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LEGENDS OF SPEED / 60TH ANNIVERSARY / ANTONIO / THE PART Y phxart.org

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NO T HIN G C A N DIM T H E L IGH T W HICH S HIN E S F R O M W I T HIN .” — MAYA ANGELOU

In November 1959, yes, the doors opened. But in the moment before, the lights came on. A hand, unseen by those who waited to step inside, flipped a switch and illuminated every room, every gallery, every space between. Yet in the months before, maybe years, there was a different light—a spark, an idea, an inkling that someday, this desert city, young and barebones then, with no freeways crisscrossing its downtown, no interstate snaking at its suburban edges, could be connected by something entirely different than roads and railroad tracks, great canals and Grand Avenues. There was a belief that this city deserved art, and to hold it, to connect it, to connect us, a museum. Now, sixty years later, that light has never gone out. Thank you for keeping the light on.

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NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020

Mark Koenig Interim Sybil Harrington Director and Chief Financial Officer Carter Emerson Co-Chair of the Board of Trustees Mark Feldman Co-Chair of the Board of Trustees

E DI T O R I A L S TA F F Executive Editor: Nikki DeLeon Martin Managing Editor: Samantha Andreacchi

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Contributing Editors Janet Baker, PhD, Curator of Asian Art Vanessa Davidson, PhD, the former Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art Betsy Fahlman, PhD, Adjunct Curator of American Art Gwendolyn Fernandez, Interpretation and Accessibility Manager Kaela Sáenz Oriti, the Gerry Grout Education Director Audrey Sands, PhD, the Norton Family Assistant Curator of Photography Rebecca Senf, PhD, Chief Curator, Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona Dennita Sewell, Curator Emerita of Fashion Design Gilbert Vicario, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator Rachel Sadvary Zebro, Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art Craig Outhier, Editor-in-Chief, PHOENIX magazine Leah LeMoine, Managing Editor, PHOENIX magazine

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Creative Director | Michael Bartley Art Director | Mirelle Inglefield, Art Director, PHOENIX magazine Associate Art Director | Angelina Aragon, Associate Art Director, PHOENIX magazine Photography Editor | Airi Katsuta Photography Contributors | Wenhui Dong, Carrie Evans, Art Holeman, Chris Loomis, David B. Moore, Travis Whittaker, Michael Woodall Editorial Intern | Alina Gonzalez

CO N N E C T W I T H U S @phxart 1625 North Central Avenue Phoenix, Arizona 85004-1685 | phxart.org

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602.257.1222 602.257.2124 602.257.2173 602.257.2115

24-Hour Information Membership Office Volunteer Office Circles of Support

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16 Letter from the Board 20 The History of Phoenix Art Museum CO N V E R S AT IO N S W I T H P H X A R T CU R AT O R S 36 Modern and Contemporary and European Art 42 Latin American Art 44 Asian Art 46 American and Western American Art 48 Photography 52 Fashion Design 62 Independent Woman Luncheon 66 Education 72 The pARTy in the Garden

E X HIBI T IO N S Legends of Speed PhxArt60: The Past Decade Antonio: The Fine Art of Fashion Illustration Guru Nanak: 550th Birth Anniversary of Sikhism’s Founder 110 American and Western American Art – Special Installations 113 Joseph Cornell: Things Unseen 76 100 104 109

115 116 118 120 121 124 130 136

Membership Affiliate Groups Circles of Support Planned Giving Corporate Council Donor Acknowledgments Night-Out Guide Find Your Ride

image credit: (front cover) 1954 Lancia D24. Private Collection. Photography: Bill Pack / V-12 Enterprises; ( back cover) Phoenix Art Museum Archive; (right) Phoenix Art Museum Archive; (above from top) 1958 Mk1 Scarab, Rob and Melani Walton Collection. Photography: Bill Pack / V-12 Enterprises; Joseph Cornell, Untitled, Soap Bubble Set/Pipe/Figurehead, not dated. Wood, glass, metal, paint and construction. Gift of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation. © 2019 The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.; Valley Bar, Carrie Evans

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THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

PHOENIX ART MUSEUM

2 019 –2 0 2 0 BO A R D OF T RU S T E E S CO - CH A IR S Carter Emerson and Mark Feldman

V ICE CH A IR S David Lenhardt and Meredith von Arentschildt

TRE ASURER Mark Feldman

S E CR E TA R Y John W. Graham

Ruben E. Alvarez Craig R. Barrett Donald Brandt Jo Brandt Drew M. Brown* Amy S. Clague* Mike Cohn Harold C. Dorenbecher Jacquie Dorrance* Robert Faver David Garcia Judy Goldberg Michael Greenbaum* Nancy Hanley Eriksson Lila Harnett*

Jon Hulburd Jane Jozoff Parvinder Khanuja, MD Alan W. Kosloff Sally Lehmann Donald Opatrny Rose Papp Blair J. Portigal Kimberly F. Robson Paige Rothermel David Rousseau Sue Selig Ann Siner Raymond Slomski * Honorary Trustee

phoenixmag.com/givesback

Support local while reading local.

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THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES

FROM T HE CO-CHAIRS of the Board of Trustees D E A R F R IE N D S , Tradition holds that one’s 60th anniversary is symbolized not by the silver of 25, nor the gold of 50, but by a diamond, and more specifically, a yellow diamond. Somewhere in the annals of time, there is a mythological origin to this, but we like to think it is perhaps because that by 60, while your way ahead may not always be completely clear, you often find that, time-tested and meticulously shaped, you have the strength to survive anything. Perhaps it is no accident that in the midst of major institutional change, Phoenix Art Museum celebrates its 60th anniversary. In November 1959, the Museum opened its doors for the first time. It was the result of dedicated community volunteers and civic leaders who believed their city, then populated with less than a half-million residents, deserved an art museum. Today, we still believe our desert home deserves a museum that continues to find ways to expand our community’s access to a world of art and experiences. Since the Museum’s 50th anniversary, we have seen an increase in visitors from year to year, now welcoming approximately 300,000 visitors annually. We have seen growth in our collection, adding thousands of new objects of Asian, Latin American, Western American and American, and modern and contemporary art, and fashion design. We have seen the endowment of curatorial positions, the expansive growth of the Museum’s education department, and a number of landmark exhibitions that brought the world to our city, and our city to the world. 

CARTER EMERSON

Co-Chair Phoenix Art Museum Board of Trustees

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We have at times experienced the tumult and change of financial and economic downturn, but we created new opportunities with the support of both local and national foundations who made key investments in Museum infrastructure, staffing, and organizational initiatives that have better prepared us to engage our ever-evolving communities. We have welcomed museum directors who were wholly dedicated to our institution’s mission of serving as a vibrant destination where members of our community can connect with and feel enriched by inspiring art. Today, our interim director and chief financial officer, Mark Koenig, guides the Museum through our next phase of transformation, as we prioritize righting the financial ship by improving business practices and engaging our donors, Members, and visitors in ways that assure our community that we will continue the legacy set by our forebears who dreamed of an art museum, and made that dream a reality. As of this writing, we are engaged in a national search for the next leader of Phoenix Art Museum, who will drive forward our mission as a brave space and a vibrant destination to which every visitor believes they belong. We can think of no work that would be more crucial, challenging, and gratifying. We hope that you will join us in honoring our 60th year while committing to working together toward our 70th and 75th, as each day, our way forward becomes clearer.

MARK FELDMAN

Co-Chair Phoenix Art Museum Board of Trustees

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WHY WE GIVE

Phoenix Art Museum is a landmark and a true point of pride, a crucial link between our community, history, art, and tradition.” D AV I D G A R CI A

E XECU TIVE DIRECTOR, J.P. MORG A N PRIVAT E BA N K Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 1979

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PMorgan Chase has a long and proud history of supporting Phoenix Art Museum. We believe it is critical to support art institutions like the Museum because they help create a rich sense of culture and a vibrant sense of community in our cities. The value of any cultural arts center, however, depends on more than just its ability to present its collections and exhibitions—it depends on the community’s ability to access those offerings. Phoenix Art Museum has increased awareness about the importance of connecting students, scholars, and community members with its diverse array of art and experiences. JPMorgan Chase is proud of the opportunities the Museum has provided our community.

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HISTORY

MUSEUM S T ORY

From its humble beginnings at the Arizona State Fair to its modern role as an anchor of culture and expression in the nation’s fifth largest city, Phoenix Art Museum—like the community which fostered it—has thrived as an American original. BY R E B E C C A L . R H O A D E S O F P H O E N I X M A G A Z I N E

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hen people think of art museums, they often imagine solemn, stately places filled with tidy rows of ancient works meant to be contemplated in silence, their details and meanings researched and analyzed with academic gravity in an effort to understand how they fit into history. But museums are more than containers of things. Rather, they are complex reflections of the cultures and people that produced them. In the case of Phoenix Art Museum, celebrating its 60th year of existence this fall, we find a profoundly unique strand of DNA—one unlike any other in the country, in fact, reaching back to a single piece of artwork. Tracing this living history, we also find a determined group of town leaders, entrepreneurs, politicians, and aficionados who fought against all odds to flourish in an unforgiving environment. So, while Phoenix Art Museum itself is celebrating 60 years, its genealogy begins much earlier than that.

DE F ININ G M O M E N T S “If you look at other art museums around the country, they were created in one of two ways: Either somebody left a lot of money with the condition that it be used to fund a museum for the community, or someone donated a large collection that needs to be housed,” says the Museum’s Sybil Harrington Director Emeritus, James K. Ballinger, who led the Museum from 1982 to his retirement in 2014. “Neither of those happened here.” In 1915, just three years after Arizona achieved statehood, a group of local women, known as the Phoenix Women’s Club, sought to improve the quality of art offerings at the Arizona State Fair. Collecting penny donations, they raised $125 to purchase Egyptian Evening (c. 1911), a tranquil oil painting of a family gathering reeds on the banks of a river by Swedish-born artist Carl Oscar Borg. Additional works would follow, one each year, forming the nucleus of a community art collection, which would be displayed at various locations across the city. A decade later, CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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A young visitor and Hoy Orton Hobbs at Phoenix Art Museum. Today, Hobbs’ granddaughter, Nancy Hanley Eriksson, is a Museum Trustee. Image courtesy of Hanley Eriksson.

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HISTORY the State Fair Committee expanded its charter and established the Phoenix Fine Arts Association to promote community interest in art, acquire additional works, and maintain a permanent gallery. In the mid-1930s, President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration (WPA) brought Philip C. Curtis—who would go on to become a celebrated surrealist painter whose work can be seen in the Museum today—to Arizona to institute and serve as director of the Phoenix Art Center, the local arm of the WPA’s Federal Art Project, which was designed to preserve the skills of professional artists and establish community art centers. Under his direction, a board of trustees was established, art classes taught by painter Lew Davis were offered, and more artworks were donated. The center’s success led to the formation of the Civic Center Association, which would oversee development of a six-and-ahalf-acre property at the northwest corner of Central Avenue and McDowell Road that was donated in 1940 by the heirs of

hardware magnate Adolphus C. Bartlett. Among those was his daughter, Maie Bartlett Heard, who, with her husband, founded the Heard Museum in the late 1920s. The proposed complex would include an art museum, public library, and theater. World War II, however, brought progress to a halt. During the war, the Fine Arts Association made use of rooms at the Heard Museum for exhibitions and storage. Shortly after the conclusion of the conflict, it purchased a Prairie-style house at 45 East Coronado Road, adjacent to the donated acreage. Known as the Civic Center House, and later called the Art Center, it was used for cultural activities, exhibitions, and art classes. “Curtis came back to Arizona after the war and settled in the Cattle Track Arts Compound in Scottsdale,” Ballinger remembers. “He and Lew Davis continued to work with the association. In fact, during those years, Davis brought in an exhibition from the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City, and it was shown in

someone’s house. Talk about how the world has changed.” In 1949, the Fine Arts Association officially incorporated as a tax-exempt organization and formed a board of trustees. Eight years later, it named founding member Forest M. Hinkhouse as the first director of the planned museum. “Hinkhouse was kind of a flamboyant personality—a little bit of Elmer Gantry thrown in on the side,” says Ballinger. “But when you think about it, in order to get a museum going in a small town, it worked.” An art reviewer for The Arizona Republic during the ’50s, Hinkhouse frequently promoted the association’s activities in the newspaper, increasing public interest in the local art scene. Under his guidance, exhibitions, gallery talks, and publicrelations activities increased. Following the success of a $1 million fund drive in 1957—in honor of the association’s 32nd anniversary— construction began on the property donated by Bartlett’s descendants to build what would eventually become Phoenix Art Museum. According to Ballinger, board members Walter Bimson, chairman of Valley National Bank, and Frank Snell, founder of law firm Snell & Wilmer, took it upon themselves to find an architect. “One had discussions with Frank Lloyd Wright, and the other had discussions with Alden B. Dow,” he says. Earlier that decade, Dow, a Michigan-based architect and student of Wright, had designed and built the Phoenix Public Library and Phoenix Little Theatre (now The Phoenix Theatre Company) on the same grounds. “It was never clear if Dow was selected and then came to town, or if he thought he was going to be selected and came out, but he went to see Mr. Wright, who asked him what he was doing in town. Dow replied, ‘I’m going to design Phoenix Art Museum.’” Dow eventually was chosen for the project, along with associate architect Blaine Drake, one of Wright’s original apprentices at Taliesin in Wisconsin and Taliesin West in Scottsdale. The hiring of the two men irritated the famously prickly Wright, who disassociated himself from the Museum. It wasn’t until Phoenix Art Museum presented the exhibition Frank Lloyd Wright Drawings: Masterworks From the Frank Lloyd Wright Archives in 1990, co-curated by Ballinger and Bruce Brooks Pfeiffer of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation, that the two organizations were once again on friendly terms.

Carl Oscar Borg, Egyptian Evening, c. 1911. Oil on canvas. From the Municipal Art Collection, by exchange.

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HISTORY Following local and national acclaim, generous donations began to pour in. In 1962, miniature artist Narcissa Niblack Thorne, whose work was displayed in the 1933 Chicago World’s Fair, donated 20 Lilliputian rooms that she crafted primarily during the 1930s. Part of a collection of 100 that are now scattered in museums across the country, the 1:12 scale scenes remain on permanent display in the Museum’s North Wing. Two years later, Texas philanthropist Sybil B. Harrington and her husband, Donald, a successful oil and gas producer—both fierce supporters of the arts—bestowed their collection of 45 Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works on the Museum, including Claude Monet’s Les arceaux fleuris, Giverny (1913) and Camille Pissarro’s Landscape at Varengeville, Gray Weather (1899), both of which remain some of the Museum’s most beloved works. The gift put Phoenix Art Museum on the proverbial map. It also reinforced the need for additional exhibition and display room. Phoenix Art Museum opening, 1959.

Like the library and theater, Dow’s threelevel modern structure was constructed of steel and reinforced concrete, featured flat roofs, and was surfaced in a soft pink stucco. Joining the Kiva room of the library, it helped form an inner courtyard with the two existing buildings. The first floor featured a spacious foyer, administrative offices, and a large gallery space. The second floor offered art galleries and an auditorium, and the lower level included a children’s museum and art school. It was a hit with the critics. An article in the internationally respected publication ARTS proclaimed, “Architects Alden Dow and Blaine Drake designed the exterior of the museum so that its appearance would fit, as an aesthetic unit, into the architectural compound of the Phoenix Civic Center quadrangle. … Its low lines, color and cantilevered gardens will suit the region of cultivated desert, brilliant light, and eroded mountain ranges which deeply impress life in the community. Its plan is spacious, the effect open and generous, yet nowhere does it yield to the signs of artificial grandiosity

which characterize so many of its elder sisters in other cities.” When the Museum opened its doors to the public on November 18, 1959, local reception was nothing short of enthusiastic as well. Approximately 5,500 Valley residents attended the grand opening. “It’s even better and greater than I expected,” one attendee told The Arizona Republic in the following day’s newspaper. In the same edition, an unnamed local artist added, “Here is the dream come true of every artist in this area. And I’m astonished to see paintings here that it normally takes a museum 10 years to collect.” The Los Angeles Times, which just a few months earlier had praised the desert metropolis as “no longer a cultural wasteland,” celebrated the Museum’s launch, noting “Phoenix may well be proud of the art museum it opened last week end [sic]… It was quite an accomplishment for the desert city to simultaneously erect a building and gather the nucleus for an impressive collection.”

“The association built a 25,000-square-foot building, and they were out of space from the get-go,” Ballinger notes. The addition of the East Wing in 1961, also designed by Dow, nearly tripled the size of the institution, resulting in more than 70,000 square feet of exhibition space, classrooms, and offices. For her contributions to the Museum, Sybil Harrington was endowed with immortal status among the Museum’s many benefactors: the Museum’s highest administrative position, the Sybil Harrington Director, was named for her.

CO M M U NI T Y S U P P O R T As the Museum grew, so did the community’s involvement. Friends of Art, a support group designed to provide assistance and raise funds for the acquisition of art, formed in 1962. The group’s first purchase was a bronze sculpture, First Portrait of Kitty (with curls) (1944), by Jacob Epstein. Additional works by Andrew Wyeth, Narcisse Virgile Díaz de la Peña, and George Inness, among others, were added. In 1967, member John Pritzlaff purchased a painting directly from renowned Southwest artist Georgia O’Keeffe. Titled Pink Abstraction (1929), the work was inspired by the artist’s time on Lake George in New York. CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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HISTORY based on the real-life tragedy of a New York socialite who plunged to her death from a skyscraper in the 1930s. Painted in the style of a traditional ex-voto, which typically depicts a miracle and is accompanied by a narrative description of the event, the work presents both a visual and written account of Hale’s violent demise. According to Museum lore, Luce was no great fan of the work, which may have dulled the sting of donating it. Be that as it may, its modern popularity is beyond question. “Every other month, we get a request for the painting from different institutions, but we have to be very selective because we want to keep her here so our community can enjoy her,” says Vanessa Davidson, PhD, who served as the Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art from October 2011 to September 2019.

Claude Monet, Les arceaux fleuris, Giverny (Flowering Arches, Giverny), 1913. Oil on canvas. Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Donald D. Harrington.

Ironically, the acquisition touched off a bitter existential controversy. “There was a strong debate in the community about whether we should be a Western art museum or we should take a more metropolitan approach,” Ballinger says. “When Pritzlaff bought O’Keeffe’s painting, it just blew up. People wanted to know why he bought an Eastern work. The infighting over the purchase led to the demise of the Friends of Art.” Working with the template provided by Friends of Art, volunteers began forming new support groups, each covering a specific curatorial area: Western Art Associates, Arizona Costume Institute, and Contemporary Forum (recently renamed Friends of Contemporary Art) are just a few of the groups that emerged. The great majority of the Museum’s more than 20,000 objects were acquired with funding provided by these support groups or given to the institution by their owners.

The Asian collection began with a gift of 150 pieces of 16th- and 17th-century blue-andwhite porcelain from Dr. Matthew Wong, a U.S.-educated physician who lived in his native Canton in the late 1930s before settling in Yuma. An assemblage of cloisonné from the Ming and Qing dynasties, donated by Robert and Marian Clague, strengthened the Museum’s emphasis on Chinese decorative arts. And the contribution of nearly 200 works of Chinese painting and calligraphy from the Jeannette Shambaugh Elliott collection offers an understanding of China’s artistic transformation from a traditional to a modern society. Writer and politician Clare Boothe Luce— who with her husband, Henry, founder of the TIME/Life publishing empire, owned a seasonal home in the Valley—made important contributions to the Museum’s holdings. In 1960, she donated what is now the Museum’s most sought-after work: El suicidio de Dorothy Hale (The Suicide of Dorothy Hale) (1939), by Frida Kahlo,

Luce also donated a piece by Kahlo’s husband, Diego Rivera. The work, titled Indígena tejiendo (Indian Woman Weaving) (1936), features a lone woman separating strands of yarn. Denison Kitchel, lawyer and campaign manager for Barry Goldwater’s 1964 presidential run, and his wife, Naomi, the first female trustee of the Museum, donated numerous pieces of Spanish and Mexican glassware, furnishings, pottery, and paintings. In 1984, the Museum hosted Diego Rivera: The Cubist Years, which introduced many guests to the artist’s paintings. “This was a landmark exhibition because most people know Rivera only as a monumental mural painter. But in the early 1900s, he was a very accomplished Cubist master living in Paris,” Davidson says. “It really opened people’s eyes to the diversity of art, not only in Mexico, but in the work of a single artist.” Davidson joined Phoenix Art Museum after receiving her PhD in Latin American Art History from New York University’s Institute of Fine Arts. When she arrived, the strength of the collection was Mexican prints, paintings, and works on paper— predictable acquisitions for a community museum in a city located just hours from the border and with a large Latina/o population. The young curator was tasked with growing the department’s reputation and expanding its focus. “Phoenix Art Museum is only the second museum in the country to establish a department of Latin American Art,” CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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HISTORY Davidson notes. “My goal was to diversify the collection, both in geography and chronology, by adding more works by artists from throughout Latin America.” During her tenure, Davidson spearheaded the acquisition of 296 Spanish colonial artworks from the Gary S. Culpepper Collection, which included not only paintings but retablos, or devotional paintings; santos, carved sculptures of saints; oratorios, wooden domestic altars;

on display,” Davidson explains. “Our community is 41 percent Hispanic, and all of our labels and signage is bilingual.” Another distinctive department is the Fashion Design collection, which originated as donations from Arizona Costume Institute, a Museum support group that for more than 50 years has been—and remains— instrumental in acquiring and preserving garments and accessories of historical and aesthetic significance. As early as 1966,

welcome Japanese designers. A New Wave in Fashion: Three Japanese Designers, which ran briefly from March through April 1983, featured experimental and inventive fashions by Issey Miyake, who is known for his pleated creations as well as designing the ubiquitous black turtleneck worn by Apple’s Steve Jobs; Rei Kawakubo, founder of Comme des Garçon; and Yohji Yamamoto, whose oversized silhouettes feature avantgarde tailoring. “That was very early to present that material here—anywhere—in museums,” says Dennita Sewell, the Museum’s Curator Emerita of Fashion Design, who served as fashion curator from January 2000 to August 2019. “The field at that time was more historical based. It’s only been since the mid-’90s that more contemporary shows have been a regular part of museum programming.” Like the department, Sewell owes a lot of her insight and success to New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art as well. After studying costume design at the University of Missouri and Yale University, she landed a job as a collections manager in The Met’s Costume Institute, overseeing its archive, meeting with scholars and designers, and teaching classes. Sewell was hired by Ballinger following a two-plus-year search. “Jean was heavily historical, and I didn’t want someone who was out of that same mold. They had to have more zip,” he recalls. “Dennita had the right mix of wanting to be edgy and inventive with fashion design. I remember telling her that if she ever did anything that looks like a historical society show, she could pick up her pink slip the following morning. She immediately said, ‘I want to work for you.’”

Phoenix Art Museum atrium, 1965.

and relicarios, miniature religious paintings meant to be worn around the neck. A 2017 gift of 112 post-1990s abstract works from Nicholas Pardon, representing 49 artists from 14 countries, increased the department’s holdings in contemporary Latin American art by 280 percent. Recently, the Friends of Mexican Art, an arts-advocacy group, celebrated its 50th anniversary by gifting a monumental installation titled Columna interminable (Endless Column) (2015), by Betsabeé Romero. “I feel very strongly that when people come to the Museum, they should be able to see themselves reflected in the works

Harrington, Kitchel, Virginia Ullman, Ellen Duke, and other Valley society women, inspired by clothing exhibitions at New York City’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, began gathering pieces that would form the foundation of the collection. In 1970, Jean Hildreth was hired as the collection’s first curator. With a background from Colonial Williamsburg, her interest was in 18th-century clothing. The addition of some 19th-century pieces donated by the Grosvenor family, expanded the collection’s historical foundation. However, Hildreth also had a pioneering vision. She was one of the first curators in America to

Sewell went on to curate such innovative and acclaimed exhibitions as Motorcycle Jacket in 2004, Trench Coat in 2005, and Emphatics: Avant-Garde Fashion 19632013 in 2016. The latter featured fashion, accessories, and ephemera by renowned designers such as Alexander McQueen, John Galliano, and Jean Paul Gaultier that had been recently acquired by the Museum. Today, Phoenix Art Museum is one of only a handful of art museums in the country to offer a fashion department. “The collection has such a comprehensiveness and such breadth that it’s possible to have this roster of exhibitions where we can present things that resonate all across the country,” says CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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HISTORY Sewell, who now teaches fashion at Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. While her innate ability to see fashion as art and to understand its role in American culture has helped transform the Museum’s fashion collection, growing it from about 5,000 objects to more than 8,000, with many of the new acquisitions falling under the contemporary label, she commends the dedication and foresight of fashion’s early admirers. “I really credit the founding members for having a vision and working really hard to make it happen.”

A F F IR MIN G T H E A R T S By the time Ballinger joined the Museum in the mid-1970s as a curator, it—along with the city of Phoenix—was expanding rapidly. Fresh out of the University of Kansas, Ballinger didn’t plan on staying long. “My plan was to be here for five years, curate some shows, and then move on to a real museum,” he recalls. “The interesting thing was it became more enjoyable to build a real

museum. We created bigger challenges and more opportunities.” Ballinger ended up taking over the directorship in 1982 and holding the position for 32 years. Tall and distinguished, with an affable demeanor, Ballinger’s adeptness at relating to everyone from government officials to high-profile donors to schoolchildren helped grow the Museum’s reputation as an unpretentious, welcoming establishment. “I always used to laugh, because if you watch movies, museum directors always have white hair and a British accent and always wear a tuxedo,” he says. “That’s not who we were.” One of the defining moments of his career came in the late 1980s. Urban livability and culture were issues at the forefront of the local political scene; the efforts were championed by Phoenix Mayor Terry Goddard. A general-purpose bond was put up for election that would deliver more than $1 billion to the arts—and increase tax rates. “If you’re talking about pivotal moments in the history of the Museum, the biggest one would be the founding. Otherwise, it wouldn’t be here,” Ballinger, now retired, says. “The second biggest would be the ’88 bond election.” A fierce grassroots campaign spread support for the bond, and on April 19, 1988, it passed by 600 votes—just 1 percent of the total votes cast. “Phoenix Art Museum received [$20 million], which led to the Museum as we know it today,” Ballinger says. Other projects funded by the bonds were the establishment of the Phoenix Mountains Preserve Program; the construction of the Burton Barr Central Library, Phoenix History Museum, and the Arizona Science Center; and the renovation of the Orpheum Theater. “If that election had failed, I don’t know where arts would be in Phoenix today. Terry Goddard deserves a lot of kudos for having a vision,” Ballinger says.

