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ULTIMATE Evening & Photographs Day Sales London, 18 May 2018

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33. Nadav Kander

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UK Guide for Prospective Buyers Each Phillips auction is governed by the applicable Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty. All prospective bidders should read these sections carefully. They govern the purchasing agreement under which you buy at auction from Phillips. They may be also amended by saleroom addendum or auctioneer’s announcement during the auction. The complete Conditions of Sale and Authorship Warranty applicable to this auction (Version 5/16/2016) are found online at phillips.com, along with detailed information on each lot. Estimates The auction estimates indicated for each lot in this catalogue do not include Buyer’s Premium (applicable on each lot), or VAT or Artist’s Resale Right (where such charges apply). Details of these charges are given below. All Lots are Subject to ‘Buyer’s Premium’ In addition to the hammer (final bid) price, a buyer’s premium is due from all successful buyers. The buyer’s premium is a commission based on the hammer price payable by the buyer as part of the total purchase price at the following rates: 25% of the hammer price up to and including £100,000; 20% of the portion of the hammer price above £100,000 up to and including£1,800,000; and 12% of the portion of the hammer price above £1,800,000. Condition and Condition Reports Phillips does not warrant or guarantee condition on any lot. Solely as a convenience to clients, Phillips may provide condition reports on many lots, which are also available online on the lot detail pages. If there is not a condition report available, that is not a representation that a lot is in perfect condition. While condition reports are prepared honestly and carefully, our staff are not professional restorers or trained conservators. We therefore encourage all prospective buyers to inspect all lots at our pre-sale exhibitions, and contact our staff with any questions. Bidding at Auction You may bid in the auction in person, online, on the phone, or by placing an advance bid. The easiest way to register to bid is to go to our homepage at phillips.com, and Sign Up or Log In. When you want to register for an auction, click Register under Buy & Sell or on our sale pages. We recommend registering at least 24 hours prior to each sale to ensure you can bid. Good luck! Some lots are sold under special conditions. Phillips uses the following symbols to designate these lots: O ◊ Guaranteed Property The seller of lots designated with the symbol O has been guaranteed a minimum price fnanced solely by Phillips. Where the guarantee is provided by a third party or jointly by us and a third party, the property will be denoted with the symbols O ◊. When a third party has fnanced all or part of our fnancial interest in a lot, it assumes all or part of the risk that the lot will not be sold and will be remunerated via a fxed fee, a percentage of the hammer price or the buyer’s premium or some combination of the foregoing. The third party may bid on the guaranteed lot during the auction.

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If the third party is the successful bidder, the remuneration may be netted against the purchase price. Where Phillips has guaranteed a minimum price on every lot in the catalogue, Phillips will not designate each lot with the symbol(s) for the guaranteed property but will state our fnancial interest at the front of the catalogue. ∆ Property in Which Phillips Has an Ownership Interest Lots with this symbol indicate that Phillips owns the lot in whole or in part or has an economic interest in the lot equivalent to an ownership interest. •No Reserve Unless indicated by a •, all lots in this catalogue are offered subject to a reserve. A reserve is the confidential value established between Phillips and the seller and below which a lot may not be sold. The reserve for each lot will not exceed the low pre-sale estimate. ♠ Property Subject to the Artist’s Resale Right Lots marked with ♠ are subject to the Artist’s Resale Right calculated as a percentage of the hammer price (in EUR) and payable as part of the purchase price as follows: Royalty Rate: From 0 to 50,000 (4%) From 50,000.01 to 200,000 (3%) From 200,000.01 to 350,000 (1%) From 350,000.01 to 500,000 (0.5%) Exceeding 500,000 (0.25%) The Artist’s Resale Right applies where the hammer price is EUR 1,000 or more, subject to a maximum royalty per lot of EUR 12,500. Calculation of the Artist’s Resale Right will be based on the pounds sterling/euro reference exchange rate quoted on the date of the sale by the European Central Bank. †, §, ±, or Ω Property Subject to VAT Where there is no VAT symbol, Phillips is able to use the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme and VAT will not normally be charged on the hammer price. An amount equivalent to VAT at 20% on the buyer’s premium will be included in the buyer’s premium. Property with a † symbol will be sold under normal UK VAT rules, and VAT will normally be charged at 20% on both the hammer price and buyer’s premium. Property with a § symbol and sold to buyers whose registered address is in the EU will be assumed to be remaining in the EU and will be treated as having no symbol (unless informed otherwise by a buyer). Property sold with a ± (5%) or Ω (20%) symbol has been imported from outside the EU to be sold at auction under temporary admission, and offered under the Auctioneer’s Margin Scheme at the respective % on the hammer price and an amount in lieu of VAT at 20% on the buyer’s premium. The foregoing is for summary purposes only. Please go to phillips.com/buy and specifically the VAT Guide, ‘VAT AND OTHER TAX INFORMATION FOR BUYERS’ for a more detailed description of the VAT symbols used in this Buyer’s Guide, as well as any VAT refunds that you may be qualified to receive.

