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PIEDMONT COLLEGE

JOURNAL

SPRING 2014 | Volume 7, Number 1

NATIONAL FOUNDATION SELECTS PIEDMONT

FOR GEORGIA STEM TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS

PIEDMONT COLLEGE

JOURNAL President James F. Mellichamp

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Vice President for Advancement Amy Amason

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Director of Special Projects and Community Relations William S. Loyd Director of Public Relations David Price Graphic Design Specialist Regina M. Fried Director of Development Justin Scali

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President’s Message Piedmont mission of inquiry and service being realized on several fronts

Associate Director of Alumni Relations Katie Porter Coordinator of Development Services Debbie Zimmerman Website Coordinator Brian Carter

Published by the Office of Institutional Advancement

Third class postage paid at Gainesville, Georgia Published Semi-Annually Send Address Changes to: Piedmont College Institutional Advancement P.O. Box 429 Demorest GA 30535 or www.piedmont.edu/updateinfo

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Cover Story

Improving STEM teaching in Georgia

Lillian Smith ‘Encounter’ Playwright Brenda Bynum brings Lillian Smith to life in one-woman show

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Alumni Spotlight

Michael Mansfield checks off goal of earning business degree

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‘Darkness’ earns Time Spotlight Religion professor Barbara Brown Taylor featured in back-to-back Time magazine issues

Northeast Georgia Wine

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Students helping vineyards with social media advertising

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Paddle Faster Stanton Collins looking for kayaking gold at 2016 Olympics

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What’s Up Doc? Lydie Koffi hopes music degree will help her give back to Ivory Coast

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Commencement Collage Undergraduate and Graduate Commencement scenes

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Alumni Weekend Six alumni singled out for awards during annual return to campus

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Fine Arts Spring semester sparkles with theatre, music, can fine arts events

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School of Nursing and Health Sciences Adds three new programs

AA thletics recap of the winter and spring

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sports seasons

32 Class Notes

35 Obituaries

Pomona and Sherman Oaks, Calif. Piedmont College’s Butman Professor of Religion, Barbara Brown Taylor, joined distinguished lecturers from Claremont Graduate University and the Claremont School of Theology to explore “The Dignity of Difference: Being Christian In A Multi-faith World.” You may have seen that Barbara Brown Taylor and her newest book, Learning To Walk in the Dark, were featured on the cover of the April 28 edition of Time magazine, and she has been named in Time magazine’s annual list of “The 100 Most Influential People in the World.” We are so fortunate to have her as part of our “world class” faculty.

President James Mellichamp, with members of his ‘Kitchen Cabinet,’ Lola and Mamie.

PRESIDENT’S MESSAGE Before he was President of the United States, Woodrow Wilson was President of Princeton University. A scholarly man, Wilson earned a BA degree from Princeton, a law degree from the University of Virginia, and a PhD from Johns Hopkins. He taught five years at two small colleges before becoming a professor and then President of his alma mater in 1902. While a professor, Woodrow Wilson coined the motto for Princeton University as “Princeton in the Nation’s Service.” In this edition of the Journal, we are thrilled to announce that the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation has chosen Piedmont College as one of only five institutions in Georgia to participate in a national program to produce superior middle and high school teachers in the areas of science, technology, engineering and math. Georgia is only the fourth state to benefit from the Woodrow Wilson Fellowship program, and this is a great honor and opportunity for Piedmont College. We are deeply indebted to The Robert W. Woodruff Foundation for the funding that makes the Woodrow Wilson Fellows possible in Georgia. This is a great honor and opportunity for Piedmont College.

As usual, the Journal is also brimming with highlights of theatre productions, art shows and activities where our outstanding students and faculty showcase their skills in the community, with area businesses and in regional and national competitions – both academic and athletic. Piedmont College is “world class” in many ways! We always celebrate when our Piedmont College alumni return to campus, and the 2014 Alumni Weekend was no different. Inside you will learn about our fun and successful Alumni Weekend with photos, Alumni Association Award winners and a special spotlight on PC Alum Mike Mansfield, who has made his mark as a business leader. Princeton University President Woodrow Wilson believed the goal of academic endeavors was service. If you read this issue of the Journal carefully you’ll find Piedmont College’s mission of inquiry, service, and legacy realized on every page. Enjoy!

Much like Princeton, Piedmont College is dedicated to bringing its excellence and distinction in the form of service, to the world as well as the state of Georgia. Inside, you will also find a story about Piedmont College’s late February trek to the west coast to present the 7th Annual Religion and the Liberal Arts Conference in partnership with Congregational churches in

Dr. James F. Mellichamp

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NATIONAL FOUNDATION SELECTS PIEDMONT

FOR GEORGIA STEM TEACHING FELLOWSHIPS expects to add more than 200,000 STEM-related jobs, a 17-percent increase over current levels. “In fact, despite an unemployment rate that hovers around 7 percent, there are currently two available STEM jobs for every unemployed person, compared to one non-STEM job for every 4.5 people,” said Dr. Dana Rickman, Director of Policy and Research for the Partnership.

How do you turn a scientist into a teacher? That is the essential task of a Piedmont College group that is developing a new teacher education program for science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals who want to make the switch from the lab, research facility, or industry to a classroom of middle or high school students in an urban or rural school. Piedmont is one of five Georgia colleges tapped by the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation of Princeton, N.J., to take part in a pilot program designed to staff more Georgia high school science classes with teachers trained in both the STEM fields and pedagogy. The other institutions include Columbus State University, Georgia State University, Kennesaw State University, and Mercer University.

The participating universities each will receive $400,000 matching grants to develop their teacher preparation programs based on standards set by the Foundation. Fellows accepted into the program will receive a $30,000 stipend to help them earn a master’s degree with certification to teach in one of the STEM areas, and they will receive a year of intensive in-school teacher preparation. The participating colleges will also support and mentor the new teachers throughout their three-year teaching commitment in a high-need school. Dr. Julie Palmour, Associate Dean of the School of Education and Project Director for the Woodrow Wilson program at Piedmont said a group of about 15 faculty members have been meeting regularly since the program was announced March 3 by Gov. Nathan Deal. In addition to the Woodrow Wilson Foundation, the program is being funded in Georgia by the Woodruff Foundation through the Georgia Partnership for Excellence in Education. According to information from the Georgia Partnership, by 2018 the state

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“However, to adequately prepare students for these jobs, Georgia needs qualified teachers delivering instruction in the classrooms,” Rickman said. “Concerns regarding the quality of our educator workforce have long been understood as the most critical component affecting student achievement.” Rickman said that in recent years as few as 12 percent of teachers trained in Georgia have been middle and highschool STEM teachers, while nearly half of the state’s teaching vacancies are in those positions. Urban and rural schools generally have a greater need for STEM teachers, as these schools often struggle to recruit and retain accomplished teachers in these fields. Palmour said the goal of the Fellowship program then is to tap into the pool of STEM experts who may be newly graduated from college or working in industry and provide a path for them to receive training as teachers and to support them once they enter the classroom. “When they leave Piedmont College, we want our Fellows to be transformed from STEM experts into STEM teachers,” she said.

Left: Piedmont Trustee Martha Cantrell, President James Mellichamp, Gov. Nathan Deal, Woodrow Wilson Foundation President Arthur Levine, Vice President for Academic Affairs Perry Rettig, and Senior Fellow in Education Patricia McCollum following the March 3 announcement of the new Woodrow Wilson Georgia Teaching Fellowship program.

Dr. Don Gnecco, Dean of the School of Education, said one reason Piedmont was selected was because of its long history of conducting master’s and specialist programs in education. “We also have a great working relationship with school systems across the state because of our existing off-campus graduate education programs,” Gnecco said. “That will help us place the Fellows in schools that can best benefit from the particular expertise that they bring to the classroom.” The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation identifies and develops leaders and institutions to meet the nation’s most critical challenges. It traces its roots back to 1945, when professors at Princeton University realized that the U.S. would need qualified science professors to teach the large number of former soldiers who entered college through the GI Bill after World War II. Since then, the foundation, named for the U.S. president who was also president of Princeton, has changed the emphasis of its fellowship program as educational needs have changed, and is focusing at present on closing the nation’s achievement gap through preparing

teachers and school leaders. The first Woodrow Wilson Fellows will enroll at Piedmont as early as summer of 2015. Palmour said applicants will enroll in the program directly through the Woodrow Wilson Foundation. For more information, prospective applicants can contact Palmour at jpalmour@ piedmont. edu or visit www.piedmont.edu/ woodrow. General information about the Woodrow Wilson Foundation and the Fellowship is also available at www.woodrow.org/georgia, and questions about the larger program can be directed to wwteachingfellowship@ woodrow.org.

Producing high quality STEM teachers in Georgia is the goal of the new Woodrow Wilson Foundation Program. Pictured with geology professor, Dr. Deb Dooley, Abby Atkinson, Scott Guthrie.

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A LILLIAN SMITH “ENCOUNTER” ENTHRALLS UGA AUDIENCE... 4

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Georgia Humanities Council President Jamil Zainaldin, with Brenda Bynum and Piedmont President James Mellichamp following Bynum’s performance at the University of Georgia.

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pproximately 200 people attended an evening performance by Brenda Bynum of Jordan is So Chilly: An Encounter with Lillian Smith Feb. 22 in the auditorium of the Russell Building Special Collections Library at the University of Georgia. The event was sponsored by Piedmont College, UGA Libraries, and the Georgia Humanities Council. Bynum has given this performance at several venues since its debut on April 20, 2013, at the Rearden Theater of Rabun GapNacoochee School, an event that was presented by the Lillian E. Smith Center for a tri-state literary festival sponsored by the Southern Literary Trail. An actor and director in Atlanta since 1973, Brenda Bynum served as the Acting Teacher for the

nationally-known Professional Intern Program at the Alliance Theater in Atlanta. From 1983 to 2000 she was a Resident Artist and member of the faculty at Emory University in the Department of Theater Studies. The one-woman play is based on published and unpublished writings and dialogue from Lillian Smith. “For me, it has been a true labor of love to bring her back to life in this way,” Bynum said. “I have been extremely gratified by the responses to her story, particularly from the many people who are hearing her story for the first time. What I want is for her name to be as familiar to any reading Georgian (and beyond) as the names of Flannery O'Connor, Carson McCullers, Alice Walker, and even Margaret Mitchell. A Lillian Smith renaissance is far overdue.”

