Photographize Magazine | Issue 45

Page 1

ISSN 2639-5673

ISSUE45


ISSUE45 who we are

Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for artists, galleries and Creatives. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique orperiod, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture, and video. It aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where the images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. Writers

Thomas Jukes Andrea Dell’Orso Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize ISSN 2576-2648 - DIGITAL SSN 2639-5673 - PRINT www.photographize.co

CREATIVE HUB

2021 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Anthony Rondinone


ISSUE45 who we are

Photographize is beyond a Magazine! It’s a platform for artists, galleries and Creatives. We dedicate our space to all kinds of art regardless of technique orperiod, such as illustration, painting, digital art, photography, sculpture, and video. It aims to become a virtual place based on the immediacy, where the images are presented in their pure beauty and have the ability to capture and captivate the viewer. Have a good journey towards a timeless Art. Founders | Editors in Chief Andrea Costantini & Carla De La Matta Writers

Thomas Jukes Andrea Dell’Orso Submissions: www.photographize.co/submissions Info: info@photographize.co Sales and Advertising: sales@photographize.co All images and text published in Photographize are the sole property of the featured authors and subject to copyright. No image or text can be reproduced, edited, copied or distributed without the express written permission of its legal owner.

Photographize

North Bethesda, MD United States

ISSN 2576-2648 - DIGITAL SSN 2639-5673 - PRINT www.photographize.co

CREATIVE HUB

2021 © Photographize Magazine Cover : © Anthony Rondinone


ZAK VAN BILJON


ZAK VAN BILJON


07

11

21

51

73

FEATURED 07 BENEDETTO DEMAIO 21 BELIN 39 ANTHONY RONDINONE 59 LAURA H. RUBIN 69 ED FAIRBURN 77 ALMA HASER INTERVIEW 25 TOM HEGEN 51 Helle & Uri Løvevild Golman 33

77

39

69

63

THE STORIES BEHIND PICTURES 45 JOHANNES VERMEER MODULE 17 DIETER RAMS ARTICLEs 11 PEJAC 33 MARTIN LAGARES 43 ERGO | SELF PORTRAIT 63 PAUL KAPTEIN 73 Bella von Einsiedel 81 ORLANDO VALDOR HIGHLIGHTS 85 Curator’s choice

25

59

81

43

17


07

11

21

51

73

FEATURED 07 BENEDETTO DEMAIO 21 BELIN 39 ANTHONY RONDINONE 59 LAURA H. RUBIN 69 ED FAIRBURN 77 ALMA HASER INTERVIEW 25 TOM HEGEN 51 Helle & Uri Løvevild Golman 33

77

39

69

63

THE STORIES BEHIND PICTURES 45 JOHANNES VERMEER MODULE 17 DIETER RAMS ARTICLEs 11 PEJAC 33 MARTIN LAGARES 43 ERGO | SELF PORTRAIT 63 PAUL KAPTEIN 73 Bella von Einsiedel 81 ORLANDO VALDOR HIGHLIGHTS 85 Curator’s choice

25

59

81

43

17


ITALY

www.instagram.com/benedettodemaio Benedetto Demaio is an Italian artist who specializes in the creation of a remarkable minimalistic series focusing on everyday objects. He blurs the line between imagination and reality with his incredible series. Throughout the years, Benedetto nurtured a specific style showing us that there is beauty in everything around us no matter how small or insignificant an object is. His passion for art started at a very young age. After many years of studies, he obtained the qualification to teach "Art and Image" and "Drawing and Art History", at the Academy of Fine Arts of Brera. While pursuing his studies, Benedetto became interested in computer technology and new media; merging the knowledge of traditional figurative arts with digital graphic techniques, reworking a visual language that finds its ideal space within social media channels. Thanks to this, he started to work as a digital artist, creating content with his now personal and immediately recognizable style to different brands and companies. The delicate elegance present in every shot is sure to ease your mind and make your troubles fade away. To make this happen, the artist adheres to all his works with the same astonishing turquoise color scheme plus a big touch of his creativity; proving that mastering your photography skills is the key to capturing works of art within any ordinary scene.

Revolution • © Benedetto Demaio 07

NEXT PAGE ► Fortune Cookies • © Benedetto Demaio

Blue Bird ► © Benedetto Demaio


ITALY

www.instagram.com/benedettodemaio Benedetto Demaio is an Italian artist who specializes in the creation of a remarkable minimalistic series focusing on everyday objects. He blurs the line between imagination and reality with his incredible series. Throughout the years, Benedetto nurtured a specific style showing us that there is beauty in everything around us no matter how small or insignificant an object is. His passion for art started at a very young age. After many years of studies, he obtained the qualification to teach "Art and Image" and "Drawing and Art History", at the Academy of Fine Arts of Brera. While pursuing his studies, Benedetto became interested in computer technology and new media; merging the knowledge of traditional figurative arts with digital graphic techniques, reworking a visual language that finds its ideal space within social media channels. Thanks to this, he started to work as a digital artist, creating content with his now personal and immediately recognizable style to different brands and companies. The delicate elegance present in every shot is sure to ease your mind and make your troubles fade away. To make this happen, the artist adheres to all his works with the same astonishing turquoise color scheme plus a big touch of his creativity; proving that mastering your photography skills is the key to capturing works of art within any ordinary scene.

Revolution • © Benedetto Demaio 07

NEXT PAGE ► Fortune Cookies • © Benedetto Demaio

Blue Bird ► © Benedetto Demaio


Freedom Touch • © Benedetto Demaio

Minibus • © Benedetto Demaio

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis Cloudy Skyline • © Benedetto Demaio

► Autumn Flame • © Benedetto Demaio

Just Landing ► © Hardi Budi Genova • © Benedetto Demaio


Freedom Touch • © Benedetto Demaio

Minibus • © Benedetto Demaio

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis Cloudy Skyline • © Benedetto Demaio

► Autumn Flame • © Benedetto Demaio

Just Landing ► © Hardi Budi Genova • © Benedetto Demaio


Tsunami | Pencil on paper | 100 x 70 cm | 2017 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

ARTICLE

www.pejac.es

INSPIRATION

PEJAC | Powerful and poetic painting by Thomas Jukes The artist Pejac’s work has become incredibly well known for its masterful use of paint in seemingly any environment. From paper and traditional canvas to the back streets and public spaces all across Europe and the wider world including Moscow, Hong Kong, Turkey, and the United States. Pejac’s work is usually not simply a canvas for a beautiful painting but also a talking point for heavyweight social and environmental concerns. Pejac was struck by the continued elitist nature of fine art through his teachers. This was the turning point for what would define the artist in 2000, it was art for everybody and not to be confined to stuffy institutions. 11

NEXT PAGE ► Stain • Santander, Spain | 2011 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art


Tsunami | Pencil on paper | 100 x 70 cm | 2017 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

ARTICLE

www.pejac.es

INSPIRATION

PEJAC | Powerful and poetic painting by Thomas Jukes The artist Pejac’s work has become incredibly well known for its masterful use of paint in seemingly any environment. From paper and traditional canvas to the back streets and public spaces all across Europe and the wider world including Moscow, Hong Kong, Turkey, and the United States. Pejac’s work is usually not simply a canvas for a beautiful painting but also a talking point for heavyweight social and environmental concerns. Pejac was struck by the continued elitist nature of fine art through his teachers. This was the turning point for what would define the artist in 2000, it was art for everybody and not to be confined to stuffy institutions. 11

NEXT PAGE ► Stain • Santander, Spain | 2011 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art


Since then Pejac’s artwork has grown and evolved more and more, creating an artistic style that emanates passion not just for paint but for humanity itself. The work is both beautiful and haunting at the same time, whether it’s his small scale silhouetted figures or his large scale public works his talent for painting never diminishes. The artist manages to capture an incredible atmosphere within his indoor paintings. Light and shadow play within the pieces conveying the environment of the painting, deep cold depths in the sea or smog-filled toxic clouds. His technique juxtaposes detail and accuracy with a tactile surface of wonderful brushstrokes that give the paintings a real aesthetic depth.

CLARISSE 451° • Oil on canvas | 150 x 150 | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

Whilst we can appreciate the rich charm and style of the artist's paintings it is that very charm that also gives the viewer a peculiar feeling in the pit of the stomach. For the very reason that these paintings should not make for pleasing viewing. They hold within them intrinsic questions of the world we are creating and destroying simultaneously. Haunting visions of a world that may yet come to pass or the violent and polluted environments that we already live within. Pejac really draws our attention to these issues by using the media of art. A form of human expression that has been used for generations as both something of pure aesthetic value but also incredible power to move and shape revolutionary change. Pejac’s message is focused on humanity and the environment. As our planet faces a climate crisis, creativity is one of our most powerful tools to raise awareness and instil a sense of the severity of the issue at hand. The artist's paintings convey a world both natural and manmade that is seeing 13

NEXT PAGE ► Tryptych • Acrylic on canvas | 200 x 200cm | 2015 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

20


Since then Pejac’s artwork has grown and evolved more and more, creating an artistic style that emanates passion not just for paint but for humanity itself. The work is both beautiful and haunting at the same time, whether it’s his small scale silhouetted figures or his large scale public works his talent for painting never diminishes. The artist manages to capture an incredible atmosphere within his indoor paintings. Light and shadow play within the pieces conveying the environment of the painting, deep cold depths in the sea or smog-filled toxic clouds. His technique juxtaposes detail and accuracy with a tactile surface of wonderful brushstrokes that give the paintings a real aesthetic depth.

CLARISSE 451° • Oil on canvas | 150 x 150 | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

Whilst we can appreciate the rich charm and style of the artist's paintings it is that very charm that also gives the viewer a peculiar feeling in the pit of the stomach. For the very reason that these paintings should not make for pleasing viewing. They hold within them intrinsic questions of the world we are creating and destroying simultaneously. Haunting visions of a world that may yet come to pass or the violent and polluted environments that we already live within. Pejac really draws our attention to these issues by using the media of art. A form of human expression that has been used for generations as both something of pure aesthetic value but also incredible power to move and shape revolutionary change. Pejac’s message is focused on humanity and the environment. As our planet faces a climate crisis, creativity is one of our most powerful tools to raise awareness and instil a sense of the severity of the issue at hand. The artist's paintings convey a world both natural and manmade that is seeing 13

NEXT PAGE ► Tryptych • Acrylic on canvas | 200 x 200cm | 2015 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

20


seemingly irreparable damage from our

hands. A very dramatic interpretation of the restrictions and the underlying need and want for human contact again. Pejac uses a recreation of Claude

existence. An oily stain of the world map

Monet's water lilies within the shadows to bring colour and a sense of peacefulness to the action.

trickles down a drain, a lonely fisher sits in a wave of dead fish and perhaps most poignant of all a forest of humanoid trees butcher themselves with axes. It is this last painting that so effectively conveys the madness of our system. Rainforests and ancient woodlands are cut down for agriculture and human development at an alarming rate. As humans on this planet, we are closely linked to trees and are co-dependent on them for essentials to life. To cut down trees we slowly doom ourselves. Pejac creates a dense and almost oppressive air in this painting, dark silhouetted tree figures vanish into the distance enveloped by a persistent fog. Each one is furiously hacking at their own truck, filling the murky air with splintered wood. It shows a tipping point. The viewer can easily see the senseless nature of these beings who would fall with a few more strokes. A stark reminder that we

Le Bateau Ivre • Acrylic on canvas | 150cm x 150cm | 2015 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

seem to be lost in this empty mist with only self-destruction as a goal. However, Pejac has used his wonderful talent recently during the coronavirus pandemic to bring a sense of creative hope and compassion back into the world. His ‘Strength’ project has seen the artist creating outdoor works at the

Wound • Oil on canvas | 81 x 100 cm | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in

The artist's first work of this project is ‘Overcoming’, which depicts a young child propped up by a wheelchair creating an incredibly vibrant rendition

his hometown of Santander. Using his incredible talent for reproducing works by the old

of Van Gogh’s, ‘Wheat Field with Cypresses’. Small handprints emerge from the painting all around the piece to give the impression that it has been

masters he has shown the light and compassion

made by the child's handprints alone. It conveys a remarkable sense of wonder and beauty from despair. An idea that the artist is keen for society to

that exists behind the darkness of this pandemic.

embrace through this crisis. We should take this dark experience and use it to grow and push ourselves forward into a brighter future.

‘Caress’ depicts the two sides of workers, “Both melancholy and humour are the locomotive of my works. They create a poetic language whose essence doesn’t rely on simple

their silhouettes are masked and must not touch 15

but

their

shadows

are

holding

Geography Lesson (L’imagination au pouvoir) Acrylic and oil on canvas | 200 x 150 cm | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

beauty, but on the hidden side of everything.” - Pejac 16


seemingly irreparable damage from our

hands. A very dramatic interpretation of the restrictions and the underlying need and want for human contact again. Pejac uses a recreation of Claude

existence. An oily stain of the world map

Monet's water lilies within the shadows to bring colour and a sense of peacefulness to the action.

trickles down a drain, a lonely fisher sits in a wave of dead fish and perhaps most poignant of all a forest of humanoid trees butcher themselves with axes. It is this last painting that so effectively conveys the madness of our system. Rainforests and ancient woodlands are cut down for agriculture and human development at an alarming rate. As humans on this planet, we are closely linked to trees and are co-dependent on them for essentials to life. To cut down trees we slowly doom ourselves. Pejac creates a dense and almost oppressive air in this painting, dark silhouetted tree figures vanish into the distance enveloped by a persistent fog. Each one is furiously hacking at their own truck, filling the murky air with splintered wood. It shows a tipping point. The viewer can easily see the senseless nature of these beings who would fall with a few more strokes. A stark reminder that we

Le Bateau Ivre • Acrylic on canvas | 150cm x 150cm | 2015 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

seem to be lost in this empty mist with only self-destruction as a goal. However, Pejac has used his wonderful talent recently during the coronavirus pandemic to bring a sense of creative hope and compassion back into the world. His ‘Strength’ project has seen the artist creating outdoor works at the

Wound • Oil on canvas | 81 x 100 cm | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

University Hospital Marqués de Valdecilla in

The artist's first work of this project is ‘Overcoming’, which depicts a young child propped up by a wheelchair creating an incredibly vibrant rendition

his hometown of Santander. Using his incredible talent for reproducing works by the old

of Van Gogh’s, ‘Wheat Field with Cypresses’. Small handprints emerge from the painting all around the piece to give the impression that it has been

masters he has shown the light and compassion

made by the child's handprints alone. It conveys a remarkable sense of wonder and beauty from despair. An idea that the artist is keen for society to

that exists behind the darkness of this pandemic.

embrace through this crisis. We should take this dark experience and use it to grow and push ourselves forward into a brighter future.