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24. Calavas Frères (publishers)

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Executives.

Edward Dolman

Cheyenne Westphal

Chief Executive Ofcer +1 212 940 1241

Chairman +44 20 7318 4044

edolman@phillips.com

cwestphal@phillips.com

Š Brigitte Lacombe

Europe.

Genevieve Janvrin

Yuka Yamaji

Sophie Busby

Co-Head of Department, Europe gjanvrin@phillips.com +33 1 53 71 77 87

Co-Head of Department, Europe yyamaji@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4098

Associate Specialist, Head of Sale sbusby@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4092

Americas.

Vanessa Hallett

Sarah Krueger

Christopher Mahoney

Caroline Deck

Rachel Peart

Carol Ehlers

Clare Milliken

Deputy Chairman, Americas and Worldwide Head of Photographs vhallett@phillips.com +1 212 940 1243

Head of Department, New York skrueger@phillips.com +1 212 940 1225

Senior International Specialist cmahoney@phillips.com +1 212 940 1208

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Cataloguer cmilliken@phillips.com +1 212 940 1245

Deputy Chairmen.

Svetlana Marich

Jean-Paul Engelen

Robert Manley

Jonathan Crockett

Peter Sumner

Worldwide Deputy Chairman +44 20 7318 4010 smarich@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman,

Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art +1 212 940 1390 jpengelen@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art +1 212 940 1358 rmanley@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Asia and Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Asia +852 2318 2023 jcrockett@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe +44 20 7318 4063 psumner@phillips.com

Miety Heiden

Alexander Payne

Vivian Pfeifer

Marianne Hoet

Deputy Chairman, Head of Private Sales +44 20 7901 7943 mheiden@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe and Worldwide Head of Design +44 20 7318 4052 apayne@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Americas and Head of Business Development, Americas +1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Deputy Chairman, Europe Senior Specialist of 20th Century & Contemporary Art +32 3257 3026 mhoet@phillips.com

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ULTIMATE Evening & Photographs Day Sales London, 18 May 2018, 6pm & 3pm Auction and Viewing Location 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX

Photographs Department +44 20 7318 4087

Auctions 18 May 2018 ULTIMATE Evening Photographs Day

Deputy Chairman, Americas and Worldwide Head of Photographs Vanessa Hallett vhallett@phillips.com

Lots 1 - 27, 6pm Lots 28 - 172, 3pm

Viewing 10 – 18 May Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm Sunday 12pm – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as UK040118 or Photographs. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +44 20 7318 4045 fax +44 20 7318 4035 bidslondon@phillips.com

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Co-Head of Department, Europe Genevieve Janvrin gjanvrin@phillips.com Co-Head of Department, Europe Yuka Yamaji yyamaji@phillips.com Associate Specialist, Head of Sale Sophie Busby sbusby@phillips.com Administrator Naomi Cooperman ncooperman@phillips.com

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ULTIMATE Evening Sale Lots 1 – 27, 6pm UK_PHOTOGRAPHS_APR18_2-55.indd 6