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ALUMNI SPOTLIGHT MICHAEL MANSFIELD ’09

Going back to college helped a Gainesville CEO close a door and open some new opportunities Michael Mansfield Sr. is a genuine captain of industry with a dream job as CEO of an international company. So why did he drop everything three nights a week to return to college? “I wanted to graduate before my kids did,” Michael said. And he did—well, actually it was a tie. The chairman and chief executive officer of Mansfield Energy in Gainesville, Ga., earned his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Business Administration from Piedmont College in Athens in 2009, the same year his son graduated from the University of the South. Michael said he had always planned to finish his degree, but work and a career that now sees him flying all over North America intervened. “At 21, I dropped out of Georgia State in my senior year,” he said. “I wanted to work.” And he did, in 1981 joining Mansfield Oil, the company his parents had founded in Gainesville in 1957. When Michael came on board, the company had about 20 employees and served Hall and surrounding counties. “Mansfield was a traditional start-up company, like thousands of other small jobbers that began between World War II and the 1960s to provide gasoline, heating oil, motor oil and lubricants to local markets,” Michael said. “I did a little bit of everything, but mostly sales and marketing.” In 1989, Michael bought the company and began to focus on supply chain management. By eliminating inefficiencies in the supply chain,

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Mansfield and its customers could both benefit. “Our niche is the ‘last mile’ of the fuel supply chain,” he said. “We buy refined products and distribute them to end users throughout North America. Our customers are entities like county commissions, police forces, and school boards.” Companies like PepsiCo also depend on Mansfield to fuel its nationwide fleet of 100,000 delivery trucks. It sounds simple enough, but the petroleum industry is such a volatile market that developments half a world away will reverberate through the supply chain in a matter of minutes, changing prices and influencing customers’ needs and decisions. That is where Mansfield Energy excels. “We were an early adopter of technology,” Michael said. “We employ technology in every corner of our business, and it gives us a good perspective on how to take on and manage risk. We now have more IT people than sales people—clever, creative people who stay close to the customer to determine what they need, when they need it, and where they need it. We created a proprietary system and provide the technology for our customers to streamline their business.” That system has helped Mansfield Energy grow steadily, and in the last 20 years it has grown exponentially. Expanding from its northeast Georgia roots, the company now employs more than 500 workers and provides services in all 50 U.S. states and 13 Canadian provinces. Last year, Mansfield recorded some $8 billion in sales of traditional petroleum products, synthetic fuels, biofuels, propane, and natural gas. It now holds the #41 spot on Forbes’ list of America’s Largest Private Companies—moving up 13 places from

2012 to 2013. And while the corporate headquarters, with about 360 people, remains in Gainesville, Mansfield has regional offices in Chicago, Detroit, Denver, Los Angeles, Houston, Bloomington, and Calgary.

SO WHAT HAS MADE MANSFIELD ENERGY GROW? Michael said it is more than the focus on technology. “It is our core values. We have an agreed upon set of corporate values—what we stand for and what we don’t stand for,” he said. “It is a common touch point for how we deal with customers and with each other.” Those values are Conscientiousness, Innovation, Integrity, Personal Service, and Excellence. “They are part of our culture. We strive to incorporate them into every meeting, every decision, and into our strategic planning processes,” he said. And so while Mansfield Energy has won industrywide awards for its innovations in technology and entrepreneurism, its values have also shaped its contributions to the community, including sponsorship of the annual Mansfield Golf Classic, which since its inception 28 years ago has raised more than $3.7 million for the Muscular Dystrophy Association.

I live in Athens, so Piedmont’s Athens campus was convenient for me.” Still, he said, with his work schedule, going to class from 5:50–9:50 p.m. three days a week for 18 months was “grueling.” Michael said none of his fellow students in the business courses knew he was CEO of a major corporation, and the professors treated him like any other student. “I think the hardest work was statistics and financial modeling,” he said. “I don’t think of myself as a math guy, so doing the PV equations on a TI calculator and learning about regression analysis were probably the toughest tasks.” “The professors were engaged, seasoned, and available at any time to answer questions,” Michael said. “They understand what is going on in the real world, and they showed a great amount of concern for their students. I think

“The professors were engaged, seasoned, and available at any time to answer questions,” Michael said. “They understand what is going on in the real world, and they showed a great amount of concern for their students. I think that comes when you have professors who are teachers first and pursuing their own interests comes second.”

Still, it was that unfinished college degree that bothered Michael. “It had been on my mind, since I didn’t finish, to check that off and get it behind me,” he said. “Piedmont made that possible.

that comes when you have professors who are teachers first and pursuing their own interests comes second.” “And I have applied the things I learned to the business,” Michael said. ‘Some of the more (Continued on Page 26)

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PIEDMONT COLLEGE 2013-14 The Rev. Barbara

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Dignity of Difference,” examined what it means to be Christian in a multi-faith world. Speakers at the conference included Jeffrey Kuan, President of the Claremont School of Theology ; and Tammi Schneider, Professor of Religion and

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mni Park/Congregational Circle missions Office ess Center Gallery kstore lands Park tens Center on Georgia Street lace Residence Hall anson Residence Hall

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22 Mayflower Residence Hall College alumni and friends

Purcell Residence Hall Mize Athletic Center and Museum Walker Athletic Fields Loudermilk Stadium Plymouth Residence Hall New Bedford Residence Hall The Retreat

by showing your support with your gift today!

Swanson Center for Performing April 9, the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of ArtsOnand Communications Pedestrian OverpassBookstore hosted a reception, Art and Piedmont Arrendale Amphitheatre reading, and book-signing for Taylor to celebrate Maintenance North the Recreation release of herComplex 13th book, Learning to Walk Anagama Kiln in the Dark, published by HarperCollins. Within Smith-Williams Art Studios days of its release, the book, which examines Ipswich Hall

people’s fears and prejudices about the dark, became a runaway best seller after it was featured

You can give a gift by using the enclosed envelope or online.

on the cover of Time magazine and the cover of Christian Century magazine. MSNBC’s “Morning Joe” television show featured Time’s managing editor Nancy Gibbs and a panel of journalists discussing Taylor’s book. To cap it off, on April 24, Taylor learned that Time had included her on its annual list of “100 Most Influential People in the World.”

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www.piedmont.edu/giving | THE PIEDMONT COLLEGE JOURNAL

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Our own TIME 100

Barbara Brown Taylor signs her new book for a fan during a reception at Piedmont’s MasonScharfenstein Museum of Art in Demorest.

Pictured from left at the Pomona conference are the Rev. Barbara Brown Taylor, Jeffrey Kuan, Tammi Schneider, and President James Mellichamp. SPRING 2014

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UNCO

GEOR Piedmont College Forensics and Debate team members include, front from left, Hannah Thomas, Katheryn Knarr, and Ethan McGowan; back: Sam Thomas, coach Janice Moss, Sarah Smagur, and Brandon Callahan. Not pictured are Rusty Crumley and Augusta Gailey.

No argument here! Forensics, Debate Teams win After taking home three first-place awards at the Georgia forensics tournament held recently at Southern Polytechnic State University in Marietta, three Piedmont College students traveled to Eastern Michigan University April 18-19 to compete in the National Forensics Association Championship Tournament. At the state tourney, Katheryn Knarr, a senior from Chickamauga, captured first place in both Editorial Impromptu speaking and won the Forensics Pentathalon, which included separate scores for Editorial Impromptu (second), Impromptu (fourth), Poetry (fourth), Persuasion (fifth) and Informative speaking (fourth). This is Knarr’s third consecutive firstplace finish at the Georgia Intercollegiate Forensics Association State Championship. Sarah Smagur, a junior from Clarkesville, won first place in Poetry, fifth in Editorial Impromptu, and seventh in Impromptu. Teammate Brittany Sharer, a freshman from Pendergrass, took fifth place in Poetry and seventh in Editorial Impromptu speaking at her first state tournament. At the national tournament, Knarr participated in eight preliminary rounds in impromptu speaking and placed second in round two with a score of 97. She also placed fifth in the seventh round with a score of 94. Smagur competed in eight poetry preliminary rounds and placed second in round two with a score of 99. The team is coached by Piedmont speech professor Dr. Janice Moss, who also coaches the school’s Debate Team, which scored some recent victories at the 2014 Georgia Parliamentary Debate Association State Championship tournament, also held April 18-19 at Morehouse College in Atlanta. (Continued on Page 26)

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They may not be able to buy it, but Piedmont College students are helping one of north Georgia’s growth industries to sell their product—wine. Vineyards have been taking the place of apple orchards in north Georgia for more than 30 years, but the viticulture industry still has a way to go when it comes to marketing Georgia wines to the rest of the nation and the world, says Dr. John Misner, dean of Piedmont’s Walker School of Business. That may change as Piedmont business students are helping area vineyards expand not only their wine sales but also collateral businesses such as dining and event hosting, using a mix of traditional and social media marketing techniques. Misner said the multi-semester project started about 18 months ago when he and Walker School professor Dr. Ed Taylor were looking for industries close to the Demorest campus that would be ideal partners for the Piedmont Business Resource Center, a joint project of the college and the Habersham County Chamber of Commerce.

