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INTRODUCING GRAND PRESIDENT SEAN SHINGLER • The 66th General Convention • A Letter from Grand President Shingler • Distinguished Alumnus Winner Eric Baron • Phi Sig’s New Look • Our Heritage

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TA B L E OF CONTENTS

FAL L 2 017

4 New Beginnings

Chief Executive Officer and Executive Director Nicholas Zuniga introduces himself in his inaugural Letter From The Editor, and speaks about the exciting things that Phi Sig is moving

8 66th General Convention

Thank you to all the individuals and groups who made the 66th General Convention such

towards!

a great success through their involvement. Read about these exciting successes!

14 The Secret Thoughts of a Ritual

Are you living the rituals of Phi Sig? Today, we again see an evolution occurring in the fraternity system and wish to center ourselves around the deeper meaning of our ritual by which we should strive to live.

18 Chapter Report Cards Convention

In this new section, we’ll regularly cover our active collegiate chapters and what they’re accomplishing.

26 Thank You Donors!

The Triple T’s Society is open to all members

44 Coming Back to Phi Sig

Brother Denis Gillan shares his story of how the

and friends of Phi Sigma Kappa who give at

Phi Sig Brotherhood came to his side during a

least $250 in gifts to the Phi Sigma Kappa

difficult time, and how he found his way back.

Foundation during the year.

34 Phi Sig’s New Look!

Learn more about the new visual identity of Phi Sigma Kappa and how it will influence the Fraternity as we move forward.

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Letter From the Editor Let me introduce myself: I am The Signet’s new Editor in Chief. And beginning with the Fall issue—redesigned and reimagined—we will learn from one another what a fraternal magazine is, and what it can be, in this ever-changing world. Nick Zuniga Executive Director/COO

THE SIGNET PARENTS The Signet is being sent to your address while your student is an undergraduate. If your son is no longer in college or is no longer living at home, please send his new contact information to the address below. SUBMISSIONS All materials for consideration of publication should be submitted to the address below or online at the website phisigmakappa.org EMAIL Communications@phisigmakappa.org SPECIAL THANKS The Signet’s publication staff thanks the various contributing writer for the articles that are found within this volume.

To start, let me say that I am a journalist at heart. From my earliest school days, I’ve been obsessed with magazines, newspapers and media. Call me a junkie. And I believe that whatever medium in which news is delivered—on the tablet, the mobile phone or in your hand—it should be the culmination of words, images and graphics, created by a dedicated editorial team, aimed at pleasing its audience in an expressive format. Magazines are about trust: we, the editors, will strive always to keep you engaged on the Fraternal front; you, the readers, are free to engage with us or to reject us. This issue is one about “Beginnings.” A new look for a new time; we proudly introduce our Grand President Sean Shingler—an amazing man and leader, who I am personally grateful to have the opportunity to work for. We also start a new series, “By The Numbers” where we’ll give data about each chapter and colony to give you an opportunity to learn more. We’re also continuing the rollout of our new brand. Some of you have seen it on the web, but this is the first time we are putting it in print. Joe Kern, Director of Communications, has done a phenomenal job with the assistance of many others, to display the Fraternity and our symbols in good light. I’m very proud to bring Dennis Gillan back into the fold. You’ll find more about his message in this issue, but Dennis is a leading mental health advocate and motivational speaker. He spent some time with the membership at General Convention this summer and his story is spellbinding. I’m glad to have him in our corner and look forward to our continued partnership. Phi Sigma Kappa is an instrument to create a better men for society. My job is to play the instrument to the masses, in any forum I can. Connect with me on Facebook and Twitter @PhiSigCOO and follow my travels with the hashtag #PSKTour18. I look forward to this journey, with you by my side. Damn Proud!

SIGNET PUBLISHING BOARD

Chair Albert D. Shonk, Jr. (Southern Cal ‘54) Board Members Christopher J. Hoye (Ferris State ‘91) Darren S. Azarian (Southern Cal ‘94) Thomas Wright (Wisconsin/Milwaukee ‘92) Nicholas Zuniga (Lambda Chi Alpha) SIGNET STAFF Nicholas Zuniga (Lambda Chi Alpha) Kathy Cannady (Alpha Gamma Delta) Joseph Kern (Radford ‘09)

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WHERE ARE YOU? The Brotherhood stretches all the way across the country, find your niche.

VOL. CVIII, NO. 1 GRAND COUNCIL Grand President Sean E. B. Shingler (George Mason ‘97) Directors Christopher J. Hoye (Ferris State ‘91) Douglas A. Diekow (Florida AI) Sean McGreevey (Henderson State ‘97) Atif Elkadi (Cal Poly ‘01) Darald Stubbs (Stetson ‘88) Jonathan Taylor (RIT AI) Undergraduate Representatives Adam Lipshin (Cal Poly) Brian Valdez (Cal State/Fullerton) FOUNDATION BOARD President John Sheehan (Northern Illinois ‘82) First Vice President Jeff Liesendahl (Northern Illinois ‘87) Second Vice President Patrick T. Murphy (Northern Illinois ‘75) Treasurer Thomas Grunwald (Ferris State ‘91) Secretary Javad M. Khazaeli (Illinois ‘98) PROPERTIES BOARD President Michael Palm (Indiana ‘04) Vice President Shawn J. Shivnen (Eastern Michigan ‘00) Treasurer Brian Radke (Northern Illinois ‘05) Secretary Peter J. Anderson (Michigan ‘87)

As Phi Sigma Kappa moves ahead to these new beginnings, we want all our brothers to be involved and have a place. The Brotherhood goes beyond the four years as an undergrad, it stretches across the country, and it reaches across generations. Brothers both young and old are always looking to connect, meet and network with other brothers, this is what it’s all about! Go online to our website, our social media or give us a call. There are countless ways you can get involved with Phi Sig and help this Fraternity and its members achieve beyond just our aspirations, but to live as men vested in those Cardinal Principles.

HEADQUARTERS STAFF Chief Operating Officer Nicholas Zuniga (Lambda Chi Alpha) Senior Director of Operations Kathy Cannady (Alpha Gamma Delta) Director of Communications Joseph Kern (Radford ‘09) Director of Chapter Services Grant Carpenter (Northern Arizona ‘13) Chapter Consultant Evan Schrauben (Eastern Michigan ‘16) Chapter Consultant Dezie Gude (Tennessee/Martin ‘17) Assistant Director of Alumni & Development Gregory DalSanto (Ohio State ‘14) Financial Services Specialist Marsha Spears Administrative Assistant Karen Miller

phisigmakappa.org facebook.com/phisigmakappa/ twitter.com/phisigmakappa instagram.com/phisigmakappafraternity/

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Letter From the Grand President Dear Brothers, Sean Shingler Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity Grand President

CARDINAL PRINCIPLES To Promote Brotherhood To Stimulate Scholarship To Develop Character

MISSION STATEMENT Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity is a lifelong brotherhood dedicated to the betterment of the individual, the university community, and our world, by giving its members opportunities to develop leadership skills, participate in service to others, achieve academic excellence, experience cultural diversity and practice personal integrity.

CORE VALUES Demand Excellence Commit to Lifelong Learning Meet Challenges with Innovation Value Brotherhood Above Self

Refl ecti on in your personal life is important; it keeps you grounded and humble. I’d like to ask that you take a moment and send thoughts and prayers to the families in Texas and Florida, those less fortunate, who have been impacted by hurricanes over the past few weeks. Some of our brothers are part of these families. Thankfully, Phi Sigma Kappa is experiencing much gentler winds of change. I shared recently that I felt we were winning. PSK Foundati on had a successful year and conti nued to support the Grand Chapter’s leadership development programs. PSK Properti es has an increasing number of chapters engaging in conversati ons for possible home improvement projects. The Grand Chapter has new staff members, plans to hire an Expansion Manager (a new positi on), and has developed a goal to visit each chapter in the next two years. At our upcoming February 2018 Mid-Year Meeti ng, the Grand Council will be strategic in choosing the ways we invest in our Fraternity and off er more services to our undergraduate brothers. The Albert D. Shonk Jr, Archive & Educati onal Center conti nues to move forward, and we have additi onal plans to improve other areas of the Internati onal Headquarters building in Indianapolis. We are seeing an increase in membership and chapter size in our undergraduate chapters. Our momentum excites me. I expect it to increase in the coming months. I’d like to ask for your help in making this happen. Strong volunteers are the backbone of most successful chapters. We are planning new volunteer programming during the winter conclaves January 2018. Please consider att ending if you are able. Our undergraduate chapters remain at the heart of what we do. If you are an undergraduate brother, ask yourself: “What have I done this week to move my chapter to a bett er place?” I want to encourage each of you to raise the bar. Raise it in your chapter room, in your IFC, and on your campus. Strive to be a leader in your chapter so that you are a leader on your campus. The skills you will practi ce and hone will provide you the opportunity to become a leader in your organizati on upon graduati ng. And with your advancement to leadership, please remember Phi Sigma Kappa. If she played a role in your success consider off ering your ti me, talent, and/or treasure. It’s going to be a great year! Damn Proud,

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HAVE A STORY? Share your news with your brothers! We want to hear from you! Send your personal stories, chapter news and Phi Sig stories to us! From recruitment photos to community service events, from casual alumni reunions at a baseball game to homecoming events. Whatever your Phi Sig story is, we want to know about it. All members are encouraged to submit photos and content to the International Headquarters Office. The Fraternity’s communications staff is always looking to receive submissions from all members, both alumni and undergraduate! Visit: https://phisigmakappa.org/connect/submit-news/

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PHI SIGMA KAPPA’S

66TH GENERAL CONVENTION At the 66th General Convention and Albert D. Shonk Jr, Undergraduate Leadership School this summer in Orlando, Phi Sigma Kappa came together to celebrate an exciting new beginning for the organization. With an excellent attendance of more than 450 brothers, spouses and guests, it was a good time for bonding and learning. This General Convention was a critical event in Phi Sig history, with many new initiatives that were launched and exciting ideas shared to take the organization further. The Grand Chapter delegates gathered to elect our newest members to the Grand Council, which serves as Phi Sigma Kappa’s national board of directors and consider numerous proposed amendments to our Constitution and Bylaws, rituals, and several policy resolutions.

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G E N E RAL CO N V E N TI O N

Pictured: The 2017 Robert M. Zillgitt Leadership Institute Delegates (page 13). The Zillgitt Facilitators Brothers Joe Farias, Matt Gregory and Ryan Cole. Attending the 66th General Convention Closing Banquet. Newly elected Grand President Sean Shingler joined these leaders for the photo.

They also engaged in learning at the leadership school, which runs concurrently during the week; and heard from numerous guest speakers who are experts in their fields. PhiredUp’s Josh Orendi spoke to a room filled with undergraduates eager to recruit men such as themselves into their chapters. He led them through recruitment techniques, overall strategies and most importantly, the right mindset one must have to successfully recruit the men Phi Sigs want to have within the Brotherhood. Brother Dennis Gillan spoke about two key topics relating to generations of men and women, mental health and suicide. He spoke about his personal experiences with the issues and how critical the relationships we form with others, especially within the Brotherhood are essential as we advance through life. You can read more from Dennis on page 44. The Robert M. Zillgitt Leadership Institute was held and 15 delegates from chapters across the country came together for high-level leadership training and selfdevelopment.

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Finally, Phi Sig’s new visual identity was revealed with a video during the opening banquet and was met with a resounding YES as the room held a minute-long standing ovation after seeing it. It was a busy meeting. It wasn’t all work, however. Delegates enjoyed their evening’s bonding with other brothers at the resort or visiting one of the many amusement parks in the area. The Fraternity also recognized the many accomplishments of our chapters, volunteers, donors, alumni clubs and general members.

Fraternity as Grand President. Three new members were elected to the Grand Council; you can read more about them and their thoughts on page 12. Brother Jacobson led the opening banquet Wednesday evening and led the beginning of Saturday’s closing banquet before passing the gavel to Grand President Shingler. A State-of-the-Fraternity address was given at the first general gathering. This was an annual report to our membership. There were many good things to report, reveal, and the excitement that was roused during the opening banquet continued throughout the weekend. Jacobson presided over many recent chapter installations during his two-year term. His personal experience with the growth of Phi Sigma Kappa and the people responsible for it added to a sincere and genuine message he gave during the opening banquet.

The Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista - Disney Springs™ Area, an Official Walt Disney World® Hotel, was located within easy walking distance to Disney Springs™ and served as an excellent host location for the event. Abundant ballrooms and meeting rooms hosted the Brotherhood as they worked, learned and shared.