‘Caress’ depicts the two sides of workers, “Both melancholy and humour are the locomotive of my works. They create a poetic language whose essence doesn’t rely on simple

their silhouettes are masked and must not touch 15

but

their

shadows

are

holding

Geography Lesson (L’imagination au pouvoir) Acrylic and oil on canvas | 200 x 150 cm | 2016 • © PEJAC • @pejac_art

beauty, but on the hidden side of everything.” - Pejac 16


DIETER RAMS by Thomas Jukes

A study of perfect principle

In our world of endless products, there is a design all around us, to

Only two years later Dieter Rams would leave his position for one at

suit all tastes and styles. The search for originality in design is one of

Braun, the company had recently seen the death of its founder Max

constant struggle and even some of our most iconic modern product

Braun in 1951. Passed down to his sons Arthur and Erwin the

designs can trace their lineage back to the teachings and principles of

company would be at the forefront of the revolution in consumer

one very iconic designer. Dieter Rams. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1932 and as a teenager grew to love watching his grandfather, a carpenter, at work. He would later accredit his grandfather's approach to his work as one of his greatest influences on the designer he would become. Seemingly not one to be pinned down or remain in one place, after just two semesters of a course in Interior Design he would transfer to a three-year carpentry apprenticeship. Following the completion of his apprenticeship, he returned to school

electronic products which had begun to flood the market after the end of the Second World War. Tastes were changing, parental generations that wanted to disguise technology within heavy and dark wooden surrounds were being replaced by their children, who saw the new technologies as exciting. Companies needed to adapt their product design to follow the trend and Braun began to invest heavily in designers with an eye for the new fashions.

with a new thrill for architecture, which he was exposed to by his professors. In 1953 having graduated with distinction he took an architect position within Otto Apel’s Frankfurt-based office.

Joining the company as an architect Dieter Rams spent his first years at Braun designing exhibition sets and offices. However, surrounded not only by new technologies and products but also talented engineers and designers, Rams became more enamoured by the idea of

The ts502 – also known as the “Cube” – is a global icon of industrial design and as such is on display in the most important contemporary art museums of the world. It can be found, for example, at New York’s MoMA. The legendary object is made up of two plastic “valves” that make it look like a cuboid seashell: ready for your favorite radio program when open, off to rest when closed. Braun T3 Pocket Radio, 1963

Apple iPod, 2001

product design. In 1956 Rams would take part in the design and

19

development of the latest radio and record player named the SK4, he

Dieter Rams continued his work for Braun, further refining their product designs and creating a company aesthetic that ran through all its products.

wanted always to move away from convention, and in turn, created

By the mid-1960’s he was working as a director for a team of young designers working at Braun and he was a household name across the world for

his own that would later be used as an industry standard. This was a

his designs. It was at this time that Rams noted down ten points which he saw as the philosophy of good design. These would stand to become some

simple change, to make the record player lid transparent. It was a

of the most prominent words in design history with some even sighting them as the ‘ten commandments’ of design. They read as follows: “Good

radical idea at the time and was discounted by many in the industry

design is innovative. Good design makes a product useful. Good design is aesthetic. Good design helps to understand a product. Good design is

deeming that the public would be discontent with seeing the workings of

unobtrusive Good design is honest. Good design is durable. Good design is consequent to the last detail. Good design is concerned with the

technology. It was a stand out success, being branded as chic and modern.

environment. Good design is as little design as possible.”

Mario Zanuso and Richard Sapper

18


DIETER RAMS by Thomas Jukes

A study of perfect principle

In our world of endless products, there is a design all around us, to

Only two years later Dieter Rams would leave his position for one at

suit all tastes and styles. The search for originality in design is one of

Braun, the company had recently seen the death of its founder Max

constant struggle and even some of our most iconic modern product

Braun in 1951. Passed down to his sons Arthur and Erwin the

designs can trace their lineage back to the teachings and principles of

company would be at the forefront of the revolution in consumer

one very iconic designer. Dieter Rams. He was born in Wiesbaden, Germany in 1932 and as a teenager grew to love watching his grandfather, a carpenter, at work. He would later accredit his grandfather's approach to his work as one of his greatest influences on the designer he would become. Seemingly not one to be pinned down or remain in one place, after just two semesters of a course in Interior Design he would transfer to a three-year carpentry apprenticeship. Following the completion of his apprenticeship, he returned to school

electronic products which had begun to flood the market after the end of the Second World War. Tastes were changing, parental generations that wanted to disguise technology within heavy and dark wooden surrounds were being replaced by their children, who saw the new technologies as exciting. Companies needed to adapt their product design to follow the trend and Braun began to invest heavily in designers with an eye for the new fashions.

with a new thrill for architecture, which he was exposed to by his professors. In 1953 having graduated with distinction he took an architect position within Otto Apel’s Frankfurt-based office.

Joining the company as an architect Dieter Rams spent his first years at Braun designing exhibition sets and offices. However, surrounded not only by new technologies and products but also talented engineers and designers, Rams became more enamoured by the idea of

The ts502 – also known as the “Cube” – is a global icon of industrial design and as such is on display in the most important contemporary art museums of the world. It can be found, for example, at New York’s MoMA. The legendary object is made up of two plastic “valves” that make it look like a cuboid seashell: ready for your favorite radio program when open, off to rest when closed. Braun T3 Pocket Radio, 1963

Apple iPod, 2001

product design. In 1956 Rams would take part in the design and

19

development of the latest radio and record player named the SK4, he

Dieter Rams continued his work for Braun, further refining their product designs and creating a company aesthetic that ran through all its products.

wanted always to move away from convention, and in turn, created

By the mid-1960’s he was working as a director for a team of young designers working at Braun and he was a household name across the world for

his own that would later be used as an industry standard. This was a

his designs. It was at this time that Rams noted down ten points which he saw as the philosophy of good design. These would stand to become some

simple change, to make the record player lid transparent. It was a

of the most prominent words in design history with some even sighting them as the ‘ten commandments’ of design. They read as follows: “Good

radical idea at the time and was discounted by many in the industry

design is innovative. Good design makes a product useful. Good design is aesthetic. Good design helps to understand a product. Good design is

deeming that the public would be discontent with seeing the workings of

unobtrusive Good design is honest. Good design is durable. Good design is consequent to the last detail. Good design is concerned with the

technology. It was a stand out success, being branded as chic and modern.

environment. Good design is as little design as possible.”

Mario Zanuso and Richard Sapper

18


Flick forward into the 21st century and the consumer electronics industry is one of the largest and most profitable sectors in the world. There are now

It is only when you see Apple products alongside Braun products,

countless household names for electronics companies that provide cutting edge technology with beautiful design. Arguably one of the biggest names

designed by Rams, thirty years their predecessor that one can truly

is Apple, who since making the leap from desktop computing in the late 80’s has become a modern icon for electronic design. Products such as the

get a sense of the inherited design ethos. The most striking is Brauns T3 pocket radio, it is the very essence of minimalist consumer design,

iMac, iPod, iPhone were truly groundbreaking on their release, an elegant mix of the latest technology and timeless ergonomic design. But was it so

a smooth-edged rectangle of gloss white. The user interface is a

revolutionary? Or had the seeds for the designs been planted years before by one Dieter Rams? It is no secret that Apple’s head designer Jonathan

simple rotating disc used to select the frequency, it is stark yet elegant

Ive had taken influence from the designs of Rams, he actively acknowledged it.

and most importantly easy and pleasing to use. Sighted next to the original iPod released in 2001 the similarities are instantly obvious. A sleek rounded rectangle in white featuring a mechanical scroll wheel. It’s like someone simply updated the T3 with new technology. Other similar designs include the Braun T1000 shortwave radio which featured a brushed metal outer casing that hid the inner workings. It has been noted as sharing features with the Apple Mac Pro which also featured the computer elements hidden within a stylish brushed metal case. The LE1 speaker by Braun fully encapsulated the less is better design ethos of Dieter Rams. A clean metal frame complimented the Braun T1000 multi band radio, 1960

neat unbranded black speaker cover, with the whole unit sitting at a slight angle held by tubular frame legs. The Apple iMac, an exemplary desktop computer. An aluminium rectangular body with the clear black glass set into the front, it leans on a crisp angled stand. These are similarities that are hard to ignore when seen. It could seemingly open up the debate over, at what point design inspiration becomes plagiarism.

A measure of good design is one that stands the test of time and is seen for its beauty not just at its conception but by future generations. Dieter Rams always set out to follow his design principles to create ‘good’ design but I think we should consider his work ‘great’ design. It was work constantly at the precipice of change, ready to be pushed into the new era. This is shown by the influence Rams has had on designers years later, a style and philosophy to design that has always remained as a constant standard for truly ‘good’ design.

“I think that good designer must always be avant-gardists, always one step ahead of the times. They should – and must – question

Braun T1000 multi band radio, 1963 19

everything generally thought to be obvious.” - Dieter Rams 1980 Apple iMac 27 inches, 2014

20


Flick forward into the 21st century and the consumer electronics industry is one of the largest and most profitable sectors in the world. There are now

It is only when you see Apple products alongside Braun products,

countless household names for electronics companies that provide cutting edge technology with beautiful design. Arguably one of the biggest names

designed by Rams, thirty years their predecessor that one can truly

is Apple, who since making the leap from desktop computing in the late 80’s has become a modern icon for electronic design. Products such as the

get a sense of the inherited design ethos. The most striking is Brauns T3 pocket radio, it is the very essence of minimalist consumer design,

iMac, iPod, iPhone were truly groundbreaking on their release, an elegant mix of the latest technology and timeless ergonomic design. But was it so

a smooth-edged rectangle of gloss white. The user interface is a

revolutionary? Or had the seeds for the designs been planted years before by one Dieter Rams? It is no secret that Apple’s head designer Jonathan

simple rotating disc used to select the frequency, it is stark yet elegant

Ive had taken influence from the designs of Rams, he actively acknowledged it.

and most importantly easy and pleasing to use. Sighted next to the original iPod released in 2001 the similarities are instantly obvious. A sleek rounded rectangle in white featuring a mechanical scroll wheel. It’s like someone simply updated the T3 with new technology. Other similar designs include the Braun T1000 shortwave radio which featured a brushed metal outer casing that hid the inner workings. It has been noted as sharing features with the Apple Mac Pro which also featured the computer elements hidden within a stylish brushed metal case. The LE1 speaker by Braun fully encapsulated the less is better design ethos of Dieter Rams. A clean metal frame complimented the Braun T1000 multi band radio, 1960

neat unbranded black speaker cover, with the whole unit sitting at a slight angle held by tubular frame legs. The Apple iMac, an exemplary desktop computer. An aluminium rectangular body with the clear black glass set into the front, it leans on a crisp angled stand. These are similarities that are hard to ignore when seen. It could seemingly open up the debate over, at what point design inspiration becomes plagiarism.

A measure of good design is one that stands the test of time and is seen for its beauty not just at its conception but by future generations. Dieter Rams always set out to follow his design principles to create ‘good’ design but I think we should consider his work ‘great’ design. It was work constantly at the precipice of change, ready to be pushed into the new era. This is shown by the influence Rams has had on designers years later, a style and philosophy to design that has always remained as a constant standard for truly ‘good’ design.

“I think that good designer must always be avant-gardists, always one step ahead of the times. They should – and must – question

Braun T1000 multi band radio, 1963 19

everything generally thought to be obvious.” - Dieter Rams 1980 Apple iMac 27 inches, 2014

20


SPAIN

BELIN www.belin.es

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, alias Belin, is a professional graffiti artist, painter, and sculptor born in the city of Linares (province of Jaén), Spain. Belin likes to define this experiment as “Post Neo Cubism”, paying his tribute to the amazing work of the Spanish master Pablo Picasso.

Thanks to his spray skills, making photorealistic murals without using a stencil just only his imagination, Belin is considered one of the most important graffiti artists in Europe. The style of this artist has varied over time, but now his work is highlighted by a hyper-realistic style valued by critics, amateurs, and experts. His mural paintings, created only from spray techniques are immediately recognizable among others in the world of urban street art.

All his sculptures and painting have been displayed in museums, galleries, and walls around Spain and different countries around the world. He also has been painting for international brands and famous people. His efforts show the perseverance of his ideas, his art, and his positive attitude to be better every day.

Natalia • © Belin

21

NEXT PAGE ► La dama del armiño • © Belin

Hombre con la mano en el pecho • © Belin


SPAIN

BELIN www.belin.es

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, alias Belin, is a professional graffiti artist, painter, and sculptor born in the city of Linares (province of Jaén), Spain. Belin likes to define this experiment as “Post Neo Cubism”, paying his tribute to the amazing work of the Spanish master Pablo Picasso.

Thanks to his spray skills, making photorealistic murals without using a stencil just only his imagination, Belin is considered one of the most important graffiti artists in Europe. The style of this artist has varied over time, but now his work is highlighted by a hyper-realistic style valued by critics, amateurs, and experts. His mural paintings, created only from spray techniques are immediately recognizable among others in the world of urban street art.

All his sculptures and painting have been displayed in museums, galleries, and walls around Spain and different countries around the world. He also has been painting for international brands and famous people. His efforts show the perseverance of his ideas, his art, and his positive attitude to be better every day.

Natalia • © Belin

21

NEXT PAGE ► La dama del armiño • © Belin

Hombre con la mano en el pecho • © Belin


René • © Belin

Marron cielo • © Belin

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis Italiano no se el nombre • © Belin

24 Frida • © Belin

Azul infinito • © Belin


René • © Belin

Marron cielo • © Belin

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis Italiano no se el nombre • © Belin

24 Frida • © Belin

Azul infinito • © Belin


GERMANY

INTERVIEW WITH

HEGEN

TOM www.tomhegen.de

Being a designer is a very unspecific term. I see myself more as a visual creative as I work in the field of visual communication in various genres like photography, film, and graphic design. Besides my personal aerial projects, I also work on assignments for clients around the world. The jobs where a client understands the creative vision and is willing to have courage are the most interesting ones. Your work provides us with a completely new perspective of the world and in some cases, such as the Coal Mine and Bathers series, of our interactions with nature. Has your work changed how you view the world? In what ways? I am definitely more sensitive about how things are connected on our planet. Over the years, I have developed an eye that reads the landscape, whether interventions are obvious or just very subtle. I think it's very important to see the world with open eyes and to question things.

“I am definitely more sensitive about how things are connected on our planet. Over the years, I have developed an eye that reads the landscape, whether interventions are obvious or just very subtle. I think it's very important to see the world with open eyes and to question things.” Tom Hegen is an award winning Photographer and Designer, based in Munich, Germany. He has that special eye for capturing unique views that show impact of human presence on earth. How did you evolve into the artist you are today? How did you discover your passion for aerial photography?

Coal Mine Series • © Tom Hagen

Around 10 years ago, I started with classic landscape photography but soon realized that those sugarcoated shots do not represent their real environment. I began to question the term »landscape« as known from »landscape photography«. »Land« is a word of Germanic origin and the roots of the suffix »-scape«, German »-schaffen« refers to the verb »shaping«. So landscape in the sense of landscaping refers to an activity that modifies the visible features of an area. As a consequence, I now focus on landscapes that show the impact of human presence on earth. It still is a kind of landscape photography but with a more conceptual approach and documentary character to it. You are not only a celebrated photographer but also an accomplished graphic designer. What is the interplay between these two facets of your creative expression? I studied graphic design and apply general design principles to my work. I am looking for clean compositions with geometric shapes, patterns, and lines. It's about finding structure in a visual complex scenery. Abstraction and aestheticization are two of the main design elements I use for my work. My background as a graphic designer definitely influenced the way I see the world around me. But also, I am Germany, and I think we are known for being kind of structured. So maybe its also something cultural about it. The Bathers Series • © Tom Hagen

25

26


GERMANY

INTERVIEW WITH

HEGEN

TOM www.tomhegen.de

Being a designer is a very unspecific term. I see myself more as a visual creative as I work in the field of visual communication in various genres like photography, film, and graphic design. Besides my personal aerial projects, I also work on assignments for clients around the world. The jobs where a client understands the creative vision and is willing to have courage are the most interesting ones. Your work provides us with a completely new perspective of the world and in some cases, such as the Coal Mine and Bathers series, of our interactions with nature. Has your work changed how you view the world? In what ways? I am definitely more sensitive about how things are connected on our planet. Over the years, I have developed an eye that reads the landscape, whether interventions are obvious or just very subtle. I think it's very important to see the world with open eyes and to question things.