James Ballinger

Flush with bond funding, the Museum embarked on an expansion and renovation that would more than double the 72,000-square-foot facility. An architectural selection committee, comprising City of Phoenix employees and Museum representatives, launched an extensive search that began with solicitations from 75 architectural firms across the country

and was eventually winnowed to a short list of six that included the much-heralded James Stirling, Charles Moore, and Peter Eisenman. “Even though the renovation was a big deal to us, for some of these bigtime architects, we weren’t going to be big fish, and people were worried about that,” Ballinger recalls. In the end, a relatively unknown team from New York City, Tod Williams and Billie Tsien, were given the nod. “The decision was based on one photograph,” Ballinger says. “They had designed a private home with an indoor swimming pool. Covering one wall of the pool room was a 70-foot-long painting by Sol LeWitt, who was a great American conceptual artist. This photograph was like magic. “We were their first major commission, and the theory was that they would deliver 120 percent, which was exactly what it turned out to be.” The architects were presented with two key challenges on a relatively restricted budget: creating a presence on Central Avenue and designing a structure that would house a growing collection of works and changing exhibitions in a style that is timeless—all on a budget of $180 per square foot. “Jim was very clear that we needed to keep the existing library and theater,” Williams recalls. “Our solution was to design two boxes along Central Avenue.” The architects salvaged the old Museum building by removing asbestos, adding insulation, and upgrading its air-conditioning, lighting, storage, and security systems. Half of the former Phoenix Public Library was torn down, and the remaining half was refurbished and turned into administrative offices and educational facilities. Finally, and most noticeably, Williams and Tsien— who went on to design the Barack Obama Presidential Center in Chicago, among other high-profile projects—utilized the footprint of a parking lot that sat on the street-facing side of the building and built two low-slung rectangles connected by a set-back glass entrance and a steel bridge that floats above the entry walkway. For the facade, the pair used materials that were inspired by and sourced from the surrounding landscape—namely precast concrete that was manufactured at a site just a few blocks from the Museum. “The whole sense of the power of the desert was quite CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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HISTORY amazing to us, and with that comes the ideal of the oasis,” Tsien says. “We wanted the building to present a perception of coolness.” Influenced by the green bark of the palo brea trees that lined Central Avenue, the duo searched for a finish that was natural in color but not the typical pink or buff stucco and sandstone that adorned so many structures throughout the Valley, including the original museum. Oversize pigmented green concrete panels inset with chunks of green glacier quartz, mined from a quarry in Utah and varying in hue from cream to forest green, and mixed with white sand and mica from Georgia, cover the west side of the building. Green-tinged glass panels protrude perpendicular from the windowless front elevation, which is inset with tall, narrow niches originally meant to hold artworks. “The side that faces Central Avenue faces west, so it gets very hot, so it needed to block light, but it also needed to feel open, airy, and cool,” Williams notes. Inside, large open spaces offered plenty of room for an ever-growing collection as well as changing exhibitions. “It’s the architect’s role to transform banalities into poetry, architectural facts into art, and to make the impersonal become personal,” Tsien said in a 1996 Arizona Republic article hailing the completion of the expansion.

Ten years later, Williams and Tsien returned for the second phase of the expansion, which included a new entrance plaza on the northwest corner of the building; a 40,000-square-foot outdoor sculpture courtyard; and the Ellen and Howard C. Katz Wing for Modern Art, a four-level wing that added more than 25,000 square feet of gallery space. “When I was interviewing for my current position, I was blown away by the building and its possibilities. It just took my breath away,” says Gilbert Vicario, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator. “There’s a creative energy that comes out of the space.” The enlarged building opened up the Museum to new and exciting exhibitions. In 2007, Curves of Steel explored the impact and influence of American and European automobile design in the 20th century. It was complemented by an exhibition called Automotivated, which explored fashion inspired by cars. “This exhibition was an ‘aha’ moment for me, because for the first time, I recognized the importance of having fashion in a museum and how it’s all connected,” says Master Docent Judy Steers, who has been volunteering at Phoenix Art Museum since 2002. “I found it unusual to have a fashion collection, but this introduced me to the fact that fashion was directly impacted by the design of things such as the cars. It was one of my favorite shows.”

Phoenix Art Museum Archive, 1995

BY PEOPLE, FOR PEOPLE Phoenix Art Museum is not just its structure, an expansive box of concretecovered steel. Nor is it solely its collections. “The strength of the Museum, from its founding through its recent history, is based around people,” Ballinger says. “When I started, we had 17 staff members and an annual budget of $375,000.” By the time he left 32 years later, the Museum had about 150 employees, and a $10 million budget. In 2015, Ballinger was succeeded as director by Amada Cruz, whose career included directorial and curator positions at Artpace San Antonio, the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington D.C., and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. Following her departure in July for the Seattle Art Museum, the Museum is conducting a national search for her replacement. During her tenure, Cruz prioritized increased diversity in the art and exhibitions presented to the community. Works by women, artists of color, and LGBTQI+ artists—groups that have historically been underrepresented in museum collections— were brought to the forefront. “When Amada hired me three and a half years ago, we spoke about how the Museum was perceived,” Vicario says. “People like to talk about the Museum as one of the few public spaces where they can gather around and have a shared experience. So our efforts have really been in reaching out to a more inclusive and multicultural community and building that audience space.” Recently, the Museum has also endeavored to project its influence and values beyond the Valley. Recent exhibitions featuring the works of renowned cross-disciplinary feminist artist Sheila Pepe (Hot Mess Formalism) and Agnes Pelton (Desert Transcendentalist) are helping grow the Museum’s reputation on a national level. Pepe’s work traveled to three venues, and Pelton’s show is headed to the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York City. “It’s the first time a Phoenix Art Museum show has traveled to New York,” Vicario says. “That’s a big deal, because curators are always wondering if what they do matters out there in the world.” The Museum’s modern mission has also been propelled by its volunteer army of Docents: educators, guides, and advocates who donate

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NEW WEBSITE AND FILMS REPRESENT COMMUNITY AND FUTURE OF PHXART

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hrough the generosity of Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust and The Steele Foundation, Phoenix Art Museum began a journey in 2017 to create new tools with which to engage our ever-transforming community. Coming soon, the Museum’s new website will be thoughtfully translated in both English and Spanish and will offer a dynamic and visually immersive user experience to highlight the rich stories that engage our community through art. In addition to the new website, Phoenix Art Museum created three short films to celebrate its 60th anniversary through art, community, and inclusivity. Premiering online and across multiple platforms throughout the anniversary season, each film will share a unique vision of our Museum, our world, and ourselves.

TH E FI RST TI M E If these walls could talk, the stories, the memories, and the moments they would share.

REPRES ENT Discover a story of finding yourself, one work of art at a time. Amada Cruz.

W I S H YO U W ERE TH ERE many dozens of hours in training before joining the team. “They’re incredibly passionate and generous, and they want to share their knowledge with the public,” Vicario says. Steers was named a Master Docent after 10 years of service. “The Museum focuses on reaching out to the community and making sure that everyone feels comfortable. We embrace diversity and give people an opportunity to talk about art, culture, and history,” she says. For more than 100 years, that focus on the community, on people, from Museum staff to volunteers to visitors, has defined the evolving character and dynamics of Phoenix Art Museum. “In our case, people might have been more valuable than the art,” Ballinger says. “None of this would exist without the people who built it.” To remember and honor those people, down to the very first, just visit the Museum this fall. There, you will find Egyptian Evening, the painting acquired via those century-old penny donations. Perfectly preserved. A seed protected by its everexpanding bloom.

Fall in love for the first time, again and again.

JOIN US THIS FALL FOR THE PREMIERES OF ALL THREE FILMS WITH THE FILMMAKERS AND CAST. Visit phxart.org for more information. Phoenix Art Museum extends its deepest gratitude to Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust and The Steele Foundation, whose profound support made these opportunities possible. We also thank Kitchen Sink Studios for developing the new site, Wanderers Guild for production of the film series, and Bill Timmerman for his photographic vision.

IN GR AT I T U DE : C Y B E R I T A S T E C H N O L O GI E S As we transition to our new site, Phoenix Art Museum is profoundly grateful to Cyberitas Technologies, LLC, for generously developing and hosting the Museum’s previous website for more than a decade. Through Cyberitas’ generosity and dedication to the Museum over the years, we served more than 10 million visitors to our website, helping to create access to art for so many within our community. We simply could not have done so without their support.

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WHY WE GIVE

Phoenix Art Museum opens its doors every day to ensure individuals and families throughout the Valley of the Sun feel welcomed at their museum.� M ARIANNE CR ACCHIOLO M AGO PRESIDEN T, T HE ST EELE FOUNDATION

Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 1995

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t The Steele Foundation, we provide funding to organizations and programs that expand cultural literacies and arts education to bolster access to the arts for children in Maricopa County. Phoenix Art Museum does just this by bringing the world to our city through outstanding exhibitions, free family weekends, and events encouraging visitors of every age to connect with art. We have been proud to partner with the Museum for more than 25 years on a wide array of initiatives and will continue to support Phoenix Art Museum in its efforts because it is a hub in central Phoenix for civic engagement and building cultural vibrancy.

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Q & A

BIG PICT URE Gilbert Vicario, Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator, on new media, Old Masters, and the future of museums

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ilbert Vicario joined Phoenix Art Museum in 2015 as the Selig Family Chief Curator, after serving as the division head for curatorial affairs at the Des Moines Art Center. Since then, the Museum has brought art from all corners of the world to Phoenix in an effort to represent global cultures while celebrating what makes the Valley community unique. We spoke with Vicario, who was recently named Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs in addition to his chief curator role, to learn about the state of the Museum’s collection today and his curatorial vision moving forward.

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A S T H E S E L I G FA M I LY C H I E F C U R A T O R , W H A T WA S Y O U R T O P P R I O R I T Y W H E N YOU S TARTED? A: When you join a new institution, it is important to understand the history of its collection so you can learn which areas can be expanded and deepened. Exploring the Museum’s collection as the new chief curator was a great learning opportunity for me, and I have been continually challenged to reconsider my preconceptions around specific collecting areas. For example, the American art collection has inspired me to question what we consider American art to be and how that definition has exponentially expanded through demographic shifts in the United States. WHAT WERE YOUR INITIA L GOA L S FOR THE MODERN AND CONTEMPOR ARY ART C O L L E C T I O N , A N D W H A T S T R I D E S H AV E YOU M ADE TO ACHIE VE THEM? A: My goals for modern and contemporary art at Phoenix Art Museum were formed around a few key pieces that the Museum had already acquired, specifically newmedia and installation artworks by Cornelia Parker, Yayoi Kusama, and Olafur Eliasson. In 2016, I was lucky to be able to help the Museum acquire a seminal work by the British artist Martin Creed, Work No. 2497: Half the air in a given space (2015), purchased with funds provided by Contemporary Forum. The work is an installation whereby half the cubic space of a room is filled with white balloons. I believe new-media and installation works like these are the foundation for building a strong collection of contemporary art for the future, and they certainly have the potential to distinguish the Museum as a leader in this area. WHY IS CONTEMPOR ARY ART AN IMPORTANT ACQUISITION FOCUS? A: Contemporary art, or art of our time, allows our audiences to engage in experiences grounded in ideas and issues inspired by the present. I like working with contemporary art and ideas because in contrast to historical art, contemporary art

is experimental by nature and allows for multiple avenues of interpretation. I believe the Museum should play a pivotal role in enabling the culture of contemporary art to flourish in our city. This is accomplished through contemporary art exhibitions but most importantly through acquisitions, which lay the groundwork for a future history. HOW DOES THE MUSEUM’S MODERN AND CONTEMPOR ARY ART COLLECTION DIFFER FROM THOSE ACROSS THE COUNTRY? A: Modern and contemporary art at Phoenix Art Museum is defined by two guiding principles: to bring the world of modern and contemporary art to Phoenix, while respecting the unique geographic and cultural specificity of the U.S.-Mexico border region of the Southwest. Although I am particularly interested in new media, the Museum has had a strong commitment to Latin American and Latinx artists for several decades, as one of the first U.S. institutions committed to this long-overlooked geographic and cultural territory. This focus has consequently given us an important advantage over other art museums in the nation. Through the efforts of Vanessa Davidson, PhD, the Museum’s former Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art, our Latin American exhibitions and collections merge seamlessly with our commitment to modern and contemporary art. Some of our most important holdings include modern artworks by Diego Rivera, Frida Kahlo, José Chávez Morado, and Alfredo Ramos Martínez, as well as contemporary works by Pia Camil, Teresa Margolles, Miguel Angel Ríos, and Gabriel Sierra. WHAT CAN WE E XPECT FOR THE MUSEUM’S MODERN AND CONTEMPOR ARY ART COLLECTION IN THE COMING Y E ARS? A: I am a strong advocate for new media as the future of contemporary art. Recent exhibitions such as The Propeller Group and Ragnar Kjartansson: Scandinavian Pain and Other Myths, along with presentations of work by local artists such as Casey Farina,

give me great confidence that this is the most exciting and visionary path forward for the Museum in this part of the collection. T E L L U S G E N E R A L LY A B O U T T H E M U S E U M ’ S EUROPE AN ART COLLECTION. WHAT ARE SOME HIGHLIGHT S? A: I like to think of our historical European galleries as an example of one of the only opportunities we humans have for time travel. Our European art collection includes more than 1,200 paintings, drawings, and sculptures, depicting everything from religious subjects to those of everyday life from the 14th through the 19th centuries. It is the largest body of work from this period in the Southwest, providing one of the cornerstones of our visitors’ art-history education. The collection galleries explore the characteristics of major styles from the Renaissance to Impressionism, as well as connections among artworks from diverse parts of the globe. Represented artists include Auguste Rodin, Gustave Courbet, Claude Monet, Marco Palmezzano, and Master of Astorga, just to name a few. For many visitors, our collection represents their first, and sometimes only, opportunity to experience the work of European masters firsthand. The Museum also presents works from the Schorr Collection, one of the largest private collections in the United Kingdom amassed by British collectors Hannah and David Lewis. The Lewis family shares works from the Schorr Collection, which range from 15th-century devotional images, to 19thcentury French impressionist landscapes, to 20th-century works by modern masters, with public museums on a long-term basis. It is part of their commitment to making art available on a global scale, and we have been incredibly fortunate to present these loans. IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT CHA LLENGES DO C U R A T O R S FA C E T O D AY C O M P A R E D T O A DECADE AGO? A: I believe curators are feeling the pressures of virtual experiences and shopping-mall CONTINUED ON PAGE 38

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art spaces that are created for the purpose of social-media moments. These spaces and experiences are vastly different from interacting with art objects in a museum. However, while this tension can be perceived as a challenge, I like to think of it as an opportunity to advocate for the relevance of the museum experience as our greatest cultural and social asset. W H A T C H A L L E N G E S D O M U S E U M S FA C E ? A: Museums exist in a time when diversity must be put into action on every institutional level. Museums are not neutral, monolithic arbiters of truth. On the contrary, they need to be spaces in which what we have accepted as truth can be interrogated and made relevant to an ethnically and culturally diverse constituency. The most direct and exciting way that we can challenge the notion that museums are cultural graveyards is by demonstrating how they can be living, breathing spaces that generate meaning and relevance to a new generation. In my opinion, museums will evolve through a generational shift in leadership that will replace outdated, elitist institutional values with ideals that more closely align with current human needs and aspirations, such as sustainability, inclusivity, technology, and creativity.

WISH LIST WHAT ARE THE E XHIBITIONS YOU’D MOS T LOV E TO CUR ATE? A: Curating for me usually starts with an idea or a problem and the urgency to work through those principles in an exhibition context. My general interests include artists who have been overlooked, the intersection of creativity and technology, and the chance to rewrite art history. IF YOU HAD UNLIMITED FUNDS TO HELP THE MUSEUM ACQUIRE WORKS BY ARTISTS NOT REPRESENTED IN THE COLLECTION, WHAT WOULD THE Y BE? A: The largest gap in our collection is modern and contemporary art of the 1950s and 1960s, so if I had $1 billion, I would acquire important works by Robert Rauschenberg, Claes Oldenburg, Jasper Johns, Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Joan Mitchell, Louise Bourgeois—the list is endless!

W H AT I S N E WM E DI A A R T ?

New-media art refers to artworks created with new and emerging digital technologies, such as virtual reality, 3D printing, robotics, computer graphics and animation, and more. Types of new-media art include virtual art, software art, Internet art, and game and interactive art. See, for example, works like Bruce Conner’s LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS (1959-67), generously on loan from the Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, on view on the first floor of the Museum’s Katz Wing. Bruce Conner, LOOKING FOR MUSHROOMS, 1959-67. Single-channel digital video (color, sound), transferred from 16mm film; digitally restored, 2016. Courtesy Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation. © Conner Family Trust.

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WHY WE GIVE

In our country’s fastest growing region, Phoenix Art Museum can play a central role in bringing our community together.” JUDY OPATRN Y PHIL A N T HROPIST

DON OPATRN Y

MEMBER OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2017

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rt broadens our perspective of the world and cultures. With its range of exhibitions and education programs, Phoenix Art Museum is a wonderful community space where we can experience art from around the globe and discover unexpected interests. Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist, for example, was an exciting opportunity for our community to learn about an obscure American painter of the desert. This exhibition will have an increased impact as it travels to other museums throughout the United States. As Phoenix Art Museum strives toward sustainability, we are excited to watch as broad support for the Museum’s mission continues to grow. We are happy to provide our own support because we know our investment goes a long way toward benefitting exhibitions, arts education programs, and collaborative experiences with our community. image credit: Lindsay Linton Buk

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BEYOND ME XICO Vanessa Davidson, PhD, the former mer Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator off Latin American Art, on diversifying ing a collection and what comes next

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ver nearly eight years, Vanessa Davidson, PhD, significantly grew the Latin American art collection of Phoenix Art Museum to increase the representation of artists from across Latin America. We sat down with the Museum’s former Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art, who left Phoenix in September 2019 to become the curator of Latin American Art at the Blanton Museum of Art at The University of Texas at Austin, to learn more about the history of the Museum’s collection and to reflect on her numerous achievements through the years, including a number of significant acquisition initiatives.

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TELL US THE S TORY OF L ATIN A MERICAN ART AT PHOENIX ART MUSEUM. A: Before the Museum opened its doors in 1959, it had already received gifts of Mexican art, including works by David Alfaro Siqueiros, Diego Rivera, and Roberto Montenegro. Then from 1964 to 1992, the Museum presented approximately 30 exhibitions of Mexican art, beginning with Contemporary Mexican Artists in 1964. Although the Museum continued to receive gifts over the decades, Latin American art wasn’t officially established as a collecting area until 1992, under then-Sybil Harrington Director James K. Ballinger. Phoenix Art Museum was only the second museum in the United States to establish a department of Latin American art, after the Blanton Museum of Art at the University of Texas at Austin (formerly the Huntington Art Gallery). This commitment to the display of and engagement with art from Latin America has continued through today. WHEN YOU ARRIV ED AT THE MUSEUM IN 2 0 11, W H A T WA S T H E S T A T E O F T H E L A T I N A MERICAN ART COLLECTION, AND HOW HA S I T E V O LV E D ? A: At that time, the collection’s primary strength was 20th-century Mexican painting, sculpture, and works on paper, as well as a relatively small but important collection of contemporary Latin American artworks from Mexico, Argentina, Brazil, and Cuba. My goal was to expand the Latin American art collection beyond Mexico and diversify it in both geography and chronology. Today, the collection has evolved to encompass approximately 1,000 works of art. In 2013, the Museum acquired 296 objects of Spanish Colonial art from the Gerry S. Culpepper Collection, including 73 paintings primarily from the 18th-century Viceroyalty of Peru and 122 Mexican retablos from the 19th century, among many other objects. Between 2011 and 2015, the Museum also received gifts of contemporary Latin American art from The Diane & Bruce Halle Collection, most notably Naturalized Citizens (2013) by Arizona Chicana artist Annie Lopez; Mexican artist Teresa Margolles’ La búsqueda (The Search) (2014); and La comida del artista (The Artist’s Meal) (1991) by Argentine artist

Victor Grippo, which was gifted by Diane and Bruce Halle from the Thomarie Foundation. The Halles also donated significant Spanish Colonial objects that added great depth to the institution’s holdings. Most recently, the Museum accepted a gift in 2017 that monumentally expanded its collection of contemporary Latin American art. Nicholas Pardon, co-founder of the SPACE Collection, the largest U.S. collection of post-1990s abstract art from Latin America, donated 112 artworks, adding to the approximately 40 stellar contemporary Latin American artworks the Museum already had. This landmark gift featured works by 49 artists from 14 Latin American countries, increasing the Museum’s holdings of work created in nations previously unrepresented, such as Chile, Colombia, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Puerto Rico, and Uruguay, while also fundamentally fortifying its collection of Argentine, Brazilian, Cuban, Mexican, Peruvian, and Venezuelan art. My hope is that the next Shawn and Joe Lampe curator of Latin American art continues to diversify the collection and curate thought-provoking exhibitions that engage the Valley community. Phoenix Art Museum truly has the potential to become a beacon for the display and research of Latin American art in the Southwest. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MUSEUM’S DEFINING L ATIN A MERICAN ART WORK S? A: El suicidio de Dorothy Hale (The Suicide of Dorothy Hale) (1939) by Frida Kahlo is a cornerstone of the collection and the artwork most frequently requested for loan from the Museum’s entire permanent collection of more than 20,000 artworks. Other major highlights include Indígena tejiendo (Indian Woman Weaving) (1936) by Diego Rivera; La Malinche (Young Girl of Yalala, Oaxaca) (c. 1940) by Alfredo Ramos Martínez; Dos figuras en rojo (Two Figures in Red) (1973) by Rufino Tamayo; and Columna interminable (Endless Column) (2015) by Betsabeé Romero, the latter three of which were gifted by Friends of Mexican Art, an arts advocacy group. Many recent donations have also added significantly to the Latin American art collection, including those from Diane and Bruce Halle, the Culpepper Collection, and the Pardon gift.

OV ER THE PA S T DECADE, WHAT WERE THE E XHIBITIONS YOU WERE MOS T PROUD TO CUR ATE? A: I would say Order, Chaos, and the Space Between: Contemporary Latin American Art from the Diane and Bruce Halle Collection in 2013, as well as Masterworks of Spanish Colonial Art from Phoenix Art Museum’s Collection. I am also proud of my many collaborative curatorial efforts with other institutions. Horacio Zabala: Mapping the Monochrome was a collaboration with the Colección de Arte Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat in Buenos Aires. Past/Future/Present: Contemporary Brazilian Art from the Museum of Modern Art, São Paulo was organized in collaboration with the Museu de Arte Moderna, São Paulo, to which the exhibition later traveled. And finally, Valeska Soares: Any Moment Now, which was co-organized with the Santa Barbara Museum of Art as part of the Getty Foundation’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative. W H A T C A N W E L O O K F O R WA R D T O I N T H E COMING Y E ARS FOR L ATIN A MERICAN ART AT THE MUSEUM? A: In 2020, the Museum will present an exhibition of highlights from Nicholas Pardon’s gift of abstract Latin American artworks. Then in 2021, the Museum will premiere Oscar Muñoz: Invisibilia, the first U.S. retrospective of this Colombian artist’s work. WHAT WOULD YOU LIK E TO SEE ADDED TO THE MUSEUM’S L ATIN A MERICAN COLLECTION IN THE FUTURE? A: I would love to see the Museum further fortify its collection of works by Latin American women artists, such as María Izquierdo, Remedios Varo, Lygia Clark, Lygia Pape, Mira Schendel, Cecilia Vicuña, Beatriz González, Ana Mendieta, and Graciela Sacco. Truthfully, the list far exceeds the space we have for this article.

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Q & A

LOOK ING BACK , MOVING FORWA RD Janet Baker, PhD, curator of Asian Art, on increasing representation, unknown artists, and what the future holds

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ith nearly two decades at the helm of the Asian art collection at Phoenix Art Museum, Janet Baker, PhD, has been busy working closely with a community of supporters. She has significantly grown the Museum’s collection, helped shepherd the naming of three Art of Asia gallery spaces, curated a slew of beloved exhibitions, and helped increase the visibility of Sikh art and culture in Phoenix, to name a few not-so-minor accomplishments. But she’s not done yet. We spoke with Baker, the Museum’s curator of Asian art, to learn more about her past successes, the current state of the collection, and what’s next. LOOK ING BACK , WHAT WERE THE STRENGTHS OF THE ASIAN ART COLLECTION WHEN YOU FIRS T ARRIV ED, A N D H O W H AV E T H E C O L L E C T I O N A N D T H E A R T O F A S I A G A L L E R I E S E V O LV E D SINCE THEN? A: When I arrived at Phoenix Art Museum in 2000, the Museum’s holdings in later Chinese art (objects created after approximately year 1000) and some Himalayan art were quite good. The rest of Asia, however, was not well-represented, so that became, and still is, my primary goal for the collection—to increase the representation of Asia’s nearly 50 countries. Over the past 19 years, we have doubled the size of the collection from 3,000 to more than 6,000 objects, adding early Chinese art, including ceramics and jade; Japanese art, such as paintings, prints, ceramics, and armor; Southeast Asian art, including textiles; and Sri Lankan Buddhist art. We have also expanded the Chinese painting collection in both historical and contemporary works. Today, the collection represents more than 5,000 years of cultural history. Additionally, three areas in the Art of Asia galleries have been named during my time at the Museum. We now have the John and Mary Coleman and Griffith and Patricia Way Gallery; the Marilyn and L. Roy Papp Family Gallery; and the Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery, only the second gallery space in the United States dedicated solely to displaying Sikh art.

WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DEFINING ART WORK S IN THE MUSEUM’S ASIAN ART COLLECTION? A: Independent of the Western and postRenaissance concepts of creating art for personal expression, fame, and public consumption, Asian artworks are meant to be functional, whether for daily use, ritual and devotion, or burial, so they could accompany the deceased into the next world. As a result, they are usually categorized by types of objects and are mostly attributed to unknown artists, as is the case with the majority of works in our collection. Instead of featuring artists with broad name recognition, the Museum’s Asian art collection reflects the generosity of many donors, for which I am immensely grateful. Although some objects have been gifted from donors in New York, Boston, Los Angeles, or Lawrence, Kan., the vast majority have come from donors in the greater Phoenix area. OV ER THE PA S T DECADE, WHAT WERE THE E XHIBITIONS YOU WERE MOS T PLE A SED TO PRESENT TO THE COMMUNIT Y? A: Sacred Word and Image: Five World Religions brought together and compared holy objects of Jewish, Christian, Muslim, Hindu, and Buddhist origins. Hidden Meanings of Love and Death in Chinese Painting: Selections from the Marilyn and Roy Papp Collection explored how sadness, longing, nostalgia, fear, and love were concealed within a visual language of metaphor and detailed imagery. Quiet Rage, Gentle Wail: Prints and Masks of Japanese Noh Theatre examined Noh, the traditional Japanese theater form that incorporates music, dance, and drama, and featured woodblock prints and more than 20 masks. The dazzling Samurai: Armor from the Ann and Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Collection, which was loaned from The Ann & Gabriel Barbier-Mueller Museum: The Samurai Collection, brought a scholarly understanding to a popular topic. Virtue and Valor: Sikh Art and Heritage was the inaugural exhibition celebrating the endowment of the Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery. And finally, Wondrous Worlds: Art and Islam Through Time and Place, which was loaned from the Newark Museum, explored the intersection of art and Islam across centuries and continents.

W H AT C A N W E L OOK F OR WA R D T O IN T HE NE X T Y E A R F OR T HE COL L E C T ION , A ND W H AT DO YOU HOP E T O A CHIE V E F OR YOUR COL L E C T ION A R E A O V E R T HE NE X T DE C A DE ? A: In the coming year, I will focus on highlighting many recent gifts. Upcoming installations and exhibitions will explore new themes that are more popular in nature than academic. My goal is to appeal to a broader scope of our local residents, many of whom are not familiar with Asian art or culture. For the future, I hope to cultivate additional gallery naming opportunities and secure the endowment of the Asian art curatorial position to ensure Asian art remains an integral part of the Museum’s collection.

