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CANADIANS ABROAD:

INTERNATIONAL ADVENTURES IN PHOTOGRAPHY MEAGHAN OGILVIE’S UNDERWATER WORLDS. JO-ANNE McARTHUR ANIMAL ADVOCATE. KOREAN DREAMS. NATHALIE DAOUST IN NORTH KOREA SAMRA HABIB’S QUEER MUSLIM PROJECT.

FALL 2018

TRAVEL TIPS. YOU WON’T EXPECT!

MORE INTERNATIONAL INSPIRATION. THAN EVER!


WWW.FUJIFILM.CA/EDUCATIONPROGRAM


MAGAZINE

we’re different in print. In case you hadn’t noticed, you’re looking at PhotoED magazine’s FREE digital edition. Here, we’re sharing some different stuff than what’s happening in our print issue. Just FYI.


MEAGHAN OGILVIE BEHIND THE SHOT: This image was captured in a cenote in Tulum, Mexico in 2018. A cenote is a natural well or reservoir, common in the Yucatán, formed when a limestone surface has collapsed, exposing the water beneath. In modern and ancient Yucatán culture, Chacs—a cult of the rain gods—are associated with cenotes.

15   PHOTO BOOKS WE LOVE

IN THIS DIGITAL ISSUE:

16  TRAVEL TIPS Travel advice you may not expect 20  MARIE  LOUISE MOUTAFCHIEVA Renaissance Light & Culinary Delights *** extended interview ! by Nicola Irvin 22  ALEIA ROBINSON-ADA’S LEAP OF FAITH by Nicola Irvin 30  THROUGH AN EAST COAST LENS by Nicola Irvin 32  CANADIAN PHOTOGRAPHERS MAKING A DIFFERENCE 36  READERS GALLERY *** Our biggest Gallery ever! Submissions by our readers


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“One’s destination is never a place, but always a new way of seeing things.”

EDITOR’S NOTE photo by: www.margaretmulligan.com

INTERNATIONAL INSPIRATION Maybe it’s a restless heart, big dreams, or plain curiosity that drives wanderlust. Whether we come back inspired to go again or more appreciative of where we started, more often than not, when it comes to travel, the reward is greater than the risk. In our print issue, I wanted to share some homegrown photography stories that spanned the globe. Nathalie Daoust’s Korean Dreams series takes us to North Korea, a place not easily accessible. On arriving back home to her darkroom in Berlin, she takes her images to a new level. Award-winning documentary photographer Jo-Anne McArthur travels extensively on a mission to share a message. Her passion for animals drives her to share the good, the bad, and the ugly when it comes to how humans treat and co-exist with animals on a global scale.

PHOTOED E IS 10 0% MAGAZIN ANADA! MADE IN C U FOR O Y THANK PORT! P SU R YOU

When it comes to travelling as a photographer, travel itself can sometimes be the hardest part of the project. We asked five Canadian frequent flyers for a few tips, and why they love what they do. (See page 12.)

—Henry Miller

This winter we’re looking forward to staying indoors. Baby, it’s cold outside, so we’re going to make the very most of our cabin fever creativity. If you’ve got unique studio work to share, drop us a line! We are super excited about some fun events and opportunities we have planned to share even more Canadian photogs’ stories in the months ahead. Follow us on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter, and sign up for our e-newsletter to keep up! Your editor,

Rita Godlevskis rita@photoed.ca

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MAGAZINE

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PhotoED Magazine is published 3x/year, SPRING, FALL, & WINTER See www.photoed.ca for subscription/advertising information. Publications Mail Agreement No. 40634032 PhotoED Magazine 2100 Bloor St. West, Suite 6218 Toronto ON M6S 5A5

This issue was made possible with the assistance of The Government of Canada.

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FALL 2018 ISSUE #53 ISSN 1708-282X

EDITOR/PUBLISHER

ART DIRECTOR

CONTRIBUTING

Rita Godlevskis / rita@photoed.ca Ruth Alves Joshua Cameron

WRITERS

Briar Chaput Nicola Irvin Samantha Small Peter Sramek

Deborah Cooper-Bullock

COPY EDITOR

SOCIAL MEDIA ASSISTANT

Joshua Cameron

Nicola Irvin

DIGITAL CONTENT

ASSISTANT

COVER IMAGE

Anton Mwewa


TAKE NOTE:

Photo by Madeline Murray / www.iammad.ca

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CALL FOR SUBMISSIONS DEADLINE: MONDAY, OCTOBER 8, 2018 This WINTER we’re looking to showcase:

STUDIO MAGIC. Baby, it’s cold outside. Studio tips, tricks, and indoor magic. Share your work with us! Drop us a line with a link to your online portfolio or email the editor with your story pitch and low-res samples of your images. — rita@photoed.ca

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GEORGE BROWN COLLEGE SCHOOL OF DESIGN

SEE YOU AT THE WATERFRONT

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George Brown College’s Waterfront Campus (opening 2019) is expanding to include an exciting new facility in the Daniels Waterfront—City of the Arts Development.

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PARTNER WITH US We bring together industry with design faculty and students to develop and test cutting-edge technologies, games, and digital applications for the smart economy. We work with a range of sectors including construction, finance, health, information and communication technologies. Join the growing list of organizations working with the School of Design on applied research and design projects. Hire our students as part of our field education program or as full-time designers upon graduation.