“I am definitely more sensitive about how things are connected on our planet. Over the years, I have developed an eye that reads the landscape, whether interventions are obvious or just very subtle. I think it's very important to see the world with open eyes and to question things.” Tom Hegen is an award winning Photographer and Designer, based in Munich, Germany. He has that special eye for capturing unique views that show impact of human presence on earth. How did you evolve into the artist you are today? How did you discover your passion for aerial photography?

Coal Mine Series • © Tom Hagen

Around 10 years ago, I started with classic landscape photography but soon realized that those sugarcoated shots do not represent their real environment. I began to question the term »landscape« as known from »landscape photography«. »Land« is a word of Germanic origin and the roots of the suffix »-scape«, German »-schaffen« refers to the verb »shaping«. So landscape in the sense of landscaping refers to an activity that modifies the visible features of an area. As a consequence, I now focus on landscapes that show the impact of human presence on earth. It still is a kind of landscape photography but with a more conceptual approach and documentary character to it. You are not only a celebrated photographer but also an accomplished graphic designer. What is the interplay between these two facets of your creative expression? I studied graphic design and apply general design principles to my work. I am looking for clean compositions with geometric shapes, patterns, and lines. It's about finding structure in a visual complex scenery. Abstraction and aestheticization are two of the main design elements I use for my work. My background as a graphic designer definitely influenced the way I see the world around me. But also, I am Germany, and I think we are known for being kind of structured. So maybe its also something cultural about it. The Bathers Series • © Tom Hagen

25

26


You have expressed that one of your goals is to document the effect of human intervention on the environment. What message would you like to convey to the public? What do you think are the main problems that need to be addressed? My motivation is to tell visual stories that inspire other people by the work I do. My photographs also raise awareness of environmentally relevant issues and make people start reflecting on the world we all live in. However, I don't judge the places I document. I am more an observer looking at places where we are making use of the earth's resources for our benefit. And we all have a connection to this as we all consume. I think it's important to take a look at the reverse side of the medal. That being said, I see myself as a documentary photographer with a fine art approach.

Due toglobalization, the coronavirus spread from Wuhan to all parts of the world. The corona pandemic could also be seen as an act of revenge by nature on globalization. In April 2020, worldwide air traffic has fallen dramatically. At many airports around the world, runways are closed and used as parking areas for grounded planes. In this project, the airplanes that were once a symbol of globalization are now becoming a symbol of worldwide crises.

Airport Book • © Tom Hagen The Lockdown Series • © Tom Hagen

Technology and machines play a central role in some of your work, like the exquisite Airport book and the Boats series. How did you conceive these works and what did you try to achieve? Every series I do has its own topic. My work is also related to the concept of the Anthropocene. It is a term used by scientists who theorize that humans, in recent centuries, have become one of the most important factors influencing the biological, geological, and atmospheric processes on Earth. Some of the most significant changes in the Anthropocene include climate change, the ozone hole, rapidly rising sea levels, and landscape changes caused by river shifts or the degradation of raw materials. In my aerial photography projects, I explore the origin and scale of that idea in an effort to understand the dimensions of man's intervention in natural spaces. For my latest project AIRPORTS, it's been a little different: This series was shot during the lockdown in early 2020. It's kind of a counter-game as in this case, as we are not interfering here in nature but nature affects the way we live. 27

The Boat Series • © Tom Hagen

The Salt Series • © Tom Hagen

The Glacier Series • © Tom Hagen


You have expressed that one of your goals is to document the effect of human intervention on the environment. What message would you like to convey to the public? What do you think are the main problems that need to be addressed? My motivation is to tell visual stories that inspire other people by the work I do. My photographs also raise awareness of environmentally relevant issues and make people start reflecting on the world we all live in. However, I don't judge the places I document. I am more an observer looking at places where we are making use of the earth's resources for our benefit. And we all have a connection to this as we all consume. I think it's important to take a look at the reverse side of the medal. That being said, I see myself as a documentary photographer with a fine art approach.

Due toglobalization, the coronavirus spread from Wuhan to all parts of the world. The corona pandemic could also be seen as an act of revenge by nature on globalization. In April 2020, worldwide air traffic has fallen dramatically. At many airports around the world, runways are closed and used as parking areas for grounded planes. In this project, the airplanes that were once a symbol of globalization are now becoming a symbol of worldwide crises.

Airport Book • © Tom Hagen The Lockdown Series • © Tom Hagen

Technology and machines play a central role in some of your work, like the exquisite Airport book and the Boats series. How did you conceive these works and what did you try to achieve? Every series I do has its own topic. My work is also related to the concept of the Anthropocene. It is a term used by scientists who theorize that humans, in recent centuries, have become one of the most important factors influencing the biological, geological, and atmospheric processes on Earth. Some of the most significant changes in the Anthropocene include climate change, the ozone hole, rapidly rising sea levels, and landscape changes caused by river shifts or the degradation of raw materials. In my aerial photography projects, I explore the origin and scale of that idea in an effort to understand the dimensions of man's intervention in natural spaces. For my latest project AIRPORTS, it's been a little different: This series was shot during the lockdown in early 2020. It's kind of a counter-game as in this case, as we are not interfering here in nature but nature affects the way we live. 27

The Boat Series • © Tom Hagen

The Salt Series • © Tom Hagen

The Glacier Series • © Tom Hagen


What are the challenges, both technical and artistic or aerial photography? From a technical perspective, the requirements really depend from shoot to shoot. I use helicopters, airplanes, and drones to get the view from above. I see those tools as a kind of tripod that brings my camera into the right position. Every platform has its own strengths and weaknesses. The image and concept are first, the technique is secondary. I choose the kind of vehicle-related to the area I would like to photograph. Usually, I prefer helicopters with an open door but it's not always possible. Helicopters for example have their very own challenges like super windy, noisy, shaky, and cold environments. Also, communication between the pilot and me is very important. Artistic wise, aerial photography has its own visual language. I like the abstraction that comes with the changing perspective and I try to do this in the most NEXT PAGE ► The Toxic water • © Tom Hagen The White Series • © Tom Hagen

47


What are the challenges, both technical and artistic or aerial photography? From a technical perspective, the requirements really depend from shoot to shoot. I use helicopters, airplanes, and drones to get the view from above. I see those tools as a kind of tripod that brings my camera into the right position. Every platform has its own strengths and weaknesses. The image and concept are first, the technique is secondary. I choose the kind of vehicle-related to the area I would like to photograph. Usually, I prefer helicopters with an open door but it's not always possible. Helicopters for example have their very own challenges like super windy, noisy, shaky, and cold environments. Also, communication between the pilot and me is very important. Artistic wise, aerial photography has its own visual language. I like the abstraction that comes with the changing perspective and I try to do this in the most NEXT PAGE ► The Toxic water • © Tom Hagen The White Series • © Tom Hagen

47


What is the typical equipment and team necessary for your shots?

You have received multiple awards and publications. How does this kind of recognition affect your work?

As mentioned before, it really depends on the project. But I shoot all my projects now with the same medium format camera with super high resolution that allows me to print large scale and make every detail of the scenery visible. The Quarry Series • © Tom Hagen

For the past years, my work has widely been recognized by people around the world. It's a great honour for me that people resonate with my work. However, I am still doing the same work that I did before anyone really had seen it. So the awards and publications are great acknowledgements but I think that I would do the same even without them. Can you tell us about some new project or challenge that you plan to undertake in the near future? In March, this 2020, I had planned to start production on my second aerial book project. Then flights got cancelled, and most of my original planes for 2020 didn't work out. In the end and in all the crises, I saw this unusual and historical option of documenting grounded airplanes at German airports. For next year, I will try to continue with my planes from early 2021.

The Sand Dune Series • © Tom Hagen

The Marble Series • © Tom Hagen

The ► Spanish Farmland Series • © Tom Hagen Daily Life © Mahesh Balasubramanian


What is the typical equipment and team necessary for your shots?

You have received multiple awards and publications. How does this kind of recognition affect your work?

As mentioned before, it really depends on the project. But I shoot all my projects now with the same medium format camera with super high resolution that allows me to print large scale and make every detail of the scenery visible. The Quarry Series • © Tom Hagen

For the past years, my work has widely been recognized by people around the world. It's a great honour for me that people resonate with my work. However, I am still doing the same work that I did before anyone really had seen it. So the awards and publications are great acknowledgements but I think that I would do the same even without them. Can you tell us about some new project or challenge that you plan to undertake in the near future? In March, this 2020, I had planned to start production on my second aerial book project. Then flights got cancelled, and most of my original planes for 2020 didn't work out. In the end and in all the crises, I saw this unusual and historical option of documenting grounded airplanes at German airports. For next year, I will try to continue with my planes from early 2021.

The Sand Dune Series • © Tom Hagen

The Marble Series • © Tom Hagen

The ► Spanish Farmland Series • © Tom Hagen Daily Life © Mahesh Balasubramanian


Martin Lagares is a Spanish born sculptor from the southwestern city of Huelva. Graduating with a degree in fine art from the University of Cuenca Lagares would enter the art world with the conception of art as more than simple expression, more as an entire language that is constantly evolving and growing. His works are focused around the mediums of clay, terracotta, resin, and bronze. Ancient and primal elements that fall well away from the pristine white marbles of the Baroque and Rococo periods. More reminiscent of the early impressionist sculptors like Rodin who had begun to explore the use of texture and

ARTICLE

within

the

sculpture.

Lagares’s work is visceral and striking, the

INSPIRATION

forms created feel more like they have been

www.martinlagares.es

carved or out of the clay than sculpted. The artist works quickly but with a deep passion as

MARTIN LAGARES | Sculpture as a soulful extension

he builds up the medium with his bare hands. This leads to pieces that are rough and often

by Thomas Jukes

incomplete but are able to convey so much

Humankind has always had a deep spiritual

traced all the way back to pre-history and the

Sculpture's early history is dominated by the

connection to the making of art and the physical

Paleolithic or Stone Age. An ivory statue of a

depiction of fine anatomic detail meticulously

world around us. Martin Lagares sculpts from

feline human is one of the oldest ever

carved from ancient stone. It was not until the

recorded, dating from approximately 30,000

19th and early 20th century that artists began to

BCE. Sculpture allowed man to form his

experiment with a more impressionist nature of

thoughts, emotions, and beliefs into a solid form.

art.

Ages passed as humanity developed but sculp-

surfaces were replaced with rich texture and

outcome of his work. These seemingly violent

ture has always been there, evolving alongside

expression. The sculpture was becoming an

movements create a real depth to the finished

embraced the visual arts to express ourselves and

us, it has depicted gods, heroes, and rulers

expression of the creator where powerful

pieces as they seem to portray the very

convey meaning in the world we experienced.

throughout. From the Pharaohs of ancient Egypt

emotions were brought through the medium to

muscles beneath the skin moving and

The roots of man's sculptural heritage can be

to the Saints and Kings of the Medieval world.

give sculptures immense depth and meaning.

animating the sculpture.

these base connections forming his pieces with raw emotion and feeling. He harks back to what attracted humankind to the art form in its early existence. Before we could write and form languages we

34

mark-making

High

accuracy

and

finely

more emotion and a real sense of life from the subjects of his study. Gestures that border on violence can be seen in the way Lagares works but with each movement, you can tell the artist has a vision of the subject and the

polished

Stitched love • © Martin Lagares

38


Martin Lagares is a Spanish born sculptor from the southwestern city of Huelva. Graduating with a degree in fine art from the University of Cuenca Lagares would enter the art world with the conception of art as more than simple expression, more as an entire language that is constantly evolving and growing. His works are focused around the mediums of clay, terracotta, resin, and bronze. Ancient and primal elements that fall well away from the pristine white marbles of the Baroque and Rococo periods. More reminiscent of the early impressionist sculptors like Rodin who had begun to explore the use of texture and

ARTICLE

within

the

sculpture.

Lagares’s work is visceral and striking, the

INSPIRATION

forms created feel more like they have been

www.martinlagares.es

carved or out of the clay than sculpted. The artist works quickly but with a deep passion as

MARTIN LAGARES | Sculpture as a soulful extension

he builds up the medium with his bare hands. This leads to pieces that are rough and often

by Thomas Jukes

incomplete but are able to convey so much

Humankind has always had a deep spiritual

traced all the way back to pre-history and the

Sculpture's early history is dominated by the

connection to the making of art and the physical

Paleolithic or Stone Age. An ivory statue of a

depiction of fine anatomic detail meticulously

world around us. Martin Lagares sculpts from

feline human is one of the oldest ever

carved from ancient stone. It was not until the

recorded, dating from approximately 30,000

19th and early 20th century that artists began to

BCE. Sculpture allowed man to form his

experiment with a more impressionist nature of

thoughts, emotions, and beliefs into a solid form.

art.

Ages passed as humanity developed but sculp-

surfaces were replaced with rich texture and

outcome of his work. These seemingly violent

ture has always been there, evolving alongside

expression. The sculpture was becoming an

movements create a real depth to the finished

embraced the visual arts to express ourselves and

us, it has depicted gods, heroes, and rulers

expression of the creator where powerful

pieces as they seem to portray the very

convey meaning in the world we experienced.

throughout. From the Pharaohs of ancient Egypt

emotions were brought through the medium to

muscles beneath the skin moving and

The roots of man's sculptural heritage can be

to the Saints and Kings of the Medieval world.

give sculptures immense depth and meaning.

animating the sculpture.

these base connections forming his pieces with raw emotion and feeling. He harks back to what attracted humankind to the art form in its early existence. Before we could write and form languages we

34

mark-making

High

accuracy

and

finely

more emotion and a real sense of life from the subjects of his study. Gestures that border on violence can be seen in the way Lagares works but with each movement, you can tell the artist has a vision of the subject and the

polished

Stitched love • © Martin Lagares

38


Pulso, espíritu e instinto • © Martin Lagares Lucía • © Martin Lagares

Much like with Rodin’s work Lagares sculpts with great anatomical knowledge, the composition and proportions of his figures are indeed accurate to life. However, much like the great ‘Thinker’ by Rodin, there is a clear need to capture the nature of being human. That we are not perfect and smooth but are forged and melded by the life that we lead. Much like scars or wrinkles on our skin the style of Martin Lagares gives his sculptures a sense of true life. An existence playing out through the constant ebb and flow of time where the foundation of our experiences becomes written upon our skin.

Look into my eyes • © Martin Lagares Deconstrucción • © Martin Lagares

Retrato de Miguel Ángel • © Martin Lagares

36


Pulso, espíritu e instinto • © Martin Lagares Lucía • © Martin Lagares

Much like with Rodin’s work Lagares sculpts with great anatomical knowledge, the composition and proportions of his figures are indeed accurate to life. However, much like the great ‘Thinker’ by Rodin, there is a clear need to capture the nature of being human. That we are not perfect and smooth but are forged and melded by the life that we lead. Much like scars or wrinkles on our skin the style of Martin Lagares gives his sculptures a sense of true life. An existence playing out through the constant ebb and flow of time where the foundation of our experiences becomes written upon our skin.

