he leaves us with the awareness that in this dark, dingy room, longing for charity is dead.

90


JIM GOLDBERG (American, born 1953), Joe Peterson, from the series Rich and Poor, 1977–85, gelatin silver print, 18 × 14 in.


PAUL SHAMBROOM on

Nancy Burson, Warhead 1 (Reagan 55%, Brezhnev 45%, Thatcher less than 1%, Mitterand less than 1%, Deng less than 1%), 1982 In 1982 Adobe Photoshop was not even a gleam in anyone’s eye, and I was a young professional photographer doing magazine and corporate work. Digital photo retouching was the realm of highly trained operators of million-dollar prepress systems. Seeing Nancy Burson’s Warhead 1 had a profound effect on me, not because of the technology but because of how she used it. Her simple gesture was to proportionally combine the faces of world leaders according to the size of their countries’ nuclear arsenals. Taking cold, hard facts and ones and zeros as its medium, her seemingly dry exercise touched at the emotional and human heart of our Cold War fears. The combined worldwide nuclear stockpile was at an all-time high—more than fifty-five thousand warheads—throughout the 1980s. The bellicose posturing of the Soviet Union and the United States in the last decade of the Cold War reignited an existential fear of species annihilation that Americans of the baby boom generation (including Burson and myself) were all too familiar with. With thirty-seven years of hindsight I can still see and feel in my own work and that of others the ripples of Burson’s intelligence and elegant innovation: her understated adoption of digital imaging technology (when most early adopters were over the top); her use of data and factual description as titles and the brilliant use of sourced images (which the younger me was indignant and aghast at); and, perhaps most important to me, her engagement with vital political and social issues in the form of information, question, and conversation, rather than as bombast and clumsy propagandist preaching to the choir. I think of the late Jacqueline Hassink’s groundbreaking series The Table of Power, Trevor Paglen’s Limit Telephotography and subsequent projects exploring the security state, and Hasan Elahi’s ongoing self-surveillance in Tracking Transience. These and many other projects, my own work included, are (or should be) indebted to Burson’s pioneering work.

98


NANCY BURSON (American, born 1948), Warhead 1 (Reagan 55%, Brezhnev 45%, Thatcher less than 1%, Mitterand less than 1%, Deng less than 1%), 1982, gelatin silver print from computer-generated negative, 7 1/2 × 8 in.


JIM GOLDBERG on

Larry Sultan, Sharon Wild, 2001 It was difficult for me to decide which of Larry Sultan’s images to write about, as they all inspire and touch me personally. Throughout our careers, Larry and I seemed to work in tandem. We’d often discuss our work, our insecurities about it, and how to strategically tell the stories we thought should be told. In addition to photographing the peripheries of society, we were also both drawn to documenting the spheres of home, life, and death in our own families. I wasn’t clear on Larry’s motives in the early stages of The Valley. Over time he would come back to me with more and more insight as to why the project was important to him; the conversation deepened to fantasies and consumerism, masculinity and desire. The work was decidedly not about pornography or sex—it was about suburban dreams and the filmmakers who created the space to fulfill those dreams. I think Larry viewed the San Fernando Valley (which was also, I should note, his childhood home) with a mix of affection, curiosity, and shock at what it became—the same blend of emotions many of us feel about our own families or pasts. I’ve lived with this photograph in my home for thirteen years now. It keeps close the memory not only of Larry himself but also of his clairvoyant and unique perspective. Larry loved to look deeper. I’m pretty sure he would be the guy (admittedly, so would I) who would look in people’s bathroom cabinets and fridges—part detective, part nosy, always an artist and collector. I think Sharon Wild encapsulates Larry’s approach to domestic documentary immaculately. It’s at once theatrical, sentimental, and mundane, and those qualities are what continue to draw us back to his work.

134


LARRY SULTAN (American, 1946–2009), Sharon Wild, 2001, chromogenic print, 50 × 60 in.