INTRODUCING OUR NEW HONOURS BACHELOR OF DIGITAL EXPERIENCE DESIGN 4 years (8 semesters) Honours Bachelor Degree In this program, students will develop the ability to critically analyse and adapt to ever changing conditions of technology and culture. Foundational courses build students’ analytical, technical, and business skills. In upper year courses and capstone projects, students collaborate on digital interfaces and applications, as well as interactive environments and objects.

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The curriculum focuses on three areas of learning based on the digital experience design process: •

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Make: designing, building and testing digital experiences

Ship: entrepreneurship and the commercialization of digital products

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Cubus Concept Rendering Ardy Llantino, Leonardo Burgatte, and Rajan Jangra


Turn your love of photography into a career. Become a professional photographer in just two years in Seneca’s Photography program. You’ll learn strong lighting and entrepreneurial skills to develop your own unique talent and style. Let our team of working professionals teach you the real-world skills needed to succeed in the industry. CONTACT US Program Co-ordinator ray.steinke@senecacollege.ca 416.491.5050 ext. 33572

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FURTHER READING:

INTERNATIONAL ADVENTURES As you may already know, we LOVE beautifully printed images, sequenced to take the reader on a journey, through finely crafted presentation. Here are a few Canadian photo books that will take you to new places.

H-HOUR, NORMANDY 1944. by Leslie Hossack, 112 pages, 30×30 cm. The Last Indian Wars, Brezno, Czech Republic © Naomi Harris

Bavarian Festival, Frankenmuth, Michigan, USA © Naomi Harris

EUSA

Westernstadt Pullman City, Eging am See, Germany © Naomi Harris

by Naomi Harris, 240 pages, 21.2 × 23 cm. In EUSA, Naomi Harris documents people in American-themed places in Europe and European-themed places in America. EUSA is a reaction to the homogenization of European and American cultures, an homage to a heritage that isn’t one’s own. Many of the pictures make it hard to locate when and where they were taken: in the US or somewhere in Europe? EUSA is an ambitious project that raises questions about authenticity, cultural identity, and appropriation.

Available online: www.chapters.indigo.ca or www.photoeye.com/bookstore See more: naomiharris.com

Leslie Hossack’s book explores places of memory and commemoration associated with Operation Overlord, the Normandy Campaign of June August 1944. Divided into four sections – Juno Beach (where Canadian troops landed on June 6, 1944, at 7:45 a.m., H-Hour), Atlantic Wall, Official Telegrams, and War Graves – Leslie’s narrative travels slowly and cumulatively. The book includes images taken at the structural remains of the Atlantic Wall – giant bunkers and fortifications, now hidden by blowing beach sands – and commemorates the graves of soldiers killed throughout Normandy. The story is further elaborated with reproductions of handwritten letters and official telegrams that “regret to inform.” By exploring the human experience of loss in war, she leaves us with more questions than answers.

www.lesliehossack.ca/books

PhotoED • 15


TOP TRAVEL TIPS

We asked five of our well-travelled expert photographer friends for their best travel advice. Here is what they had to say.

Nathalie Daoust

Kasha Slavner

Naomi Harris

I never travel without...

I never travel without...

I never travel without...

A good book that is written by someone from the country I am visiting. It gives you a literal insight on the culture.

My lavalier microphone. I never know who I’ll be meeting in my travels, so if I meet someone with an amazing story, I can interview them on the go for future film projects.

My travel kit includes earplugs, an eye mask, and melatonin. Why? Jetlag. I also like to bring my own bitters. Soda and bitters is my drink of choice, however, it’s often not an option, so I carry my own.

The best thing about travel is...

The best thing about travel is...

I love having the opportunity to learn about other cultures and to break down barriers between people. It is one of the best tools for creating global citizens who care about the world they live in and about the impact their actions have in the world. I love how heart- and mind-opening travel can be. I get to see gorgeous new landscapes and meet people from all walks of life. It is a privilege I don’t take for granted.

Lately most of my travel has been road trips, which I really adore. I love travelling with my Shih Tzu sidekick Maggie because when you have a dog you have to put walking into the itinerary so I’m always looking for beautiful places I wouldn’t have visited otherwise for us to hike in. But the best part is pulling into a Walmart parking lot at the end of a long day and jumping into the back of my car, falling asleep within minutes with Maggie by my side. And then to wake up the next day, crawl back into the front seat and drive away all without paying for a hotel room. That’s living!

daoustnathalie.com

The best thing about travel is...

I love discovering new cultures and different ways of life. With my camera, I am able to meet people I would normally not. I am also a foodie, so discovering new flavours always puts a smile on my face. Basically, I divide most of my time between feeding my soul and my tummy. My advice for newbie travel photographers...

It’s easier than it seems. You just need to be curious and respectful. Most of the time people will accept you with open arms.

theglobalsunriseproject.com

My advice for newbie travel photographers...

I always encourage new artists, whether they be working in photography, film, or other media, to find what they’re most passionate about. Finding your passions is the key way to make a difference. Art has the potential to change minds and touch hearts and that’s a responsibility we must not take lightly.

www.naomiharris.com

My advice for newbie travel photographers...

Do not leave packing until the last minute; you will forget something. Going through airport security when travelling by air can be really stressful if you’re not prepared with your toiletries in a separate bag, ensuring each item is within the airline’s allowance guidelines. Also, bring a few extra Ziploc bags. They always come in handy.


celebrating years

Chelsie Xavier-Blower Wildlife biologist, conservationist, and visual storyteller. Chelsie is also an intern at @sea_legacy

www.chelsiexb.com

I never travel without...