Look into my eyes • © Martin Lagares Deconstrucción • © Martin Lagares

Retrato de Miguel Ángel • © Martin Lagares

36


Much of Martin Lagares’s sculptures are created as partial forms, faces which seem to be but fragments of their former selves or that the artist has simply run of clay. Others appear from solid slabs of material seeming to emerge from the very substance itself or being just about to be absorbed back into the whole. All Lagares’s work is striking but these have their own particular power. They exist as parts of a whole or the expression of moments captured in time. Faces that are only part remembered or those intimate flashes that become so vivid within the human mind. Far from feeling unfinished, these sculptures suggest a beauty within the incomplete and a constant struggle that many people feel of striving for the idea of a complete self. A comment that no one is truly finished or perfect but it is those imperfections that hold the very best essences of humanity. Like early man discovering the concept of form and identity within the clay of the earth, Martin Lagares is reaching deep within himself to capture and explore the primal spiritual essence that can be translated through sculpture. Exploring the nature of recreating the human form not from an anatomical or religious standpoint but one which challenges the conception of imperfection and of how form creates expression. “The sculptor who works with primitive matter creates, even without intending it, the sense of a new form. In that tension between form and information lies everything.” - Martín Lagares

Belmonte • © Martin Lagares

41

Kiss • © Martin Lagares

Face to the wind III • © Martin Lagares 36

Mulan ► © Olga Esther


Much of Martin Lagares’s sculptures are created as partial forms, faces which seem to be but fragments of their former selves or that the artist has simply run of clay. Others appear from solid slabs of material seeming to emerge from the very substance itself or being just about to be absorbed back into the whole. All Lagares’s work is striking but these have their own particular power. They exist as parts of a whole or the expression of moments captured in time. Faces that are only part remembered or those intimate flashes that become so vivid within the human mind. Far from feeling unfinished, these sculptures suggest a beauty within the incomplete and a constant struggle that many people feel of striving for the idea of a complete self. A comment that no one is truly finished or perfect but it is those imperfections that hold the very best essences of humanity. Like early man discovering the concept of form and identity within the clay of the earth, Martin Lagares is reaching deep within himself to capture and explore the primal spiritual essence that can be translated through sculpture. Exploring the nature of recreating the human form not from an anatomical or religious standpoint but one which challenges the conception of imperfection and of how form creates expression. “The sculptor who works with primitive matter creates, even without intending it, the sense of a new form. In that tension between form and information lies everything.” - Martín Lagares

Belmonte • © Martin Lagares

41

Kiss • © Martin Lagares

Face to the wind III • © Martin Lagares 36

Mulan ► © Olga Esther


UNITED STATES

www.anthonyrondinone.com

Anthony Rondinone is an emerging American painter born and raised in the Bronx, New York. With no formal training, he primarily focuses on stylistic portraits and figurative works which are the culmination of memories from growing up in a poor immigrant community and his take on humanity and current events. Mainly conveying emotions from deja vu like melancholy to inner disgust, each piece has its own personality. Anthony is interested in self-reflection and connecting to emotions. Whether he's attempting to show the beauty in sadness or revealing the ugly side of humanity, he wants people to find themselves in his work and spark a personal confrontation. Each of Anthony's paintings is a snapshot of exactly how he feels in a moment; a page in a journal where he pours emotion and watches it take shape. This is his way of documenting life. Anthony mainly works on figures and portraits because these are supposed to be people you know even if you can't recognize them. The hope is that you can find yourself in his pieces. Anthony tends to work with emotions that we should be coming face to face with like sadness, anger, or the uglier sides of ourselves.

Christmas Morning • © Anthony Rondinone 39

NEXT PAGE ► © Anthony Rondinone

• © Anthony Rondinone


UNITED STATES

www.anthonyrondinone.com

Anthony Rondinone is an emerging American painter born and raised in the Bronx, New York. With no formal training, he primarily focuses on stylistic portraits and figurative works which are the culmination of memories from growing up in a poor immigrant community and his take on humanity and current events. Mainly conveying emotions from deja vu like melancholy to inner disgust, each piece has its own personality. Anthony is interested in self-reflection and connecting to emotions. Whether he's attempting to show the beauty in sadness or revealing the ugly side of humanity, he wants people to find themselves in his work and spark a personal confrontation. Each of Anthony's paintings is a snapshot of exactly how he feels in a moment; a page in a journal where he pours emotion and watches it take shape. This is his way of documenting life. Anthony mainly works on figures and portraits because these are supposed to be people you know even if you can't recognize them. The hope is that you can find yourself in his pieces. Anthony tends to work with emotions that we should be coming face to face with like sadness, anger, or the uglier sides of ourselves.

Christmas Morning • © Anthony Rondinone 39

NEXT PAGE ► © Anthony Rondinone

• © Anthony Rondinone


Business, in Technicolor • © Anthony Rondinone

• © Anthony Rondinone

Love • © Anthony Rondinone

41

HAHAHAHAHAHA • © Anthony Rondinone

Mona • © Anthony Rondinone

42


Business, in Technicolor • © Anthony Rondinone

• © Anthony Rondinone

Love • © Anthony Rondinone

41

HAHAHAHAHAHA • © Anthony Rondinone

Mona • © Anthony Rondinone

42


ARTICLE

Process of Recognition

43

One of the most exciting and studied pictorial forms in the history of art is the self-portrait: the representation that an artist makes of himself.

this artistic activity is the artist who will properly represent himself, and above all, to be recognized. But how would that be done?

Initially spread in the Middle Ages, when as Vasari pointed out, artists used artists to sign their works; it was in modern times that it found its heyday. In the Renaissance, new studies on the composition of colors and the diffusion of the mirror, together with the renewed interest towards the man who characterized the 15th-16th century, led artists to take them as a model and work on this type of representation. Unlike in the past, the artist no longer wanted to portray themselves as "classical" subjects as perfect and solemn men, but as "individuals" who have their own physical characteristics and their own emotional dimension. Classic examples of this are Caravaggio, Raphael, Frida Kahlo. Therefore, beyond the period considered, what seems to characterize

Indeed, one can indicate how one of the first phases of this work is to study one's own image to grasp its salient features. For this to be possible, the artist must, as Ricoeur suggests "suspend himself from himself". The artist must abandon the idea about himself and consider his portrait as if it were from a stranger. The artist then studies his appearance as if in front of him were another person who occupies a specific position, who has a confident attitude of which he tries to grasp and represent the essential aspects. Only after seeing your portrait in this way, will it be possible to highlight those aspects, those expressions that distinguish him and that make him the particular person he is. However, even if the proper representation is

The artist stops seeing himself as a stranger and returns to consider the knowledge he has of himself, which on the one hand, he believes can characterize him clearly and, on the other, help that audience that has some kind of connection with him, to recognize him.

SELF PORTRAIT by Andrea Dell’Orso

undoubtedly a necessary and fundamental element, it does not always be sufficient. There are numerous examples of artists who do not recognize themselves in the picture they have made or of experts who are hesitant in attributing to that work the face of that artist: a famous example is that on the self-portrait of Leonardo.

But even in this case, the process of the depiction of self and recognition may not be complete. In fact, this could be enough for the credit of an outsider audience, it may not yet be enough to satisfy the artist's initial will. It may be the case that the image in front of the artist, however appropriate and present characteristic elements, lacks something, that emotional aspect, which prevents a complete identification between the artist and the painting. Even artists who, mostly contemporary, consider the emotional element that distinguishes it most: just think of Munch, the latest self-portraits of Picasso, to those of Schiele, Gauguin, and Van Gogh himself who in several works shows several of his troubles. They deliberately neglect the physical adequacy to bring out the facial expressions that express their emotions or feelings during that period and allow their eyes to be represented most exhaustively and truthfully. In the latter case, the self-return process takes a further step forward: it establishes that implicit and unique link between the artist and the work of art that could never be obtained by external observers and that allows. Finally, the artist to recognize himself in his picture.

Fortunately, sometimes in these cases, it is the artist who comes to our aid. They (perhaps) realize the discrepancy between the real and the represented self. He puts some elements that he considers his own and thinks the character to make it more recognizable. Classic examples are the effigies, such as that present in Nicolas Poussin's self-portrait or those of Dürer, or ornamental elements such as the hat worn by Van Gogh in some of his self-portraits. In this way, the artist begins to develop a new phase, which is indispensable for the self-portrait work: that of the "return to self".

­

44


ARTICLE

Process of Recognition

43

One of the most exciting and studied pictorial forms in the history of art is the self-portrait: the representation that an artist makes of himself.

this artistic activity is the artist who will properly represent himself, and above all, to be recognized. But how would that be done?

Initially spread in the Middle Ages, when as Vasari pointed out, artists used artists to sign their works; it was in modern times that it found its heyday. In the Renaissance, new studies on the composition of colors and the diffusion of the mirror, together with the renewed interest towards the man who characterized the 15th-16th century, led artists to take them as a model and work on this type of representation. Unlike in the past, the artist no longer wanted to portray themselves as "classical" subjects as perfect and solemn men, but as "individuals" who have their own physical characteristics and their own emotional dimension. Classic examples of this are Caravaggio, Raphael, Frida Kahlo. Therefore, beyond the period considered, what seems to characterize

Indeed, one can indicate how one of the first phases of this work is to study one's own image to grasp its salient features. For this to be possible, the artist must, as Ricoeur suggests "suspend himself from himself". The artist must abandon the idea about himself and consider his portrait as if it were from a stranger. The artist then studies his appearance as if in front of him were another person who occupies a specific position, who has a confident attitude of which he tries to grasp and represent the essential aspects. Only after seeing your portrait in this way, will it be possible to highlight those aspects, those expressions that distinguish him and that make him the particular person he is. However, even if the proper representation is

The artist stops seeing himself as a stranger and returns to consider the knowledge he has of himself, which on the one hand, he believes can characterize him clearly and, on the other, help that audience that has some kind of connection with him, to recognize him.

SELF PORTRAIT by Andrea Dell’Orso

undoubtedly a necessary and fundamental element, it does not always be sufficient. There are numerous examples of artists who do not recognize themselves in the picture they have made or of experts who are hesitant in attributing to that work the face of that artist: a famous example is that on the self-portrait of Leonardo.

But even in this case, the process of the depiction of self and recognition may not be complete. In fact, this could be enough for the credit of an outsider audience, it may not yet be enough to satisfy the artist's initial will. It may be the case that the image in front of the artist, however appropriate and present characteristic elements, lacks something, that emotional aspect, which prevents a complete identification between the artist and the painting. Even artists who, mostly contemporary, consider the emotional element that distinguishes it most: just think of Munch, the latest self-portraits of Picasso, to those of Schiele, Gauguin, and Van Gogh himself who in several works shows several of his troubles. They deliberately neglect the physical adequacy to bring out the facial expressions that express their emotions or feelings during that period and allow their eyes to be represented most exhaustively and truthfully. In the latter case, the self-return process takes a further step forward: it establishes that implicit and unique link between the artist and the work of art that could never be obtained by external observers and that allows. Finally, the artist to recognize himself in his picture.

Fortunately, sometimes in these cases, it is the artist who comes to our aid. They (perhaps) realize the discrepancy between the real and the represented self. He puts some elements that he considers his own and thinks the character to make it more recognizable. Classic examples are the effigies, such as that present in Nicolas Poussin's self-portrait or those of Dürer, or ornamental elements such as the hat worn by Van Gogh in some of his self-portraits. In this way, the artist begins to develop a new phase, which is indispensable for the self-portrait work: that of the "return to self".

­

44


LIFE It is actually said that the life of this painter was very miserable and even unsuccessful. Vermeer spent his entire life in Delft. There he belonged to the painters' guild, which he led twice. It is believed, that he never took up painting professionally, but rather he ran the inn and the art dealer business inherited from his father. He married a Catholic woman named Catherina Bolnes, his family never agreed to this union, and the children they had died at an early age. Furthermore, his life span was short.

THE STORIES BEHIND THE PICTURES The Master of Light

The Geographer c. 1668–1669 Oil on canvas 53 x 46.6 cm. (20 7/8 x 18 1/4 in.) Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

JOHANNES VERMEER by Photographize

Delft, Netherlands, 1632 - 1675

Johannes Vermeer was a Dutch Baroque Period painter (Delft, Netherlands, 1632 - 1675). Despite he was not a famous painter in his time, Vermeer is now considered the great figure of the Dutch seventeenth century, after Rembrandt. His remarkable paintings evoke light with subtle effects that speak to our visual experience, creating a sense of physical immediacy. At the time the cultural and artistic life was in full bloom, this time was baptized by historians as the Dutch Golden Age. Vermeer was a painter who made his works more than of his own free will; by commissions for patrons. Therefore, his known work is limited. Approximately 34 works of him are known, while many of his contemporaries completed hundreds. On the other hand, many of his works were lost or deteriorated. 45

Thanks to his relationship with Catherina and her rich family, Vermeer was able to interact with important figures in public life. For this reason, in 1672 he was called to The Hague to curate a collection of paintings sold by an Amsterdam merchant to the Elector of Brandenburg. In short, his mother-in-law constantly supported him financially, but his debts never ceased to burden him. His production consisted of domestic interiors, these were characterized by being very bright. The characters portrayed were usually doing activities such as reading, writing, playing a musical instrument, or doing some domestic chore. In Dutch history, the year 1672 was termed "The Year of Disaster," owing to the invasion of the Dutch Republic by the French, German, and British armies. This led to a dramatic economic crash for the once prosperous, middle-class country. The art market plummeted, and Vermeer could barely afford to keep himself, his wife, her mother, and his eleven children. He took on increasing amounts of debt, borrowing thousands of guilders, and was even caught pocketing his mother-in-law's money.

Woman with a Pearl Necklace c. 1662–1665 Oil on canvas, 55 x 45 cm. (21 5/8 x 17 3/4 in.) Staatliche Museen Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Gemäldegalerie, Berlin


LIFE It is actually said that the life of this painter was very miserable and even unsuccessful. Vermeer spent his entire life in Delft. There he belonged to the painters' guild, which he led twice. It is believed, that he never took up painting professionally, but rather he ran the inn and the art dealer business inherited from his father. He married a Catholic woman named Catherina Bolnes, his family never agreed to this union, and the children they had died at an early age. Furthermore, his life span was short.

THE STORIES BEHIND THE PICTURES The Master of Light

The Geographer c. 1668–1669 Oil on canvas 53 x 46.6 cm. (20 7/8 x 18 1/4 in.) Städelsches Kunstinstitut, Frankfurt am Main, Germany

JOHANNES VERMEER by Photographize

Delft, Netherlands, 1632 - 1675

Johannes Vermeer was a Dutch Baroque Period painter (Delft, Netherlands, 1632 - 1675). Despite he was not a famous painter in his time, Vermeer is now considered the great figure of the Dutch seventeenth century, after Rembrandt. His remarkable paintings evoke light with subtle effects that speak to our visual experience, creating a sense of physical immediacy. At the time the cultural and artistic life was in full bloom, this time was baptized by historians as the Dutch Golden Age. Vermeer was a painter who made his works more than of his own free will; by commissions for patrons. Therefore, his known work is limited. Approximately 34 works of him are known, while many of his contemporaries completed hundreds. On the other hand, many of his works were lost or deteriorated. 45

Thanks to his relationship with Catherina and her rich family, Vermeer was able to interact with important figures in public life. For this reason, in 1672 he was called to The Hague to curate a collection of paintings sold by an Amsterdam merchant to the Elector of Brandenburg. In short, his mother-in-law constantly supported him financially, but his debts never ceased to burden him. His production consisted of domestic interiors, these were characterized by being very bright. The characters portrayed were usually doing activities such as reading, writing, playing a musical instrument, or doing some domestic chore. In Dutch history, the year 1672 was termed "The Year of Disaster," owing to the invasion of the Dutch Republic by the French, German, and British armies. This led to a dramatic economic crash for the once prosperous, middle-class country. The art market plummeted, and Vermeer could barely afford to keep himself, his wife, her mother, and his eleven children. He took on increasing amounts of debt, borrowing thousands of guilders, and was even caught pocketing his mother-in-law's money.