WISH LIST IF YOU HAD UNLIMITED FUNDS, WHICH ART WORKS WOULD YOU HELP THE MUSEUM ACQUIRE, AND WHY? A: I would focus on acquiring works of Islamic, Buddhist, Hindu, and Sikh art. We have very few of these works in our collection, with the exception of Sri Lankan Buddhist art, and they would enable the Museum to help visitors better understand cultures and traditions outside of the mainstream Judeo-Christian heritage of the majority of Americans. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE MUSEUMS ACROS S THE COUNTRY YOU ADMIRE, AND WHY? A: The Minneapolis Institute of Art has an outstanding Asian art collection, along with changing exhibitions that are innovative and a free-admission policy for all visitors that allows the museum to leverage fundraising opportunities. I also admire the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City. It is a private museum founded to promote the understanding of Himalayan civilizations, and they offer edgy exhibitions, innovative programs and performances, and a haven of peace and quiet in the middle of Manhattan.

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART.ORG

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TA K ING T HE OL D, M A K ING IT NE W Betsy Fahlman, PhD, adjunct curator of American art, on re-imagining galleries, creating new contexts, and highlighting women and Arizona artists

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hen Betsy Fahlman, PhD, arrived at Phoenix Art Museum three years ago, the American art galleries in the Museum’s North Wing needed a major revamp, as many of the same works had been on view for a number of years. Eager to engage new audiences and contextualize the works within the Museum’s collection, Fahlman made it her mission to refresh the galleries using works from the collection as her foundation. We sat down with the adjunct curator of American art to learn more about her first months at the Museum and how the American art galleries have evolved since then.

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IN ADDITION TO OV ERHAULING THE A MERICAN ART GA LLERIES, WHAT OTHER PROJECT S AT TR ACTED YOUR AT TENTION WHEN YOU FIRS T S TARTED AT PHOENIX ART MUSEUM? A: At the same time I was re-imagining the American art section of the North Wing, I learned the Museum planned to upgrade systems in the art-storage vaults. The most practical solution was to temporarily use the American art galleries for on-site storage, and so they were closed. Surprisingly, this strategy worked to my advantage. I was able to take the time to thoroughly learn the American art collection and present my first installation, Philip C. Curtis: The New Deal and American Regionalism, in a smaller gallery. I had the opportunity to collaborate with our former Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art, Vanessa Davidson, PhD, on Border Crossings: Mexico and the American Southwest, which created a wonderful dialogue between our American and Latin American art collections. I also worked with Gilbert Vicario, our Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator, who conceived of the Video Crossings series, a contemporary video dialogue inspired by the historical American, Southwestern, and Mexican artworks in Border Crossings. The result was a productive collaboration between three curators that hit all the right notes. WHAT ARE YOUR GOA L S FOR THE MUSEUM’S A MERICAN ART COLLECTION? A: Our American art collection has so many treasures, but the challenge is that it is very homogenized, consisting predominantly of works by white, male artists. My goal is to diversify the collection where possible and, in the meantime, showcase the works we have but change how they are interpreted. For example, part of the American art galleries is devoted to Western art subjects, but because I want visitors to experience the full range of our Western art collection, the installation You Are in Cowboy Country includes an extended text panel that references African-American, indigenous, and Latino cowboys, as well as depictions of the cowgirl. We have also installed the video Navajo Son: Meet the Great American Cowboy, which is in English with Spanish subtitles and tells the story of Derrick Begay, an indigenous rodeo star and cowboy. Next, we will commission wall labels for specific

works to bring in other interpretive voices, starting with indigenous writers. TELL US ABOUT THE STRENGTHS OF THE MUSEUM’S A MERICAN ART HOLDINGS. WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DEFINING ART WORK S? A: We have strong examples of work by important New Mexico artists, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Maynard Dixon, and Raymond Jonson. There are important works by artists who worked in Arizona, like Philip C. Curtis, Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton, and Ed Mell. We also have significant works by women artists, such as Helen Torr, Alice Trumbull Mason, Florine Stettheimer, and Louisa McElwain, to name a few. Generally, American printmaking, particularly from the first half of the 20th century, is a collection strength, and we have many handsome examples of western landscape as well. OV ER THE PA S T THREE Y E ARS, WHAT WERE THE E XHIBITIONS OR INS TA L L ATIONS YOU WERE MOST PROUD TO PRESENT TO OUR COMMUNIT Y? A: My favorites were Philip C. Curtis: The New Deal and American Regionalism, Border Crossings: Mexico and the American Southwest, and The Figure in Context: An Academic Tradition. On a broader view, I am proud of the reinstallation of the American art galleries, which was supported by a $100,000 grant from the Henry Luce Foundation. The galleries reopened in September 2018 with five collection-based special installations. The space looks fresh and clean, with old favorites and recent additions on view, along with works that haven’t been displayed for a long time. My goal is to complete several rotations each year in the revitalized galleries so visitors will regularly see something new. W H A T C A N W E L O O K F O R WA R D T O F O R T H E A MERICAN ART GA LLERIES? A:There is an installation of abstract works that were created in the 1930s and 1940s, and there will be a cross-collection exhibition of still-life painting. I plan to pull still-life paintings from the American art collection and place them in conversation with those from the Latin American, European, and contemporary art collections.

WISH LIST WHAT ARE THE E XHIBITIONS YOU’D LOV E TO CUR ATE? A: I have explored the relationship between American art and industry throughout my entire career, and am already working on Landscapes of Extraction: The Art of Mining in the American West, which is scheduled to open in fall 2021. It features the multiple landscapes created by large-scale mining, and we plan to have it travel to museums across the United States. The other exhibition I am eager to curate would recreate a large exhibition of African-American art that was presented at Fort Huachuca in 1943. Intended as a permanent installation, it is an amazing story of art in an unlikely place—Sierra Vista, Arizona, near the U.S.-Mexico border. IF YOU HAD UNLIMITED FUNDS TO HELP THE MUSEUM ACQUIRE WORKS BY ARTISTS NOT REPRESENTED IN THE A MERICAN ART COLLECTION, WHAT WOULD THEY BE? A: Without a doubt, I would increase our holdings of work by women artists. To represent the Southwest, I would love to find top works by Catharine Carter Critcher, the only woman member of the Taos Society of Artists, and Florence Miller Pierce, one of two women members of the Transcendental Painting Group (TPG). Agnes Pelton was the other woman member of the TPG, and we already have two of her works in the collection. A reverse painting on glass by Rebecca Salsbury James is also high on my acquisition wish list, and works by African-American artist Lois Mailou Jones, who was part of the Harlem Renaissance; Emily Carr, the Canadian counterpart to Georgia O’Keeffe; New York Precisionist artist Elsie Driggs; and portraitist Romaine Brooks would greatly enhance the collection.

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Q & A I fell in love with photography’s history in college. As an art history student at Barnard, I became interested in the areas of overlap between art and science, fiction and truth, mass and high culture. When photography was invented in the 19th century, it supplanted the role of the skilled artisan and immediately and indelibly reshuffled our understanding of objective knowledge and its visual transmission. This completely fascinated me.

PICTURE PERFECT Audrey Sands, PhD, on celebrating women photographers, exploring identity, and the materiality of photography

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n August 2019, Audrey Sands joined Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) at the University of Arizona as the Norton Family Assistant Curator of Photography, a joint appointment shared by the two Arizona institutions. With numerous experiences working in curatorial departments of photography at institutions like the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C., and the Museum of Modern Art, New York, she brings extensive vision and expertise to her role. We spoke with Sands, who recently completed a Chester Dale Fellowship at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, to learn more about her interests and hopes as the newest member of the curatorial team.

W H E N D I D Y O U F I R S T FA L L I N L O V E W I T H P H O T O G R A P H Y ? A: I took my first photography class in high school and began volunteering at a local darkroom in Los Angeles on weekends. This was when I first gained an appreciation for the craft of photography— not just the camera-based side of the practice, but also the material aspects of printing and all the ways images can be manipulated and perfected in the darkroom. I loved the romance and quiet of working in the dark, with a single glowing red light and the lingering smell of developing chemicals on my fingers.

Photography is an incredibly beautiful medium, but also a deeply complex one. The earliest photographs feel like otherworldly objects—from the shadowy softness of a salted paper print by William Henry Fox Talbot to the delicate and infinitely detailed silver surfaces of daguerreotype plates. Throughout its history, the medium has been continuously used to convey varying types of information, from the scientific and anthropological, to the documentary, commercial, personal, and expressive. Still, while photographers have always defined themselves in relation to the boundary between realism and abstraction, for many viewers, photographs have the appearance of objectivity. This premise of transparency is what makes photography simultaneously mysterious and brutally revealing. Ultimately, photography is our most potent language of memory, and that’s extremely compelling. IN YOUR OPINION, HOW HA S THE PERCEP TION OF PHOTOGR APH Y AS AN ART FORM SHIF TED OVER THE DECADES? A: Sixty years ago, photography was barely an accepted art form, but that sentiment has profoundly changed through the years. In the 1960s and 1970s, galleries struggled to sell prints by Edward Steichen and Edward Weston for a mere $200 each. Today, prints by those same artists have set records, selling for more than $1 million at auction. In museums, independent departments of photography were extremely rare until around the 1990s. Now, photographs are one of the most collectible art forms and one of the fastest growing areas of museum collections. Another major change to note in the perception of photography today is linked to the current ubiquity of the medium. At one time, photography was considered the realm of wealthy amateurs or trained practitioners, and you went to a studio to have a photograph made. Today, more than four billion people have camera phones. This means more than half of the global population has a camera in their pocket that they can use to communicate every single day. As a result, we are more versed in the visual language of photography than ever before. WHO ARE SOME OF THE PHOTOGR APHERS YOU MOS T ADMIRE? A: I’m a big lover of mid-20th-century street photography. Many photographers of this period were true poets of the fleeting moment, capturing the subtle glances of urban pedestrians, the glow of city lights at night, the throng of beach crowds, and the energy of the street. Among my deepest loves are Roy DeCarava, Robert Frank, Garry Winogrand, Diane Arbus, and her teacher, Lisette Model, on whom I wrote my dissertation. In different ways, they were all tender, hungry observers of the human condition. Some other favorites whose work may be less familiar to American audiences include Chilean photographer Paz Errázuriz, the Japanese photographer Masahisa Fukase, and the Hungarian-born Mexican photojournalist and surrealist artist Kati Horna. CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

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Q & A Rebecca Senf.

W H A T E X CI T E S Y O U M O S T A B O U T W O R K I N G A T T H E M U S E U M A S OUR NE W PHOTOGR APH Y CUR ATOR? A: Phoenix Art Museum is a dynamic, impactful institution, with an incredible team of curators, educators, and leadership who are committed to its mission of increasing access to the arts. It is a tremendous honor to join these new colleagues, and I look forward to collaborating with them. I also know the Museum has passionate, devoted, and diverse audiences with varied perspectives and needs, and I’m excited to engage with them as well. In terms of my chief role, I look forward to working with the unparalleled collection of photographs at CCP to create exhibitions in the Norton Family Photography Gallery. It is an inspiring collection and space, and I am excited to share works with our community through a range of exhibitions. SPE A K ING OF E XHIBITIONS, WHAT ARE YOUR GOA L S FOR PHOTOGR APH Y E XHIBITIONS AT THE MUSEUM OV ER THE NE X T FEW YEARS? A: The first thing I intend to do is really dig into the CCP collections and spend time in the vaults, which house more than eight million objects. The collections also include approximately 110,000 prints by more than 2,200 modern and contemporary photographers. Much of this material has never been published or shown but holds invaluable insights. It’s important to me to teach audiences about the depth and breadth of CCP’s collections and highlight some of the little-known material so we can have a deeper understanding of the work. As for explicit exhibition goals, I am very dedicated to exploring the legacies of women photographers. There are countless innovative and influential women photographers throughout history who still haven’t received the same level of acknowledgement through exhibitions and publications as their male counterparts, and it’s time to change that. Many of them are represented in the CCP collections, including Lola Álvarez Bravo, Linda Connor, Judy Dater, Louise Dahl-Wolfe, Laura Gilpin, Marion Palfi, Rosalind Fox Solomon, the list goes on. These women are a core part of our cultural heritage and they deserve to be studied and celebrated. Additionally, we are in a unique cultural moment in which conversations about identity and our diverse heritage are more charged and urgent than ever before, and photography is one of the most potent and transmittable mediums through which artists today are exploring these topics. One of my top goals is to exhibit works by artists who were or are vocally engaged in these issues, while also creating a space where people of all backgrounds can come and connect. Finally, I’m always interested in the material choices photographers have made—the different cameras, artificial light sources, and the varied printing processes and materials—as they are all important to understanding the final image on the wall. We are also increasingly losing touch with the physicality of photography in the digital age. A huge portion of the population today will grow up without ever holding a physical print, which creates a new onus to educate visitors about the material history of the medium. So, I want to create exhibitions that invite close looking and inspire a new curiosity about how photographs were made.

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A L A S T IN G PA R T N E R S HIP In 2006, Phoenix Art Museum and the Center for Creative Photography (CCP) at the University of Arizona embarked on an innovative collaboration to bring vibrant photography exhibitions, featuring works from CCP’s world-renowned collections, to new and larger audiences. Founded in 1975 by acclaimed photographer Ansel Adams and John Schaefer, then-president of the University of Arizona, CCP is home to more than eight million objects, including contact sheets, albums, scrapbooks, and other materials, all drawn from 270 archival collections, including those of Ansel Adams, Wynn Bullock, Harry Callahan, Aaron Siskind, Frederick Sommer, W. Eugene Smith, Lola Álvarez Bravo, and Edward Weston. The Center also acquires individual photographs by modern and contemporary artists, and its collection now features approximately 110,000 works by more than 2,200 photographers, in addition to a library of books, journals, and exhibition and auction catalogues. Rebecca Senf, PhD, the Center’s chief curator and the Museum’s former Norton Family Assistant Curator of Photography, describes the partnership as the brainchild of the Museum’s Sybil Harrington Director Emeritus, James K. Ballinger. In the early 2000s, she said, CCP was facing criticism for a perception of not sharing enough from its vast vault of materials. “People wanted works by Ansel Adams and Edward Weston to be on view more frequently,” she said. “As Jim told me, he had the idea for the collaboration one night while walking his dog. He thought, ‘We can provide a platform for making Ansel Adams and Edward Weston more accessible at Phoenix Art Museum.’” From there, Ballinger worked with CCP’s director, and soon, Doris and John Norton generously provided funding to both open the Museum’s Doris and John Norton Gallery for the Center for Creative Photography and endow the Norton Family Assistant Curator of Photography position. Since then, CCP and Phoenix Art Museum have organized nearly 40 exhibitions, showcasing extraordinary works by 20th-century and contemporary photographers alike. Reflecting on what CCP and the Museum have accomplished over the years, Senf is hopeful the collaboration will grow and deepen as the Museum celebrates its 60th anniversary and looks forward to the next decade to come. “Art isn’t worth anything if people can’t experience it, which is why the partnership between CCP and Phoenix Art Museum is incredibly powerful,” she said. “The collection that CCP stewards belongs to the people of Arizona, and by continuing to mutually invest in the work we produce together, the Center and the Museum can continue to share outstanding photography with wider audiences, a mission that not only benefits our institutions but the entire state.”

UPCOMING EXHIBITION

ANSEL ADAMS: PERFORMING THE PRINT

January 11 – May 10, 2020 Norton Gallery Featuring 60 photographs drawn from the Ansel Adams Archive at the Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona, Ansel Adams: Performing the Print illustrates how the 20th century’s foremost American photographer often created multiple prints from a single negative in pursuit of the fullest expression of the view as he had imagined it. For more information, visit phxart.org.

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Q & A

SUCCE S S BY DE SIGN

Dennita Sewell, the Curator Emerita of Fashion Design, on the strengths of the Museum’s collection, motorcycle enthusiasts, and the future of fashion

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s fashion art? In the 1960s, the answer to this now age-old question would’ve almost certainly been “no.” How could clothing—the sewn and structured fabric we wear every day to work, sleep, eat, and shop in—ever be considered an art form worthy of exhibition at a museum? In 1966, however, the Board of Trustees of Phoenix Art Museum and a group of visionary Valley women had a different idea. They ventured that fashion was art, and it did, in fact, belong in the galleries for visitors to consider just as they considered paintings and sculptures. So, that same year, the Museum created its Fashion Design Department, and Sybil Harrington, Naomi Kitchel, Virginia Ullman, and Ellen Duke founded Arizona Costume Institute (ACI), with the mission of collecting and preserving garments and accessories of historical and aesthetic significance for exhibition at Phoenix Art Museum. CONTINUED ON PAGE 54

Dennita Sewell. Photo by Mark Peterman.

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Q & A Through the support of ACI, the Museum’s fashion collection grew steadily over the years, and by 1970 when Jean Hildreth was hired as the collection’s first curator, there were already 1,000 backlogged objects in need of cataloguing and processing. Throughout her nearly 25-year career, Hildreth presented exhibitions and installations featuring works by Pauline Trigère, Cristóbal Balenciaga, Christian Dior, and other renowned designers, and when Dennita Sewell joined Phoenix Art Museum in 2000, the collection had grown to approximately 5,000 objects. Over her 19 years as curator, Sewell, who was named the Jacquie Dorrance Curator of Fashion Design in 2016 with the position’s endowment, added more than 3,000 objects alone, and today, the collection now exceeds 8,000 ensembles, garments, and accessories dating from the 18th century to the present. In addition to expanding the collection, she developed more than 50 groundbreaking exhibitions that pushed beyond traditional presentations of historical fashions and garnered significant national press in publications such as Vogue, Harper’s Bazaar, Women’s Wear Daily, and Elle. In August 2019, Sewell left Phoenix Art Museum to focus on a new role overseeing the development of a Bachelor of Arts program in fashion at the School of Art at Arizona State University’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts. Her final exhibition at Phoenix Art Museum, Antonio: The Fine Art of Fashion Illustration, is on view through January 5, 2020, and prior to her departure, she selected ensembles by Rei Kawakubo, purchased with funds provided by ACI, that appear in PhxArt60: The Past Decade, the Museum’s 60th-anniversary exhibition on view through January 26, 2020. We sat down with the Curator Emerita of Fashion Design to reflect on her time at the Museum and learn about the challenges fashion curators face today. WHEN YOU FIRS T ARRIV ED AT PHOENIX A R T M U S E U M I N 2 0 0 0 , W H A T WA S T H E S T A T E O F T H E FA S H I O N C O L L E C T I O N , A N D H O W H A S I T E V O LV E D ? A: In the mid-1990s, the collection was moved into a new storage space with museum-quality fixtures, an effort that was made possible through the support of Arizona Costume Institute. This was a big achievement for the Museum. When I arrived, the collection was organized chronologically, and although everything

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was neatly organized in oversized boxes, there were no photos on the boxes, which made it difficult to quickly assess the collection and find objects. The first summer I was at the Museum, I hired two graduate students to take photos of the collection’s 18th- and 19th-century works, place the items in boxes, and create an inventory of the contents, which included accession numbers and names of donors who had gifted each object. This system allowed me to visually scan the works in the collection when brainstorming exhibition ideas, and I was able to find the objects more quickly. It’s funny to think about that time now because the Museum had only one digital camera that we all shared, and even though the technology was up-to-date at the time, all of the data was recorded on a floppy disk. The next summer, another intern, Nora, helped me reorganize and photograph the works from the 20th century. We took everything out of boxes, grouped the objects by designer, and then put them back into alphabetically organized boxes. Again, this work made a big difference, enabling me to more quickly assess what we had as I envisioned new projects.

with our resources at the time, but it also allowed me to move the collection forward into the present, which made it more competitive and relevant within the larger museum field. Another key goal was to establish a sense of pride in the fashion collection within our community. I strategized exhibitions based on themes such as the motorcycle jacket, the trench coat, and jumpsuits, which drew a wide range of audiences. Some of the exhibitions, like the recent Flora exhibition, were purposefully all drawn from the collection so that visitors realized the quality and comprehensiveness of what the Museum has in its vaults. The Museum’s collection is special, and I wanted people to connect with that on a really meaningful level. CONTINUED ON PAGE 56 Rei Kawakubo for Comme des Garçon, Coat, dress and shoes, spring/summer 2018 look #6. Multi fabric patchwork and inkjet printed polyester, leather. Museum purchase with funds provided by Arizona Costume Institute.

From there, we kept tackling different areas of the collection between exhibitions. For example, one summer, a friend who used to work as Vivienne Westwood’s assistant helped organize the shoe aisle. WHAT WERE YOUR INITIA L COLLECTION GOA L S, AND HOW DID THE Y CHANGE THROUGH THE YE ARS? A: The founding curator, Jean Hildreth, had exquisite taste. When she was curator from 1970–1993, the museum costume field focused on historical dress, and Hildreth, who had come from Colonial Williamsburg, loved historical pieces. By the time I arrived in January 2000, fashion exhibitions had begun to focus more on contemporary subjects, or they presented the historical and the contemporary together. Also, fashion was gaining popularity in museums and garnering more respect, and as a result of the heightened demand to collect and exhibit ensembles, historical dress was becoming more expensive and harder to find. The greatest area of opportunity for Phoenix Art Museum to collect became contemporary works, so I shifted our focus. This initiative to bring contemporary designs into the collection was more in line

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Q & A WHAT ARE SOME OF THE DEFINING WORK S IN THE COLLECTION?

and exhibit fashion. This means there is dramatically more competition for the same resources, including objects, press, and attention from designers. In addition, the designers and brands have now become aware of the importance of their own archives. As a result, they are less willing to donate works to a museum, and some have even begun to form their own exhibition programming.

A: The Museum is so fortunate that the early pieces from the 18th century were purchased in the 1970s and 1980s. Those works have become extremely rare and expensive and are true treasures of the archives. I am excited by all of the objects in the collection, but two stand-out opportunities for the Museum were the acquisition of the Ann Bonfoey Taylor collection and that of the Emphatics archive. They both elevated the collection so it now has strengths in midcentury couture and avant-garde ready-towear from the 1980s to the 1990s. WHAT WOULD YOU LIK E TO SEE ADDED TO T H E FA S H I O N C O L L E C T I O N ? A: I would love to see the Museum choose something that really speaks to the cultural conditions in which we currently live. One of the most exciting aspects of fashion is its cultural connection—the way it both expresses the zeitgeist of our time and serves as a bellwether of where culture is headed. For example, I loved the Viktor & Rolf designs at the Fall 2019 couture presentation, particularly look number 18. For each look in this collection, the designers used fabrics in their existing stock that were left over from prior shows. With its felted bolero and embroidered butterflies, this sustainable design encompasses the consciousness and concerns of our era but with a timeless elegance. OV ER THE PA S T DECADE, WHAT WERE THE E XHIBITIONS YOU WERE THE MOS T PROUD TO PRESENT? A: Truthfully, each and every exhibition has been so much fun. For the production of Emphatics: Avant-Garde Fashion 1963–2013, I came up with a unique vision for the installation, which included the creation of an original video, set, lighting, and soundtrack. I felt I was able to use my training in theatrical design to its fullest on that project. The opening of Motorcycle Jacket was spectacular. All of the people whom I had met while organizing the exhibition rode to the opening reception on their motorcycles. The chief of security decided to let them park in the old courtyard, and they became part of the experience as guests arrived. The motorcycles ranged from Harley-Davidsons and Japanese sport bikes, to custom, new, and vintage bikes. Bringing together these

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Installation view, The Cape, 2013.

motorcycle enthusiasts with Museum visitors created an excitement and energy that was so fun, and we were even able to get a jacket that Elvis Presley had worn. I had to put that one in a special case! W H A T FA C T O R S W I L L H E L P E N S U R E T H E CONTINUED SUCCES S OF THE MUSEUM’S FA S H I O N D E S I G N P R O G R A M ? A: The program’s longstanding success has been and will continue to be influenced by several things. The Valley’s climate brings a steady stream of visitors to our region every winter, thus diversifying and expanding the Museum’s visitor base beyond members of the community. People from coast to coast have visited Phoenix, experienced the exhibitions, gotten involved, and donated to the collection. The strong leadership of Arizona Costume Institute has, without a doubt, been an invaluable source of support in the development of the fashion collection and program. Additionally, the program benefits from two significant endowments: the Ellman Endowment, which secures the care of objects and the advancement of research, and the Dorrance Endowment, which ensures the collection will always have a steward in the Jacquie Dorrance Curator of Fashion Design position. The dedicated gallery space in the Kelly Ellman Fashion Design Gallery has also been instrumental in fashion’s success at the Museum. W H A T C H A L L E N G E S D O FA S H I O N C U R A T O R S FA C E T O D AY C O M P A R E D T O A D E C A D E A G O ?

Fashion brands have also become extremely brand conscious. Even just to procure a loan for an exhibition, fashion houses and designers often ask to approve everything, from the context of the exhibition and the installation design, to the PR and marketing materials. They want to ensure messaging about their brand is consistent across every platform, and this process can be very time-consuming. Finally, the rise of celebrity-driven social media has affected how brands are willing to distribute their resources. So museums are now in competition with celebrities, as designers weigh with whom to align and give their clothes. H O W D O Y O U T H I N K FA S H I O N I N T H E M U S E U M C O N T E X T W I L L E V O LV E O V E R T H E NEX T FIVE YEARS? A: In the global museum field, fashion has drawn large attendance and attracted major fundraising since 2011, when the Metropolitan Museum of Art presented Alexander McQueen: Savage Beauty. The success of that exhibition ignited a demand for fashion exhibitions even among institutions without collections or a history of displaying fashion, and the flame has never died out. I have watched this phenomenon like other people watch stockmarket activity, always looking for trends. I often wonder if fashion’s popularity is nearing its peak, but ultimately, I don’t think so. Multiple institutions in Asia and Europe are establishing galleries or renovating existing ones, along with starting new programs. I think fashion is on the verge of achieving a new level of validity—and a new level of competition. The fashion program at Phoenix Art Museum is well poised for success because it has been active for more than 50 years and has an international reputation. The institution is ahead of the game, so to speak, because of this tradition of successful activity.

A: With the rise in fashion’s popularity, more institutions are seeking to collect

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WHY WE VOLUNTEER Fashion is one of the purest expressions of art because it is art lived on a daily basis.” K A T H I E M AY

PRESIDEN T, A RIZON A COST UME INSTIT U T E Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 1979

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ashion is our own personal story. When I walked through the Museum’s recent Flora exhibition, I was reminded of my mother, who was often featured in the society section of the Memphis newspaper, in an ensemble of floral design. Then, in the middle of Flora, a memory flashed before me: it was 1965, and I was wearing a floral-inspired dress for my spring wedding rehearsal. For nearly 10 years, I have been a member of Arizona Costume Institute (ACI), serving on several committees and the ACI board. What most inspires me to continue volunteering and supporting the Museum in this role is the history of ACI. In 1966, when the Museum was less than 10 years old, a group of dedicated, forwardthinking women came together to help build a fashion design program at the Museum during a time when the idea of fashion in art museums was still a revolutionary consideration. These women had the vision, the bold determination, and the imagination to create something meaningful that would transform Phoenix Art Museum for decades to come. They fostered Arizona Costume Institute and, through it, helped to assemble an extraordinary collection at Phoenix Art Museum that today numbers more than 8,000 objects, from the historic to the ultracontemporary.