RKING NORTHEAST

R GIA WINE SALES It was clear from the trends that wine production was growing steadily in the area. Until the late 1970s, there were almost no wineries in north Georgia using European varietal grapes. Then a few entrepreneurial vintners in Ringgold, Cartersville, and Clarkesville corked their first bottles of wine using north Georgia-grown fruit, and a veritable gold rush in winemaking began. Today, there are more than 20 wineries in northeast Georgia, ranging from small mom-and-pop vintners to the nationally known Chateau Elan in Braselton. There are many more growers who provide grapes to the wineries, and the statewide production is now estimated at $400 million per year. “These are mostly small businesses and they face the same concerns and struggles that all small businesses face,” Misner said. The business students first conducted a study of the entire industry. “We used students from all the academic areas—marketing, finance, accounting, and management,” Misner said. “They looked at the history of wine making in the area, the demographics, and the demand. Others studied the science of viticulture to understand that piece of the puzzle, and some looked at the common threads among the different wineries: what services they were offering, such as production, tasting, dining, and weddings.” Since then the class, which is known as Marketing 4425, has begun working with individual wineries, including Tiger Mountain Vineyards, Stonewall Creek, and 12 Spies Vineyards, all around Clayton, to help improve their sales and brand recognition. This past fall semester, the students prepared a 50-

page marketing plan for Stonewall Creek that included surveys of restaurants and advertising studies to explore ways the winery can expand its sales in the Athens and Atlanta markets. During the current spring semester, a second group of students is preparing a similar study for the 12 Spies Vineyards just south of Clayton. Chris Goershel of Kennesaw and Tyler Marcinko of Ontario, Canada are both students in the class. “It is a great opportunity to work on a marketing plan that has real-world impact,” Goershel said. “It lets us get our toes wet in the type of things we’ll be doing after Piedmont.” Marcinko agreed that it was valuable experience to “meet with the winery owners and have them explain what they do and why, and how they market now.”

to find out what recommendations the students would have in the area of online advertising. “Especially with this group that came in—the awareness that this generation has with social media will give us a great leg up as opposed to us having to learn it,” he said. 12 Spies owners Lisa Romanello (left) and Mike Brown (right) with Chris Goershel, professor Ray Kreiner, and Tyler Marcinko, examine budding grape vines at the vineyard near Clayton.

At the end of the semester, the students will present their new plan to the winery owners Mike Brown and Lisa Romanello. “I think this is a great program,” Brown said. “It gives the students an opportunity to examine a real-life business.” Brown said he was interested

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PADDLE FASTER!

Stanton Collins, right and inset, and Chris Miller at the 2013 World Championships held in Welland, Canada. 12

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Piedmont sophomore Stanton Collins paddling toward 2016 Olympic games

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s a sophomore business student, Stanton Collins’ routine at Piedmont is the same as most students—except for the twice-a-day workouts to hone his flatwater kayaking skills for the upcoming 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.

Currently competing in one and two-man kayak events for paddlers under age 23, Collins has a string of national championships under his belt in events ranging from the 200-meter sprint to the grueling 5,000-meter races. Most recently, he and his kayaking partner, Chris Miller of Gainesville, a student at North Georgia College, took first place in the 200-meter race at the U.S. National Championships held in Oklahoma City, Okla. They then went on the World Championships held Aug. 1-3, 2013 in Welland, Canada, where they finished 14th.

PAN-AM GAMES Looking ahead, Collins and Miller will head back to Oklahoma to compete in the National Team Trials, which will determine who will qualify for the Pan American Championships to be held in Mexico City in September 2014. After that is the Pan-Am Games 2015 to be held in Welland, which will in turn determine the qualifiers for the 2016 Olympics. Competing in the Rio Olympics would bring Collins full circle, because it was the 1996 Atlanta Olympics that are responsible for his interest in kayaking in the first place. The flatwater kayaking and canoe events for 1996 were held on Lake Lanier, and the venue is now home to the Lake Lanier Canoe and Kayak Club, where Collins got his first taste of paddling in middle school. He had previously played soccer and football, but age 13, he joined the Development Team and soon kayaking took over. “I just knew it was fun, and so I slowly switched from school sports to kayaking,” he said.

WORLD CLASS KAYAKER By his junior year at North Hall High School, Collins was already a world-class kayaker, taking home eight medals in the 2011 National Championships, including four first-place finishes in one- and two-man kayaking. Getting this far has not been easy. Each weekday, Collins puts in one to two hours of weight training and running each morning, and each afternoon finds him on Lake Lanier for “easy paddling.” On Saturdays, he and Miller run “time controls,” simulating actual 200-meter and 1,000-meter races. Collins said he is concentrating more on the two-man events. “I think that is our best shot at the Olympics.” Hopefully, Collins will not be the only member of the Lake Lanier Club at the 2016 Olympics. There are four or five other (Continued on Page 24)

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WHAT’S UP, DOC? Lydie Koffi has plans to make the Ivory Coast and her parents proud Lydie Koffi (’14) remembers playing on the beaches of her native Ivory Coast, and she remembers the aroma of food cooking in her family’s home near Abidjan, a metropolis of three million people and the largest city in the West African nation. “And I remember going to church a lot,” she said. “My dad was a pastor and the church was a playground for me.”

loved Bugs Bunny, and my first English words were, ‘What’s up, Doc?’” They then moved to Tucker, Ga., where Lydie began elementary school, and she later graduated from Grayson High School in Loganville. At Grayson, music teacher Reneé Wicker told her about Piedmont College. “After my first visit, I was sure this was where I wanted to go,” Lydie said. A music major, Lydie was a four-year member of the Piedmont Singers, and she performed in musical theatre productions, including “Anything Goes” and “South Pacific.” She also studied piano and now plays for the worship services at her father’s church in Tucker.

Lydie with her parents, Felicité and Francois Koffi, after her senior capstone performance.

Then in 1995, her parents made a hard decision. They would come to the U.S., where Lydie’s father was helping to organize a ministry for Frenchspeaking immigrants from West Africa. As the youngest, five-year-old Lydie came with them, but her older siblings remained behind. She and her parents, Felicité and Francois, first settled in Charlotte, N.C., and that is where Lydie attended kindergarten and began learning English. Her parents mostly spoke French at home, “but I watched a lot of cartoons,” she said with a laugh. “I

“The music department was definitely my family, too,” she said. “When I first met Dr. [Wallace] Hinson, it really felt like home. I love the professors. They are the smartest people you will ever meet, and so talented and so humble. It is not just a job for them. When I came to Piedmont, finances were an issue. But Dr. Hinson assured me that everything would be OK. I took a leap of faith, and it came true.” Lydie was named this year’s winner of the Charles Spence Citizenzhip Award. Among other awards, she received the Lachicotte-Strickland Scholarship, established by the Habersham County Alliance for African-American Music. She also worked as a resident assistant (RA) in Getman-Babcock Hall for freshman women. “For me the most rewarding part of being at Piedmont was being an RA,” Lydie said. “Talking and working with the freshman girls,

it is a great feeling to know you can have some sort of positive impact on someone’s life. I call them ‘My Little Sisters.’” Lydie graduated in May and plans to remain at Piedmont to earn a master’s degree in music education. She credits her parents for being the main impetus to her success so far. “It means a lot that I have parents who care that much and put their daughter first,” she said. “I hope I can make them proud.” Lydie said her dream is to someday return to the Ivory Coast she remembers so fondly and begin a fine arts program for children there. “I want to offer the same opportunities to kids in Ivory Coast that I got here. I want to learn what I can here and then take that back and make Ivory Coast better, to have some positive impact on the country.”

A music major, Lydie has performed in a number of musical theatre events while at Piedmont and is pictured here with Matt McClure in Anything Goes!

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Commencement WEEKEND

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Faculty Marshal Dr. Ralph ‘Buzz’ Singer

lead the procession of faculty members during Commencement. The long-time history professor is retiring after 42 years at Piedmont.

Will Schofield, Superintendent of the Hall

County School System, addressed the afternoon Commencement, which included some 300 graduates receiving master’s, specialist, and doctoral degrees

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Joel Silverberg of Knoxville, Tenn., and Jesse Sutton of Buford are captured for posterity while waiting to march into the Cave Arena at the Johnny Mize Center for undergraduate Commencement.

Maddie Haymore of Gainesville is all

smiles after earning her Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree. She was one of 38 student nurses to graduate this semester.

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 joki Nicole Coleman of Powder Springs N and Lillian Baxley of Atlanta share a moment after graduation with theatre professors Bill Gabelhausen and Kathy Blandin. Coleman earned degrees in mass communications and theatre arts, and Baxley was also a double major in theatre arts and design and technical theatre.

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Linda Scott, Dean of the Daniel School of Nursing and Health Sciences, presented pins to 38 graduating student nurses, including Janelly Albino of Braselton, during a special ceremony held May 1 in the Swanson Center.

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Undergraduate business administration

graduates Quinton Deaton of Winder, Ashley Fannon of Ball Ground, and Jasmine Haley of Lavonia await their turn to march across the stage and receive their diplomas.

During the Bacclaureate service, Brian

Horton of Community Bank and Trust and Dr. James Mellichamp presented the H.M. Stewart Sr. Award of Excellence to Taylor Sexton of Danielsville. The award goes to the top honor graduate each year.

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At the undergraduate Commencement, honorary doctorates were presented to the speaker, Dr. Jamil Zainaldin, president of the Georgia Humanities Council (left), and to Baccalaureate speaker The Rev. Dr. James Gertmenian, senior minister of Plymouth Congregational Church in Minneapolis, Minn.

N  icholas Johnson of Kingsland leaves the Mize Center after picking up his BA degree in music.

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President James Mellichamp and

Board Chairman Thomas A. ‘Gus’ Arrendale III lead the platform party off stage following the undergraduate Commencement ceremony.

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 anielle Maffett of Villa Rica graduated D magna cum laude with a BS degree in biology.