Woman with a Pearl Necklace c. 1662–1665 Oil on canvas, 55 x 45 cm. (21 5/8 x 17 3/4 in.) Staatliche Museen Preußischer Kulturbesitz, Gemäldegalerie, Berlin


WORKS Vermeer frequently began his paintings with a monochrome sketch. He used the sketch to establish the play of light as a central element of his composition from the beginning, representing the shadows with larger areas of brown paint and leaving the background color light for the bright areas. An unfinished painting by the Le Nain brothers shows a sketch painted in this way. Because Vermeer's sketched lines are delicate, they are usually hidden under his final painting. Often he would mix his paint to smooth the edges between the shapes, but sometimes he would leave an almost imperceptible gap. Due to the rigor of perspective and reflections, it has been suggested that he was able to use a camera obscura to produce his works. Layers of dark paint (including sketch) below the surface played an important role in Vermeer's luminous paintings. The artist took advantage of these background layers by varying the thickness of his final painting. Girl with a Pearl Earring is Vermeer’s most famous painting. It depicts an imaginary young woman in an exotic dress and a very large Vermeer died on December 16, 1675, having fallen into a fit of madness and depression. In the court records, his wife stated that "...during the ruinous war with France he not only was unable to sell any of his art but also, to his great detriment, was left sitting with the paintings of other masters that he was dealing in. As a result and owing to the great burden of his children having no means of his own, he lapsed into such decay and decadence, which he had so taken to heart that, as if he had fallen into a frenzy in a day and a half he went from being healthy to being dead." Woman Holding a Balance c. 1662–1665 Oil on canvas, 42.5 x 38 cm. (16 3/4 x 15 in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

pearl earring. The work permanently resides in the Mauritshuis Museum in The Hague. It represents a young woman in a dark shallow space, an intimate setting that draws the viewer’s attention exclusively to her.

Girl with a Pearl Earring c. 1665–1667 Oil on canvas, 46.5 x 40 cm. (18 1/4 x 15 1/4 in.) Mauritshuis, The Hague 62


WORKS Vermeer frequently began his paintings with a monochrome sketch. He used the sketch to establish the play of light as a central element of his composition from the beginning, representing the shadows with larger areas of brown paint and leaving the background color light for the bright areas. An unfinished painting by the Le Nain brothers shows a sketch painted in this way. Because Vermeer's sketched lines are delicate, they are usually hidden under his final painting. Often he would mix his paint to smooth the edges between the shapes, but sometimes he would leave an almost imperceptible gap. Due to the rigor of perspective and reflections, it has been suggested that he was able to use a camera obscura to produce his works. Layers of dark paint (including sketch) below the surface played an important role in Vermeer's luminous paintings. The artist took advantage of these background layers by varying the thickness of his final painting. Girl with a Pearl Earring is Vermeer’s most famous painting. It depicts an imaginary young woman in an exotic dress and a very large Vermeer died on December 16, 1675, having fallen into a fit of madness and depression. In the court records, his wife stated that "...during the ruinous war with France he not only was unable to sell any of his art but also, to his great detriment, was left sitting with the paintings of other masters that he was dealing in. As a result and owing to the great burden of his children having no means of his own, he lapsed into such decay and decadence, which he had so taken to heart that, as if he had fallen into a frenzy in a day and a half he went from being healthy to being dead." Woman Holding a Balance c. 1662–1665 Oil on canvas, 42.5 x 38 cm. (16 3/4 x 15 in.) National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C.

pearl earring. The work permanently resides in the Mauritshuis Museum in The Hague. It represents a young woman in a dark shallow space, an intimate setting that draws the viewer’s attention exclusively to her.

Girl with a Pearl Earring c. 1665–1667 Oil on canvas, 46.5 x 40 cm. (18 1/4 x 15 1/4 in.) Mauritshuis, The Hague 62


She wears a blue and gold turban, the titular

As the Mauritshuis building underwent renovation

pearl earring, and a gold jacket with a visible

in 2012, Girl with the Pearl Earring traveled to

white

of

Japan, Italy, and the United States. It drew

Vermeer’s subjects, she is not concentrating

crowds in each location, attesting to its now firm

on a daily chore and unaware of her viewer.

place in audience regard. When The Girl with a

Instead, caught in a fleeting moment, she

Pearl Earring returned to the Netherlands in

turns her head over her shoulder, meeting the

2014, the Mauritshuis announced it would no

viewer’s gaze with her eyes wide and lips

longer lend out the painting, assuring visitors

parted as if about to speak. A young woman

that the museum’s main attraction would

might have sat for Vermeer, but the painting is

always be in its home.

collar

beneath.

Unlike

many

not meant to portray her or any specific individual. Vermeer’s subject is a generic young woman in exotic dress, a study in facial expression and costume. The work attests to Vermeer’s technical expertise and interest in representing light. The soft modeling of the subject’s face reveals his mastery of using light rather than line to create a form, while the reflection on her lips and on the earring show his concern for representing the effect of light on different surfaces. The Girl with a Pearl Earring became one of Vermeer’s more famous pieces only around the turn of the 21st century, with the 1995 blockbuster exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the publication of the best-selling novel Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier in 1999. The book fashioned

the

painting’s

subject

into

a

housemaid named Griet who works in Vermeer’s home and becomes his paint mixer. It was adapted into an Oscar-nominated film in 2003 starring Scarlett Johansson as the fictional The Milkmaid c. 1657–1661 Oil on canvas, 17 7/8 x 16 1/8 in. (45.5 x 41 cm.) The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 59

Griet and Colin Firth as Vermeer.

Officer and Laughing Girl c. 1655–1660 Oil on canvas, 50.5 x 46 cm. (19 7/8 x 18 1/8 in.) Frick Collection, New York 72


She wears a blue and gold turban, the titular

As the Mauritshuis building underwent renovation

pearl earring, and a gold jacket with a visible

in 2012, Girl with the Pearl Earring traveled to

white

of

Japan, Italy, and the United States. It drew

Vermeer’s subjects, she is not concentrating

crowds in each location, attesting to its now firm

on a daily chore and unaware of her viewer.

place in audience regard. When The Girl with a

Instead, caught in a fleeting moment, she

Pearl Earring returned to the Netherlands in

turns her head over her shoulder, meeting the

2014, the Mauritshuis announced it would no

viewer’s gaze with her eyes wide and lips

longer lend out the painting, assuring visitors

parted as if about to speak. A young woman

that the museum’s main attraction would

might have sat for Vermeer, but the painting is

always be in its home.

collar

beneath.

Unlike

many

not meant to portray her or any specific individual. Vermeer’s subject is a generic young woman in exotic dress, a study in facial expression and costume. The work attests to Vermeer’s technical expertise and interest in representing light. The soft modeling of the subject’s face reveals his mastery of using light rather than line to create a form, while the reflection on her lips and on the earring show his concern for representing the effect of light on different surfaces. The Girl with a Pearl Earring became one of Vermeer’s more famous pieces only around the turn of the 21st century, with the 1995 blockbuster exhibition at the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the publication of the best-selling novel Girl with a Pearl Earring by Tracy Chevalier in 1999. The book fashioned

the

painting’s

subject

into

a

housemaid named Griet who works in Vermeer’s home and becomes his paint mixer. It was adapted into an Oscar-nominated film in 2003 starring Scarlett Johansson as the fictional The Milkmaid c. 1657–1661 Oil on canvas, 17 7/8 x 16 1/8 in. (45.5 x 41 cm.) The Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam 59

Griet and Colin Firth as Vermeer.

Officer and Laughing Girl c. 1655–1660 Oil on canvas, 50.5 x 46 cm. (19 7/8 x 18 1/8 in.) Frick Collection, New York 72


DENMARK

INTERVIEW WITH

Tell us about Project Wild and your motto “What you love, you will protect” In 2014 we had moved in together in a small cosy apartment in Copenhagen. We sat there with our newfound love and decided that we wanted to make a project larger than ourselves and that it should be WILD thus we had invented the Project WILD documenting the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife. Working our way to all the seven continents going on 25 expeditions. But we needed a mantra and decided on going for something with love. And I said I will always protect you because I love you. Helle looked at me with her beautiful blue eyes, almond-shaped face, and long blond hair and shouted: that’s it Uri “

www.weareprojectwild.com

what you love - you will protect “! And our adventure was born!

As National Geographic photographers, Helle & Uri have traveled their whole life, visiting all seven continents, with more than 25 photo expeditions behind them, to capture the wildlife they love so much. They have overcome the biggest obstacles together as when Uri was stabbed by a supposed poacher from Boko Haram on their last expedition to Gabon. He died for two minutes but his will to live was stronger than death and today he is still grateful for life even sitting in a wheelchair learning how to walk again. Helle has been by Uri’s side every minute and fought just as hard to get to this point today. Please guide us through your early years and how your love for nature and photography was born? Helle grew up in the north of Zealand, in Denmark, and spent much of her younger years sailing the coasts of Scandinavia together with her parents. She later went on to become a ranger in Africa and Middle East Archeologist and then always carrying her camera, went on to expedition-guiding for a Danish travel company and that is where she met me doing an expeditions cruise to the world's largest national park in North-East Greenland. I myself had grown up in close proximity to nature always daydreaming of adventures and photographing wild animals and I was inspired by Frans Lanting and Art Wolfe. Those guys made me realize that it was possible to follow my dreams of becoming a wild photographer/filmmaker. But it wasn’t until 1999 that I finally started as a professional photographer starting out with a 500 mm Sigma lens called Bigma. I quickly realized that if I was to have any success delivering photos to magazines I had to switch to either Canon or Nikon. I ended up with Canon and quickly became Canon Ambassador for the Danish market. It was the constant contact with green tall oak trees and listening to birds chirping, roe deers foraging near to the forest that turned happiness and joy into the greatest feeling of all. The love of nature and the wild. After having met each other we decided to pair our love for nature and our knowledge of art and photography and turn it into our life's mission. To use photography as the means of communicating our love for the wild and the animals. To bring our stories to a greater audience and later on reaching even leaders of the world. 51

Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

40


DENMARK

INTERVIEW WITH

Tell us about Project Wild and your motto “What you love, you will protect” In 2014 we had moved in together in a small cosy apartment in Copenhagen. We sat there with our newfound love and decided that we wanted to make a project larger than ourselves and that it should be WILD thus we had invented the Project WILD documenting the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife. Working our way to all the seven continents going on 25 expeditions. But we needed a mantra and decided on going for something with love. And I said I will always protect you because I love you. Helle looked at me with her beautiful blue eyes, almond-shaped face, and long blond hair and shouted: that’s it Uri “

www.weareprojectwild.com

what you love - you will protect “! And our adventure was born!

As National Geographic photographers, Helle & Uri have traveled their whole life, visiting all seven continents, with more than 25 photo expeditions behind them, to capture the wildlife they love so much. They have overcome the biggest obstacles together as when Uri was stabbed by a supposed poacher from Boko Haram on their last expedition to Gabon. He died for two minutes but his will to live was stronger than death and today he is still grateful for life even sitting in a wheelchair learning how to walk again. Helle has been by Uri’s side every minute and fought just as hard to get to this point today. Please guide us through your early years and how your love for nature and photography was born? Helle grew up in the north of Zealand, in Denmark, and spent much of her younger years sailing the coasts of Scandinavia together with her parents. She later went on to become a ranger in Africa and Middle East Archeologist and then always carrying her camera, went on to expedition-guiding for a Danish travel company and that is where she met me doing an expeditions cruise to the world's largest national park in North-East Greenland. I myself had grown up in close proximity to nature always daydreaming of adventures and photographing wild animals and I was inspired by Frans Lanting and Art Wolfe. Those guys made me realize that it was possible to follow my dreams of becoming a wild photographer/filmmaker. But it wasn’t until 1999 that I finally started as a professional photographer starting out with a 500 mm Sigma lens called Bigma. I quickly realized that if I was to have any success delivering photos to magazines I had to switch to either Canon or Nikon. I ended up with Canon and quickly became Canon Ambassador for the Danish market. It was the constant contact with green tall oak trees and listening to birds chirping, roe deers foraging near to the forest that turned happiness and joy into the greatest feeling of all. The love of nature and the wild. After having met each other we decided to pair our love for nature and our knowledge of art and photography and turn it into our life's mission. To use photography as the means of communicating our love for the wild and the animals. To bring our stories to a greater audience and later on reaching even leaders of the world. 51

Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

40


What do you think are the greatest dangers currently facing our planet? What can be done to overcome them?

And please sign this constitution with this pen knowing in your heart that the only important part of history is the one we rewrite today. And when you sign, remember your love for your children and family and ask yourself: do we have the right to steal the future of humankind?

The greatest danger facing our world and humanity is the loss of biodiversity and habitat destruction. if we hadn’t destroyed more than 3 trillions of trees and killed more than 60 % of all mammals then most likely with enough space for wildlife to roam free we would never have experienced the horror like the pandemic that we have today. But if we decide to recreate that ancient love for nature and animals that we are all born with and start rewilding then we can recreate what we with our machines and vanity have destroyed.

We would like to answer this question with the statement below:

MOTHER EARTH First came the vanity that we as humanity turned into insanity! We lost our sense of reality and forgot to care for wildlife killed by humanity and miss understood democracy.

Canada Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

Actually, we destroyed our mother! Yes, we actually destroyed her. How on Earth did we let this happen? Well well well fortunately it’s not too late! We can use our ingenuity to get rid of the insanity of our human race and once again reconnect our hearts with our brains and remember that when intelligence thinks and speaks we should look at the wild wisdom of animals. No species besides humans have ever eaten or destroyed and killed more than their habitats could give or hold. Not without giving back through seed dispersal or fertilizer. Hopefully, through what we have done and have seen how much we have destroyed and still are ruining nature, forests, and wildlife every day we are bringing ourselves to the point of no return. We @weareprojectwild are working closely together with the highly esteemed family-owned Italian pen maker company Montegrappa. Armed with love and the WILD Montegrappa Baobab Fountain pen. We will visit leaders of State and Presidents who have the power to make the changes we have to do in order to protect nature and wildlife and life on planet Earth.

Kenia Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

As Sir David Attenbourough says: Fortunately it is not too late to save the planet.

Dear humanity together with Montegrappa we will present a WILD Book in a beautifully designed box containing the book and Baobab fountain pen together with a calligraphy written letter and contract. The letter stating: in this Book, you will find our witness statement of the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife and with this fountain pen, we kindly ask you honored sir to sign this REWILDING Contract remembering that the most important part of history is the one we are writing today. And together we will REWRITE the Future of our Planet.

Finland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

► ►

Helle and I don’t believe in doomsday and have decided to do something about it: with our new book WILD and a specially designed Montegrappa Fountain Pen, we will write the world's first constitution for nature and wildlife. We will carry this document to leaders of states and say: in this book you can see our witness statement of the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife.

Have you found any parallels between the animal and human worlds? What lessons can we draw from other species?

Greenland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

54


What do you think are the greatest dangers currently facing our planet? What can be done to overcome them?

And please sign this constitution with this pen knowing in your heart that the only important part of history is the one we rewrite today. And when you sign, remember your love for your children and family and ask yourself: do we have the right to steal the future of humankind?