Phoenix Art Museum is one of a handful of museums throughout the country that has a fashion collection on which to draw constant inspiration and is used as a reliable source of reference for students, professionals, and the cultural and social development from the viewpoint of fabrics, clothing design, and the personalities who make fashion history. I believe we owe it to the founding members of ACI and ourselves to continue that legacy and build upon the work we’ve already done. I am excited for the future of ACI and Phoenix Art Museum and to welcome new members who will surely fall in love with the Museum’s fashion collection as I have.

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WHY WE GIVE

Like museums in every major city, Phoenix Art Museum is an important component of the community.” D AV I D E . A D L E R

OW NER, DAVID E. A DLER FINE RUGS Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 1984

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e’ve sponsored the Independent Woman Luncheon for several years. I continue to support Phoenix Art Museum through the annual event because of its ability to bring together interior designers and those interested in design, who are our customers. With the Museum as the venue and beneficiary, there’s an element of prestige and dignity. More than participating for business, however, it’s worthwhile to be part of an effort that has a wide reach. Like museums in every major city, Phoenix Art Museum is an important component of the community. The Museum presents objects and creates events that can impact those who visit. Its exhibitions and programs are fun, engaging, and available to everyone, whether they live here or are visiting, from students on a field trip, to artists and collectors, to those simply looking for an afternoon out of the house. Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus used to say they entertained people from eight to 80. I would say there are parallels with an art museum— although without the elephants.

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image credits: (above)

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Lu Tapp. (right) Haute Photography.

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INDEPENDENT WOMAN LUNCHEON THE MUSEUM’S 10TH-ANNUAL SPRING FUNDRAISER WILL PRESENT MARTYN LAWRENCE BULLARD AND HONOR FORMER CHAIRS OF THE BELOVED PHILANTHROPIC EVENT

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or one afternoon each spring, some of the Valley’s most talented designers gather together to celebrate inspired design and mindful beauty at the Independent Woman Luncheon (IWL) at Phoenix Art Museum. This unique, beloved event welcomes guests of all professions and interests to enjoy a presentation by a renowned designer, lavish tablescapes, and an opportunity to connect with fellow design, fashion, and art enthusiasts in our community, all while supporting Phoenix Art Museum. Founded in 2011, IWL was conceived by long-time Museum supporter Ellen Katz, who drew inspiration from the Museum’s 2011 exhibition Fashion Independent: The Original Style of Ann Bonfoey Taylor. Katz was speaking with the exhibition’s curator, Dennita Sewell, who served as the Museum’s Jacquie Dorrance Curator of Fashion Design from 2000 to August 2019, when the idea for the Museum’s first-ever ladies’ luncheon arose. At the first-annual Independent Woman Luncheon, the Museum presented Pamela Fiori, then-editor of Town and Country magazine who had also been a friend of Bonfoey Taylor, and Cummings Great Hall was decorated with red velvet tablecloths and chairs as if it were Bonfoey Taylor’s dining room. Thanks to Katz’s vision and leadership, the inaugural event was a resounding success.

T H E 10 T H A N N U A L IN DE P E N DE N T W O M A N L U N CH E O N

Since then, IWL has evolved into one of the Valley’s most beautiful and highly anticipated events, made possible each year through the creativity and dedication of a committee of volunteers who are passionate about the arts and arts education. In its nearly 10-year history, IWL has welcomed more than 3,500 guests, featured renowned designers such as Charlotte Moss, Sarah Richardson, and Amy Lau, and raised nearly $2.5 million given in support of the Museum’s exhibitions, education programs, and vital operations.

F E AT U RI N G M A R T Y N L AW RE N CE BU L L A RD M A RCH 2, 20 20 P H O E N I X A R T M U S EU M

For the 10th annual Independent Woman Luncheon, the Museum will present Martyn Lawrence Bullard as the event’s keynote speaker. Based in Los Angeles, Bullard is known for his broad range of styles and eclectic, yet sophisticated and inviting, interiors. His designs have appeared in more than 4,000 publications worldwide, including Architectural Digest, ELLE Decor, Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar, among many others, and his celebrity clientele include Kylie Jenner, Khloé and Kourtney Kardashian, Tommy Hilfiger, Cher, Ellen Pompeo, and Eva Mendes. This year’s luncheon and tablescapes will be inspired by Bullard’s dynamic work.

Libby Cohen, Co-chair Lisa Portigal, Co-chair George Abrams Molly Dalton Katie Drost Matthew Boland, Committee Advisor

2 0 2 0 IN D E P E N D E N T W O M A N L U N CH E O N CO M MI T T E E

Additionally, the milestone luncheon will honor past IWL chairs, including Katz, who also served as chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees from 2007–10 and created The pARTy, the Museum’s annual fall gala, in 2007. Phoenix Art Museum extends its deepest gratitude to the 2020 Independent Woman Luncheon co-chairs and committee, as well as former IWL co-chairs and committees, for their tireless commitment to increasing access to the visual arts for our community.

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WHY WE GIVE

Phoenix Art Museum provides education and inspiration for our entire community.” JEREMY MEEK

PRINCIPA L, DESERT STA R CONST RUCTION Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2016

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hoenix Art Museum helps us to value the great artworks of the past and embrace and promote the work of current talent. That is why Desert Star Construction is happy to support Phoenix Art Museum through the Independent Woman Luncheon (IWL). IWL is a great source of creativity and joy for our clients and design partners, and as a company that builds homes that are life-sized custom commissions of art, we believe it is worthwhile to continue investing in an event and an institution that provides inspiration to the clients we serve, the designers with whom we are privileged to work, and our community at large. One of my favorite quotes is: ‘I am only one, but still I am one. I cannot do everything, but I still can do something. And because I cannot do everything, I will not refuse to do the something that I can do.’ Whether big or small, an investment in Phoenix Art Museum is an investment in arts education, the honoring of our past, a vision for our present, and inspiration for our future.

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EDUCAT IO N

OUR T OW N, OUR TIME

PROVIDING COMMUNITY ART AND EDUCATION PROGRAMS FOR DIVERSE AUDIENCES

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hen Kaela Sáenz Oriti joined Phoenix Art Museum in 2015 as the Gerry Grout Education Director, her goal for the education division was to create public programs that better reflected and served the transforming Phoenix community. “When I arrived at the Museum, the division already had a strong foundation, but my mission going forward was to fulfill a vision of an art museum that welcomed the diverse audiences in our city and state,” she said. “To do that, we knew we had to expand our programs to help draw a wider range of people into the Museum, many for the first time.” Today, as it celebrates its 60th anniversary, the Museum has made great strides to achieve this endeavor. From hands-on artmaking workshops and pop-up libraries, to educator programs and in-gallery artist lectures, the Museum’s education division has spearheaded a wide variety of programs and experiential learning opportunities that

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enable visitors, community members, and long-time Museum Members alike to enjoy inspiring encounters with art from around the world. None of this important work, however, would be possible without the dedicated staff in the Museum’s education division, including the Museum’s Docents, Sáenz Oriti said. “The Docents are the face of the Museum’s education programs,” she said. “They interact with visitors and community members every day, so they understand the needs of the community and how to fulfill those needs in the best way possible.” As volunteer educators with a diverse range of personal, educational, and professional backgrounds, Docents interact with visitors of all ages through workshops, tours, offsite presentations, and more, empowering them to connect with artworks on view in meaningful ways. Lisa Roger, current Docent board president, loves to lead

children’s tours to help make the Museum an accessible and welcoming environment for the community’s youngest members, encouraging them to engage with the contemporary art collection in particular. “Contemporary art is a wonderful fit for children because they don’t have any preconceived notions about what art is or should be,” said Roger, who has served as a Docent since 2007 and has a degree in studio art. “When children walk into a contemporary art gallery in the Museum, they are awed by the various materials and the sense of possibility.” Former Docent-board president Rebecca Albrecht, on the other hand, focuses her volunteer hours on the Arts Engagement Program (AEP), the Museum’s nationally renowned program that enables adults with mild to moderate forms of dementia (including Alzheimer’s disease) and their care partners to interact with the Museum’s collections and exhibitions. AEP uses art to facilitate companionship, social

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engagement, and community participation, empowering participants to tap into emotional memory as their short-term memory deteriorates. “I love working with AEP participants and their caregivers because I believe it is an important opportunity to give more of yourself than just your knowledge of art,” said Albrecht, who became a Museum Docent in 2011. “It’s about creating a moment with another person and offering respite from everyday life.” Docents, however, help with more than just on-site programming and in the Gene and Cathie Lemon Art Research Library. They also bring art to those community members who are unable to visit the Museum and experience art in the galleries. Docentboard president-elect Cathie Rubins, who completed her Docent training in 2009, gives art presentations at schools, senior centers and nursing facilities, and other community spaces across the Valley. Her hope is to always use her presentations to help participants connect with each other and the world around them. “Through my years as a Docent, I have found that no matter how unrelated to everyday life these topics may seem, there is always some connection,” said Rubins, who has a background in art history. “Every time I research, I am always struck by how much we all have in common despite our different backgrounds, and that’s the type of awareness I want to inspire in others as well.” With the support of Docents like Roger, Albrecht, and Rubins and the efforts of education staff, the Museum has greatly increased its engagement with the community through the decades. Over the past four years alone, the Museum has been able to accommodate a 75% increase in student tours, due in large part to strategic partnerships with local organizations such as Act One and the generosity of Cox Charities, J.W. Kieckhefer Foundation, Maricopa Community Colleges, PetSmart, SRP, The Steele Foundation, Wells Fargo, and other donors who have helped reduce economic barriers. Additionally, this significant increase would not have been CONTINUED ON PAGE 68

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possible without the support of Museum Docents, who increased touring availability by adjusting their training days from Fridays to Mondays so the Museum can provide an additional day for school and public tours for the community. Sáenz Oriti is certain the education division will continue to bring unique visual art experiences to the Valley of the Sun in the coming year and beyond. “As we look to the future of Phoenix Art Museum, we are committed to honing our ideas so our programs can continue making a significant impact on our community and as many people as possible can connect with the art on view,” she said. That means the education division will continue to prioritize diversity, equity, accessibility, and inclusion as it creates new arts education opportunities and builds upon established ones. After all, artworks on display in the Museum’s galleries are so much more than simply precious objects. They are gateways to learning, understanding, and critical thinking—and a powerful way to connect with ourselves, each other, and the world around us.

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FROM YOUR PERSPECTIV E, WHAT IS THE MOS T IMPORTANT WORK OF THE MUSEUM’S EDUCATION DIVISION? A: I think the education division offers a range of programs and opportunities for the Museum to engage with the community, from school tours to family days. My daughter loves coming on family days—she never wants to leave.

WHY I VOLUN T EER Q & A with PhxArt Docent Gwen Gorlin

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wen Gorlin joined Phoenix Art Museum as a Docent in 2014 after relocating from Boston to Phoenix. Formerly a pediatric speech pathologist, she has always loved visiting art museums and hoped to find an outlet for her passion that would allow her to become involved in her new community. We spoke with Gorlin to learn more about her time as a Docent and why she feels her work is so meaningful. WHAT DO YOU FOCUS YOUR DOCENT TIME ON, AND WHY? A: I lead children’s tours—that’s my background coming into play. Since my time as a speech pathologist at a children’s hospital, I have always found so much meaning in working with kids, and when I’m guiding children through the Museum, I like to look for that spark in their eyes. I remember when I was in Docent training, I saw that same spark when I brought my son to the Museum. He was two years old at the time, and I had parked his stroller in

front of Upside Down, Inside Out (2003) by Anish Kapoor. The next thing I knew, he said, “Mommy! Look! I’m upside down!” That’s one of my favorite memories—seeing his excitement when he interacted with the piece even though he was so young. Recently, I toured high school students, and we had a long discussion about that same work, about color and what the piece makes them feel. They also had one of those moments, just loving the art because they could access that higher level of meaning and symbolism.

I never went to a museum as a kid, so I always wonder how my life would be different if I had been able to engage with art in that way, because there is so much joy that comes from contemplating art. You can learn so much. The whole world is encapsulated within the Museum, and we’re really inviting the community to experience that.

W H A T VA L U E D O E S T H E M U S E U M B R I N G T O OUR COMMUNIT Y? A: I remember when Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals / Zodiac Heads was at the Museum in 2015, and I brought my parents, who are immigrants from Taiwan, to visit. They didn’t really feel comfortable inside an art museum, but when we explored the Art of Asia galleries, they helped me read the calligraphy on the scrolls, and we were able to talk about the artistic and Chinese philosophy. We all took pictures in front of the zodiac heads at the exhibition. It was such a fun experience for all of us. I think my parents felt good seeing themselves here, even if they’re not necessarily passionate about art. That’s why I think the Museum is important: it allows people in our community to see themselves reflected in a significant way.

That’s why I think the Museum is important: it allows people in our community to see themselves reflected in a significant way.”

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EDUCAT IO N W H A T L E D Y O U T O B E C O M E I N V O LV E D W I T H A R I Z O N A C O S T U M E I N S T I T U T E ( A CI ) ? A: I learned to sew on my grandmother’s sewing machine when I was five years old, so I’ve always been interested in fashion and I wanted an outlet for that passion. Phoenix Art Museum has an amazing fashion collection, and with my work as a Docent and in ACI, I was able to study the cultural heritage of many of the garments in the collection. When I gave off-site art presentations, I always found a way to engage my audiences with a work of fashion from the Museum.

O V E R Y O U R P A S T 17 Y E A R S A S A D O C E N T, Y O U H AV E WA T C H E D T H E M U S E U M ’ S P U B L I C PROGR AMS GROW AND TR ANSFORM. DO YOU H AV E A FAV O R I T E P R O G R A M ?

WHY I VOLUN T EER Q & A with PhxArt Master Docent Judy Steers

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udy Steers has always had a passion for volunteer work, so when she moved to Phoenix in 2002, the Docent program at Phoenix Art Museum provided her with the perfect opportunity to continue doing what she loves. Since then, she has taken every opportunity to further her involvement with the Museum and the arts community, serving as president of both the Docent board from 2017–18 and Arizona Costume Institute, a Museum support group dedicated to fashion education and the acquisition and preservation of historically significant garments and accessories, from 2014–16. We sat down with Steers to learn more about her areas of interest and the role of Docents at Phoenix Art Museum.

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A: The Arts Engagement Program (AEP) is very important. It was one of my focuses when I was Docent-board president, and I’ve seen it develop into a wonderful community service. AEP allows individuals with dementia and their caregivers to interact with art in meaningful ways to help them enjoy positive social experiences in a safe and welcoming environment. I remember one time after I had observed an AEP session, a man, who was his wife’s caregiver, came up to me and said, “I just want to tell you what an amazing service this is for me and others in my position. When my wife comes to these sessions, I find her again. I know her again.”

IN YOUR OPINION, WHAT ROLE DO THE DOCENT S P L AY W I T H I N T H E E D U C A T I O N D I V I S I O N , A N D WHAT IS THE ROLE OF THE MUSEUM WITHIN OUR COMMUNIT Y? A: The education division fulfills the various needs of the public, and the Docents are the ambassadors of that mission. It is our job to reach out and engage the community to learn about their concerns and what they expect from their tours at the Museum. We have to continue shifting our methods as the needs of the public shift. Recently, we have been hugely dedicated to increasing student tours. Our goal was to reach 20,000 students from July 1, 2018 through June 30, 2019, but we exceeded that goal and served more than 22,000 students for the year. This type of initiative is so important because the Museum and its programs offer many opportunities for critical thinking and the examination of the lives of others through art. The Museum must remain a safe space to have those conversations and a place where visitors can forget their everyday lives and come to a haven of elevated thinking.

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WHY WE GIVE

We can’t imagine living life as spectators.” EL LEN K ATZ

CH AIR OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES, 2007–10; FOUNDING CH AIR OF T HE PA RT Y A ND T HE INDEPENDEN T WOM A N LUNCHEON

H O WA R D K A T Z

RE TIRED PA RT NER OF GOLDM A N SACHS; FORMER BOA RD CH AIR OF A RIZON A SCIENCE CEN T ER A ND HONOR HE A LT H FOUNDATION Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2001

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hether in New York or Arizona, we need to be involved. We do this by giving—giving our time, giving our commitment, and supporting worthy causes by making donations and also getting our friends involved. By digging in, we derive a great deal of pleasure and satisfaction knowing we have helped to strengthen the institutions around us. If we can leave those organizations just a little bit better, then we’ve done our job. image credit: Tanya Arianne Malott

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Lordprice Collection / Alamy Stock Photo.

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FALL GALA HONORS ELLEN AND HOWARD KATZ AND CELEBRATES MAJOR MILESTONES Each fall, The pARTy in the Garden gala at Phoenix Art Museum amazes guests with its creative décor, contemporary cuisine and cocktails, and, of course, the extraordinary art. The culmination of meticulous, year-long planning by a committee of dedicated community leaders, the elegant event, originally known simply as The pARTy, raises vital funds given in support of the Museum’s exhibitions and education programs.

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he 2019 pARTy in the Garden commemorated the Museum’s 60th anniversary and its continued role in the community with added fanfare. Along with fine dining, custom cocktails, and dessert and dancing under the stars in the Museum’s Dorrance Sculpture Garden, this year’s gala honored long-time Museum supporters Ellen and Howard Katz and presented the premiere of Legends of Speed, the Museum’s first exhibition exploring the artistry and design of racing cars. Ellen and Howard Katz began their support of Phoenix Art Museum in 2001 through the Museum’s Circles of Support program, and in 2006, they endowed the funds to support the construction of the Museum’s 25,000-square-foot Ellen and Howard C. Katz Wing for Modern Art. From 2007–10, Ellen Katz served as chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees, and in 2007 and 2011, respectively, she created The pARTy and the Independent Woman Luncheon, serving as inaugural committee chair for both events. Most recently, she served in 2018 on the steering committee for The pARTy in the Garden, which revived the signature pARTy theme. Last year’s gala raised more than $1 million given in support of Phoenix Art Museum. Since its inception in 2007, The pARTy has raised more than $10 million given in support of the Museum’s exhibitions, education programs, and vital operations. In addition to celebrating the generosity and dedication of the Katz family, the evening featured an exclusive preview of Legends of Speed. The landmark exhibition showcased more than 20 cars by Maserati, Ferrari, Bugatti, Ford, Mercedes-Benz, and more, all driven by some of history’s greatest drivers. Gala guests enjoyed a private viewing of Legends of Speed before it opened to the public on November 3, 2019, along with access to a special exhibition celebrating the Museum’s 60th anniversary. Phoenix Art Museum extends its deepest gratitude to the 2019 pARTy in the Garden co-chairs and committee for their creative vision and dedication to the visual arts in our city. The Museum also offers a special thanks to The pARTy in the Garden table hosts and sponsors for their vital support.

T H E PA R T Y IN T H E G A R D E N CO - CH A IR S Susan Emerson | Laurie Florkiewicz

T H E PA R T Y IN T H E G A R D E N 2 019 TA B L E S H O S T S L E M A N S U N D E R W RI T E R S *Donald and +Judith Opatrny *+Sue and Bud Selig

I N DY 5 0 0 BE N E FA C TO R S *Mr. and +Mrs. Drew M. Brown *Jacquie and Bennett Dorrance +Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz *+Ellen and Howard C. Katz *+Margot and Dennis Knight +Vicki and Kent Logan *+Kimberly and Steven S. Robson, and +Pam and *Ray Slomski Charles and *+Meredith von Arentschildt

TA RG A F LO RI O BE N E FA C TO R S Arizona Community Foundation +Ginger and *Don Brandt The *Clemmensen Foundation +Lee and *Mike Cohn Shelley Cohn and Mollie C. Trivers +Gloria and Philip Cowen Mr. and +Mrs. Michael DeBell, and Dr. and +Mrs. Jack A. Friedland +Cathy Dickey Ellman Foundation *Carter and +Susan Emerson *Mrs. Nancy Hanley Eriksson & Mr. Ronald J. Eriksson +Joanie and Rick Fox +Kathleen and *John Graham +Billie Jo and Judd Herberger HonorHealth *Jon and Carrie Hulburd J.P.Morgan +Judy and *Alan Kosloff *Richard and *+Sally Lehmann + Cathie Lemon *David and +Dawn Lenhardt *Polly and Jonathan Levine Robert and +Marina Moric MRA Associates Northern Trust Company Dr. and *+Mrs. Hong-Kee Ong *+Rose and Harry Papp *+Ms. Ann Siner Mr. and +Mrs. Robert Smalley Jr. UMB Bank

S P ECI A L T H A N K S T O Arizona Distilling Co. | Código 1530 Tequila PHX BEER Co | Saks Fifth Avenue Wines underwritten by Denise and Bob Delgado *Current and Former Trustees +Steering Committee Listing as of 9/30/2019

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WHY WE GIVE

Art is often a window to the past, present, and future, and we are intrigued by all three.” SUSAN EMERSON

CO - CH AIR OF T HE PA RT Y IN T HE G A RDEN, 2019

CARTER EMERSON

CO - CH AIR OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2014

Why do we give? Because art inspires us. It educates and entertains us. When we travel, we always make it a point to visit the great art museums wherever we are. Giving to Phoenix Art Museum ensures that current and future generations in Phoenix will also be able to experience extraordinary art from around the world.

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FA S T CA R SPEED DEMONS Q&A PG. 80 / GALLERY GUIDE PG. 82 / A QUICK LAP PG. 92 / SHOP SPEED PG. 96

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The 1973 Porsche 917/30 was, in every sense of the phrase, turbo charged. With an astounding 1,580 horsepower, the Can-Am recorded zero-to-60 speeds between 1.9 and 2.1 seconds, with the ability to go from zero to 100 mph in 3.9 seconds, and zero to 200 mph in 13.4. It also clocked a world-record, closed-circuit speed of a whopping 241 mph. Without a doubt, the 917/30 was a very fast car, a true prodigy of speed. CONTINUED ON PAGE 78

LEGENDS OF SPEED

November 3, 2019 – March 15, 2020 Steele Gallery PRESENTING SPONSOR

CONTRIBUTING SPONSORS

SUPPORTING SPONSORS

Susan and Carter Emerson

Joan Cremin Exhibition Endowment Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT

Sonia and John Breslow | Nancy and Najeeb Kahn Del and Sharron Lewis | narrative TM

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hrough March 15, 2020, visitors to Phoenix Art Museum can experience this 1973 Porsche 917/30 alongside 21 others of the world’s most exquisitely designed and successful race cars in Legends of Speed. The first in the Museum’s 60-year history to explore the artistry and design of racing automobiles, the exhibition showcases an unparalleled selection of rare and historically significant cars loaned to the Museum by collectors and automotive museums from across the United States and Arizona, including Melani and Rob Walton and the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum. “This exhibition tells a fascinating story of humankind’s dedication to the pursuit of technology and innovation as a defining feature of the 20th century,” said Gilbert Vicario, the Museum’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator. “Art and technology, the machine age, and the fundamental human impulse for competition and gamesmanship merge seamlessly in the narrative of Legends of Speed.”

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Spanning six decades, the landmark exhibition traces the evolution of race-car design, innovation, and excellence, beginning with the boxy Franklin that took second place in the 1910 Cactus Derby, and ending with the sleek, curvilinear 1978 Lotus 79 raced by Mario Andretti to a Formula-One World Championship. It is the latest in the growing list of museum exhibitions to showcase the automobile within the context of modern art. In 1951, the Museum of Modern Art in New York (MoMA) presented 8 automobiles: an exhibition concerned with the esthetics of motorcar design, featuring everyday cars as artifacts of 20th-century design and technology. It wasn’t until 1966, however, that MoMA featured race cars in its galleries. The Racing Car: Toward a Rational Automobile showcased 29 automobiles, and co-curated by Arthur Drexler, director of MoMA’s Department of Architecture and Design, and David Ash, a former race car driver and expert, it considered the relationship between the race car’s function and form.

In 2007, Phoenix Art Museum presented its first exhibition of cars, though without any racing vehicles included. Curves of Steel focused on the design of streamlined automobiles primarily from the 1920s and 1930s, drawing comparisons between the industrial design and engineering of cars, airplanes, and trains. Legends of Speed now asserts a different focus, offering viewers the opportunity to consider race cars as both aesthetic and historical objects. Showcasing cars driven by some of racing’s greatest drivers, including Hellé Nice, A.J. Foyt, Dan Gurney, Mario Andretti, and Stirling Moss, Legends of Speed contextualizes each featured automobile within its unique history of creation, competition, and triumph. Visitors learn about the specs, mechanics, and design elements of the cars on view, in addition to significant details about the races they’ve won and the men and women who drove them to victory. The content that follows recounts several anecdotes about the odds and obstacles,

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C A N ’ T GE T E N OUGH O F LEG EN DS O F S PEED ? JOIN U S F O R T H E S E E X CI T IN G E V E N T S IN S P IR E D B Y T H E E X HIBI T IO N . N O V E M B E R 3 / CIR C L E S O F S U P P O R T E X CL U S I V E E X HIBI T IO N P R E V IE W

Join us for a Circles-only viewing of Legends of Speed, featuring a champagne breakfast reception and a tour with Carter Emerson, avid car collector and co-chair of the Museum’s Board of Trustees.

N O V E M B E R 5 / M E M B E R S ’ NIGH T Join us for a Members-only viewing of Legends of Speed, featuring light refreshments and special programming.

N O V E M B E R 9 / IN S ID E T H E C A C T U S D E R B Y W I T H C A R CO L L E C T O R T E D D AV I S * Learn about the 1911 Franklin that came in second place in the 1910 Cactus Derby, an open-road race from Los Angeles to Phoenix across treacherous desert terrain.

DE CE M B E R 6 / F IR S T F R ID AY * During First Fridays, general admission is reduced to a voluntary donation. Admission to Legends of Speed is free for Museum Members, $8 for adults, and $5 for youth (ages 6–17).

DE CE M B E R 7 A N D 15 / S PEED SISTERS* the winding roads and the measured politics each featured car and its driver faced as they sought to reach new levels of speed and achieve legendary status. Yet beyond these pages is an exhibition with so many more stories to tell, an exhibition that is, in its own right, groundbreaking. Legends of Speed is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Melani and Rob Walton, through The Rob and Melani Walton Foundation, Susan and Carter Emerson, Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation, Joan Cremin Exhibition Endowment, Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz, Jackson Family Foundation, APS, and OUTFRONT Media. Additional support is provided by Sonia and John Breslow, Nancy and Najeeb Kahn, Del and Sharron Lewis, and narrativeTM. It is also made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

Join us for Speed Sisters, a film by Amber Fares about the first all-women race car driving team in the Middle East.

DE CE M B E R 12 / A F T E R H O U R S Enjoy exclusive, late-night access to Legends of Speed, along with a no-host bar, music, and more.

F E B R U A R Y 1 / L E C T U R E W I T H LY N S T. J A M E S W I T H E X CL U S I V E R E CE P T IO N F O R CIR C L E S O F S U P P O R T * Join us to hear from American racer Lyn St. James. A seven time Indy 500 racer and the 1992 Indy 500 Rookie of the year, St. James was a two-time class winner at Daytona, a class winner at Sebring, and a class winner at the 24 Hours of Nürburgring. She also competed at the 24 Hours of Le Mans, among many other achievements.