Alumni Weekend 2014

The Piedmont College Alumni Association singled out four graduates for special honors during the annual Alumni Weekend held April 4–6 in Demorest. The late O.L. “Kal” Kelehear (‘52) of Dalton earned the group’s Distinguished Alumni Award, while Tony McCullers (‘00, MAT ‘01) of Monroe was honored with the Excellence in Education Award. Deloris Mullins (‘58) of Dacula received the Alumni Service Award, and Anthony Baldridge (‘06) of Berkeley, Calif., was selected for the Pacesetter Award.

The Alumni Association singled out four graduates for special honors during the annual Alumni Weekend held April 4–6 in Demorest. Accepting the Distinguished Alumni Award for Kal Kelehear were his sons, Zach (left) and Steven ‘Sparky’ Kelehear, and widow Kathryn Burrell Kelehear (’52). David Champagne (’07), center, accepted the Pacesetter Award for Anthony Baldridge (’06) of Berkeley, Calif. Deloris Mullins (’58) of Dacula earned the Alumni Service Award, and Tony McCullers (‘00, MAT ‘01), right, of Monroe received the Pacesetter Award

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD

EXCELLENCE IN EDUCATION AWARD

ALUMNI SERVICE AWARD

THE PACESETTER AWARD

The late O.L. “Kal” Kelehear (’52) of Dalton earned the group’s Distinguished Alumni Award. Classmates Lyndol Cain (’53) and Grady Starnes (’53) nominated Kelehear for the posthumous award for his roles in education, industry, and as a pioneer in the field of work place wellness.

As the winner of the Excellence in Education Award, Tony McCullers (’00, MAT ’01) of Monroe was cited for his work as a mathematics, business, and computer science teacher at Eastside High School in Covington and at North Oconee High School in Bogart. He currently serves as an Instructional Technology Specialist with the Oconee County Schools. In 2010, he was named Teacher of the Year at North Oconee High School. In addition to teaching, Tony serves as an assistant baseball and football coach and was named Assistant Coach of the Year by NOHS, the Georgia Athletic Coaches Association Region 8AA, and by the Georgia Dugout Club.

Deloris Newberry Mullins (’58) of Dacula received the Alumni Service Award in recognition of her longtime commitment to Piedmont College. As a member of the Alumni Association, she has served on the Coach Cave Memorial Golf Tournament Committee, Alumni Weekend Committee, and as the 1950s Chairman. Deloris graduated from Piedmont with a double major in business administration and business education. She worked for the University of Georgia Business Office, Jackson County elementary and high schools, and she taught for 30 years in Gwinnett County. In 2012 she received the Gwinnett County Retired Educators Association’s Outstanding Community Service Award.

The Pacesetter Award went to Dr. Anthony Baldridge (’06), a postdoctoral research fellow at the National Institutes of Health in Berkeley, Calif. While at Piedmont, Anthony earned BS degrees in chemistry and mathematics, and he earned a PhD in chemistry from the Georgia Institute of Technology. While at Tech, he was elected president of the Graduate Student Association and Student Government Association Senator. At the National Institutes of Health, he received the 2013 Kirschenstein National Research Service Award. His current research involves the development of chemical probes for imaging cancer cells in early stages.

Kelehear served in the U.S. Navy in the Philippines during World War II before enrolling at Piedmont, where he was named class president his junior and senior years in 1951-52. He lettered on the basketball and baseball teams for four years and was inducted into the P-Club Hall of Fame in 1983. Kelehear began his career as a teacher at (Continued on Page 26)

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BETTER THAN EVER The alumni soccer women, pictured front from left, are Kristen Murri, Cydney Goodwin, Katherine Metz, Meghan Heim, Laura Goodwin, Lyndsey Nichols, Hayleigh Waters; middle: Caitlin Delvasto, Marjorie Hammond, Kaitlyn Induni, Haley Grimes, Sarah Hill; and back: Caitlin Krieger, Chelsea Angelic, Justine Clay, Casey Lovelady, and Katie Porter.

LETTER CLUB INDUCTS TWO NEW MEMBERS TO HALL OF FAME The Piedmont College Letter Club inducted two new members to its Sports Hall of Fame during Alumni Weekend April 4-6. This year’s class includes Bryan Getty (’04) of Tiger in tennis and Meredith Ray (’07) of Memphis, Tenn., in softball, pictured with P-Club president Michael Williams. Getty helped lead the Lions to three straight conference championships and was a three-time All-Conference player. Ray was a four-time All-Conference pitcher, twice named Pitcher of the Year, and ranked 14th in the nation for NCAA D-III wins.

GOOD AS THEY EVER WERE The artificial turf was a welcome relief to some old knees as the soccer alumni men took the field. Pictured, from left are Jeremy Beaton, Chris Duran, Jason Smith, Melvin Montoya, Jason Laury, Jimmy Stephens, Keith Cowart, Sidney Smith, Justin Matthews, Chris Baker, Stephen Andrew, Daniel Ostojic, and George Sandi.

FIRST ANNUAL ART ALUMNI EXHIBIT

For more information, go to www.piedmont.edu/alumni

Alumni artist showed their work at the first Alumni Weekend Art Exhibition held at the new Smith-Williams Art Studios. Pictured at the show, from left, are Jennifer Osborne Anderson (’08), Rosemary Wood Dodd (’69), Sharon Dugger Wheaton (’05), Mackenzie Terrell Chester (’03), Cody Davis (’07), Regina McCormick Fried (’08), Deanna Neal-Dwyer (’13), Hollie Crumley (’13), and Amy Pippin (‘13). (Not pictured) Cara L. Kenney Carson (‘13), Amber Kerr Lee (‘05, M’06, EdS’08), Laurel Sprague (‘05), A.J. Wolff (‘03), and Leslie Reed (M’07).

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Arts Pictured from left are art professor Kaitlin Botts with daughter Mia; RoseHannah Keith of Clarkesville, Art honorable mention; Dekotah Lego of Demorest, first-place 2D Art; English professor Dr. Timothy O’Keefe; Nikki Blanchard of Powder Springs, Art honorable mention; and Haley Major of Dacula, Trillium Prize for Creative Writing. Not pictured is Staci Sulhoff of Cleveland, first-place 3D Art.

TRILLIUM

The eighth volume of Trillium, Piedmont’s award-winning journal of literature and art, was released on April 22 with a reception at the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art. Trillium features a wide variety of student-produced poetry, short stories, and art, and perhaps the most striking element of this year’s issue is its free-form binding, which allows readers to shuffle the pages into any order they like. “In this, we’ve attempted to reimagine the possibilities of what a literary journal can be, as well as the space in which it resides,” the editors said. “Like a vacation from the day-to-day obligations of life, Trillium invites you to find a quiet space, perhaps a comfortable chair near a window, and enjoy the time away.” This year’s Trillium faculty sponsors are Dr. Timothy O’Keefe, Kaitlin Botts. Student editors were Catherine Moore, Manye Eno, Jackie Wertan, and Julia Bearden. Art directors were Nikki Blanchard and Alex Sridej, and graphic designers were Corey Barbham, Dekotah Lego, and Rachael Tomlinson. Artists were Laura Eavenson and Brandi Lee. The photographer was Mikayla Wells. Production assistants were Safari Smith and Megan Studdard. Special thanks go to Dr. Stephanie Almagno for serving as the art work jurist.

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Rosemary Wood Dodd (’69) with Daniel White, director of the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art, at a reception for Dodd’s exhibit at the MSMA.

Dr. Bill Mason (’57), Dale Kennington, Bob Scharfenstein and Dr. Julius Linn, at the reception for the Kennington and Hill exhibits.

Southern Artists

Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art features Rosemary Dodd & other Southern artists Pen and ink sketches and paintings by Gainesville artist and Piedmont College alum Rosemary Wood Dodd (’69) were on display at the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art in January.

A member of the Blue Angel Art Studio and the Quinlan Visual Arts Center in Gainesville, Dodd attended Wesleyan College and the University of Georgia before taking time out to raise a family. In 1967, she returned to college at Piedmont and graduated magna cum laude in 1969, majoring in art and English. Now a noted artist, illustrator, and graphic designer, she worked in marketing for several area companies and for 13 years served as director of advancement and information services at Gainesville College. With her late husband, Ed Dodd, she founded the Ed Dodd/ Mark Trail Foundation to promote conservation, and

she was a founding member of the Elachee Nature Science Center near Oakwood. She also was a co-founder of the Gainesville Ballet and the Gainesville Children’s Theatre (now WonderQuest), as well as the North Georgia Community Foundation. This past fall, the museum presented works by two other Southern artists, Savannah-born Dale Kennington of Dothan, Ala., and the late Carrie Lillian Hill of Birmingham, Ala. Kennington is known as a contemporary realist, often infusing her paintings with subjects in a variety of situations, ranging from the wisp of wind at an outside café to the profound complexity of human interaction. The show includes a special loan by the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan, Ala.

Art student Catherine Schaaf of Blairsville looks over the works of Rosemary Wood Dodd at an exhibit held in the Mason-Scharfenstein Museum of Art.

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THREE WORLD PREMIERES FOR SUDDERTH Music major Chris Sudderth of Buford experienced world premieres of three of his compositions within a few weeks before graduating this May with a bachelor of arts degree in music. On Dec. 3, the North Gwinnett High School Choral debuted Sudderth’s composition “Magnificat,” written for women’s choir and piano. On Dec. 6 in Demorest at the annual Service of Lessons and Carols, the Piedmont Chorale and Piedmont Singers— with Sudderth as a member— performed “Love Came Down at Christmas.” Then in January, Sudderth conducted as a piece he wrote, “Pastorale,” was debuted for the entire Georgia Music Educators Association Convention in Savannah. Performed by Piedmont students Jessie Bee of Hartwell on flute, and Cole Martin of Commerce on horn, the quintet also included Vikie Pinson, conductor of the Piedmont Wind Ensemble on oboe, clarinet instructor Diana Sue Walton, and Katie Bennett, band director at Columbia Middle School in Grovetown. “It was great to hear,” Sudderth said. “Playing it on the piano is not like hearing it live. It was a great experience.”