The greatest danger facing our world and humanity is the loss of biodiversity and habitat destruction. if we hadn’t destroyed more than 3 trillions of trees and killed more than 60 % of all mammals then most likely with enough space for wildlife to roam free we would never have experienced the horror like the pandemic that we have today. But if we decide to recreate that ancient love for nature and animals that we are all born with and start rewilding then we can recreate what we with our machines and vanity have destroyed.

We would like to answer this question with the statement below:

MOTHER EARTH First came the vanity that we as humanity turned into insanity! We lost our sense of reality and forgot to care for wildlife killed by humanity and miss understood democracy.

Canada Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

Actually, we destroyed our mother! Yes, we actually destroyed her. How on Earth did we let this happen? Well well well fortunately it’s not too late! We can use our ingenuity to get rid of the insanity of our human race and once again reconnect our hearts with our brains and remember that when intelligence thinks and speaks we should look at the wild wisdom of animals. No species besides humans have ever eaten or destroyed and killed more than their habitats could give or hold. Not without giving back through seed dispersal or fertilizer. Hopefully, through what we have done and have seen how much we have destroyed and still are ruining nature, forests, and wildlife every day we are bringing ourselves to the point of no return. We @weareprojectwild are working closely together with the highly esteemed family-owned Italian pen maker company Montegrappa. Armed with love and the WILD Montegrappa Baobab Fountain pen. We will visit leaders of State and Presidents who have the power to make the changes we have to do in order to protect nature and wildlife and life on planet Earth.

Kenia Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

As Sir David Attenbourough says: Fortunately it is not too late to save the planet.

Dear humanity together with Montegrappa we will present a WILD Book in a beautifully designed box containing the book and Baobab fountain pen together with a calligraphy written letter and contract. The letter stating: in this Book, you will find our witness statement of the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife and with this fountain pen, we kindly ask you honored sir to sign this REWILDING Contract remembering that the most important part of history is the one we are writing today. And together we will REWRITE the Future of our Planet.

Finland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

► ►

Helle and I don’t believe in doomsday and have decided to do something about it: with our new book WILD and a specially designed Montegrappa Fountain Pen, we will write the world's first constitution for nature and wildlife. We will carry this document to leaders of states and say: in this book you can see our witness statement of the world's last wild places and endangered wildlife.

Have you found any parallels between the animal and human worlds? What lessons can we draw from other species?

Greenland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

54


What are the main steps involved in envisioning and preparing one of your projects? Whenever we take off, it is a journey into the unknown and our goal is to push the boundaries of photography as an art form. We always aim to take a voyeuristic approach in our imagery so when we find an animal, we quietly get as close as possible and then back off a little to find some foliage or grass to act as foreground, sometimes even working with long exposure. That way we create an image that conveys the spirit or the soul of the wildlife, clearly making a statement that we are merely guests in their habitat. And they will still be around when we have left.

What do you consider are the main tips to succeed in wildlife photography? When I was a young boy most people told me that becoming a wildlife photographer was a stupid dream of a job with no money. But my father and mother always taught me to aim for the stars so I decided never to give up. And just to follow the river of life, to see where it would lead me. Today we have found our own special way of working together. I guess that is one of the great things about getting older: the sharp pointy corners of your mentality gets rounded. And your ego gets less crazy with time. Especially when you have kids of your own then there is no room for an egotistical mindset. Our good advice to people who would like to make a living from travelling and photographing nature would be: Don’t ever be afraid to ask your peers and work on your stamina and don’t forget to hone your skills and learn how to use your camera to the fullest. Step number 1: create an Instagram account and a website remembering that the way people judge your work will never be better than your worst photo. So make sure that you only post your best shots. And don’t ever buy fake followers only if you are true to yourself and your audience you will have a chance of succeeding. Another point of great importance is to generate a strong network within the advertising and the media world and remember that no one is further away than a well-written email.

Congo Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

Gabon Expedition © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

What are the advantages and challenges of sharing trips, adventures, art, and a life mission with your soul mate? Is there any secret to make things work? Love is the magic of life and when you work in close with people you care about, all problems have a way of solving themselves. That’s it! of course, we don’t live in wonderland and have decided to keep a realistic approach to trouble in paradise. Whenever we get on each other's nerves we have a safe word. We simply say: blue bananas. Because to use humor when things heat up is like ice cream for a hungry child. You simply can not smile. It has worked so far. To be able to share a life together, both at home and in the field, makes us feel very privileged and it feels like the gift of life. When things go wrong you always have a shoulder to lean on and the most trusted person in your life to celebrate with when we experience success. 55

Can you share with us some memorable anecdotes from your trips? We have been to the farthest corners of our beautiful planet, always travelling with great respect and gratitude for what we have seen and discovered: From the Ross Sea in Antarctica to the equatorial forests and savannas of Africa; from the world’s largest wetland area, the Pantanal in South America, to the North American archipelago with its tempered rainforest; from

the world’s largest national park in Northeast Greenland, sailing with the Danish Navy vessel I/F Knud Rasmussen, to the mighty taiga, the boreal forest of Finland; and from Borneo’s lowland jungle to the cloud forest of Papua New Guinea. Along the way, we have made feature articles for National Geographic and other magazines as well as television documentaries about our life in the wild, and we have anchored a spot in The Guinness Book of World Records. We have photographed everything from the world’s largest penguin and the rarest seal to the great apes – chimps, gorillas, and orangutans – the powerful jaguar and the funny-looking anteater, the exceptional coastal wolf and white spirit bears, the iconic polar bear, mighty brown bears and extravagant birds of paradise. When we are out in the wild surrounded by nature and animals, we feel at home. We feel a love and a primeval force of energy there. We need to reconnect our hearts with our minds and find the love of the wild that we are all born with – then we can save the last wild places, and with that, humanity. There are so many fantastic moments and anecdotes because we love what we do, we love the entire planet and its glorious wildlife. But one special experience was when a wild coastal wolf came wandering straight towards us on a beautiful island bordering the Pacific Ocean in British Columbia, Canada. It walked on a stony beach with beautiful silver coloured driftwood timber. We were completely mesmerized by this wild creature’s confidence in us, it showed no fear. A clear sign that the wolves here are not hunted and are left completely alone. It came up to Uri and licked his rubber boot and we were both crying with tears of joy and happiness. A few seconds later it stuck its snout into the lens hood of our camera. It was so close and playful that we couldn’t use our big lenses and decided to switch and take pictures with our cell phones. The playfulness of this lone female wolf is a clear sign of how the man met the dog and they became best friends. 56 Portrait ► © Mahesh Balasubramanian


What are the main steps involved in envisioning and preparing one of your projects? Whenever we take off, it is a journey into the unknown and our goal is to push the boundaries of photography as an art form. We always aim to take a voyeuristic approach in our imagery so when we find an animal, we quietly get as close as possible and then back off a little to find some foliage or grass to act as foreground, sometimes even working with long exposure. That way we create an image that conveys the spirit or the soul of the wildlife, clearly making a statement that we are merely guests in their habitat. And they will still be around when we have left.

What do you consider are the main tips to succeed in wildlife photography? When I was a young boy most people told me that becoming a wildlife photographer was a stupid dream of a job with no money. But my father and mother always taught me to aim for the stars so I decided never to give up. And just to follow the river of life, to see where it would lead me. Today we have found our own special way of working together. I guess that is one of the great things about getting older: the sharp pointy corners of your mentality gets rounded. And your ego gets less crazy with time. Especially when you have kids of your own then there is no room for an egotistical mindset. Our good advice to people who would like to make a living from travelling and photographing nature would be: Don’t ever be afraid to ask your peers and work on your stamina and don’t forget to hone your skills and learn how to use your camera to the fullest. Step number 1: create an Instagram account and a website remembering that the way people judge your work will never be better than your worst photo. So make sure that you only post your best shots. And don’t ever buy fake followers only if you are true to yourself and your audience you will have a chance of succeeding. Another point of great importance is to generate a strong network within the advertising and the media world and remember that no one is further away than a well-written email.

Congo Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

Gabon Expedition © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

What are the advantages and challenges of sharing trips, adventures, art, and a life mission with your soul mate? Is there any secret to make things work? Love is the magic of life and when you work in close with people you care about, all problems have a way of solving themselves. That’s it! of course, we don’t live in wonderland and have decided to keep a realistic approach to trouble in paradise. Whenever we get on each other's nerves we have a safe word. We simply say: blue bananas. Because to use humor when things heat up is like ice cream for a hungry child. You simply can not smile. It has worked so far. To be able to share a life together, both at home and in the field, makes us feel very privileged and it feels like the gift of life. When things go wrong you always have a shoulder to lean on and the most trusted person in your life to celebrate with when we experience success. 55

Can you share with us some memorable anecdotes from your trips? We have been to the farthest corners of our beautiful planet, always travelling with great respect and gratitude for what we have seen and discovered: From the Ross Sea in Antarctica to the equatorial forests and savannas of Africa; from the world’s largest wetland area, the Pantanal in South America, to the North American archipelago with its tempered rainforest; from

the world’s largest national park in Northeast Greenland, sailing with the Danish Navy vessel I/F Knud Rasmussen, to the mighty taiga, the boreal forest of Finland; and from Borneo’s lowland jungle to the cloud forest of Papua New Guinea. Along the way, we have made feature articles for National Geographic and other magazines as well as television documentaries about our life in the wild, and we have anchored a spot in The Guinness Book of World Records. We have photographed everything from the world’s largest penguin and the rarest seal to the great apes – chimps, gorillas, and orangutans – the powerful jaguar and the funny-looking anteater, the exceptional coastal wolf and white spirit bears, the iconic polar bear, mighty brown bears and extravagant birds of paradise. When we are out in the wild surrounded by nature and animals, we feel at home. We feel a love and a primeval force of energy there. We need to reconnect our hearts with our minds and find the love of the wild that we are all born with – then we can save the last wild places, and with that, humanity. There are so many fantastic moments and anecdotes because we love what we do, we love the entire planet and its glorious wildlife. But one special experience was when a wild coastal wolf came wandering straight towards us on a beautiful island bordering the Pacific Ocean in British Columbia, Canada. It walked on a stony beach with beautiful silver coloured driftwood timber. We were completely mesmerized by this wild creature’s confidence in us, it showed no fear. A clear sign that the wolves here are not hunted and are left completely alone. It came up to Uri and licked his rubber boot and we were both crying with tears of joy and happiness. A few seconds later it stuck its snout into the lens hood of our camera. It was so close and playful that we couldn’t use our big lenses and decided to switch and take pictures with our cell phones. The playfulness of this lone female wolf is a clear sign of how the man met the dog and they became best friends. 56 Portrait ► © Mahesh Balasubramanian


What exciting new project is in your future?

Your work has, at times, also make you face danger up close, taking a life-changing turn in 2017 while working on a documentary in Gabon. Please tell us about this experience and your journey since then. After having been brutally attacked during our work with wild critically endangered lowland gorillas and forest elephants in Gabon we went to a local market and a crazy man stabbed Uri ten times and Uri only survived because of his martial skills which he was taught during his time in a special forces unit. Uri took the aggressor down and gave him a good beating but couldn’t manage to get the knife out of the attacker's hand. Helle jumped into the fight roaring like an angry lioness not thinking about herself or her own life acting purely out of love for her husband. We managed to fight the aggressor off. And that day Uri and Helle had saved each other's lives but nonetheless, Uri paid the ultimate price in his battle to save nature when he died clinically for two minutes during heart surgery. Uri tells: “My soul left the dead body and went as he explains to a beautiful tunnel starting out light blue twirlings like soft ice pulling him up into bright white light, a place he saw there he witnessed eternity a beautiful vision of ever bending light and nothing to stop the eye a wonderful happiness love and no pain. And no reason to return to life on earth again. But fortunately, Helle started singing: “ Urimo Urimo Urimo I love you yes I do “ and Uri realized as he says himself, my soul is simply too tough to die, and I had to return to my beautiful strong wife and wonderful daughters Silvia and Lilya and of course I have to finish our mission to protect the world's wild places together with Helle. And I was lucky to be reincarnated in my own body now a much wiser and more loving person than ever before.

The idea of a nature conservation foundation has been with us since we started Project WILD, but we did not have the capacity to write bylaws while making 25 photographic expeditions – so we agreed on saving it for when we have made all the expeditions while making the WILD book. But then our life took another turn …

Canada Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

If we learnt something after what happened in Gabon it is that we will never again delay the pursuit of our dreams. You never know how much time you have left. The future holds many adventures for us; handing over the WILD book and fountain pen to world leaders and as we write we are working on establishing the first national park in west Greenland and a rewilding project in Columbia within our WILD Nature Foundation. The work our board members and we do in the foundation is pro bono which means we all do it on a voluntary basis.

Today we are aware of that with this story behind us we have now got a much more powerful voice for nature and conservation because we have now proved our willingness to fight for what we love because what you love you will protect.

Antarctica Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

India Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

While Uri was training him, his body, mind, and soul back from not being able to talk, think, see, eat and move we managed to actually make our foundation called WILD Nature Foundation, but only with the help of many dear and close friends and lawyers. And by the help of some more dear friends, we succeeded in making our photographic masterpiece, our book called WILD.

Greenland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

We have decided to make a Kickstarter project to fund a sailing expedition circumnavigating the globe in the name of peace love and nature. A journey to inspire greatness, forgiveness, and love. Along the way embarking from Copenhagen in July 2026. The goal is to produce a film named LOVE of the WILD. I know that although I am sitting in a wheelchair and can only use my right arm and will never walk again I refuse to give up ever. So the solution is that we need to fundraise for hiring a crew, a captain, and a few able seamen to complete this journey of our dreams. We also have plans through our nature foundation called WILD. Which works by the vision of buying land and rewilding our still beautiful planet. 58


What exciting new project is in your future?

Your work has, at times, also make you face danger up close, taking a life-changing turn in 2017 while working on a documentary in Gabon. Please tell us about this experience and your journey since then. After having been brutally attacked during our work with wild critically endangered lowland gorillas and forest elephants in Gabon we went to a local market and a crazy man stabbed Uri ten times and Uri only survived because of his martial skills which he was taught during his time in a special forces unit. Uri took the aggressor down and gave him a good beating but couldn’t manage to get the knife out of the attacker's hand. Helle jumped into the fight roaring like an angry lioness not thinking about herself or her own life acting purely out of love for her husband. We managed to fight the aggressor off. And that day Uri and Helle had saved each other's lives but nonetheless, Uri paid the ultimate price in his battle to save nature when he died clinically for two minutes during heart surgery. Uri tells: “My soul left the dead body and went as he explains to a beautiful tunnel starting out light blue twirlings like soft ice pulling him up into bright white light, a place he saw there he witnessed eternity a beautiful vision of ever bending light and nothing to stop the eye a wonderful happiness love and no pain. And no reason to return to life on earth again. But fortunately, Helle started singing: “ Urimo Urimo Urimo I love you yes I do “ and Uri realized as he says himself, my soul is simply too tough to die, and I had to return to my beautiful strong wife and wonderful daughters Silvia and Lilya and of course I have to finish our mission to protect the world's wild places together with Helle. And I was lucky to be reincarnated in my own body now a much wiser and more loving person than ever before.

The idea of a nature conservation foundation has been with us since we started Project WILD, but we did not have the capacity to write bylaws while making 25 photographic expeditions – so we agreed on saving it for when we have made all the expeditions while making the WILD book. But then our life took another turn …

Canada Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

If we learnt something after what happened in Gabon it is that we will never again delay the pursuit of our dreams. You never know how much time you have left. The future holds many adventures for us; handing over the WILD book and fountain pen to world leaders and as we write we are working on establishing the first national park in west Greenland and a rewilding project in Columbia within our WILD Nature Foundation. The work our board members and we do in the foundation is pro bono which means we all do it on a voluntary basis.