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ULTIMATE

ULTIMATE is a unique selection of photographs, photo-based works and video. In this frst Evening edition, we have curated a tightly edited collection of 27 outstanding works, dating from the late 19th century to the present, and ranging from rare masterworks to exclusive collaborations. As this exciting programme evolves, so do our criteria for entry. If it’s the frst, the last, special, unique, a one-of or the only chance to own it, then it might just be the ultimate… Each work in ULTIMATE is distinctive and has been selected for its rarity and exclusivity. Leading our inaugural ULTIMATE Evening Sale is Helmut Newton’s provocative Panoramic Nude with Gun, Villa d’Este, Como, 1989, the only known extant print of this unpublished variant to date (lot 16), and a platinum-palladium print of Irving Penn’s iconic Black and White Vogue Cover (Jean Patchett), New York, 1950 (lot 15). Fresh-to-market works include Robert Mapplethorpe’s unique, early composition Double Tiger Lily, 1977, which has been in the same collection for two decades (lot 17), and Mika Ninagawa’s earthly fowers, heavenly colors, 2018, a unique site-specifc installation, which is accompanied by an in-depth interview with the artist (lot 23). Following up on our recent world auction records for Masahisa Fukase and Seiji Kurata, we continue our celebration of 1970s Japanese photography with exceptional works by Ishiuchi Miyako (lot 19), Kunié Sugiura (lot 20) and Tamiko Nishimura (lot 21), three women artists whose creative output can be described as highly subjective and deeply personal. We are also thrilled to premiere POLAROIDS from The Piero Bisazza Collection, highlights of which are featured in ULTIMATE and include unique Polaroid prints from Robert Mapplethorpe (lot 1), Andy Warhol (lots 2-6), Nobuyoshi Araki (lot 7) and Helmut Newton (lots 8-11). Artists debuting at auction include street style photographer extraordinaire Tommy Ton with his unique polyptych (lot 26) and multimedia artist Kim Heewon with his hypnotic video (lot 27). ULTIMATE ofers something special for every collector.

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3. Andy Warhol

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

Piero Bisazza has one passion aside from mosaics – Polaroids. The CEO of Bisazza since 2000, Piero has led his family business to become an international luxury brand as one of the world’s leading producers of glass mosaics. In 2012, he and his sister Rosella inaugurated the Bisazza Foundation, a 6,000 square metre exhibition space designed by the architect Carlo Dal Bianco, featuring a permanent collection of works by a wide range of artists, architects and designers, including Marcel Wanders, Sandro Chia and Mimmo Paladino. Recent temporary solo shows have included John Pawson, Candida Höfer and Nobuyoshi Araki. Each handmade Bisazza mosaic tile is small and unique, qualities that Piero recognises as having drawn him to Polaroids: ‘I like small things.’ First introduced in 1948, Polaroid technology revolutionised photography by ofering instant access to the fnal print. This spontaneity appealed to Piero as he built his collection of Polaroids. ‘It’s an instinctive collection,’ he explained. ‘I plan nothing.’ Piero acquired his frst Polaroids afer meeting Helmut Newton at LA’s Chateau Marmont in January 2004. In the Collection, Polaroids by Newton constitute the largest number of works by a single artist (lots 8-11, 152-163). Eroticism is an underlying theme that extends to the work of other artists, including Nobuyoshi Araki (lot 7), Paolo Roversi (lots 169-170) and Carlo Mollino (lot 172). Piero’s Collection addresses the multitude of ways in which artists use the Polaroid. For Newton, the Polaroid acted as his sketchbook. Andy Warhol took many Polaroids of his subjects in search of the perfect pose that would be immortalised in one of his silkscreens (lots 2-6). Robert Mapplethorpe’s Polaroids are ofen seen as his entry into photography (lot 1), whereas Peter Beard draws on his Polaroids with ink and paint as an extension of his creative process (lots 164-168). The featured works from Piero’s Collection represent the culmination of nearly 15 years of collecting Polaroids. This sale presents collectors an unrivalled opportunity to acquire unique Polaroid prints that provide an intimate and insightful glimpse into the working practices of 20th and 21st century masters.