My journal. It’s amazing how much detail you can forget about a place! Reminiscing about places I’ve seen and experiences I’ve had that have slipped my mind is one of my favourite feelings. Besides photos, reading notes in a journal is one of the best ways to bring all of the memories back. I also never travel without my Swiss army knife. It’s come in handy more times than imaginable! The best thing about travel is...

The adventure of it all! No matter where you go — whether you are travelling somewhere new and experiencing different landscapes, sounds, smells and tastes, or if you are returning to a place that you know and love — it’s always a wondrous feeling. I get butterflies from the excitement of what’s to come on the journey ahead. I live for that feeling. (Super cheesy I know, but hey, it’s true!) My advice for newbie travel photographers...

As a technical tip, I was taught that the ground rule in photography is “f8 and be there.” F8 because it’s a nice aperture to keep things sharp, and be there, well, you’ve got to be there to take that pic! Whether it’s pulling yourself out of bed in the morning before sunrise for morning light, or wondering if you can be bothered to go to that place to shoot that thing… DO IT!

Meaghan Ogilvie

IG: @meaghan_ogilvie I never travel without...

My mask and snorkel. The best thing about travel is...

Everything. From the flight, to the food, to exploring new places, I love it all. My advice for newbie travel photographers...

If you’re bringing a lot of gear (drones), do research about the custom taxes of the country you’re entering. You don’t want to get surprised with extra fees.

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RENAISSANCE LIGHT & CULINARY DELIGHTS BY NICOLA IRVIN

20 photo ED

BY NICOLA IRVIN


MARIE LOUISE MOUTAFCHIEVA loves food. Her culinary quests are the driving force behind her adventures around the globe, and she captures it all through a Renaissance-inspired lens.

Marie Louise, better known as “Mimi,” is a Bulgarian-Canadian photographer and recent photo school graduate. She honed her skills in the studio during her studies at Ryerson University in Toronto, and progressed naturally towards still life and food photography. This direction may even have been written in the stars; at the tender age of 1, per Bulgarian tradition, Mimi’s family conducted a small ceremony in which several objects representing various career paths or passions were placed in front her. Little Mimi toddled a beeline for the pita bread, and the rest is history. Through her teen years, she discovered her passion for photography as she documented her baked creations in the kitchen of her family home. Mimi’s method has remained quite the same and even now, as a seasoned photographer, she describes her process of planning, baking, and shooting as a time of “delightful tranquillity.” She has always loved to immerse herself in a cozy creative bubble when making new work. Although Mimi’s own kitchen is dear to her, she has undeniably been bitten by the travel bug. Family trips evolved into selfdirected food tours that tend towards rural European cuisine. This artist’s appreciation for “little moments” — a coffee break shared with friends, a café serenaded by birdsong, or a fresh fig plucked from the grounds of a Chateau in Bordeaux — remains at the forefront of her images. Mimi never aims to illicit jealousy in a viewer, but rather to create images that allow others to be drawn into these magical little moments for themselves. She finds comfort and inspiration within these memories when she returns home to Canada, creating and photographing dishes in her own kitchen that remind her of a sunny day in, say, Lisbon. The combination of the artist’s zeal for history and desire to live simply (ideally in a rural village somewhere in Eastern Europe) plays a part in her creative process. Mimi stylistically draws from her favourite Renaissance artists, including Rembrandt, Van Eyck, and Vermeer, in her photography practice.

Despite her endearingly “old soul,” Mimi has a deep appreciation for all that the Internet has to offer. Food blogs have inspired her to embark on some of her most memorable experiences, such as her trip to Bordeaux, France, where she had the opportunity to work alongside some of her favourite food blogger photographers at a workshop hosted in an ancient French castle.

PhotoED • 21


NICOLA IRVIN NOTE: On a sunny afternoon in spring, I met Mimi for coffee at The Grange, a lovely café in the Art Gallery of Ontario. Mimi is slightly on edge - after all, I did invite her out for coffee and an art chat, only to immediately hook her up to my handy little lavaliere microphone. She quickly forgets however, as we settle into seats in a little nook by a window.

Her high-waisted, gingham pants and ruffled shirt contrast the dark wooden architecture of the café, yet somehow she seems to match the design of the space. We sit surrounded by fine art and artfully crafted caffeinated beverages. A waiter arrives with our drinks - a cappuccino for Mimi and a chai tea for me.