The Hilton Orlando Lake Buena Vista - Disney Springs™ Area, an Official Walt Disney World® Hotel, was located within easy walking distance to Disney Springs™ and served as an excellent host location for the event. Abundant ballrooms and meeting rooms hosted the Brotherhood as they worked, learned and shared. Brother Sean Shingler (George Mason ‘97) was elected the Grand President after serving as a Grand Council Director from 2009-2017. Brother Scott Jacobson (Cal Poly ’01) became Chancellor of the Court of Honor after the culmination of two years of hard work leading our

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“I’ve known for years that I was supported by my brothers and mentors. But serving as your Grand President for the last two years has further instilled in me the true bond of Brotherhood when we talk about Fraternity. To simply leave you with one takeaway seems so insignificant but I will try. If we each take care of ourselves and take care of each other, truly live the Golden Rule, truly brothers, you’ll find that there is no deeper feeling than that bond, that support, and that love.”

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The 66th General Convention concluded, as it always does, with the closing banquet. Our top awards were presented (read more on pages 13 & 22), stirring speeches given and a feeling of enthusiasm occupied the people within the room. Grand President Shingler gave an eloquent and moving story about never letting up that brought a swell of pride to the room. He left all those present excited, inspired and honored to be associated with this organization that is doing such great work. It will be led by a man who will continue to lead us #PhiSigFWD.

THANK YOU

The Fraternity’s leadership would like to extend its thanks to all the individuals and groups who made the 66th General Convention such a great success through their involvement.

What makes a General Convention Special? The General Convention is held every two years and marks the beginning or a new biennium for the Fraternity, whereas a Leadership School is held annually and on odd years it coincides with a General Convention. Some of the key aspects of a convention are that the legislature meets to vote on constitution and bylaw changes, ritual changes and even some policy and procedures. Elections are held for open director positions on the Grand Council (these are staggered in two groups of three but may change based upon terms or appointments) and for the office of Grand President, which is a two-year term. Voting structure and procedure can be found in the Constitution and Bylaws on our website.

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The New Grand Council Directors Each general convention, Phi Sigma Kappa members are given the opportunity to elect new individuals to the Fraternity’s Grand Council. Results of the election are announced at the Business Meeting that weekend and the new directors are installed. Three members were elected to the Grand Council during the 66th General Convention.

Darald Stubbs (Stetson ‘88) ”Live a full and productive life that leaves positive and constructive memories in the hearts and minds of those lives that I’ve touched. To invest here all that I am, I was and hope to be.” This is how I strive to live my life which I feel exemplifies our cardinal principles. Being elected to the Grand Council is an honor and privilege. I am excited about our future forward to working with my fellow council and all the brothers as we continue to build and move our fraternity forward to success! Damn Proud!

Atif Elkadi (Cal Poly ‘01)

Jonathan Taylor (RIT AI)

I was honored and humbled when I was selected to the Grand Council. I get to work side by side with outstanding brothers to continue the positive trajectory the previous Council started in shaping our Fraternity for the future. I am looking forward to further developing the national synergy of our brand, working for our undergraduate brothers and learning from the other brothers on Council. We have something special that bonds us all together and that bond will be the driving force for this fraternity as we continue to win and never let up.

Being elected to one of the most sacred positions within our Brotherhood makes me humbled and honored as my fellow Grand Council Directors will attest. I look forward to serving our Fraternity, working with other committed Brothers to continue bringing our Fraternity forward to accomplish bigger and better things. We are a special Brotherhood, and Phi Sig is in the midst of an incredible era of transformation and to be a part of that effort is a distinction I hold Damn Proudly and with the utmost respect. By These Things, I Stand!

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Outstanding Chapter Adviser Award Len Gailes, Georgia Institute of Technology Mark Decker, Southern Illinois University Jonathan Taylor, Rochester Institute of Technology

Alumni Club Awards Epsilon Lambda Alumni Association, Eastern Michigan University Eta Alumni Association of Phi Sigma Kappa, University of Maryland Kappa Hexaton Alumni Association, Stetson University Phi Sig Epsilon Epsilon Alumni Association, Northeastern State University

Founders’ Awards Mark Azzarello (Rhode Island ‘80) Atif Elkadi (Cal Poly ’01)

2017 ROBERT M. ZILLGITT LEADERSHIP INSTITUTE DELEGATES Stephen Burzynski (Valparaiso)

Adam Lipshin (Cal Poly)

Nicholas Sieban (LIU/Post)

Michael Chen (Georgia Tech)

Anthony Matt (Northern Arizona)

Nate Smith (Stetson)

Skylar Hoch (Pitt State)

Sunny Patel (Young Harris)

Brian Valdez (Cal State/Fullerton)

Christopher Iverson (Rutgers)

Alexander Pedroza (Cal State/LA)

Kevin Woolums (Southern Illinois)

Giuseppe LaGioia (Northern Illinois)

James Rich (Southern Cal)

Dylan Wyckoff (Hope)

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PASS THE GAVEL

The Old Chapel at University of Massachusetts Amherst is pictured above, an iconic image for Phi Sigma Kappa.

The Secret Thoughts Of A Ritual By Edward M. King

EDITOR’S NOTE: Chairman of the Phi Sigma Kappa Ritual Committee Herbert L. Brown, who at the time was Editor Emeritus of The Signet, it was originally suggested that this article be reprinted for Brothers of Phi Sig to read. Today, we again see an evolution occurring in the fraternity system and wish to center ourselves around the deeper meaning of our ritual by which we should strive to live. Special permission has been granted by Phi Kappa Psi Fraternity to reprint the article, which originally appeared in the fall, 1974, issue of The Shield.

There are many of us around. Some of us are very informal and loosely structured, others are very formal and precisely worded. Whether you are aware of it or not, your whole life is based on certain ritualistic patterns. The way you get up in the morning, the way you study, the way you organize your social life, the way you speak and write, these are all based on certain habits or routines that you develop and are performed, by and large, in an informal ritualistic way.

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Today I would like to share with you some thoughts on another kind of ritual. One that is considered very private and is often called esoteric. I am the fraternity ritual. One that you will find locked in a file in the corner of some dark office. Because I don’t get used or opened up very often, I have a lot of time to think, and I’d like to share with you some of my thoughts. Sometimes, I go through a real identity crisis. Who am I? What am I? Why am I? In order to know what a thing is, you must first know what it is for. You tell what a thing is for by the way it is used. Although there are some exceptions in the way I am used, let me tell you how the majority of fraternities use me. The vast amount of my time is spent in a dark cabinet, locked up and gathering dust. About once a semester there comes a mad rush for my existence, people literally scrambling, and all of a sudden I become very important. It’s really funny because many times they can’t find me. They forget where I was

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P A S S T H E G AV E L

see that’s what I’m about. I’m meant to be read carefully, discussed and even argued about. Yes, in fact, I can even be changed. I’m really a very human document, one that was written down some time ago after a great deal of thought by one or two men and I have been reworded, rephrased and re-evaluated many, many times.

Father Joe Farias giving and invocation during opening banquet.

placed and a mild panic sets in until finally, they dig me out from under the stacks of constitutions, bylaws and chapter minutes. Once I am found I am under 24-hour surveillance. It’s almost as if I’m being digested, but that’s not really it, what’s happening is that I’m being memorized. I’m literally studied word for word, phrase for phrase, and sometimes people all wanting me at the same time. They begin with me “Well let me just copy my part” then the argument gets hotter because somebody says, “No, it’s not legal to copy anything out of the ritual.” Some people, however, go ahead and fudge a bit and copy their part and then pass me on. After being up almost all day and all night for a week, I am taken to a dimly lighted room where a number of people are gathered. There I am presented with much feeling and serious drama. It is obviously a moment of great climax for some of the people, for they are seeing and hearing me for the very first time. Shortly after the ceremony I am brought back to the dark room and placed in the locked file drawer, and I am not seen or heard of until the end of the next semester. In this case, as ritual, what am I? Well, as I see it, I am a perfunctory service that must be performed in order to get new members into an organization. Once the initiation is over, I’m pretty much pigeonholed until the next class is to be initiated.

In order to know what I’m really about, I need to be perpetually used and studied. (Too often the members mention me only at initiation time and I’m really meant for much more than that.) In fact, one of my most important missions is to help the active chapter at its weekly meetings. If I am understood and used properly at these weekly meetings, I can really help the chapter get things together. There are always a few guys who don’t like to use me and put up a big argument about having an informal chapter meeting. What a joke that usually turns out to be. Most informal chapter meetings last a heck of a lot longer than formal chapter meetings where I’m used. As I’ve listened to people and watched how they use me, a couple of important thoughts have crossed my mind. First, the fraternities have done an excellent job in keeping me an esoteric document, that is; basically, a secret document and therein is much of the problem. Not only am I a secret document to the outside, but I am also a secret to most of the members as well. They really don’t know or understand me because they’ve never really studied me. Some people, I suspect, would like to keep me very, very secret because if non-members found out what I stood for they might expect the members to live by it and that would be very difficult. Therefore, they keep me secret, and they won’t have to change their lifestyle.

“Because I am a system of values I am, therefore, an instrument of selfevaluation. My values are clear and absolute and yet difficult to emulate.”

However, in some fraternity houses, I exist in quite a different fashion. Shortly after the initiation the brothers come in one by one, get me out of the drawer and look me over very carefully. Some just like to read me; others try to memorize me. Whatever the case, I like it when they use me. Sometimes they even argue over me, and this gets exciting because you

Although I can be used in different ways and for different things, when you boil me down to my fundamental essence, I’m essentially one thing, a system of values. I don’t change very much because I am the product of history and the spirit of man and how he relates to his fellowman and to his God. This relationship between man and man, and man and God, has never been a static one. It is confusing and illuminating, painful and exciting, a separation and a reunion and although I appear to be a contradiction I am really no more of a contradiction than man himself. Too frequently we forget that man is both animal and spiritual in nature and to reconcile the two can often be painful, confusing, and frightening. And that is why it is so critical that man understands who I am and what I am for. Because I am a system of values I am, therefore, an instrument of self-evaluation. My values are clear and absolute and yet difficult to emulate. To state a few, I am honor, courage,

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P A S S T H E G AV E L

integrity, fidelity, courtesy and I demanded self-control as well as ambition and humility. Those of you who are leaders in the fraternity movement, the officers of the national, international or general fraternities, you who are professional fraternity men must continue to ask yourselves how you can improve in articulating to your members the message of your fraternity. Why is it that some of the members get it and others do not? To some, the message goes deep and becomes a part of their very being, while for others it never scratches the surface. Ask yourself the question when you attend your regional meetings, your workshops, retreats, leadership schools, how much time do you spend discussing and sharing with each other what personal effect I have had on your lives. Do you as so many

that continues to stifle the growth of the fraternity system. Never has the time been so ripe as this period in our history when the young people of today on our college campuses are crying out for the kind of message, guidance, value, and leadership that has been so long hidden in my pages. If you would just realize that by better knowing and understanding me, many of your day-to-day problems, housing, drugs, collections, and apathy, would simply fade and not exist. To threaten or fine a brother is an anathema to my very being. If a brother slips and becomes derelict, he should be asked to review his oath and charge, and if he chooses not to obey and follow that oath then he should be asked to leave the brotherhood. If you would weed out those, who do not wish to follow or believe in the obligation they swore to uphold

“It is the indifference to and the ignorance of my essential message that continues to stifle the growth of the fraternity system.” we would all be much better off. Too frequently I see you caught up with the numbers in our brotherhood rather than the quality of our brotherhood.

Brotherhood is a supportive bond throughout life.

active chapters do, use me to start the meetings and close the meetings and become so involved in your day to day business that you forget that I am there to be reflected upon? For those of you who do understand and use me, are you afraid or ashamed to share those experiences and thoughts with your fellow brothers? Those of you who are fraternity leaders, and are not using me in this way are very derelict in your responsibilities, your duties, and the very oath that you took when you became a member and an officer of your fraternity. For you see as written in your esoteric manuals, I am really of very little value unless you and the other brothers come, and through your mutual sharing begin to experience the essence and depth of my message. Then you and I are activated by the real charge into your spiritual and moral fiber that is possible for all men but achieved by too few. The effectiveness of my message is in direct proportion to your knowledge and belief in my values.

Basically, I am a roadmap to help a person along his journey of life and assist him in his communion with his fellow travelers. Who am I? Your ritual. What am I? A system of values. What am I for? My purpose is not to make you a better fraternity man, but also a better human being.

Want to share what our rituals mean to you and how you live them? Go leave a comment on our Facebook page.