M A R CH 6 / F IR S T F R ID AY * Experience First Friday like never before with programs inspired by Legends of Speed. During First Fridays, general admission is reduced to a voluntary donation. Admission to Legends of Speed is free for Museum Members, $8 for adults, and $5 for youth (ages 6–17).

FO R D E TA I L S A N D T I C K E T S , O R TO BEC O M E A P H X A R T M U S EU M M E M BE R, V I S I T P H X A R T.O RG . *Sponsored by Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation

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Q & A

SPEED DEMONS

Meet the men behind Legends of Speed, the groundbreaking exhibition at Phoenix Art Museum that spotlights the drivers behind history’s greatest race cars. BY DAWSON FE ARNOW OF PHOENIX M AGA ZINE

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on’t be fooled by saucy spoilers, radical rally stripes, and sleek air-intake manifolds—the Legends of Speed exhibition is more than just a bunch of beautiful race cars,” says Carter Emerson, an avid car collector who serves as the co-chair of the Board of Trustees of Phoenix Art Museum. “What’s different about race cars—it’s the people, the drivers, that truly make a car a legend.” To realize this vision, the Legends of Speed team spent the past year crisscrossing the globe, hunting down not just the world’s rarest, most groundbreaking race cars, but also tracking down the backstories of the men—and women—who risked life and limb to drive them into the record books. So how did they pull off this modern marvel of an exhibition? Emerson and Gilbert Vicario, the Museum’s Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator, recently sat down for a revealing look in the rearview mirror.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO PUT TOGE THER A SHOW DEDICATED TO CL A S SIC R ACE CARS? Gilbert Vicario: Aside from just being a pretty thing, a sculpture, it’s this industrially manufactured object that everybody can relate to. In a lot of ways, cars are such a part of our daily lives, [they’ve] become an extension of our bodies. Carter Emerson: There’s another thing that racing does even aside from creating a beautiful car. It creates legends like the famous Frenchwoman, Hellé Nice, who drove so fast she got a job with Bugatti and then barnstormed around the United States in the 1930s as The Bugatti Queen. We have her car. GV: So aside from the technical specs, the human side is amazing. Not only are they aesthetic objects, they’re historic artifacts. WHAT ’S ANOTHER E X A MPLE OF THE UNIQUE HIS TORY OF THESE R ACERS? CE: Try this on for size: Hitler said we’re going to use racing as a propaganda tool to show the superiority of the ‘master race.’ Only one driver in five years beat the much-better-funded German machine. A

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[diminutive] chain-smoking Italian [man] by the name of Tazio Nuvolari went out and beat the Germans on their own turf in a car with 200 less horsepower. And we don’t have a car like that—[that’s the] car we have. H O W E X A C T LY D I D Y O U G O A B O U T BORROWING A LL THESE HIS TORIC R ACE CARS? CE: It was a lot of arm-twisting, but also with the help of some friends. For example, the Revs Institute museum in Naples, Florida, is lending us its star car, driven by one of the most famous American drivers of all time, Dan Gurney. So you know how we solved that? We found something else to fill the hole in their floor. I said, “I think I know another collector with something pretty neat that you can borrow.” WHAT ’S SOME THING UNE XPECTED THAT YOU HOPE PEOPLE WILL TA K E FROM THIS E XHIBITION? CE: It’s just shocking how transitory things are. The world champion Maserati Birdcage could probably do 140 miles per hour. Within

nine years, cars were doing 220 miles per hour. It was an arms race similar to the Space Race. But the people being bolted into them were not just along for the ride—[they] had to beat the other guy, or other woman. GV: By spotlighting people such as Hellé Nice, and by inviting people such as Lyn St. James, a Phoenix resident and a very well-respected former race car driver, to contribute to the Legends of Speed book, it’s my hope that we can demonstrate that racing is not just a male-dominated pastime, for people to get a different perspective through that.

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image credit: Gilbert Vicario (left); Carter Emerson (right) of Phoenix Art Museum in the 1960 Maserati Tipo 61 “Birdcage”. Photograred at Bill Pope’s

TELL ME ABOUT THE OLDES T CAR IN THE E XHIBITION THAT R ACED ACROS S THE D E S E R T I N T H E C A C T U S D E R B Y. CE: Imagine trying to drive from L.A. to Phoenix without using a road. That’s insane, but that’s what this race was like back in the 1910s. The first time they tried it, they got lost out in the desert and had to be rescued. But the second year, one driver makes it, which is an unbelievable feat. And the neat thing is, some of the cars in Legends of Speed are all shiny and restored, but this one is completely original.

car museum with assistance by Jeff Pope. Photo by Michael Woodall.

F I N A L LY, W H A T D O E S I T, L O G I S T I C A L LY, TA K E TO BRING R ACE CARS RIGHT INTO A MUSEUM? THE Y ’RE ALRE ADY INSURED, SO T H AT ’S ONE HE A DACHE YOU DON’ T H AV E TO DE A L WITH, RIGHT ? GV: Last year we did a Pre-Columbian show, and we had to figure out how to move and install a 2,000-year-old stele, which weighed four tons. So this is going to be relatively easy for our registrar [since cars are designed to travel]. But, these are very valuable objects and take the utmost care.

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GALLERY GUIDE

BRE A K ING DOW N T HE PA R T S

Legends of Speed showcases the innovative designs of some of the 20th century’s most successful race cars, from A.J. Foyt’s Indy-500 winning Trevis Offy, to Ford’s two-time 24-Hours-of-Le-Mans winner, to the Bugatti driven by the world’s fastest woman racing professional prior to World War II. Take a closer look at the masterpieces featured in the first exhibition of racing cars ever presented at Phoenix Art Museum, and discover the remarkable histories of 22 legendary cars and the men and women who drove them.

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1911 F R A N K L IN Still in its original state, the 1911 Franklin survived the Desert Race, or “Cactus Derby,” a 500-mile road race from Los Angeles to Phoenix over treacherous roads. It was driven by Ralph Hamlin.

1913 DU E S E N B E R G The first Duesenberg ever, the race car was designed by brothers Fred and Augie Duesenberg and driven to victory at the Sioux City, Iowa, track in 1914 by Eddie Rickenbacker.

19 2 7 MIL L E R 91

19 2 7 B U G AT T I T Y P E 3 5 B

19 2 9 B E N T L E Y

The 1927 Miller 91 is a superb example of American innovation in racing from the early 20th century, setting international records driven by Leon Duray at Montlhery and the Italian Grand Prix at Monza. Impressed with the Miller’s speed, Ettore Bugatti traded three new Bugattis for two Millers and essentially copied the engineering.

The most successful of the Bugatti racing models, the 1927 Bugatti Type 35 secured victories at the Grand Prix World Championship, Monaco Grand Prix, and Targa Florio. Type 35B, chassis 4863, was raced by French racing legend Hellé Nice, also known as “The Bugatti Queen.”

The exhibition’s 1929 Bentley, known as “Old Number One,” is a two-time 24-Hoursof-Le-Mans winner, driven by Woolf “Babe” Barnato and Tim Birkin in 1929, and Barnato and Glen Kidston, one of the “Bentley Boys,” in 1930. It is arguably the most famous vintage Bentley racing car. CONTINUED ON PAGE 84

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19 3 4 A L FA R O M E O T IP O B P 3 Driven by Italy’s Tazio Nuvolari, the agile Alfa won the 1935 German Grand Prix on the last lap, leaving 300,000 spectators, including Nazi party officials, stunned. CONTINUED ON PAGE 86

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START YOUR ENGINES

19 5 2 M E R CE DE S 3 0 0 S L This Mercedes won the 1952 24 Hours of Le Mans driven by Hermann Lang and Fritz Riess. With trademarked “gullwing” doors that open upward, the 300 SL model has an impressive top speed of 180 mph.

SOME THINGS TO CONSIDER AS YOU EXPLORE LEGENDS OF SPEED

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hether you’re a racing aficionado or a student driver, take a moment to slow down and examine the subtle design details of the extraordinary cars featured in Legends of Speed. How did their creators balance aerodynamics with aesthetic form? What are the differences between these iconic automobiles and the cars you see each day on streets and byways of our city? What makes them works of art? Look for dynamic groupings and head-to-head match ups as you wander through the exhibition, and consider the technological innovations and thrilling histories of each car on view. Compare and contrast the Maserati 450S with the Ferrari 315 S. Both Italian-made, both built in 1957. But what sets these two rivals apart? How would you describe their differing shades of red? Which car would you rather drive?

19 5 3 J A GU A R C -T Y P E Driven to second place at the 1953 24 Hours of Le Mans by Stirling Moss and Peter Walker, this Jaguar is the last 53 C-Type and one of only three “lightweights” with Dunlop disc brakes. The 053 is the only “lightweight” C-Type that retains its original bodywork.

Legends of Speed also features two cars that have won the prestigious 24 Hours of Le Mans more than once: the 1929 Bentley and the 1968 Ford GT40. What enabled them to reign triumphant over the competition in this grueling race? And at top speeds of 95 mph and 211 mph, respectively, could either win the race today? Finally, don’t be afraid to imagine yourself in the driver’s seat. What must it have been like for the men and women who raced these cars to victory around daring circuits and oval tracks across Europe and the United States? Can you feel their anticipation? Can you taste the rush of adrenaline? What does it sound like when the world rushes past you at 200 mph? How does the experience of high-speed change the form of an object in motion? Is a car streaking by just a blur of color and light? Can you feel the vibration of the steering wheel as you round the final turn? What is it like living onequarter mile at a time? Few of us may ever experience the sensation of accelerating from zero to 60 to 200 mph in mere seconds. But we can all marvel at the combination of ingenuity, innovation, courage, and perseverance it requires to become a true legend of speed.

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19 5 3 L A N CI A D 24 S P Y D E R Winner of the 1954 Targa Florio, a grueling road race in Sicily where a single lap was 45 miles long, the exhibition’s 1953 Lancia D24 Spyder was driven to victory by Piero Taruffi, nicknamed the “Silver Fox.”

19 5 6 M A S E R AT I 2 5 0 F One of two GP cars known as “offsets,” No. 2525 won its first and only race at the Italian Grand Prix at Monza, driven by Stirling Moss. Moss in this Maserati beat Formula-One champion Juan Manuel Fangio in a Lancia-Ferrari by 5.7 seconds.

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GALLERY GUIDE 19 57 F E R R A R I 315 S S C A G L IE T T I S P Y DE R

19 6 0 M A S E R AT I T IP O 61 “BIR DC A GE”

Piero Taruffi won his first—and only—Mille Miglia victory in 1957 in this 1957 Ferrari 315 S Scaglietti Spyder.

Chassis 2470 is the third to last Birdcage ever made. Out of 16 races, it finished in the top three 13 times and won six times. The car’s moniker came from an American journalist who compared the space frame— made of approximately 200 small steel tubes—to a birdcage.

19 57 M A S E R AT I 4 5 0 S The 1957 Maserati 450S was created to compete specifically with Ferrari. During development, the engine’s power output was measured at 412 hp at 7,000 rpm.

19 5 8 M K1 S C A R A B Driven by Chuck Daigh to victory at the 1958 Riverside Grand Prix, the 1958 Mk1 Scarab dominated U.S. road racing well into the 1960s.

19 61 T R E V I S O F F E N H A U S E R “O F F Y ” The exhibition’s 1961 Trevis Offy is A.J. Foyt’s first Indianapolis 500 winner. During the 1961 race, Foyt took the lead with only three laps to go when Eddie Sachs pitted to replace a badly worn tire. Foyt would go on to win three more Indy 500 races (1964, 1967, and 1977).

19 6 2 F E R R A R I 2 5 0 G T O Considered by many to be the greatest Ferrari of all time, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO was built to compete with the all-new E-type Jaguar, which debuted in 1961. This particular 250 GTO finished 13th overall at the 1964 Tour de France driven by Marquis Philippe de Montaigu.

19 6 4 S H E L B Y CO B R A D AY T O N A CO U P E During the 1964 racing season, the Daytona Coupe won 12 Hours of Sebring and set lap records at Daytona, Le Mans and Reims in France, Spa in Belgium, and the Tourist Trophy in England. This particular model, the CSX 2299, won the GT class at the 1964 24 Hours of Le Mans, driven by Dan Gurney and Bob Bondurant. CONTINUED ON PAGE 88

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GALLERY GUIDE 19 6 8 F O R D G T4 0

19 6 5 L O T U S - F O R D T Y P E 3 8

Ford’s GT40 was refined by Carroll Shelby at the request of Henry Ford II, who was on a quest to win the 24 Hours of Le Mans. As one of the most celebrated cars ever, chassis 1075 went on to win at Le Mans twice, driven by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi in 1968, and Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver in 1969.

In the early 1960s, American racer Dan Gurney and Colin Chapman, the owner of Formula-One Team Lotus, envisioned the first rear-engine car to win the Indianapolis 500, and at the 1965 Indy race, Jim Clark drove it to victory. After their victory, no front-engine vehicle ever won the Indianapolis 500 again.

19 67 GU R N E Y E A G L E F 1 Driven to victory at the Belgian Grand Prix at Spa by Dan Gurney, chassis 104 set the fastest lap of the race and scored the team’s only Formula-One Championship victory. It is the first and only American-built race car to win a Formula-One race in the modern era.

19 73 P O R S CH E 917/ 3 0 This Porsche can spin its tires at an impressive 200 mph and went from zero to 100 mph in 3.9 seconds—and zero to 200 mph in 13.4. Its world-record, closedcircuit speed was 241 mph. It was driven by Mark Donohue.

19 78 L O T U S 79 The 1978 Lotus 79 was driven by Mario Andretti at the 1978 Italian Grand Prix at Monza, where Andretti secured his Formula-One World Champion title.

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GALLERY GUIDE

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RL

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Curious about which races the cars featured in Legends of Speed have competed in and won? Here are just a few of the world’s most prestigious Grand-Prix, Formula-One, road, and sports-car races mentioned throughout the exhibition.

THE WO

R AC

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O U R N A

RACING TRACKS Road trips have been an American tradition since the days of Route 66, the classic highway spanning the United States often referred to as The Main Street of America. Whether your road trip dreams include desert drives dotted with cacti, adventures along the Autobahn, pit stops at greasy spoons for slices of homemade apple pie, or simply imagining the places you could go while strolling through Legends of Speed, we have the ultimate playlist for you. 90

“NO M AT T E R W H E R E W E GO” — WHITNEY Although released in 2016, the Chicagobased band’s cut from their album Light Upon the Lake evokes mid-’70s vibes of vintage vans and summers at the shore.

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TA R G A F L O R IO

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) F RO M 19 0 6 –77 location: Sicily, Italy

point of interest: An open-road endurance race, the Targa Florio was

considered one of the most difficult races due to narrow, unpaved roads; hairpin turns; and free-roaming dogs and farm animals.

T H E C A C T U S DE R B Y ( A L S O K N O W N A S T H E D E S E R T R A CE ) RU N A N N U A L LY F RO M 19 0 8 –14

location: Los Angeles, California, to Phoenix, Arizona

24 H O U R S O F L E M A N S

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) S I N CE 1923 location: Circuit de la Sarthe

near Le Mans, France

point of interest: The 24-hour

endurance race, considered the world’s most prestigious sports-car race, used to begin with the “Le Mans start”—when the start flag signaled drivers to sprint across the track to jump into their vehicles. The tradition ended after the 1969 race, when Jacky Ickx walked to his Ford GT40 in protest.

(various routes)

point of interest: The first Cactus Derby was won by a steam-

powered car.

GE R M A N GR A N D P R I X

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) S I N CE 1926 location: AVUS, Nürburgring, and Hockenheimring, Germany

IN DI A N A P O L I S 5 0 0

point of interest: Ferrari is the most successful marque in the history

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) S I N CE 1911

of the German Grand Prix, with 22 victories between 1950 and 2012.

location: Indianapolis

Motor Speedway in Speedway, Indiana point of interest: The tradition of celebrating an Indy 500 victory by drinking a bottle of milk began in 1936 when winner Louis Meyer drank a bottle of buttermilk in Victory Lane to cool off.

I TA L I A N GR A N D P R I X

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) S I N CE 1921 location: Autodromo

Nazionale Monza near Monza, Italy point of interest: The first Italian Grand Prix was held in 1921 at a circuit between Milan and Verona, Italy. Monza hosted the race in 1922, and since 1950 when the event joined the Formula-One calendar, every Italian Grand Prix has been run at Monza, except in 1980 when it was run at Imola.

“P O S T C A R D S F RO M I TA LY ” — BE I RU T Simple and pared down with yearning vocals, a ukulele, and galloping percussion, this song is a love note sent from the road, streaking through the Italian countryside.

MIL L E MIG L I A

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) F RO M 1927– 57 location: Italy (various routes)

point of interest: The Mille Miglia was

banned after the 1938 event, during which a number of spectators, including children, were killed in a crash. The open-road endurance race was reinstated in 1947, only to be discontinued for good in 1957 after a crash once again killed several spectators of various ages.

12 H O U R S O F S E B R IN G

RU N A N N U A L LY ( W I T H E XCE P T I O N S) S I N CE 1952 location: Sebring International Raceway in Sebring, Florida

point of interest: Gene Hackman, Paul Newman, and Steve McQueen

are just a few of the many celebrities who have driven in the 12 Hours of Sebring. In 1970, McQueen (with his broken foot in a cast) and co-driver Peter Revson (who did most of the driving) nearly won in a Porsche, finishing behind Mario Andretti in a Ferrari.

“FA S T C A R” — T R A CY CH A P M A N Cruise from city to city with this 1988 hit that conjures up feelings of longing, hope, and the desire to escape from something, somewhere.

“L I T T L E R E D COR V E T T E” — P RI N CE The artist’s 1982 ode to the iconic car has a classic retro beat but a timeless ache for lost love at high speeds.

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A QUICK LAP

FUL L SPEED A HE A D

A QUICK TOUR OF LEGENDS OF SPEED

If you’re running short on time, take a lighting fast lap around Legends of Speed in 15 minutes or less with these helpful highlights of seven cars from nearly every decade represented in the landmark exhibition.

“M E & M A GD A L E N A” — THE MONKEES Yes, those Monkees. The bubble-gum pop group of 1960s television has grown up in this subtly beautiful ode to road trips and romantic epiphanies at sunset.

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“GO Y OUR O W N WAY ” — FLEET WOOD MAC This ultimate late-’70s breakup anthem has a timeless feel of kicking into high gear and leaving your cares behind you, somewhere in the last town, the last time zone.

“R E A R V IE W MIR ROR” — P E A RL J A M The quick build of this grunge classic conjures up images of releasing your cares while careening around mountain curves, building speed toward the open road.

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A QUICK LAP 1911 F R A N K L IN

19 3 4 A L FA R O M E O T IP O B P 3

The 1911 Franklin in Legends of Speed remains in its original state. It was built for Ralph Hamlin, a Franklin dealership owner who originated the Desert Race along with Earle Anthony, a famous Packard dealer, and John Bullard, thenattorney general for the Arizona Territory and president of the Maricopa Automobile Club. Also known as the Cactus Derby, the 500-mile road race from Los Angeles to Phoenix across rugged desert terrain predated the modern interstate highway. Hamlin raced the 1911 Franklin to a second-place finish in the 1910 Cactus Derby in the same condition it appears today. The antique race car has received awards at the Pebble Beach Concours and the Amelia Island Concours.

Driven by Italy’s Tazio Nuvolari, the 1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3 in Legends of Speed won the 1935 German Grand Prix against all odds. With just 285 hp and a top speed of 160 mph, the agile Alfa didn’t stack up against the power and speed of the race’s German cars. But while a win for Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the Nürburgring seemed certain, Nuvolari remained confident, telling team manager Enzo Ferrari, “Today, I will win.” And he did. On the last lap of the race, the left-rear tire of Manfred von Brauchitsch’s Mercedes shredded, and Nuvolari shot past to victory. His personal record of Italy’s “Marcia Reale” played during the victory ceremony to a stunned crowd that included high-ranking Nazi party officials.

Adapted from an essay by Ted Davis in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

19 2 7 B U G AT T I T Y P E 3 5 B The exhibition’s 1927 Bugatti Type 35B, chassis 4863, was driven in 1930 at the 24 Hours of Le Mans by French racing legend Hellé Nice, who competed against and claimed victory over some of racing’s best male drivers, including Tazio Nuvolari, René Dreyfus, and Louis Chiron. After competing at the 1930 Le Mans, Nice raced chassis 4863 in 1931 in various Grand-Prix events, taking several top 10 finishes. Chassis 4863 has been shown at the Chantilly Arts and Elegance Exhibit in Paris, where it was named runner-up in the Voitures des Grandes Dames category, and it appeared at the 2017 Arizona Concours d’Elegance. By the preference of its current owner, chassis 4863 is rarely exhibited to the public. Adapted from essays by Lyn St. James in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

Adapted from an essay by Ted West in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

19 5 8 M K1 S C A R A B Some of the rarest and fastest automobiles in the world have been produced in Southern California, reaching the height of creation for front-engine sports racers in the late 1950s. Lance Reventlow, a young man with nearly unlimited funds and a taste for all things fast and beautiful, decided to build and challenge the world’s best with a small series of race cars called the Scarab, named after the Egyptian dung beetle. Although Reventlow’s team produced several innovative automobiles for different categories, the best of the bunch was the 1958 Mk I Scarab sports racer. The metallic blue missile, driven by Chuck Daigh, won the 1958 Riverside Grand Prix, beating the latest Ferraris driven by Phil Hill and Dan Gurney. The Scarabs would go on to dominate U.S. road racing into the 1960s. Adapted from an essay by Peter Brock in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue. CONTINUED ON PAGE 94

“IN THE AEROPL ANE “K ICK , P U S H” “ T H E HIGH RO A D” – LUPE FIASCO – BRO K E N BE L L S OV ER T HE SE A” – N EU T R A L M I L K H OT E L The simple chord progressions, lo-fi style, and mournfully singing saw and saxophone of this deceptively cheerful tune off the band’s 1998 album lifts the listener from the road and into the wide blue sky.

Get lost in this iconic track about skateboarding as you kick, push, coast along those long stretches of highway.

“Find a detour in your new life,” the singer urges in this 2010 hit off the band’s eponymous album. With a driving electronic beat and lush lyrics, this cut makes for smooth roads ahead.

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A QUICK LAP 19 6 2 F E R R A R I 2 5 0 G T O In March 1961, Jaguar debuted its all-new E-type at the Geneva Motor Show, striking fear in the heart of Enzo Ferrari. In response, Ferrari put engineer Giotto Bizzarrini in charge of secretly creating a Jaguar conqueror. A handpicked team modified a 250 SWB (short wheelbase) berlinetta to construct a prototype that would test several seconds faster than its predecessor at Monza in September 1961. Then, through the combined talents of chief engineer Mauro Forghieri and master coachbuilder Sergio Scaglietti, the 250 GTO debuted in February 1962 at Ferrari’s press conference. From its first race at Sebring in Florida where it finished second overall, the 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO was a force, winning three straight GT championships. The model is considered by many to be the greatest Ferrari of all time. Adapted from an essay by Winston Goodfellow in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

19 6 4 S H E L B Y CO B R A D AY T O N A CO U P E Carroll Shelby’s world-champion Daytona Coupes were conceived in secrecy by designer Peter Brock. Brock’s unorthodox shape, with its chopped tail and flat roofline, proved itself in the Daytona’s first test at Riverside Raceway when star driver Ken Miles smashed the previous lap record by 3.5 seconds and added some 20 mph to the roadster’s top speed. Six weeks later, the new Coupe set the lap record at Daytona, giving the car its name before it won its next race at the 12 Hours of Sebring. During the 1964 European season, Daytonas also set lap records at Le Mans and Reims in France, Spa in Belgium, and the Tourist Trophy in England, and this featured Daytona Coupe, CSX 2299, won the GT class in Le Mans. Because of the Daytona’s success, Henry Ford II ultimately contracted Shelby to

“DRI V E M Y C A R”

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Adapted from an essay by Peter Brock in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

19 6 8 F O R D G T4 0 In June 1962, Ford returned to racing despite a 1957 American Automobile Manufacturers Association ban on Ford, GM, Chrysler, and any of their divisions. As the company devised its comeback, it was decided Ford must win the 24 Hours of Le Mans, a feat no American marque had ever achieved, and to do so, they would need to buy Ferrari. By spring 1963, negotiations were well under way to complete the purchase—until Enzo Ferrari walked away from the table in May. Henry Ford II declared that if Ford couldn’t buy Ferrari, they would simply have to beat them. Ford Advanced Vehicles (FAV) was formed, and in August 1963, the Ford-powered Lola Mk. 6 GT served as a starting point for the GT40 project. Not one GT40, however, finished any race in 1964.

Later that year, Ford sent former Le Mans-winning driver and automobile manufacturer Carroll Shelby two GT40s. In less than eight weeks, Shelby’s team transformed the GT40, which would go on to win at Le Mans in 1966 and 1967. In 1967, John Wyer purchased the assets of FAV to start J.W. Automotive Engineering, and over the years, he continued to develop the smallblock GT40 into what would later be called a Mirage. The nonstop refining led to the creation of GT40 chassis 1075, one of the most celebrated race cars ever. This featured car was raced to Le Mans victory in 1968 and 1969 by Pedro Rodriguez and Lucien Bianchi, and Jacky Ickx and Jackie Oliver, respectively. Adapted from an essay by Harley Cluxton III and Winston Goodfellow in the Legends of Speed exhibition catalogue.

“ S T R E E T L IGH T S”

– T H E BE AT L E S A requirement for any driving-inspired playlist, the Fab Four’s iconic 1965 hit explores the endless possibilities of fame, fortune, and, most of all, speed, complete with a horn-honking beat.

develop and race his Ford GT40 prototypes starting in 1965, thus beginning the famed Ford v. Ferrari wars that culminated in Ford’s consecutive wins at Le Mans from 1966 through 1969.

– K ANYE WEST A B-side track on West’s acclaimed 2008 808s & Heartbreak album, this moody, auto-tuned march toward the future will take you the rest of the way, on your journey to what comes next.

“FA S T A S Y OU” – D W I G H T YO A K A M Long, never-ending drives across Texas are the bane of any road trip. Pass the time with this utterly danceable country classic.

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A QUICK LAP

image credits : ( page

“DR E A M S” – T H E CR A N BE RRI E S A long time ago, The Cranberries released this optimistic, soaring tune about all that is possible, creating the ultimate soundtrack for the open road.