NI: Tell me a bit about your family. How they have influenced your work? MM: Most of my childhood summers were spent travelling from Canada to Bulgaria visiting family members. These visits often revolved around food. My grandparents and my mother are big food enthusiasts and they are always in the kitchen. I think it was in grade eight that I really started to appreciate it all. I then started to do my own research, make bucket lists for myself, and ask my parents “why don’t we go here, see this and that…” NI: Where are some of the places that you’ve been? MM: There’s many! I’ve been to France, Italy…Italy a couple times, it’s one of my favourites. England - mostly London, Bulgaria of course, Turkey - Turkey is one of my highlights actually. NI: Why was Turkey so special? MM: I think it was mostly because of the food culture. I found the cuisine to be very similar to Bulgarian cuisine. The two cultures have influenced each other historically dating back to the Ottoman Empire. Also, Greece - my Godmother is there and I was baptized in Greece, oh!, and, Japan last year. NI: Do you ever experience culture shock when you travel? MM: Japan was a huge shock. It was my first time in Asia - although Turkey is kind-of right on the borderline but you don’t feel it as much. The people that I met in Japan handled themselves with such poise and respect. I also enjoyed the distinctive Japanese design style, such as these pants! NICOLA IRVIN NOTE: Mimi gestures to her super cool gingham pants. NI: How has travel influenced you personally? MM: I do try to take whatever I’ve experienced when I’m travelling and include it into my everyday life in Canada. I’m not a fan of living where I am at this point *she laughs uncomfortably* I feel I’ve lived here long enough and want to move somewhere else likely, Europe. I feel there’s more of a life, and a different way of living there. Here, I’m just at my office, come home, sleep, and live life on the side NI: You’re totally selling me on Europe! MM: It’s true! I feel as though, in Canada, you’re expected to work from morning to night. The enjoyment is something that I feel is missing here. I’m trying to keep that positivity of enjoying life from the European side to here in Canada but it’s difficult.


“I DO TRY TO TAKE WHATEVER I’VE EXPERIENCED WHEN I’M TRAVELLING AND INCLUDE IT INTO MY EVERYDAY LIFE IN CANADA.”

NI: When did you transition your love of food into food photography? MM: The photography really started when I started to bake. That’s what got me energized. I wanted to share my love of food with other people. It was in my 3rd year of photography study [at Ryerson University], I started doing more food styling, more baking, and was feeling more successful.

I also visited a lot of bakeries and pastry shops. I asked chefs to enter their kitchens. I started off at a family owned Italian bakery and a later a French pastry shop. That’s when I started experimenting with Italian Renaissance-style lighting. It has worked for me and I’ve never looked back. I take inspiration from Instagram and follow a lot of food bloggers. A while ago, I saw that a couple of my favourite food bloggers were offering a workshop in Bordeaux. This was kind of a graduation gift to myself. I was feeling pretty confident in my work and felt that it would be a good step forward for me to work with these artists that I had followed for so long. It was based in an old chateau and the small group of us had the whole thing to ourselves. I was the youngest of the group but felt very welcomed. The views from the chateau were of green vineyards, and there was always a lingering smell of fresh morning dew. Every morning we would wake up to a view of a fig tree and smells of fresh figs. This workshop definitely helped me along. When I first got there I felt nervous and star-struck! But when we started working oneon-one, it boosted my confidence. I’m a very timid person. This experience really did help me to mature confidence-wise, and it helped my work tremendously as well. It was really a dream come true.

artworks that so heavily inspire her. We stop in front of JeanSiméon Chardin’s 1758 painting “Jar of Apricots.” NI: I think your work strives do deliver this same feeling. MM: Yes. It’s this same simplicity, this wonderful lighting, that I draw from in my work. I want the food that I photograph to be beautiful, but not too beautiful to be eaten. NI: Do you think that you shoot to travel, or travel to shoot, or something in between?

MM: On our last night there, we had a big dinner at an even older chateau. Some of us got quite emotional at the end of the workshop. We had grown attached to each other, since we all shared the same passion.

MM: I think it’s a bit of both, but I start with the ‘travel to shoot.’ The travelling is where I get the inspiration and before I go anywhere, I research and talk to people who have gone before me to gather information, and then start to develop my own idea surrounding the trip. When I’m in the process of organizing a trip to go somewhere, I create these visions in my head of what I want to see, experience, and the food I want to eat. I pinpoint specific locations and then once I’m there, the travelling takes care of all the inspiration.

NICOLA IRVIN NOTE: At this point, Mimi and having finished our drinks decide to explore the gallery to stroll around some of the

NI: Are you also able to re-capture this inspiration when you’re at home in your own kitchen?

NICOLA IRVIN NOTE: I am enraptured with Mimi’s retelling of this culinary adventure, peering wistfully over the edge of my teacup, and longing for one of those fresh figs.


the world, and it broadens your perspective, which then broadens your work. Travelling teaches you that there is more to life than simply work. NI: I feel like your food photography especially illustrates this. MM: Through my photography I aim to share those narrow streets in Europe, and take people on a journey with me. I hate when people say ‘oh I’m so jealous.’ I don’t want people to feel jealous, I want to share with them and want the audience to feel inspired. Maybe inspire them to take a journey themselves or even start cooking in their own home. NI: They don’t have to go to Florence, Florence can be their own kitchen. MM: I feel I depend on my travel to give me inspiration. I bring ideas from abroad back to my own kitchen, and always come back wanting to do more baking and cooking.

I use the memories from the places I’ve been in an aim to relive those moments. Through my work, I never have to let go of those experiences. Sometimes I find it hard to be in the place that I am. Right now, I live outside of Toronto and don’t get into the city much. I feel as though I am in a routine every day. It can be hard to find inspiration in that.

MM: Exactly! And if then they someday do get the chance to go to Florence, even better!

Wherever Mimi’s travels take her next, we’re excited to follow her vicariously as she pursues her passion for documenting sweet and savory adventures.

