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SOUTH PHILADELPHIA

Vol. I No. 2

Issue 485

January 12, 2017

The Only Union Newspaper Reporting South/Southwest Philly The Way It Deserves

PhiladelphiaPublicRecord

@phillyrecord

PhillyRecord

PhillyRecord.com

GUV’S RACE HEATS UP SEE P. 22

CHANGING TIMES AROUND MLK PLAZA

RESIDENTS OF THE MLK PLAZA, NAMED FOR DR. KING, ARE FEELING THE EFFECTS OF GENTRIFICATION. SEE STORY PAGE 2 PHOTO BY ELDON GRAHAM

SPECIAL MLK SECTION P. 3


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HAWTHORNE FACES CHANGE BY ELDON GRAHAM

E IN THE Hawthorne neighborhood of S. Phila., where Dr. King came and spoke in 1965 during the Freedom Rally, his ideals had a lasting effect, which caused its PHA housing to be named the Martin Luther King, Jr. Plaza. Photo by Eldon Graham.

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CAMBODIANS CELEBRATE

S. PHILADELPHIANS of all stripes gathered at Wokano on Washington Avenue last Saturday to celebrate Cambodian Independence Day with local representatives of the Cambodian People’s Party. Above, L-R, Hor Chou, Peter Sok, Whitney White, Sonny Sem, Frank Sileo and Dennis Chhim. Below, Cambodian Americans dance whole-heartedly on this festive occasion.

LOCAL GOP IN D.C.

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SOUTH PHILLY Republicans who enjoyed meeting up with US Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell are Vince Minniti and William Lanzilotti, Jr. at swearing-in ceremony for US Sen. Pat Toomey.

MEETING up with 55th Ward Committeewoman Helen Banushi and Congressman Lou Barletta at swearing-in ceremony for US Sen. Pat Toomey were South Philadelphians Vince Minniti and Billy Lanzilotti, Jr.

very third Monday in January, Philadelphia celebrates a national icon who courted controversy as the voice of the downtrodden. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was concerned about the rights of exploited workers, as well as those birthright citizens who were subjugated in their own skin. It didn’t matter if you were Caucasian, African American, Hispanic or Latino; he was the voice of the people and fought the fights that needed to be fought. On more than one occasion, those fights brought him to Philadelphia, instances the city still commemorates in places like Hawthorne. In this South Philadelphia neighborhood, just east of Broad and Christian streets, where King came and spoke in 1965 during the Freedom Rally, his ideals had one lasting effect: 1st Dist. Councilman (and founder of the Public Record) Jim Tayoun had the Hawthorne public-housing project renamed after Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., to honor one of King’s crucial campaign appearances for civil rights in the North as well as the South. The city issued a plaque placed at MLK Plaza, the public-housing complex at 13th and Fitzwater streets. That project has since been demolished, but the space and the plaque endure. It is in this section of South Philadelphia where King’s legacy is still being honored by the residents of the neighborhood: standing their ground and not quietly following the trend of being gentrified, as with other parts of the city. Patricia Bullard, the former president of the Hawthorne Empowerment Coalition and a resident of the neighborhood, has steadily

noticed a change in the area since its remodeling ended. When asked if the neighborhood has become gentrified, she said, “It most certainly has. I have been here 30 years and they raised my taxes.” Bullard mentioned how this is an unfair tactic that heavily targets the elderly. Eminent domain – the taking of private property for the public good by the government – is another tactic Bullard says scared many residents when the neighborhood was being reconstructed – and it is still a worry today. Because of its proximity to Center City, the neighborhood has become very attractive and gained massive interest among newcomers who want to move into the neighborhood. In this process, Bullard fears they will push many current African American residents out. Benjamin Woodson, a Hawthorne resident, sees things changing. Some families are moving out of the neighborhood, or being forced out. “I still live here,” Woodson said. “Me and my family, we still live down here; but the rest of the families, they’re gone. It’s only a very few families that still live here from the old days. Some of them live on Webster Street, but other than that, some of the other families moved up north, to West Philly or to Gray’s Ferry. “The people that live in the neighborhood now are” white, he continued. “Some of them, they’re all right, but they’re trying to change things for the better – do what they want to do and how they want things done.” Housing prices in the neighborhood are going up, he argues, to the point where low-income families can’t afford to stay. This poses a particular problem for working-class families with kids.

Talking about the young singles who are moving into Hawthorne, Woodson said, “Sooner or later, they are probably going to push us all out by the price ranges for the houses and apartments and stuff like that. It’s going to happen. You can’t stop that; that’s what they want!” The towers, which were demolished in 1999, were slowly replaced with lowrise public housing, based on “New Urbanism” ideas, thanks to the HOPE VI program. HOPE VI is the name of a grant program administered by the US Dept. of Housing and Urban Development. Congress created this program after recognizing that many large inner-city housing sites were collapsing. Bullard was a major factor in the negotiations of the process for the Hawthorne area during that period, especially as the HEC president. “I was entrusted with looking after the neighborhood,” she said. “We wanted to maintain the look.” Bullard was mostly satisfied with how the neighborhood turned out afterward, noting there’s always going to be differences in preference among two negotiating parties. A debate over two-story housing vs three-story housing was an issue where both sides had to compromise. Bullard and her side were pushing for only two-story housing to fill up the area, whereas the PHA preferred to install three story housing. In 2005, the Philadelphia Housing Authority used HOPE VI funds in combination with funding from both private investors and other public entities to build MLK Plaza in Hawthorne, turning it one of the most-desirable places to live in the city.


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COUNCIL’S DAY OF SERVICE C

ITY HALL, LIKE MOST government offices, will be closed on Martin Luther King Day. But many of its workers will be putting in time elsewhere, as part of a Day of Service volunteer project. That goes for the elected officials at the top. Of course, if you’re the mayor or a City

Council member, you’re never really beyond the reach of public business. Many councilpeople will be active in programs across the city on Monday. Many plans were still up in the air as the Public Record went to press – the amount of planning involved in this massive venture takes a long time to finalize – but we are able to report a few of their engagements below.

GYM (AT LARGE)

CINDY BASS (8TH DIST.)

DAVID OH (AT LARGE)

The Councilwoman will be at Parkway Northwest High School for Peace & Social Justice, which is hosting Stronger Partners, Stronger Schools’ annual Martin Luther King Day of Service celebration. The event runs 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 6200 Crittenden Street. The MLK program will feature a “Peace Pole” ceremony honoring the legacy of Dr. King and the character development goal of Parkway Northwest wHigh School. “Parkway NW High School for Peace and Social Justice is an academic institution that nurtures not only the mind but also the heart,” said Ms. Gina Steiner, principal of Parkway Northwest. “We push our students to excel academically, but we also show them how to be good citizens, especially with peace and social justice in mind.” The service-day project brings together community partners to paint the school’s interior; hold college prep/financial aid and community-resource workshops; host a men’s discussion panel; non-traditional sports play day/clinic; and provide a toy and book giveaway. The Overbrook High School JROTC Marching Band will kick off the ceremony. Beside the Councilwoman, numerous other elected leader, including Congressman Dwight Evans, will participate. The Councilwoman will also attend the MLK Interfaith Service at La Salle.

JANNIE BLACKWELL (3RD DIST.)

The Councilwoman will participate in a service event at Cobbs Creek Recreation Center, 280 Cobbs Creek Parkway.

HELEN

The Councilwoman’s main activity will be participating in the MLK Day of Action, Resistance & Empowerment march and rally. This will start at 10 a.m. at 6th & Market Streets and head south to Mother Bethel AME Church, where a two-hour rally will commence.

The Councilman will be attending the largest Day of Service event in the city, at Girard College, 2101 S. College Avenue. It will involve the coordination of dozens of projects by more than 5,000 volunteers – who will enjoy a free concer t by Yannick Nézet-Séguin and the Philadelphia Orchestra.

CHERELLE PARKER (9TH DIST.)

The Councilwoman will join State Rep. Isabella Fitzgerald in the morning to celebrate the 203rd Dist. Community Volunteers at West Oak Lane Community Center, 7210-18 Ogontz Avenue. She will be joined there by Congressman Evans and other elected leaders as well as the Nicetown CDC.

BLONDELL REYNOLDS BROWN (AT LARGE)

The Councilwoman will be participating in religious service and service projects based out of her church, Dare to Imagine, which meets at 1st Dist. Plaza, 38th & Market Streets.

MARK SQUILLA (1ST DIST.)

The Councilman will be joining the 1st Judicial Dist. workers of the Philadelphia courts for a beautification project at South Philadelphia High School, Broad Street & Snyder Avenue, and will help in a cleanup at Starr Garden Playground, 6th & Lombard Streets.


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CO-CHAIRMEN SAMUEL STATEN, JR. VINCENT PRIMAVERA, JR.