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‘He was the artist of my life.’ Patti Smith

1. Robert Mapplethorpe

American 1946-1989

Untitled (Patti Smith), 1973-1975 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 11.2 x 8.8 cm (4 3/8 x 3 1/2 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.6 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Annotated ‘PD 392’ in another hand in pencil on the verso. This work is unique. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,200-21,400 €11,500-17,300 Provenance The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature S. Wolf, Polaroids: Mapplethorpe, Munich: Prestel, 2013, pl. 88, p. 38, dated 1973-1975

Patti Smith was the frst person Robert Mapplethorpe photographed and the only person he photographed more than himself. Mapplethorpe and Smith frst met in 1967. As lovers and then as friends, they supported each other through developments in their creative pursuits. In 1970 Mapplethorpe frst picked up a Polaroid camera when he borrowed one from fellow artist and Chelsea Hotel neighbour Sandy Daley. ‘I was Robert’s frst model and he was his second,’ Smith recalls in her memoir Just Kids. ‘The settings and options were limited but it was technically simple and he needed no light meter.’ While early on Mapplethorpe economised on food in order to buy Polaroid flm at $3 a pack, in 1971, John McKendry, then Curator of Photography at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, purchased Mapplethorpe his own Polaroid camera and helped the artist to obtain a grant from Polaroid via their Artist Support Program for unlimited flm. The bulk of Mapplethorpe’s Polaroids were taken in 1970-75 and it was during this time that he frst discovered his love for photography. ‘I never anticipated Robert’s complete surrender to its powers. I had encouraged him to take photographs to integrate into his collages and installations,’ Smith writes, ‘but Robert shifed his focus, the photograph was not a means to an end, but the object itself.’ Mapplethorpe’s Polaroids provide a fascinating insight into his early experimentation with light, composition and representations of the body, which would become the foundation of his later work. In the Polaroid ofered here, Patti Smith is partly blurred, caught mid-turn, but her eyes remain fxed on Mapplethorpe, her soulmate. According to Smith, Mapplethorpe ‘saw more in me than I could see in myself. Whenever he peeled away the image from the Polaroid negative, he would say, “With you I can’t miss.”’ From the very beginning of his appreciation for this instant medium, he photographed his friend, muse and lover Patti Smith, capturing the intimacy that transcended their relationship. The present lot is the only Polaroid by Mapplethorpe in the Piero Bisazza Collection.

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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2. Andy Warhol

American 1928-1987

3. Andy Warhol

American 1928-1987

Robert Mapplethorpe, 1983 Unique Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Initialled ‘T.J.H.’ by Timothy J. Hunt of the Andy Warhol Foundation, numbered ‘FA05.01674’ in another hand, all in pencil and Estate of Andy Warhol stamps on the verso.

Debbie Harry, 1980 Unique Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 print. Image: 9.5 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Initialled ‘T.J.H.’ by Timothy J. Hunt of the Andy Warhol Foundation and numbered ‘FA04.04868’ in another hand, all in pencil and Estate of Andy Warhol stamps on the verso.

This work is unique.

This work is unique.

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800

Provenance The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, 2006 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy

Provenance The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York Mark Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, 2006 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy

Literature G. Baldwin, Nadar/Warhol, Paris/New York: photography and fame, Los Angeles: Getty, 1999, pp. 176, 256, variant P. Hickson, Warhol & Mapplethorpe: Guise & Dolls, New Haven: Yale UP, 2015, pl. 63, p. 118, variant Andy Warhol: Polaroids, 1958-1987, Cologne: Taschen, 2017, p. 347, variant

Literature Andy Warhol Polaroids: 1971-1986, New York: Pace/MacGill Gallery, 1992, p. 76, variant G. Baldwin, Nadar/Warhol, Paris/New York: photography and fame, Los Angeles: Getty, 1999, p. 195, variant Andy Warhol’s Serial Photography, Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2004, p. 15, variant Andy Warhol: Polaroids 1958-1987, Cologne: Taschen, 2017, p. 307, variant

