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Everything is Dead Pg. 8 South’s Swimming Sensation Pg. 19

Technology Time-Out

Students React to the New Electronics Policy Pgs. 12-13

Park Hill South High School September 14 , 2012 Volume 15 / Issue 1


September 15, 2012 The View / Issue 1 / Volume 15

Sophomores Aspen Hudson and Emma Woodson work with speaker Colleen at the training following the Rachel’s Legacy Assembly on Sept. 6. Photo by SARAH HARDIN

safe at south / page 4

411

Spotlight pixar perfection / page 6 Perspective Detail seeing double / page 15 orlando magic / page 20 Score what grinds my gears / page 10

LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

cover design by derek braun

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The first few weeks of school at South are always both interesting and exciting. For Freshmen, high school is a completely new experience and opens the door to the always heralded “best four years of your life.” For Seniors, it marks the beginning of the end; this is the last year we’ll be living with Mom and Dad and the last year that we will be able to ask them for things (such as money) whenever we want. And for the rest of you, well, it’s just another year of high school. Each year takes some time to get used to what’s new and adjust yourself to it. The View staff is no exception to that standard. Although we promise to devote ourselves 100 percent to appeasing students all over South, we have only six returning staff members and feature 18 brand new faces. Everyone is more

than ready for the opportunity to bring local, South and breaking news to you and deliver diverse opinions to create the best possible newsmagazine. We also update our website, www.phsview.com, daily with even more. In this issue, you’ll get a chance to read about this year’s Homecoming Dance (page 3), our center spread of the new technology devices policy (pages 12-13) and an interview with a former South swimming standout (page 19). While this is just the first of our eight issues for the year, we couldn’t be more excited to deliver the news that is important to all of South.

Yearbook Senior Salute orders are due Sept. 18 to room C200 • Order a book by Jan. 11


by KATIE BLECHINGER and MALLORY MOXHAM

Some students worry that this year’s dance will not be worth the cost, but STUCO encourages sales and predicts a great turnout

H

photo by SHELBY COOPER

omecoming has been a high school tradition for years. The question now is how long will this tradition carry out? There has been debate about stronger enforcement of dancing rules by the administration which has left South students wondering if it is really worth the money to go to the dance this year. “Me and my friends decided it wasn’t worth the money,” said Austin Denney, senior. “It’s not fun anymore.” While rules do not allow students to do absolutely anything, they provide a safer environment for students to feel comfortable and not violated. “The rules have always been there – we just didn’t apply them,”

said John Carr, administration, who has been dealing with a lot of complaints from upset students. “It’s not just me, it’s also the administration; this is a high school, not a night club.” Some students may be upset about having rules, but others do not seem to mind as much. “The dancing rule isn’t that big of a deal,” said Daria Ghasemi, freshman, who plans on attending the dance this year. However, she also believes that stricter rules will affect the attendance of this year’s Homecoming and future dances. With all the negative talk surrounding the dance, STUCO has tried to lighten the mood. “We’re really excited about it,” said Sarah Mathews, STUCO. Mathews also added that they have new, exciting things planned for this year and said it will be “the biggest Homecoming South has ever seen.” Some students predict a decrease in ticket sales as well, but Zack Royle, STUCO president, disagrees and believes the number of students will be the same. “It’s been a tradition,” said Royle. “It’s a fun environment.” Making sure students feel like they are in safe environment is very important to Carr, Mathews and the rest of STUCO. Homecoming Dance is tomorrow night from 8-11 p.m. in the gym.

>>how to survive a

LAST MINUTE homecoming

Girls: Finding a Cheap, Stylish Dress Forever 21: Starting at $7.80 Guys: Find a Decently Priced Dress Shirt Dillards: Starting at $29.99 Girls: Buying Heels - Charlotte Russe Pumps start at $25.50 Guys: Buy A Tie to Match Your New Dress Shirt - Walmart: Starting at $9.99 Buying Flowers: Check out Price Chopper’s Pre-Made arrangements Find Somewhere Simple to Have Dinner. Somewhere that does not require reservations. (Stone Canyon, Olive Garden) You can buy your tickets at the door for a little bit more than you would have paid in advance

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here comesHomecoming

“I bought a $20 Dress from Forever 21, but it didn’t look cheap, it looked classy. If you buy cheap, make sure it doesn’t look cheap,” Breezy Kolkoski, junior. “It’s easy to just borrow one instead of spending money on one,” David Thibeau, senior.

“Price Chopper is quick and easy. You can pick them up right away,” Matt Barry, senior.

Homecoming Court Freshmen Brady Smith Blake Barth

Sophomore Adele Royle Dylen Propes

Junior Maddie Putnam Amanda Smith Chase Riekhof CJ Whisnant

Senior

Allyssa Brubeck Samantha Boling Elaina Fopeano Stephanie Allred Kylie Vandeven Chase Gray Brody Bouillon Seth Cline Adam Weatherly Alex Weatherly

Fall sports records (as of Sept. 11) Football: 1-2 • Boys Soccer: 5-1-0 • Volleyball: 9-0

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Safe at

Are citizens of the United States becoming desensitized to violence?

Over a decade ago, multiple students lost their lives at Columbine High School in Colorado when two students opened fire. Following the shooting, schools across the country began implementing new rules such as wearing ID badges. They also created or renewed their anti-bullying policies. There have been many additional mass shootings since Columbine. The movie theatre shooting in Aurora, Colorado and a shooting at the Empire State Building are some of the most recent. According to the Brady Campaign to Prevent Gun Violence, by BREANNA WEBSTER the United States experiences an average of 20 mass shootings a year. Park Hill South is not desensitized to these acts of violence, PARK HILL SOUTH WORKS TO ENSURE THE however. The staff knows that they are a big deal and for that SAFETY OF THEIR STUDENTS reason they work to ensure the safety of their students. Students like Danni Britz, junior, feel safe as they walk through the halls. Britz knows that South is one of the most “We don’t want people to risk their lives, but we want them to be secure places to be. She said she would be “really scared” if able to report safely,” Westrich said. something violent were to occur here at school, but knows she is Something that helps the staff keep students safe are their in good hands regardless. ID badges. The staff needs to know who is in the building at all “I feel like we have really nice security here,” Britz said. times and wearing a picture ID lets them know who belongs at Britz also said that she does not understand why someone South and who does not. If someone is not wearing their badge, would do something similar to the Columbine shooting at a then it makes them look suspicious and that is why the guards are school. She is not the only one who strict about students wearing them. feels that way. South also uses drills to make sure “IT WOULD BE VERY HARD TO Officer Matt Westrich, School students know how to react during difResource Officer, has been in the TARGET PARK HILL SOUTH.” ferent situations. security business for 14 years. He “Our goal isn’t to scare people. It said there is no telling why people do such a thing and that most is to educate people on what to do,” Westrich said. shooters are killed before they can be questioned. Nick Raue, freshman, thinks the drills work to help keep stuWhat he does know is that South is well prepared for any type dents safe. He said it also helps that South discourages bullying. of violence that may occur. Raue believes that bullying is something that can potentially lead “It would be very hard to target Park Hill South…we run a to a shooting. tight ship,” Westrich said. “[Students at South are safe] because of all the security Westrich said that South is isolated and that security keeps an guards and because people stop bullying,” Raue said. eye out for trouble. A shooter would typically pick a soft target Whether or not shootings like Columbine or the latest in an and according to Westrich, South is definitely not a soft target. Aurora movie theater desensitize students and staff to violence, Westrich goes to active shooter training classes every year South has taken the appropriate steps to prevent a disaster and and is well prepared if anything were to happen here at South. provide a safe environment for it’s students. The South staff is lectured on expectations during an active shooting situation and they know what they are supposed to do in that sort of situation.

SOUTH

ohSHOOT! by MEGAN MCMULLEN

COLUMBINE HIGH SCHOOL

US DEADLIEST SHOOTINGS FORT HOOD, TEXAS

13 killed 23 wounded

High school students Eric Harris and Dylan Klebold opened fire at their high school, killing several students and a teacher.

13 killed 32 wounded

Major Nidal Malik Hasan, an army pyschiatrist, went on a shooting rampage at the base he was stationed on.

VIRGINIA TECH UNIVERSITY April 16, 2007 32 killed

Senior Sueng-Hui Cho shot students in a dorm and waited two hours before killing more in an academic building.

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AURORA, COLORADO July 20, 2012

November 5, 2009

April 20, 1999

12 killed 58 injured

James Holmes attacked at a Century 16 movie theater during a midnight premiere of “The Dark Knight Rises.”

SEAL BEACH, CALIFORNIA October 12, 2011 8 killed 1 wounded

Scott Dekraai walked into his former wife’s hair salon and shot and kiled several customers and workers. He was in a current custody dispute.