76) 1973 Porsche 917/30. RK Motors Private Collection. (page 78, left to right) 1911 Franklin. Private Collection; Race winner Jim Clark in car number 82, Lotus-Ford 33 with crew. Indianapolis 500, Indianapolis Motor Speedway, 1965. Courtesy of Revs Institute, Bruce R. Craig Photograph Collection; 1978 Lotus 79. Collection of Duncan Dayton; 1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3. Private Collection. (page 82) 1929 Bentley. The Collection of Bruce R. McCaw. (page 83, top to bottom ) 1911 Franklin. Private Collection; 1927 Bugatti Type 35B. William E. (Chip) Connor Collection; 1913 Duesenberg. Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum; 1927 Miller 91. Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum; Hellé Nice with Joseph Cecchi, Type 35B, Montlhéry, December 18, 1929, Women’s record. Courtesy of The Bugatti Trust Photograph Archive. (page 84) 1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3. Private Collection. ( page 85, top to bottom ) Winning Mercedes-Benz 300 SL in pits driven by Hermann Lang and Fritz Riess. 24 Hours of Le Mans, Circuit de la Sarthe, 1952. Courtesy of Revs Institute, Rodolfo Mailander Photograph Collection; 1961 Trevis Offenhauser “Offy.” Courtesy of the Indianapolis Motor Speedway Museum; 1960 Maserati Tipo 61 “Birdcage.” Courtesy of Sunchase Holdings. (page 86, top to bottom ) Stirling Moss and Peter Walker have just crossed the line in second place in their Jaguar C-type, number 17. 24 Hours of Le Mans, Circuit de la Sarthe, 1953. Courtesy of Revs Institute, Albert R. Bochroch Photograph Collection; 1953 Jaguar C-Type. Private Collection; 1953 Lancia D24 Spyder; Private Collection. ( page 87) 1952 Mercedes 300 SL. The Collection of Bruce R. McCaw. (page 88, top to bottom ) 1965 LotusFord Type 38. From the Collections of The Henry Ford, Dearborn, Michigan; 1973 Porsche 917/30. RK Motors Private Collection; 1967 Gurney Eagle F1. The Miles Collier Collections at Revs Institute. ( page 89) 1968 Ford GT40. Rob and Melani Walton Collection. (page 90) 1953 Jaguar C-Type (detail). Private Collection. (page 92) 1958 Mk1 Scarab. Rob and Melani Walton Collection. (page 94) 1962 Ferrari 250 GTO. Rob and Melani Walton Collection. ( page 95, top to bottom ) 1964 Shelby Cobra Daytona Coupe. Miller Family Automobile Foundation; 1968 Ford GT40. Rob and Melani Walton Collection. All vehicle photography: Bill Pack / V-12 Enterprises.

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SHOP

SPEED

BRING HOME A PIECE OF LEGEN DS OF SPEED W I T H COL L EC T IBL E S , FA S HION A CCE S S ORIE S , T OY S , A ND BOOK S F ROM T HE MU S EUM S T OR E . U N DE R T H E H O O DIE S P E E D R E A DE R

$58.50 (Member) | $65.00 (NonMember)

$67.50 (Member) | $75.00 (Non-Member)

This Legends of Speed sweatshirt with tire-track details is the perfect lightweight pullover for any car enthusiast.

Discover even more about the historic race cars featured in Legends of Speed with this full-color exhibition catalogue featuring essays by internationally recognized racing experts and car collectors.

Unisex. 50% polyester, 25% cotton, 25% rayon tri-blend jersey.

Hardcover, 176 pages.

O F F O N T H E R IGH T F OO T $175.50 (Member) | $195.00 (Non-Member) With its working steering wheel and rubber wheels, this sleek, kid-powered, foot-to-floor race car will have every young driver dashing to the finish line.

S CE NIC DR I V E

30” x 16” assembled. Finished in a chip- and rustresistant, child-safe, non-toxic, lead-free, powdercoating paint. Adult supervision required.

Inspired by 1960s fashion and footwear and the bold designs of Formula-One racing cars, this midi race car will look stunning on any shelf or zooming across the living room floor.

$58.50 (Member) | $65.00 (Non-Member)

Ages 3+. 6” x 4” x 4.5”.

MOTOR TREND $47.70 (Member) | $53.00 (Non-Member) Engineer a racing-inspired look with this nut-and-bolt cufflink pairing. Zinc alloy.

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WHY WE GIVE

An art museum is more than a building with great art—it’s a place to inspire goodwill and collaboration and to reach out to our community.” LEE COHN

PHIL A N T HROPIST

MIK E COHN

MEMBER OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 199 4

A great museum helps us understand ourselves and our history. We support Phoenix Art Museum because of its compelling vision to engage audiences and members of every background with art. Our hope is that our giving has an impact, like an investment that grows over time, and we can help attract talented leadership to the city and the institution. We want Phoenix Art Museum to be essential in people’s lives, and we embrace the change the Museum seeks to achieve through its innovative programs and mission.

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PA S T, PRE SEN T Congratulations, people of the Southwest! You’ve struck it rich! You do know, don’t you, that this month, every man and woman of you acquires a fortune? Wealth greater than the gold of Fort Knox. Riches more satisfying, more lasting than gems, oil or gold...I refer, of course, to the bonanza Phoenix Art Museum brings.” — Vincent Price, actor, in the inaugural issue of Phoenix Point West magazine, November 1959

PHXART60: THE PAST DECADE

Through January 26, 2020 Marshall and Hendler galleries

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I

t began with the Borg. Carl Oscar Borg, that is. A Swedish-born painter who spent most of his adult life working in the American West. The painting was titled Egyptian Evening, created some time in 1911, a handful of years too late for the Post-Impressionist movement but too muted for the Fauvists. With thick daubs of oil that bring to life just the hints of faces, of figures bearing their burdens on the slow trek home at dusk, the work was the first purchased, for $125 in 1915, by the Phoenix Women’s Club with the dream of building an art collection that belonged to the people of Phoenix and brought great art from across the globe to their burgeoning desert city. Today, that germinating seed is just one of more than 20,000 objects in the collection of Phoenix Art Museum, which has grown over the years through the generosity of donors, support groups, grants, and artists. In 2009, the Museum celebrated its 50th anniversary with a campaign led by Gail and Stephen Rineberg and Carole and Joel Bernstein, an initiative that resulted in 50 significant gifts from 50 separate donors to each of the Museum’s collecting areas. Newly acquired artworks included those by Kehinde Wiley, Chuck Close, Hashimoto Kansetsu, Fritz Scholder, Julius Rolshoven, Viola Frey, Andy Warhol, René Magritte, Liliana Porter, and James Turrell; important historical Sri Lankan, Japanese, and Chinese objects; and fashion designs by acclaimed designers Ralph Rucci, Judith Leiber, Geoffrey Beene, and Madeleine Vionnet, among others. From the campaign, the Museum presented a subsequent exhibition of these works, in honor of the 50 years the institution had opened its doors to the community. Now, as the Museum commemorates its 60th anniversary, PhxArt60: The Past Decade presents works acquired in the 10 years since that major milestone. But more than a reflection on how the Museum’s collection

has grown, the exhibition is a study of how the collection has evolved to reflect and respond to our time, to social and cultural shifts, presenting a greater awareness of the institution’s responsibility to represent multicultural perspectives and contribute to the global dialogue on diversity and inclusion in the arts.

their acquisition processes and prioritize the representation of diverse perspectives in their collections, the exhibition exemplifies the efforts of the Museum’s curators, working closely with both local and national donors, to steward a collection that is responsive to the world in which it has been carefully cultivated.

Featuring approximately 70 works, most of which have never been on view, The Past Decade showcases paintings, sculptures, photographs, and more by nearly 30 artists of color, including women artists such as Janet Toro, Rei Kawakubo, and others. At a time in which museums across the United States have begun to interrogate

“We are excited for our community to take this journey through the past decade,” said Gilbert Vicario, the Deputy Director for Curatorial Affairs and the Selig Family Chief Curator, who curated the exhibition working with each of the Museum’s collecting areas. “The objects in the exhibition range from contemporary CONTINUED ON PAGE 102

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Latin American art to Chinese painting, and an incredible selection of photographs documents some of the most compelling moments in the American struggle for racial equality. The Past Decade truly highlights the progress the Museum has made to build a 21st-century collection.”

husband and wife are emblematic of the traditional practice of ancestral worship and veneration and are examples of those created during the Qing Dynasty, which ruled until the early 20th century. The Past Decade also features a Chinese scroll from 1678 entitled Perilous is the Journey to Shu. The delicate work’s non-linear perspective evokes the feeling of moving through the mountainous landscape characteristic of the remote region, located in what is now Sichuan Province.

Familiar objects in the exhibition include three digital chromogenic prints by AfricanAmerican photographer Erica Deeman, which were featured in the Museum’s 2018 exhibition In the Company of Women. The backlit silhouetted portraits of black women, which challenge concepts of race and identity through their simplistic, stark forms, are

With its breadth of material, PhxArt60: The Past Decade stands as a reminder of the commitment of scholars and donors to continue developing a diverse collection for Phoenix Art Museum and the Valley of the Sun, the very same mission that a group of determined, forward-thinking women dreamed of all those years ago. Still, it is impossible for a single exhibition to truly capture the entirety of 10 years of history, over which more than 5,000 objects were added to the collection. The truest monument to the past decade—the past six decades—of history, then, is the Museum itself, with more than 20,000 works held in the public trust and hundreds of exhibitions presented to the community. And to think, it all began with a single painting. PhxArt60: The Past Decade is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

complemented by a 2012 chromogenic print from a series by African-American visual artist Mickalene Thomas that documented the lives of transwomen of color. These works stand in contrast to the luridly colored diptych of a fraught domestic scene by Arcmanoro Niles. Titled Does a Broken Home Become a Broken Family (2019), the painting is one of the Museum’s most recent acquisitions, purchased with funds from the Dawn and David Lenhardt Emerging Artist Acquisition Fund. In addition to the aforementioned works, the exhibition also includes selections from a recently acquired collection of photographs

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by Bruce Davidson. Shot primarily during the tumult of the 1960s, they document the intensity, strife, pain, humanity, and occasional grace of the civil rights movement in mid-century America. These works weave together the story of the nation’s struggle for racial equality, which continues into the present day, while providing a subtle backdrop of the world as it was when the Museum first opened its doors. Along with modern and contemporary works, the exhibition highlights various historical objects, including those from the Museum’s Asian art collection. Dated circa 1820 to 1860, a pair of Chinese ancestor portraits of a

See objects throughout the Museum acquired in the past 60 years. Look for the PhxArt60 insignia to discover them all.

image credits: (pages 100-101, clockwise from left) Bruce

Davidson, Untitled (East 100th Street), 1966. Gelatin silver print. Gift of an anonymous donor. © Bruce Davidson; The Propeller Group (Phunam Thuc Ha; Matt Lucero; Tuan Andrew Nguyen), AK-47 vs The M16, 2015. Fragments of AK-47 and M16 bullets, ballistics gel and custom vitrine. Purchased with funds provided by Contemporary Forum; Comme Des Garcons, Ensemble, Spring 2019. Museum Purchase. Sérgio Sister, Pontalete 12, 2012. Oil on canvas mounted on aluminum on wood composed of 11 parts. Gift of Nicholas Pardon. Image courtesy Nicholas Pardon; (this page top to bottom) Lew Davis, The Rebel (Elizabeth Ruskin), 1932. Oil on canvas. Gift of Jeanne L. Herberger, Ph.D. In loving memory of Gary Kierland Herberger; Arcmanoro Niles, Does a Broken Home Become a Broken Family, 2019. Oil, acrylic and glitter on canvas. Purchased with funds provided by the Dawn and David Lenhardt Emerging Artist Acquisition Fund; Angela Ellsworth, Pantaloncini: Work No. (indeterminate radiance) (Emma), 2017. 50,930 pearl corsage pins, colored dress pins, fabric, steel. Purchased with funds provided by Contemporary Forum.

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A R T, FA SHION, LIFE ANTONIO: THE FINE ART OF FASHION ILLUSTRATION

Through January 5, 2020 Kelly Ellman Fashion Design Gallery and Orme Lewis Gallery

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Over three revolutionary decades, Antonio Lopez changed the fashion industry forever. Known for his dynamic drawings that regularly incorporated elements of Pop Art, Op Art, and Surrealism, the late fashion illustrator brought a fresh perspective to an industry that was quickly prioritizing photography over illustration. Yet the convergence of art and fashion was hardly the most transgressive characteristic of his vibrant designs.

“A

ntonio added a sensuality to his illustrations that wasn’t allowed to be explored in the cultural climate until the 1960s and 1970s,” said Dennita Sewell, Curator Emerita of Fashion Design of Phoenix Art Museum. “His work was about more than just making an image. He styled and fostered unique identities for the women he drew, and he was at the forefront of the movement toward diversity and inclusion in the fashion image.” Born in 1943 in Utuado, Puerto Rico, Lopez and his family moved to New York when he was 7, and from an early age, he was a budding artist. At age 12, he attended the Traphagen School of Fashion’s Saturday children’s program, followed by the High School of Art and Design (formerly the School of Industrial Arts). Upon graduation,

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he was accepted to the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT) where, through a work-study program, he was offered a job at Women’s Wear Daily. He eventually left FIT to work full time at the fashion trade paper, beginning what would become one of the most impactful careers in the history of fashion illustration. Lopez went on to illustrate for the world’s preeminent fashion publications and retailers before moving to Paris in 1969, where he worked with Karl Lagerfield and Yves Saint Laurent, among other significant designers. He moved back to New York in 1975, and during the 1980s, his work was heavily influenced by athletic wear and street and breakdancing style. Throughout his career, he also discovered some of the most famous faces in the world, including Pat Cleveland, Tina Chow, Jerry Hall, Grace Jones, and Jessica Lange. He championed these diverse women, and through his illustrations of them, the boundaries between art, fashion, and life were blurred. Lopez, however, didn’t work alone as he re-envisioned what fashion illustration was and could be. Juan Ramos, Lopez’s longtime creative collaborator and, at one time, romantic partner whom he met at FIT, played an integral role in the work that would expand—and ultimately transform—fashion’s view of beauty, ethnicity, and sexuality. On view through January 5, 2020, Antonio: The Fine Art of Fashion Illustration, Sewell’s final exhibition at Phoenix Art Museum, explores the work that Lopez and Ramos created under ANTONIO, the signature representing the duo’s collaborative creations. Viewers experience more than 100 original drawings, photographs, and magazines from the 1960s through the 1980s that depict motion, include people of color, and explore fluid sexuality. These artworks represent the artistic, editorial, and commercial work that Lopez and Ramos produced for publications and retailers such as Vogue, The New York Times Magazine, French Elle, Harper’s Bazaar Italia, Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale's, and more. In addition, the exhibition displays more than 20 lavish drawings from Antonio’s Tales from the Thousand and One Nights, an illustrated book of stories from The Arabian Nights. These works are shown alongside 12 never-before-exhibited, large-scale drawings from 1973, which

were commissioned by former Vogue editor Carrie Donovan and created at the Condé Nast offices in New York City during a series of Vogue seminars. The drawings illustrate designer collections for buyers and journalists and feature models Pat Cleveland and Amina Warsuma. To round out the exhibition, Antonio also features a multimedia component—a continuous screening of the documentary Antonio Lopez 1970: Sex, Fashion and Disco (2017) by director James Crump. The film explores the impact of Lopez and Ramos, who was also born in Puerto Rico, on the fashion industry. When asked in an interview with Cultured magazine why he wanted to showcase the partnership, Crump said Ramos’ role is often eclipsed by Lopez’s talent, despite the great knowledge of pop culture and art and fashion history that Ramos brought to Lopez’s drawings. “[Lopez and Ramos] were so connected,” he said. “It’s a very loaded partnership that goes back for a very long time. [Ramos is] a participant, an observer, an intimate, and an incredible contribution to all that came out of that studio.” Sewell also views the partnership in a similar way, with each artist representing a different, yet significant, element of the artistic equation. “Lopez was an exceptionally gifted illustrator, while Ramos was the art director, researcher, and organizer,” she said. “In the early 1960s, they became pioneers of a multinational view that moved fashion illustration forward with a modern perspective.” Through its expansive selection of works, Antonio captures the energy of an artistic partnership that ultimately revolutionized not just the aesthetic but the role of fashion illustration. As viewers discover the colorful, evocative, and radical works of Lopez and Ramos, they will inevitably feel the exuberance—and fearlessness— with which these two trailblazers dreamed and created.

Antonio: The Fine Art of Fashion Illustration is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of Arizona Costume Institute, with additional support from the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members. image credits: (left to right) Antonio Lopez,

Personal Study, Bill Blast, 1983. Pencil and watercolor on paper. © The Estate of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos; Antonio Lopez, Fashion Study, American Vogue Seminar, Pat Cleveland/Amina Warsuma, c. 1972. Pentel and cello-tak on paper. © The Estate of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos; Antonio Lopez, Fashion Study, American Vogue Seminar, Pat Cleveland/Amina Warsuma, c. 1972. Pentel and cello-tak on paper. © The Estate of Antonio Lopez and Juan Ramos.

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WHY WE GIVE

Art museums have the power to open minds, increase tolerance, and foster a deeper understanding of diverse cultures.” PARV EEN K AUR K HANUJA PHIL A N T HROPIST

DR. PARVINDER JIT SINGH K HANUJA MEMBER OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES

Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2016

O

ur favorite memory at Phoenix Art Museum was the opening reception for the Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery, the second gallery space in the United States dedicated to the exhibition of Sikh art. The gallery is a wonderful example of how the Museum is committed to serving and reflecting diverse audiences so different generations of visitors can experience histories and cultures with which they are unfamiliar. We have seen the significant impact the Museum has on young people, helping them to engage with art from around the world and expand their horizons. We feel fortunate to support and be of service to Phoenix Art Museum. It has been one of the best social investments we have made in our city and community.

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A SUBLIME JOURNE Y I see no stranger.” –Guru Nanak, the First Sikh Guru

GURU NANAK: 550TH BIRTH ANNIVERSARY OF SIKHISM’S FOUNDER Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery Through March 29, 2020

A

philosopher and poet, Guru Nanak (1469–1539) traveled for nearly 30 years and completed four major journeys during his life, interacting with holy men of various faiths in India, Sri Lanka, Tibet, Afghanistan, Iraq, and Saudi Arabia. He eventually founded the city of Kartarpur (place of Divine), where he served as a spiritual guide for the first Sikh community until his death.

Presented in the Khanuja Family Sikh Heritage Gallery, one of only two gallery spaces in the United States dedicated solely to displaying Sikh art, Guru Nanak offers deep insight into the founding tenets of the world’s fifth largest religion. Beyond its presentation of stories from an extraordinary life, the exhibition also continues the Museum’s initiative to build awareness of the Valley’s diverse communities and showcase artwork and objects that explore themes of Sikh history and visual culture.

Throughout his life, Nanak expounded the belief in only one Divine Spirit, whom all people can access without rituals or priestly intervention. His concept of oneness grew to include spiritual, sociological, and humanitarian insights that have informed the cornerstone of Sikhism, and today, followers of the monotheistic religion accept that all creation is equal, transcending social distinctions such as race, gender, economic status, and religion. On view at Phoenix Art Museum through March 29, 2020, Guru Nanak: 550th Birth Anniversary of Sikhism’s Founder examines the life and teachings of the First Sikh Guru. Spanning four centuries, the exhibition showcases approximately 25 historical and contemporary paintings, lithographs, and more that illuminate stories from the Janam Sakhi, the texts dedicated exclusively to the life and teachings of Guru Nanak. These stories, which include anecdotes and hymns, depict Nanak’s spiritual journeys and attest to his wisdom and meaningful interactions with the communities he met through his travels. “The 18th- and 19th-century works by anonymous artists illustrate Guru Nanak in

Guru Nanak: 550th Birth Anniversary of Sikhism’s Founder is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Sikh Heritage Fund, with additional support from the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

image credits: (top to bottom) Arpana Caur, Bhai Mardana in Trance in the Footsteps of Guru Nanak, 2015. Oil on canvas. The Khanuja Family; Rabindra K. D. Kaur Singh, Enlightenment of Guru Nanak, 1992. Poster color, gouache and gold dust on paper. The Khanuja Family; Unknown, Guru Nanak in the country ruled by women, not dated. Ink and color on paper. The Khanuja Family.

classical Indian settings in the delicate and formal style of the Mughal period of Indian traditional painting, while 20th- and 21st-century works by several renowned artists adapt a variety of international styles,” said Janet Baker, PhD, curator of Asian art at Phoenix Art Museum and the exhibition’s curator. “Some of these works display the bold use of blocks of color, whereas others adapt a distinctively expressive style that radiates spiritual energy. However, all of them, when experienced together, explore the universal themes of tolerance, equality, social responsibility, and devotion to truth that inform Sikhism.”

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S W EEPING VIE WS 110

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I think sometimes people look down on the history of American art, as if it simply copies the traditions of European art. But American artists of a certain era worked in a country that did not have a tradition of patronage and art institutions, yet look how far they came despite those disadvantages.” — Betsy Fahlman, PhD, adjunct curator of American art at Phoenix Art Museum

AMERICAN SCENES/ AMERICAS SEEN

Through February 9, 2020

SUBLIME LANDSCAPES

Through June 14, 2020

PHILIP C. CURTIS AND THE LANDSCAPES OF ARIZONA Through November 15, 2020 American art galleries

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ammoth Southwest panoramas, meticulous studies of earth and light, evocative abstracted compositions, and a surreal circus scene are just a few of the natural and constructed landscapes lining the American art galleries in the North Wing of Phoenix Art Museum. Part of three separate, special installations and all drawn exclusively from the Museum’s American art collection, these works and more offer a journey through the evolution of American landscape painting from the 1800s through the present. Broad in scope and subject, Sublime Landscapes features works from the 19th through the 21st centuries that depict scenic views of the Grand Canyon to Yosemite Valley, the Sierra Nevadas to the Rocky Mountains. Early works in the installation, on view through June 14, 2020, are detailed and representational, attempting to present the various landscapes true to life. Zoroaster Temple at Sunset (1916) by Thomas Moran, for example, is a dazzling partial view of the Grand Canyon, complete with depictions of craggy rocks and wispy clouds. The painting served to all but transport viewers to Arizona’s signature landscape during a time when transcontinental travel to the West remained arduous and expensive and a view of the natural wonder was, for many, only the stuff of imagination. Moran’s work, however, stands in stark contrast to the installation’s contemporary paintings. One of the most beloved works in the Museum’s collection, Desert Rain God (2009) by Louisa McElwain, is a sweeping landscape that captures the violence, unpredictability, and beauty of natural storms and, perhaps, internal ones. “McElwain is painting with palette knives and trowels,” said Betsy Fahlman, PhD, the Museum’s adjunct curator of American art and the curator of the three installations. “Her work is very textural, and unlike early landscape artists, she is attempting to get at the emotion of a place rather than presenting a factual snapshot.”

of the

WES T

American Scenes/Americas Seen then narrows the historical view of American landscapes to a particular time period and context, featuring works by artists from the 1930s and 1940s who lived and created on either side of the U.S.-Mexico border. A collaboration between Fahlman and Vanessa Davidson, PhD, the Museum’s former Shawn and Joe Lampe Curator of Latin American Art, the installation features works by such celebrated muralists and abstract artists as Diego Rivera, Doris Rosenthal, Alice Trumbull Mason, Frida Kahlo, Lew Davis, and Carlos Mérida, all of whom explored regionalism and place through their practice. CONTINUED ON PAGE 112

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American Scenes/Americas Seen is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Henry Luce Foundation, with additional support from the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members. Sublime Landscapes is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Henry Luce Foundation, with additional support from the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members. Philip C. Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Henry Luce Foundation, with additional support from the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

Viewers experience representational paintings, portraying specific local and regional narratives of the Americas, next to highly abstract works, whose amorphous color areas, expressive lines, and geometric forms evoke natural elements, provoke emotion, and seek to create meaning. By placing these artworks in conversation, American Scenes/Americas Seen, on view through February 9, 2020, draws comparisons between the perspectives and styles of artists from the United States and Latin America, suggesting the cultural permeability of national borders. Finally, Philip C. Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona focuses on a single artist’s perspective on Western landscapes. Appointed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt under the New Deal’s Federal Art Project, Philip C. Curtis served from 1937–1939 as the director of the Phoenix Art Center, which later became Phoenix Art Museum in 1959. Although best known as a figural painter, Curtis also created surreal landscapes featuring Victorian-style figures in stark, desert settings. On view through November 15, 2020, Philip C. Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona showcases these works alongside landscapes by artists such as Lew Davis and Ed Mell. The fantastical elements of Curtis’s work are amplified in

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this context, leaving viewers to contemplate how differently artists of the same region may interpret and portray American scenes. Despite their varied perspectives, the three installations in the Museum’s North Wing altogether illustrate the progress of American landscape painting and, according to Fahlman, showcase the strength of the Museum’s American art holdings. “It’s important to me to always feature a range of works in the installations and exhibitions I curate to demonstrate the significant variety we have in the Museum’s American art collection,” she said. “While these particular installations include many old favorites, they place them in new contexts and alongside new voices and perspectives.” Still, as viewers wander through the galleries, taking in the colors, details, and magnitude of artworks spanning three centuries, they may begin to uncover a grander narrative than the diversity of a museum’s art collection or the evolution of American landscape painting. Instead, they may unearth an American art history that is vast and diverse, nuanced and complex. A history that, despite misconceptions, is truly all its own, individual, stirring, and triumphant.

image credits: (pages 110-111) Louisa McElwain, Desert Rain God,

2009. Oil on canvas. Museum purchase with funds provided by Betty Van Denburgh in honor of Western Art Associates; (this page, left to right) Miklos Suba, American Landscape (Paisaje americano), 1938. Oil on canvas. Gift of Dr. and Mrs. Lorenz Anderman; Philip C. Curtis, Dying Saguaro (Saguaro moribundo), 1958. Oil on panel. Bequest of Iris S. Darlington

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orn in 1903 on Christmas Eve in Nyack, New York, Joseph Cornell never received formal art training, instead working full-time to support his mother and younger brother, Robert, who had cerebral palsy. Despite his non-traditional approach and his classification as a fringe artist, Cornell enjoyed a career spanning five decades, characterized by an expansive body of work that includes collages, films, graphic designs, and his renowned glass-paneled shadow boxes, in which he artfully ordered his oddities to create, as he once said, “poetic theaters.” He exhibited in major New York City galleries alongside Marcel Duchamp, Salvador Dalí, Jackson Pollock, Mark Rothko, Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly, and other prolific avant-garde artists of the 1940s, ’50s, and ’60s. In 1972, he died in obscurity to the masses but remained largely known and respected by his fellow artists of the era, as well as the museum directors and curators and art critics, dealers, and collectors who had come to know and appreciate his work.

On view at Phoenix Art Museum from January 25 through August 16, 2020, Joseph Cornell: Things Unseen provides a small taste of the artist’s whimsical creations. Through 12 two-sided collages, two unlidded boxes filled with rolled paper and spools of thread, and one shadow box, viewers can discover how Cornell never attempted to imitate reality but instead created many realities of his own. “Joseph Cornell revered Marcel Duchamp’s use of the readymade, Kurt Schwitters’ signature collages, and Paul Klee’s childlike perspective, and later, he was inspired by Andy Warhol’s repetitive imagery and Robert Rauschenberg’s combines,” said Rachel Sadvary Zebro, the Museum’s assistant curator of contemporary art and the exhibition’s curator. “The works on view in Things Unseen are strong examples of how he used these progressive art forms to explore surrealist concepts of memories, fantasies, and dreams.” Cornell’s collages, with scenes on either side, encourage viewers to walk around them and discover every detail. The varied compositions include an ethereal nude placed among desert plants, animals on a roller coaster superimposed on a stark landscape, and a watercolored face of a sun. The exhibition also showcases For Emily Dickinson (not dated), with an image of children jumping rope in front of a setting

T R E A S UR E

T ROV E Joseph Cornell was a collector of curiosities. A regular visitor to the flea markets, secondhand bookshops, and museums of New York City, he assembled a collection of Victorian bell jars and magazines, seashells and silver chains, wooden beads and colored paper, and mechanical toys and games that many would consider mere clutter. To Cornell, however, these knickknacks, tchotchkes, and doodads were the materials that formed the foundation of his art, the treasures and talismans that, if arranged just so, could yield small, perfect worlds that enraptured viewers and invited them to explore their own nostalgia, sensuality, and relationship to time and the natural world.