4. Andy Warhol

American 1928-1987

Dennis Hopper, 1977 Unique Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 print. Image: 9.4 x 7.3 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.6 x 8.5 cm (4 1/8 x 3 3/8 in.) Copyright credit blindstamp in the margin; initialled ‘T.J.H.’ by Timothy J. Hunt of the Andy Warhol Foundation and numbered ‘FA05.01230’ in another hand, all in pencil and Estate of Andy Warhol stamps on the verso. This work is unique. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800 Provenance The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York Mark Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, 2006 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature Andy Warhol Polaroids: 1971-1986, New York: Pace/MacGill Gallery, 1992, p. 68, variant Andy Warhol: Photography, Hamburg: Kunsthalle; Pittsburgh: Andy Warhol Museum, 1999, p.185, variant Andy Warhol: Polaroids 1958-1987, Cologne: Taschen, 2017, p. 283, variant

Andy Warhol and the Polaroid During the 1970s up until his untimely death in 1987, Andy Warhol’s camera of choice for his silkscreen portraits was the Polaroid Big Shot. A close-up camera with a fxed focal lens and built-in fash, the Big Shot was perfect for taking portraits and made it easy for Warhol to quickly take multiple shots of his subject. To prepare for the shoot, women’s faces were ofen painted with white makeup to achieve a smooth appearance and men were posed to conceal any faws. For most sittings Warhol was known to go through a few packs of flm, and at the end of a shoot, he would select a small number of Polaroids to be sent of and re-photographed in 35mm, printed as 8 x 10 acetates and then re-printed in 40 x 40 to be fnally transformed into the silkscreens. Most of these portraits were done on commission or trade. Both Roy Lichtenstein and Gilbert & George (lot 5) traded their paintings with Warhol for his silkscreen portraits. The Polaroid was the foundation for his 1970s and 80s silkscreen portraits and the Big Shot with its speed and disposability suited the purpose. These 11 Polaroids (lots 2-6) ofer a unique record of the famous faces that populated the world of Andy Warhol, 20th century’s preeminent visual artist.

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘My idea of a good picture is one that’s in focus and of a famous person.’ Andy Warhol

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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5. Andy Warhol

American 1928-1987

Gilbert & George, Truman Capote, Roy Lichtenstein, 1975-1981 Four unique Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 prints. Each image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) One with copyright credit blindstamp in the margin; each initialled ‘T.J.H.’ by Timothy J. Hunt of the Andy Warhol Foundation, numbered ‘FA05.00143’, FA05.00138’, ‘FA05.01307’, ‘FA05.01043’ respectively, in another hand, all in pencil and Estate of Andy Warhol stamps on each verso. Each work is unique. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,700 €23,100-34,600 Provenance The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York Sean Kelly Gallery, New York, 2006 (Roy Lichtenstein) Mark Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, 2006 (Truman Capote) The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature Andy Warhol Polaroids: 1971-1986, New York: Pace/ MacGill Gallery, 1992, p. 57, variant Andy Warhol: Photography, Hamburg: Kunsthalle; Pittsburgh: Andy Warhol Museum, 1999, p. 185, variant G. Baldwin, Nadar/Warhol, Paris/New York: photography and fame, Los Angeles: Getty, 1999, pp. 164, 168, variant The Andy Warhol Catalogue Raisonnée, Vol. 4, London: Phaidon, 2002, pp. 451, 455, variant Andy Warhol: Polaroids 1958-1987, Cologne: Taschen, 2017, pp. 251, 258-259, variant

6. Andy Warhol

American 1928-1987

Bianca Jagger, Jerry Hall, Grace Jones, Diane von Fürstenberg, 1974-1984 Four unique Polaroid Polacolor Type 108 prints. Each image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) One with copyright credit blindstamp in the margin.; each initialled ‘T.J.H.’ by Timothy J. Hunt of the Andy Warhol Foundation, numbered ‘FA04.05119’, ‘FA04.03380’, ‘FA04.08337’ and ‘FA04.03245’ respectively, in another hand, all in pencil and Estate of Andy Warhol stamps on each verso. Each work is unique. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,700 €23,100-34,600 Provenance The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, New York Mark Selwyn Fine Art, Los Angeles, 2006 (Jerry Hall and Bianca Jagger) The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature Andy Warhol: Photography, Hamburg: Kunsthalle; Pittsburgh: Andy Warhol Museum, 1999, p. 178 Andy Warhol: Polaroids 1958-1987, Cologne: Taschen, 2015, p. 497, variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘Why do they come across as erotic? Because I shot them. That’s what my photos are.’ Nobuyoshi Araki