TRUSTEES RYAN N. BOYER JAMES HARPER, JR. ESTEBAN VERA, JR. DANIEL WOODALL, JR. FRED CHIARLANZA JAMES DAVIS DAVID HOPLAMAZIAN DAMIAN LAVELLE

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TONI STATEN ADMINISTRATOR ALAN PARHAM


”If you can’t fly, then run; if you can’t run, then walk; if you can’t walk, then crawl; but whatever you do you have to keep moving forward.” **DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. ***

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Rep. Jim Roebuck 4712 Baltimore Avenue Philadelphia, PA 19143

(215) 724-2227

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jroebuck@pahouse.net


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TIME TO RECLAIM KING’S REAL LEGACY BY JAY A. MCCALLA As a person who lived during the time of Martin Luther King Jr., I’m still

struck that he was assassinated a half-century ago. I’m also struck that the legacy of

this extraordinarily controversial man, this strikingly radical Christian – during

his life, he was accused of communist sympathies, harassed by the FBI, hated by

much of America – has gently and rightly morphed into a spirit that affirms equality, acceptance and service. No other American’s birth and life is observed the way we observe King’s. Thomas Jefferson, Abraham Lincoln and George Washington are smushed together on Presidents’ Day. (Transformational presidents like JFK, LBJ and FDR must be shoehorned into that holiday as well.) The enormous difference between this holiday and all others on the calendar: The legislation creating the MLK Day of Service mandated it be led and promoted by the Corporation for National Community Service, a little-known federal agency with a billion-dollar budget. Hence, the shelving of King’s dogged challenges to power and the subsequent elevation of general calls to love, serve and aspire. The King legacy has been shaped by the federal government as much as any other entity. In the years since Congress passed the King Holiday & Service Act, the moral authority of his message has been buoyed by a political environment that supported civil rights, voting rights and religious freedom. The implicit message of nonviolence and economic justice existed as themes most politicians – Democratic and Republican – could support. Eight years ago, with the election of President Barack Obama, the bipartisan consensus began to collapse. Racially charged images of the first Black president were paraded through town squares and opportunistic politicians eagerly rode the wave of anger. With the gutting of the Voting Rights Act, Voter ID laws and high-level calls for a ban on Muslims and Latinos, social and civic distress has be-

OPINION come common. Long story short: Our next president is America’s #1 Birther, disbeliever in religious freedom and overt instigator of mob violence. Gays, immigrants and minorities of color are fearful. Swastikas are being scrawled in more and more public and private spaces. The new president’s chief strategist formerly ran a website that was remarkably accommodating to white supremacists and neo-Nazis. We will have a Secretary of Labor who would reverse America’s 75-year embrace of a minimum wage. With the presidency, the courts and Congress arrayed against education, equality and workers, many Americans desperately seek a way forward that nurtures hope and mitigates impending setbacks in human progress. The Tea Party offers a recent example of how to successfully turn a political tide. Its abrasive activism involved racially provocative signs, bullying and name-calling, but their efforts successfully resulted in a federal government that is far more sympathetic to their agenda than to any other voting bloc in the nation. King was a courageous and brilliant strategist who would probably have a theory on how to proceed in these regressive times, (Cont. Page 14)


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dation has been very supportive not just of our programs, but of the programs of a lot of organizations,” Nottage said. “Were it not for their help, a lot of organizations wouldn’t be able to do the work that they do. Dr. Evans has also made an impact on the lives of others and has been humble about it in the same way that Dr. King was. We felt that it was time to honor him.” In addition to the award presentations, there will be a presentation from one of the students who was a member of the King Association’s youth programs, Nottage said. But if you’re not in the mood for something as formal as a luncheon, the African American Museum in Philadelphia has a variety of programs that you and your family can participate in for a nominal fee. With a theme of “Where Do We GO from Here: Chaos or Community?” and sponsored by Citizens Bank, The museum has a variety of activities that look at the challenges we face as a community through the eyes of King and how we can meet these challenges, said James Claiborne, the museum’s public programming manager. The theme is the title of a speech King gave in which he asked his audience if they wanted to solve the problems the country was facing as a communal unit or if they’d be willing to allow chaos to ensue. Because the country seems to be in a similar po-

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BY DENISE CLAY HE CITY OF PHILADELPHIA is home to one of the largest Day of Service projects dedicated to the legacy of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But when you’re done painting, building playgrounds, registering people to vote, feeding families in need or reading to children, there are other activities designed to give you more insight into the iconic civil-rights leader. One of the city’s premier events is the annual Drum Major luncheon held by the Philadelphia Martin Luther King, Jr. Association. Founded by the late C. DeLores Tucker, Philadelphia’s King Association is the only entity outside of Atlanta approved by King’s widow, the late Coretta Scott King, said Joye Nottage, the association’s executive director. Drum Major Award winners are chosen from a combination of the nominations of community groups and individuals with which the association has interacted during the volunteer work it oversees. This year’s honorees are the Philadelphia Foundation and Dr. Arthur C. Evans, commissioner for the city’s Dept. of Behavioral Health & Intellectual Disability Services. The two entities were chosen because they embodied King’s ethos of providing service to others that makes an impact, Nottage said. “The [Philadelphia] Foun-

sition now, this is the perfect time to look at this particular speech, Claiborne said. “We tend to think about that in terms of connecting him with current narratives,” he said. “This shows audiences of all ages the things he dedicated his life to, how much work still has to be done, and how to tackle that work in a way that allows us to become a community. We ask: ‘Where do we go from here?’” The discussion begins on Friday night at 6 p.m. with a screening of “13th,” a documentary from “Selma” director Ava DuVernay that looks at the growth of the nation’s prison population through the Emancipation Proclamation, or the 13th Amendment of the Constitution, and a clause that freed all slaves, except for the ones in prison. The documentary, which is also available on Netflix, will be followed by a panel discussion. On Saturday, “Where Do We GO from Here?” is manifested through an interactive exhibit, which continues through Monday. There will also be musical and theatrical performances, face-painting and a scavenger hunt for the children, and a panel discussion featuring the August Wilson Consortium with Rhone Fraser, Ph.D and film director Ozzie Jones. The African American Museum in Philadelphia will be open from Saturday to Monday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; admission is $2. Tickets for the Philadelphia Martin Luther King, Jr. Association for Nonviolence’s 35th Annual Awards & Benefit Luncheon begin at $85 (general admission) and can be purchased by calling the association at (215) 751-9300 or on the association’s website at philadelphiamlk.org.

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EVENTS PROBE KING’S MEANING

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THE RIGHT AMERICAN NAME BY JOE SHAHEELI LIVER ADAMS may go down in history as a pioneer

O

who changed the nomenclature of African American to Afro-American in an effort to distinguish Americans,

with lineage to slaves in America, from those now in major numbers from various countries in Africa.

Then again, he may well be forgotten, if Black or African American leaders on all levels of society continue to ignore his entreaties. But, for now, marking his 75th birthday this Jan. 17, Adams continues to make his pitch on radio and television shows and by confronting national leaders such as Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton as to why they need to “wake up to reality.” “Look at the size of Africa and its many nations,” Adams says. “Don’t you dare tell a Nigerian African coming to this country he’s no different than a South African! He’ll loudly tell you why you are ‘stupid’ in the more-colorful language of his country!” Thus Adams argues, “Negroes, Colored folk, Blacks, and now African Americans are names that do not

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BY DENISE CLAY

relate to who we really are and from where we come and our rich history as contributors to every phase of American life as we know it today. What we need is one name to which every youngster who qualifies can relate and that is Afro-American. That tells the world we entered this world as sons and daughters of slaves brought here from not only Africa, but the Caribbean Islands and elsewhere from around the globe.” Adams has felt that way, he says, from, the age of 12, when his grandfather would send him to pick up a copy of a newspaper called the “Afro-American.” With more and more Africans and Islanders pouring into the United States, attempts by Americans who can trace their lineage to

Oliver Adams … fighting words

slaves from this county, feel their goals do not include those of the “newcomers.” Hence the search by Adams to find a unifying identity. The history of the search for an identifying name goes back to America’s earliest days as a Republic. An advertisement in a (Cont. Page 14)


On

President’s

Day

OUR NEW LOOK!

OPINION

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ho says you can’t teach an old dog new tricks? Not me. That’s why I’m proud to welcome you to the redesigned Philadelphia Public Record. The changes have made our stories easier to read, while allowing us more-innovative ways to draw attention to stories

we feel merit your attention. We trust you will enjoy this more-inviting format, and we want to hear your thoughts on it, good and bad, at editor@phillyrecord.com. Though most readers are unaware, the way newspapers have gone from typewriter or computer to print has been a marvel of progress. Back in my youth, as a graduate of Temple University School of Journalism, we learned how to set type for print from little metal letters. We would work on machines that created col-

umn-width lines of lead. Those lines were put into columns; heavy cardboard mats then were pressed into them. Those mats went down to the press rooms where they were curved and onto which lead was poured to form a lead cast. That cast was clamped to rotary presses. Today it’s all done on computers, with intricate colors and eye-catching headlines. The transition to reach this point has been speedy and phenomenal, and we are proud to share the results with you. – Jim Tayoun