Girls Softball: 8-2 • Girls Tennis: Next home match is Sept. 18 against Truman


by ANDRE SHAVER

MAYHEM

Apple has stopped production of the

Macbook Pro 17” laptop. Whether for the best or not, it is to increase company production of other smaller Macbooks, produce more iPads and other such products. This also includes the production of Macbooks with retina display screens, according to ZDNet.com. Most students in South do not agree with Apple’s decision to cut down laptop production and replace them with iPads. “This personally affects me. The iPad is great for fun, but not for business,” said Kylie Vandeven, Senior. Vandeven uses Macs constantly for computer art projects and they make it easier for her to do work. Although iPads can do the same thing as Macbooks, they are not as functional or user friendly. South students agree that if a company is intending to do this, they will need to make iPads as user-friendly as their Macbooks are. That way there is not a loss in ability during transitions between the two. “iPads are more versatile, but are harder to do the same tasks on [Macbooks],” said Connor Blinzler, Senior.

Apple Facts

April 1, 1976 - Apple 1 Computer was created.

Vandeven and Blinzler both agreed that they would rather get a Macbook Pro over an iPad. According to student opinion, it seems that Apple is making a mistake in stopping this production. And it is assumed that other computer companies will follow suit. “They’re all searching for the next form of technology. Always trying to make something better,” said Bob Bohning, business. Mac plans to increase screen graphics and make more iPads, possibly leading the technology into its next era surpassing laptops, the era of tablets. With new technology typically comes more money and people cannot always afford the newest things in technology. Trevor Eiken, Senior, said, “[Companies] can make more expensive items, but will lose interest with minorities.” Whether companies like Apple follow suit or not, students will have to wait and see, but one thing is for sure… they will try to compete with Apple for the best products like they always have.

OVERPOPULATEDAnime

1983 - John Scully, com-

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Mac

Apple is taking steps to lead the technology era yet again

pany CEO of Pepsi-Cola, became CEO of Apple to help Apple increase growth.

1997 to 2000 - Steve Jobs announced big changes in Apple and the way it was going to be ran; including a 5-year patent crosslicense with Microsoft.

2000 to 2004 - Apple

took the world by storm with its personal electronic devices, including the iPod.

June 29th, 2007 - Apple’s first iPhone went on sale, selling around 3 million units by the end of the year. apple-history.com

by ELIE QUIROZ

How a student-based club skyrocketed to a high populated status with obstacles in the way Through the doors of the Anime club room. you will find loud conversations, drawings of anime, unusual hats and a game of Yugioh going on in the back. This club knows they are different, nerdy and crazy, but they just do not care.

The Anime Club was started in 2009 by a small group of friends who all enjoyed the Japanese culture. In the beginning, the club had to overcome obstacles such as finding a teacher to help run the class. Members had to share the Art Club’s teacher for the first two years. They also had to deal with the fact that other clubs outcasted them and considered them a joke because of the topics they chose to talk about. “Despite [the obstacles], we remained a family. We worked hard and took pride in it,” said Cody Santi, a previous member of the club. Santi was there from the beginning.

His first job was to give support, recruit members and help keep the club in line. He soon became the club’s skit writer and won the club two awards at an Anime convention for two years. Since then the club has grown to become one of the largest in the school, with more than 30 members. Each member has brought something to the club to help it make it great. They branch out and are not afraid to talk about the club they love.

year. With the new people in charge, some things will change for the better,” said Tyler Fennel, Sophomore. The Anime club centers themselves to take pride in the culture of anime, one culture they intend to defend.

“It will be exciting and a little crazy, but I hope it will be very fun for everyone,” said Hannah Cockrill, junior and president of Anime Club.

The club plans to be a part of the Homecoming Parade again this year with a new float idea. There will also be more activities such as of having Ninja games, watching plenty of anime, discussing the difference between American and Japanese anime and a possible “Animenia” lock-in. “Things will definitely be different this

Anime club in the midst of a meeting. photo by ANDRE SHAVER

Boys/Girls XC: Next meet is Sept. 20 at Grandview • Royals are 63-77 (as of Sept. 10)

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pixar

[

PERFECTION

]

South Students discuss the sucess of Pixar’s animation

by CALEB FENNER

With Classics like “Toy Story”, “Monsters Inc.” and “Finding From the bright lights of Paris, to the Great Barrier Reef, to the Nemo” it is not hard to see why people love Pixar. Most students at Scottish highlands and to outer space, Pixar has traveled around South grew up watching films like these. the world and people have taken notice. Pixar has had plenty of success elsewhere as well . Apart from The groundbreaking animation company has had countless hits, being critical and commercial successful, they have won 11 Oscars. made billions of dollars and won numerous Oscars. They have released 13 major computer generated image films, all of Pixar has arguably attracted more success than any other film which opened number one at the box office. No other animation company in cinema history. Critics love it and audiences love it. company has had success near that level. Kids enjoy the movies due to the colorful artwork and vibrant Hills thinks that kind of success can continue. characters. Adults enjoy them because of “The company is based around people who the unique stories and underlying messages. only wanted to make that type of movie. They That is why Pixar has not been dethroned as just have creative people,” he said. animation’s top dog. Of all the Pixar films, “Toy Story” seems to “I think they’re timeless,” said Connor be the favorite amongst South students. Hills, sophomore. “I still watch them, and “Watching as a kid, something about [“Toy they’re as good as the first time.” Story”] just sticks with you,” Mata said. Pixar has many reasons as to why they are Hills had to put “Toy Story” at the top of his the most successful animation company in list as well. source: pixar.com history. Appealing to kids and adults is one “They made three of those movies for a of the biggest. reason,” he said. “They have characters that are toys and monsters, but have Although Pixar has had tremendous success with its films, they underlying themes that adults can enjoy,” Hills said. have been trying different ways to bring their classics back to life. Pixar does have plenty of vibrant characters that children are For example, “Finding Nemo” is being re-released in 3-D on likely to love. There is a sheriff, a space ranger, a one eyed monster Sept. 14. and countless others. Those characters also deal with problems Pixar does not look to be going anywhere either. They have that often have real world meanings. several upcoming projects, including a prequel to “Monsters Inc.” “They’re classics because they have all different types of With these new films coming out, people of all genders, races characters,” said Meghan Jones, freshman. and ages will be flocking to movie theaters to enjoy these movies However, Elias Mata, junior, enjoys Pixar for a different reason. once more. After all, Pixar only makes movies that everyone “They’re something everybody can enjoy, the whole family can enjoy. loves,” said Mata.

PIXAR PRODUCED THEIR FIRST SHORT FILM IN

1983

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FIRST YEAR AT SOUITH

My favorite part about being at South is being in the educational study again.

by MEGAN MCMULLEN

SecurityCampus Supervisor

MR. MIGUEL GONZALEZ

[The most rewarding part about my job is that] I get to work with kids...I love the kids.

spotlight

Administration Assitant Attendance

15 YEARS AT SOUTH

MRS. JULIE LOWE

Principal

DR. DALE LONGENECKER

south staff

12 YEARS AT SOUTH [The craziest thing that has happened over the years] is definitely those girl fights.

Kara Venzian, senior, is the lead in “Little Women” • Visit PHSView.com for more stories!


sugar mama’s If you are in the mood for some delicious

smallcakes

Smallcakes, the cupcake bakery which cupcakes, ice cream, smoothies or decadent opened in Parkville last February, is owned cakes, Sugar Mamma’s in Briarcliff Village by our very own South student Samantha is the place to be. There are a wide variety Boling, Senior, and her family. The store of pastries, breakfast and lunch items and has a very welcoming environment because smoothies or coffee available. of the employees and as soon as you enter, When I walked in, I was immediately you are greeted with a smile. greeted and asked if I would like to sample There are a lot of different cupcakes anything. I was offered a peanut butter to choose from: the typical Pink Vanilla, cookie, which was delicious. Their cookies Choco-holic, Chocolate Cream and Red are baked fresh daily to perfection with a soft Velvet. However, there are also more center and firm around the edges. unique cupcakes such as the Caramel The store is stocked with perfectly Crunch, Hot Fudge Sundae, Lemon and decorated cakes, cupcakes and truffles. They many more. bake extravagant cakes for events such as My personal favorite cupcake, Peanut weddings, baby showers, sporting games, Butter Cup, is a chocolate cupcake with etc. The cupcakes are pretty well priced peanut butter frosting and crumbles of considering how big they are... and how peanut butter cupcakes. The best part is delicious they are. definitely the frosting… it is what makes There are a lot of unique flavors to choose the cupcakes. The moist cake goes together from at Sugar Mamma’s such as Dreamsicle, so perfectly with the creamy frosting. Boston Cream Pie, Expresso Me, Mint, Another great thing about Smallcakes PB&J, Rootbeer Float and many more. They is the size of the cupcake. For only $3 you range from about $3 to $5. get enough cupcake to leave you full and Along with these desserts there is a short satisfied. It is hard to find something that breakfast and lunch menu and many options filling and delicious at an affordable price. for smoothies or coffee and specialty drinks. Presentation is an important key factor They are open all days of the week and of a bakery, and Smallcakes has it. Every are willing to offer samples. Anytime you cupcake has a creative topping that is just are looking for something to satisfy your as appealing to your eyes as it is to your dessert craving without spending a fortune, stomach. If you are someone with a sweet I definitely recommend trying out Sugar tooth, Smallcakes is the perfect treat to Mamma’s Bakery. make your day. I would give this bakery four stars, I would give Smallcakes four and a because although there were more options to half stars because it definitely has the choose from, I liked the cupcakes better best cupcakes, but there is not as much to at Smallcakes. choose from.