I’m really passionate about what I’m doing. Just getting your hands dirty, you become more inspired creatively. For me, I’m always wondering ‘where do these ingredients come from?’ If you are able to travel, the travelling itself is a great teacher. You learn so much about life in general, people in different areas of

IG: @marielouphotography www.marielou.photography


BEAU PHOTO

Shares an image by local Vancouver photographer:

©Nicole Langdon-Davies - Beau Photo “One of the best parts about travel is the anticipation of using all of the cameras I’ve carefully chosen. This year, I took part in building Arcane Axis — a wizard tower of sorts — at an electronic music festival. Colourful lights at night created a magic that made it come alive. Watching people experience the piece, and documenting it, was extra special, as I had been a part of the tower’s creation.” Shot with a Fujifilm X-T1 camera, Fujifilm XF 23mm f2 R WR lens.

1520 W 6th Ave, Vancouver, BC V6J 1R2 Phone - 604.734.7771 / Toll free - 1.800.994.2328

www.beauphoto.com


The story behind Meaghan Ogilvie’s UNDERWATER WORLDS is BEST VIEWED in high quality PRINT. Get yourself a copy through better bookstores across Canada or buy it online NOW:

www.photoed.ca


a leap of faith ALEIA ROBINSON-ADA took a leap of faith when she accepted a

photography internship in Cairo, Egypt. Back in Canada, she reflects on the opportunity and how it has, and will continue to, shape her photographic practice. BY NICOLA IRVIN


AR4PHOTOGRAPHY.COM IG: @_AR4PHOTOGRAPHY

NI: How would you sum up your photographic practice? ARA: I’m a portrait, documentary, and travel photographer. In own my own business, Aleia Robinson Photography, I lead various documentary projects and collaborations with other creatives. My blog, ‘Chasing Dreams Worldwide’ is where I share my travel adventures and personal growth stories.

NI: You recently went to Egypt on an internship with AIESEC International (a “non-governmental, not-for-profit organization in consultative status with the United Nations Economic and Social Council”). Can you tell me more about that experience?

whose first language was not English, and on top of that, we were in a country whose primary tongue couldn’t be further away from English.

NI: What advice do you have for emerging photographers who are interested in taking part in an AISEC internship?

ARA: Take a chance! A lot of people warned me about going to ARA: My experience working with AIESEC was different than any Egypt, and how it could be dangerous for me, not being of the other internship I’d done before. We were partnered with a travel and tourism agency called Dune Raider’s Egypt with a goal of documenting the country’s tourism opportunities. Interns included photographers, bloggers, videographers, and social media writers. Our teams travelled together and built social media followings by sharing our tourist adventures. There is something about travelling for work that changes your entire experience and perspective. Once we started the backpacking portion of the trip, that’s where the creativity really took place, as we were getting to know the Egyptian people and living in a different city every two days. With limited time in each city, it was important to photograph as much as possible.

culture or primary religion, but I’m thrilled that I went. I didn’t know what I was getting myself into until I arrived, but I’m very glad I did it.

NI: How did you transition from your internship into working independently as a travel/tourism photographer?

ARA: I draw from the skills that I learned in Egypt every day in my

work now. I made a lot of notes over the course of the trip. Now, I take every chance I get to make a story out of something. Whenever I travel for leisure, it turns into a storytelling and documentation experience rather than a ‘fun trip.’

NI: What was it like to work alongside other international creatives?

NI: What is the most important aspect of travel photography for

What were the challenges? What were the biggest rewards?

you?

ARA: Working alongside other creatives was my favourite part

ARA: The most important aspect of travel photography to me is

of the internship because we were able to learn from each other to work and memories together. I still talk to my teammates and consider them family. The biggest challenge was not knowing the local languages. Most of my teammates came from countries

being able to tell a story exclusively through a visual medium – without words or sentences. The way I see it, if the images can tell the story on their own, then you’ve done a good job. If the images can tell multiple stories on their own, then you’ve done a great job. To learn more about AIESEC International, www.aiesec.org


TH RO UG

S N E L T S A O H AN EAST C

LITY A T I P S O H E ITIM R A M T R E P X E

Owned by husband and wife team Jon and Kara Monaghan, the lens rental company supplies Maritime locals and visitors alike with top-of-the-line lenses along with a side of East Coast hospitality. BY NICOLA IRVIN PhotoED’s own Nova Scotian, Nicola Irvin, dropped by to visit Jon and Kara to find out more about their niche business. I arrived at East Coast Lens, AKA; the Monaghan family home in Sackville, NS, and was promptly greeted by the family’s two adorable dogs. The morning quickly became a classic East Coast affair. Sitting in the kitchen with Jon, Kara, and their 4 children, we talked about cameras, lenses, surfing, astronomy, and how they started their photo business. Jon and Kara’s household is a vibrant one. In addition to running their own business, travelling the world, and chasing the surf of Nova Scotia’s many beaches, the couple also homeschool their children and try to make everything that goes on within the home and business into a learning experience. An impressive telescope sits in the corner of the living room. Their eldest, aptly named Cassiopeia, chimes in and explains to me that she likes stars and photography, and proceeds to show me some truly lovely images that she had taken on her very own DSLR.