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CANTABILE

The a cappella group, Cantabile, presented a program of “All American” music April 1 in Demorest. Directed by Dr. Wallace Hinson, the group of 10 singers performs works from the 19th and 20th centuries. Composers for the April concert included Stephen Foster, Rodgers and Hammerstein, Randy Newman, James Taylor and Billy Joel. Cantabile singers include, from left, Megan Holder, Cole Martin, Ben Rikeman, Mitchell Auger, Elizabeth Parmer, Wally Hinson, Chris Sudderth, Chastin Dobbs, Jennifer Pitt, and Kate Berardi.

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WIND ENSEMBLE

Piedmont and area high schools team up each year for a wind ensemble concert that includes musicians from the college and seven area high schools. This year’s concert featured works by Hayden and Mozart, as well as 19th and 20th century composers George Bizet, John Philip Sousa, Ralph Vaughn Williams, Moises Simons, and Percy Grainger. Partner schools include East Hall, West Hall, Jackson County, Banks County, Rabun County, Tallulah Falls, and Riverside Military Academy. The ensemble was conducted by Vicki Pinson with program host Ron Evans.

Music

PIEDMONT SINGERS

The Piedmont Singers performed their Fall Concert in November with works by Marek Jasinski, Giovanni Palestrina, Gerald Finzi, and Benjamin Britten. The ensemble of 40 select student singers is directed by Dr. Wallace Hinson and accompanied by Louise Bass on organ. The college’s touring group, the Singers have performed across the U.S. and Canada and this past summer presented concerts in England and Wales.

‘GREAT COMPOSERS’ CONCERT

The Piedmont College Chorale and Orchestra presented two works by 19th century Belgian composer César Franck in a concert at the college April 15. Conducted by Dr. Wallace Hinson, chair of the Department of Music, the performance includes the 100-voice Piedmont Chorale Chorale, directed by Dr. Lauren Ringwall and accompanied by Joy Hayner; and the 35-member Piedmont Orchestra, with accompanist Joy Hayner and soloists Dr. Andrea Price, Jonathan Pilkington and Barton Gilleland. The concert included Franck’s “Morceau Symphonique” and “The Seven Last Words of Christ.”

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Brandon Deen of St. Marys, Kristin Reeves of Suwanee, Erin Gathercoal of Lilburn, Tyler Dale of Clayton, and Melanie Cassiday of Maysville in a scene from ‘Blithe Spirit.’ The Theatre Department presented the supernatural comedy by Noel Coward in February on the Swanson Center Mainstage.

Theatre 2

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K ristin Reeves and

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S oldiers prepare to march off to war in ‘Courage,’ a

Brandon Deen in ‘Blithe Spirit.’ THE PIEDMONT COLLEGE JOURNAL

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multi-media play based on Stephen Crane’s Civil War novel, ‘The Red Badge of Courage.’

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Jacob McKee has his hands full with Audrey II, a

man-eating plant in the PCT production of Little Shop of Horrors.

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Katie Robinson of Cornelia, left, and Jessica Williams of Watkinsville in Little Shop of Horrors.

SPRING 2014 | THE PIEDMONT Photographs by theatreCOLLEGE studentJOURNAL Melissa

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MICHAEL MANSFIED (Continued from Page 7) obvious areas are in organizational design and talent management—interacting with and retaining talent defines our success. It was good to get a fresh, unbiased look at the methods and systems of academia versus the way private industry views organizational design.” Michael said he also got one more thing from the Piedmont classes—leads on new employees for his company. To date, there are now 11 Piedmont graduates working for Mansfield Energy, including Jorge Pradilla (’10, MBA ’12) and Evan Poole (’06, MBA ’12). Both are analysts who also write about world energy markets for Mansfield Energy’s web newsletter, FUELSNews Daily, and quarterly magazine, FUELSNews 360.

“The Piedmont graduates do very well, not just in our industry, they do well in any business they pursue,” Michael said. “Piedmont gets its students ready to go to work. We hire a lot of grads from Georgia Tech, UGA, and North Georgia, and I am every bit as pleased with the Piedmont grads as those we get from the bigger business schools.” As for Michael, he is already thinking about adding another Piedmont degree. “An MBA? Maybe. I’ve talked to Dr. Steve Carlson about it,” he said, shaking his head. “But I travel a lot.”

PIEDMONT DEBATE TEAM WINS (Continued from Page 10) Sam Thomas won the fifth best Debate Speaker award in the varsity division, and Knarr received the Individual Achievement Award.

Dr. Moss was elected President of the Georgia Parliamentary Debate Association for 2014-2015, and Piedmont College was selected to host

PADDLE FASTER

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI AWARD

(Continued from Page 13) canoers and kayakers who can compete at that level, he said, and having the Lake Lanier site nearby has been a great boost for the sport in the area. “Gainesville has one of the best courses in the world,” he said. “It is deep and the water is clean.” Best of all, the course is hemmed in by mountains on two sides, which means that rowers only have to contend with head or tail winds. In place like Oklahoma and Germany there are usually crosswinds, which take seconds off of the paddlers’ times.

(Continued from Page 18) Morgan County High School and North Habersham High School and then joined Clarkesville Mills as personnel director. He worked for WestPoint Pepperell in Dalton and retired as personnel director at J&J Industries in Dalton in 1994.

EYE ON THE CLOCK And paddlers always have their eye on the clock. Collins’ best time in the oneman 200-meter race is 37.5 seconds. The world record is 33.8 seconds. If he can shave just 3.7 seconds off of his time between now and 2016, it might be enough for the gold.

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the Georgia Parliamentary Debate Association State Championship Tournament in the spring of 2015.

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In Dalton, Kelehear was active in a number of community organizations, including the Rotary Club, which named him a Paul Harris Fellow; and he was co-founder and a charter Trustee of the Dalton Education Foundation. In 1986, the Daily Citizen named Kelehear the Dalton-Whitfield County Man of the Year. Even after retiring, he continued to work in the then-new field of workplace wellness. In 1994 he joined the board of Northwest Georgia Healthcare Partnership and led the development of “Working Well,” a wellness and prevention program for Whitfield and Murray counties that received national attention as a model for such programs. “We remember Kal’s days at Piedmont,” Cain said. “He excelled in everything he did, both in academics and athletics. As the most mature member of the teams, his leadership inspired all of us to never give up.”

School of Nursing and Health Sciences adds three new programs years for students entering at the freshman level. Graduates seeking accreditation by the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education can then take the Board of Certification for the Athletic Trainer exam. Dr. Abbey Dondanville

While there is some overlap in courses for these three new majors, Dondanville said each one is designed to meet specific needs of students interested in entering these related fields. “For example, the Athletic Training program includes more than 900 hours of clinical experiences that is designed to prepare graduates for the National

“These new majors involve students taking a broad range of courses focusing on biology, anatomy, nutrition, and biomechanics in order to serve as health professionals working in areas of fitness, injury prevention, rehabilitation, and wellness,” said Dr. Abbey Dondanville, associate professor and director of the three programs. New to the Piedmont faculty, Dondanville hold a Ed.D. in exercise and sport science from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and has taught athletic training and physical education at several liberal arts and public university during her 18 year career,

Exercise and Sport Science Exercise and Sport Science is a branch of sports medicine providing a link between physically active individuals and the medical community,” Dondanville said. Graduates provide health and fitness assessments, skill training, and rehabilitation procedures. Sport scientists work with clients to create programs that will help them meet their fitness and wellness goals. “This is an excellent degree for those wishing to pursue graduate education in fields Piedmont athletic trainers Erika and Matt McKinney work on softball such as physical players Maryrose Burns of Clarksburg, W. VA., and Abby Smith of therapy, medical, or Washington, Ga., before practice. chiropractic school.”

Athletic Training Dondanville said the Athletic Training courses cover a wide range of health care subjects, from pathology of injuries and illnesses, to conditioning and rehabilitative exercises, to nutrition and pharmacology. Students receive classroom instruction and serve clinical practicums at health care facilities across northeast Georgia. The Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training degree may be completed in four academic

Nutrition & Wellness “For the Nutrition and Wellness major, the focus is on helping individuals achieve optimal health and fitness while leading more balanced and meaningful lives,” Dondanville said. This cross-disciplinary degree combines the study of biology, anatomy, nutrition, fitness assessment, exercise, community health, and the prevention and control of disease. “Graduates from this program are

Piedmont’s Daniel School of Nursing and Health Sciences has added three new bachelor of science degree programs in the fields of Athletic Training; Exercise & Sport Science; and Nutrition & Wellness.

eligible to sit for the strength and condition coach certification.”

Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification exam. Students in the Exercise and Sport Science program are not required to complete that many clinical training hours,” she said. Graduates in each of the three areas may also pursue graduate degrees in their field and may work in college or professional sports settings, corporate wellness, fitness and recreation areas, military or government agencies, and in the performing arts. SPRING 2014

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BRAWN

CoSIDA winners

BRAINS &

Katie Faith Simpsonville, S.C. Volleyball

Ashley Fannon Ball Ground Volleyball

RECORD NUMBER OF STUDENTS EARN ATHLETIC HONOR ROLL AWARD AND COSIDA ALL-AMERICA HONORS The Department of Athletics has released its Director of Athletics Honor Roll for the fall semester of 2013 with a record number making the list. More than 160 Piedmont student-athletes earned the distinction for carrying better than a 3.40 GPA last fall as the requirement for the honor, with 50 of those earning a perfect 4.0 GPA. “I am extremely pleased by the number of student athletes at Piedmont who consistently produce outstanding results in the classroom,” said Director of Intercollegiate Athletics John Dzik. “It is a testimony to their hard work and understanding of priorities. Our coaches share the credit for identifying and recruiting such outstanding players.” Overall, the average GPA for the more than 300 student-athletes was an impressive 3.32, as almost 250 carried at least a 3.0 GPA for the semester or better in the fall of 2013. The 162 making the Honor Roll list is a record

since the Department began the awards listing records back in the fall of 2010. The 50 with a 4.00 GPA is the second-highest in that same time period, behind only the 53 who did so in the spring of 2013. In the 2013-14 academic year, Piedmont also experienced its most successful year with the Capital One Academic AllAmerican program sponsored by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). After seeing just one Academic All-American award winner in the Athletic Department’s history coming into the year, Piedmont boasted two such winners in the fall to go with three additional All-District honorees through the winter seasons.