MARK your CALENDAR Jan. 12- Phila. Housing Authority hosts “Doing Business with the PHA” at Greater Grays Ferry Estates, 1800 S. 32nd St., 1st fl., Registration 5:30-6 p.m., Networking 6-7:30 p.m. Jan. 13- State Sen. John Sabatina hosts Shrimp Night at Harmonia Cl., 2404 Orthodox St., 7-11 p.m. All-you-caneat shrimp, buffet & beer. Tickets $35, table of 10 $300. Checks to “Committee to Re-Elect John Sabatina.” For info or RSVP: (215) 821-7606 or re.elect.johnsabatina@ gmail.com. Jan. 14- Phila. Republican Party hosts S. Phila. Trump Inauguration Gala at Toll Man Joe’s, 26 E. Oregon Ave., 7 p.m. Beef, pork, pasta sides; draft beer and wine. Auction raffles, door prizes. Tickets $35. For info: Vince Minniti vminniti16@gmail.com. Jan. 16- Celebrate Martin Luther King, Jr. Day with a free screening of “Our Friend, Martin” at Kingdom Life Christian Ch. Devon Theatre, 6325 Frankford Ave., 12 m. Jan. 21- Ribbon-Cutting for Rev. Mary L.B. Franks Resource Ctr. at Wayland Memorial Baptist Ch., 52nd & Baltimore Ave., 1 p.m. Jan. 21- Democratic Women of Phila. holds rescheduled Meeting at 833 S. 58th St., 1-3 p.m. For info: Juanita Hatton (215) 749-0161 or

Bar & Lounge, 7165 Germantown Ave., 7-10 p.m. Tickets $60, Host level $100, Sponsor level $250. For info: (215) 917-4410. Feb. 18- 42nd Ward Democratic Committee hosts Candidates Morning Out at Aspira Olney HS, 100 W. Duncannon Ave., enter at Mascher & Duncannon, 9:30 a.m.-12 m. Meet & greet committee people, voter petitionsigning. Refreshments. Candidates’ donation $50, checks payable to “42nd Democratic Ward,” P.O. Box 24419, Phila., PA 19120. RSVP: Elaine Tomlin Elaine. Tomlin@verizon.net or (267) 496-5662. Feb. 24- Friends of 56th Ward Democratic Committee hosts fundraiser & PetitionSigning Party at FOP Lodge 5 Ha., 11630 Caroline Rd., 7-11 p.m. Tickets $50, Candidates $125. Checks payable to “Friends of 56th Ward.” RSVP: John Sabatina, 7720 Castor Ave., 2nd fl., Phila., PA 19152. For info: (215) 742-8600. Feb. 25- Maj. Octavius Catto is honored at 6th & Lombard Sts., 10 a.m.; then at Union League for Lunch and Awards. Tickets $35. For info: (215) 204-5452. Mar. 3- Spirit of Port Luncheon honors Eugene Mattioni at Hilton at Penn’s Landing, 201 S. Columbus Blvd., 11:30 a.m. For info: Christine (215) 9409900, ext. 104. Mar. 3- Jim Donnelly hosts the 58th Ward Democratic Committee’s St. Patrick’s Day Bash at Knowlton Mansion, 931 Rhawn St., 7-11 p.m. Special guest Lt. Gov. Mike Stack. Food, drink, live music. Tickets $50/person, Candidates $100. RSVP: Jim Donnelly (610) 360-5682 or Skip Montell (267) 444-7945. For further listings see”calendar” online at www.phillyreord.com

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Philadelphia, our city, has seen better days and it’s seen worse days. We, too, are a work in progress. Let us begin 2017 with a hard look around and begin to fix something that’s broken, right something that’s wrong. This Monday, if possible, let us take a day off --- and get to work.

jhattonsr@icloud.com. Jan. 25- Green Party of Phila. holds Nomination Mtg. at Roxborough Read & Eat, 6156 Ridge Ave., 7 p.m. City residents interested in running for office are welcome. Free. For info: (215) 215) 843-4256. Jan. 26- Academy Town Square hosts US Sen. Bob Casey in Talk & Panel Discussion on effects of climate change on health, particularly children, at Acad. Of Natural Sciences, 1900 B. Franklin Pkwy., open 6:45 p.m., talk starts 7:15 p.m. Free. To ensure seating: register http://bit. ly/2j9BQ4Z. Feb. 2- Phila. Republican Party and House Speaker Mike Turzai host Winter Cocktail Party at Pyramid Club, 1735 Market St., 6-8 p.m. Sponsors $500. RSVP: Annie Havey (215) 561-0651 by Feb. 1. Feb. 3- Chapel of 4 Chaplains hosts Gala Awards Night at IATSE Ha., 2401 Swanson St. Tickets $100. Feb. 10- Ward Leader Bobby Henon hosts 65th Ward Party at Maggie’s Waterfront Café, 9247 N. Delaware Ave., 6-9 p.m. Tickets $40. Checks payable to “Friends of the 65th Ward,” 9209 Torresdale Ave., Phila., PA 19114. For info: John Donohoe (267) 334-3775. Feb. 13- Union League hosts Lincoln Day at 140 S. Broad St., Lincoln reads Gettysburg Address outside 12 m., Lunch 12:30 p.m., Parade to Independence Hall ceremony follows. Feb. 17- 44th Ward Democratic Committee hosts Evening of Jazz & Petition Party at Danny Banquet Ha., 50th & Market Sts. Featuring Napoleon Black Redeemed & 61st St. Band. Tickets $150. Checks payable to “Ward 44” RSVP: (215) 429-4819 by Feb. 13. Feb. 18- 9th Ward Democratic Committee hosts Fundraiser/PetitionSigning Party at 7165

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OPINION

Transformation can be messy business but it requires us to acknowledge we are not perfect. We are a great nation, but we stop being great when we think

we are great enough. There is always work to be done, always a problem we’ve put up with for too long.

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coming next month, we honor men – George Washington and Abraham Lincoln – who created our nation and who saved it. On Martin Luther King’s Birthday, we honor a man who transformed our nation.


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Op Ed (Cont. From Page 8) but that strikingly radical Christian is no longer on display. Rather, we have a government-sponsored, poetic and benign version of the man who shook this nation. During ordinary times, it is adequate and good to focus King Day celebrants on how to volunteer, donate and give back. But our national commitment to co-

mity has been extinguished; far more is now required. With our new, inhospitable realities, good Americans focusing solely on community service may seem quaint and insular. The challenge for community leaders who hold high the shining example of MLK is to find and present the parts of his legacy that are pertinent and animating. Civil Rights, voting

rights, fair housing, equal employment opportunity – King set the stage for all of it. To preserve the relevance of this amazing federal holiday, leaders must dig deeper or forever surrender King to the homogenizers of history. Jay A. McCalla is a former deputy managing director under Mayors Ed Rendell and John Street and former chief of staff to the late Council President Joseph E. Coleman.

Adams (Cont. From page 12) Philadelphia newspaper in 1782 referred to two sermons written by “the African American.” Malcolm X in the turbulent 1960s preferred “Afro-American,” but it was the movement in 1989 led by Rev. Jesse Jackson which turned many to using “African American” when asked to identify themselves. But Adams keeps on fighting for all to accept Afro American as an identity for

all Americans who can trace their ancestry to slaves born in America. He has gone so far as to register “AfroAmerican,” and designed and has made a flag which should be carried at all events commemorating Afro-American history. He acknowledges the help in getting the copyright from the late Judge Angelo Guarino, who at the time was a practicing attorney. Adams intends to continue the fight. He says, “As

Afro-Americans, we can come together in the American system, remember our ancestors who paid a high price in this country for us. Then we can move forward to improve on our image as a people and continue to do more of the positive things we have done for ourselves in America. If it takes talking loud and long to make this happen, I’m committed.” Want to join Adams in his campaign? Reach out to him at (2l5) 228-3946.


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table had to be monitored, for as the gear work spring wound down, the turntable slowed, usually before the end of the record. Remember, all of this was done without any electricity. The Victrola is an acoustic phonograph. Some of our records were very old, dating before 1920. They were recorded only on one side. He had an entire collection of Enrico Caruso op-

eratic records. It was from 19 these records wand others like them that I learned to appreciate the opera and beautiful music. I still love those arias of Caruso and, of course, Mario Lanza. Grand Pop Achille’s’ Victrola was a beautiful piece of furniture and he took care of it accordingly with daily polishing and TLC. It (Cont. Page 31) (Cont. From page 19) T HE S O U T H PHIL A D EL PHI A P UB L I C R E CO R D

spring was cranked till the spring was “tight enough” and the start/stop lever was released. The gears went into action, spinning the turntable. The needle riding in the record groove vibrated, causing the sound-reproducing horn built into the cabinet to emanate a beautiful sound, although somewhat hollow and scratchy. The speed of the turn-

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O! HERE WE go again. I was wondering whatever happened to Grand Pop Achille’s Victor Victrola record player. What brought this memory on? On a recent airplane trip, a young girl, about 5 years old, was sitting in the next row watching a DVD movie on a portable DVD player. I wondered what Grand Pop Achille would have thought about these DVD players. To him, going to the moon by rocket couldn’t be done – it was impossible. He absolutely insisted the moon landings were faked. These motion picture DVDs and players would probably be too unbelievable to him. Grand Pop Achille was, however, somewhat the curious one, though, for he bought the first TV in our neighborhood. It was a 10inch black-and-white TV in a beautiful wooden cabinet with folding doors. His favorite TV shows were wrestling – which he considered

powered by a spring-driven gear system that had to be wound by a crank. The ideal speed of the turntable was not exactly 78 RPM but somewhere between 60 and 90 RPM, depending on how tight the spring was wound. It played only one record at a time and each one was changed manually. The record to be played was carefully removed from the lower cabinet base of the Victrola where they all were stored. It was then removed from its cardboard dust jacket, being careful not to drop it – heaven forbid. The record was made of a synthetic resin material that was fragile. If the record ever fell to the bare wood floor it would break – the ultimate sin. The record, having survived its removal from the jacket, was then gently placed on the turntable. The long, silver playing arm was fitted with a new needle. The needle was then gently lowered into the record groove. The gear work