naughty bites The newest edition to the Village

at Burlington Creek shopping center, previously known as Tuileries Plaza, is a bakery owned by Hannah Brown, junior, and her family. The bakery, Naughty Bites, plans to open sometime in the next week. Meanwhile, the bakery’s products are available at the HyVee off 64th St. These delicious cake pops are moist, fudge-like spheres of different flavored cake dipped in sweet frosting and decorated in colorful sprinkles. These desserts are perfection. When I first heard about Naughty Bites, I had low expectations. However, after trying the strawberry flavored cake with vanilla frosting, I was amazed. The cake pops are so flavorful and filling because they are more dense than airy. HyVee sells flavors like chocolate, strawberry, vanilla, red velvet and many more. Each cake pop is sold for only $1.99 at HyVee, so these Naughty Bites are delicious and cheap. With the opening of the new store, Naughty Bites is sponsored by the Chiefs and also Hyvee. This treat is taking the Kansas City area by storm and I definitely recommend it to all sugar lovers. I would rate this food with five stars because they are addicting, affordable and I have nothing negative to say. I look forward to the opening of the store to see what else they will have to offer!

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take3

LOCAL BAKERIES

photos and reviews by JESSICA HAYES

Kylie Vandeven, senior, is a finalist for the NSPA National Newspaper Design of the Year

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everything is

by KENNETH HARRIS and SEAN GREVICE

This year’s drought has been a major problem for many farmers in the Midwest, as well as the people at South

A

ll the plants are dead, water and food are more expensive and it is unbearably hot outside. “It’s a tragedy,” said senior Aditya Joshi. “My lawn is dead.” The drought is affecting all of us. Whether students realize it or not, and everyone is being urged to do their part to conserve water and other resources. Making a difference can be simple. For example, turning the faucet off while you brush your teeth saves about a gallon of water a minute, according to Marcia Umscheid, Environmental Science. The cause of this pattern of heat and low precipitation starts hundreds of miles away in the ocean. Right now, there is a La Nina storm cycle, which brings more precipitation and warmer winters to the southern United States and colder winters and drier summers to the Midwest and Northern United States. Less rain water means lower crop yields. According to a New York Times article by Paul Krugman, a Nobel Prize winning professor at Princeton University, the current

drought conditions are equal to those of the Dustbowl in the early 1900s and have forced record breaking corn prices. The drought is not just a problem here in Kansas City, but elsewhere in the country as well. Amy Goodman, a columnist specializing in weather at The Guardian, says that 72 percent of the continental United States is dealing with drought conditions and that number is only going to increase.

“there’s just not enough water in the soil...” Farmers and people who have vegetable gardens are most affected by the drought. Dr. Dale Longenecker, Principal, manages his parents’ farm and said he has had trouble maintaining some of the crops, like corn and milo. However; he says plants like wheat are doing fine due to their reduced dependence

on water. Dr. Longenecker does not seem to be too worried though. “That’s just part of farming,” he said, “sometimes it goes well and sometimes it doesn’t.” It is not just crops that are dying; young trees and bushes are suffering as well. Keegan Nash, whose uncle owns a small farm, has seen the damage firsthand. “Four out of five of our new trees died. There’s just not enough water in the soil for them to take root,” Nash said. The only thing students can do is to wait for the currents to change to El Nino, which will bring more precipitation. Until the currents change, Umscheid said it is “very unlikely that there will be enough rain to seep into the ground and stay there.” In the meantime, water conservation should remain a major concern.

peak area in DROUGHT (% of states in a drought)

JUL 1934

DEC 1939

JUL 1954

9 of the 10

hottest summers on record have occured since 2000

Over 2000

DEC 1956

JUL 2012 SEP 1931

57.2

79.9 62.1 60.4 57.6 57.2 54.9 Source: The Weather Channel

8

DID YOU KNOW? heat records were set in one week in July 2012

1 Degree Celsius

is the amount current global temperatures exceed what they should be naturally Sources: Paul Krugman, Amy Goodman, and the IPCC

Home football game vs St. Joe Central on Oct. 5 • 67 days until Thanksgiving Break


marching on

by SPENSER BRAYMER South’s marching band prepares for upcoming competitions

Although you may know them as the soundtrack artists of every Friday night football game at Preston Field, the Park Hill South marching band does much more than play at South games. While meeting for around 90 minutes two to three times a week, the band has been working to prepare for the Bands of America photo by RAELYN MORRIS (BOA) musical festival in St. Louis, Raytown Invitational and their Venzian’s instrument of choice, on the other hand, meant more to very own competition that they will be hosting at Preston Field this her than just looks. spring. This band of Panthers will not be participating at their own “My mom used to play clarinet in high school, so we already had competition, however. in our house,” said Venzian. “It would look like we were cheating at our “IT WOULD LOOK LIKE oneVenzian and Carlisle both agreed that the own competition,” said Dr. Miller, instructor of the band, with a laugh. “We will play to showcase WE WERE CHEATING AT biggest challenge that the band would face this year would be the lack of experience. our talents, however.” “About half the band is underclassmen,” Miller was faced with a tough choice on who OUR OWN COMPETITION” Venzian said. “It definitely makes for a harder was going to be his lead Drum Major for this learning curve.” school year. At the end of his decision he had not only one, but two Dr. Miller has faith that his students will overcome this lack of South Seniors chosen to lead his band. experience and prove that it is only a small obstacle. Alex Carlisle, (12), and Jamie Venzian, (12), were chosen as co“It is harder, sometimes, to manage such a large group all by drum majors for the band this year. myself, but I have the smartest kids in the school,” said Miller. “They Carlisle has been playing the trumpet since the seventh grade at are very cooperative. They’re not required to be here; they choose to St. Therese because he said, it “looked cool.” Although Carlisle has be here and want to get better.” earned the title of Drum Major, he still gets a little nervous when it With high statistics and an memorable sound; these young comes time to perform. South musicians, lack of experience aside, are ready to make a new “It’s intimidating,” said Carlisle. “But it is still a lot of fun. It’s cool soundtrack for the new year. to show off what we have been working so hard for.”

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&

they all go

Outside the drum Lines photo by LAIYA SMITH

by DANNY KERWIN South students love their performances, but how much do you actually know about the Drum Line?

F

rom the pep rallies to the tenor solo, to the unified yell of, “South!” it is safe to say a vast majority of South students know and love the drum line. Who are the 15 individuals who captivate the ears of South, and how exactly did they get into this musical fraternity? “Drum Line was more exciting than playing the flute,” said Bailey Walter, senior. “All the boys are hilarious, too.” Other members, such as Mathias Kuhl, senior, were simply just asked to audition. Kuhl now finds himself as the Percussion Drum Major. The 15 members, who refer to the group as

a family, were not just selected, but auditioned for the spots. The band department contains hundreds of students; however, only 15 make it into the drum line: three tenors, seven snares and five bass. Dr. Craig Miller, band director, believes the small group is a lot easier to manage. “The work ethic out of our group is awesome,” said Miller. “The practices actually get pretty intense, but we have some of the smartest kids in school on the drum line. The average GPA is about 3.70.” Such an academic achievement as a whole is impressive considering the additional drum line schedule each and every week. While the student body watches the drum line at every assembly and most sporting events, there are practices on weeknights that last for hours. Whether in class or after school at Preston Field, warm-ups and rehearsals are held to keep the drum line in tune throughout the year. Although Miller is the head of the band department, the drum line is actually instructed by Matt Arnet and Alex Valor, two South alumni. The two write and compose the music played every time the drum line performs.