Jon explained that he had the opportunity to study photography throughout high school and continued to hone his craft whenever possible during his service in the Canadian Forces. When a local camera supply store announced it’s closing, they made the decision to buy a large portion of the inventory to create East Coast Lens. Since this small business started in 2017, they have provided equipment to clients including advertising firms, musicians, tourists and locals alike, photographing projects around from Nova Scotia all the way to Turks and Caicos. When I eventually left East Coast Lens a few hours later, I had a case of beautiful lenses in my hand, a little insight into astrophotography, and some new friends to boot. The equipment available at East Coast Lens is second to none. They have everything from zooms to fisheyes. My two personal favourites are a Canon 50mm f1.0, and a hefty Canon 300mm f2.8. With its arsenal of rentals, East Coast Lens provides travelers and locals access to these specialist tools of the trade with service that really makes you feel at home.

www.eastcoastlens.com

Canon 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6

Canon 11-24mm f/4 (fisheye)

Canon 50m


mm f1.0

NICOLA’S NOTES LEFT: I photographed these horses with the16-35mm f2.8. I wanted a lightweight option as I was standing quite close to these guys so this lens did the trick. CENTRE: The ferry dock on the Dartmouth side of Halifax harbour was at a bit of a distance from where I was standing, so I used the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 to get closer. BOTTOM LEFT: This is my personal favourite lens! I took the Canon 50mm f1.0 into the garden to capture an everyday moment in a new light, taking advantage of this lens’ super shallow depth of field. BOTTOM TIGHT: I used the 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6 for the Canada Day fireworks because I wasn’t using a tripod and knew that this lens was up to the task.


CANADIAN PHOTOGRAPHERS

MAKING A DIFFERENCE These six photographers use their talents to help international communities in need. They go above and beyond to create striking images along the way. Follow these leads to learn more about what these amazing Canadians abroad do!

MARK KELLY

In 2017, Whitehorse-based photographer Mark Kelly journeyed to Siem Reap, Cambodia to help tell the Bracelets4Buildings story in pictures.

See more from that project online at: www.bracelets4buildings.com/gallery www.depthoffield.ca


ERIN VON KĂ–NIG “This image is from a series of photos taken during visits to rural Ethiopian communities while I was posted to the Canadian Embassy in Addis Ababa (2013-16). In Ethiopia, two in every five girls are married before their 18th birthday and nearly one in five girls marries before the age of 15. Child marriage remains a deeply-rooted tradition in many Ethiopian communities and, in many cases, function as a source of livelihood for families. It also increases the likelihood that girls will not attend school and will suffer complications as a result of early pregnancy and childbirth. My objective for this photo series was to look beyond these statistics, and to engage with the girls directly so that their perspectives could also inform discussion on this issue. The young girls I met during my visits were determined, committed to accessing education, and renegotiating gender roles and expectations in their communities. While there is so much work yet to be done, they are increasingly active in carving out the requisite space for positive change to happen. My photos seek to tell this hopeful story as well.â€?

IG: @evkpix


EILEEN SETO

In May 2015, Eileen travelled to the Kathmandu Valley as an independent healthcare volunteer, providing treatments at community clinics run by a Nepali NGO. Above: One month after the devastating Gorkha earthquake volunteers are busy with cleanup efforts, breaking down damaged buildings and clearing the rubble.

GERRY YAUM

Top right: A sadhu or holy man, with his begging bowl in hand along a street in Kathmandu. Left: A wild monkey at the Swayambhunath Stupa,

with Kathmandu city in the background. With so many monkeys here, visitors from abroad have nicknamed the site “Monkey Temple”.

Security guard by night and humanitarian by day, Edmonton-based photographer Gerry Yuam is driven to share the stories behind the most vulnerable. Since 2013, Gerry has been documenting families in Mae Sot, Thailand for his project,

See more: www.eileenseto.photography

FAMILIES OF THE DUMP. These families are Burmese refugees who work in the garbage, as well as live on it. They make their livings scavenging and selling plastics and other recyclables.

Gerry works with his online community to raise money and awareness for his projects – check out his extensive collection of images at:

gerryyaum.blogspot.com


ROBERT WALLACE

Edmonton-based Robert Wallace These images, from the Are We travelled to Uganda on behalf of Together series, represent a Victoria School of the Arts and Old glimpse into the lives of the children HTTP://ROBERTWALLACE.CA/GALLERIES/UGANDA Scona Academic, in support of two and the families of rural, western local NGOs: HEAL International and Uganda. Some images represent the the Ainembabazi Children’s Project. conditions of living in a financially Students of Victoria School and Old poor area of the world, while Scona Academic provide funding others display the joy, courage, and to support Ugandan children’s resilience of a people he came to education. better understand and admire. “Are we together?” is the Ugandan way of asking, “do you understand me?”

robertwallace.ca/galleries/uganda

RAY MAJORAN

Based in London, Ontario, Ray Majoran is a photographer, follower of Jesus, and co-founder of the Compassion Gallery. The gallery functions online and through live exhibitions, and profits from photographs sold are donated to charities.

The project’s mandate is: “To document the world through fresh eyes, to inspire humanity with God’s beauty, and to bring hope to the most vulnerable. That is Compassion Gallery”.

https://compassion.gallery @raymajoran


THE

GALLERY

SUBMISSIONS BY OUR READERS

OU R DIGIT BIGGEST AL GA L EVER LERY !!!