Kaitlin Norman Good Hope Volleyball

Laura Goodwin Snellville women’s Soccer

With the spring sport award winners yet to be announced, the Green and Gold have already surpassed previous highs in the categories and will likely have a banner year with the Capital One Academic AllAmerican program when the 2013-14 campaign concludes.

Jessie Jenkins McDonough Men’s Basketball 28

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SPRING SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS

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LAUREN HAMEL The senior from Winder averaged 9.1 PPG as she helped lead the Lady Lions to a 17-9 record this season. Hamel had 237 points on the year and hit 77 percent from the freethrow line. The basketball women finished second in the South Division of the USA South Conference and lost in the tournament quarterfinals to Methodist University 77-51. Hamel is the only graduating senior on the team, leaving a host of freshmen and sophomores who saw regular time in the season and are sure to be a factor in 2013-14.

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BRIAN EDWARDS The Gillsville freshman was named to the Georgia Basketball Coaches Association second team All-State after leading the Lions in scoring this season with 13 PPG. Freshman Chase England of Oakwood averaged 10.9 PPG, while sophomore Jessie Jenkins of McDonough put in 9.2 PPG. Often starting five freshmen, the team wrapped up its 2013-14 season, the first under Head Coach Greg Neeley, with a 9-16 overall record, finishing 4-10 in the USA South Athletic Conference.

BRITTNEY HEAD

Piedmont softball did the impossible on the final day of the 2014 USA South Tournament, winning three games, including two against previously unbeaten Huntingdon. Piedmont first knocked off LaGrange in a 1-0 thriller before holding on to a 1-0 win over Huntingdon in game one of the championship round,. That victory set up a winner-take-all second game that saw the Lady Lions rally from two down in the bottom of the 7th to take a 5-4 win to claim their first USA South title. Senior Brittney Head (pictured) of Cumming and sophomore Jordan Ellingson of Cornelia went 20-2 and 20-4 respectively to lead the Lady Lions to a 41-6 record. The team finds out in May where it will play in the NCAA National Tournament.

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For the latest updates on Piedmont athletic action, go to www.piedmont.lions.com

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TREY MARTIN The men’s tennis team saw their USA South postseason come to an end at the hands of North Carolina Wesleyan, as Piedmont was shut out 9-0 for just the third time all season by the #1 seed. The loss ended the Lions’ 2014 campaign with an 11-7 overall record, and the Lions made their second straight appearance in the USA South Tournament. Trey Martin (pictured), a junior from Homer, had an 11-5 record in singles playing primarily in the #3 position. Senior Joel Silverberg of Cape Coral, Fla., was 10-6 in the #2 spot, while freshman Matthew Metzger of Auckland, New Zealand went 9-6 in the #1 spot.

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KATIE SAILORS

The women’s tennis team entered the USA South tourney as the #4 seed, but fell in the quarterfinal round to #5 Huntingdon College. The Lady Lions finished the season 12-7 overall, the best single season winning percentage in the program’s NCAA, era which started with the 2004 season. Senior Katie Sailors (pictured) of St. Marys was 13-5 at the #1 spot, while freshman Viola Terschluse of Dinslaken, Germany, was 9-7 at #2. Sophomore Nicole Parish of Baldwin went 9-7 at #3.

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ALLEN TOKARZ The Lions wrapped up their season in style with a three game sweep of long-time conference rival Maryville College. Finishing 25-14 overall and 17-10 USA South play, Piedmont placed fourth in the tightly matched league standings. Sophomore Allen Tokarz of Snellville (pictured) led the Lions’ pitching with a 1.65 ERA and a 5-1 record, followed closely by Chris Goershel (6-3) of Kennesaw and Matt Lisk (5-1) of Norwood, N.C. Sophomore outfielder Evan Gresham of Fayetteville led all batters with a .336 average. Infielder Will Skidmore of Cumming hit .328, and sophomore Michael Barnes of Dacula hit .308.

SPRING SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS

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NICK GREEN The men’s lacrosse team finished the season at 6-8. Junior midfielder Nick Green of Kennesaw led the scoring with 32 goals, including five hat tricks on the season and one six-goal game against Transylvania. Junior Spencer Ortis of Cumming was right behind with 29 goals, and sophomore Holin Axley of Lawrenceville had 20. Junior Sumner Gantz of Ball Ground led the team with 26 assists.

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MCKYNSEY DOUGLAS

The women’s lacrosse team finished their second season in first place, but came up just one goal short in the USA South Championship game, falling to Meredith College 14-15 in double overtime. The Lady Lions finish with a 14-3 record and were undefeated in the conference regular season. Sophomore Mckynsey Douglas of Newnan led the scorers with 61 goals on the year, including a six-goal game against The University of the South. Kayla Jones of Lawrenceville, the USA South Rookie of the Year, and sophomore Alexis Narducci of St. Johns, Fla., each scored 44 goals. For the season, the Lady Lions averaged 17.59 goals per game, while holding their opponents to 8.12.

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KATARINA HODGE AND ANDREW LONG

The men’s and women’s golf teams played in seven and six tournaments respectively this season. For the men, sophomore Andrew Long of Lilburn (pictured) was the low medalist with a 79.15 average. Freshman Jake Forbes of Woodstock was just a fraction behind at 79.27, while sophomore William Jarrard of Dublin totaled 80.10, and sophomore Joseph Morris of Auburn came in at 80.40. For the women, senior Katarina Hodge of Dublin (pictured) was low medalist at 80.40. Junior Cortney Boggs of Colbert came in at 87.42, and sophomore Taylor Mitcham of McDonough finished with an average of 90.83.

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CLASS NOTES

CONGRATULATIONS! Two of the 15 finalists for Four longtime faculty members who retired after the spring semester were honored during the April faculty assembly. Pictured with Dr. Viviane Daigle, President of the Faculty Senate (left), and Dr. Perry Rettig, Vice President for Academic Affairs, are education professor Dr. Gene Pease (2001-2014), history professor Dr. Ralph ‘Buzz’ Singer (1972-2014), and business professor Ray Kreiner (2004-2014), (left) Professor Dr. Mark Gardner (1985-2014). The new retirees were each presented with a ceramic piece created by Chris Kelly, chairman of the Art Department.

Georgia Teacher of the Year are Piedmont graduates. Sarah Ballew Welch (’MA ’08) Fannin County English Teacher

Marc Pederson (EdS ’11) Paulding County biology, biotechnology, and chemistry teacher

We will find out on May 16, 2104, who has been selected. The 10 finalists were selected from a pool of 156 local school system Teachers of the Year. The 2015 Georgia Teacher of the Year will travel around the state and the nation, serving as an ambassador for the teaching profession. The winner will also be entered in the National Teacher of the Alumni from the ’60s and ’70s who attended Alumni Weekend took a special tour of the campus to reminisce in some familiar spaces and to see new buildings on campus. Pictured in the gazebo at Getman-Babcock Hall are from left, Celeste Durham Wilson (’53) and Wesley Wilson (’53) of Thomasville, Rosemary Wood Dodd (’69) of Gainesville, Carol and John Flowers (’66), Karen Gallipeau Palermo (’75), Stephanie Olah Lozel (’76) and Doug Lozel (’74) of Jonesboro, Maletta Collins Bond (’75) of Seneca, S.C., Linnie Matheney (’73), Roger Cook (’74) of New Woodstock, N.Y., Dock Sisk (’72) of Homer, Henry Pollitz (’72) of Rome, Mary Hill Towns (’72), Lamar Allen (’72) of Rome, Doug Johnson (’66) of Cornelia, Michael Hunter (’74), and Ron Webb (’74) of Pendleton, S.C. Also taking the campus tour was Rudy Buice (’47) of of Columbia, S.C., pictured with his daughter, Deidre Buice Crow. Rudy is wearing his original “P” basketball letter.

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Year competition.

CLASS NOTES Gladys Holcomb (’35) of Clarkesville celebrated her 100th birthday on March 2, 2014, with a party at Clarkesville Baptist Church. More than 300 visitors stopped by to greet the retired educator who served for many years as principal of Clarkesville Elementary School. Marjorie Fields Lewis (’39), pictured with President Mellichamp, is retired and living in Vero Beach. Fla. Marjorie earned a degree in English at Piedmont, where she was a member of The Owl newspaper staff and Theta Zeta Phi women’s literary society. Over the years, she taught French, owned and operated a kindergarten, and taught hospital-bound students. Loyce Alberta Bagwell Petersen (’43) and Richard Marion Petersen (’43) of Burlington, N.C., celebrated their 70th wedding anniversary Dec. 30, 2013. The couple met at Piedmont in 1939. Richard joined the U.S. Marines in 1942 and served in the Pacific Theatre, where he was wounded and returned to the U.S. Richard worked in the ministry at Shallow Ford, a church in northern Alamance County, N.C. Grady Starnes (’53) and Anne Ruth Hawkins Starnes (’53) of Duluth celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary Dec. 27, 2013, with a cruise to the western Caribbean with daughter Karan Waid and son Gary Starnes. Dr. Charles Cho (’57) and his wife, Tina, met with Dr. Mellichamp and Dr. Ashley Cleere during the latters’ recent visit to California for the Religion and the Liberal Arts Conference. Dr. Cho graduated magna cum laude from Piedmont and earned a BS degree in chemistry.