Although the emotions still run high in practice, nothing compares to the real deal, according to Andrew Johnson, sophomore. “It’s just a rush of excitement. I always start with the butterflies but they go away as we get going,” said Johnson. “Performing at football games and assemblies is the best feeling in the world. We know all eyes are on us.” Other more veteran members, such as Kuhl, have grown accustomed to the routines. “It was nerve racking freshman year, but the feeling goes away as you get older,” said Kuhl, who plans on joining the Missouri Western State University Drum Line next year. While it may seem that the drum line is not quite as competitive as that of Atlanta A&T in the 2002 film Drumline, they do have competitions of their own. The group will participate in the BOA competition (Bands of America) and the annual Raytown Festival, along with a competition at Park Hill as well. South’s drum line takes pride in what they do and serve as an iconic symbol of school spirit, so remember next time when the 1,567 students chant, “South!” these 15 mean it with all of their heart.

97 days until Winter Break • Next Chiefs game is Sept. 19 at noon against Buffalo Bills

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thecenterwingVOTER APATHY

I

by KENNETH HARRIS

n the United States, one of our most valued rights is the ability to decide upon our own government. Every citizen, upon the age of 18, is given the right to participate in fair elections that determine the leaders of our country. Sadly enough, this privilege is taken for granted by the electorate, particularly within our age group. According to the 2010 Census, only 48.5 percent of registered voters between the ages of 18 and 24 voted in the 2008 election. That is approximately 28 percent of all people between the ages of 18-24. That means that 72 percent of people our age are blowing off a right that is given to them while in many other places of the world you would find people struggling or even dying on a daily basis to have the same freedoms. I think it is time our electorate and young people especially begin to take societal responsibility and realize what politics actually means. Let me be perfectly clear, I am not calling all non-politically active students lazy or ungrateful. I am merely trying to call attention to what is a major issue for the future of participatory democracy. It might not be that people choose not to vote

because they do not feel like it. Brock Wilkerson, a senior who is eligible to vote in this upcoming election, said, “None of it seems relevant to me. I feel like my vote is meaningless because it’s all about advertisements and who can raise the most money. It’s not about actual leadership.”

“72 PERCENT OF PEOPLE OUR AGE ARE BLOWING OFF A RIGHT THAT IS GIVEN TO THEM...” Maybe there is a problem that exists within our political system. Perhaps politicians have made the political system more about slander and buzz words that turn off younger voters because they lose interest. In fact, that is exactly how some of South’s more politically active students feel. “Politicians are purposefully setting up the system to make voters ignorant to what they are actually doing behind the scenes so they can maintain power,” said Hunter

what GRINDS my GEARS FRIENDS vs. SIGNIFICANT OTHERS

Picture this: It is Friday afternoon, the final bell is just about to ring. You check your cell and notice a text from your boyfriend: “Hey, do you have plans tonight?” At the same moment, your friends are discussing how excited they are for their night out tonight and ask if you would like to join them. Pretty sticky situation, huh? Do you join your friends for a girls’ night, or do you reply to your boyfriend’s text and agree to hang out with him? The answer is pretty simple: girls night! Text your boyfriend back, say you are going out and you will see him tomorrow. You can live without your man for one night. I promise he will still be there to cuddle, watch movies and be all sappy with you on Saturday night. Besides, you can just chill whenever you want. You cannot go out with your girls everyday, so take this opportunity to have fun with them. Not to mention, if you keep skipping out on time with your friends... they will get fed up with it eventually and stop inviting you. This means you’ll start drifting, maybe even to the point when you are not friends anymore. And if you lose all your friends because you are always with your boy-toy, who is going to be there for you when the inevitable breakup happens? Nobody. Sounds harsh, but I have seen it happen way too many times. To avoid being lonely when the end finally comes, always keep your friends close. Be honest, you are probably not going to marry your high school boyfriend. But, it is always possible that your best friends will be with you forever. Balance is key. Friday night with your girls and Saturday with your guy is a fair way to make everyone happy.

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Norton, senior and 2013 class president. “If people were involved in politics and knew what our government was doing, politics wouldn’t slip into the state of decay it is in now. Politicians are causing the problem, but ultimately our engagement is key.” Hunter is spot on. Whatever your reasons may be for not voting or not paying attention to government, it is up to us to reclaim our political system. If you think politics is boring, if you think that politicians need to be more concise with voters or if you think that politics are irrelevant in your life, then it is up to you to change that. Our votes are the only thing that can radically change our political system because our votes are the only things politicians have to answer to. It is because of our ability to check the political system that I am encouraging students to try and engage in their government a little more. The beauty of our political system is that the people have the ability to shape it into whatever they want it to be. It may not seem important to you, but if we do not seize that opportunity now then some politician might and turn the world into a much darker and scarier place.

by EMILY ORVOS and JAKE PAROLIN

There is nothing that pisses me off more than when my friends decide that their new broad is more important than best friends they grew up with. It grinds my gears when this new girl comes waltzing in and straight up changes everything. I get it, you are in a new relationship and your body has been taken over by hormones and puppy love, but the fact that you now devote all of your time and attention to some girl who you are bound to break up with anyway really does not make sense to me. Another thing, naive females entertain me. I love watching teenage girls get into new relationships with a guy they swear is Mr. Right. They then start ditching their friends for the new guy and all of sudden, Mr. Right is not around anymore and the brokenhearted Benedict Arnold has nobody to lean on because she kicked everyone else out of her life. If you cannot find a balance between your significant other and your friends, then you better hope that they are “the one” because if it were me, I would not stick around to mend your broken heart after you repeatedly shunned me from your life. For those relationships that can find a balance, kudos. It is always a feeling of relief when your bro brings in this new girl and she is actually cooler than a penguin in an icebox. When any friend of mine can bring around his girlfriend and she fits like a charm, then everything is perfect and there is nothing to worry about. Letting your significant other become friends with your friends usually ends well for everyone. It is a win-win situation that requires less choosing between the two. Friends come first in my book. If I were in a relationship, I would find a way to intermingle my new girl with my old dudes. If she tries to pull me away from them, then the buck stops there. Relationships will happen and they will end, but how you treat your friends will determine who is there for you when that ending arrives. I go by a certain saying that all guys know: bros come first.

South was named a National Blue Ribbon School on Sept. 7 by the US Dept. of Education


hearing AeonicResonance

SOUNDS COLORS

by SPENSER BRAYMER

Frank Ocean’s beautifully-odd rise to fame

viewstaffeditorial ELECTRONICS PLICY

was malignant. It was hopeless. There was no Frank’s drug induced vision of Heaven, Pocket change, a suitcase and a Nissan Ocean also takes us through the sweet lives of escaping… It was my first love.” Maxima. This was all Christopher Breaux super-rich kids living in the Ladera Heights possessed on his way to Los Angeles after being Excitement, confusion and the idea of forced to evacuate his home in New Orleans change raced through the heads of Ocean’s fans neighborhood of Los Angeles, California. Frank leaves us in confusion, with his last three and other hip-hop artists everywhere. following Hurricane Katrina. Though some did not know how to handle songs alternating between the longings for Better known by his stage name, Frank both a woman and a man. Ocean’s coming out letter, my image of him Ocean, Breaux began to pursue a career in I have been a fan of Frank Ocean since music. He recorded demos out of his friend’s had not been altered one bit. Many fellow 2010 when he released his song “Thinkin’ Bout musicians also jumped to Ocean’s defense, in-home recording studio and would soon You” on YouTube for the first time. I have make his dubious fantasies into an attainable including Jay-Z, Kanye West and 50-Cent. As if that was not enough to reassure Frank’s watched him grow as an artist, and I never reality in the City of Dreams. Breaux began his career by writing songs confidence, thousands of his fans bared even thought he would ever be able to outdo himself after the release of his award-winning mix more love and support with them than they for many established artists, such as Justin had before, getting Ocean’s name to trend on tape, Nostalgia, Ultra. After hearing channel Bieber, John Legend and Beyonce. He then ORANGE, however, I knew it was special. It Twitter for nearly three days straight. would join Tyler, the Creator and his L.A. is what Michael Jackson’s album, BAD, was to It takes an immense amount of courage based hip-hop collective, Odd Future. Gaining an underground notoriety as both a singer and and confidence to come out and say you are the 80s; no one will ever come close to making anything quite like it. a rapper, Breaux accompanied two of hip-hop’s bisexual, but to do so as a rising star in the To be quite ‘Frank’, channel ORANGE is a most established artists, Kanye West and Jay-Z, Hip-Hop industry is on the verge of insanity. on two songs on their platinum album Watch As far as I know, Ocean is the first rapper to work of art. “I feel like a free man,” Ocean writes at the the Throne. come out as openly gay. Though Frank Ocean continued to Hurtful homosexual slurs are used often in end of his open letter. make steady strides in the music industry, the rap world; someone who uses these explicit No longer would there be maintaining a Christopher Breaux was going through the slurs more than anyone is Ocean’s fellow band balance of his two lives; Frank Ocean and ordinary struggles of the average human being: member, Tyler, the Creator. However, Tyler andChristopher Breaux had finally become one. working two jobs, the temptations of drugs andthe rest of Odd Future supported Ocean more No more secrets, no more questions, no alcohol and passionate love followed by tragic than ever and exclaimed that they had known more struggles. Well, all but one struggle remains. heartbreak. In fact, Ocean harnessed those Ocean was bisexual for quite some time. feelings of sorrow that his first love has forever Ocean’s album, Channel ORANGE was The album name refers to Breaux’s struggles encrypted on his languid heart and wrote his released a week later on July 10 and it quickly with grapheme color synesthesia; a disease first studio album, Channel ORANGE. peaked as the number one album on iTunes. where the diagnosed individual perceives and Ocean croons beautifully written lyrics over associates numbers, words and feelings with That first love happened to be a man. “Four summers ago I met someone. I was 19 psychedelic synthesizers and tasty guitar riffs, colors. When Ocean fell in love that summer, years old. He was too,” said Ocean in a letter he often mesmerizing his listeners with a glass everything was orange. wrote to his fans that he posted on his Tumblr shattering falsetto. Just like the sound waves of Ocean’s listeners account. “By the time I realized I was in love, it From everlasting daydreams of love to were this summer. Through just four and a half weeks of this 2012-13 school year, one of the most noteworthy rule changes in school history has left the South student body angered and looking for refinement to the new guidelines. The administration passed a new rule for the year outlawing any technology device such as a phone or iPod in the classroom; however, the new rule permits the use of both in the hallways during passing time, and unprecedented ruling for South. This has outraged much of South and has left the 1,570 students wondering “why?” The reasons are obvious; with the technological revolution adapting devices into both cell phones and