If there is something about me that you do not like, then change me, but for God’s sake do not ignore me. It is the indifference to and the ignorance of my essential message

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facebook.com/phisigmakappa


SAVING IS SIMPLE. Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity members could save even more with a special discount on auto insurance.

1-800-368-2734 phisigmakappa geico.com/greek/phisigmakappa Some discounts, coverages, payment plans and features are not available in all states or all GEICO companies. GEICO contracts with various membership entities and other organizations, but these entities do not underwrite the offered insurance products. Discount amount varies in some states. One group discount applicable per policy. Coverage is individual. In New York a premium reduction may be available. GEICO may not be involved in a formal relationship with each organization; however, you still may qualify for a special discount based on your membership, employment or affiliation with those organizations. GEICO is a registered service mark of Government Employees Insurance Company, Washington, D.C. 20076; a Berkshire Hathaway Inc. subsidiary. GEICO Gecko image Š 1999-2017. Š 2017 GEICO

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CHAPTER REPORT CARD The Chapter Report Card is a chance for us to share information on our current chapters to the membership. This will be a permanent piece of The Signet, and with each issue, we’ll break down different data points. The Key below will help decipher specific data for each chapter. Information collected is based on records kept at the International Headquarters. If you have questions about this data, please contact Grant Carpenter, Director of Chapter Services, at grant@phisigmakappa.org.

KEY

Chapter Name School Name

Founding Date

Total Members

Undergraduate #

Alpha

Alpha Deuteron

University of Massachusetts 1873

1459

73

Y

40

N

Delta

1743

62

N

1397

52

Y

55

N

65

N

N

1263

1923

933

1925

1685

1925

794

33

60

N

Omicron

41

Y

1926

1191

79

Y

108

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N

1926

1153

786

36

N

1936

21

N

882

18

N

988

102

N

981

1942 Indiana University

N

1949

Psi Triton

Hobart and William Smith College 96

N

1950

743

17

N

25

N

Beta Tetarton

Kent State University 32

Y

1950

732

Gamma Tetarton

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 94

N

1950

693

16

N

22

N

Kappa Tetarton

Washington State University 28

1930

Sigma Triton

Chi Deuteron

University of Virginia

N

University of Akron

University of Kentucky

Psi

748

450

71

Eta Triton

Phi Deuteron

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 891

1925

533

American University N

Ohio State University 857

1929

Epsilon Triton

Pi Deuteron

Lehigh University

18

N

University of Alabama

Nu

1907

26

Omicron Deuteron

George Washington University 15

1915

N

Purdue University

University of Tennessee/Knoxville

Lambda

1902

692

67

Delta Triton

Xi Deuteron

Pennsylvania State University

1901

Y

Georgia Institute of Technology

Kappa

1095

1915

1211

University of South Carolina 37

Kappa Deuteron

Stevens Institute of Technology

1314

946

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

Iota

916

1910

1928

Gamma Triton

Epsilon Deuteron

University of Maryland

1899

N

University of Michigan

Eta

1899

65

Delta Deuteron

West Virginia University

1899

1268

University of Minnesota 1253

1897

1910

University of Southern California

Beta Deuteron

Cornell University

1891

Omega Deuteron

University of Illinois

Gamma

1889

2017 Award Winner?

Southern Illinois University 45

THE SIGNET

N

1957

759


Upsilon Hexaton

Fairleigh Dickinson University, Madison

Nu Tetarton

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey 1959

799

33

N

Long Island University C.W. Post Campus 173

12

N

811

37

N

657

24

N

600

46

N

773

16

N

661

29

N

599

52

N

1329

86

Y

N

403

48

N

30

N

N

24

N

Y

2010

Virginia Polytechnic Institute 71

Y

10

N

Eta Hexaton

2010

University of Dayton 639

82

N

92

Y

37

Y

73

N

Beta Octaton

Mu Hexaton

2014

Radford University 429

21

N

84

58

N

Gamma Octaton

Rho Hexaton

2015

Northern Arizona University 358

46

Y

40

16

N

Delta Octaton

906

8

N

1785

40

Y

907

44

Y

525

41

N

30

N

24

N

30

N

28

Y

Shippensburg University 612

Phi Nu

Mansfield University 365

Phi Upsilon

Valparaiso University 1964

Young Harris College

N

Phi Theta

1962

University of North Carolina at Charlotte

13

University of Wisconsin/Milwaukee

1959 30

910

Epsilon Phi

Alpha Octaton 2012

Stetson University

N

Ball State University

1949

New Jersey Institute of Technology

Kappa Hexaton 499

160

20

Epsilon Tau

Omega Septaton Auburn University

1269

Northwest Missouri State University

1948 89

N

Epsilon Nu

Psi Septaton

Valdosta State University

Epsilon Hexaton

734

32

9

University of Central Arkansas

1938 78

1209

Epsilon Mu

Chi Septaton 2008

Robert Morris University 385

N

N

Eastern Michigan University

1935 22

14

Epsilon Lambda

Phi Septaton

144

1227

University of Central Missouri

1934 56

Y

Epsilon Iota

Upsilon Septaton 217

25

Northeastern State University

1931 154

980

Epsilon Epsilon 1930

Georgia Southern University

Gamma Hexaton

1981

41

N

Truman State University 1927

405

8

Gamma Epsilon

Tau Septaton

2006

Northern Illinois University

1976

N

Adelphi University

Pi Pentaton

1974

69

1039

Pittsburg State University 1927

361

N

Beta Epsilon

Omicron Septaton

2005

California State University/Fullerton

1972

N

Clemson University

Iota Pentaton

1972

71

54

Emporia State University

Xi Septaton

2003

Indiana University of Pennsylvania

1971

759

64

Alpha Epsilon 1910

Hope College

Theta Pentaton

1967

N

Eta Septaton

1996

East Stroudsburg University

1966

37

Villanova University

Beta Pentaton

University of Cincinnati

Beta Septaton

1995

California State University/LA

1965

505

George Mason University

Omega Tetarton

1963

1985

1991

Western Michigan University

Epsilon Octaton 2017

California Polytechnic State University

Chi Tetarton

1962

N

Phi Hexaton

1990

Rochester Institute of Technology

1961

14

Florida State University

Upsilon Tetarton 1960

462

Towson University

Pi Tetarton 1960

1984

613

Sigma Epsilon

Ferris State University 1968

824

Appalachian State University 2017

45

40

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N

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19


6 YEARS AND COUNTING The house pictured above belongs to the Eta Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa at the University of Maryland, College Park.

The Eta Alumni Association lends their perspective on Alumni Club Success In 2010, as the Eta Colony was growing rapidly, past Grand President Dru Bagwell, part of a star-studded team of advisors for the chapter-to-be, sought to revitalize the local alumni club. Little did he know that he was putting into motion what would become the largest alumni organization in all of Phi Sigma Kappa, but also amongst all Greek-letter alumni groups on the campus of the University of Maryland. The Eta Alumni Association of Phi Sigma Kappa is now entering its 8th year of operations, and during its first seven years has averaged 309 paid members. During this time, the association has paid Sustaining Member dues to the Grand Chapter totaling $10,725.00. The association also has a wide appeal: to-date, Brothers from as far back as the Class of 1933, and as recently as the Class of 2017 have held membership. At the 66th General Convention of Phi Sigma Kappa, held in Orlando, Florida, the Eta Alumni Association won an “Alumni Club of the Year Award” for 2017. The announcement marked the 6th consecutive year that the association has received this prestigious award - having previously been recognized in

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2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2016. In their news release, the association thanked the Grand Chapter for this highlycoveted award, the undergraduate chapter at the University of Maryland for the impetus to organize and to excel, and offered deep and sincere thanks to each and every one of their members for their steadfast dedication to the goals and objectives of the association and for providing continuing support to, and daily evidence of, the theme of “Fraternity for Life”.

The Goal is a Simple One The association strives to provide a connection between Eta Alumni, Phi Sigma Kappa Alumni from other chapters who are now located in and around the Baltimore-Washington Corridor, and the undergraduate chapter at the University of Maryland, College Park. To this end, two elements are most important: social events and communications. An important benefit of membership is the twice-yearly major social functions. An Alumni Homecoming Tailgate in the fall and an Open House/Reunion in the spring offer members

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A L U M N I F E AT U R E

History in the Making

A photo from the Eta Chartering Banquet in 2011. Alumni support has always been present within the Eta Chapter.

and their families the chance to re-connect, swap stories, and re-kindle fraternal bonds. In the past, the Tailgate has featured personal omelet chefs and a wood-fired pizza oven. Turnout at these events has been remarkable, and additional social events are being planned. Not long after reading this issue of the Signet, members will be receiving the 13th edition of their association newsletter/magazine. The previous twelve issues of their full-color magazine, “The THIRD DEGREE” have averaged 48 pages in length and sold-out issues can be read on-line at the association website. The magazine itself has won four awards: for “Association Magazine”, “Magazine Copy/Writing”, “Writing - Feature Article” and “Magazine - Overall Design”.

A photo of Eta from the 1960s “IFC Hoops.”

The association website, www.Alumni.PSK-Eta.com is kept up to date with everything a member would want to know. Of special note is the “Six Columns” fund (a capital campaign) and the new PSK Scholarship Fund, both of which offer alumni the chance to give back to the fraternity. The website is the centerpiece of a multi-channel communications program designed to feed information to members using the channels they prefer. So, the association maintains an active presence on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, and transmits E-Newsletters in between printed issues of the magazine. The association also has a “photo vault” where recent images, as well as those from the past, are posted for all to see, share and download for free.

The Eta Chapter was chartered in 1897, making 2017 their 120th Anniversary. To commemorate this anniversary, members in good standing will receive the “History of Eta Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa at the University of Maryland, College Park, MD, 1920-1927” written by Edgar Farr Russell H, ‘22 (who also designed the Phi Sig flag). Being released for just the second time in 120 years, this document has rarely been seen because of its age and delicate condition. Transcribed and enhanced with researched images and photos, from cover to cover it is 44 pages of unique and interesting history of the Secret Order of the Skull and Coffin and how the organization became the Eta Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa in College Park.

The association is managed by a five-Brother Executive Committee, who often find themselves asking each other, “Are we having fun yet?” as they move from responsibilities including member renewal and recruitment, social event planning, communications, and fundraising, each in turn each and every year. You can learn more about the Eta Alumni Association of Phi Sigma Kappa when visiting their website at www.Alumni.PSK-Eta.com. The Eta Alumni Association also began a new tradition the “Eta Alumni Pins Program.” The program, developed and proposed by Robert G. “Bob” Pemberton (Maryland ‘58), and expertly administrated by then-First Vice President Wayne H. Bethards (Maryland ‘59), called for jeweled Phi Sigma Kappa Fraternity pins, donated by alumni of the Eta Chapter, be used to establish an award or awards for those Undergraduate Members in recognition of their outstanding performance as an associate or officer. This is a rich local tradition that was reestablished in 2011 during the rechartering banquet and continues today.

Above are rings typically given in Eta’s local ceremony.

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2017 CHAPTER AWARDS The 66th General Convention in Orlando was an eventful week! The presentation of the Fraternity’s National Awards, is a time to recognize and highlight the excellent work Phi Sig chapters across the country are doing in their communities.

President’s Special Achievement Awards Scholarship

New Member Education

Auburn University, Omega Septaton

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Omicron

University of Minnesota, Beta Deuteron

University of Massachusetts, Alpha

Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Epsilon Hexaton

Stetson University, Kappa Hexaton

Philanthropy

Diversity Initiatives

University of Minnesota, Beta Deuteron

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Omicron

Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Epsilon Hexaton Ball State University, Epsilon Tau Northwest Missouri State University, Epsilon Nu

Community Involvement Ohio State University, Pi Deuteron Georgia Institute of Technology, Kappa Deuteron

Georgia Tech Delegates at the 66th General Convention accepting their award for Special Achievement for Technology.

University of Massachusetts, Alpha

Risk Management Northern Illinois University, Pi Pentaton Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Omicron Ferris State University, Sigma Epsilon Northern Arizona University Delegates at the 66th General Convention accepting their award for

Leadership Northern Arizona University, Rho Hexaton Stetson University, Kappa Hexaton University of Massachusetts, Alpha

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The 2017 Awards Committee, pictured on the right, received many excellent submissions this year and is proud to help select the award winners.

THE SIGNET

Georgia Southern University Delegates at the 66th General Convention with their award.


Campus Involvement Stetson University, Kappa Hexaton Georgia Institute of Technology, Kappa Deuteron Northwest Missouri State University, Epsilon Nu

Recruitment Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Epsilon Hexaton Ohio State University, Pi Deuteron Pittsburg State University, Beta Epsilon Georgia Southern University, Chi Septaton University of Massachusetts, Alpha

Risk Management

Virginia Tech Delegates at the 66th General Convention with their award.