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the WAFFLEMAN

absolutely genuine – and Westerns – especially those with Roy Rogers and his sidekick George “Gabby” Hayes. He loved the antics of “the old man.” We could not convince him that a six-shooter could not fire 15 or 16 bullets, or how a shot with a pistol from a galloping horse was always accurate only when fired by the good guy. If it was too outrageous to be believed, he believed it; but a man going the moon – no way. Go figure. Prior to the arrival of the television, we had a huge cabinet radio for our entertainment. It was AM only, and what great entertainment it provided – but that is another story. He also had next to “his” chair a Victrola. It was about four feet tall, housed in a hand-rubbed mahogany cabinet. It had a big turntable covered in plush green velvet which was so smooth to the touch. It was only one speed and played only 78-RPM records. It was


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ELEPHANT CORNER

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AM ASSUMING most of the people reading this column saw “Casablanca” and recall Claude Rains’ famous line about being “shocked, shocked!” that gambling was taking place at Rick’s Bar Americain. Well, we heard City Council, and SPECIFICALLY COUNCILMAN BILL GREENLEE, express “shock” that the business community, namely Comcast, was outraged at their bill banning employers from asking applicants for

EVERYDAY PEOPLE BY DENISE CLAY ne of the highlights of covering the 2016 presidential election was getting the chance to meet Congressman John Lewis. Lewis, who represents a district in Georgia, has been a leading light in the area of civil rights since before he graduated from college. He was a member of the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee and was the youngest person to make his way across the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama when the Rev.

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salary history. Rains’ shock was with a wink and nod. Greenlee’s shock is probably genuine, because, like most of his colleagues, he has limited private-sector experience. Comcast and the Greater Philadelphia Chamber of Commerce have expressed serious concerns and in the case of Comcast – outrage. City Council was stunned – stunned, I say – because they held hearings on this bill. Comcast and the Chamber should have known! Yes, they should have known City Council was going to totally ignore the testimony of Comcast, its largest private-sector employer. What Council does not get is that salary histories in the private sector are important to the hiring process. One way to see if some is exaggerating the quality of his/her last job is compensation. If a propspective employee says they have done X, but the com-

pensation indicates they were too junior for that level of responsibility, they may pass on that person. Also, if you have a newly created position, past compensation of the qualified person may help guide the final salary offer. Greenlee, who sponsored the bill, designed his proposal after a Massachusetts law. It assumes that the wage inequality starts (women make 21% less than men on average) when young women start at lower salaries and are forced to state their salary histories when applying for new positions perpetuates the problem. In full disclosure, the author of this column this week is a female who spent most of her career in the private sector. The 21% wage gap is based on aggregate salary levels among men and women in the US. It does not adjust for the types of jobs performed, absences from

Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. made the march for voting rights. The first time he tried to cross the bridge, he was badly beaten. Sheriff’s deputies cracked him and the other marchers across the head with various wooden implements. Blood filled the streets. If you go to Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse on Frankford Avenue, you can get a copy of the “March” series of graphic novels that Lewis wrote with Andrew Aydin, one of his congressional aides and artist Nate Powell, so that you can share the historic story with your children and grandchildren. But the reason why I’m bringing it up is because it’s one of those places where the celebration of the birthday of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King and the concept of marching intersect. On Saturday, I’ll be in Washington, D.C. attending the “We Shall Not Be

Moved: The March 2017,” sponsored by the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network. In addition to NAN, The NAACP, the National Urban League, the National Congress of Black Women, Planned Parenthood Federation of America, the Human Rights Campaign, the National Council of LaRaza, Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc. and the Hip-Hop Caucus will also be participating in the march. Because Philadelphia has fairly active chapters of most of these groups, I’m pretty sure I’ll get to talk to busloads of Philadelphians at the march, which is designed to serve as a warning to Republicans, newly emboldened by cementing their hold on Congress and gaining the presidency, that they can expect opposition to their more egregious plans. The march will culminate with a rally across the (Cont. Page29

CITY HALL SAM 2016 was considered an unconventional political year by many politicos and pundits. We saw the rise of an angry, divisive candidate for president who was shunned by the mainstream segments of his party, who time after time defied the predictions, polling and conventional experts of many experts to win the election for president of the United States. Will 2017 be equally unpredictable, or will it return to a more normal pace and

WALKING the BEAT BY JOE STIVALA SPENT a delightful two hours in an unannounced visit to former Philly Police Commissioner Joe O’NEILL. We had a great time, in which we were joined by his nephew, who is a Philly cop. O’Neill was Commissioner during the administrations of Mayors Jim TATE and Frank RIZZO. He is about 90, and faring well. Reporters do not write about him because they were born too late to know him. I retold a lot of the old stories

I

schedule? Time will tell. So as Congress races to begin the confirmation process for the president-elect’s cabinet picks, the Pennsylvania General Assembly had its swearing-in on Tuesday, Jan. 3. A number of new senators and representatives, their families and friends packed the Capitol to celebrate the swearing-in. New STATE SEN. SHARIF STREET had the largest swearing-in contingent in the state Senate. He replaces the popular and hard-working SHIRLEY KITCHEN, who retired after a 20-year legislative career. Fellow Philadelphia Democrats STATE SENS. LARRY FARNESE, JOHN SABATINA and VINCE HUGHES were sworn in for their next terms. All of the Philadelphia state representatives were sworn into office for the 2017-18 legislative session. The new state represen-

tatives from Philadelphia include: STATE REP. MORGAN CEPHAS, of the 192nd Legislative Dist., which includes neighborhoods in West Philadelphia including Overbrook; STATE REP. ISABELLA FITZGERALD, taking over for her former boss, CONGRESSMAN DWIGHT EVANS, to represent the good people of West Oak Lane; young attorney STATE REP. JARED SOLOMON, who picks up the reins in the 202nd Legislative Dist., where he replaces MARK COHEN after a 40-year run; and STATE REP. CHRIS RABB, who will represent the great neighborhoods of Northwest Philadelphia including West Mount Airy. Why are these names significant and worth mentioning? Because they will be leading the fight to help Philadelphia and Philadelphians fund schools, (Cont. Page 27)

(which might have startled his nephew) O’NEILL dealt with: major labor unrest at Food Fair, installation of closed-circuit TV in all police districts. Opening a Living Flame to Police and Firemen, prison murders (including a warden), food drives and police recruitment in high schools, to name a few. O’NEILL cared for his ailing wife for years until she recently passed. He is a WWII vet (I found out we were both in the Army Engineers; he has a Purple Heart). A great collection of his time as commissioner is held at Temple University. GOD BLESS Joe O’Neill! I am with the DA on the issue of NOT CHARGING the teen who slapped a policewoman. My reason is in the types of force applied by the officer and girl.... A plus or minus for the DA can be in the outcome of a hearing by Judge Gwen BRIGHT in the Msgr. LYNN case to determine if prosecutors withheld evidence.

An article noted that Vince FENERTY got rich with unused sick or vacation leave payments. But this is a benefit granted to ALL employees – usually in the contract. The reporter never wrote about this benefit before? Maybe it is not in his contract (?) The OVERPLAYED news stories about the Fenerty flap may have cost MORE MONEY. Fenerty was paid $223k a year. So the same job pays $223k for his replacement plus the $130k Fenerty retirement check.... I read some great lines from a patriot on FAKE NEWS. Said news coming from a reliable media source, or trusted government agency (or both) is THIRD WORLD and an AFFRONT to DEMOCRACY. I add that it is less-than honorable, and less-than masculine (or feminine). A neat story told of the New Jersey Route 55 ROAD TO NOWHERE, which (Cont. Page 30)


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Photo by Wendell Douglas

Jim Donnelly hosts the

58th Ward Democratic 45th Annual Saint Patrick’s Day Bash at Knowlton Mansion, 931 Rhawn Street, Philadelphia, PA 19111, from 7 PM to 11 PM. Special guest Lieutenant

Governor Mike Stack. Tickets $50.00pp, food, drink, live music. Candidates $100.00pp R.S.V.P. Jim Donnelly 610-360-5682 or Skip Montell 267-444-7945

JA N UA RY 12 , 2017

PA REP. Vanessa Brown, standing, hosted constituents on a bus trip to the annual PA Farm Show in Harrisburg.

March 3, 2017

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CHECKING OUT LIFE ON THE FARM


GOVERNOR’S RACE CHATTER ALREADY!