7. Nobuyoshi Araki

Japanese b. 1940

36 Polaroids, n.d. 36 unique Polaroid Type 600 prints. Each image: 7.8 x 7.6 cm (3 1/8 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.7 x 8.7 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Four signed in ink in the margins; 32 signed in ink on the verso. Each work is unique. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,200-21,400 €11,500-17,300 Provenance Kamel Mennour, Paris and Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, for many The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy

In 2009, afer Piero Bisazza had started collecting Polaroids by Nobuyoshi Araki, he invited the Japanese photographer to shoot a campaign for his mosaic company Bisazza. ‘I’ve always admired Araki’s photographic style, in particular his use of colour,’ Piero explains. ‘In our advertising campaign, Araki was able to harmoniously match the brilliance of the golden mosaics with the vivid colours of the models’ kimonos.’ Eight years later in 2017, the Bisazza Foundation presented a solo exhibition of Araki’s work from the 1970s onwards with his Tokyo, kinbaku [bondage] and fora images, as well as his more recent work such as his 2014 Love on the Lef Eye series. The exhibition featured an installation around Araki’s 2009 Bisazza campaign with a video of the artist painting onto the mosaic tiles and creating the advertising images. The Polaroid camera is one of the many tools Araki uses to sustain his prolifc output. Throughout his unrivalled six-decade-long career, Araki, who will be 78 in May this year, has documented the people, events and sights that move him. He is constantly in the act of imagemaking and re-examining what it means to take photographs. Each taken with a Polaroid 600 camera, the present lot features 36 unique Polaroids of nudes, bondage and fowers, and together celebrate Araki’s distinctive eroticism.

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘Arielle was one of my favourite girls at the time. She made my camera sizzle... Cover for Amica. This was the frst photo I took of her.’ Helmut Newton in Pola Woman, 1992

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘Wibecke’s legs in her bedroom in Paris...’ Helmut Newton in Pola Woman, 1992

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘Marie Christine in a room in the Paris Hilton, late 70s.’ Helmut Newton in Pola Woman, 1992

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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8. Helmut Newton

German-Australian 1920-2004

Arielle for Amica, Milan, 1982 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Titled and dated in ink in the margin; signed by the artist in ink and printer’s notations in pencil on the verso.

9. Helmut Newton

German-Australian 1920-2004

Wibecke’s legs in her bedroom, 1974 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.3 x 7.2 cm (3 5/8 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.6 x 8.5 cm (4 1/8 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed in ink on the verso. This work is unique.

This work is unique. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800 Provenance Christie’s, New York, Photographs from the Collection of Gert Elfering, 10 April 2008, lot 114 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, cover, p. 37 Amica, September 1982, cover, variant H. Newton, Pages from the Glossies: Facsimiles 1956-1998, Zurich: Scalo, 1998, p. 457, variant

10. Helmut Newton

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800 Provenance The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature Instantanés, Paris: Centre Georges Pompidou/ Musée National d’Art Moderne, 1980, p. 32, black-and-white variant H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 58

German-Australian 1920-2004

Marie Christine in a room in the Paris Hilton, late 1970s Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed by the artist in ink and printer’s notations in pencil on the verso. This work is unique. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800 Provenance Christie’s, South Kensington, 2 November 2011, lot 120 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 102

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Helmut Newton and the Polaroid ‘It’s a wonderful sketchpad, the Polaroid. I use it ofen to take my “frst look” at what I am about to do. Do I like what I see? Do I want to continue in this way or change my tactics? Somewhere along the line, and rather sooner than later, I must make a decision on how I want the sitting to go – in what direction. The pola helps me.’ Helmut Newton in Pola Woman, 1992