Frankie Derrell Adams (’87) of Monroe has signed with C&C Music Group in Nashville. A gospel singer and songwriter, Frankie has a new CD coming out soon.

Originally from Korea, he graduated from the University of Kansas School of Medicine in 1962. He served as a U.S. Navy medical officer before opening a family practice in California. He is an emeritus member of the Piedmont Board of Trustees. Jim Sievers (’63) and his wife, Samira Beckwith, met with President Mellichamp recently in Fort Myers, Fla. Jim is retired as a National Accounts Manager for Bristol-Myers Squibb. A longtime golfer, he is a past president of the Chattanooga District Golf Association, former vice president of the Tennessee Golf Association, and a USGA Committeeman Rules Official. After golfing for more than 56 years, Jim has witnessed 38 holes-in-one—four of them his own. Few Hembree (’70) and partner Johan Eussen recently celebrated their 14th anniversary. Few is retired from the State of Georgia, and works as a Poll Manager for Fulton County Elections. Kathy Segers (’82) of Norcross completed a PhD In Educational Leadership and graduated with distinction from Capella University on March 15, 2014. She is currently employed by the Georgia Department of Education Division for Special Education Services and Supports as Program Specialist for Accessible Instructional Materials.

Brandon Reed (’98) of Commerce is editor and publisher of RaceweekIllustrated.com, a motorsports news website. He also produces and hosts a Raceweek Illustrated television show for Windstream and is the motor sports editor for Jacobs Media at AccessNorthGa.com. David Limbach (’01) of Kingsland and his wife, Lisa, announce the birth of a son, Dixon Neil Joseph Limbach, Dec. 17, 2013. David teaches Taekwondo at the Kings Bay Navy Base in St. Marys and recently earned his 4th Degree Black Belt and was awarded the title of “Master.” He also works for Camden County High School as an English tutor for at-risk students. Marleen Springston (’01, MAT ’03) of Flowery Branch was one of nine educators honored for dedication and tenacity in the classroom with this year’s Masters in Teaching awards, presented by the Featherbone Communiversity in Gainesville. Gerri Sue Fish (MA ’03, EdS ’08) of Clarkesville has retired from teaching and is doing educational consulting. She is currently working with the University of Georgia on a research project.

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David McNeill White (’03) and his wife, Jessica, announce

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CLASS NOTES the birth of a girl, Catherine Lynne White, Dec. 26, 2013. Dr. Alex Pyron (’04) has an invited professorship in Paris from the European Union, from May through July 2014. He has been asked to help re-write certain aspects of amphibian taxonomy. Heath Webb (MAT ’04) has been named head football coach at Winder-Barrow High School. Heath is married to the former Jesi Jones (’03, MA ’05, EdS ’08). They have two daughters, Josie (5) and Abbie Kate (3). DJ Johnson (’05) is currently an Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education Fellow at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. After graduating from Piedmont, he received a graduate certificate in pharmaceutical and biomedical science from the University of Georgia and this past July earned his PhD in analytical chemistry at UGA. Delana Knight (’05) manager of the ClarkesvilleHabersham County Library, has been appointed by the Northeast Georgia Regional Library System board as Director of System Services. Lauren Turner (’05, MAT ’06) has been living in Denver, Colo., for two years and is moving to Chattanooga, where her fiancé, Andy, will complete his medical residency. Lauren worked for the assessment department of the Denver Public Schools. Lindsey Rhodes (’07, MA ’10, EdS ’11), a kindergarten teacher at Sugar Hill Elementary School for the past seven years, was named by

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Gov. Nathan Deal as one of seven winners statewide in the “Innovation in Teaching” competition. Lindsey will receive a $2,000 stipend, and the school will receive $5,000 to be used for classroom materials and technology. (You can view Lindsey’s nomination video at www.youtube. com/watch?v=PqNVgc40X9o) Sandi Tatum Suda (’09, MBA ’11) and Tim Suda (’10) are living in Demorest. Sandi is a communications specialist for the University System of Georgia Board of Regents, working in marketing, social media, and event planning. Tim is a technology specialist for the Banks County School System. Maghan Holmes (’10 BA, ’12 MAT) is a general music instructor for the Morgan County Charter School System. She is currently completing her second year of teaching and “adores every second of it.” She participates in the Madison Community Theater and most recently played the role of Maxine in the musical How I Became a Pirate. Maureen McClure (MA ’10) of Warne, N.C., has been named to North Carolina Governor Pat McCrory’s 24-member Teacher Advisory Committee, which was created in September 2103 to provide input from teachers on legislative issues. McClure teaches U.S. history and English at Hayesville High School in Clay County. She was the 20102011 Clay County Teacher of the Year and has been with the school system for more than 20 years. James Moyer (’13) of Fayetteville is working for Kemron Environmental Services. He works in the lab analyzing soil samples for organic contaminants. Chris Sugiuchi (EdS ’13) of Athens was named Teacher of the Year for 201314 at Chase Street Elementary School where he teaches STEM classes. Spencer Bragg (’14) of Dalton has been accepted into the Doctor of

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Veterinary Medicine program at the University of Georgia. Only 137 applicant were accepted from more than 900 applicants this year. Danielle Maffett (’14) of Villa Rica has been accepted into the Doctor of Physical Therapy program at Georgia State University. Only 38 applicants were accepted from more than 300 applicants. Amy Thompson (’13) of Bogart will be starting the pharmacy program in the fall at the University of Wyoming. Brittany West (’13) is working as a Worship Leader at Harvest Christian Church in Clarkesville and has been accepted into Liberty University’s graduate program to pursue a master’s degree in music and ministry.

FRIENDS

The Rev. Fred Nelson (center) who served as assistant chaplain at Piedmont during Dr. James Walter’s administration, is pictured with Dr. Mellichamp and current Chaplain Dr. Ashley Cleere. Dr. Nelson received an honorary degree from Piedmont and is now 105 years old and living in Naples, Fla. Piedmont Trustee Dr. Betty L. Siegel, President Emeritus of Kennesaw State University, was honored on Feb. 15, 2014, by the Georgia Commission on Women and the Georgia Women’s Institute as the first recipient of the Emily B. Grigsby Award “For a Lifetime of Inspiration and Achievement.” In December, Dr. Siegel was recognized by the American Clergy Leadership Conference with the True Family Values Award for her “exemplary standard of living for the sake of others” and for inspiring others to fulfill their Godgiven potential. Dr. Siegel continues her academic activities with recent publications, and in April she traveled to South Africa to present a paper on urbanization at the 14th International Winelands Conference held in Stellenbosch.

1920s

Lois Mongold Barr (’26) of Blairsville died July 2, 2013. She was 107. Born at Mountain Rest, S.C., Mrs. Barr entered the eighth grade at Piedmont Academy in 1919 and continued until graduation from Piedmont College in 1926 with a degree in German. She was secretary of her senior class at Piedmont and a member of Gamma Chi, Drama League, and the Carolina Club. She served as assistant to the library her junior and senior years. She taught for several years before marrying the Rev. Horace K. Barr, who died in 1943. She then moved to Atlanta and worked for many years with the Frigidaire Sales Corporation, a division of General Motors. She retired in 1986 and moved to Blairsville. (To read an interview with Lois Barr published in the Journal in 2010, visit www.piedmont.edu/barr)

1930s Patrick Henry Hallford (’39) of Sacramento, Calif., died Jan. 26, 2014. He was 94. Mr. Hallford graduated from Piedmont at age 19 and moved to Washington, D.C., where he attended George Washington Law School and joined the FBI, starting his career as a clerk to J. Edgar Hoover. While attending law school at night and working during the day, he became one of the youngest FBI agents in its history, serving throughout the United States during World War II. As an FBI agent, he was exempt from military service, but volunteered for the Army, serving in the Philippines and rising to the rank of Second Lieutenant by the

Obituaries

time of his discharge. He returned to Georgia to finish law school at Emory University. He then re-entered the military, serving as head of the War Damage Commission in the Philippines while still in his 20s. It was there that he met his wife, Nan, a flight attendant for Philippine Airlines. They moved to California, where Pat served as District Attorney of Merced County for 25 years. A former Trustee of Piedmont College, he is survived by his wife of 63 years, Nan, and four children, Dan, Linda, Glen, and Elizabeth. He is survived locally by nephew Dr. James R. Hallford of Atlanta, and nieces Marcia Hallford, Lisa Hallford, and Patricia Keller (’71) of Habersham County. Mary Alice Santora (’39) of Athens, Ga., and formerly of Huntingdon and Kennett Square, Pa., died Feb. 8, 2013. She was 94. Born in Buford, Ga., Mrs. Santora earned a BA in education with minors in English and history at Piedmont. She earned a master’s degree in education from the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She taught primarily fourth grade at New Garden Elementary School in Kennett Square, Pa., for many years and taught Sunday School at the Kennett Presbyterian Church for 30 years, led a Girl Scout troop and volunteered in numerous organizations. She and her husband, the late Dr. Arthur C. Santora, were married for 47 years. She is survived by a son, Dr. Arthur Santora II, and wife Rebecca of Watchung, N.J.; Drs. Albert and Crissy Santora of Bogart, Ga.; son, Andrew Santora of Watkinsville, Ga., and daughter, Dr. Artamarie Barclay and husband, Robert, of Huntingdon, Pa.