LEFT:

LORI RYERSON Toronto, ON ‘The Ice Man Cometh’

“From a February adventure in Iceland, under one of Iceland’s biggest glaciers, Vatnajokull. A sample of Mother Nature’s below-the-surface work.” IG: @focalocity www.focalocity.ca

ABOVE:

BELOW:

CATHERINE COMTOIS

HEDY BACH

‘Kiddie, Gananoque, 2011”

bachcreative.com

Toronto, ON ‘Sneaky, Montreal, 2009’

‘Christine, Lac Gautier, 2003’

Edmonton, AB ‘Fumante, Poroto, Portugal, April 2018’


JULIE-ANNE DAVIES Kimberly, BC

TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT): ‘Buddhist monk at Boudhanath Stupa in Kathmandu, Nepal’ ‘Shoe salesman in Havana, Cuba ‘Woman in market, Havana, Cuba’ ‘Child from Khumbu Valley, Nepal’ BOTTOM (LEFT TO RIGHT): ‘Sweet little old woman, Havana, Cuba’ ‘Boy on his way to school, Khumbu Valley, Nepal’ ‘Nepali woman carrying loads up to the market at Namche Bazaar in the Khumbu Valley’ ‘Old woman (one blue eye), Havana, Cuba’

“I travel a LOT for photography. In the past ten months, I’ve gone to the Galapagos, the Amazon, Ladakh - Northern India and the Baja. I am heading to Bhutan in October. I have my own business, Julie-Anne Davies Photography, and also work for a company called Wild Images based out of the UK, leading international photo tours. I’ll be leading a tour to Ladakh in April/May 2019, called ‘Women of Ladakh’ for Wild Images and then to Namibia/South Africa in 2020 - with more to come.” IG: @julieannedaviesphoto julieannedavies.com To find out more about Wild Images, visit: www.wildimages-phototours.com/leader/ julie-anne-davies-photography-tour-leader/


DANIELLE VAN WERKHOVEN Toronto, ON ‘Intrapersonal’

“I am drawn to landscape photography, and the opportunity to travel has allowed me to explore the subject in new ways. I went to Australia because I wanted to experience and explore a landscape new to me. My experience is depicted through photomontage layering images. Instead of one photograph to represent an experience, these images layered in a singular frame represent the emotional rollercoaster that being away from home felt like.”

IG: @dvanwerkhoven.photography dvanwerkhoven.photography.com


LEFT (TOP):

DAVID LEECH Calgary, AB ‘Solid Gold’

IG: @imageseekers imageseekers.ca LEFT (BOTTOM):

LINDA BRISKIN

Toronto, ON ‘Landscape Imagined: Morocco (v) ’

“Landscape Imagined challenges the conventions of travel photography and reminds the viewer that landscape is invented through our gaze.” lindabriskinphoto.com RIGHT (TOP TO BOTTOM):

CATHIE ALDERS TAYLOR Calgary, AB ‘Artistic License’

IG: @cathie_aalders_taylor cathieaalderstaylor.com

KEVIN LAW Edmonton, AB

“A Buddhist Monk in repose at Wat Pha That Luang, in the city of Vientiene, Laos where the monks live and study.”

BARBARA BROWN

Ottawa, ON ‘Manjri’, From the series: Matka: Traditional Water Carriers, Jaipur India, 2017. Work from the Kala Chaupal Artists Collaborative project in 2017.

IG: @BBrownartist BarbaraBrown.ca


TOP ROW:

JENS KRISTIAN BALLE Vancouver, BC ‘Remains II’ ‘Remains III’ ‘Remains IV’ ‘Remains V’

“This series portrays a handful of World War II bunkers located on the Danish West Coast in the Oksbøl military firing range close to Blåvandshug. This range is the largest of its kind in Denmark. These bunkers were part of the Nazi regimes Atlantic Wall, stretching along the coast from Norway in the North, all the way to the Spanish border in the South. Close to 5000 kilometres of concrete fortifications and other defensive measures.

The bunkers were all originally built in the sand dunes but are now, after decades of erosion and exposure to the elements, slowly being swallowed up by the ocean. It is unknown how long these relics will remain. For now they still stand as a reminder of the past.” IG: @ballephoto jenskristianballe.com

LEFT PAGE:

GERRY KAISER Windsor, ON ‘Brúarfoss waterfall’

“The Brúarfoss waterfall is located in Iceland, east of Reykjavik in the region known as the Golden Circle - a route that covers a 300km loop from Reykjavik and includes Þingvellir National Park, Gullfoss Waterfall and the geothermal area known as Geysir. We were told about this special place by a local who said it should not be missed because of its intense beauty. It was definitely

RIGHT:

PAUL TEOLIS Toronto, ON

A tabular iceberg at sunset during the crossing of the Drake Passage to Antarctica

IG: @paulteolisphotography fieldandscreen.com

one of the highlights of our trip. This image is a time exposure with use of a tripod and ND filter to blur the motion of the icy turquoise blue water swirling in the whirlpool at the bottom of the falls.” IG: @ kaiserphotography kaiserphotography.ca


TRISHA GILLINGS Toronto, ON

TOP: ‘A matter of scale’

“When you see photos of the Treasury building in Petra, Jordan, you do not realize how big it is. The size and scale are immense. A tourist walking by illustrates the scale of the structure while showcasing the remoteness of the location.”

BOTTOM (LEFT TO RIGHT): ‘Ottoman tradition’

“Very few North Americans think of Bosnia as a vacation destination. However the war torn country is starting to come back from the devastation of the late 1990’s. Mostar is a city that still carries echoes of the Ottoman occupation to this day. Traditional Turkish coffee is prepared and served in many restaurants and cafes.”