Northern Illinois University, Pi Pentaton Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Omicron Ferris State University, Sigma Epsilon

Technology Northern Illinois University, Pi Pentaton Georgia Institute of Technology, Kappa Deuteron University of Maryland, Eta Ohio State University Delegates at the 66th General Convention with their award.

Fred Schwengel Most Improved Chapter Award Pi Deuteron, Ohio State University Omicron, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Jim WhitďŹ eld Circle of Honor Kappa Deuteron, Georgia Institute of Technology Kappa Hexaton, Stetson University Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Epsilon Hexaton

Stetson University Delegates at the 66th General Convention with their award.

Grand Council Director Ed Kovacs opens the 66th General Convention’s Closing Banquet.

HERBERT L. BROWN OUTSTANDING CHAPTER AWARD Alpha, University of Massachusetts

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23


P RO P E RT I E S

The Indiana University Phi Sigma Kappa house received a short-term loan from Properties.

The mission of Phi Sigma Kappa Properties, Inc. is to ensure the housing facilities of Phi Sigma Kappa do not hinder but instead, empower the growth of our Fraternity at every chapter, nationwide. Phi Sigma Kappa Properties is looking to develop partnerships with local chapters and alumni clubs. Properties is currently working with six local groups in a variety of ways. Every chapter housing situation is going to offer its own unique opportunities and challenges. Because of this, we analyze every situation individually and work directly with the chapter to find the best possible solutions to fit its specific needs. While Properties is not the default landlord of the Fraternity, it exists to support the growth of the Fraternity and its local chapters through the provision of both financial and other tangible assistance relating to housing.

CONSULTING As a service to the members of Phi Sigma Kappa, Properties will review lease documents, provide basic sample documents and provide input and perspective on any chapter housing issue at no charge. Properties can also provide more in-depth consulting and implementation services such as drafting customized lease and housing contract creation, creation of a housing corporation, or property financial analysis. The purpose of this service is to be an advocate for the groups who encounter issues or have questions that they may not be prepared to overcome.

SHORT-TERM LOANS Properties has developed a short-term loan program to provide capital to Phi Sigma Kappa alumni housing corporations to make needed improvements to their existing properties. If your group is interested in applying for a loan from Properties, please visit our contact page and let us know.

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THE SIGNET

For more information on Properties and how they can help your local chapter meet their housing goals, email board@pskproperties.org.


Pictured above are some of the renovations that have taken place at the Beta Deuteron house in Minnesota, thanks in part to their work with Phi Sigma Kappa Properties.

Beta Deuteron, Minnesota, chapter alumni have contributed toward a multi-year whole house renovation program, nearing completion.

“We appreciate PSK Properties, which aided us with gap funding for key items where an immediate sponsor didn’t appear. For example, chapter alumni paid for the library but loan money from PSKP paid for the 2nd floor bathroom. Both rooms are important; apparently, donors preferred their names over the library door. We’ve had a very good experience with PSKP as a lender, and recommend them.” Tom Jackson (Minnesota ‘87)

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25


TRIPLE Ts SOCIETY DONORS IN THE 2016 - 2017 FISCAL YEAR JULY 1, 2016 - JUNE 30, 2017 The Triple T’s Society is open to all members and friends of Phi Sigma Kappa who give at least $250 in gifts to the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation during the year. The trustees of Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation express their appreciation to these loyal and generous donors. Names are listed in alphabetical order. Both donors supporting the national educational programming of the Fraternity as well as donors supporting chapter specific educational programs and educational building spaces are recognized. PLATINUM LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $20,000 and higher) John P. Beck (Purdue ‘55) David J. Carter (Purdue ‘66)

Your Gift:

Gary F. Ervin (Central Missouri ‘80) Paul L. Grane (Northern Illinois ‘93) Don A. Kuhn (Purdue ‘61) E. Dale Lowe (Houston ‘66) Richard L. Schleicher (Purdue ‘59) Albert D. Shonk, Jr. (Southern Cal ‘54)

DIAMOND LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $10,000 - $19,999) John F. Brock III (Georgia Tech ‘70) K. Wade Carpenter (Central Missouri ‘89) David M. Franzman (Purdue ‘80) Jeff Liesendahl (Northern Illinois ‘87) Frank B. Micheletti (Purdue ‘63) Amanda Moritz Dan D. Power (Central Missouri ‘73) John P. Sheehan (Northern Illinois ‘82) Samuel W. Staples (Purdue ‘55)

Helps to create programming and opportunities for students to learn. “Attending the 66th General Convention expanded my network to more motivated individuals, increased my leadership capabilities, and is was one of the more exciting conferences in my life. Working collaboratively with brothers from across the country was an enlightening experience. I returned to my chapter a better person, leader, and brother.” Brian Valdez (Cal State/Fullerton ‘18)

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THE SIGNET


S U P P O RT E RS

SAPPHIRE LEVEL

AMETHYST LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $5,000 - $9,999)

(Gifts Totaling $1,750 - $2,499)

Lary R. Aldrich (Purdue ‘78)

Ralph E. Brideweser (Purdue ‘59)

William A. Bloomer (Emporia State ‘55)

Adam C. Carter (Hobart ‘90)

Chad E. Burney (Central Missouri ‘05)

Bob D. Fox (Purdue ‘57)

David L. Cohen (Union ‘88)

Bud G. Hanna (Ferris State ‘70)

David F. Eichenauer (Purdue ‘62)

James S. Harrison (Purdue ‘71)

Frederick M. Hausmann Jr. (Purdue ‘81)

James A. Manos EdD (Southern Cal ‘54)

Dennis M. Joyce (Purdue ‘69)

William S. Meyer (Purdue ‘52)

Dr. Sloan L. Robertson (Arizona ‘69)

Patrick T. Murphy (Northern Illinois ‘75)

David L. Towle (San Jose State ‘58)

Robert A. Phillabaum (Purdue ‘58)

Karl L. Zimmermann (Purdue ‘56)

Edgar C. Schiffer (Purdue ‘51) Ralph L. Schowe (Purdue ‘52) Paul J. Smeller (Purdue ‘63)

Your Gift: Provided 1,000+ students with a quality leadership experience

Ernest R. Vibbert (Purdue ‘68) Hugh N. Zeiner (Purdue ’55)

RUBY LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $1,000 - $1,749) Clark K. Ahrens (Purdue ‘65)

EMERALD LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $2,500 - $4,999) James L. Arneson (Purdue ‘60) J. Tom Avery, Jr. (Purdue ‘82) Mark M. Azzarello (Rhode Island ‘80) Douglas M. Burghardt (Purdue ‘63) David R. Butcher (Purdue ‘62) Michael L. Fatta (Northern Illinois ‘82) Anthony Fusaro (Rhode Island ‘58) Thomas Grunwald (Ferris State ‘91) W. Ben Havird (South Carolina ‘06) Charles R. Idol (Houston ‘68) David W. Jones (Emporia State ‘98) Michael J. McDonald (Purdue ‘66) David T. McNaught (Indiana ‘64) Mary & Michael Moritz Gene F. Seevers (Central Missouri ‘51) R. Todd Simpson (Central Missouri ‘86) Larz Smith (Purdue ‘70) Joe C. Trevino (Purdue ‘69) Lash Turville (San Jose State ‘61) James Visnic (Youngstown ‘77)

David L. Anderson (Purdue ‘75) John E. Ayers (Purdue ‘63) Darren Azarian (Southern Cal ‘94) Thomas J. Boldrick III (Purdue ‘83) Alan E. Bower (Purdue ‘72) William L. Brachat (Purdue ‘66) Dave J. Breazzano (Union ‘78) Christopher J. Burch (Purdue ‘04) Thomas S. Burchett (Central Missouri ‘80) Charles V. Loring Charitable Fund at Our Fund Michael E. Clift (Tennessee ‘69) Anthony A. Curtis (George Washington ‘90) Nhi & Andrew Donovan Jonathan Dugdale (Indiana ‘07) Richard J Eickemeyer (Purdue ‘82) Jon M. Frain (Indiana ‘07) Juan M. Fraiz (Purdue ‘79) James P. Gazdecki (UC/Santa Barbara ‘74) Gregg A. Grote (Purdue ‘83) Judge Richard Hall (Houston ‘65) Robert L. Harman (Mansfield ‘76) David Harrington Jerry T. Hill (Purdue ‘59) Kirk B. Hoggatt (Purdue ‘66)

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27


S U P P O RT E RS

William G. Hummel (Purdue ‘70) Scott Jacobson (Cal Poly ‘01) Allan H. Johnson FSA (Illinois ‘73) Javad M. Khazaeli (Illinois ‘98) Christopher R. Knott (Purdue ‘04) Colby B. Leathers (Alabama ‘95) Terry Liffick (Purdue ’64) T. Scott Lyons (Alabama ‘95) John M. Mattingly (Gettysburg ‘62) Kenneth J. Merkt (Wisconsin/Milwaukee ‘68) Robert Morgan (Central Missouri ‘84) Albert F. Moritz James A. Murman (Tennessee ‘68) John R. Murphy (Purdue ‘89) Michael Palm (Indiana ‘04) Brian P. Pietrandrea (Clarion ‘97) David W. Piper (Purdue ‘68) Wesley J. Poynor (Texas ‘72) Dennis C. Rilling (Oregon State ‘71) Glenn M. Roby (Northern Illinois ‘91) Robert G. Rose (Purdue ‘74) Jim R. Schmitz (UC/Santa Barbara ‘80) Mark A. Seifried (Central Missouri ‘82) Mark W. Viel (Ferris State ‘73) Wayne A. Walker (Purdue ‘66) Wayne A. Ward (Towson ‘93) Bennett Williams (Indiana ‘07) Thomas S. Wright(Wisconsin/Milwaukee ‘92)

PEARL LEVEL

(Gifts Totaling $500 - $999) Robert L. Balogh (Michigan ‘80) William L. Bauer (Rutgers ‘60) Mary Briggs Ryan Hans Budke (Delaware ‘12) Keith P. Buehler (Purdue ‘80) Jeffrey A. Butler (Northern Illinois ‘83) Virginia & Arthur Carr James T. Craig, Jr. (Alabama ‘60) John Crowe (Southern Cal AI) Sean B. Eaves (Midwestern State ‘93) Michael T. Eaves (Kentucky ‘94) Beth & Peter Edelstein Herb Eldean (Northern Illinois ‘63) John W. Everest (Alabama ‘69) Jonathan T. Georgis (Illinois State ‘86) Carl W. Goltermann (Illinois ‘74) Kenneth J. Green (Northern Illinois ‘84) Robert H. Gunn, Jr. (Georgia Tech ‘60) Kenneth A. Hall (Ferris State ‘68) Brian L. Hoffbauer (Purdue ‘95) Mykle C. Jacobs (Ferris State ‘70) Bruce C. Johnson (Illinois ‘70) Seline Jung John Krzywicki Steve R. Laukhuf (Midwestern State ‘84) Richard A. Lejk (Georgia Tech ‘55) David Maddux (Southern Cal ‘90) Drew Malcomb (Tennessee/Martin ‘75) Robert J. Mauro (Rensselaer ‘78) Keith R. Meier (Florida State ‘92) Daniel Mills (Ferris State ‘88) Donald J. O’Brien (Connecticut ‘51) James R. Ochu (Northern Illinois ‘87) Max A. Ordonez (Cal State/LA ‘92) Timothy J. Ostrowski (Northern Illinois ‘74) Rocco P. Pannella (Connecticut ‘63) Michael L. Petitjean (Emporia State ‘70) Matt M. Pilcher (Maryland ‘00) Daniel J. Pomerening (Georgia Tech ‘75)

Undergraduates participating in the Shonk Leadership School sessions during the 66th General Convention.

Peter G. Popoff (UC/Santa Barbara ‘69) Ronald J. Pugh (Texas ‘68) Leonard H. Ralston (Washington State ‘58) Robert Redhead (Southern Cal AI)

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THE SIGNET

DO UNTO OTHERS AS YOU WOULD HAVE THEM DO UNTO YOU.