mp3 players, teachers cannot decipher the difference. One thing is certain: there are plenty of advantages to permitting the use of these devices in school. With the drastic change in the world of cell phones and their capabilities, there is more potential than ever to use a phone such as the iPhone or Android for educational purposes. Marketplaces on both companies’ software feature thousands of apps that can be used for gathering information, staying updated and even completing assignments. While these high-technology phones can be abused in school, they can also be a huge aid to learning and reshape the way lessons are taught in the classroom, in everything from

practicing Spanish conversation and vocabulary to using Scientific Calculator apps. Aside from being a physical aid to the schoolwork being completed, music can also be an internal aid. Whether making projects in art or studying for the next test, students can focus a lot better when they are tuned into their own preferred tunes, and this continues beyond high school. A study by the Teachers at Risk organization found that 90 percent of 18- to 24-yearolds said listening to music while working boosted both job satisfaction and productivity. Why prevent this progress? Although teachers claim that iPods shouldn’t be allowed because it can give a student an ample opportunity to cheat,

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seeing

there are circumstances where their use is beneficial, and teachers can prohibit their use at certain times like testing to prevent this from happening. When students take AP Exams, test proctors take their phones, so teachers at South could easily do the same thing on test days. While the cheating taking place in the classroom is the driving factor in this decision, it is evident that the oppression of cell phones and mp3 players is hindering students more than helping them. As both arguments have been made, a medium needs to be found. The use of technology in the classroom through mobile devices needs to be held to the teacher’s discretion.

Volleyball won their Fall Classic Tournament in Fla. • Sporting KC is 15-7-5 (as of Sept. 10)

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Technology Time-Out A new cell phone policy leaves many changes in the classrooms at South

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by JAKE PAROLIN & KARLIE BISCHOFF

alking through the halls between classes, students may notice an increasing number of people checking their Facebook, scrolling through Twitter and texting their friends. Just last year, cell phones and music players were completely banned in the hallways during school hours. However, a brand new rule is being enforced this year: students are now able to enjoy their phones and music in the hall, but neither can be seen, used or heard in the classroom. Everyone has heard about the new policy, but not everyone knows the reasons for the change. “[Cell phones] are a constant bother to everyone,” said John Carr, assistant principal. “Students have been distracted by electronics in the classroom, and have also used them to cheat.” Students have never been allowed to use their phones during class, but after a cheating scandal and an outbreak on Twitter, not only cell phones are banned, but iPods as well. Students are most upset about the restriction on music players during independent study time. “I listen to music to be productive and to get things done,” said DeShon Jones, senior. “I’m not listening to music to help me cheat.” However, so many students are getting iPhones that their music and cell phone are on the same device and it is becoming impossible for the teacher to determine if a student is switching a song or texting their friends. “I’m not going to make a teacher distinguish what’s an

iPod and what’s a cell phone and what’s an mp3 player. It doesn’t need to happen,” said Carr. Like Jones, in the past many students would listen to music on their phone as a way to stay focused during work time in classes such as math, tutorial and art. “Music helps an artist to block out everyone else and zone in on their artwork,” said art teacher Megan Carson. “They can also use their phone to look up an artist or take a photo of a still life.” The new rule has led many students to search for alternatives such as walkmans or CD players, but these have been banned as well. “The teacher can bring in a boom box,” said Carr. Aside from being a music source, cell phones help many school organizations and clubs to keep track of assignments and communicate with the student body through Twitter and Facebook.  Apart from social media, organizations such as the Freshman Mentor Program, Student Council and Yearbook have also used their phones during class to contact advertisers, plan events and sell their products. “A cell phone can be a useful tool to keep a person organized and connected,” said Carson. “Using no cell phone is like going backward.” Although the new rule takes away freedoms previously enjoyed in the classroom, it also gives students new privileges they have never had before. Even though not everyone agrees with the new rule, all students and teachers are still expected to follow it.

“Using no cell phone is like going backward.”

Only 10% of Parents Want Stricter Technology Policies

>>

>>BANNED

69% of Schools Have

of teens admit to cheating >>35% at least one with cell phones >>8 in 10

Cell Phones

kids have cell phones

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source: common sense media 2012 study


Pho ne F reak 25% out of stu de n AV iew

1/4th Are Sent From a Classroom

The Average Teen Sends 440 Text Messages a Week

Source: Common Sense Media 2010

25%

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of

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rule

s

percentage of teens

using cell phones at school

72%

in schools with no real or known cell restrictions

63%

in schools that ban cell phones altogether

57%

in schools where phones must be stored during the day

66%

in schools where phones must remain off all day source: common sense media 2010 study

page design by derek braun

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Come visit our NEW

www.worthharley-davidson.com 816-420-9000 IT’S NOT JUST DOING HOMEWORK.

IT’S DOING WORK THAT MAKES A DIFFERENCE, TRANSFORMING AMBITION INTO ACHIEVEMENT.

umkc.edu/choose


by CJWHISNANT

by CJ WHISNANT

Some South students share more than just a similar face

Whether it is on the field or in the classroom, being confused for the other and trying to beat each other is just another day in the life of these sets of twins. Adam and Alex Weatherly, seniors, do not share what one would call a ‘healthy’ sibling relationship. “We have a high level of competitiveness at everything we do,” said Alex, who is the older of the two boys. The boys take the meaning of “everything” to the fullest extent. It goes all the way from FIFA, a game they play practically every day, to on the soccer field and wrestling mats. During FIFA, the boys said they “get into fist fights” and would “die” to beat the other, according to Adam. Not only does it carry over to wrestling and soccer, but life in general too. “[Alex has] never gone to state [for wrestling],” said Adam, “I have 100 wins and he only has 81.” While they suggest it is only for bragging rights, being better than the other is their ultimate goal every year. They have played sports with each other every year since they were little and for some, they are the same person during games. “Every day [Coach] Toigo doesn’t know who I am. We’re both known as ‘Weatherly’ to him,” said Alex. Alex considers this rivalry as a plus due to how it “pushes [them] to be [their] best.” However, amidst all of the confusion and conflict, the boys both agree that at the end of the day neither one would be as good as they are without the other. Another set of twins that share the same complications are Courtney and Mallory Land, deniors. “[Our] own parents can’t even tell us apart,” said Courtney, older than Mallory by one minute exactly. The girls currently play for the Varsity softball team. They said they enjoy playing and being around each other because they are more competitive that way and it pushes them. “We’re very competitive...oh my god...

at everything and anything,” said Courtney. In Courtney’s opinion, both of the girls are the “best” at what they do and they have their own “different specialties” that they are better at than the other. “Whenever the other does something good we always say, ‘Wow that sucked!” said Mallory. While these two sets of twins can both relate to one another more and have more competition against each other, it does not mean it goes away with twins of different genders. Cody and Ashley Kildow, also in the twin infested senior class, do not get along any better than the Weatherlys or Lands--actually, it may be worse. “We don’t get along at all,” said Cody, who added that they fight about “pretty much everything.” Even though it seems like their problems may never be resolved, Ashley actually mentions that they have gotten better towards each other over the years and that it is more of a goal to be better than the other. When it comes to being better than each other, neither one of the Kildows wants to be the lesser twin. How well they compete can decide that. At first Cody said that the two had no competitiveness. After a moment of thought, he then added, “Actually, yes we do.” Ashley would agree, adding that “Cody’s a jerk,” and, “We have a strong sibling rivalry.” “I [have the] athletics, she’s got the smarts,” said Cody. Although it might seem cliché, South’s twins do seem to fit the typical stereotype of most twins; that can be a very good or very bad thing depending on the person.