11. Helmut Newton

German-Australian 1920-2004

Bergström over Paris, 1976 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 7.2 x 9.4 cm (2 7/8 x 3 3/4 in.) Sheet: 8.5 x 10.7 cm (3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.) Signed in pencil on the verso. This work is unique. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,800

Helmut Newton started taking pictures with the Polaroid camera in the 1970s, using it to test lighting conditions and see instantly how a situation would appear photographically. Afer a day of shooting, he would come home and share his Polaroids with his wife June who would sometimes use them as place cards at dinner parties. In 1992 Newton decided to ofcially position these works within his œuvre and published Pola Woman, a personal project that showcased his Polaroid prints. The Polaroids in the book were accompanied by Newton’s short captions about the shoot or the model, emphasising his intimate relationship to these images.

Provenance Christie’s, New York, Photographs from the Collection of Gert Elfering, 10 April 2008, lot 24 The Piero Bisazza Collection, Italy Literature H. Newton, Sleepless Nights, London: Quartet Books, 1978, pp. 20-21, variant Helmut Newton, Paris: Centre National de Ia Photographie, 1986, pl. 25, dated 1975-78, variant Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., dated 1976, variant

H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992

For the continuation of POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection, please refer to lots �52 –172 in the Photographs Day Sale.

Many of the Newton Polaroids found in the Piero Bisazza Collection are the actual prints reproduced in Pola Woman. Such examples in the sale include the cover of Pola Woman, Arielle (lot 8), Prunella and Sylvie on the Quai d’Orsay for Playboy (lot 152) and the frst Polaroid in Pola Woman, Modelling fashion for Vogue Hommes (lot 160). Polaroids of such quintessential Newton images as Bergström over Paris (lot 11) and Sylvia in My Studio (lot 159) are also featured. Together, these works ofer a captivating insight into how ideas were formed in Newton’s restless imagination and reveal the eye of a master photographer.

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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‘I work from awkwardness. By that I mean I don’t like to arrange things. If I stand in front of something, instead of arranging it, I arrange myself.’ Diane Arbus

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Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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12. Diane Arbus

American 1923-1971

Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C., 1962 Gelatin silver print, printed later by Neil Selkirk. 37 x 36 cm (14 5/8 x 14 1/8 in.) Stamped ‘A Diane Arbus Photograph’, signed, titled, dated and numbered 67/75 by Doon Arbus, Executor, in ink, Estate, copyright credit and reproduction limitation stamps on the verso. This work is number 67 from the edition of 75. As of this writing, Tate Modern, London/National Galleries, Scotland; Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam; Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; Akron Art Museum; National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa; SFMOMA and Art Gallery of Ontario, Toronto, hold other prints from this edition. Estimate £70,000-90,000 $100,000-129,000 €81,000-104,000 ‡ Provenance Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco Aferimage Gallery, Dallas Private Collection, Europe Literature Diane Arbus, New York: Aperture, 1972, n.p. S. Kismaric, American Children: Photographs from the Collection of the Museum of Modern Art, New York: MoMA, 1980, p. 20 J. Green, American Photography: A Critical History 1945 to the Present, New York: Harry N. Abrams, 1984, p. 119 P. Galassi, American Photography 1890-1965 from the Museum of Modern Art, New York: MoMA, 1996, p. 243 Diane Arbus: Revelations, New York: Random House, 2003, pp. 104–105, 164 (contact sheet) A. Nemervo, Silent Dialogues: Diane Arbus and Howard Nemerov, New York: D.A.P., 2015, p. 31 J. Rosenheim, diane arbus: in the beginning, New York: The MET, 2016, p. 257