Derek E. Holmes (Robert Morris ‘89)


S U P P O RT E RS

Todd M. Schatzka (Purdue ‘88)

GOLD LEVEL

Larry E. Sheffield (Ohio State ‘64)

(Gifts Totaling $250 - $499)

Sean Shingler (George Mason ‘97)

Behrouz Abedian

Sam J. Soffa (Wisconsin ‘57)

Lary L. Acker (Maryland ‘57)

Timothy A. Spiegel (Northern Illinois ‘91)

Anthony S. Ameri (Northern Illinois ‘93)

Gregory R. Stack (Kentucky ‘89)

David B. Amy (Robert Morris ‘74)

Leonard C. Suchyta (Detroit ‘65)

Dean G. Anderson (Northern Illinois ‘73)

John D. Tickle (East Tennessee ‘62)

Joshua R. Apling (Purdue ‘03)

Tatsuo Tomura

Tim Ryan Aquinto (Ferris State ‘10)

William Vanderpool (Central Missouri ‘98)

Linton D. Arbaugh (Houston ‘63)

Hector M. Verde (Purdue ‘89)

Ronald G. Assaf (Akron ‘57)

Matt Waltz (Marian University ‘02)

Dr. Drury G. Bagwell (Tennessee ‘64)

Bruce Wells (Purdue ‘86)

Maurice E. Baker (Purdue ‘57)

Mark F. Wille (Southern Cal ‘77)

Deborah Barlow

Jon D. Williams (Michigan ‘88)

Luke Benedict (Clarion ‘01)

James M. Wolf (Dayton ‘87)

John A. Benkovich (Georgia Tech ‘60)

Leslie D. Young (Maryland ‘62)

Henry B. Blackwell II (Illinois ‘52) Robert J. Bohrer (Cal State/Fullerton ‘79) Sean D. Bond (Ball State ‘94) Leon A. Boulavsky, Jr. (Maryland ‘75) Steven H. Brose (Penn State ‘69) R. M. Brown (Minnesota ‘84) James M. Bryner (Illinois ‘71) Kathy Cannady Richard S. Carron (Purdue ‘62) Tim Childers (Northwest Missouri State ‘00) Steve L. Cutaia (Western Illinois ‘90)

THANK YOU TO THESE ALUMNI CLUBS, ASSOCIATIONS AND COMPANIES WHO GAVE BACK THIS YEAR! Air Park LGA, Inc.

Mark H. Dahlmann (Clarion ‘76) Kevin D. Donovan, Jr. (Cal/Berkeley ‘74) Donald V. Dotts (Arizona State ‘57) William W. Dudman (Florida Southern ‘87) Matthew Dunn (Indiana ‘08)

Epsilon Lambda Alumni Chapter

Joseph G. Farias (FDU/Madison ‘12)

Gerald L. Limp Leadership Endowment Fund

Todd A. Feuerman (Towson ‘87)

Phi Sigma Kappa Properties, Inc.

Victor M. Fernandez (Illinois ‘97) Mark D. Fisk (Purdue ‘91) Lance A. Fox (Ferris State ‘92)

Pi Pentaton

David R. Frank (Northern Illinois ‘92)

PSK Alumni Assn. of Northern IL

Dennis M. Gardner (Central Missouri ‘85)

Signet Circle Corporation Signet Corporation of Santa Barbara The Lagunitas Brewing Co.

David Galatte (Northern Illinois ‘90) Gerry D. Getman (Florida Southern ‘69) Alan T. Girton (Ball State ‘87) William J. Glass (Illinois ‘83) George L. Glotzbach (Minnesota ‘53) Scott W. Gordon (UC/Santa Barbara ‘79)

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29


S U P P O RT E RS

William P. Green (Washington ‘82)

Your Gift:

Walter J. Groman, Jr. (Tennessee ‘81) Martin F. Grossman (Rhode Island ‘60) John Guido, Jr. (Northern Illinois ‘95) Steven A. Gyory (Union ‘76) Sean P. Hamilton (Stetson ‘89)

Ensured that 30 students received scholarships and grants

Greg Hammon (Memphis ‘92) Austin N. Harris (Virginia Tech ‘09) Kurt E. Hauseman (Northern Illinois ‘88) Donald D. Henry (Indiana ‘63) Steven C. Holman (Southern Cal ‘75) Vincent J. Horner (Ferris State ’75) Jonathan R. Insull (Hobart ‘87) Robert O. Jacobs (Hobart ‘80) Gregory R. Johnson (Northern Illinois ‘76) Jan M. Klinck (Texas ‘66) Madhu S. Kollipara (Cal/Berkeley ‘92) Aleksandar Krakovic (Cal State/LA ‘94) David H. Kummer (Ferris State ‘72) George F. LaForte (Northern Illinois ‘92) Edwin S. Lane (Arizona State ‘58) Christopher D. Lantz (Ferris State ‘06) Matt Lownik (Wisconsin/Milwaukee ‘13) James W. McClain (Washington ‘61) Thomas O. McConnell PhD (Purdue ‘52) K. Sean McGreevey, Jr. (Henderson State ‘97) Brian Melford (Ferris State ‘97) C. Mike Mitchell, Jr.(Tennessee/Martin ‘86) Ronald W. Morrison (Purdue ‘72) Peter G. Morton (George Washington ‘61) Carl C. Munck (UC/Davis ‘60) Joseph L. Mundy (Rensselaer ‘63) Julia Nolet Tim Padden (Northern Illinois ‘84) Brandon Paternoster (Ferris State ‘05) William Paternoster (Ferris State ’11)

Dave J. Servatius (Northern Illinois ‘91) Stephen R. Shane (Southern Illinois ‘93) Douglas E. Sheehan (Northern Illinois ‘88) Shawn J. Shivnen (Eastern Michigan ‘00) Scott Shotter (Johnson & Wales ‘90) Niel P. Smith (Washington State ‘76) David M. Spreitzer (Kentucky ‘80) Col. Thomas R. Stautz (Western Michigan ‘77) J. Donald Steele, Jr. (Susquehanna ‘73) Mark C. Stoner (Robert Morris ‘88) Ryan Tabaka (Illinois ‘00) Gary Thompson (Northwest Missouri State ‘76) James E. Thron (Memphis ‘85) Edward C. Tompkins (Purdue ‘61) Ken H. Vaughan (Michigan ‘83) Carl Vercollone John B. Waters, Jr. (Tennessee ‘51) Josh Welsh (Towson ‘88) James Buford White, Jr. (Tennessee/Martin ‘65) David Wilcox James A. Wilde (Alabama ‘10) Robb C. Williams (Southern Illinois ‘93) Randolph L. Willoby (Houston ‘67) Brian Willsey (Indiana ‘06) Richard C. Wisniewski (Ferris State ‘84) Robert A. Yellowlees (Maryland ‘60) John E. Yorger (Purdue ‘98) Lawrence R. Young (Southern Cal ‘61)

Dale C. Patrias (Indiana of PA ‘66) Walter B. Peine (Houston ‘66) Christopher J. Piotrowicz (Ferris State ‘91) Thomas A. Prather (Kentucky ‘49) James P. Rile (Purdue ‘95) Matthew D. Robbe (Purdue ‘11) Nasrin Rohani Abedian Michael P. Rose (Purdue ‘66) Richard J. Scherr (Arizona State ‘69)

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The Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation would like the thank the generous Triple Ts Society donors who gave this past year. You have made a lasting impact on thousands of young Phi Sig leaders.

THE SIGNET


TOP CHAPTER BY AMOUNT GIVEN

Broadening Brotherhood What I Got & Why I Give.

1

Purdue University

$414,064

2

Northern Illinois University

$54,547

3

University of Central Missouri

$50,232

4

University of Southern California

$43,858

5

University of Houston

$25,993

6

Georgia Institute of Technology

$12,367

7

San Jose State University

$8,775

8

Indiana University

$8,682

As the years passed, I realize that, although valuable to me my limited experience gave little hint of the real scope of lifelong Brotherhood. Our Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation affords us the opportunity both to broaden our commitment to our members and extend it into the future. Our contributions take us beyond our original bond to our chapters and bring us together with the world over in a constructive and meaningful way. The scholarship program along with our Zillgitt Leadership Institute and Shonk Leadership School prepare our men for lives as the best of the best.

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Emporia State University

$7,123

Being involved with the Foundation has made me realize that we can powerfully live our Cardinal Principles as part of a strong Brotherhood in ways that we never could individually. I give because I am Damn Proud to be your Brother! Sal Lowry (Ohio State ’61)

In 1957, I came to The Ohio State University as a freshman and found myself alone on a very large campus. I soon was recruited by Pi Deuteron Chapter of Phi Sigma Kappa, and suddenly I was no longer alone. I became one of a group of brothers who would share my life, help mold me into a better man and citizen and give me a sense of belonging. That Brotherhood, along with Scholarship and Character seemed to make the perfect measure of a man

10 Ferris State University

$5,661

TOP CHAPTERS BY NUMBER OF DONORS 1

Northern Illinois University

140

2

Purdue University

75

3

University of Illinois

28

4

University of Southern California

27

5

Ohio State University

22

6

Towson University

21

7

University of Central Missouri

16

8

Ferris State University

15

9

Georgia Institute of Technology

14

10 Indiana University

The 2017 Robert M. Zillgitt Leadership Institute Facilitators. The Zillgitt Institute is a high level leadership development program that brothers can apply to be a part of every year.

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Thank you to all our donors for the continued support of Phi Sig and helping your Fraternity to fulfill the Mission!

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Distinguished Alumnus Award Brother Eric Baron

In 2018, his career will have hit its 50th year and as he put it, “it has been a good run.” He attributes this success to three components. 1. Luck: “No matter what you end up doing, Luck plays a role.” he says, “It’s not the only thing but it plays a significant role, and I’ve been very lucky.” 2. His wife: She has been his friend and best friend throughout the entire process. Whenever someone asks him what the most important decision you’ll make is, he always responds, “It is who you choose to partner for life with. Nothing is more important than that and nothing ever will be.” 3. Phi Sigma Kappa: When Baron speaks to associates at Columbia Business School and discusses what to look for in their careers, he shares with them what this Fraternity did for him as a young man. He constantly reiterates that values, and in Phi Sig’s case The Cardinal Principles, are something on which his career and life have been. He explains that no one has a definite idea as to where their career will take them, but to have some degree of stability, something to look at that will grant you balance and an aim to center your objectives around, that is truly invaluable.

Brother Baron accepting his award at the 66th General Convention Closing banquet

Brother Eric R. Baron (Stevens ’68), is an adjunct professor at The Columbia University Business School where he teaches “Entrepreneurial Selling” to MBA students. He participates in many of Columbia Business School’s programs for corporate executives. He is also a sales process consultant and special events speaker, has spent more than 30 years in sales, sales management, and sales training and is the founder of The Baron Group, a consulting firm devoted to sales training, which began in 1992. He has worked with major Fortune 500 companies including AT&T, Pepsi, JP-Morgan, Kraft, American Express, Prudential, Pfizer, Citi, Hewlett Packard, UBS, and Dr. Pepper. Baron’s diverse background also includes significant experience in creative problem solving and motivational team building. He regularly conducts programs ranging from small group training sessions to large group presentations. He is widely featured as a motivating keynote speaker, and routinely provides salespeople with insights that create a distinct edge over the competition by demonstrating how every sales call can be transformed into a problem-solving opportunity. Brother Baron’s first book, Selling Is a Team Sport, explains how sales teams can become much more efficient by applying proven problem-solving skills to both internal strategy sessions and sales interactions. He believes passionately that everyone within an organization can and should contribute to the sales process, and that teamwork is a core component of an efficient process.

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The Cardinal Principles as he explains, also translate to critical business skills. Brotherhood evolves to teamwork. Baron’s view of teamwork is “knowing that you can ask for help or someone will help you back up when you fall.” It is critical in business, and it is essential in life. He addresses scholarship or intellectual curiosity, by saying that remaining curious will help you thrive and continue to grow in life and your career. He believes that the saddest thing one can do is accept their status and not seek to improve themselves further. Character, to Baron, is all about values. He asked the convention attendees in the room, “How do you want to be remembered?” He then cited author David Brooks saying, “It is more important what people will say when they talk about your eulogy than when they talk about your resume.” Baron then challenged the attendees, “What are the things you did to make the world better?” Brother Baron ended his speech with some parting advice: Trust your instincts. “You’re going to be right so much more than you’re going to be wrong, so trust your instincts.” Remain genuine. “Authenticity is critical. If you’re not authentic, you’re nothing. Be who you are, you can’t be anyone else, so don’t waste time trying.” Look for a mastery. “Find something you do great and do it over and over and over again.” Don’t lose touch. “50 years removed from my undergraduate years, one of my biggest regrets is losing contact with my brothers.”

THE SIGNET


BRADEN KEETER (AUBURN ‘17)

THE TODD SIMPSON DISTINGUISHED CHAIR Brother Simpson is a member of the Court of Honor and a former President of the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation. Braden helped to do away with any activities/actions considered to be hazing on his campus, in the state, and Phi Sigma Kappa. He established a relationship with the local Special Olympics and promoted the importance of community service, resulting in hundreds of hours of service by chapter brothers and attendance at dozens of Special Olympics events. One of his references said, “His performance as president came at a crossroads in the young chapter’s history. Upon his graduation, he has truly left the chapter better than he found it.”