“[OUR] OWN PARENTS CAN’T EVEN TELL US APART.”

TWINS

In Each Grade JUNIOR

15%

SOPHOMORE

30%

FR E 10 SHM % AN

Photos by KARLIE BISCHOFF & ELIE QUIROZ

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DOUBLE

SENIOR 45%

by PERSON

Conner Blinzler, senior, received the 2012 Virjean Burton Youth Philanthropy Award

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OUT

CAMPIN’

Students reminisce on their summer experiences at camp

Sleeping bag? Flashlight? Summer fun? Check, check, check.

For students trying to get the most out of their 80 days of freedom as possible, camp was in their summer plans. Whether it was church camp, journalism camp, sports camp, a leadership camp or adventure camp it was sure to be a good time. Just a few of the camps attended by South students this summer include: Camp Cedar Crest in Mexico, Mo., Young Life Camp in Sharp Top Cove, Ga., Band Camp at Ball State Indiana University and many more. Students go to camp for a variety of reasons, but more often than not it is to have a good time with friends. “I went because a bunch of my friends had gone before and said it was the best experience of their lives,” said Kayla Mikuls, junior, who attended a Young Life Camp. Many great memories can come from attending a summer camp, and of course, a few that are not so good. “Going to Camp Cedar Crest taught me to drink more water so I don’t end up in the hospital with heat exhaustion again,” said Harrison Fox, sophomore, “At first I just had cramps, but then my

selfless summers

Countless miles, days of travel, one cause. Instead of spending their summer days by the ocean or at Disney World, many students at South were busy serving others on a different type of vacation. Whether they traveled across the country or overseas, they all had one goal in common: to spread the gospel. Brody Smith, Senior, went on a total of seven youth-led mission trips throughout the summer. He went everywhere from Joplin and St. Louis, Mo. to Arlington, Tex. and Kenwood, Okla.

“PEOPLE SAY ‘YOU DO SO MUCH FOR THEM,’ WHEN REALLY THEY ARE THE ONES WHO DO SO MUCH FOR US.” Smith spent only two weeks in his hometown of Kansas City and only three nights in his own bed. “Once doing what I call ‘God’s Work’ becomes a habit, it becomes truly special,” said Smith. As the head chair of the youth missions trips community for his church, Smith was able to go to Joplin three times and on trips to other cities such as Colorado Springs. Smith worked with a leadership team from United Methodist churches all over Missouri; together, they contacted places in order to find work for volunteers and initiated work sites. While on site in Joplin, Mo. Smith got the opportunity to meet a couple who lost

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by PERRI MILLER

muscles started to twitch and I began having seizures. They took me to the hospital. My dad ended up having to pick me up a day early from camp,” Some of students’ favorite memories came from the organized activities already set in camp schedules. “Our camp had a zip line, ropes course and western night; we got to hike a mountain, go rock climbing and go swimming, too. It was an accomplishment for people who were scared of heights,” said Mikuls. With busy schedules, many campers enjoy the down time that they are allowed at camp. “Staying in the dorms and hanging out on the Mizzou campus for basketball camp was fun,” said Nichole Krug, junior. Summer team camps for South sports can be very beneficial. It is a way for the teams to see how they well play together before they begin the season. “It was good getting to play games with the team at an away camp because it made us grow closer together,” said Krug. When summer camps become a tradition for South students, it becomes something that they can truly look forward to each summer.

South students share how they spent their summer serving others by MEGAN MCMULLEN

everything in the 2011 tornado. The woman was at the local Walmart when the tornado hit and her husband spent days searching for her amongst the rubble. Meanwhile, the woman had returned back to the couple’s home where she eventually met up with her husband four days after the tornado. This story became memorable for Smith when he realized the couple “had nothing left, but yet they had each other”. “Making service work a habit allows you to open your eyes when you come back to the real world,” said Smith. Hannah Pettijohn, junior, spent two weeks of her summer traveling through the mountainous villages and capital of Peru on a mission trip. Throughout her stay, Pettijohn and her fellow church members helped spread the gospel and the idea of purity. She also volunteered at churches, helping with office work, and at schools, taking part in general up keep during her trip. “It was crazy to realize that the same God I have, they have... even if we speak different languages,” said Pettijohn. Raven Jennings, junior, traveled overseas as well. Over the past summer she went to El Salvador on two separate mission trips. Between both trips, Jennings ventured to cities such as Allegn, Lebertad and San Miguel. “I love to remove myself from the worldly distractions here and spend a

week or two just serving others,” said Jennings. During her trips to El Salvador, she got the opportunity to teach at a Vacation Bible School in El Bosque del Tirgre. Jennings and her fellow missionaries also worked in various orphanages throughout the country. As a member of South’s Junior Varsity team last year, Jennings said she enjoyed playing soccer with local teenage boys as a way to spread the gospel even farther while in El Salvador. “People say ‘You do so much for them,” Jennings said, “when really they are the ones who do so much for us.”

photo provided by HANNAH PETTIJOHN

FOR Club’s first meeting is Sept. 19 during collaboration. All are welcome, invite friends!


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New Year, New Lunchroom Policy South Students Come Back to a Change in the Lunchroom

Proceeds from the traditional snack machine go toward the Bell Tower

Proceeds from the drink machines also go toward the Bell Tower

The lunch vending machine proceeds all go toward the lunch system of Missouri

T

he new school year ushered in new students, new school supplies and new policies in the Park Hill School District cafeterias. The former policy used to serve high school students a lunch that included over 825 calories each day, the lunches are now being limited between 750-850 calories. The decrease in calories has affected the serving size of many Park Hill South lunches. “I liked the old lunch better,” said Evan Jones, senior. “The serving sizes were much bigger.” Jones’ favorite thing to order in the cafeteria is the traditional chicken nuggets every Wednesday. He said he was disappointed when they did not allow him to partake in “Dub Nug Wednesday”,combining two orders of chicken nugget lunches into one. Jones also has taken notice that the lunchroom is much stricter about choosing fruits and vegetables to go along with their meals this year. The cafeteria is required to direct students who buy a school lunch to get at least one cup of

fruits and vegetables every day. Students must get a carton of orange juice or apple juice at the very least. “I think kids are confused on who is setting these guidelines,” said Melissa Wolf, cafeteria. “It’s not the cafeteria who is choosing to cut back on calories and serving sizes. It’s the government.” As far as the quality of food goes, there has not been too drastic of a change in taste. According to Wolf, the biggest complaint she has received is the transition of mixing whole grain into the pasta bar. Wolf also said things are not looking too much better for the quality of food, because in the next three years, the district will be cutting back on the amount of sodium in lunches as well. Eventually, they will include a whole sodium system. Although these changes have impacted all Park Hill School District students, South has been far more fortunate than the middle school in the district. The old lunch policy used to be split between K-5th students, and 6th- 12th in regards to portion sizes; now

by SPENSER BRAYMER & JAKE PAROLIN the new policy has added a 6th grade-8th grade group for portion sizes. This has caused the serving sizes for middle school kids to shrink from a high school sized lunch, to being much closer to the size of an elementary school lunch. Despite being unhappy with the serving sizes, Jones said he was pleased with the new nutrition plans and thought they would be better healthier choices. Wolf also agreed that the food choices are healthier and in some cases better. “A few lunch ladies actually went to a few conventions to taste test new healthy choices for this year’s lunches,” said Wolf. “So we kind of had an idea of what we were getting.” Wolf added to these lunch ladies’ contributions by advising students to try the new pizza. Despite changing the crust to whole grain, the pizza is “just as good, if not better,” according to Wolf. Throughout the school year, students move away, supplies will get replaced, but one thing is for sure: do not mess with the student’s lunches.