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POLS on the STREET

R

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EPUBLICANS BELIEVE Gov. Tom Wolf is vulnerable, and as expected, their efforts to generate support for one or more of their candidates is already reaching the ears of both party leaderships, if not the average voter. Making an early, and hopefully strong enough, presence to chase away

others with the same inclination, is State Sen. Scott Wagner (R-York). He kicked off his campaign to become the GOP challenger to Wolf with press conferences yesterday and today. An article in a recent Governing magazine suggests Gov. Tom Wolf isn’t yet on solid ground to win a second term and listed him as vulnerable should he seek a second term in 2018 because his approval ratings are too lukewarm. It also cites Hillary Clinton’s presidential loss in Pennsylvania, a state legislature that is solidly Republican and what it assumes will be several potential GOP challengers hoping to draw attention to why they would be better at governing than Wolf. Undaunted, Wolf continues to press for cutting expenditures without racing

The Gov.

broad-based taxes to balance his budgets. The latest is closing two and possibly five Dept. of Corrections facilities. Overcrowding, as a result, in other facilities is a concern. But Secretary of Corrections John Wetzel said, “These cost-saving measures are exactly the kind of action we must take to en-

sure we can continue to invest in middle-class families and Pennsylvania’s future. DOC believes we are able to close prisons without security risk because of the historic reduction in the inmate population and crime is down. By investing in the things that make Pennsylvania a better place – like reducing recidivism and improving our schools – we can ensure the long-term prosperity and safety of our Commonwealth.” As expected, Pennsylvania State Corrections Officers Association President Jason Bloom blasted the decision, saying, “It’s disappointing the Wolf administration has already made a decision to close two prisons without any public input whatsoever and is now strangely leaving five communities twisting in the wind for several weeks. Closing these prisons will uproot families and damage the local economies in these communities. “This administration continues to have extreme-

Governor Wannabe

ly optimistic projections about the state prison population,” Bloom continued. “The fact remains, our system remains over-capacity at 103.8%, according to the Dept. of Corrections’ own population figures. That number would be even higher (104.9%) if the state wasn’t paying counties to house hundreds of additional inmates. It’s mystifying why this administration would be closing prisons if we can’t even house the inmates we currently have. With fewer prisons, a smaller system could literally

burst at the seams, creating a public-safety risk. The PSCOA is calling on the Pennsylvania General Assembly to immediately hold hearings and seek ways to keep these prisons open.” Pressing Wolf to seek even more ways to make cuts, some of which will be unpopular, is the fact the Pennsylvania Gaming Control Board last week reported the amount of slots revenue generated from gambling during 2016 was a bit more than $2.36 billion, or 0.23% less (about $5.5 million) than in 2015. In 2013, revenues were $2.38 billion, which was the first revenue drop reported since slots gambling was legalized (2012’s reported revenues were $2.47 billion). The 2016 revenue figure means taxes collected from slots gambling was likewise down from last year: $1,259,648,414 compared to 2015’s $1,263,320,954. And, if anyone was wondering, back in 2012, tax revenues topped $1.3 billion. (CONT. PAGE 23)


down the line. Other GOP stalwarts indicating an interest and maybe announcing shortly, rather than leaving the field wide open for Wagner are Senate Majority Leader Jake Corman, House Speaker Mike Turzai, House Majority Leader David Reed, for-

mer Lt. Gov. Jim Cawley and Congressman Mike Kelly.

DA’s Race Getting Interesting

Realtor, developer and lawyer Michael Untermey-

er is putting his money 23 where it’s needed most for him now. It’s the race for District Attorney. He’s raised the limit allowed for contributions to $6,000 from individuals and $23,800 from PACS, doing (Cont. Page 24)

JA N UA RY 12 , 2017

(Cont. From Page 22) Gov. Wolf has already said he will not seek to raise broad-based taxes. He also does not want to make indiscriminate cuts like budgets did five years ago to schools and services for the most vulnerable. Instead, the governor’s 2017-2018 budget will challenge the status quo and look for ways to cut costs and streamline government. Together, these four steps are estimated to

“our current footprint to drive costs down.” All well and good; but to make hay from his efforts, Wolf needs to check his campaign staff’s ability to get these efforts out to the general public in a way they will remember him favorably when voting two years

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POLS on the STREET

save hundreds of millions of dollars. Wolf will look good if he can get his message across to voters that he is eliminating thousands of unfilled state jobs. He made this known to department heads in mid-December, advising them to look at their current workforce, which would now be the number of positions that could be filled by the agency, to determine how best to serve the people of Pennsylvania. He also sent a memo last week to department heads outlining his plan to eliminate duplicative and unnecessary bureaucracy by consolidating administrative functions of human resources and information technology. Also, landlords are being notified no leases may be renewed without the Dept. of General Services’ review and approval of whether opportunities exist to reduce

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UNTERMEYER RAI$E$ CAMPAIGN $TAKE$ IN DA PRIMARY


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POLS on the STREET (Cont. From Page 23)

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JU N E 3 0, 2016

this by contributing $250,000 to his own campaign for DA. That creates a problem for the other challengers seeking to win the Democratic primary for District May 16. They now know they’ll need more money to wage an effective campaign. Joe Kahn announced this week he has raised over $200 thousand to date. And it could change the mind of one or

more of them. Making that assessment now are Judge Teresa Carr Deni, Rich Negrin, and a couple others who have indicated their interest but have yet to formally enter the race. Now the smart ones, such as Judge Deni, know how to get the biggest bang for their dollar. Commit a small portion of their campaign budget to advertising in the Public Record, long the trade publication for the city’s elected committee people and ward leaders. This brings us to note State Rep. Angel Cruz (D-Kensington is now the longest-serving Latino legislator, celebrating his ninth term. He was and remains the legislator with the longest continuous ad in this paper. Felicitaciones!

BUBBLING HEADACHE

FOR KENNEY

CELEBRATING INAUGURAL AT HOME

The voting public once again has suffered sticker shock with the prices now being asked for Philadelphia’s new beverage tax. Opposition is clamoring the city’s 1.5-cent-perounce tax is substantially increasing costs on Philadelphia families. It is also threatening many small businesses, from movie theaters to restaurants, corner stores to supermarkets. Philadelphians Against the Grocery Tax, the organization that lost the fight to kill the sugary beverage tax, is urging its members to keep the pot boiling, saying in a release, “Even as we continue to pursue a legal challenge to the beverage tax, our elected leaders must continue to hear from the public that this tax is bad for Philadelphia families and businesses.”

JUDGE Jimmy DeLeon, L, performed swearing-in at Temple’s Mitten Hall for State Sen. Sharif Street as Street’s wife, April, looks on for supporters unable to attending swearing in ceremonies in Harrisburg. Photo by Wendell Douglas

JUDICIAL candidate Vikki Kristiansson added her congratulations to the senator. Photo by Wendell Douglas

WORKING ELAINE’S 42ND WARD Leader Elaine Tomlin, second from left, welcomes PA Rep. Jason Dawkins, and Councilwomen Cindy Bass and Maria Quinones Sanchez who participated in her Community Meeting. Photo by Wendell Douglas

START EACH DAY THE INFORMED WAY

AS AN ACTIVE MEMBER OF THE PENNSYLVANIA POLITICAL COMMUNITY, WE INVITE YOU TO FIRST READ FROM CITY & STATE PA. EVERY DAY WE KEEP YOU ABREAST OF THE TOP NEWS AND TRENDS IMPACTING POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT, FROM PHILADELPHIA TO HARRISBURG TO PITTSBURGH. TO RECEIVE YOUR FREE MORNING NEWS CAPSULE, GO TO WWW.CITYANDSTATEPA.COM/FIRSTREAD. YOU WILL RECEIVE A CONFIRMATION EMAIL RIGHT AWAY. CLICK THE BUTTON TO BE A FIRST READER!


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LOOKING FOR D.C. RIDERS

MAJOR clergy and political leaders attended conference to rally attendance for turnout in Washington, DC, January 14. From left are Mt. Carmel Pastor Reginald Johnson, Deacon Matthew Smith(President of National Action Network) Dr. Donald D. Moore, Rev. Al Sharpton, Sen. Vincent Hughes, Rev. Gregory Holston and Rev. Robert P. Shine. Photo by Wendell Douglas.

VISITING WITH HENRY

GOP DA candidate Beth Grossman gets a plug from 13th Ward GOP Leader Carmel Harley. Photo by Wendell Douglas.

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GROSSMAN WILL CARRY GOP COLORS IN DISTRICT ATTORNEY RACE

ENTERING home of Labor Leader Henry Nicholas on New Year’s Day for his traditional open house are City Council President Darrell Clarke and City Controller Allan Butkovitz.

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Photo by Joe Stivala.


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ELEPHANT CORNER (Cont. From Page 20) the workforce or other compensation factors. Many women in the country have for decades opted for jobs that just do not pay well. How many men do you know who are social workers? Also, women are a larger percentage of our K-12 teachers and other government

jobs than men. When was the last time you walked into the Municipal Services Building across from City Hall and saw a majority of men behind the counters? Traditionally, the salaries for these jobs pay less than many in the private sector. But these people are eligible for pensions and thus need to save far less of their salaries for retirement than their pri-

vate-sector friends. Then we come to a more sensitive topic: the women who take less demanding jobs or take sabbaticals from the workforce for their families. I understand why women do this, but to expect to make the same money as a man who does not do this or, better yet, another woman who does not is just not fair. I cannot tell you the number

of times I encountered women who thought they deserved the same compensation I received, despite working fewer hours and having less experience (owing to taking time off ). Aside from being based on a false premise, this bill is not good for Philadelphia, for it, like the wage tax and our burdensome business taxes, will encourage employers to

leave the city. The Massachusetts law was a least statewide. But Philadelphia’s law will encourage employers to just cross City Line Avenue. Do remember that these people will not only not be paying Philadelphia taxes, but also not be buying lunch at Philadelphia restaurants or purchasing Philadelphia-based personal services. City Council is lucky

that Comcast is already building a new complex in town. Or maybe it is not, as Comcast has vowed to take the City to court over this law. Comcast has the deep pockets to make its case. Many of our other large employers have already been forced into the suburbs.