1940s

W. Vance Grant Jr. (’43) of Atlanta and formerly of Cornelia, Ga., died March 19, 2014. He was 89. Born in Gainesville, Ga., Mr. Grant graduated cum laude from Piedmont at age 18 with a degree in history and government and was a member of the J.S. Green Society, Yonahian yearbook, and school orchestra. He served in the U.S. Navy on board a submarine chaser during World War II. After the war he earned a degree in business administration from the University of Georgia and a master’s degree in psychology from Columbia University. At Florida State University, while earning a master’s degree in another branch of psychology, he met and married Earlynn Vance, his wife of 61 years. He worked as a statistician for the State of Florida until 1954, when he and his wife moved to the Washington, D.C., area where he later earned a PhD in political science from the University of Maryland. He worked for the U.S. Army, helping to rewrite the Army Qualifying Test before transferring to the U.S. Office of Education (later the National Center for Education Statistics), where he worked as a specialist in the statistics of education. He was a writer and editor for the agency and was referred to by his colleagues as “Mr. Information.” The breadth of his knowledge of American education enabled him to answer questions of members of Congress, the White House, presidential candidates preparing for debates, the press, foreign governments,

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and the public. In 2005 he received the Piedmont Distinguished Alumni Award. Survivors include his wife, Earlynn V. Grant of Atlanta; son, James V. Grant of Louisville, Ky.; and daughter and son in law, Jeanie and David P. Gushee of Atlanta. Robert L. Ash Sr. (’43) of Smyrna died Nov. 12, 2012. He was 90. Born in Telfair County, Ga., Mr. Ash began his career in education after serving in the U.S. Navy during World War II. He was a teacher and basketball coach at Lawrenceville High School and after one year went to Fitzhugh Lee High School in 1947. He was there as teacher and basketball/ baseball coach until the opening of Campbell High School, where he assumed the same duties along with that of assistant principal in 1952. He was a successful coach, taking numerous girls and boys teams to region championships and state tournaments. In 1954 he was named principal of Monroe Area High School. He served there for 11 years and then came back to Cobb County as Principal of Campbell High School in 1965. His career in education spanned 43 years, 33 of which were as a high school principal. Mr. Ash was recognized as Principal of the Year in 1987 by the Georgia Association of Educational Leaders. He retired in 1987. He was a member of the Piedmont Athletic Hall of Fame and in 2001 received the alumni Excellence in Education award. He and his wife, Carolyn Lord Ash, who died in 2011, were married for 67 years. Chaplain (Col.) Robert Freeman Mashburn (’44) of Oklahoma City, Okla., died Feb. 22, 2014. He was 95. Born in Rocky Mount, N.C., he earned a degree in philosophy at Piedmont College and in the late 1940s taught at Holmes Bible College as a Bible instructor. Mr. Mashburn joined the U.S. Army as a chaplain during the final phase of World War II in June of 1945. When the war ended, he married Colleen Hilley and left active duty. When the

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Korean War started in June 1950, he volunteered for duty again and remained in the Army as a Chaplain until retiring in 1972. He is one of very few soldiers, and even fewer Chaplains, to have served in World War II, the Korean War and the Vietnam War. Among his numerous commendations and decorations, he was awarded the Bronze Star With “V” (for Valor) Device for helping to rescue a soldier under fire, off the front line in Korea. After retiring from the Army, he served as a pastor and in a number of church administrative positions. He is survived by his wife of 64 years, Colleen Mashburn; his son, Bob and wife Gaye, of Morehead City, N.C.; son, Joe and his wife Alice, of Baggs, Wy.; son, Jim and wife Lindy, of San Diego, Calif.; daughter, Pat Beckner and husband Brad Beckner of Roanoke, Va.; and son, John and wife Cyndee of Edmond, Oklahoma;

1950s

Sarah Ophelia “Fifi” Turner (’58) of Cleveland, Ga., died March 1, 2014. She was 82. Born in Rabun County, she graduated from Toccoa Falls High School and Truett-McConnell College before earning a BS degree at Piedmont. She taught 33 years in the White County School System. After retirement, she served as the office manager of the White County News for more than 10 years. She was a long-time member of Cleveland First Baptist Church, where she was involved in the Faith Sunday School Class, the Card Ministry, and the Grand Adults. She was a member of the White County Retired Teachers Association.

1960s

James Dobson “Jim” Cantrell (’60) of Abbeville, S.C., died Oct. 25, 2013. He was 78. Born in Liberty, S.C., he was a Navy veteran and retired from the Milliken-Abbebille Plant after many years. At Piedmont, he was president of the J.S. Green Literary Society and the P-Club and vice president of the junior class. He

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played baseball and basketball and was a member of the 1959 GIAC championship team that went 11-1 in the conference.

1970s

Larry Michael Hill (’71) of Demorest, Ga., died Jan. 18, 2014. He was 64. Born in Clarkesville, he was a graduate of North Habersham High School, Piedmont College, and the University of Georgia, where he earned master’s and specialist degrees. Mr. Hill worked as assistant principal and taught at North Hall High School; assistant principal at Habersham Central High School, and for more than 20 years was principal at South Habersham Middle School, from which he retired. He continued in the Habersham County School System as principal of the Alternative School and was appointed interim school superintendent. He was serving as administrative assistant for facilities at the time of his death. Survivors include his wife of 44 years, Betty Ann Sutton Hill of Demorest; son and daughter-in-law, Joe and Leah Hill of Ellijay; and daughter and fiancé, Brandi Hill Moore and David Thompson of Demorest. Carter Daniel (’74) of Cornelia, Ga., died April 17, 2013. He was 66. Born in San Diego, Calif., he was the owner and operator of C&H Mechanical & Plumbing Inc. for 30 years. He was a member of Cornelia United Methodist Church, where he served on various church boards, and he was a recipient of the Boy Scouts Distinguished Citizen Award. Survivors include his wife of 44 years, Susie Long Daniel (’67) of Cornelia; and son, Chad Daniel of Clarkesville. Dr. Kay Brown Pitts Rogers (’79) of Mt. Airy, Ga., died Nov. 6, 2013. She was 57. Born in Clarkesville, she was a retired educator and taught in Habersham, Banks, Haralson and Gwinnett counties.

1980s

Joni Cash Owens Byrd (’84) of Toccoa, Ga., died Dec. 10, 2013. She was 50. Born in Stephens County, she was a cum laude graduate of Piedmont College and worked for the Bank of Toccoa and Dempster Equipment before becoming a Realtor with Century 21 and Remax. She later worked with the Stephens County School System in the Nutrition Department. Survivors include her husband, Jeff Byrd (’87), and son, Houston Owens of Toccoa.

2010s

Kathleen Virginia Vinson Strickland (’12) of Commerce, Ga., died April 4, 2014. She was 45. Originally from Atlanta, she was a veteran of the U.S. Army and a member of the American Legion. At Piedmont, she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in drama education.

Friends Milda K. Kranats, 94, of Polson, Mont., formerly of Demorest, died Dec. 22, 2013. Born in Riga, Latvia, where she worked as a nurse, she was married to Julius Kranats, a mounted policeman. In 1945 the couple and their son, John, fled to Augsburg, Germany, to escape communism. They lived in a Displaced Persons Camp for four years, where John died and another son, I.J. Kranats was born. In 1946, they immigrated to the U.S., settling near Stone Mountain and then moving to Demorest, where Julius, who died in 1983, operated the Piedmont College dairy farm. Through the late 1950s and ’60s, Milda worked as a pediatric nurse at Habersham County Hospital and later worked as a school nurse at Piedmont College until her retirement. Dr. Jodie Lee Burton, 71, of Cornelia, Ga., died Jan. 16, 2014. Dr. Burton was a graduate of Marietta High School and North Georgia College. He served as an officer on active duty with the United States Army and with the United States Reserve for eight years, with a final rank of captain. He later earned a master’s degree in education, specialist degree in social science, and doctorate in social science education from the University of Georgia. From 1971 to 1978 he taught history and education at Piedmont and was named chair of the Division of Education in 1972. In 1978, Dr. Burton left Piedmont College to become dean of continuing education at BrewtonParker College and later was named associate dean of the college. In 1983, he returned to Habersham County to teach at the Georgia Industrial Institute before returning to Piedmont College as the registrar. In 1989, Dr. Burton became

the registrar at Limestone College in Gaffney, S.C., until his retirement in 2003. Survivors include his wife of more than 40 years, Shirley Hamby Burton (’61) of Cornelia; son and daughter-in-law, Michael and Jennifer Burton of Clarkesville; and sister, Peggy Morris Brock of Alto. Martha Gail Anderson, 73, of Andrews, N.C., died Dec. 11, 2013. A basketball star with the Andrews Wildcats, she was a 1962 graduate of Western Carolina University, where she majored in physical education. After completing a master’s degree in education, she taught in high schools in Stanley, Haywood, and Macon counties, and later at Piedmont College and Brevard College, coaching basketball and tennis. Bonnie Louise Prickett Sheridan, (attended ’34) of Wylie, Texas, died Dec. 22, 2013. She was 100. Born in Commerce, Ga., she was married for 68 years to Mark M Sheridan, Jr., who died in 2006. Virginia Nelson Walker (attended ’41) of Atlanta, Ga., died Oct. 31, 2013. She was 90. Born in Nelson, she was the widow of Roy Stakeley Walker Jr. and was a deacon at Wieuca Road Baptist Church. Imogene “Gene” Irvin Batson (attended 1947) of Demorest, Ga., died Feb. 25, 2014. She was 85. Born in Demorest, she was the widow of Charles T. Batson. She was a member of Demorest Baptist Church and a former co-owner of Lane’s Food Store.

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NoN-Profit U. S. PoStage PaiD gaiNeSville, ga Permit #47 PO Box 429 | Demorest, Georgia | 30535

NORTH GEORGIA THEATRE AT PIEDMONT COLLEGE PRESENTS

PIEDMONT COLLEGE

DISCOVER WHAT PIEDMONT HAS TO OFFER IN THE SUMMER!

2014 SUMMER SCHEDULE JUNE 12-14 8PM & JUNE 15 2PM Shakespeare in the Park Taming of the Shrew Arrendale Amphitheater (Al fresco dinners available from Sweet Breads.)

JUNE 26-28 8PM & JUNE 29 2PM 9 to 5: The Musical Swanson Center Mainstage

INFO 38

Natalie Crawford, 706-778-8500 x1050 ncrawford@piedmont.edu www.piedmont.edu/summer

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www.piedmont.edu/fa


Piedmont College Journal Spring 2014