Victoriously Vending by KYLE VANICE

New Vending Machines and Old Favorites Come Back to South

You put in your dollar bill into the vending machine and press the button in anticipation for your bag of M&M’s. The coil starts to twist, bringing your candy closer and closer...but your heart stops when you see that the coil has stopped. Now you do not have your candy or your dollar. But it is okay that you lost that dollar, because now you know that the dollar you put in is going to the South Bell Tower fund. “All profits from the traditional snack food vending machine are going into building the Bell Tower,” said Dr. Dale Longenecker, Principal. The vending machines can come in handy when wanting a quick snack during lunch. “I like the vending machines because it’s faster and I don’t have to talk to people,” said Abby Cogswell, Freshman. Some students are not as big of fans as Cogswell. “I wish they would leave them on after school during sports practice. I also wish you could use your lunch code for the candy snack machines,” said Jennifer Welch, Sophomore. Something Welch might not know is that “the money from the lunch vending machines actually goes towards state lunch funding, not the school’s [funding],” according to Longenecker. “The vending machines, including the drink and candy machines

[profits] are being used to build the Bell Tower and that is why there cannot be a pad to type in your lunch pin” said Dr. Longenecker. Another vending machine new to South is the spirit vending machine, otherwise known as the “Spirit Box”. The profits from this “Spirit Box”, go to DECA. “DECA is a marketing organization that tries to develop future business leaders through leadership conference and business competition,” said Dan Dunkin, DECA Sponsor. DECA uses the “Spirit Box” in hope to raise school spirit and hopefully turn a profit. “[The Spirit Box] helps to promote school spirit. If a South student wants to promote their favorite school or team, hopefully the ‘Spirit Box’ will have something for them,” said Dunkin. Every student at South is benefiting from the vending machines, whether they get a good afternoon snack or some new spirit gear to represent our school. “The vending machines are great,” said Cogswell. So it is okay that you lost your dollar bill to the vending machine because you have now supported your school and even showed a little school spirit.

“THE VENDING MACHINES ARE GREAT.”

Class of 2013: 247 days until Graduation • FCA meets every Thursday in the Auditorium

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South’s Gotspirit

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Katie Smith, senior

Lindsey Yager, senior

Breezy Kolkoski, junior

Taylor Lenz, sophomore

Maddie Henning, junior

Students show off different class t-shirts trending in the halls of South

NBA PLAYERS & MALE CELEBRITIES MADE SPLASHES IN THE FASHION WORLD

hile you were on vacation this summer, trends were set. Unnecessary bold frames, shirts with fishes and denim took center stage as celebrities and athletes flocked to the spotlight. Headlining these looks were megastars such as LeBron James, Kanye West, Dwyane Wade and Russell Westbrook. In 2005, the NBA established a dress code to prevent players from wearing the clothing associated with hip-hop culture. The players embraced it with open arms. James, the first black man to ever be on the cover of Vogue magazine in 2008, has been seen walking into the locker room before games with a bag he calls a ‘man bag’, but it looks similar to a purse. James and the company’s looks have even been noticed here at South. When walking around during passing time you will see some students dressing the part. Craig Scott, Senior, took notice of West’s denim ‘blob’ trend, a denim top and bottom, and has been seen rocking it as well.

Westbrook, NBA superstar, made the boldest statement with his never before seen look. He wore shirts with fish on them, which look like they could be found at a thrift store, and eye captivating red glasses with no frames. Westbrook also wore shirts with multiple colorful geometric shapes on them. “It’s out there and I like it,” said Max Laney, Junior. Laney believes he is also “out there” when he wears his Hawaiian shirts to school.  Wade has the most explosive outfit of all. Your eyes squint at the sight of his blazing fuchsia pants. His pants even received more attention than his lackluster play in the NBA Finals. Laney and Scott both say Wade’s pants stick out in their minds due to the daring color. As ridiculous as some of them look, experts say the outfits are fashionable. When interviewed by the New York Times, Wade said, “Trends, they come and go, and people get on board with them or they don’t. With the nerd glasses in the NBA, it’s just something fun to do right now.”

GOTTA Have it

by CODY SHOPPER

“IT’S OUT THERE AND I LIKE IT.”

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Homecoming Game is tonight at 7 p.m. • Homecoming Parade is tomorrow at 10 a.m.


sensation Former foreign exhange student at South competed in the 2012 Summer Olympics by EMILY ORVOS

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ot many people can say they personally know an Olympic athlete, let alone, are friends with one. However, many South students can, thanks to one swimmer in this year’s Summer Olympics in London. Riccardo (Ricky) Maestri was an Italian foreign exchange student during the 20102011 school year. After demolishing multiple school swimming records, he continued his career to compete in the 2012 Summer Olympics. His fellow swimmers could not have been more excited. “It was crazy seeing him on TV,” said Chase Riekhof, junior. “I never thought I’d know an Olympian.” Maestri was the third swimmer in the 4x200 meter freestyle race during the Olympics. With a time of 7:12:69, Italy took eleventh place overall. When Maestri first showed up at South, all the swimmers were impressed, to say the least. Riekhof said that it was very “intimidating” swimming with him at first. “When he showed up and destroyed everyone, the entire team was blown away,”

said Aditya Joshi, senior. Sometimes when athletes are amazing at their sport, they tend to get overly confident or big-headed. This was not the case at all with Maestri. Liam Huffman, senior, said that he is “incredibly humble.” Jake Little, senior, agreed and said, “[Maestri] was always so friendly, and he helped people out with the technique of their strokes.” Maestri helped out the team in more ways than one. Head coach Steven De La Piedra, business, said that he really had to “ramp up the intensity of practices” to ensure that he was being challenged. This meant more difficult practices for the rest of the team, according to Huffman. “Since he was already so fast, all we could do was just make him swim yards on yards on yards,” said Little. As an incredible swimmer and a great friend, Maestri’s former teammates from South are ecstatic for him and his success. As Joshi put it, “it couldn’t have happened to a more deserving person.”

photo by Casey Wood

photo provided by Chase Riekhof

“I NEVER THOUGHT I’D KNOW AN OLYMPIAN.”

Maestri, Spencer On (class of 2012) and Riekhof at an invite

Maestri at South’s swim senior night in 2010

Q&A with an OLYMPIAN

Emily Orvos: How did you mentally and physically prepare for London? Ricky Maestri: I knew I was going to London only at the end of June, so basically the biggest part of my prearation was already done. It was great to see my name on the list of the people that were going there. EO: What was your Olympic experience like? RM: It was an awesome experience, I had the chance to meet all the sport stars. We had breakfast, lunch and dinner with all of them, it was weird to walk in the village and see them cross my way. EO: What were your feelings going into your semi-final race? RM: We got 11th, but our time was good. We improved our time, it was half a second lower than what we swam at European Championships. It was amazing to compete with all the people and in the same pool I was able to watch only on TV. My race went very quickly, just a little more than a minute and it was over. I didn’t really realize what I was gonna do and what I just did when I finished. I just did it.

score • detail • perspective • spotlight • 411

South’s Swimming

EO: How did swimming at Park Hill South contribute towards your success? RM: I think swimming at PHS helped me a lot, especially because I got used to competing frequently. More frequently than in Itlay. And also used to competing in different moods, feelings, in a different country. So it was a mental growth, but I also think I improved my technique with the help of De La [Piedra]. I think different coaches can see different things and mistakes, so it’s useful just to listen to everyone’s advice. EO: Did you ever think you’d end up where you are in your career today? Why or why not? RM: Well of course as a child I was going for it haha who doesn’t? Growing up I seriously understood I could have accomplished this. Of course, I was expecting it would have taken more time, but it came this year so I’ll just take it! EO: What are your plans for the future? RM: Next year I’m planning on increasing practices and kind of workouts. This year I didn’t have much time due to school, but now I’m done so swimming is the primary thing I’ll focus on. I’m gonna continue my studies in a scientific sector.

Academic Awards Assembly is Sept. 24 during tutorial • 250 days until Summer Break

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I

t has been a while since any team from Kansas City has had any shot at winning a championship, but the time has finally come. There is a real championship contender from Kansas City and it is not the Chiefs or Royals, it is the newly named Sporting Kansas City. Sporting KC has been a strong team all season long, starting off the year with a 7-0 record and proving that they are the best professional sports team in Kansas City. The team has stayed consistent with 14 wins, five draws and seven losses; totaling 47 points which leads the Eastern Conference. Sporting KC has had a lot of different players contribute in big ways this season; goal scorers like Kei Kamara and CJ Sapong, defenders such as Aurélien Collin and Matt Besler, and of course their goalie, Jimmy Neilsen. It is obviously hard to decide who the best player is on such a talented team. “Kei Kamara is who I would contribute a lot of Sporting’s success to because he is a lot of the reason they get their points in those 1-0 games. He is just clutch when it comes to scoring,” said Josh Hall, junior. In their quest for an MLS Cup, Sporting

KC has already accomplished something big this season, winning the U.S. Open Cup. This is a tournament that all professional teams in the United States, not just MLS teams, are qualified to play in. They defeated the Seattle Sounders 3-2 in penalty kicks after regulation ended in a 1-1 tie. It was a really emotional game and a huge win for the team. They played through a lot of adversity, with it going to PKs and all, which made it an even better win for the team.

together,” said Cooper Saunders, Sophomore. While Saunders thinks the team chemistry is what gives Sporting KC the edge, Hall feels the will to win is what really pushes this team and makes them all better. “The players make each other better because they want to win so badly,” said Hall. I think all these characteristics is what makes a great team and I feel like Sporting KC does have a real shot at winning the MLS Cup. They just know how to win games. “They will win the MLS,” said Courtney Claassen, senior. “I believe they really have what it takes.” The biggest thing for Sporting KC is just if they can score when they have the opportunity and are playing at home. “Honestly, they could finish first if they have home-field and finish their chances,” said Hall. “They have the best players.” Hall and I aren’t the only ones who think home-field is important, Rolstad feels this is the main component for Sporting KC’s title run. That and not playing the Houston Dynamo in the playoffs. With high expectations from fans and a solid team, it seems like Sporting KC has everything it takes to make a deep title run.