JOSEPH CORNELL: THINGS UNSEEN January 25 – August 16, 2020 Orme Lewis Gallery

sun, collaged above a cloudy sky. Cornell was deeply influenced by poetry and had a strong affinity toward famous women and starlets, such as Dickinson, Hedy Lamarr, Shirley MacLaine, Marlene Dietrich, and Marilyn Monroe. For Emily Dickinson stands as an homage to a famous poet Cornell greatly admired, while exploring themes of childhood, nature, and nostalgia for days gone by. The exhibition’s shadow box, on the other hand, with two clocks and a silver hoop as its focal points, references Cornell’s fascination with non-linear time. Cornell often created multiple variations of his shadow boxes, circling the same theme in repetition to explore it from every perspective. In addition, viewers may note that many of the works in the exhibition are not dated, existing without temporal reference and prioritizing content over context. Joseph Cornell: Things Unseen offers the Phoenix community a unique opportunity to experience the imaginative, wonder-filled qualities that undoubtedly characterize Cornell’s body of work. Yet the yin to the exhibition’s yang cannot be ignored, as Things Unseen also offers a profoundly melancholic view into the psyche of a reclusive artist who sacrificed greatly to support his family, creating in the basement of his mother’s house until his final days. Is it possible that Cornell’s lifelong fascination, if not obsession, with childhood, time, nature, and famous women spoke to a deeper desire and longing for more of each in his own life? For as many answers as Things Unseen provides, it also leaves space for viewers to question, contemplate, and imagine. Joseph Cornell: Things Unseen is organized by Phoenix Art Museum. It is made possible through the generosity of the Museum’s Circles of Support and Museum Members.

image credits: (left to right) Joseph Cornell, Untitled (Shaker Box with cylinders), not dated. Mixed media. Gift of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation. © 2019 The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY; Joseph Cornell, Untitled, Soap Bubble Set/Pipe/Figurehead, not dated. Wood, glass, metal, paint and construction. Gift of The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation. © 2019 The Joseph and Robert Cornell Memorial Foundation / Licensed by VAGA at Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY.

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WHY WE SUPPORT

Art connects us in incredible ways. It helps us express ourselves, share our stories, and start important conversations about the world.” NICOLE ABBOT T Me mbe r Since 2008

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rt has always been a huge part of our lives. My parents were Members of Phoenix Art Museum when I was a child, and my husband has taught art and photography in Arizona public schools for 15 years. Being a Museum Member is so important not just because of the great events and opportunities we get to experience, but because our Membership is a way we can financially support the Museum so our family and community can have access to even better exhibitions and programs year after year. Looking at art also teaches my sons to consider and speak about the world in creative and unexpected ways. I’m excited to see how Phoenix Art Museum continues to grow through the next generation of Members and visitors. I have so many childhood memories of studying the Thorne Miniature Rooms in the Museum’s North Wing, and now I love sharing that same experience with my children. We have created our own space at the Museum, where we can enjoy quiet moments discovering art in the galleries.

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MEMBERSHIP

HELP US OPEN DOORS TO INSPIRING, WORLD-CLASS ART.

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t Phoenix Art Museum, we believe in the power of art to changes lives, and the support of our Museum Members enables us to bring transformative art and arts education programs to our community. Through their support, Members help us accomplish so much, from reducing economic barriers for school tours, to offering creative programs that help support community members living with dementia and Alzheimer’s disease, and more.

image credit: Julio César Morales, Broken Line, 2018. Neon. Courtesy of the Artist and Gallery Wendi Norris. Installation view Phoenix Art Museum.

Join Phoenix Art Museum to make a difference in our community, all while enjoying unlimited admission, priority access, and special discounts.

M E M B E R S HIP S S TA R T AT $ 8 0 P E R Y E A R . B E N E F I T S IN CL U DE : A U N LI M I TE D AD M ISSIO N to the Museum, all year long A F R E E TI C K ET S to most lectures, gallery talks, films, and more A E X C LU S I V E M EM B ER R EC EP T IO N S, including Members’ Mornings, special exhibition previews, and more

M ON T H LY S U B S CRIP T ION S

A 1 0 % D I S C OU N T at The Museum Store and Palette Restaurant A D I S C O U N TE D T IC KET S to National Theatre Live, special events, and more A F R E E S U B SC R IP T IO N to PhxArt Magazine and an exclusive Members’ e-newsletter A O P P O R TU N IT Y T O JO IN Museum specialinterest affiliate groups. Already a Member? Upgrade to a Premier Membership to deepen your impact on the arts in our city and unlock additional benefits, including invitations to curator-led tours. Annual Premier Memberships begin at $250. For more information about Membership opportunities at Phoenix Art Museum, contact the Membership Office at 602.257.2124 or membership@phxart.org.

Become a Museum Subscriber and enjoy unlimited admission all year long. Packages begin at just $6 per month.

A Phoenix Art Museum Membership provides a significant opportunity to increase access to the visual arts for all members of our community. Thank you to our current Members, whose generosity helps us open doors every day to worldclass art.

Interested in exclusive Member benefits, but looking for a more manageable path to an annual Membership? Enjoy unlimited admission and special benefits as a Museum Member with monthly subscriptions beginning at just $6 per month for one visitor, $8 per month for two visitors, or $9 per month for a family with children 17 and younger. Contact the Membership Office to learn more about our Museum Subscription program. 602.257.2124 | membership@phxart.org

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SUPPORT

MEMBERSHIP+

ENHANCE YOUR MUSEUM MEMBERSHIP BY JOINING AN AFFILIATE GROUP Phoenix Art Museum offers two unique opportunities to experience our contemporary art and fashion design collections in deeper ways by adding on to any Circles of Support or Museum membership. F RIE ND S OF CON T E MP OR A RY A R T

Thank you to Arizona Costume Institute, Men’s Arts Council, and Friends of Contemporary Art for their continued and vital support of Phoenix Art Museum.

Our Friends of Contemporary Art (FCA) are Museum Members who support our contemporary art exhibitions, education programs, and acquisitions while enjoying access to exclusive contemporary art experiences and other exciting benefits. Join FCA today to discover what’s new, what’s now at Phoenix Art Museum.*

Annual ACI Memberships begin at $40 (Nouveau under 35). Core benefits include:

A R IZ O N A CO S T U M E IN S T I T U T E Arizona Costume Institute (ACI) members are Museum Members who provide valuable support for our fashion exhibitions, education programs, and acquisitions, all while enjoying private opening receptions for fashion exhibitions, special member pricing for seasonal luncheons and events, and more. Annual FCA memberships begin at $100 (Friends under 40). Core benefits include:

Join ACI today to support the art of fashion design in the Valley of the Sun.*

A F R E E A D M ISSIO N for two to exclusive contemporary art exhibition previews A F R E E A D M ISSIO N and priority seating for two for contemporary art lectures and film series A C O M P LI M EN TARY SU B SC R IP T IO N to the tri-annual FCA e-newsletter A I N V I TATI O N S to special events celebrating contemporary art. To join FCA or learn about additional levels of support, contact the Affiliate Groups Office at 602.257.2176 or visit phxart.org/fca. image credits: (left to right) Shara Hughes, Jagged Little Hills, 2018.

Oil and acrylic on canvas. Lenhardt Collection. Installation view; ACI, Haute Photography.

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A S PE CIA L MEMBER PRI CI NG for luncheons and events A S UBS CRIPTI ON to a monthly President’s e-newsletter A PA RT ICIPATI ON in the ACI Book Club A INV ITAT ION to opening receptions for fashion exhibitions A INV ITAT ION to fashion conversation-andcocktails events. To join ACI or learn about additional levels of support, contact ACI today at 602.307.2011 or visit arizonacostumeinstitute.org. *An active Phoenix Art Museum Membership is a prerequisite for FCA and ACI membership.

M E N ’ S A R T S COU NCIL S INCE 1 9 6 7 , Men’s Arts Council (MAC) has raised more than $9.7 million given in support of exhibitions, acquisitions, education programs, and vital operations at Phoenix Art Museum. With more than 200 members and through non-traditional fundraising efforts, including the Bell Lexus North Scottsdale Copperstate 1000 vintage-car road rally, the Copperstate Double Gun, and the Copperstate Overland vintage off-road rally, the non-profit organization continues to support the Museum and help increase access to the visual arts in our city and region. MAC membership is by invitation only. To learn more about MAC and their annual events, visit mensartscouncil.com.

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CIRCLES OF SUPPORT

Circles of Support offers a fulfilling way to deepen your relationship with Phoenix Art Museum and transform your community. We are profoundly grateful to our Circles donors for their dedication to the arts and arts education in Arizona.

TAKE YOUR SUPPORT FOR THE ARTS TO THE NEXT LEVEL

The work we do at Phoenix Art Museum to engage our community with world-class art and inspired education programs is made possible through the generosity of our member communities, led in particular by our Circles of Support donors.

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s the prestigious annual-giving program of Phoenix Art Museum, Circles of Support creates a pathway of philanthropy for those whose generosity of spirit moves them to make a significant impact on the Museum’s exhibitions, education programs, and vital operations, all while offering a range of meaningful experiences. From exclusive previews of major exhibitions to lectures featuring renowned artists and scholars, Circles donors enjoy unprecedented access to Phoenix Art Museum, empowering them to engage with our collections and exhibitions in a whole new way. Join Circles of Support today to enrich your life and ensure the legacy of your museum.

CIRCLES OF SUPPORT OPPORTUNITIES BEGIN AT $1,500. BENEFIT S INCLUDE: A U N LI M I TE D AD M ISSIO N to the Museum, all year long A F R E E O R D ISC O U N T ED AD M ISSIO N to many lectures, artist talks, concerts, films, special events, and more A A C C E S S TO SP EC IAL -EN G AG EM EN T exhibitions before they open to the public A E X C LU S I V E EXH IB IT IO N C EL EB R AT IO N S A I N V I TATI O N to the Circles Presents annual lecture series, featuring worldclass artists, arts-and-culture thought leaders, scholars, and more A R E C I P R O C AL G EN ER AL AD M ISSIO N to more than 1,000 cultural institutions in North America A 1 5 % D I S CO U N T at The Museum Store

A 1 0 % DIS COUNT at Palette Restaurant A COMPL IME NTA RY S UBS CRIPT ION to PhxArt Magazine and an exclusive Circles’ e-newsletter A A NNUA L DONOR RE COGNIT ION in PhxArt Magazine A OPPORT UNIT Y T O JOIN Museum specialinterest affiliate groups A COMPL IME NTA RY GUE S T PA S S E S and so much more. Already a Circles of Support donor? Upgrade to a higher level of philanthropic giving today to strengthen your impact and unlock additional benefits, including invitations to VIP receptions with artists and lecturers.

image credit: Installation view, Emphatics: Avant-Garde Fashion 1963-2013, 2016.

CIRCL E S M E M B E R S HIP S BY- M ON T H Beginning at $125 per month Interested in joining the Circles of Support family, but looking for a more manageable path to your $1,500 minimum annual contribution? Divide your Circles of Support annual gift into 12 simple monthly payments, beginning at $125 per month, while still enjoying the full array of Circles of Support benefits, all year long. Contact the Circles of Support Office to learn more about our Circles of Support Membership-byMonth program. 602.257.2115 | circles@phxart.org

For more information about Circles of Support at Phoenix Art Museum, contact the Circles of Support Office at 602.257.2115 or circles@phxart.org.

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PL A NNED GIVING

SUPPORT THE LEGACY OF PHOENIX ART MUSEUM Planned gifts to Phoenix Art Museum provide vital support for the future of the visual arts at the Museum and in Arizona.

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he Museum’s 21st Century Society is a group of highly honored friends who have included Phoenix Art Museum in their estate plans to help ensure our diverse community can continue to engage with inspiring art from around the world and meaningful arts education programs for generations to come. Society members have made a planned gift of $5,000 or more to Phoenix Art Museum in the form of:

A B E Q U E S TS to the Museum in a will or living trust A G I F TS of cash or appreciated securities to establish charitable gift annuities A C H A R I TA B L E T R U ST S with Phoenix Art Museum named as the beneficiary A P A I D LI F E IN SU R AN C E policies or retirement accounts with Phoenix Art Museum named as the beneficiary A TR I B U TE G IFT S A E N D O W M E NT G IFT S In recognition of their deep generosity, Society members are invited to an annual celebration and reception, along with other events throughout the year. They are also recognized on the donor board in the Museum. For more information on how you can support the future of Phoenix Art Museum through a planned gift, contact the Development Office at plannedgiving@ phxart.org. We are happy to work together to find a solution that best suits your needs and interests, while ensuring the greatest impact on the Museum and our community.

image credit: Keisai Eisen, Seated Beauty at Yoshiwara, 1835. Woodblock print. Bequest of Ruth Bank Weil.

Phoenix Art Museum is profoundly grateful to our 21st Century Society members and those whose realized gifts help us remain a pillar of the arts in our city, state, and region. For a full list of 21st Century Society members and realized gifts, see page 127. NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART.ORG

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At Phoenix Art Museum, we believe that art should be for all people, and our success in increasing access to the arts and arts education is made possible through the generous support of both local and national businesses and organizations that share our commitment to community.

CORPOR AT E COUNC I MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE COMMUNITY YOUR COMP

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SUPPORT

Supporting the arts is good for business and our community.

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he Museum’s Corporate Council is a corporate membership program that provides a path for businesses to invest in the work of Phoenix Art Museum and ensure the future of the visual arts in Arizona. A Corporate Council membership provides critical, unrestricted funds to empower Museum innovation, ensure organizational excellence, and support vital operations. In return, Corporate Council members earn exclusive benefits, such as a free-admission weekend for employees and invitations to upper-level Member receptions and some Circles of Support events. Join the Museum’s Corporate Council today to make an immediate impact on our city’s cultural landscape.

A N N U A L CO R P O R AT E CO U N CIL M E M B E R S HIP S R A N GE F R O M $1, 5 0 0 T O $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 . B E N E F I T S IN CL U DE : A F RE E A DMI SSI ON for all employees to the annual Corporate Council Weekend A INV ITAT IONS to Circles Presents lecture series A INV ITAT IONS to upper-level Member receptions

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A RE COGNIT ION on the Museum’s donor board and Corporate Council roster

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A COMPL IMENTARY SUBSCRI PTI ON to PhxArt Magazine A 2 0 % DIS COUNTED MEMBERSHI P offers for employees. For more information about the Corporate Council program at Phoenix Art Museum, contact the Development Office at corporate@phxart.org.

ANY CALLS HOME. image credit: Bill Timmerman

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART.ORG

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WHY WE GIVE

The arts can offer experiences that improve our quality of life, define who we are as a community, and support economic development.” ANDRE A MORENO

M A N AGER, SRP COM MUNIT Y OU T RE ACH Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 1973

At SRP, we value and support arts and cultural organizations like Phoenix Art Museum because we know a vibrant arts community is vital to the growth and advancement of a major metropolitan area like Phoenix. For several years, we have proudly sponsored the Museum’s Free Wednesdays, a program that offers free general admission for every visitor from 3–9 pm on each Wednesday of the month. We believe it is important to provide every member of our community with an equal opportunity to experience art, which is why we support Phoenix Art Museum and its efforts to increase access to the visual arts for all people.

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T H A NK YOU

Phoenix Art Museum gratefully acknowledges the generosity of our donors, whose annual gifts benefit our exhibitions, educational programs, and services for the community. Please Note: This list recognizes those who have made a gift between July 1, 2018 and June 30, 2019.

$1, 0 0 0 + CU M U L AT I V E GI V IN G $10 0,0 0 0 + APS Arizona Community Foundation California Community Foundation City of Phoenix Carol and *Larry Clemmensen Lee and *Mike Cohn Discount Tire Company The *Dorrance Family Foundation Ford Foundation Freeport-McMoRan Inc. Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund *Mrs. Nancy Hanley *Jon and Carrie Hulburd *David and Dawn Lenhardt Men’s Arts Council The Opatrny Family Foundation Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Jonas and Jacqueline Schreider *Sue and Bud Selig The Steele Foundation Charles and *Meredith von Arentschildt The Rob and Melani Walton Foundation Fred E. Wood

$ 5 0,0 0 0 – $ 9 9,9 9 9 °Alice and Jim Bazlen Andrew and °Amy Cohn *Carter and Susan Emerson The Flinn Foundation Ann and Chet Goldberg JPMorgan Chase & Co. °Ellen and Howard C. Katz J.W. Kieckhefer Foundation *Margot and Dennis Knight Vicki and Kent Logan National Endowment for the Arts *Donald and Judith Opatrny The Papp Family Foundation Phoenix Office of Arts and Culture *Blair and Lisa Portigal Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors Pam and *Ray Slomski SRP Carl & Marilynn Thoma Art Foundation

Thunderbirds Charities The Virginia M. Ullman Foundation Wells Fargo

$ 25,0 0 0 – $ 49,9 9 9 Anonymous Erin and Chris Andrews Arizona Commission on the Arts Craig & Barbara Barrett Foundation *Craig and Barbara Barrett Allison and Bob Bertrand Blue Cross® Blue Shield® of Arizona, an independent licensee of the Blue Cross and Blue Shield Association *Mr. and Mrs. Drew M. Brown Deborah G. Carstens Gretchen M. Cherrill and °Bradley D. Wilde Desert Star Construction *Mark and Diana Feldman Laurie and Budd Florkiewicz °Erin and John Gogolak *John and Kathleen Graham Jackson Family Foundation Jewish Community Foundation of Greater Phoenix *Jane and Mal Jozoff *Dr. Parvinder Jit Singh Khanuja and Parveen Kaur Khanuja Judy and *Alan Kosloff Jane A. Lehman and Alan G. Lehman Foundation °Richard and *Sally Lehmann Stanley and Tochia Levine Sam and °Judy Linhart Margaret T. Morris Foundation °F. Francis and Dionne Najafi National Philanthropic Trust Northern Trust Bank, NA *Rose and Harry Papp … PetSmart The Pivotal Foundation *Kim and Steve Robson °Betty and Newton Rosenzweig SC Johnson Giving, Inc. Jeanette H. Schmidt Schwab Charitable Fund Tres Points, LLC Wells Fargo Foundation

$10,0 0 0 – $ 24,9 9 9 Anonymous (2) °Roberta Aidem Jett and Julia Anderson Arizona 5 Arts Circle Arizona Taste Catering Milena and °Tony Astorga Atlasta Bank of America Bessemer National Gift Fund Ginger and *Don Brandt Sonia and John Breslow Bruce Brown Catering Carstens Family Funds Copper Square Kitchen Creations in Cuisine Catering Gloria and Philip Cowen David E. Adler, Inc. °Denise and Bob Delgado Cathy Dickey Herbert H. and Barbara C. Dow Foundation The Ellman Foundation Fabulous Food Falcon Investments Trust Allen and °Charlesa Feinstein Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund Joanie and Rick Fox Kenneth and Janet Glaser *Judy and Bill Goldberg … Mary Lou and Melvin Goldstein Greater Kansas City Community Foundation Beverly N. Grossman *Paul and Mary Beth Groves *Lila Harnett Dr. Oliver and Sharon Harper Billie Jo and Judd Herberger The Herberger Foundation Hospice of the Valley Intel Corporation Jo Malone London Ellen and Bob Kant Tracy and Jeff Katz Nancy and Najeeb Khan Del and °Sharron Lewis T.W. Lewis Foundation Janis and *Dennis Lyon M Catering by Michael’s

… Arizona Five Arts Circle * Current Trustee ° Past Trustee

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SUPPORT Maricopa Community Colleges Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. McKee Jane N. Mooty Foundation Moreno Family Foundation Morgan Stanley Global Impact Funding Trust, Inc. Robert and Marina Moric MRA Associates, Inc. Neiman Marcus Dr. and °Mrs. Hong-Kee Ong OUTFRONT Media *Mr. and Mrs. James S. Patterson, Jr. RED Development, LLC Saltlick Family Trust Santa Barbara Catering Company °Ms. Ann Siner Mr. and Mrs. Robert Smalley Jr. °Miriam and Yefim Sukhman Nancy Swanson Ann H. Symington Foundation To Be Continued...A Consignment Boutique Mollie C. Trivers and Shelley Cohn UMB Bank Arizona Vadara Quartz Surfaces Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth A. Vecchione °Mr. and Mrs. Louis A. Weil III Wells Fargo Private Bank

$ 5,0 0 0 – $ 9,9 9 9 Anonymous Richard Anderman ASU Foundation Richard Bilbrough Bonhams Betsy and Kent Bro Luba and Wes Burns Richard and Ann Carr Katherine and Charles Case Jennifer and Bill Clark Communities Foundation of Texas Corporate Presentation Network The De Falco Family Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Michael DeBell Pam Del Duca Larry Donelson Mr. and Mrs. Richard R. Donnelley, III Dr. and Mrs. Jack A. Friedland Goldman Sachs Gives Bud and Gerry Grout Rose O. Gustafson Judith Hardes Patricia Hawkins Jeanne and °Gary Herberger Peter Hernandez Char and William Hubble Ricki Dee and John Jennings Carol and Kenneth Kasses Amy Koch Catherine L. Lemon Jan and Tom Lewis … Arizona Five Arts Circle * Current Trustee ° Past Trustee

Lynne Love Lubar Family Foundation °Paul and Merle Marcus Martha Martin Susan and Philip W. Matos Pat and Keith McKennon My Sisters’ Charities National Bank of Arizona The Norton Foundation Elizabeth and Kyle Owens Matthew and Mary Palenica Camerone Parker McCulloch and Robert McCulloch, M.D. Earl and Pat Petznick PHX Architecture Premiere Wood Floors, Inc. Robert Burg Design Lois and John Rogers Eileen and Rob Rominger Sacks Tierney P.A. Iris and °Adam Singer Stephanie Larsen Interior Design Lisa and Brad Tank °Gary and Diane Tooker Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program Versant Capital Management Viamedia, Inc °Gilbert Waldman and Christy Vezolles °Mr. and Mrs. William G. Way Mr. and Mrs. Michael Zuieback

$ 2,5 0 0 – $ 4,9 9 9 Anonymous (2) Joan Baekeland Uta Monique Behrens Benevity Billi Springer & Associates °John and Oonagh Boppart Linda H. Breuer Ray and Mona Buse Kay Butler … Jennifer and Chip Carmer Susan and Alfred Chandler Charles Schwab & Co. Inc. Chris Jovanelly Interior Design Clara Choi *Amy S. Clague Edie and James Cloonan Clyde Hardware Co., Inc. Elaine and Sidney Cohen Libby and Joel Cohen Robert and Vanne Cowie Denise Milano Design Dickinson Wright Distinctive Custom Cabinetry Robert M. Dixon Jim and Betsy Donley DOXA Central, LLC Est Est Inc. Glenn and Mary Beth Evans

The French Bee Gammage & Burnham, PLC Amanda and Dana Garmany Paul Giancola and Carrie Lynn Richardson Laurie and Charles Goldstein Victoria and Rod Granberry Dean and Taylor Griffin Guided Home Design Josh and Cat Hartmann Lori and Howard Hirsch … Doris and Martin Hoffman Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. James D. Howard Mack Jones John Brooks, Inc. Juliska Dr. and Mrs. Jamie Kapner Jaffrey and Nadeem Kazi James and Ina Kort KT Tamm Inc Mr. and Mrs. Robert J. Lavinia Mr. Edward A. Lesser The Levin Family Charitable Foundation Thomas S. and Sheri A. Levin Jerry and Shirley Lewis Lisa Sette Gallery Dr. and Mrs. Robert F. Lorenzen Steve and Janice Marcus Cindy and °Don Martin Diane and Larry McComber Arthur Messinger and Eugenie Harris Milwaukee Jewish Federation Michael and Jane Murray Fred and Linda Nachman National Bank of Arizona Foundation Kay and Walter Oliver Michael and Susan Oster John J. Pappas Stan Payton Jody Pelusi Karen Rapp Nancy Riegel Karen Riley °Gail Rineberg Robert Burg Design Merle and Steve Rosskam … Elizabeth and Bryan Saba Saks Fifth Avenue James and Linda Saunders Jacqueline Schenkein and Michael Schwimmer Sheila Schwartz Timothy Schwimer Mr. George F. Sheer and Linda Porter Donna Stone Barbara and Jim Sturdivant Tabarka Studio Tarbell’s Vallone Design, Inc Mrs. Betty Van Denburgh Charles and Vonnie Wanner Waterworks, LLC CONTINUED ON PAGE 126

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SUPPORT Dr. and Mrs. William Weese Sherry Wilcop Daniel and Joy Wilhelm Wiseman and Gale Interiors Paul and Katherine Wolfehagen Woodcase Fine Cabinetry Inc.