TODD HIDO on

Katy Grannan, Anonymous, Los Angeles, 2009 When I was studying photography at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston twenty years ago, I attended a lecture by Emmet Gowin. He cited a quote by Frederick Sommer that I have always liked: “The best practitioners use photography at its fulcrum.” I understood what Gowin was speaking of in relation to Sommer’s work, but then a friend told me to look at the work of German photographers Bernd and Hilla Becher. I made my way to the library, and for the first time I encountered their famous Water Tower series, which left me immediately awestruck. Once I laid eyes on those images, nearly perfect in concept and technique, I finally understood. It was a high point in utilizing the fulcrum, using photography to document the world in a manner no other medium can. The mechanics behind what the Bechers used were the very best available during their lifetime. As with most technology, photographic tools have only continued to improve over time. Fast-forward to 2009, when Katy Grannan began shooting with the finest digital camera. That, in combination with working in the brightest and most descriptive West Coast light buffered by a tinge of haze, produced images that have hit a mark very few artists can attain. Absolutely nothing is obscured, as she uses the highest definition to record her sitters’ faces, creating hyper-detailed portraits that cannot be ignored. Even as a perceptive citizen of the world, one might never notice the intricacies of another. Most of the time this is because we are too polite to blatantly stare at people. Being stared at is much like being evaluated, which among strangers is too personal an exchange. Walker Evans famously stated that it is important for photographers to stare in order to educate themselves. Grannan’s combination of new high-definition technology and raking light allows us to scrutinize the texture of a human face in a way I have never encountered before. Her images are well conceived; their execution is pristine and they are tack-sharp, containing multiple layers of information. Time and time again, you can look at them and see something new that you may have previously missed. Because of the richness of detail, your eye is constantly stimulated. With this work, you can stare as long as you like and learn as much as you want, fully satisfying the innate human curiosity within all of us. This is one of the glorious qualities of photography.

160


KATY GRANNAN (American, born 1969), Anonymous, Los Angeles, 2009, pigment print, 38 1/4 × 28 3/4 in.