“THEY WILL WIN THE MLS.”

by DYLAN WORTH

Orlando Magic 20

by ZAC RICKETTS

Fans of Sporting KC expect a playoff run as their strong season comes to an end

South volleyball team goes undefeated at KSA Invitational in Orlando

score • detail • perspective • spotlight • 411

sporting SUCCESS

“After winning that one everyone wants to win another,” said Skylar Rolstad, Senior. “The team knows how to win now.” It is not just the winning games and Open Cups that the fans have noticed, though. They notice the way the team interacts with each other and the chemistry they play with every game as well. That is why the fans think this team has a real shot at winning the MLS Cup. This is also why I think Sporting Kansas City is ready to win it all this year. They are a talented team that plays for each other and that really says a lot. “They are so talented, but they also have really good team chemistry and play well

It is not often that a sports team from South gets the opportunity to compete out of state, let alone 1,050 miles across the country. On Aug. 29, South’s volleyball team hopped on a plane and traveled all the way to the city of Orlando, Fla. The team was invited to the KSA Invitational at ESPN’s World Wide of Sports. To be invited to the tournament, South’s team had to be one of the best in Missouri. The tournament was set up in a pool play style and the team who finished atop their pool claimed the trophy. South dominated the competition, winning all six matches without losing one set. “Honestly, for being an invitational tournament, the competition wasn’t as good as we expected but there was still some tough teams,” said Lindsey Yager, senior. South’s final game seemed to be the toughest one; however, they still won both sets by a margin of six or more. “It was exciting.We came out and did our best and it felt good knowing all of our hard work paid off,” said Tori Kerr, senior. Coach Debbie Fay said she was very pleased with how each player performed. She couldn’t pick a single stand out player but she did mention that they were very dependent on their setter, Ashton Anderson, Junior, to play well. “Her position is comparable to the quarterback in football and without her playing well, they would fall apart offensively,” said Fay. Although volleyball was the main purpose of the trip, it’s impossible to forget that they were in Orlando, home to some of the most famous amusement parks on earth. “Words really can’t describe how excited we were when we

found out that we were going to Disney World,” said Yager. When raising money for the trip, it wasn’t all just for the plane ticket and transportation around the city. It also went to a special pass for just volleyball teams competing in the tournament. The passes went to a majority of the surrounding parks including Hollywood Studios, EPCOT and Magic Kingdom. At certain times of the day the parks were open just to volleyball players, eliminating the long waits in the heat. “It was really cool that we were the only ones in the park because we could go on the rides as many times as we want,” said Maddie Palmer, junior. Hollywood Studios was the favorite spot for most of the players, along with Fay. “Magic Kingdom made my heart smile, making me feel like a little kid again,” said Anderson. Although the team had a lot of fun in Orlando, they got the job done and are looking to carry on the team chemistry they gained throughout the rest of the season to hopefully bring home Photo contributed by LINDSEY YAGER another district title.

Picture re-takes are Oct. 10 • Girls Golf: Next match is Sept. 17 at Blue Hills C.C.


Chad Brewster, Senior Cody Shopper, Senior Mark Simcox, Weights Maddie Palmer, Junior

Isaac Brizendine, Junior Bryce Thompson, Senior

Geno Smith QB, WVU

Marcus Lattimore RB, South Carolina

Montee Ball RB, Wisconsin

Matt Barkley

Matt Barkley

Florida State University

Florida State

Virginia Tech

Florida State

Florida State

Virginia Tech

University of South Florida

South Florida

Rutgers University

University of Pittsburgh

University of Louisville

University of Cincinnati

Champion

Michigan State University

Michigan State

University of Wisconsin

University of Illinois

Michigan State

University of Illinois

Big 12 Champion

West Virginia University

University of Oklahoma

Oklahoma

Kansas State University

Oklahoma

PAC-12

University of Southern Cal

Southern Cal

Southern Cal

University of Oregon

University of Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

Alabama

University of Florida

Overrated Team

Boise State University

University of Michigan

University of Nebraska

Nebraska

University of Texas

University of Missouri

Surprise

Kansas State

Team

University

University of Utah

Kansas State

University of Kansas

Ohio State University

Notre Dame

National

USC over Alabama

Alabama over USC

Alabama over Oklahoma

Alabama over Florida State

Alabama over USC

USC over Notre Dame

Heisman

Matt Barkley QB, USC

Winner ACC Champion Big East Champion Big Ten

Champion SEC Champion

Champions

KEY GAMES IN COLLEGE FOOTBALL #1 Alabama at Arkansas #2 USC at #21 Stanford #18 Florida at #23 Tennessee #17 Michigan at #20 Notre Dame #10 Clemson at #5 Florida State Wisconsin at Nebraska #12 Ohio State at #11 Michigan State #7 Georgia at #9 South Carolina #8 West Virginia at #14 Texas

9/15 9/15 9/15 9/22 9/22 9/29 9/29 10/6 10/6

2:30 p.m. 6:30 p.m. 5:00 p.m. 6:30 p.m. TBA 7:00 p.m. TBA TBA TBA

CBS FOX ESPN NBC ESPN ABC ABC ESPN FOX

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redZONE

A Look Inside the 2012 College Football Season by CHAD BREWSTER & CODY SHOPPER

Texas Christian University

Southern Cal Southern Cal

CHAD’S TOP 10 TEAMS* 1. Alabama 2. USC 3. Oregon 4. LSU 5. Florida State 6. Oklahoma 7. Georgia 8. West Virginia 9. South Carolina 10. Clemson

at Arkansas 2:30 p.m. at #21 Stanford 6:30 p.m. vs Tenn. Tech 2:00 p.m. vs Idaho 7:00 p.m. vs Wake Forest 11 a.m. BYE WEEK vs Fl. Atlantic 6:30 p.m. vs James Madison 3:30 p.m. vs UAB 11:21 a.m. vs Furman 2:00 p.m. * (all games on 9/15)

Homecoming Dance is tomorrow night from 8-11 p.m. • South vs. PH Swim meet Oct. 2

21


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Follow us on Twitter: @CAFECEDAR


What we love about

this month

sept 14 - oct 12

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UGG/ Sweater weather

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College/ Career Fair at Park Hill, 6:30 p.m.

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Kanye West’s new album hits stores

South vs. Park Hill Boys Soccer

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New NBA game hits stores

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Last home Royals game, against Tigers

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Volleyball @ Park Hill, 6:30 p.m.

Staff

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15 HC Parade at 10, dance from 8-11 p.m.

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Perks of Being a Wallflower comes to theaters

Fall flavored drinks

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14 Homecoming Game at 7

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Mac Miller concert at the Uptown Theater

New FIFA game hits stores

No school! Parent/ teacher conferences

NHL season begins

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Second issue of The View is distrubuted!

>>read more stories, watch videos and see photos at phsview.com

Editors

Editor-in-Chief : Daniel Kerwin Managing Editor: Emily Orvos Copy Editor: Megan McMullen Web Editor: Emily “Maxx” Beshears Art Director: Derek Braun Public Relations Manager: Jake Parolin

fall 2012

Reporters

Elie Quiroz Andre Shaver Dylan Worth Zac Ricketts CJ Whisnant Cody Shopper Spenser Braymer Jessica Hayes Kyle Vanice Karlie Bischoff

Breanna Webster Perri Miller Chad Brewster Caleb Fenner Katie Blechinger Mallory Moxham Sean Grevice Kenneth Harris Shelby Cooper

Adviser

Megan Hughes

The View, published 8 times during the regular school year, is the student news publication of Park Hill South High School in Riverside, Mo. Editorials and opinions expressed in this student publication are that of the student journalist and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of the Park Hill South School District. For editorial policies or to submit a letter to the Editor, visit our website at www.PHSVIEW.com. The View us a member of the Missouri Interscholastic Press Association and National Scholastic Press Association and is printed by Osage Graphics in Olathe,Kan.


The View, Issue 1, Volume 15