$1,0 0 0 – $ 2,49 9 Anonymous (4) Judy Ackerman and Richard Epstein Dr. Dan and Miriam Ailloni-Charas Bert and Jill Alanko Makenna and Mike Albrecht … Rebecca Albrecht and Norris Livoni Caralee Allsworth Jean Ambler American Express Foundation Megan and John Anderson … Angelica Henry Design Avant-Garde Studio Ellen Andres-Schneider and Ralph Andres … Richard Banks and Cher Redmond Bar Napkin Productions °Carol Barmore Deborah Baronofsky Martin and Mary Ann Baumrind Matt D. Bedwell and Lindsay A. Mehrtens-Bedwell Philip and Lydia Bell Joan Benjamin and Larry Cherkis David and Susan Berman Neil Berman Karen and Gary Bethune James T. Bialac Sarah and David Bodney °Donna and Gus Boss William H. Brady, III and Magaly Blandón Nancy and Joe Braucher … Eric and Dorothy Bron Brenna C. Brooks and Jon Gabrielson Sumner Brown and Lyn Bailey Dana Bryant Buffalo Collection Robert Bulla Sue Bunch Susan Burman Mr. Joe Bushong and Mr. Chad Christian °Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Butler Camelback Interior Design LLC Cameo Jerry and Stefanie Cargill Philip Carll CeTerra Accents & Interiors Stephanie and James Chastain Jill Christenholz Marilee and David Clarke Clyde Hardware Co., Inc. Deborah and Richard Cookson … °Joyce Cooper Lattie and Elva Coor Sam Coppersmith Jon and Alicia Crumpton

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Mr. and Mrs. Robert P. Damico Mr. and Mrs. Alfred D’Ancona Jennifer Danziger Leslie Dashew and Jack Salisbury DeCesare Design Group Molly DeFilippis Maureen Delaney Luino and Margaret Dell’Osso Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Denk Designs By Robyn, LLC Paul and Frances Dickman Conrad Diven JoAnne Doll … Harold Dorenbecher and Mary Heiss Kathryn and Michael Dowell Sydney D. Dye and L. Michael Dye Dr. and Mrs. John Eckstein Eli Lilly and Company Foundation Judith and John Ellerman … Maureen and Tom Eye … Phillip and Sharon Felker Richard and Suzanne Felker Katalin Festy-Sandor Noel and Anne Fidel George and Ann Fisher Amy Flood and Larry West Flora Bella Dr. Stephen and Madeleine Fortunoff Susie and Don Fowls Juanita and Philip Francis Dr. Paul and Amy Gause The GE Foundation Allison Gee Elton Gilbert … Angela and Jeffrey Glosser … Dr. David and Joan M. Goldfarb °Richard and Susan Goldsmith Shawn and John Goodman Judy Gordon Peter and Wendy Gordon … Karen and James Grande Barbara Graves Heather and *Michael D. Greenbaum The Harold and Jean Grossman Family Foundation Kate Groves and Warren Meyer Christine and David Gustafson Jackie and Larry Gutsch … Ingrid Haas The °Diane and Bruce Halle Foundation Sharon Halliday and Joseph Lee Ms. Ashley Harder Karen and Lawrence Harris Marilyn W. Harris Dr. and Mrs. Douglas Hauser William Hawking … Michael Hawksworth and Anna Sokolova Mary and Gates Hawn The Head Family Foundation Maxine and Ralph Henig Ms. Mary Beth Herbert and Mr. Cecil Penn

Linda Herman Paul and Yinglu Hermanson Cheryl J. Hintzen-Gaines and Ira J. Gaines Leah Hoffman Michael and Genevieve Hogan Lynda and Arthur Horlick … Mimi and David Horwitz … Christine Hughes Betty Hum Nancy Husband Imoni Events Linda and Albert Jacobs Jeff and Sarah Joerres John Brooks, Inc. Donna Johnson Gigi Jordan and Bob Patterson °Dr. Eric Jungermann Barbara and Donald Kammerzell Kathy and Fred Kenny Eleanor and Bruce Knappenberger Carolyn Refsnes Kniazzeh John and Anabel Konwiser Richard and Christine Kovach Susan Kovarik and Brian Schneider Judy Krolikowski °Carolyn R. Laflin Bruce and Jane Lawson Cindy and Benjamin Lenhardt Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Levine Dr. Dorothy Lincoln-Smith and Dr. Harvey Smith … Nils Lindfors and Marilyn Kluge °K. David and Ann Lindner Lissa Lee Hickman, Inc Michael and Susan Little Livingston Foundation Mr. and Mrs. John Lucking Don and Debra Luke Luxe Pros Susan Lynch Carol Ann and Harvey Mackay Main Dish Mr. and Mrs. Daniel G. Maloney Roger and Victoria Marce Paul and Ann Markow Mr. and Mrs. James Marsh Sandra Matteucci Katherine May Gregory and Anita Mayer Carol Davidson McCrady Tammy McLeod and John Hamilton °Jim and Jean Meenaghan Janet and John Melamed … James and Ana Melikian Mendil + Meyer Design Studio Victoria and Anthony Miachika … Glenda and Eugene Miller Jolyn and Earl Miller Sherrell Miller Doris and Eliot Minsker … MMB Studio

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SUPPORT ModaScapes Interior Design Carole and Arte Moreno Gene and Connie Nicholas °Priscilla and Michael Nicholas Richard B. and °Patricia E. Nolan Noteworthy American Women Project OBJECTS Kenneth O’Connor and Deedee Rowe Dawn and Michael Olsen Carol Orloski The Ottosen Family Foundation Ownby Design Judy Passalaqua David and Mary Patino … Nancy Pendleton and Robert Smith Helen J. Pierson Mrs. Arnold Portigal Helene and Joseph Presutti Deb & Bob Pulver Foundation Mrs. Maritom K. Pyron Phyllis and James Rector Betsy Retchin … Ida Rhea … Christine Rhodes Carol and Thomas Rogers … Stephena C. Romanoff … Herbert and Laura Roskind ROUX Design Studio LLC Sandra and Earl Rusnak … Vincent and Janie Russo Ryan Companies US, Inc. Val and Ray Sachs … Mary and Tom Sadvary Saks Fifth Avenue Jana Sample Stella and Mark Saperstein … Claire Sargent Ronald Sassano Janice C. Schade Charles and Adrienne Schiffner Carol and Randy Schilling … Fred and Arleen Schwartz Arlene and Morton Scult Seattle Foundation The Seidler Foundation Seneca Jewelry Lisa and Dan Shapiro Jenna and Danny Sharaby Mr. and Mrs. Robert Shull Kurt Slobodzian and Patricia Weegar Donald and Dorothea Smith Lynne Smith Mr. and Mrs. Richard Snell Jean and Scott Spangler Dr. and Mrs. Robert Spetzler Walter Spitz Sandra Staehle and Keith G. Johnson Judy and Bud Stanley Ann Stanton and Robert Haddock Lou and Larry Stein … Arizona Five Arts Circle * Current Trustee ° Past Trustee

Barbara Steiner Rosemary and George Stelmach … °Betsy and Bruce Stodola Paula and Jack Strickstein Rick and Lynda Strusiner Stuart Weitzman Susan Hersker Interior Design Gustavo A. Tabares Janice Tekofsky Eric and Lauri Termansen Fred and Gail Tieken Mark and Mary Timpany To Be Continued...A Consignment Boutique William C. Torrey Dr. and Mrs. Richard Towbin Pat and Phil Turberg … Missy Turner Jacquie and Merrill Tutton Vallone Design, Inc Susan and Chuck Watts Gerald Weiner Stephanie and John Weldon, Jr. Wharf Rat Ventures and Terese Cilluffo Trudy and Steven Wiesenberger Mildred B. Williams Sandra Williams Gretchen and Dick Wilson … Ronald G. Wilson and Bonnie Naegle-Wilson Stephen and Jeanne Winograd Wiseman and Gale Interiors Stephen and Robin Woodworth Carole and Jack Wooldrik Delwyn and Diana Worthington Pat and Barry Yellen °Judy Zuber

21 S T CE N T U R Y S OCIE T Y Phoenix Art Museum gratefully acknowledges our 21st Century Society members and those whose realized gifts have helped support our exhibitions, educational programs, and services for the community.

U N RE A L IZE D Anonymous (3) °Alvan and Sara Adams Annie Allen Milena and °Tony Astorga Linda and James K. Ballinger Dr. and Mrs. John A. Bamberl Pari and °Peter Banko Jim and °Alice Bazlen Uta Monique Behrens Viola F. Bernstein Ben Bethel Oonagh and °John Boppart Bonnie and °John Bouma LaVerne Beall Burhans

Joe Bushong Iris Cashdan-Fishman Marc and Mary Ann Cavness Mr. Sandy Chamberlain and Dr. David Kest Jae and Diann Christensen Chad Christian *Amy S. Clague Elaine W. and Sidney A. Cohen °George and Mandy Cohen Pat and Gary Cohen Lee and *Mike Cohn Mr. and Mrs. °Jerry Colangelo °Charles Coronella Harry R. Courtright °Bruce Covill and Lucia Renshaw °Joan D. Cremin Dorothy and Herold Crume °Joseph and Kathy D’Amico °Denise and Robert Delgado °A. J. Fleet Dickey Marnie Dietrich Gary J. Egan and Daniel A. Holterman *Mark and Diana Feldman Sharon and Victor Figarelli Kate Forbes Sharyn and Stuart Frankel Mr. and Mrs. William Gardner Dr. Paul and Amy Gause °Richard and Susan Goldsmith *Michael and Heather Greenbaum Pamela Grieco *Paul and Mary Beth Groves Stephen and Marcia Guerrant °Meryl H. Haber °Mrs. Diane Cummings Halle *Mrs. Lee T. Hanley Terrence M. Hanson *Lila Harnett Mary Heiss and Harold Dorenbecher Lynette Heller Mary Beth Herbert Cheryl Hintzen-Gaines and Ira Gaines Dr. Bill Howard Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth Husband Ray and Dee Isham Henry E. (Hank) and MaryAnn L. Johnson Stanford S. Johnson *Jane and Mal Jozoff °Dr. Eric Jungermann Karen Justice Don Karner Ruth R. Kaspar °Ellen Katz Mohammad and Vernita Khosti Dottie Kobik Dr. and Mrs. Ravi Koopot Shawn and °Joseph Lampe Thomas and Julianne LaPorte *Sally Lehmann Tochia and Stan Levine CONTINUED ON PAGE 128

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SUPPORT °Sharron Lewis Linda Ligon Dr. Dorothy Lincoln-Smith and Dr. Harvey Smith °Judy and Sam Linhart °James and Dr. Michele Lundy Janis and *Dennis Lyon Jeffrey Manley °Paul and Merle Marcus Mrs. Robert McCreary Glenda and Eugene Miller Dr. Herbert and Susan Miller Roy and Mary Miller °John H. Morrell °Susan and Mark Mulzet °Steve and Dr. Kristen Nelson Robert and Mary Newstead The Nieto Family °Patricia and Richard Nolan June Olson Harry and *Rose Papp *Jim and Anita Patterson Cecil W. Penn Mr. and Mrs. Manuel A. Perez Linda Peshkin John and Laura Phelps Don and Karen Randolph Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan W. Reining Mr. and °Mrs. Robert P. Robinson Mary Ell Ruffner Elaine and Timothy Ryan C. Angus Schaal Miriam Schaeuble Dawn and °Jay Schlott Steve and Anita Schultz Melanie D. and Richard I. Shear Rowena Simberg °Adam and Iris Singer Leonard and °Angela Singer Albert Skorman Pamela and *Raymond Slomski Dr. Jerry N. Smith and Vickie Hamilton-Smith Helen Spacek Becky Curtis Stevens Patricia Stillman Roxie Stouffer Paula Strickstein V.T. and Vicky Tarulis Allyson J. Teply George Thiewes French Thompson Diane and °Gary Tooker Betty W. Van Denburgh Irene H. Vasquez and Mildred B. Williams Abram C. Villegas Charles and *Meredith von Arentschildt Joan and James von Germeten Ms. Susan von Hellens °William G. and Mary Way °Louis A. and Daryl G. Weil Naomi and Gerald Weiner °Steve and Ann Wheeler

128

Carol D. Whiteman Ronald Wilson and Bonnie Naegle-Wilson Georgia Ray and R. Stephen Wolfe Robin and Stephen Woodworth °Mares Jan Wright °Judy and Sidney Zuber, M.D.

RE A L IZE D Eleanor Ableson Dr. Robert Adami E. Mark Adams and Beth Van Hoesen Adams Joan and Lorenz Anderman Ruth and Hartley Barker Claudia I. Baum George K. Baum II LeRoyce Bennett C. W. Brose Lynne and Warren Brown °Yvette Ward Bryant °Pat Burney Mabel and James Cahill Spiro Cakos Susie Cakos John M. Clements Ruth Clements Jane Pearson Collamer Virginia S. Connor Mary Moore Coughlin Russell Cowles Mary Meeker Cramer °Philip C. Curtis Ralph Dudley Daniel Paul Hyde Davies °Barbara C. Dow Nancy L. Durham Lucille B. Earle Liese Lotte and Albert Eckstein Jeannette Shambaugh Elliott °Darby and Herschel Epstein Josephine “JoJo” Fabrizi Richard Faletti Donald Farnsworth Allen and °Charlesa Feinstein Carol and Harold Felton Arthur Fishman, M.D. Colin R. Floyd Nancy Gale Forrester Eunice Fort Reginald J. Franklin Margaret P. Gale Georgia Gelabert George F. Getz, Jr. Marie Connor Girardin Ann and Chet Goldberg Bernard Grebanier Ruth Gunston Rose O. Gustafson Delbert Harr °Sybil Harrington Margareta Harris Kax and °Bob Herberger

Barbara Turner Hitchcock Hugh Hard Horner Arleen W. Hughes Margaret Iglauer °Edward ‘Bud’ Jacobson Mrs. Oliver B. James Vivienne B. Jennings Eva Jungermann Robert D. Kaufmann Nan Kempner Sharon Lee Ketai Margaret Kirkpatrick Helen M. Kollmeyer-Herzberg Betty M. La Fevers Helen Lawler Kathleen I. Leavitt Frances Leonard °Orme Lewis Dr. Patricia Lynch Lyon Family Estate Elizabeth B. MaGuire James and Dhira Mahoney Felicia Meyer Marsh °Maxine and Jonathan Marshall Beatrice McDowell Mrs. Martha McKelvie Miriam A. McKeown Maurine Mueller Gerald H. Myers Mary K. O’Malley °Mr. and Mrs. L. Roy Papp Helen Gunn Powell Herbert L. Pratt Margarite Mary Ramond Mildred E. Reed °Ginger Renner Allan Richard Reznikoff Genevieve D. Roach Lucy Roca Margeurite Roll Joseph and Gloria Rose Robert R. Rosenbaum °Betty and Newton Rosenzweig °Jay S. Ruffner Evelyn and Ernest Sauer Jeanette and Bernard Schmidt Jonas and Jacqueline Schreider Carolyn Schulte Frederick J. Schweitzer Charles A. Simberg Lee H. Slater Sylvia Sleigh Carolann Smurthwaite Marjorie and George Springer Frances Hover Stanley Mildred N. Starr Ettie Stettheimer Earl Stroh °Betty Lou Summers Ruth Hobday Sussman Helen C. Tarbox

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SUPPORT Astrid L. Thomas Arlene Tostenrud °Virginia Ullman Florence Van Norden Baroness Carl von Wrangell

Anna Maude Webster Albertine M. Weed Ruth Bank Weil Lee W. Werhan Fred E. Wood

Eleanor and George Woodyard Florence Woolsey Leon H. Woolsey Hamilton W. Wright

IN R E COGNI T IO N O F T R A N S F O R M AT I V E GIF T S – $1 MILLION+ DONORS OVER PAST 10 YEARS Phoenix Art Museum is profoundly grateful to those donors who have given more than $1 million to the Museum in the past decade in support of exhibitions, educational programs, and services for the community. Please note: This list recognizes those who have made a gift between July 1, 2009 and June 30, 2019.

F Y10 TO F Y19

Bud and Gerry Grout The Diane & Bruce Halle Foundation JPMorgan Chase & Co. Men’s Arts Council Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust Betty and Newton Rosenzweig Sue and Bud Selig Angela and Leonard Singer

City of Phoenix Lee and Mike Cohn Contemporary Forum Joan D. Cremin Discount Tire Company The Dorrance Family Foundation

CE L E BR AT E IN T HE HE ART OF P HOE NI X Phoenix Art Museum offers unique, state-of-the-art settings for a wide range of private events. From exquisite cocktail gatherings, to awards banquets, to corporate meetings, celebrate your next special day, any day, at the largest art museum in the Southwest.

F O R M O R E IN F O R M AT IO N O N H O S T IN G A P R I VAT E E V E N T AT P H O E NI X A R T M U S E U M , V I S I T P H X A R T. O R G O R CO N TA C T U S AT E V E N T S @ P H X A R T. O R G .

image credit: Haute Photography

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A PRÈS PA M Plan on visiting Phoenix Art Museum for its 60th anniversary? PHOENIX magazine has designed five Downtown itineraries just for you. B Y M A R I LY N H A W K E S O F PHOENIX M AGA ZINE

130

T HE M OR NING / MIDD AY V I S I T

H EAD O VER T O PHOENIX ART MUSEUM

3

AFTER THE INSTAL L AT ION, duck into

4

WALK O F F YOUR L UNCH at the Japanese

(PAM) to catch the Philip C. Curtis and the Landscapes of Arizona installation (through mid-November 2020). Curtis first came to Arizona in 1937 to establish the Phoenix Federal Art Center and returned in 1947 to paint surreal compositions using Arizona’s landscapes through the lens of magical realism.

1 1

2

STAR T YO U R D AY at hipster hangout

Jobot Coffee & Bar on Roosevelt Row and pick up a house-made scone to go with a chai latte. If the weather’s nice, snag a spot on the patio for topnotch people watching. 333 E. Roosevelt St., Phoenix, 602-281-7127, jobotcoffee.com

Palette, the Museum’s onsite farm-totable restaurant, for a cranberry-studded pecan chicken salad sandwich. 1625 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, 602-257-2191, phxart. org/palette Friendship Garden, where you can learn about Japanese horticulture and garden design in a tranquil park setting. 1125 N. Third Ave., Phoenix, 602-274-8700, japanesefriendshipgarden.org

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART MAGAZINE

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M FUN

3

ART + ART 1

TH E D O W N TO W N P H O EN I X arts

scene springs to life on First Fridays, when galleries and other art spaces open their doors from 6-10 pm on the first Friday of the month. Stop at PAM (free general admission during First Fridays) to take in PhxArt60: The Past Decade, an exhibition highlighting the growth of the Museum’s permanent collection over the past 10 years. AFTER TH E EXH I B I TI O N , make a beeline to Found:Re, a boutique hotel chockfull of locally curated contemporary art scattered throughout the property. The hotel also features an outdoor display box with ever-changing public art offerings by local artists. Time it right and listen to live jazz on the patio from 7-10 pm. 1100 N. Central Ave., Phoenix, 602-875-8000, foundrehotels.com

2

4

3

H U N G RY? Head over to Taco

Chelo for some grub and a couple of Jose Cuervo-laced margaritas and you’ll be ready to tackle Roosevelt Row Art District’s galleries. 501 E. Roosevelt St., 602368-5316, tacochelo.com

1 4

DON’ T MISS MADE art

boutique (922 N. Fifth St., 602-256-MADE, madephx.com), which features one-of-a-kind items made by more than 100 artists, and then walk to monOrchid Gallery (monOrchid, 214 E. Roosevelt St., 602-253-0339, monorchid.com) to see works by the gallery’s current crop of creatives, including mixed media artist Judith Ann Miller and contemporary abstract painter Michael Viglietta. CAP OFF your evening with a Mexi-Cold Brew laced with tequila and sweetened with Mexican Coca Cola at The Dressing Room. 220 E. Roosevelt St., 602777-0763, conceptuallysocial. squarespace.com

5

CONTINUED ON PAGE 132

2

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A PRÈS PA M FUN

PA M + L AT IN A R T VISIT PAM’S American Scenes/ Americas Seen installation, featuring the works of celebrated muralists and abstract artists of the 1930s and 1940s, including Diego Rivera and Alfredo Ramos Martínez.

1

2

CONT INU E T H E T H E ME by taking a self-

guided tour of the many building-side murals scattered throughout the Downtown area. Stop by the ASU Immigration Mural near Central Avenue and Fillmore Street to see a mural depicting a wide range of immigrant experiences, coordinated by artist Hugo Medina; see Los Suns, a representation of Phoenix Suns Los Suns City Edition uniforms by Lalo Cota on the east side of Carly’s Bistro, 128 E. Roosevelt St.; and visit Sign of the Times by Hugo Medina, a mural showing an artist’s reaction to change in the Roosevelt Row District. 407 E. Roosevelt St. muralsofphoenix.com

2 132

3

3

G LI M P SE MURAL S on Grand Avenue on

your way to enjoy an early dinner at Barrio Café Gran Reserva, chef Silvana Salcido Esparza’s shoebox-size restaurant, where you might find squash blossoms, mole dishes, and other surprises on her imaginative menu. The James Beard Awardnominated chef also boasts a substantial vegan menu. While you’re enjoying her exceptional tres leches cake dotted with berries, check out the restaurant’s colorful murals. 1301 W. Grand Ave., 602-252-2777, barriocafe.com

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1

PA M + M U S IC 1

IF YOU’R E A FA N of snow-covered peaks and sweeping bucolic vistas, you’ll enjoy the Sublime Landscapes installation at PAM, featuring American landscapes as well as distant locations from the Amazon to the frozen Arctic. AFT ER T H E MU S E U M, stop by Cibo Urban Pizzeria for an artisanal pizza on the leafy patio or grab a table in the restored 1913 bungalow. 603 N. Fifth Ave., 602-4412697, cibophoenix.com

2

3

2

AFTER D I N N ER , choose a music venue:

Crescent Ballroom, a mid-size spot with a full bar that showcases everything from local folk rockers to standup comedians; Valley Bar, a gathering place with billiards and games and a 250-seat music hall with a nightly lineup of music, live readings, and comedy; or The Van Buren, a larger hall with a mix of headliners from the Indigo Girls to Snoop Dogg. statesidepresents.com

3

CONTINUED ON PAGE 134

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A PRÈS PA M FUN

PA M + L IGH T R A IL NIGH T L IF E TH E LO N G - AN TI C I P ATED Legends of Speed exhibition (opening November 3) features more than 20 legendary race cars by Maserati, Mercedes, Alfa Romeo, and other marques. Some cars have been driven by celebrated drivers and have won highly competitive races like Le Mans and the Indy 500.

1

Start PAM

McDowell Rd.

Roosevelt St.

COBRA ARCADE BAR McKinley St.

Second St.

Central Ave.

First Ave.

Van Buren St.

AFTER VI EW I N G these sleek beauties, hop on the light rail at the McDowell Road and Central Avenue station for a short ride to the Roosevelt Street and Central Avenue station for some Downtown fun.

2

FR O M TH E STATI O N , walk to Cobra Arcade Bar to play vintage video games and pinball while listening to DJ tunes. 801 N. Second St., 602-595-5873, cobraarcadebar.com

3

4

N EXT, STO P at Gypsy Bar inside Lucky

5

EN D YO U R N I G H T at Bitter & Twisted

Strike to bust some moves on the dance floor. 50 W. Jefferson St., 602-732-5490, luckystrikesocial.com

Washington St.

GYPSY BAR Jefferson St.

BITTER & TWISTED COCKTAIL PARLOUR

Cocktail Parlour sipping inventive premium cocktails while devouring a Dragon Dumpling Burger. Finish with Campfire Marshmallows and call it a night. Or call an Uber. 1 W. Jefferson, 602-340-1924, bitterandtwistedaz.com

1 134

5

2 image credits: (pages 130-131; clockwise from top)

Jobot, Wenhui Dong; Palette, Phoenix Art Museum; The Propeller Group (Phunam Thuc Ha; Matt Lucero; Tuan Andrew Nguyen), AK-47 vs The M16, 2015. Fragments of AK-47 and M16 bullets, ballistics gel and custom vitrine. Purchased with funds provided by Contemporary Forum; Found:RE courtesy Found:RE; Japanese Friendship Garden, Art Holeman; (page 132, top to bottom) Barrio Gran Reserva, Chris Loomis; ASU Immigration by Hugo Medina and Los Suns by Lalo Cota murals, Travis Whittaker; (page 133, clockwise from top left) Installation view American Scenes/Americas Seen, Phoenix Art Museum; Cibo Urban Pizzeria, Mirelle Inglefield; Valley Bar, Carrie Evans; The Van Buren, courtesy The Van Buren; (this page, clockwise from top) Bitter & Twisted Cocktail Parlour, Angelina Aragon; Cobra Arcade Bar, Mirelle Inglefield; 1957 Ferrari 315 S Scaglietti Sypder, Private Collection. Photography: Bill Pack / V-12 Enterprises.

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART MAGAZINE

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WHY WE GIVE

Watching busloads of school children explore the galleries and participate in Museum programs is the best reward.” MEREDITH VON ARENT SCHILDT

VICE CH AIR OF T HE BOA RD OF T RUST EES

CHARLES VON ARENT SCHILDT PHIL A N T HROPIST

CHARLES VON ARENT SCHILDT JR. PHIL A N T HROPIST

Suppor ting Phoe nix Ar t Mu se um Since 2012

Art is a wonderful connector of people, and Phoenix Art Museum is a vibrant institution that offers exhibitions and education programs that expose our community to other cultures and experiences. With reduced budgets for art programs in our public schools, the Museum’s education programs become increasingly critical and valuable as we try to fill the void. As a family that has always loved art and participating in our community, we know our support is vital to providing access to the arts, especially for our community’s youngest members. That’s why we are proud to support Phoenix Art Museum.

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020 / PHXART.ORG

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LEGENDS OF SPEED

CA R FINDER

Plan on visiting the ground-breaking Legends of Speed exhibition? Cut to the chase with this handy decision tree, presented by PHOENIX magazine.

S TA

RT

HE

WHAT’S MOST IMPORTANT TO YOU: SPEED, HISTORY, O R D E S I G N ?

RE

SPEED

HISTORY

DESIGN

YES, I’M A HOMER.

DRIVETRAIN ARIZONA CONNECTION IMPORTANT?

WELL, THAT WOULD BE THE 1973 PORSCHE 917/30. 0-60 IN 1.9 SECONDS. WHOOSH.

1911 FRANKLIN. AN EARLY CACTUS DERBY COMPETITOR. PG. 83

1965 LOTUS-FORD TYPE 38. THE FIRST REARENGINE RACER TO WIN THE INDIANAPOLIS 500. PG. 88

NOT NECESSARILY…

THE LATTER ONE.

USA, BABY ENOUGH WITH THE DENSE CAR JARGON. JUST WANNA SEE SOMETHING SEXY.

EUROPEAN OR AMERICAN?

FROM THE CONTINENT, DAHLINK.

YES

IS YOUR KNOWLEDGE AND APPRECIATION OF HISTORY GENERALLY LIMITED TO WHAT YOU SEE IN MOVIES? YOU GOT ME

DO YOU WATCH A LOT OF WORLD WAR II DOCS ON NETFLIX?

1962 FERRARI 250 GTO. DRIVEN BY A REAL FRENCH MARQUIS! PG. 87

ARE YOU A DRIVETRAIN PERSON OR A CHASSIS/BODY PERSON?

1957 MASERATI 450S. AN AUTOMOTIVE SOPHIA LOREN. PG. 87

YOU OFFEND ME, SIR. NOT IF I CAN HELP IT.

1934 ALFA ROMEO TIPO B P3. BASICALLY THE JESSE OWENS OF RACE CARS. PG. 84

1960 MASERATI TIPO 61 “BIRDCAGE.” YOU’LL UNDERSTAND WHEN YOU SEE IT. PG. 87 1968 FORD GT40. INSPIRED EARLY OSCAR FRONTRUNNER FORD VS. FERRARI WITH MATT DAMON AND CHRISTIAN BALE. PG. 88

1927 MILLER 91. ONE OF THE GREAT EARLY AMERICAN RACE CARS. PG. 83

image credits: (clockwise from top left) 1973 Porsche 917/30, RK Motors Private Collection; 1965 Lotus-Ford Type 38, From the Collections

of The Henry Ford, Dearborn, Michigan; 1960 Maserati Tipo 61 “Birdcage,” Courtesy of Sunchase Holdings; 1968 Ford GT40. Rob and Melani Walton Collection; 1934 Alfa Romeo Tipo B P3, Private Collection, Photography: Bill Pack / V-12 Enterprises.

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6 0 T H A N N I V E R S A RY COM M E MOR AT I V E I S S U E

NOVEMBER 2019–FEBRUARY 2020

LEGENDS OF SPEED / 60TH ANNIVERSARY / ANTONIO / THE PART Y phxart.org

Profile for Phoenix Art Museum

Phoenix Art Museum Magazine 60th Anniversary Commemorative Issue – Fall/Winter 2019-2020  

Phoenix Art Museum Magazine 60th Anniversary Commemorative Issue – Fall/Winter 2019-2020, featuring articles about the Legends of Speed exhi...

Phoenix Art Museum Magazine 60th Anniversary Commemorative Issue – Fall/Winter 2019-2020  

Phoenix Art Museum Magazine 60th Anniversary Commemorative Issue – Fall/Winter 2019-2020, featuring articles about the Legends of Speed exhi...

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