INDEX TO THE PHOTOGRAPHERS

Adams, Robert, 96, 120

Koudelka, Josef, 76

Arbus, Diane, 64, 74

Lange, Dorothea, 34, 40

Atget, Eugène, 24

Leong, Sze Tsung NicolĂĄs, 150

Avedon, Richard, 98

Lerski, Helmar, 36

Baltz, Lewis, 106

Lutter, Vera, 158

Barth, Uta, 124

Meatyard, Ralph Eugene, 56

Becher, Bernd and Hilla, 60

Mermelstein, Jeff, 134

Bellocq, E. J., 20

Misrach, Richard, 102

Bernhard, Ruth, 50

Morris, Wright, 42

Burson, Nancy, 100

Mosley, Joshua, 152

Callahan, Harry, 54

Mullaney, Martina, 138

Cao Fei, 156

Muybridge, Eadweard, 14

Casebere, James, 128

Nickerson, Jackie, 116

Catanese, Melissa, 166

Nimoy, Leonard, 148

Clark, Larry, 82

Owens, Bill, 80

Cockburn, Julie, 172

Penn, Irving, 44

Demand, Thomas, 164

Photographer unknown, 48

Dijkstra, Rineke, 110

Probst, Barbara, 140

Disfarmer, Mike, 38

Ross, Judith Joy, 108

Eggleston, William, 78, 88

Ruwedel, Mark, 154

Evans, Walker, 30, 32

Sander, August, 26

Feldmann, Hans-Peter, 130

Shao Yinong and Mu Chen, 142

Frank, Robert, 52

Shore, Stephen, 84, 94

Friedlander, Lee, 66

Smith, Graham, 86

Goldberg, Jim, 92

Sultan, Larry, 104, 136

Goldblatt, David, 58

Tillmans, Wolfgang, 114

Grannan, Katy, 162

Umbehr, Otto (Umbo), 28

Hatakeyama, Naoya, 118, 122

Van der Molen, Awoiska, 174

Hido, Todd, 126

Wall, Jeff, 160

Hine, Lewis, 18

Wessel, Henry, 90

Kanaga, Consuelo, 46

Weston, Edward, 22

Kawauchi, Rinko, 170

Winogrand, Garry, 68, 70, 72

Klett, Mark, 146


CONTRIBUTORS


MAURIZIO ANZERI

DANIEL GORDON

PHILLIP MAISEL

NEIL SELKIRK

Italian, born 1969

American, born 1980

American, born 1981

British, born 1947

ROY ARDEN

PAUL GRAHAM

DHRUV MALHOTRA

PAUL SHAMBROOM

Canadian, born 1957

British, born 1956

Indian, born 1985

American, born 1956

VALÉRIE BELIN

JITKA HANZLOVÁ

SCOTT MCFARLAND

STEPHEN SHORE

French, born 1964

Czech, born 1958

Canadian, born 1975

American, born 1947

NANCY BURSON

ANTHONY HERNANDEZ

JEFF MERMELSTEIN

PAUL ANTHONY SMITH

American, born 1948

American, born 1947

American, born 1957

Jamaican, born 1988

MELISSA CATANESE

TODD HIDO

JOEL MEYEROWITZ

TABITHA SOREN

American, born 1979

American, born 1968

American, born 1938

American, born 1967

MICHAL CHELBIN

PIETER HUGO

ABELARDO MORELL

ALEC SOTH

Israeli, born 1974

South African, born 1976

Cuban, born 1948

American, born 1969

JOHN CHIARA

TIM HYDE

JACKIE NICKERSON

CINTHYA SOTO

American, born 1971

American, born 1968

American, born 1960

Costa Rican, born 1969

JULIE COCKBURN

VERONIKA KELLNDORFER

REBECCA NORRIS WEBB

MARK STEINMETZ

British, born 1966

German, born 1962

American, born 1956

American, born 1961

LINDA CONNOR

MARK KLETT

EVA O’LEARY

JOEL STERNFELD

American, born 1944

American, born 1952

Irish-American, born 1989

American, born 1944

SOFÍA CÓRDOVA

OWEN KYDD

CATHERINE OPIE

MIKHAEL SUBOTZKY

Puerto Rican, born 1985

Canadian, born 1975

American, born 1961

South African, born 1981

BINH DANH

AN-MY LÊ

ED PANAR

ED TEMPLETON

Vietnamese American, born 1977

Vietnamese American, born 1960

American, born 1976

American, born 1972

SCOTT B. DAVIS

RICHARD LEAROYD

MARTIN PARR

HANK WILLIS THOMAS

American, born 1971

British, born 1966

British, born 1952

American, born 1976

ERICA DEEMAN

AUSTIN LEONG

MIMI PLUMB

BRIAN ULRICH

British, born 1977

Chinese American, born 1990

American, born 1953

American, Born 1971

JANET DELANEY

SZE TSUNG NICOLÁS LEONG

ROBERT POLIDORI

AWOISKA VAN DER MOLEN

American, born 1952

British Mexican American, born 1970

Canadian, born 1951

Dutch, born 1972

THOMAS DEMAND

JEFF CHIEN-HSING LIAO

DANIEL POSTAER

STEPHEN WADDELL

German, born 1964

Taiwanese, born 1977

American, born 1978

Canadian, born 1968

JOHN DIVOLA

MATT LIPPS

MARK POWER

JEFF WALL

American, born 1949

American, born 1975

British, born 1959

Canadian, born 1946

KOTA EZAWA

REAGAN LOUIE

BARBARA PROBST

ALEX WEBB

Japanese German American, born 1969

American, born 1951

German, born 1964

American, born 1952

LUCAS FOGLIA

DEBORAH LUSTER

MARK RUWEDEL

DONOVAN WYLIE

American, born 1983

American, born 1951

American, born 1954

Irish, born 1971

JIM GOLDBERG

VERA LUTTER

BRYAN SCHUTMAAT

American, born 1953

German, born 1960

American, born 1983


PHOTOGRAPHY CREDITS Robert Adams: © Robert Adams, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Diane Arbus: © The Estate of Diane Arbus / Richard Avedon: photograph by Richard Avedon © The Richard Avedon Foundation / Uta Barth: © Uta Barth, courtesy the artist and Tanya Bonakdar Gallery, New York/Los Angeles / Bernd and Hilla Becher: © Estate Bernd and Hilla Becher, represented by Max Becher; courtesy Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – Bernd and Hilla Becher Archive, Cologne, 2019 / E. J. Bellocq: © Lee Friedlander, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Ruth Bernhard: reproduced with permission of the Ruth Bernhard Archive, Princeton University Art Museum. © Trustees of Princeton University / Nancy Burson: © Nancy Burson, courtesy the artist / Harry Callahan: © The Estate of Harry Callahan; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Cao Fei: © Cao Fei, courtesy Cao Fei and Vitamin Creative Space / James Casebere: © James Casebere, courtesy the artist and Sean Kelly, New York / Melissa Catanese: © Melissa Catanese, courtesy the artist / Larry Clark: © Larry Clark, courtesy the artist and Luhring Augustine, New York / Julie Cockburn: © Julie Cockburn, courtesy the artist / Thomas Demand: © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Rineke Dijkstra: © Rineke Dijkstra, courtesy the artist and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York / Mike Disfarmer: © Peter Miller for Disfarmer, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York / William Eggleston: © Eggleston Artistic Trust, courtesy Eggleston Artistic Trust and David Zwirner / Walker Evans: © Walker Evans Archive, The Metropolitan Museum of Art / Hans-Peter Feldmann: © Hans-Peter Feldmann, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York / Robert Frank: © Robert Frank, from The Americans; courtesy Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York / Lee Friedlander: © Lee Friedlander, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Jim Goldberg: © Jim Goldberg, courtesy the artist; Pace/ MacGill Gallery, New York; and Casemore Kirkeby, San Francisco / David Goldblatt: © The David Goldblatt Legacy Trust / Katy Grannan: © Katy Grannan, courtesy the artist; Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco; and Salon 94, New York / Naoya Hatakeyama: © Naoya Hatakeyama, courtesy Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo / Todd Hido: © Todd Hido, courtesy the artist / Rinko Kawauchi: © Rinko Kawauchi, courtesy ROSEGALLERY, Santa Monica / Mark Klett: © Mark Klett, courtesy the artist / Dorothea Lange: © The Dorothea Lange Collection, the Oakland Museum of California. Gift of Paul S. Taylor / Sze Tsung Nicolás Leong: © Sze Tsung Nicolás Leong, courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York / Helmar Lerski: © Estate Helmar Lerski, Museum Folkwang, Essen / Vera Lutter: © Vera Lutter, courtesy the artist and Galerie Max Hetzler / Ralph Eugene Meatyard: © The Estate of Ralph Eugene Meatyard, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco / Jeff Mermelstein: © Jeff Mermelstein, courtesy the artist / Richard Misrach: © Richard Misrach, courtesy the artist; Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco; Pace/MacGill Gallery, New York; and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles / Wright Morris: © Estate of Wright Morris, courtesy the Center for Creative Photography / Joshua Mosley: © Joshua Mosley, courtesy the artist / Martina Mullaney: © Martina Mullaney, courtesy Yossi Milo Gallery, New York / The Museum of Modern Art: Photo: Cait Carouge. © The Museum of Modern Art/ Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY / Jackie Nickerson: © Jackie Nickerson, courtesy the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery, New York / Leonard Nimoy: © Estate of Leonard Nimoy, courtesy R. Michelson Galleries, Northampton, MA / Bill Owens: © Bill Owens, courtesy the artist / Irving Penn: © The Irving Penn Foundation / Barbara Probst: © Barbara Probst / Judith Joy Ross: © Judith Joy Ross, courtesy Galerie Thomas Zander, Cologne / Mark Ruwedel: © Mark Ruwedel, courtesy the artist and Gallery Luisotti, Santa Monica / August Sander: © Die Photographische Sammlung/SK Stiftung Kultur – August Sander Archive, Cologne; ARS, New York, 2019 / Shao Yinong and Mu Chen: © Shao Yinong and Mu Chen / Stephen Shore: © Stephen Shore, courtesy 303 Gallery, New York / Graham Smith: © Graham Smith, courtesy Augusta Edwards Fine Art, London / Mikhael Subotzky: © Mikhael Subotzky, courtesy the artist and Goodman Gallery, Johannesburg / Larry Sultan: © Estate of Larry Sultan / Wolfgang Tillmans: © Wolfgang Tillmans, courtesy David Zwirner, New York; Galerie Buchholz, Berlin/Cologne; and Maureen Paley, London / Otto Umbehr (Umbo): © 2019 Phyllis Umbehr/Galerie Kicken Berlin / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn / Awoiska van der Molen: © Awoiska van der Molen, courtesy the artist / Jeff Wall: © Jeff Wall, courtesy the artist / Henry Wessel: © Henry Wessel / Edward Weston: © 1981 Center for Creative Photography, Arizona Board of Regents / Garry Winogrand: © Estate of Garry Winogrand, courtesy Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco


Creative Director and Editor: Allie Haeusslein Pre-Press Management: Ry Allred Duotone and CMYK Separations: Ry Allred Editorial Associate: Mari Iki Design: Bob Aufuldish, Aufuldish & Warinner Copy Editors: Amanda Glesmann, Lindsey Westbrook Print Management: Sprinkel Media Pier 24 Photography Staff Director: Christopher McCall Associate Director: Allie Haeusslein Head of Operations: Ry Allred Guest Services Manager: Mari Iki This publication would not have been possible without the generous contributions of the Pier 24 Photography volunteer and intern team. ISBN: 978-1-59711-006-8 Printed in 2019 in the United States Š 2019 Pier 24 Photography and the authors. All rights reserved. No part of this book may be reproduced in any manner whatsoever without the prior written permission of the publisher and copyright holders. p. 2: Larry Sultan, Untitled Home Movie Still, from the series Pictures from Home, 1983–92, detail


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Photographers Looking at Photographs: 75 Pictures from the Pilara Foundation  

Photographers Looking at Photographs: 75 Pictures from the Pilara Foundation  

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