UNDERSTANDING BANKRUBTCY BY MICHAEL A. CIBIK, ESQUIRE AMERICAN BANKRUPTCY BOARD CERTIFIED

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Q

UESTION: Will my neighbors and employer find out I filed a bankruptcy? Answer: First off, the bad news. Bankruptcy filing is a public record. That means, the public has a right to know. Now, the good news! More than likely, the only people who will know you filed for bankruptcy are the creditors, your attorney, the trustee, the bankruptcy court staff and the judge. Your creditors have to be notified as they have the right to notice. In a very few areas of the country, the local newspaper publishes lists of bankruptcy filings, but that practice is very rare. If your local newspaper doesn’t publish lists of filings, then your neighbors will not know unless that neighbor is also a creditor. And unless the debt is a marital debt, your spouse won’t know. If one of your friends co-signed on a debt for you, that friend is also entitled to notice because that person is now responsible for payment on that debt. Employers are a bit different. An employer is

not entitled to any kind of notice of your filing. In a Chapter 7 case, the employer wouldn’t be aware of the filing of a bankruptcy case, at least not by any paperwork required to be filed (unless the employer is also a creditor). In some Chapter 13 cases, however, the Chapter 13 payment is required to be paid through a wage order and then, the employer may then have knowledge that there is a bankruptcy case when the payroll preparer receives that order (which will have your name, the bankruptcy case number and indicate that the payment is to be sent to the Chapter 13 Trustee). You have probably seen the headlines screaming about this celebrity or that celebrity filing for bankruptcy and worried about your own headline. But, unless you are a well-known person and the news media would be interested in your filing, the chances are that the only ones who will know are those that need to know. Next Week’s Question: How do I go about rebuilding my credit score after bankruptcy?


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(Cont. From Page 20) fix roads, and create jobs. While they may represent particular neighborhoods, when it becomes budget time, these leaders have a great ability to put aside their differences and work together to help the City of Brotherly Love. The city’s reps and senators will be asked to help the city with their budget by giving them authorization to implement taxes or to get more money for the schools. Speaking of the city’s budget, the soda tax was implemented last week. This tax is estimated bring in over $300 million to fund a pre-K program for children and rec-center improvements, and to help with many other services. Many consumers and retailers have voiced their concerns about the tax and its impact on people’s pocketbooks. Social media has been ablaze with complaints. But don’t expect a repeal anytime soon. This tax was a centerpiece of MAYOR JIM KENNEY’S campaign for universal pre-K. It passed with a comfortable 13 yes votes by City Council. Also, there is a good chance consumers will forget about the tax in a few months because they will be used to paying it and no one is against pre-K education. The question is: What will the city need next to balance its budget and deliver services? Maybe this is where 2017 becomes predictable and replaces the unpredictable trends of 2017. There is always something the city always needs help on or has an ask for in Harrisburg during budget season ... as our new state senator and state representatives will soon find out.

NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE - WHEREAS, on April 24, 2009, a certain mortgage was executed by Eleanor T. McCool and James Joseph McCool, Sr., as mortgagor in favor of Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. as mortgagee and was recorded in Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County in Mortgage Document Number 52057504 (“Mortgage”); and WHEREAS, the Mortgage encumbers property located at 5945 Houghton Street Philadelphia, PA 19128, parcel number 213230200(“Property”); and WHEREAS, the Property was owned by James Joseph McCool, Sr. and Eleanor T. McCool, husband and wife, by virtue of deed dated January 11, 1946 and recorded January 17, 1946 in Book CJP 1129; Page 77; and WHEREAS, Eleanor T. McCool died on August 15, 2014. By operation of law title vests solely in James Joseph McCool. James Joseph McCool died on March 12, 2015 intestate and is survived by his heirs-at-law, Karen Ann Lapera, Eileen C. Walls, Kevin McCool and James McCool. WHEREAS, the Mortgage is now owned by the Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (“Secretary”), pursuant to an assignment recorded on March 17, 2015 in Document Number 52892434, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Mortgage (paragraph 9 (a)(i)), as James Joseph McCool died on March 12, 2015, and that upon the death the entire principal balance becomes due and owing, and that no payment was made, and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this Notice; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of October 20, 2016 is $240,986.86 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Mortgage to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, l2 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR Part 29, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on September 29, 2011 in Misc. 52395684, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, notice is hereby given that at January 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the Property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: All that certain lot or piece of ground with buildings and improvements thereon erected described according to a Survey and Plan thereof made by John T. Campbell, Surveyor and Regulator of the Ninth District on the Twenty-eighth day of July A. D. 1941, as follows, to wit: Situate on the Southwesterly side of Houghton Street (fifty feet wide) at the distance of two hundred twenty-nine feet, Two and one-half inches Northwestwardly from the Northwesterly side of Gerhard Street (fifty feet wide) in the Twenty-first Ward of the City of Philadelphia. Containing in front or breadth on the said Houghton Street eighteen feet, two inches and extending Southwestwardly in length or depth between parallel lines at right angles to said Houghton Street on the Southeasterly line thereof Ninety-eight feet, Six and three-fourths inches and on the Northwesterly line thereof ninety-eight feet, one and five-eighths inches and containing in breadth on its rear line Eighteen feet, two and one-eighth inches, the said Southeasterly and Northwesterly lines passing through the average center of the party wall between this and the premises adjoining on the Southeast and Northeast respectively and crossing a certain fifteen feet wide driveway which extends Southeastwardly into said Gerhard Street and Northwestwardly curving to the right at its Northwesternmost end and from thence extending Northeastwardly into the said Houghton Street. Being No. 5945 Houghton Street, Philadelphia, PA 19128. Being Parcel Number: 213230200. Together with the free and common use, right, liberty and privilege of the aforesaid driveways as and for passageways and courses at all times hereafter forever, in common with the owner, tenants and occupiers of the other lots of ground bounding thereon and entitled to the use thereof. The sale will be held on January 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $240,986.86 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date. Ten percent (10%) of the highest bid is the deposit required at the sale. The amount that must be paid to HUD by the mortgagors or someone acting on their behalf so that the sale may be stayed is the total delinquent amount of $240,986.86 as of October 20, 2016, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bid, all bidders, except the Secretary, must submit a deposit totaling ten percent 10% of the Secretary’s bid as set forth above in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. Each oral bid need not be accompanied by a deposit. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of ten (10%) percent must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within thirty (30) days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the high bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveyance fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for fifteen (15) days, and a fee will be charged in the amount of $150.00 for each fifteen (15) day extension requested. The extension fee shall be paid in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder’s deposit will be forfeited, and the Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD Field Office Representative, offer the Property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein.

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NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE - WHEREAS, on August 25, 2005, a certain mortgage was executed by Willie Cherry, as mortgagor in favor of BNY Mortgage Company, LLC as mortgagee and was recorded in Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County in Mortgage Document Number 51262458 (“Mortgage”); and WHEREAS, the Mortgage encumbers property located at 2808 North 20th Street Philadelphia, PA 19132, parcel number 111258400 (“Property”); and WHEREAS, the Property was owned by Willie Cherry by virtue of deed dated May 8, 1992 and recorded May 21, 1992 in Book VCS 74; Page 130; and WHEREAS, Willie Cherry died on January 26, 2015 intestate and is survived by his heirs-at-law, Valerie Whitfield aka Valerie Cumberbatch, Yvonne Cotton-Campbell, Yarnetta Lee and Wilhelmenia Lee; and WHEREAS, the Mortgage is now owned by the Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (“Secretary”), pursuant to an assignment recorded on May 17, 2011 in Document Number 52348188, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Mortgage (paragraph 9 (a) (i)), as Willie Cherry died on January 26, 2015, and that upon the death the entire principal balance becomes due and owing, and that no payment was made, and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this Notice; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of October 28, 2016 is $52,423.88 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Mortgage to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, l2 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR Part 29, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on September 29, 2011 in Misc. Document Number 52395684, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, notice is hereby given that at January 26, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the Property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: ALL THAT CERTAIN lot or piece of ground with the two story brick messuage or tenement thereon erected, SITUATE on the Westerly side of Twentieth Street at the distance of sixty-one feet Northwardly from the Northerly side of Somerset Street in the 11th formerly part of the Thirty-Eighth Ward of the City of Philadelphia. CONTAINING in front or breadth on the said Twentieth Street fifteen feet and extending of that width in length or depth Westward between parallel lines at right angles to the said Twentieth Street, eighty feet to a certain Three feet seven inches wide alley which leads Southwardly into said Somerset Street. KNOWN AS 2808 North 20th Street. TOGETHER with all and singular the buildings, improvements, ways, waters, water-courses, driveways, rights, liberties, hereditaments and appurtenances whatsoever thereunto belonging, or in any way appertaining, and the reversions and remainders, rents, issues and profits thereof. BEING parcel number 111258400. The sale will be held on January 26, 2017 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107 . The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $52,423.88 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date. Ten percent (10%) of the highest bid is the deposit required at the sale. The amount that must be paid to HUD by the mortgagors or someone acting on their behalf so that the sale may be stayed is the total delinquent amount of $52,423.88 as of October 28, 2016, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bid, all bidders, except the Secretary, must submit a deposit totaling ten percent 10% of the Secretary’s bid as set forth above in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. Each oral bid need not be accompanied by a deposit. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of ten (10%) percent must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within thirty (30) days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the high bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveyance fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for fifteen (15) days, and a fee will be charged in the amount of $150.00 for each fifteen (15) day extension requested. The extension fee shall be paid in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder’s deposit will be forfeited, and the Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD Field Office Representative, offer the Property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein.