Today we are aware of that with this story behind us we have now got a much more powerful voice for nature and conservation because we have now proved our willingness to fight for what we love because what you love you will protect.

Antarctica Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

India Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

While Uri was training him, his body, mind, and soul back from not being able to talk, think, see, eat and move we managed to actually make our foundation called WILD Nature Foundation, but only with the help of many dear and close friends and lawyers. And by the help of some more dear friends, we succeeded in making our photographic masterpiece, our book called WILD.

Greenland Expedition • © Uri and Helle Løvevild Golman

We have decided to make a Kickstarter project to fund a sailing expedition circumnavigating the globe in the name of peace love and nature. A journey to inspire greatness, forgiveness, and love. Along the way embarking from Copenhagen in July 2026. The goal is to produce a film named LOVE of the WILD. I know that although I am sitting in a wheelchair and can only use my right arm and will never walk again I refuse to give up ever. So the solution is that we need to fundraise for hiring a crew, a captain, and a few able seamen to complete this journey of our dreams. We also have plans through our nature foundation called WILD. Which works by the vision of buying land and rewilding our still beautiful planet. 58


SWITZERLAND

www.instagram.com/la___aura The creativity and passion of artists have remained immutable throughout history. Their tools, however, are constantly evolving, often unleashing totally new ways of expression. This is the case of Laura Heussi Rubin, a digital artist based in Bern, Switzerland. Replacing the canvas for a tablet and pigments for pixels, Laura creates striking portraits with a subtle surreal touch. Laura studied film and visual effects at the SAE Institute in Zurich. Remarkably, she started drawing on a tablet with the intention of minimizing the wear and tear of paper while creating storyboards. When describing her work, she often emphasizes a predilection for simple aesthetics. Her distinctive style mixes realism, fantasy, and emotion. Escorted by her drawing tablet, Laura H. Rubin wanders through a one-of-a-kind universe that she manages to capture in original yet ominous creations. Her portraits emanate from a fascination for mythology and psychology, which shines a light on both poetic and profound reflection. A wild and untamable taste brushes the plump lips of her graceful characters, who bear untouchable and tormented airs. As timeless models, they seem frozen in the eye of an observer who admires emotions’ impenetrable wound. It is with a remarkable fineness and technical realism that she depicts the hidden territories of our sensitivities, thanks to her sensual and enigmatic characters. She thus offers a genuine journey through Melancholia. This autobiographical art book is presented as a truly practical guide: the artist shares her tips and technical advice. She also offers help with the choice of material, style development, or graphic techniques application thanks to an educational approach to creative processes. Howl • © Laura H. Rubin 59

NEXT PAGE ► Cerulean • © Laura H. Rubin

Phi • © Laura H. Rubin


SWITZERLAND

www.instagram.com/la___aura The creativity and passion of artists have remained immutable throughout history. Their tools, however, are constantly evolving, often unleashing totally new ways of expression. This is the case of Laura Heussi Rubin, a digital artist based in Bern, Switzerland. Replacing the canvas for a tablet and pigments for pixels, Laura creates striking portraits with a subtle surreal touch. Laura studied film and visual effects at the SAE Institute in Zurich. Remarkably, she started drawing on a tablet with the intention of minimizing the wear and tear of paper while creating storyboards. When describing her work, she often emphasizes a predilection for simple aesthetics. Her distinctive style mixes realism, fantasy, and emotion. Escorted by her drawing tablet, Laura H. Rubin wanders through a one-of-a-kind universe that she manages to capture in original yet ominous creations. Her portraits emanate from a fascination for mythology and psychology, which shines a light on both poetic and profound reflection. A wild and untamable taste brushes the plump lips of her graceful characters, who bear untouchable and tormented airs. As timeless models, they seem frozen in the eye of an observer who admires emotions’ impenetrable wound. It is with a remarkable fineness and technical realism that she depicts the hidden territories of our sensitivities, thanks to her sensual and enigmatic characters. She thus offers a genuine journey through Melancholia. This autobiographical art book is presented as a truly practical guide: the artist shares her tips and technical advice. She also offers help with the choice of material, style development, or graphic techniques application thanks to an educational approach to creative processes. Howl • © Laura H. Rubin 59

NEXT PAGE ► Cerulean • © Laura H. Rubin

Phi • © Laura H. Rubin


Apophis • © Laura H. Rubin

The Concept of Reality © Laura H. Rubin

Carnivore • © Laura H. Rubin 61

The Freedom Behind The Mask © Laura H. Rubin

Mats Van Snippenberg • © Laura H. Rubin

62


Apophis • © Laura H. Rubin

The Concept of Reality © Laura H. Rubin

Carnivore • © Laura H. Rubin 61

The Freedom Behind The Mask © Laura H. Rubin

Mats Van Snippenberg • © Laura H. Rubin

62


stutters. These glitches are manifested in Kaptein’s sculpture. The figures dramatically distort, pulled from left to right like an old TV screen suffering from static. The bodies are stretched and manipulated like they are wet clay being pulled by a sculptor and the form is warped to give the effect of misalignment and strange elongated proportions. They are truly strange to look at, in some ways you are watching and expecting the form to return to some kind of normality as if it were simply a glitch. But these sculptures are stuck in this nonspace between a form and perception.

ARTICLE

WITH THE POISE OF ONE ENTERING A BLACK HOLE FOR THE THIRD TIME

. WORK NEWS ABOUT CONTACT LOG MUTE FIGURE #10 (SUNSET SELFIES AT THE GREAT ATTRACTOR)

Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2015 h36 w44 d25

Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2019 H80 W41 D28cm

Royal Perth Hospital Collection © Paul Kaptein

Collection of the City of Joondalup © Paul Kaptein

slots both left open or drilled through, these small additions add to the surreal nature of the works. The gaps left between blocks juxtapose the wonderfully smooth exterior and convey a jigsaw-like feeling. Has the maker not entirely finished with this piece, or does it open the

INSPIRATION

sculpture to encourage the viewer to complete the piece? The artist himself explains that his

PAUL KAPTEIN | A glitch in woodwork

practice is informed by two critical notions,

www.paulkaptein.com

Pneuma and Sunyata. Pneuma comes from

www.instagram.com/paulkaptein

the Stoic philosophy and is the concept of the

by Thomas Jukes

‘breath of life’ and in the Stoic world,

Paul Kaptein is an Australian artist working

the notion of a digital world. Delicate and

these are somehow not of the medium.

everything both animate and inanimate is

primarily with sculpture and drawing, he is

painstaking sculpting appears to go into each

Despite the majority of his work being left plain

made up of matter and pneuma. Sunyata is

most coveted for his intricate yet mind-bending

piece with anatomy and details followed

wood the overall texture and expression of

from Buddhist philosophy and is often

sculptures made from large blocks of laminated

closely and with incredible skill. The stacked

both textile and tissue add to that sense of a

translated as ‘emptiness’ but it does not mean

wood. A winner of several awards including the

blocks of wood are pressed together and

rendered computer model. It is no coincidence

empty in conventional terms. Instead, it tells that

2019 City of Joondalup Invitation Art Prize in

carved away before the artist leaves the

that these sculptures evoke images of

there is existence but that phenomena or objects

his local region of Perth.

surface impossibly smooth, giving the viewer a

technological involvement as this is the altered

are empty of ‘own being’. For example, we project

clear sense of texture and form.

reality that Paul Kaptein exploring.

a title to an object, like a toaster but its elements,

His sculptural works are an incredible sight to

63

Many of Kaptein’s sculptures have holes or

metal, and plastic do not contain the essence of

behold, one could be forgiven for thinking they

It is this attention to detail that makes these

By now most of us are aware of the phenomenon

the object. An interesting way to look at it is, when

are looking at some interesting work of CGI

sculptures truly exceptional. They are so finely

of digital glitches, when a sequence of code

does an object stop being that object when you

but they are far from digital, whilst exploring

wrought that the viewer really does feel that

goes awry and the digital image skips of

break it down to its constituent parts? THE SMELL OF RAIN 2015, Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite h39 x w19 x d18cm © Paul Kaptein

64


stutters. These glitches are manifested in Kaptein’s sculpture. The figures dramatically distort, pulled from left to right like an old TV screen suffering from static. The bodies are stretched and manipulated like they are wet clay being pulled by a sculptor and the form is warped to give the effect of misalignment and strange elongated proportions. They are truly strange to look at, in some ways you are watching and expecting the form to return to some kind of normality as if it were simply a glitch. But these sculptures are stuck in this nonspace between a form and perception.

ARTICLE

WITH THE POISE OF ONE ENTERING A BLACK HOLE FOR THE THIRD TIME

. WORK NEWS ABOUT CONTACT LOG MUTE FIGURE #10 (SUNSET SELFIES AT THE GREAT ATTRACTOR)

Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2015 h36 w44 d25

Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2019 H80 W41 D28cm

Royal Perth Hospital Collection © Paul Kaptein

Collection of the City of Joondalup © Paul Kaptein

slots both left open or drilled through, these small additions add to the surreal nature of the works. The gaps left between blocks juxtapose the wonderfully smooth exterior and convey a jigsaw-like feeling. Has the maker not entirely finished with this piece, or does it open the

INSPIRATION

sculpture to encourage the viewer to complete the piece? The artist himself explains that his

PAUL KAPTEIN | A glitch in woodwork

practice is informed by two critical notions,

www.paulkaptein.com

Pneuma and Sunyata. Pneuma comes from

www.instagram.com/paulkaptein

the Stoic philosophy and is the concept of the

by Thomas Jukes

‘breath of life’ and in the Stoic world,

Paul Kaptein is an Australian artist working

the notion of a digital world. Delicate and

these are somehow not of the medium.

everything both animate and inanimate is

primarily with sculpture and drawing, he is

painstaking sculpting appears to go into each

Despite the majority of his work being left plain

made up of matter and pneuma. Sunyata is

most coveted for his intricate yet mind-bending

piece with anatomy and details followed

wood the overall texture and expression of

from Buddhist philosophy and is often

sculptures made from large blocks of laminated

closely and with incredible skill. The stacked

both textile and tissue add to that sense of a

translated as ‘emptiness’ but it does not mean

wood. A winner of several awards including the

blocks of wood are pressed together and

rendered computer model. It is no coincidence

empty in conventional terms. Instead, it tells that

2019 City of Joondalup Invitation Art Prize in

carved away before the artist leaves the

that these sculptures evoke images of

there is existence but that phenomena or objects

his local region of Perth.

surface impossibly smooth, giving the viewer a

technological involvement as this is the altered

are empty of ‘own being’. For example, we project

clear sense of texture and form.

reality that Paul Kaptein exploring.

a title to an object, like a toaster but its elements,

His sculptural works are an incredible sight to

63

Many of Kaptein’s sculptures have holes or

metal, and plastic do not contain the essence of

behold, one could be forgiven for thinking they

It is this attention to detail that makes these

By now most of us are aware of the phenomenon

the object. An interesting way to look at it is, when

are looking at some interesting work of CGI

sculptures truly exceptional. They are so finely

of digital glitches, when a sequence of code

does an object stop being that object when you

but they are far from digital, whilst exploring

wrought that the viewer really does feel that

goes awry and the digital image skips of

break it down to its constituent parts? THE SMELL OF RAIN 2015, Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite h39 x w19 x d18cm © Paul Kaptein

64


This concept is very complex but in essence, the artist attempts to explore the energies that exist beneath the surface of things. His manipulation of these forms challenges the viewer's sense of being human. When does the human body stop being human with these glitches effects and missing sections? Where does the line of a digital future begin affecting us as humans? Despite a deeply personal resonance and understanding in his work, the pieces themselves do not alienate the viewer because of the artist's own beliefs. Kaptein’s work evokes very different reactions from all who view it, bringing up questions of form and being. And that at the end of the day is what the artist is exploring personally through these sculptures.

LIGHT WITHIN THE LIGHT, 2017 Laminated, hand carved + carbonised wood H54 W47 D27cm MARSYAS, 2013 laminated, hand carved wood (Jelutong - Dyera costulata)h15 x w47 x d40 Private collection Perth

MUTE FIGURE #6 (FADING OUT EVEN AS IT FOCUSES) 2017 Industrial plasters, pigment, foamH40 W25 D25cm © Paul Kaptein

66


This concept is very complex but in essence, the artist attempts to explore the energies that exist beneath the surface of things. His manipulation of these forms challenges the viewer's sense of being human. When does the human body stop being human with these glitches effects and missing sections? Where does the line of a digital future begin affecting us as humans? Despite a deeply personal resonance and understanding in his work, the pieces themselves do not alienate the viewer because of the artist's own beliefs. Kaptein’s work evokes very different reactions from all who view it, bringing up questions of form and being. And that at the end of the day is what the artist is exploring personally through these sculptures.

LIGHT WITHIN THE LIGHT, 2017 Laminated, hand carved + carbonised wood H54 W47 D27cm MARSYAS, 2013 laminated, hand carved wood (Jelutong - Dyera costulata)h15 x w47 x d40 Private collection Perth

MUTE FIGURE #6 (FADING OUT EVEN AS IT FOCUSES) 2017 Industrial plasters, pigment, foamH40 W25 D25cm © Paul Kaptein

66


“Exploring the body as the interface between quantum, relative, technological, spiritual, material, psychic and conscious states, my work collapses distinctions of internal and external binaries and linear temporalities to explore notions of identity and boundaries of self.” - Paul Kaptein

MUTE FIGURE #10 (SUNSET SELFIES AT THE GREAT ATTRACTOR) Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2019 H80 W41 D28cm Collection of the City of Joondalup © Paul Kaptein

AM I REALLY ALL THE THINGS THAT ARE OUTSIDE ME? 2015, Laminated, hand carved wood H68 W30 D20 Private collection Perth NEXT PAGE ► AND IN THE ENDLESS SOUNDS THERE CAME A PAUSE 2014 Laminated hand carved wood h63 w61 d61 cm Private collection Los Angeles

36

Mulan ► © Olga Esther


“Exploring the body as the interface between quantum, relative, technological, spiritual, material, psychic and conscious states, my work collapses distinctions of internal and external binaries and linear temporalities to explore notions of identity and boundaries of self.” - Paul Kaptein

MUTE FIGURE #10 (SUNSET SELFIES AT THE GREAT ATTRACTOR) Laminated, hand carved wood, graphite, 2019 H80 W41 D28cm Collection of the City of Joondalup © Paul Kaptein

AM I REALLY ALL THE THINGS THAT ARE OUTSIDE ME? 2015, Laminated, hand carved wood H68 W30 D20 Private collection Perth NEXT PAGE ► AND IN THE ENDLESS SOUNDS THERE CAME A PAUSE 2014 Laminated hand carved wood h63 w61 d61 cm Private collection Los Angeles

36

Mulan ► © Olga Esther


UNITED KINGDOM

www.instagram.com/edfairburn "I combine topography with pointillism, a process I call topopointillism. " Ed Fairburn is an English artist, based in Dorset, England, whose ability to combine the geography of our facial features with the geography of the earth leads to a startling and compelling synthesis of the two. Ed has become known in Europe for his evocative portraits, which produce complex human features from the random patterns found in mundane topographical and astrological maps. Ed's work is a direct combination of cartography and portraiture. Using traditional materials such as ink and pencil, the artist intervenes with a range of original maps, making gradual changes to contours, roads, and other patterns. These changes allow him to tease out the human form, resulting in a comfortable coexistence of figure and landscape. He aims to preserve the functionality of each map by feeding the composition instead of fighting it – spending hours studying each map before he begins any physical processes. Ed is interested in the subtlety of each synchronization, and how each completed map behaves more like a portrait when viewed from further away – it’s almost paradoxical that a portrait should lose detail when examined closely. Denver Southbound • © Ed Fairburn