ADAM MARTIN (OHIO STATE ‘17)

THE MIKE PALM DISTINGUISHED CHAIR Brother Palm is the President of Phi Sigma Kappa Properties. Brother Martin helped to revamp his chapter’s housing bylaws and helped with a remodel of a large part of the chapter house. He also helped his chapter achieve the largest associate class in his chapter’s history. Adam is an alternate to the Senate General Assembly to the Committee on Academic Affairs. He is also a full-time member of the Committee on Academic Misconduct. As a member of the Fisher Honors Cohort Program, he takes part in a highly selective and rigorous academic program of 30 students in the fisher college of business that emphasizes leadership, service, interpersonal and critical thinking skills.

NIC LACONICO (GEORGIA TECH ‘17)

THE FRANK TORTORICI DISTINGUISHED CHAIR Brother Tortorici is a longtime regional adviser, working with chapters in the south. Brother Laconico helped to establish new scholarship requirements for his chapter, which raised the chapter’s GPA from 2.98 to 3.21, moving the chapter up 14 spots in Greek rankings on campus. He brought a focus back to rituals by fine-tuning the chapter’s performance and inviting regional volunteers to observe them. He led the efforts to recruit 22 new members, which made up 48 percent of the chapter and was the first chairman to execute a successful summer recruitment, increasing numbers by 53 percent.

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THE PHI SIGMA KAPPA BRAND LAUNCH

Kicked Off The 66th General Convention

What is a Visual Identity or Brand? Well, it goes far beyond being just a logo or a tagline, colors or a visual identity.

Welcome to Phi Sigma Kappa’s new look! As Scott Jacobson (Cal Poly ’01) said two years ago at the 65th General Convention in Minneapolis, “It’s an exciting time to be a Phi Sig.” He was not kidding, and two years later an exciting reveal happened at the 66th General Convention as Phi Sig unveiled its brand’s visual identity! This was the product of a year-long process initiated by the Grand Council and guided by Phi Sig’s Undergraduate Experience Committee.

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A brand is the promise made to audiences; the essence of an organization; the actions taken; the identity we promote. Most importantly though, a brand is how you are perceived by others. A brand boils down to an experience, and if managed correctly, it can connect generations of brothers from around the world. A strong brand is all about cohesion. A brand and its visual style must be cohesive so that audiences can see the connection as they view it in other mediums. Take the time to look at our website, our social media and other mediums and you will see the cohesion in action. The ability for Phi Sig to Stand Up and Stand Out as being recognized will develop from this core identity.

THE SIGNET


Phi Sig? What is Phi Sigma Kappa? What sets us apart?

First, the primary goal was to discover “What is Phi Sigma Kappa?” What sets us apart as an organization? • An organization with nearly 150 years of history and traditions; • An organization that became what it is today through the largest merger between two fraternal organizations in 1985; • An organization which has continued to push ahead and works to be the greatest version of what a brotherhood should truly be This and much more is what makes Phi Sig the Fraternity it is, but it does not tell us “what” Phi Sig is. Second, the objective was to keep all of Phi Sig’s history in mind, but we must build a simpler, more direct and clearer image of Phi Sig. All this while remaining compelling, inspiring and striving to evoke the deep sense of pride that the Brotherhood feels. Phi Sig’s “new” brand isn’t just a new logo, a tagline or precisely defined colors. Phi Sig’s brand is who we are and what we stand for. What is Phi Sig? Phi Sig is 1873… Phi Sig is 1910... Phi Sig evolved in 1934 when the Creed and Cardinal Principles were brought to the convention and chosen as guides for how we should strive to live our lives. Phi Sig evolved again in 1985 through the Merger of two great fraternities, Kappa and Epsilon. What is Phi Sig? Phi Sig is where history made meets history to come.

This visual identity was the first step of our Strategic Communications Plan approved by Phi Sigma Kappa’s leadership at the 2016 Albert D. Shonk, Jr. Undergraduate Leadership School. Throughout this journey of discovery, Phi Sig leadership worked closely with undergraduates, alumni, and branding experts to create the innovative but remarkably familiar look that Phi Sig will use for years to come. In a number of surveys, we examined both members’ and some non-members’ views of the Fraternity. Using this information, we exposed primary symbols and text linked with Phi Sigma Kappa and the brand experience. The Fraternity staff was guided by the experts at an Indianapolis design firm, specializing in visual identity discovery and brand refinement. This partnership provided expert guidance and was essential in identifying key insights of the Brotherhood from its many members during the process.

Simply put, this visual identity is the combination of a logo or brand mark with fonts, colors, and imagery to form a unique and easily identifiable visual presence and design style. A well done visual identity carves out a place in a market by distinguishing itself from the competition. Phi Sig’s new visual identity is consistent and well-crafted. It will give visual life to our brand and help to drive and connect all communications. This is the public face of Phi Sig conveying our Cardinal Principles, core values, distinct personality, mission and purpose, and a promise of quality that the membership deserves.

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Discovery

Phi Sigma Kappa’s Fractured Image

In order to discover Phi Sig today, we had to engage with our members, our Greek partners, and our campus communities. We engaged in conversations with Phi Sigs of all ages, phases of life, and points in their careers. We had to discover where they were within their journey so that they would be compelled to join the Brotherhood on its journey. We spoke to many of our members, our core stakeholders, influential higher education professionals and our dedicated university partners to discover these insights. Our exploration and where it led was both illuminating and empowering. We confirmed the common themes that define the Phi Sig experience: Brotherhood, Scholarship, and Character. These themes continue to affirm that our Phi Sig Cardinal Principles are timeless. But we also discovered more covert experiences that played into our member’s lives: progressive leadership, community-mindfulness, freethinking, and reverence to others who hold these qualities. We discovered that Phi Sigs are viewed and admired as relatable but inspiring leaders, courteous members of their communities and empathetic men. Knowing how Phi Sigs are viewed to those in their society is what truly anchors our identity and establishes a genuineness that cannot be counterfeit.

Some of the top images in Google when searching for Phi Sigma Kappa. The errors and misconceptions are rampant throughout the internet and our campuses due to the lack of a unified visual identity.

Key Insights: 1. The Cardinal Principles resonate with members and parents • Brotherhood (and family) • Character (authenticity) • Scholarship (a desire to learn) 2. The “Triple Ts” were undeniably the mark most often associated with Phi Sigma Kappa. 3. A “knight” or “shield” was mentioned many times as well, which is no surprise as that shows a strong connection to our Epsilon based history and symbols. 4. “The Golden Rule” was a strongly threaded theme throughout every respondent’s life and values, living by it is what many thought living the “Phi Sig Way” truly meant. 5. An owl, while never officially used, was often associated through to Phi Sig through its use in the “Kinney Coat of Arms.” We took all of the feedback into consideration as our brand was forged into what you see here. A brand that is so genuine and true to Phi Sig that it will remain relevant with the times and be able to grow again as Phi Sig itself grows.

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The Website Along with revealing our new brand identity, a new website was launched. The new site and brand identity reflect the bold, energetic and forward-looking culture of Phi Sig and is designed to inspire and further elevate us as we continue to provide quality value to our members and communities. The new site delivers content in a clean and organized way to provide visitors easy access to learn about our Fraternity. Our new website uses what is called a “responsive design” that dynamically resizes to fit your browser. This means that no matter what device you are using, the site will adjust. If you have any comments or suggestions, please feel free to email, communications@phisigmakappa.org.

THE SIGNET


PHI SIG You will see that the traditional symbols, colors, and imagery was taken and modernized, creating a fresh new look. Study of the logo may lead you to see something different every time, something that resonates with your view of Phi Sig. Just like every Phi Sig experience is distinct and valued, our brand identity and its iconography is meant to mirror that experience. This logo does not detract from historical marks, in fact, Phi Sig has never had an official logo. The esoteric symbols of the Fraternity, such as the Crest or Grand Chapter Seal are not and never will be forgotten. Phi Sig has moved forward to a cohesive visual identity so that we may provide the necessary reverence to these meaningful symbols and repair a confusing visual past. The Crest as it is seen today, was created in 1985 as a symbol of the Merger of Kappa and Epsilon. Only the membership knows the details and esoteric meaning of the Crest. But the branding process has meaning beyond the obvious visual components, the refinement of our visual identity will flow throughout all of Phi Sig’s mediums. The creation of a logo has given the Crest the ability to be used more formally and with greater reverence. The Crest will evoke/invoke a more significant use by being used sparingly throughout Phi Sigma Kappa mediums. Knowing what the Crest means to us, do we truly want to see it placed on shot glasses or other places where its meaning clashes with its application? Moving ahead, we will not have to worry about the marks and meanings being disrespected and treated without reverence.

The Launch To launch the identity, this video was shown at the 66th General Convention to attendees and made available online. The video isn’t just an introduction to the brand itself; it is the reintroduction of Phi Sig to the world and the fresh impression we which to leave with audiences.

The video is available on the website to download and use for recruitment.

The Marks

Phi Sig’s new brand signifies an opportunity to reintroduce our organization to our members, our campus communities, and society. Many of our marks just needed to be remastered digitally so they could be available for use by the membership and vendors. As you will see the Crest itself did not change and the new artwork will preserve it longer. For the letters, we’ve created a standard look for them but have not removed them.

ΦΣΚ

Want to learn more about the new visual identity? Go online to phisigmakappa.org/brand. While there you will also be able to download the logo, fonts, brand identity guide, images for social media, and more. Chapters have excitedly embraced the new look & feel of Phi Sig! Pictured above, Cal State Fullerton, Cincinnati, LIU Post and Akron.

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FOUNDATION UPDATE Phi Sig for Life – The Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation Phi Sigs can point to the Golden Rule as the unifying pillar of both Phi Sigma Kappa and Phi Sigma Epsilon. All of us share this laudable tenet to “do unto others as we would have them do unto ourselves.” This commitment starts within our Brotherhood and then extends out into greater society itself. We also share the common experiences that all true fraternities bring their members: lifelong friendships; the development of skills that aid us in our personal and professional lives; and a focus on personal integrity that manifests into a greater appreciation and respect for diversity and equality. Add these things together, and you can see the value Phi Sig brings to its members and society as a whole. At the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation, dedicated alumni brothers work tirelessly with Phi Sig headquarters staff to fund the educational and leadership programs of the Fraternity. The brothers give generously of their time and money to ensure that our undergraduate members receive innovative training in risk management, scholarship, and finance. The Foundation Trustees are all brothers ranging in age from recent graduates to brothers who protected us in long ago wars. We have graduated from

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schools all over the country. Some of us return to our chapter house every year, while others yearn to see their chapters return to their campuses. We all serve because of the love of our Fraternity, commitment to the Golden Rule, and a desire to continuously enrich the experiences our undergraduate members will have as Phi Sigs. We know what a positive difference Phi Sig can make in the life of a college student. We see Phi Sig programming change our young members for the better, and warmly remember how we became better men through our Fraternity. The Foundation is an excellent place for alumni brothers with a passion for Phi Sig, and a desire to help our undergraduate members become more involved with their national Fraternity. We encourage our Trustees to engage with alumni and to visit chapters when their travels take them near a college campus. We look for them to conduct themselves as national officers and to follow and embrace the vision of the Grand Chapter to enrich the undergraduate experience, support strategic expansion, and engage with alumni to encourage support for our Fraternity.

“Add these things together, and you can see the value Phi Sig brings to its members and society as a whole.”

THE SIGNET

In the past few years, the Foundation has continued to fund the established educational programs of the Fraternity including Shonk Leadership School, Zillgitt


FO U N DATI O N

Leadership Institute, regional conclaves, and scholarships. It has also created the Good Samaritan Fund and the Advisors’ Excellence Fund to help undergraduates in need with costs to participate in our educational programs and assist alumni volunteers with travel expenses when supporting chapters or colonies, respectively. The Foundation is also proud to be a partner with Phi Sigma Kappa Properties in supporting educational building space projects for individual chapters that are remodeling chapter houses or acquiring new ones. At the national level, the Foundation is raising money to build and create the Albert D. Shonk Jr. Archive and Educational Center at Phi Sig’s headquarters building in Indianapolis. This facility will serve as a national museum, educational center, and archive for Phi Sig history (both PSK and PSE) and memorabilia for all members and the public.