SEPTA OK’S GAS PLANT

T

HE SEPTA Board has voted to advance a sustainability initiative that will power Regional Rail trains and the Midvale Bus Maintenance Facility with a new combined heat and power (CHP) plant and lighting upgrades at the Midvale Complex. The $35.9 million project was developed under the Pennsylvania Guaranteed Energy Savings Act (GESA) and comes at no cost to taxpayers or fare-paying customers. This initiative, says SEPTA, will improve service reliability, reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and lower operating costs. The decision was made despite strong opposition from those attending the board meeting. Earlier in the meeting, Mitch Chanin, of 350 Philadelphia, handed the SEPTA board letters from District 8 Councilwoman Cindy Bass and City Councilwomen at Large Helen Gym and Blondell Reynolds Brown. 2nd Dist. Councilman Kenyatta Johnson had also written a letter, as did state Rep. Rosita Youngblood. Protestors were calling on SEPTA to rapidly transition from fossil fuels to renewable energy. SEPTA said it thoroughly evaluated alternatives to CHP for this project, but found that other energy resources such as wind and solar are not capable of providing the resilient power load at the scale, cost-effectiveness and reliability that will be required of this facility. SEPTA noted it is advancing a plan to incorporate renewable energy into its portfolio of sustainable energy resources.


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(Cont. From Page 20) street from the Martin Luther King monument in West Potomac Park. I’m sure it’ll be a raucous gathering filled with committed activists who recognize that handing the keys to our ship of state to a recalcitrant millionaire who seems more interested in doing things like badmouthing reporters and artists, the latest being Oscar-winning actress Meryl Streep, may not be the smartest thing we’ve ever done as a republic. But other than that, and the cardiovascular exercise that comes with marching more than a mile through the streets of our nation’s capital, what do people expect to get from this? That’s often an unpopular question. I say this because whenever I’ve asked it over the last 10 or so years, I’ve been told that it’s an unpopular question. That said, we’ve really got to talk about it because, in the words of hip-hop legends De La Soul, “Stakes is High.” Right now, Congress is coming up with ways to gut the Affordable Care Act with no plan in place to provide the 20 million folks who will be kicked off of their health insurance with a means to be able to continue to see their doctor. Next week, a guy named Beauregard who views Black Lives Matter as a terrorist group will probably be confirmed as Attorney General. This is an administration that wants to hand the nation’s schools over to a woman who wants to turn them into a cash cow for private education companies and give control of the nation’s housing stock to a man whose only qualification for the office is that he has lived in a house. So it might be a good idea to have an endgame strategy when the march is over, if for no other reason than that a lot of people stand to get screwed if you don’t. Marching for the sake of marching has become passé.

NOTICE OF DEFAULT AND FORECLOSURE SALE - WHEREAS, on February 17, 2006, a certain mortgage was executed by Julie Vitale, as mortgagor in favor of Financial Freedom Senior Funding Corporation, a Subsidiary of IndyMac Bank, F.S.B. as mortgagee and was recorded in Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County in Mortgage Document Number 51391837 (“Mortgage”); and WHEREAS, the Mortgage encumbers property located at 2305 South Lambert Street Philadelphia, PA 19145, parcel number 262178500 (“Property”); and WHEREAS, the Property was owned by Salvatore Vitale and Julie Vitale, husband and wife, by virtue of deed dated May 29, 1952 and recorded June 2, 1952 in Book MLS 118; Page 550; and WHEREAS, Salvatore Vitale died February 17, 2006. By operation of law title vested solely in Julie Vitale. Julie Vitale died on September 22, 2014 intestate and is survived by her heirs-at-law, Thomas Vitale, Bonita Sabatini and Deborah M. Vitale; and WHEREAS, the Mortgage is now owned by the Secretary of the United States Department of Housing and Urban Development (“Secretary”), pursuant to an assignment recorded on August 13, 2013 in Document Number 52681085, in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania; and WHEREAS, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the Mortgage (paragraph 9 (a)(i)), as Julie Vitale died on September 22, 2014, and that upon the death the entire principal balance becomes due and owing, and that no payment was made, and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this Notice; and WHEREAS, the entire amount delinquent as of September 19, 2016 is $206,011.85 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date; and WHEREAS, by virtue of this default, the Secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the Mortgage to be immediately due and payable; NOW THEREFORE, pursuant to powers vested in me by the Single Family Mortgage Foreclosure Act of 1994, l2 U.S.C. 3751 et seq., by 24 CFR Part 29, and by the Secretary’s designation of me as Foreclosure Commissioner, recorded on September 29, 2011 in Misc. 52395684, in the Office of the Recor­­der of Deeds of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, notice is hereby given that at January 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the Property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: All that certain lot or piece of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate on the East side of Lambert Street at the distance of 30 feet 02 inches Southward from the South side of Wolf Street in the Twenty-Sixth formerly part of the 36th Ward of the City of Philadelphia, County of Philadelphia and State of Pennsylvania. Containing in front or breadth on the said Lambert Street 14 feet 02 inches and extending of that width in length or depth Eastward between parallel lines at right angles to the said Lambert Street 51 feet 06 inches to a certain 03 feet wide alley which extends Northward and Southward from the said Wolf Street to Ritner Street. Being known as 2305 South Lambert Street, Philadelphia, PA 19145. Being BRT Tax#26-2-1785-00. Being Plan/Parcel #30 S 15 – 219. Together with the free and common use, right, liberty and privilege of the aforesaid alley as and for a passageway and watercourse at all times hereafter, forever. Being known as 2305 South Lambert Street, Philadelphia, PA 19145. The sale will be held on January 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.m. at Southeast Entrance of Philadelphia City Hall located at Broad Street and Market Street, Philadelphia, PA 19107. The Secretary of Housing and Urban Development will bid $206,011.85 plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date. Ten percent (10%) of the highest bid is the deposit required at the sale. The amount that must be paid to HUD by the mortgagors or someone acting on their behalf so that the sale may be stayed is the total delinquent amount of $206,011.85 as of September 19, 2016, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the Foreclosure Commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the Foreclosure Commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the Foreclosure Commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the Secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bid, all bidders, except the Secretary, must submit a deposit totaling ten percent 10% of the Secretary’s bid as set forth above in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the Secretary of HUD. Each oral bid need not be accompanied by a deposit. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of ten (10%) percent must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within thirty (30) days of the sale or at such other time as the Secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the Secretary is the high bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveyance fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The Secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for fifteen (15) days, and a fee will be charged in the amount of $150.00 for each fifteen (15) day extension requested. The extension fee shall be paid in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the Secretary of Housing and Urban Development. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the Secretary, the high bidder’s deposit will be forfeited, and the Commissioner may, at the direction of the HUD Field Office Representative, offer the Property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the Act. Therefore, the Foreclosure Commissioner will issue a Deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein.