‘Death is all around us’

“I spent some time in an Orthodox Jewish community in Jerusalem. A young man stops to read the bulletin boards of death notices and obituaries of people in the community.” ‘Man and eagle’

“A Kazakh eagle hunter spends a quiet moment gazing at the mountains of Bayan-Ulgii Province in Mongolia. He has spent the day working with his eagle to perfect the maneuvers that they need for a successful fox hunt. The landscape is extremely barren and remote. No crops can be grown in this harsh territory - inhabitants rely on livestock and hunting for food.” IG: @trish_around_the_world


TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

JESUS MAZAPINERO St. Catherines, ON

“Quinn is a 25 year old California man, traveling around the world chasing surf communities.” “Surfer Portrait Trio: Maxim (left), Bryce (middle) and a shy local from Barranco taking their first surf lessons in Lima’s rough waters.” “Unknown Local: Although she asked to remain anonymous she did tell me her age; she’s 64.” jesusmaza.com BOTTOM:

MACKENZIE CALARCO

Toronto, ON ‘Northern Iceland, September 2017’

“This was my last shot on my T-Max 400 roll of film, and was well worth the climb. On an empty stomach that morning, weak and slowly loosing energy as I got closer to this waterfall, I finally arrived and took the money shot of the day!” maccalarco.tumblr.com


LEFT:

RIGHT :

ALI PENKO

LIAM MACKENZIE

Vancouver, BC ‘Valencia Street Trees’ ‘Plataja La Malvarrosa, Valencia’ ‘Russafa, Valencia’

IG: @alipenkophotographer alipenko.com

Edmonton, AB ‘Greece’

IG: @liammackenziephoto


ROSEMARY ADLER Toronto, ON TOP (LEFT TO RIGHT):

‘Sunshine in Glencoe’ Glencoe, Scotland, 2018 ‘Golden Gorse’ Isle of Arran, Scotland, 2018

BOTTOM (LEFT TO RIGHT): ‘Namesake’ Connemara foal and mother, Connemara National Park, Ireland, 2017 ‘Lealt Falls’ Isle of Skye, Scotland, 2017

IG: @rosemaryadler


KYLIE PINDER Toronto, ON

TOP: ‘Crikey’ Aerial view of a marshland in Kakadu Nation Park where Wild Water Buffalo’s are known to roam. BOTTOM (LEFT): ‘Parallel Lines’ View of the outback from a morning hot air balloon ride.

BOTTOM (RIGHT): ‘Airship’ Sunrise balloon ride in Alice Springs.

IG: @thekyliepinder kyliepinder.com


LEFT (TOP):

DANIKA RICHARD Dieppe, NB ‘Lausanne’

theeastcoastlife.wordpress.com LEFT (BOTTOM):

SHERI WHITE

Wainwright, AB ‘Tobermory Scotland, Isle of Mull”

IG: @prairiewinds77 Twitter: @prairiewinds77 RIGHT (TOP):

PAUL YEGHOUCHIAN Toronto, ON ‘Tivoli Gardens’

Tivoli Gardens, opened in 1843 in Copenhagen, Denmark. The park is the second oldest operating amusement park in the world.

IG: @travellrite travellrite.com RIGHT (BOTTOM):

JULIE VINCENT Calgary, AB ‘Gardenia Pizza, Cambridge, England, 2012’ ‘Fashion Yin Yang; Tokyo, Japan, 2016’

IG: @JulieVincentPhotography @TrippingTheStreet Twitter: @JCVPhotography flickr.com/photos/writerwriter


BELOW:

CHAD TOBIN

Sydney, NS From the Beautiful Strangers Tokyo series

“Crowded streets, sensory overload, and a concrete metropolis, describes the rhythm of the Tokyo experience. I spent three weeks walking the streets of Shinjuku, Shibuya, and Nihonbashi, awash in a neon glow armed with my camera.” IG: @tobinchad chadtobin.com


FARIHAH SHAH

Toronto, ON ‘Miller Outdoor Theatre Houston, Texas, 2015 ‘Gathering at Chouwen, Lebanon 2016’

IG: @rihah fshah.format.com


LEFT:

CHRISTINA GREGOIRE Toronto, ON ‘Trinidad’

IG: @christinagregoire christina-gregoire.com


RIGHT:

JAKE BORCHENKO Toronto, ON ‘Portraits from Nepal’

“While working on a documentary in rural Nepal, I used my spare time to explore the area and capture these photographs. It was a great way to practice the language and meet some really genuine people.”

IG: @jakeborchenko jakeborchenko.com


D7500 | f/10 | 18 mm | 1/1000s | ISO 200

I AM THE NIKON D7500. Don’t let a great moment escape you. Equipped with a 20.9MP DX-CMOS sensor, 51-point AF and ISO 100 to 51200, the new Nikon D7500 can achieve stunning images in low light and has a continuous shooting speed of 8 fps. Wherever you move, an intuitive, tilting touch screen and slim body with deep grip offer added agility, and you can share your images in an instant to your smart device*. Alternatively, capture movies in incredibly sharp 4K UHD to relive again and again. Go chase. Visit Nikon.ca

*This camera’s built-in Bluetooth® capability can only be used with compatible smart devices. The Nikon SnapBridge application must be installed on the device before it can be used with this camera. For compatibility and to download the SnapBridge application, please visit Google Play ® and App Store. The BLUETOOTH® word mark and logos are registered trademarks owned by Bluetooth SIG, Inc. and Google Play® is a trademark of Google Inc.


Profile for PhotoED Magazine

PhotoED FALL 2018 DIGITAL ISSUE