Please consider joining with the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation and formally engaging with our Fraternity once again. The rewards of helping our undergraduates become better men while enjoying the fellowship of our Brotherhood are many. To find out how you can serve and support this worthy cause, please contact Greg DalSanto, Asst. Director of Alumni and Development, Nick Zuniga, Executive Director and COO, or John Sheehan, Foundation President, at 317-573-5420 during regular business hours. Fraternally,

John P. Sheehan Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation President

UPCOMING EVENTS JAN

NEW YORK CITY

17

Club 101, 101 Park Ave, New York, NY 10178 JANUARY 17, 2018 - 6:00PM-8:30PM

Heavy Appetizers provided with a Cash Bar. Meet new Grand Council Director Jonathan Taylor and Chief Operating Officer Nick Zuniga! Attire is business casual so come right after work or straight from home!

FEB

7

MAY

17

DALLAS

BOSTON

3913 Amherst Ave. Dallas, TX 75225 FEBRUARY 7, 2018, 6:30PM-8:30PM

Jake n Joes Sports Grill, Waltham, MA 02451 MARCH 1, 2018 6:00PM-9:00PM

MAR

1

WANT TO LEARN MORE?

MILWAUKEE Champps Americana, Brookfield, WI 53005 MAY 17, 2018 5:30PM-8:30PM

VISIT OUR WEBSITE: PHISIGMAKAPPA.ORG OR CONTACT GREGORY DALSANTO BY EMAIL AT GREGORY@PHISIGMAKAPPA.ORG

KEEP AN EYE OUT FOR OTHER EVENTS IN THESE CITIES: DC/N.Va - Nashville - Southern California Austin - Chicago

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CHAPTER NEWS Did your chapter participate in something new and exciting, overcome a challenge or host a successful event? Phi Sigs across the country wants to hear about it! Tell Phi Sig members, friends and partners around the country what your chapter did by submitting Chapter News to phisigmakappa.org/connect/submit-news/. Once reviewed by the professional staff, your news item could be published to the website, social media and featured in the Chapter News section of The Signet!

BALL STATE EPSILON TAU

The Ball State Chapter and Ball State Phi Mu Sorority on campus hosted their annual Bonnamu Battle of the Bands. This was the first year performers had the chance to win a recording session. “We got an email from a guy who professionally records, so whoever wins will get to professionally record their music for an album,” co-chair of philanthropy for Phi Mu Jacy Vuckovich said. “This will also be the first year where Bonnamu will be hosted outside at the Lafollette fields.”

CAL STATE/FULLERTON

Ivan Lomeli, sentinel/risk chair for Phi Sigma Kappa, explained the money raised from the event would go to the fraternity’s and sorority’s respective charities. “This is the first year that Phi Sigma Kappa will be paired with Phi Mu,” Lomeli said. “Our usual philanthropy event is the Polar Plunge, where all the proceeds go to the Special Olympics, so all of the money that we raise will go towards Special Olympics and the money that Phi Mu raises will go towards Riley Children’s Hospital.”

IOTA PENTATON

The Fullerton Chapter held an event named “Bring Your Own Broom.” Where they stepped up with others in their community to help clean the streets. The local fire department partnered with them. They began the event for two main reasons. To help clean the community and raise money for those affected by breast cancer.

The goal for Phi Mu and Phi Sigma Kappa is to raise at least $5,000 for Riley’s Children’s Hospital and the Special Olympics.

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THE SIGNET


OHIO STATE PI DEUTERON

“It was a great year for the Pi Deuteron chapter at the Phi Sigma Kappa General Convention. Four of our brothers traveled down to Orlando and each one of them helped to carry one of our chapter’s four new awards back to the homeland. The Fred Schwengel Most Improved Chapter. Special Achievement in Community. Special Achievement in Recruitment and the Order of the Diamond Circle Outstanding Undergraduate awarded to our president, Adam Martin.”

NORTHWEST MISSOURI STATE EPSILON NU

The Epsilon Nu Chapter at Northwest Missouri State, recruited 26 new Associates this fall. A great job by them.

NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIVERSITY RHO HEXATON

AKRON

The Rho Hexaton Chapter at Northern Arizona University, spent their Saturday cleaning the streets in their community. The chapter and other volunteers hope that by being an example to other students on their campus, that their community will be seen and treated as it should be, with respect. Great job men!

ETA TRITON

The colony at Akron University, kicked off the year with a move-in day kickball game. Brothers wanted to foster a welcoming environment for those new to campus, and show what an excellent organization Phi Sig at Akron aims to be. They hope to petition for chartering in the Spring so look out for these brothers!

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UNIVERSITY OF KENTUCKY

PENN STATE

PHI DEUTERON

KAPPA

The Phi Deuteron Chapter at the University of Kentucky, had four brothers make it to the end of their schools 24 hour dance philanthropy! They raised almost $4,000 through this event.

NEW FORMAT FOR CHAPTER NEWS

The Kappa Chapter at Penn State University worked hard in their fundraiser as they work toward Penn State’s “THON” week. “We raised over $17,000 this weekend with our partner Phi Rho! It’s amazing what a single weekend can accomplish. Can’t wait to start canvassing!” THON is a collaboration across the Penn State campus and is highly funded and managed by the students, many Greeks included.

You will notice that along with the new look and feel for the entire magazine. The Chapter/Member News sections have received a slight overhaul as well, and the changes don’t end here. We’re mixing up the format and how submissions of news work. You see, The Signet is Phi Sigma Kappa’s flagship of communication. It serves as a source of information for current readers but also acts a historical publication for the Fraternity. Within the walls of the International Headquarters, you can find issues of The Signet dating back to 2005, 1987, 1954 and even further. The magazine is and will always be our most treasured form of communication. You can submit content to us by using the address on the back of this magazine, or visit our website and click “Submit News.” This easy to use the form can be found under “Connect”, check it out and start sharing today!

Stand up and let you the Fraternity know what makes you damn proud of yourself, your chapter or another brother.

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GEORGIA TECH KAPPA DEUTERON

The Kappa Deuteron Chapter at Georgia Tech recruited 22 new associates this last semester, pictured above. They continue to grow and be a well run and operating chapter within our Fraternity.

THE SIGNET


CHAPTER THOUGHTS LEADING THE RITUAL During Convention this summer in Orlando, the Kappa Hexaton Chapter at Stetson University had the distinct honor of performing our Fraternity’s Ritual at Convention. As the president of this chapter, I understood the immense amount of work that needed to be put into an operation such as this. Performing the Ritual is no easy task. And though we all come from a variety of chapters all across the nation, our Ritual is the one thing that binds us all together as brothers. Because of this, I, along with the rest of the chapter here at Stetson, knew we needed to prepare heavily in order to deliver the best Ritual performance we could give, not only because we were being honored with the challenge, but also to ensure that our Ritual would be performed the way our founders intended it to be. Upon receiving the news that our chapter would be acting as the Ritual Team for Convention, planning began immediately. Members of the Executive Board were selected for positions first before asking any other brothers to volunteer. This ensured that bigger roles would be covered by more experienced brothers who have performed the Ritual ceremony before. Once these positions were filled, we decided that this opportunity for Kappa Hexaton would also be a great opportunity for some of our newer members to get involved with not only the chapter but for the Fraternity as a whole. Along with the vice president and sentinel, we reached out to our newly initiated brothers and asked if any of them would be interested in taking up a role for the Ritual team. To our surprise, the response was more than we expected. Several new brothers replied stating that they would be happy to have a role on the initiation team, and after deliberation, we selected a few to join us at Convention. This would be their first time performing our Ritual ceremony, and I am proud to say that they did an excellent job.

Once all of the positions on the Ritual team were solidified, we moved on to practicing the Ritual itself. Our Sentinel compiled a list of dates containing mandatory rehearsal times where the Ritual team would meet in secret in order to go over the ceremony and ensure that everything was being performed the correct way. Throughout these rehearsals, we realized that our Ritual is more important than ever. Without going into too much detail for obvious reasons, we on the Ritual team began to understand just how our Ritual ties us all together, and we also began to appreciate it more for what it was. Once you repeat something like this over and over again, you become more connected to it than ever. Rehearsals ran until summer break, and we weren’t back together until the week of Convention. However, rehearsals didn’t stop. Each brother made sure to practice their roles throughout the summer in order to ensure that they would still be ready for the actual performance. Though we understood what a tremendous honor this was, and we acknowledged all the challenges we came across while rehearsing in secret for extended amounts of time, there is no better feeling than knowing that your chapter successfully performed the one Ritual that binds your entire Brotherhood together in front of what is essentially the whole Brotherhood. Working closely with brothers such as Scott Jacobson and Tony Fusaro was truly a privilege, and we would encourage all chapters to volunteer in the hopes that one day they can perform our Ritual during Convention as well. It is a moment we will never forget.

The Stetson Chapter pictured to the left was proud to assist and perform the Ritual during the 66th General Convention.

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COMING BACK TO PHI SIGMA KAPPA BY DENNIS GILLAN

Brothers, Sorry, it took me so long to come back. Wait. Remember what they say about apologies— “Your friends don’t need them, and your enemies won’t believe them,” and we are more than friends, we are brothers. My name is Dennis Gillan, and after years of being away from the Phi Sig Brotherhood, a purposeful career change has thankfully brought me back to the Triple Ts. You see, I am a mental health advocate and speak on suicide prevention on college campuses and when possible, the brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa come out in droves to support the talk and their brother. This has been the case at Georgia Southern, the University of Michigan, Clemson University, the University of Cincinnati, Radford University and my alma mater and home of the Delta Chapter, West Virginia University. In fact, it was at West Virginia University where I learned the incredible power of the Phi Sigma Kappa brotherhood and started down the path of becoming a mental health advocate. It was my junior year when I got the call from back home that my older brother Mark lost his battle with depression and died by suicide. I sadly flew home to New York to attend the funeral, and after the last day of the wake, I went upstairs to get something to drink. Before I could open the refrigerator, I noticed a bunch of flowers had arrived and were taking up a good part of the dining room table at my parents’ house. I walked over to the table, and

the first tag I looked at said: “From Your Brothers at Phi Sigma Kappa.” If I am lying, I am dying and brothers, you will never know how much that meant to me. I went back to school and became a better brother and even ran for office the next semester to pay back this thoughtful gesture of brotherhood. I was the inductor for the best new associate class Delta Chapter ever had----IMHO! As we all know, life is full of twists and turns and Mark’s death was an unwanted twist and if we were to stop right there, my family story would be sad enough. Eleven years later my life took an even darker turn, and I lost my younger brother also to suicide. Hurts even to type it. Now I was in a horrible place mentally, and I retreated from friends, family, and the Phi Sigs. I focused on my little world and not much else. I was married, we started a family, and I just faded into my life and left the brotherhood behind--or so I thought. The years went on, and I slowly started to dust myself off, and I emerged from my self-imposed isolation to volunteer to work on the Suicide Prevention Hotline. I got to the point where I just felt like I needed to do something, but I still carried the shame and stigma that comes with death by suicide, so I did not tell anyone outside my family that I was doing this. I would leave my house every Thursday night at 7:30 p.m. and I would return at 12:30 a.m. and no one

“...we are more than friends, we are brothers”.

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commitment to each other is lifelong, and you need to take advantage of that fact.

The Clemson Chapter came to see Dennis during his talk on campus.

suspected a thing. Cool---I could help the cause and remain anonymous. Perfect, but God had other plans, and one day I told my story at a fundraiser, and it just felt right. So, I told it again with an emphasis on prevention, and this time with a little appropriate humor, and the audience gave me a standing ovation. This talk hit a nerve and now people wanted to take their picture with me. I remember once proclaiming “I at this moment solemnly declare My Faith in the wisdom and love of God,” and maybe this was my calling. Finally, I presented to more than 600 women in Greek life and after walking off the stage with tears in my eyes, I heard in my head “Well done, my good and faithful servant, well done!”

I recently had the opportunity to come back to Phi Sigma Kappa at a national level, and it was awesome. I did my talk on mental health at the 66th General Convention and got to reconnect with brothers young and old. Sure, I had to dust off the Creed and re-memorize it, but it’s amazing how quickly it came back. All that memorization years ago paid off and it truly is a remarkable statement of commitment, a lifelong commitment. You may recall that we all pledged to remain forever true to this, my fraternity’s faith in me and in turn to preserve and promote courageously and unselfishly the chosen ideals of our mutual affection and common endeavor. That fraternal faith, as I recently experienced, is always there. We just need you to come back and experience it with us. Because of my work, I know that 90% of people who die by suicide have some form of treatable mental health issue. When this mental health situation flairs up in a man it can leave them with a profound sense of loneliness, alienation, and isolation. As a lifelong member of Phi Sigma Kappa, you should know that if you are feeling lonely, alienated, and isolated that we are here for you and we want you to come back. Been there, done that and I was welcomed back with open arms. Your brothers would do the same for you. Come back.