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Notice of default and foreclosure sale - whereas, on january 09, 2009, a certain mortgage was executed by genevia hamilton, as mortgagor in favor of metlife home loans, a division of metlife bank, n.A. As mortgagee and was recorded in office of the recorder of deeds of philadelphia county in mortgage document number 52023531 (“mortgage”); and whereas, the mortgage encumbers property located at 3312 north bailey street philadelphia, pa 19129, parcel number 381183000 (“property”); and whereas, the property was owned by alonzo j. Hamilton and genevia hamilton, husband and wife, by virtue of deed dated may 14, 1996 and recorded september 6, 1996 in book jtd 80; page 473; and whereas, alonzo hamilton died on september 5, 2007. By operation of law title vests solely in genevia hamilton. Genevia hamilton died on may 30, 2015 intestate and is survived by her heir-at-law, denise johnson white; and whereas, the mortgage is now owned by the secretary of the united states department of housing and urban development (“secretary”), pursuant to an assignment recorded on october 28, 2013 in document number 52712301, in the office of the recorder of deeds of philadelphia county, pennsylvania; and whereas, a default has been made in the covenants and conditions of the mortgage (paragraph 9 (a)(i)), as genevia hamilton died on may 30, 2015, and that upon the death the entire principal balance becomes due and owing, and that no payment was made, and remains wholly unpaid as of the date of this notice; and whereas, the entire amount delinquent as of september 22, 2016 is $81,052.05 Plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date; and whereas, by virtue of this default, the secretary has declared the entire amount of the indebtedness secured by the mortgage to be immediately due and payable; now therefore, pursuant to powers vested in me by the single family mortgage foreclosure act of 1994, l2 u.S.C. 3751 Et seq., By 24 cfr part 29, and by the secretary’s designation of me as foreclosure commissioner, recorded on september 29, 2011 in misc. Document number: 52395684, in the office of the recorder of deeds of philadelphia county, pennsylvania, notice is hereby given that at january 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.M. At southeast entrance of philadelphia city hall located at broad street and market street, philadelphia, pa 19107, all real and personal property at or used in connection with the property will be sold at public auction to the highest bidder: all that certain lot or piece of ground with the messuage or tenement thereon erected, situate on the northwest side of bailey street at the distance of 101 feet 6 -3/4 inches northwestward from the corner formed by the intersection of the northwest side of bailey street with the northeast side of westmoreland street, in the 38th ward of the city of philadelphia. Containing in front or breadth on the said bailey street 16 feet 4 inches and extending of that width in length or depth northwestward between parallel lines at right angles to the said bailey street 55 feet 6 inches to the middle line of a certain 10 feet wide driveway which extends southwestward and northeastward communicating at its northeasternmost end with a certain 10 feet wide driveway which extends northwestward and southeastward from marston street to bailey street. Being 3312 north bailey street. Together with free common use, right, liberty and privilege of the aforesaid driveway as and for driveways and passageways at all times hereafter forever in common with the owners, tenants and occupiers of the other lots of ground bounding thereon and entitled to the use thereof. Being parcel number 381183000. The sale will be held on january 26, 2016 at 10:00 a.M. At southeast entrance of philadelphia city hall located at broad street and market street, philadelphia, pa 19107. The secretary of housing and urban development will bid $81,052.05 Plus interest, costs and other charges through the sale date. Ten percent (10%) of the highest bid is the deposit required at the sale. The amount that must be paid to hud by the mortgagors or someone acting on their behalf so that the sale may be stayed is the total delinquent amount of $81,052.05 As of september 22, 2016, plus all other amounts that would be due under the mortgage agreement if payments under the mortgage had not been accelerated, advertising costs and postage expenses incurred in giving notice, mileage by the most reasonable road distance for posting notices and for the foreclosure commissioner’s attendance at the sale, reasonable and customary costs incurred for title and lien record searches, the necessary out-of-pocket costs incurred by the foreclosure commissioner for recording documents, a commission for the foreclosure commissioner, and all other costs incurred in connection with the foreclosure prior to reinstatement. There will be no proration of taxes, rents or other income or liabilities, except that the purchaser will pay, at or before closing, his prorata share of any real estate taxes that have been paid by the secretary to the date of the foreclosure sale. When making their bid, all bidders, except the secretary, must submit a deposit totaling ten percent 10% of the secretary’s bid as set forth above in the form of a certified check or cashier’s check made out to the secretary of hud. Each oral bid need not be accompanied by a deposit. If the successful bid is oral, a deposit of ten (10%) percent must be presented before the bidding is closed. The deposit is nonrefundable. The remainder of the purchase price must be delivered within thirty (30) days of the sale or at such other time as the secretary may determine for good cause shown, time being of the essence. This amount, like the bid deposits, must be delivered in the form of a certified or cashier’s check. If the secretary is the high bidder, he need not pay the bid amount in cash. The successful bidder will pay all conveyance fees, all real estate and other taxes that are due on or after the delivery of the remainder of the payment and all other costs associated with the transfer of title. At the conclusion of the sale, the deposits of the unsuccessful bidders will be returned to them. The secretary may grant an extension of time within which to deliver the remainder of the payment. All extensions will be for fifteen (15) days, and a fee will be charged in the amount of $150.00 For each fifteen (15) day extension requested. The extension fee shall be paid in the form of a certified or cashier’s check made payable to the secretary of housing and urban development. If the high bidder closes the sale prior to the expiration of any extension period, the unused portion of the extension fee shall be applied toward the amount due. If the high bidder is unable to close the sale within the required period, or within any extensions of time granted by the secretary, the high bidder’s deposit will be forfeited, and the commissioner may, at the direction of the hud field office representative, offer the property to the second highest bidder for an amount equal to the highest price offered by that bidder. There is no right of redemption, or right of possession based upon a right of redemption, in the mortgagor or others subsequent to a foreclosure completed pursuant to the act. Therefore, the foreclosure commissioner will issue a deed to the purchaser(s) upon receipt of the entire purchase price in accordance with the terms of the sale as provided herein.

WALKING (Cont. From page 20) was planned to end in Cape May, but ends 30 miles from it. The cost to extend it would be $ 1 BILLION, and take decades due to historical concerns and environmentally sensitive areas. Don’t do it. Improve existing Routes 49, 347 and 83 to CONNECT with the Garden State Parkway. And WIDEN the dangerous one-lane ramp to the Walt Whitman Bridge approach!... MAYOR KENNEY, please look at roads that go NOWHERE in Philly: The BETSY ROSS BRIDGE approach, which ends at I-95, but was intended to terminate at Roosevelt Boulevard; also the WOODHAVEN Road Expressway, ending abruptly at a tree line. KATHY McGEE BURNS’ era as President of the Irish Memorial ends on March 17, 2017. And what a WONDERFUL leader she was! She had accomplished so much in her life, quietly and efficiently. The new President is Robert GESSLER ... I just heard of the loss of Harriet FISHER last summer at age 89. I worked with her husband HAROLD to build the Veterans Home on Southampton Road – with her invaluable help. She published a veterans’ newsletter that was SECOND TO NONE, providing IN DETAIL all ways to get Vet benefits. That Jewish War Vets publication was read by ALL veteran groups! She was and is (on High) described in Yiddish as a “SHAYNA MAYDELA”! TOMORROW is Ben FRANKLIN’S birthday: The day starts with a seminar on “Increasing Prosperity and Rising Inequality” 9-11 a.m. at Ben Franklin Hall, 422 Chestnut Street; then a march of flags to Ben’s grave with wreath-laying at 11:15 a.m. Both events are free and open to all. Learn more at franklincelebration. org/2017-celebration.


SMALL ADS BIG DEALS

BLACK HISTORY MONTH SPECIAL ISSUE

FEBRUARY 9TH

HELP WANTED/ EDUCATION

TO ADVERTISE CALL MELISSA BARRETT

TEACHER RECRUITMENT FAIR for 2017-18 vacancies in 21 Virginia school divisions. Sat, Jan 28 – 9:00 a.m. to 2 p.m. @ Salem Civic Center in Salem, VA. See www.wvpec.org Sponsor: WVPEC

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2004 JEEP GRAND CHEROKEE 4X4 V-8, 123,000 miles, power everything, sunroof, very clean. $4,500. 215-704-1512

2003 CHEVROLET 2500 HD SILVERADO EXTENDED CAB 4X4 PICKUP229,008 miles, tool boxes, Bedliner mat, leather, safety strobe light. $6,000. 215-704-1512

Drivers: OTR & Dedicated. Excellent Pay + Rider Program Family Medical/Dental Benefits. Home Weekends Guaranteed CDL-A, 1 yr. EXP. 877-758-3905

2004 JEEP WRANGLER RUBICON4x4, 6 Cyl.,5 spd, power a/c, 80,000 miles. $11,500. 215-704-1512

IF YOU HAD HIP OR KNEE REPLACEMENT SURGERY AND SUFFERED AN INFECTION between 2010 and the present time, you may be entitled to compensation. Call Attorney Charles H. Johnson 1-800-535-5727

MISCELLANEOUS

FREE Online Business Workshop In Philadelphia Area: Learn a proven formula for building a lucrative online business from scratch! No experience, technical or sales skill required! Register for Your FREE Ticket. jennifergibat.com/ philadelphia

2000 CADILLAC ESCALADE 4x4 Pa. state inspected, 130,000 miles, power everything, 6 CD Changer, Runs Great !!! $2,800. 215-704 -1512

AIRLINE MECHANIC TRAINING – Get FAA certification to fix planes. Approved for military benefits. Financial Aid if qualified. Job placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877-207-0345

Drivers-CO & O\Op’s. Earn Great Money Running Dedicated! Great Benefits. Home Weekly. Monthly Bonuses. Drive Newer Equipment! 855-582-2265

SPORTS/SPORTING GOODS GUN SHOW: PA Gun Collector’s Association. Pullman Square, 100 Pullman Square, Butler, PA.16001 January 14th-15h. Sat.9-5, Sun.9-4. Adults $8. Under-12 $4. Saturday admission good for both days! Info: www.paguncollectors. org Or: 412-486-1129 WANTED TO BUY FREON 12 WANTED: R12 collecting dust in your garage? We pay CA$H for R12. Cylinders or case of cans. EPA certified (312)291-9169 sell@refrigerantfinders.com

WAFFLEMAN (Cont. From page 19) was never abused. So now I wonder whatever happened to the Victrola. I know that it would be valuable today as an antique. But the value it had to our family was worth much more. The Victrola was a status symbol for Grand Pop Achille as it cost him a lot of 1920 dollars. But furthermore, the Victrola and the memory of the beautiful music played on it were something that cannot be bought – priceless memories. Now if you or your parents or grandparents had a Victrola, I hope I brought back some nice memories.

2006 Ford E-350 Cargo VanV-8, Auto., 98k miles $4,800. 215-704-1512

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