69

NEXT PAGE ► Richmond • © Ed Fairburn

Denholme • © Ed Fairburn


UNITED KINGDOM

www.instagram.com/edfairburn "I combine topography with pointillism, a process I call topopointillism. " Ed Fairburn is an English artist, based in Dorset, England, whose ability to combine the geography of our facial features with the geography of the earth leads to a startling and compelling synthesis of the two. Ed has become known in Europe for his evocative portraits, which produce complex human features from the random patterns found in mundane topographical and astrological maps. Ed's work is a direct combination of cartography and portraiture. Using traditional materials such as ink and pencil, the artist intervenes with a range of original maps, making gradual changes to contours, roads, and other patterns. These changes allow him to tease out the human form, resulting in a comfortable coexistence of figure and landscape. He aims to preserve the functionality of each map by feeding the composition instead of fighting it – spending hours studying each map before he begins any physical processes. Ed is interested in the subtlety of each synchronization, and how each completed map behaves more like a portrait when viewed from further away – it’s almost paradoxical that a portrait should lose detail when examined closely. Denver Southbound • © Ed Fairburn

69

NEXT PAGE ► Richmond • © Ed Fairburn

Denholme • © Ed Fairburn


New York • © Ed Fairburn

Chingford • © Ed Fairburn

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis

Oregon • © Ed Fairburn

71

72 Distance Chart • © Ed Fairburn

Amsterdam • © Ed Fairburn


New York • © Ed Fairburn

Chingford • © Ed Fairburn

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis

Oregon • © Ed Fairburn

71

72 Distance Chart • © Ed Fairburn

Amsterdam • © Ed Fairburn


Bella’s passion for photography blossomed in 2009 and developed into a distinctive style over the following years. In 2012 she moved to the cosmopolitan city of Berlin and realized her dream of living as an artist. Her work has been recognized with several international awards, exhibitions and interviews, and commissioned by renowned musicians, authors and journalists. Since 2016 Bella volunteers in the German foundation "Dein Sternenkind" and gives parents photos of their deceased children. Bella provides us with a multifaceted perspective into our existence, one which approaches reality through a plethora of characters, existential conundrums and artistic styles.

ARTICLE

Acceptance Series | Accept Yourself • © Bella von Einsiedel

BELLA von EINSIEDEL | Ethereal Portraits

www.bellavoneinsiedel.de www.instagram.com/bellavoneinsiedel

by Photographize Bella von Einsiedel portraits explore every dimension of human nature. They dive into the depths of existence but also reflect on our interactions with the outside world. With an exquisite visual language that effortlessly alternates between realism and fantasy, Bella explores profound questions such as self-awareness, diversity and our relation to nature. The origins of her seemingly boundless imagination can be traced back to an upbringing in a small town in the former German Democratic Republic. The dreary gray of prefabricated buildings and the frequent lack of funds were the perfect incubator for her creative mind. 73

NEXT PAGE ► Acceptance Series | Love Yourself • © Bella von Einsiedel

74


Bella’s passion for photography blossomed in 2009 and developed into a distinctive style over the following years. In 2012 she moved to the cosmopolitan city of Berlin and realized her dream of living as an artist. Her work has been recognized with several international awards, exhibitions and interviews, and commissioned by renowned musicians, authors and journalists. Since 2016 Bella volunteers in the German foundation "Dein Sternenkind" and gives parents photos of their deceased children. Bella provides us with a multifaceted perspective into our existence, one which approaches reality through a plethora of characters, existential conundrums and artistic styles.

ARTICLE

Acceptance Series | Accept Yourself • © Bella von Einsiedel

BELLA von EINSIEDEL | Ethereal Portraits

www.bellavoneinsiedel.de www.instagram.com/bellavoneinsiedel

by Photographize Bella von Einsiedel portraits explore every dimension of human nature. They dive into the depths of existence but also reflect on our interactions with the outside world. With an exquisite visual language that effortlessly alternates between realism and fantasy, Bella explores profound questions such as self-awareness, diversity and our relation to nature. The origins of her seemingly boundless imagination can be traced back to an upbringing in a small town in the former German Democratic Republic. The dreary gray of prefabricated buildings and the frequent lack of funds were the perfect incubator for her creative mind. 73

NEXT PAGE ► Acceptance Series | Love Yourself • © Bella von Einsiedel

74


Femmes de la Natur | The Fire

Body Language | The Deer

► ©Hide Bogdan Kotewicz • © Bella von Einsiedel

Femmes de la Natur | The Hurricane

Body Language | The Butterfly

Body Language | The Hedgehog

Body Language | The Centipede


Femmes de la Natur | The Fire

Body Language | The Deer

► ©Hide Bogdan Kotewicz • © Bella von Einsiedel

Femmes de la Natur | The Hurricane

Body Language | The Butterfly

Body Language | The Hedgehog

Body Language | The Centipede


GERMANY

www.haser.org

Born in 1989 into an artistic family in the Black Forest, Germany, Alma Haser is now based in London and on the southeast coast. She is known for her complex and meticulously constructed portraiture, which is influenced by her creativity and her background in fine art. Alma creates striking work that catches the eye and captivates the mind. Expanding the dimensions of traditional portrait photography, Alma takes her photographs further by using inventive paper-folding techniques, collage, and mixed media to create layers of intrigue around her subjects; manipulating her portraits into futuristic paper sculptures and blurring the distinctions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional imagery. Her current projects include the Twin Puzzle series, delving into her fascination with identical twins, their genetics, and how to distinguish them. She’s also been working on her Plant series; an exploration of what is real and what is manufactured, through using her unique paper collage and re-photographing techniques.

I Always have to Repeat Myself • © Alma Haser 77

NEXT PAGE ► • © Alma Haser

Within 15 Minutes • © Alma Haser


GERMANY

www.haser.org

Born in 1989 into an artistic family in the Black Forest, Germany, Alma Haser is now based in London and on the southeast coast. She is known for her complex and meticulously constructed portraiture, which is influenced by her creativity and her background in fine art. Alma creates striking work that catches the eye and captivates the mind. Expanding the dimensions of traditional portrait photography, Alma takes her photographs further by using inventive paper-folding techniques, collage, and mixed media to create layers of intrigue around her subjects; manipulating her portraits into futuristic paper sculptures and blurring the distinctions between two-dimensional and three-dimensional imagery. Her current projects include the Twin Puzzle series, delving into her fascination with identical twins, their genetics, and how to distinguish them. She’s also been working on her Plant series; an exploration of what is real and what is manufactured, through using her unique paper collage and re-photographing techniques.

I Always have to Repeat Myself • © Alma Haser 77

NEXT PAGE ► • © Alma Haser

Within 15 Minutes • © Alma Haser


Husband and Wife • © Alma Haser

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis

• © Alma Haser

79 • © Alma Haser

I Always have to Repeat Myself • © Alma Haser

14 ► © Paul Croes Inge Nelis Just Landing ► ©& Hardi Budi


Husband and Wife • © Alma Haser

► © Paul Croes & Inge Nelis

• © Alma Haser

79 • © Alma Haser

I Always have to Repeat Myself • © Alma Haser

14 ► © Paul Croes Inge Nelis Just Landing ► ©& Hardi Budi


For Orlando, the answers to the most transcendental questions lay in our inner cosmos. His depiction of inert spaces suggests that we need to look inside ourselves to make a critical self-examination if we want to improve our human condition. He seeks to motivate the audience to explore and connect with their inner self in order to find fulfilment.

ARTICLE

Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

www.instagram.com/orlandovaldor.artist

ORLANDO VALDOR | When Geometry and Reality Collide by Photographize

Originally from Cuba, Melbourne based visual artist Orlando Valdor is widely recognized for his abstract paintings. Combining geometric elements and a vibrant palette, his unique style has influences from art movements like Cubism, Elementarism and Op Art. Lines escaping to infinity along multiple directions create random geometric shapes that tesselate the canvas. Vivid colors suspended from this intricate geometric skeleton create kaleidoscopic patterns from which reality magically emerges. A new dimension of existence is born from the delicate tension between abstraction and realism. This juxtaposition allows Orlando to express ideas often related to philosophical and psychological subjects. After experimenting with various media, acrylic is his current choice as it is best suited to this methodology. The legend of the seven wise man • © Orlando Valdor

81

82


For Orlando, the answers to the most transcendental questions lay in our inner cosmos. His depiction of inert spaces suggests that we need to look inside ourselves to make a critical self-examination if we want to improve our human condition. He seeks to motivate the audience to explore and connect with their inner self in order to find fulfilment.

ARTICLE

Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

www.instagram.com/orlandovaldor.artist

ORLANDO VALDOR | When Geometry and Reality Collide by Photographize

Originally from Cuba, Melbourne based visual artist Orlando Valdor is widely recognized for his abstract paintings. Combining geometric elements and a vibrant palette, his unique style has influences from art movements like Cubism, Elementarism and Op Art. Lines escaping to infinity along multiple directions create random geometric shapes that tesselate the canvas. Vivid colors suspended from this intricate geometric skeleton create kaleidoscopic patterns from which reality magically emerges. A new dimension of existence is born from the delicate tension between abstraction and realism. This juxtaposition allows Orlando to express ideas often related to philosophical and psychological subjects. After experimenting with various media, acrylic is his current choice as it is best suited to this methodology. The legend of the seven wise man • © Orlando Valdor

81

82


Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cause and Effect Series • © Orlando Valdor

The Domes ► © Muhammad Almasri

Paradise between second and fird• © Orlando Valdor

►Landscapes © Bogdan andKotewicz lineal games

Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cubans Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cause and Effect Series • © Orlando Valdor

84


Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

Landscapes and lineal games Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cause and Effect Series • © Orlando Valdor

The Domes ► © Muhammad Almasri

Paradise between second and fird• © Orlando Valdor

►Landscapes © Bogdan andKotewicz lineal games

Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cubans Series • © Orlando Valdor

Cause and Effect Series • © Orlando Valdor

84


Highlights

Highlights

Frederic Debilly

Hany HOSSAMELDIN

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.fredericdebilly.fr www.instagram.com/frederic.debilly

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.facebook.com/hanyhossam.photography www.instagram.com/hanyhossameldin

126


Highlights

Highlights

Frederic Debilly

Hany HOSSAMELDIN

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.fredericdebilly.fr www.instagram.com/frederic.debilly

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.facebook.com/hanyhossam.photography www.instagram.com/hanyhossameldin

126


Highlights

Highlights

Geir Fløde

Stephen Clough

Curator’s Choice NORWAY

www.geirfloede.com www.instagram.com/geirfloede

Curator’s Choice CANADA

www.stephencloughphotographe.com www.instagram.com/sxs.clough


Highlights

Highlights

GUS

Stephen Clough

Curator’s Choice SPAIN

www.gusfineart.es www.instagram.com/gusfineart

Curator’s Choice CANADA

www.stephencloughphotographe.com www.instagram.com/sxs.clough


Highlights

Highlights

GUS

Stéphane Navailles

Curator’s Choice SPAIN

www.gusfineart.es www.instagram.com/gusfineart

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.facebook.com/stephanenavailles1967 www.instagram.com/stephane_navailles


Highlights

Highlights

Geir Fløde

Stéphane Navailles

Curator’s Choice NORWAY

www.geirfloede.com www.instagram.com/geirfloede

Curator’s Choice FRANCE

www.facebook.com/stephanenavailles1967 www.instagram.com/stephane_navailles


Highlights Curator’s Choice Hasan Alsaffar

KUWAIT

www.alsaffarstudios.com www.instagram.com/alsaffarstudios

Highlights Curator’s Choice Susan Marie Carlo

United States

www.carlophotography.art www.instagram.com/sue_carlo15

Ondrej Medved SLOVAKIA

www.ondrejmedved.com www.facebook.com/ondro.medved

Cain Shimizu JAPAN

www.cainshimizu.com www.facebook.com/kenichi.shimizu.777 www.instagram.com/cain_shimizu

96


Highlights

Highlights

Peijun Cao

Joanna Kucia

Curator’s Choice CHINA

www.instagram.com/peijunfashion_art

91

Curator’s Choice POLAND

www.facebook.com/laboheme111 www.instagram.com/laboheme100

92


Highlights

Highlights

Callejón

Kachon Kaewpradit

Curator’s Choice COLOMBIA

www.instagram.com/c.a.l.l.e.j.o.n

Curator’s Choice THAILAND

www.facebook.com/kachon.kaewpradit.5 www.instagram.com/melbournegallagher


Highlights

Highlights

Callejón

Kachon Kaewpradit

Curator’s Choice COLOMBIA

www.instagram.com/c.a.l.l.e.j.o.n

Curator’s Choice THAILAND

www.facebook.com/kachon.kaewpradit.5 www.instagram.com/melbournegallagher


Highlights Curator’s Choice Peijun Cao

CHINA

www.instagram.com/peijunfashion_art

95

Highlights Curator’s Choice Cindy Mantle

United States

www.instagram.com/mantlecindy


Highlights Curator’s Choice Javier Roldan Perez

SPAIN

www.facebook.com/javierroldan.net www.instagram.com/javierroldanp

97

Highlights

Jack Savage UNITED KINGDOM

www.jacksavage.co.uk www.facebook.com/jacksavagephotographer www.instagram.com/jacksavage_photo

Curator’s Choice

Anneke Bloema NETHERLANDS

www.wondrousgoose.com www.facebook.com/WondrousGoose www.instagram.com/wondrous_goose

Cindy Mantle

United States

www.instagram.com/mantlecindy


Highlights Curator’s Choice Javier Roldan Perez

SPAIN

www.facebook.com/javierroldan.net www.instagram.com/javierroldanp

97

Highlights

Jack Savage UNITED KINGDOM

www.jacksavage.co.uk www.facebook.com/jacksavagephotographer www.instagram.com/jacksavage_photo

Curator’s Choice

Anneke Bloema NETHERLANDS

www.wondrousgoose.com www.facebook.com/WondrousGoose www.instagram.com/wondrous_goose

Susan Marie Carlo

United States

www.carlophotography.art www.instagram.com/sue_carlo15

Ondrej Medved SLOVAKIA

www.ondrejmedved.com www.facebook.com/ondro.medved

Cain Shimizu JAPAN

www.cainshimizu.com www.facebook.com/kenichi.shimizu.777 www.instagram.com/cain_shimizu

98


Highlights Curator’s Choice Javier Roldan Perez

SPAIN

www.facebook.com/javierroldan.net www.instagram.com/javierroldanp

97

Highlights

Jack Savage UNITED KINGDOM

www.jacksavage.co.uk www.facebook.com/jacksavagephotographer www.instagram.com/jacksavage_photo

Curator’s Choice

Anneke Bloema NETHERLANDS

www.wondrousgoose.com www.facebook.com/WondrousGoose www.instagram.com/wondrous_goose

Susan Marie Carlo

United States

www.carlophotography.art www.instagram.com/sue_carlo15

Ondrej Medved SLOVAKIA

www.ondrejmedved.com www.facebook.com/ondro.medved

Cain Shimizu JAPAN

www.cainshimizu.com www.facebook.com/kenichi.shimizu.777 www.instagram.com/cain_shimizu

98


www.modulemag.co


www.modulemag.co


ISSN 2639-5673

ISSUE45