The Georgia Southern Chapter came to see Dennis during his talk on campus.

I booked a gig at Georgia Southern University, and I noticed they had a Phi Sigma Kappa chapter. So, I called Chapter President Levi Kerlin and begged him to let the brothers know I was coming. He replied with enthusiasm, and he came through, as most of the chapter showed up for the talk. See Picture Below. Now I had a powerful ally in the fight against the stigma of mental health, and it was my brothers of Phi Sigma Kappa. I was back in the fold of the Triple T’s, and it felt good. So good that I even started to go back to fraternal functions at my alma mater, and I basked in the joy and support of my brothers. It was there all along; I was the one who walked away. Now if you are reading this article in the Signet, I have a question to ask you: Have you walked away? If so, please know that you can always come back and in fact, you should…. it’s good for your mental health. As men age, we tend to lose friends. No one’s fault, life just gets in the way. It just happens, and we so desperately need these connections later in life. The suicide rates for middle-aged men are ridiculously high and close to 80% of all completed suicides are men. Our

The Cincinnati Chapter came to see Dennis during his talk on campus.

About the Author: Dennis Gillan is on a mission to reverse the trends in completed suicides and to reduce the stigma associated surrounding mental health---especially in men. Dennis lost two brothers to suicide and jumped into helping those in need by telling his personal story of how he recovered from these losses and what he has learned along the way. You can visit his website here: www.dennisgillan.com or drop him a line here dgillan@gmail.com.

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The mock-up of the new Purdue University Chapter house, estimated completion Fall 2018.

Building A Future The Delta Triton Alumni Association at Purdue University partners with Pennington & Company to address their housing needs. If you’ve returned to your alma mater in the past several years, you’ve noticed advances in the makeup of the campus and the local community. Colleges and universities across the country are making a significant investment in collegiate housing. Additionally, for-profit companies are following suit, building luxury off-campus apartments and competing for student tenants. Fraternities, Phi Sigma Kappa chapters included, recognize they must update their homes to remain a relevant, competitive, and a viable housing option for today’s college men. “Many chapters are in need of upgraded housing and some lack housing altogether,” shares John Sheehan, president of the Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation. “Good housing is one of the building blocks of a great chapter.”

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For house corporation boards, knowing where, or even how, to start the process of updating a chapter house can be daunting. In addition to developing building plans and managing construction, house corporations must obtain funding and manage the project budget. The Delta Triton chapter at Purdue University has been exemplary in addressing their housing needs. They have built a successful capital campaign, begun demolition, and construction is underway. Doors to the brand new chapter house are set to open for the 2018 fall term. For Delta Triton alumni leaders, the process for building a new chapter house had been discussed since the 1970s but not fully embraced until 2013. As leaders began planning for a new house, they quickly realized a need for professional support to complete their project.

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The Purdue University Chapter house prior to demolition.

A photo from the early demolition of the house.

“In 2014 I attended a meeting in Charleston that linked other Greek communities, architects, and fund raising organizations to focus on the process and key decision points in housing construction,” explained Phi Sigma Kappa Director of New Housing John Lendrum. “From that meeting, we realized Delta Triton did not have the capability to execute a campaign without dedicated support.”

John Sheehan adds, “The Phi Sigma Kappa Foundation views Pennington & Company as our “go to” resource for chapter educational space building project specific fundraising. Pennington has the professionalism and approach down pat for these types of fundraising activities.”

“...we realized Delta Triton did not have the capability to execute a campaign without dedicated support.”

Delta Triton leaders credit their campaign and project success to the combination of long-term planning, professional support and a team of dedicated volunteers. “I was a bit pessimistic going into this process that we could achieve such lofty goals,” Schleicher said. “I learned that this could be accomplished if we identified the right brothers for their various roles in the process. Remember the secret to success is to surround yourself with capable people. You can’t do it all by yourself.”

After reviewing proposals from several fundraising groups, Delta Triton leadership selected Pennington & Company to lead the campaign to fundraise for the new chapter house. Under Pennington’s guidance, a team of alumni volunteers raised more than $1.5 million for their ~$3.5 million project. “The smartest or luckiest thing we did was to hire Pennington to assist us with the project” Campaign Chairman Richard Schleicher said. “They had the experience and expertise in fraternity fundraising that we obviously lacked. They pointed us in the right direction in all facets of success in our efforts.”

Interested in supporting the campaign? Contact Richard Schleicher at rls@ajskfc.com.

View a live web-cam of Delta Triton’s construction https://app.truelook.com/?u=dp1500918166#tl_live

May ’15

TIMELINE:

Fall ’14

Delta Triton Capital campaign

Dec ’13

Architect and

initiated in conjunction with

Proposal to build

fundraising

new Alumni Relations program

new house

consultant selected

coordinated by Pennington

Aug ’18 Dec ’16

Purdue Chapter moves

$1.5 million raised

into new house

Attend Greek

Pennington &

Capital campaign formally

Demolition

Housing summit June ’14

Company Feasibility

announced to all alumni April ’16

May ’17

Study initiated Dec ’14

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OUR HERITAGE... 1917 ONE HUNDRED YEARS AGO IN PHI SIG

By Albert D. Shonk, Past Grand President & Historian

D

uring the 10 years leading up to 1917, many improvements were made in the national Phi Sigma Kappa organization and the fraternity system, which made it possible to survive World War I. Phi Sigma Kappa became a national fraternity in 1909 when the Omega Chapter at University of California, Berkeley was chartered. Cal/Berkeley was followed the next year by Alpha Deuteron at the University of Illinois and Beta Deuteron at the University of Minnesota. Before that time we were primarily a New England/eastern fraternity. The future of the Signet was determined during this period. Before 1908, it hadn’t been published with any regularity. At the Convention in 1908, its future was raised. After much discussion, it was decided to give the magazine a trial. James A. Boehm(Franklin & Marshall 1904), who was the Grand Vice-President, was appointed the editor. He continued publishing it successfully as editor for several years, and it has been regularly published ever since. In 1909 a significant step forward for the entire college fraternity system took place when President Faunce of Brown University called together a meeting in New York of representatives of all the known fraternities, and the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC) was organized. Phi Sigma Kappa was a charter member. The NIC has met almost yearly since that time and has assisted its members through many painful periods, including two world wars. One of the most fortunate happenings leading up to 1917 occurred at the Convention in 1914. Dr. Walter H. Conley (Union 1891), head of the Metropolitan Hospital of New York, was elected our Grand President. He had previously served as the auditor on the Grand Council. He was re-elected in 1916. There was no Convention in 1918, but he was again re-elected in1920 and served until 1922. In 1925 he served

as chairman of the NIC. He was an excellent executive and guided the Fraternity through WWI and its recovery following the war. On April 6, 1917, the United States entered World War I. However, two years prior, Robert Henri Chapon (Massachusetts 1914), had given his life at Verdun under the flag of France and the men of the Rho Chapter in Canada (Queens College) had for several years been at war. Because of lack of members, the chapter ceased to exist in 1914. With the beginning of World War I, came the mobilization of the first Officers’ Training School and the rush of undergraduates and younger alumni to join. Many, failing appointments, enlisted in the regular army, choosing those divisions which were scheduled for early sailing to the war zone in Europe. During 1917, fraternity life at most schools almost ceased to exist. Many chapter houses became barracks. The one exception was Lambda at George Washington University in Washington, DC. There were many Phi Sigs stationed in Washington and Lambda became their Headquarters. The chapter initiated 44 new members during the War. They continued to have meetings year round and had Phi Sig guests from all of our chapters. Even though chapter life was completely disorganized by the War, following the end of the War on November 11, 1918, chapter life recovered very quickly. Extensive repairs had to be made to the houses that served as barracks. The expense was paid by the government. The Signet continued to be published throughout the War and helped our members to stay in touch during this difficult time.

World War I, also known as the First World War, the Great War, or the War to End All Wars, was a global war originating in Europe that lasted from July 28, 1914 to November 11, 1918.

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Brother Robert Henri Chapon, the first Phi Sig to give his life for his country during World War I.

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CHAPTER ETERNAL The Signet publishes Chapter Eternal to recognize and honor the passing of members. The Grand Chapter relies on our members for the deceased notices and obituaries. Please help to honor these brothers.

MIT Paul E Gray ‘54 Midwestern State Univ. Robert H Rasmussen ‘89 Northern Illinois University Alexander Budzisz ‘18

American University John B Rabner ‘50

Penn. State University Elwood R Wertz ‘50

Arizona State University Robert C Harness ‘60

Purdue/Calumet University Jesse J Gonzalez Jr ‘75 John A Kania ‘92

Ball State University Barry Roberts ‘85

Univ. of Central Missouri Howard L Campbell ‘50

Clarion University Michael J. Marshall ‘05 Bruce Summerville ‘93

University of Detroit Jerald D Tobin ‘65

Eastern Michigan University Gerald E Albright ‘58

University of Houston Ronald H Mansur ‘69

Emporia State University Darrell L Whistler ‘55

University of Kentucky Norval R Copeland ‘53 William P Jones ‘48 Dr. George D. Schrader ‘53

Ferris State University Robert S Dertien ‘04 George Washington Univ. George O Hook ‘50 Timothy N Ormsbee ‘80 Georgia Tech Thomas J. Hughes ‘59 Indiana University of Penn. Donald J. Frederick CPA ‘77 Ronald A Frederick ‘77

University of Maryland George A Arzberger ‘28 Donald R Beeman ‘31 William O Bradley ‘29 Frederick E Bradstreet ‘29 John F Cadden ‘27 Frank C O’Brien ‘69 Jerry C Tobin ‘52 Keith R Wheeler ‘58

Kent State University Vaughn R Esch ‘58

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The Signet publishes Chapter Eternal to recognize and honor the passing of members. The Grand Chapter relies on our members for the deceased notices and obituaries. Please help to honor these brothers.

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University of Massachusetts Raymond F Tenney ‘53

University of Minnesota George D Armstrong ‘16 Paul J Deegan ‘59 David M Stearns ‘66 Francis A Walker ‘65

University of Pennsylvania Peter M Cianfrani ‘69

Univ. of Southern California Lawrence D Matson ‘50

Univ. of Tennessee Dewey M Ewing ‘69 Lee E Jacobs ‘59 Larry O Taylor ‘71

Univ. of Tennessee/Martin William D Hunter ‘74

University of Texas, Austin James S Hall ‘61

Univ. of Wisconsin/Stout Z.A. Prust

Washington State Univ. Douglas C Corey ‘59

West Virginia University Joe C Bigony ‘48 Charles H Ruck Jr ‘41 Earl R. Stalnaker ‘48

Western Michigan Univ. Jack C Widas ‘61

CONTACT US

B R OT H E RS O F S E RV I C E Brother Albright Brother Gerald E. Albright (Eastern Michigan ’58) passed away on Tuesday, February 28, 2017, at Saint Clares Hospital in Denville. He was 81. After graduation, Albright served in the United States Army from 1958 until being honorably discharged in 1960 with the rank of Lieutenant. Albright served the Fraternity as the national president of Phi Sigma Epsilon from 1974-1978. Brother Copeland Brother Norval Copeland (Kentucky ’53) passed away on Saturday, June 24, 2017. Brother Copeland served as a Province President from 1980-1986 and was beloved by the many brothers he encountered during his years of service. Before graduating college, Copeland served with the Air Force in Northern Africa during the Korean War, returning after his service and completing his education. Brother Gray Brother Paul Gray (MIT ’54) passed away Monday, September 18, 2017, after a lengthy battle with Alzheimer’s disease. He was 85. Brother Gray’s legacy at MIT spans generations — from his brilliance as a member of MIT’s faculty starting in 1960, to his leadership as Dean of the School of Engineering, Chancellor, 14th President and Chairman of the MIT Corporation. Gray was able to also serve his Fraternity from 1962-1965 as a Council Director. Gray served as chapter adviser to the Omicron Chapter, before to being elected to the Grand Council and received the Medallion of Merit in 1971.

Please send notices by email or mail to: Joe Kern at joe@phisigmakappa.org Phi Sigma Kappa Headquarters Attn: Joe Kern 2925 E. 96th St., Indianapolis, IN 46240

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2925 East 96th Street Indianapolis, IN 46240 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

SUMMER 2018 ALBERT D. SHONK, JR. LEADERSHIP SCHOOL AUGUST 2-4, 2018 ATLANTA, GA

The Signet (Fall 2017)  
The Signet (Fall 2017)