One of the most important and recognisable images within Diane Arbus’s oeuvre, Child with a toy hand grenade in Central Park, N.Y.C., 1962, refects a new chapter in her photographic practice as she switched from the 35mm Nikon camera to the twin-lens Rolleifex, which used a 2¼ x 2¼ inch flm. The lower viewpoint of the Rolleifex, which she used for this shot, allowed Arbus to maintain eye contact and interact with her subjects. Colin Wood, identifed as the subject here, recalled, ‘I was not directed, but there was a collusion of some kind. There’s almost this “is this what you want?” feeling on my face.’ In 1962, the same year in which this photograph was taken, Arbus wrote to close friend Marvin Israel expressing ideas for a project she wished to pursue: ‘I wanna do the children the overprivileged ones…who are almost toomuchblessed [sic] as freaks.’ Wood was one such child. He came from a wellof family on Park Avenue and was frequently abandoned to the care of nannies while his parents were in the midst of a divorce. By his own admission, Wood was a lonely and troubled child, deeply afected by his parents’ separation, exasperated and at odds with the world, as implied by Arbus’s original title Exasperated boy with toy hand grenade. As one of the frst images Arbus created with the Rolleifex, Child with a toy hand grenade represents a signifcant moment in her career – the birth of her signature aesthetic. In 1964, Child with a toy hand grenade was one of only seven Arbus photographs acquired by John Szarkowski for the Museum of Modern Art, New York, which was the frst time her work had entered a museum collection. In MoMA’s 1967 landmark New Documents show, the only major exhibition of Arbus’s work during her lifetime, this image was one of 30 Arbus prints featured.

Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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13. Robert Mapplethorpe

American 1946-1989

American Flag, 1987 Gelatin silver print, fush-mounted. 49 x 58.5 cm (19 1/4 x 23 in.) Signed, dated by the artist, titled, numbered 2/10 in another hand, all in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the fush-mount. This work is number 2 from the edition of 10 + 2 AP. As of this writing, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art/J. Paul Getty Museum hold another print from this edition. Estimate £80,000-120,000 $115,000-172,000 €92,600-139,000 ‡ Provenance Robert Miller Gallery, New York, 1988 Christie’s, New York, Crossing America: Photographs from the Consolidated Freightways Collection, Part I, 7 April 2011, lot 293 Private Collection, Europe Exhibited Robert Mapplethorpe Retrospective, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sapporo, 24 August - 25 September 2002; Daimaru Museum, Tokyo, 17 - 29 October 2002; Daimaru Museum, Osaka, 30 January - 11 February, 2003, another Literature Robert Mapplethorpe Retrospective, Sapporo, Japan: Museum of Contemporary Art, 2002, pl. 115

The decade in which American Flag, 1987 was made marked the height of Robert Mapplethorpe’s career as an artist. Ofen, his artistic legacy is discussed in terms of the explicit or taboo as evident in American Flag, 1977, which drew public outcry for its depiction of a tattered fag. Here, by contrast, Mapplethorpe captures the American emblem raised in the sky above a bed of clouds and against the sun’s glowing halo. In a counter-cultural twist, the fag is shown fying backwards as it was shot from behind. He depicts the subject in elegant black and white, an approach he had perfected throughout his career. When the image was taken, Mapplethorpe had been diagnosed with AIDS and had lost his mentor Sam Wagstaf to AIDS-related complications in January of the same year. In the wake of Wagstaf’s passing and confronted with his own mortality, Mapplethorpe’s photographs became more self-refective. Dignifed and somber with a hint of optimism, American Flag demonstrates his capacity for profound communication through restrained composition. In addition to the gelatin silver edition, American Flag, 1987 was realised in platinum on Belgian linen in an edition of 2 + 1AP.

Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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‘Free, profuse, strong as a wolf, the poppy is vital, persistent.’ Anthony West, American Vogue, December 1969

14. Irving Penn

American 1917-2009

Three Poppies, Arab Chief, New York, 1969 Dye transfer print, printed 1992. 55 x 46.2 cm (21 5/8 x 18 1/4 in.) Signed, initialled, titled, dated, Condé Nast copyright credit reproduction limitation and edition stamps on the verso. This image was realised only in a dye transfer edition of 27. Estimate £80,000-120,000 $115,000-172,000 €92,600-139,000 Provenance Hamiltons Gallery, London Private Collection, Europe Literature A. West, ‘Free, Profuse, Strong as a Wolf, the Poppy is Vital, Persistent’, Vogue US, December 1969, p. 207 I. Penn, Flowers, London: Jonathan Cape, 1980, p. 11 J. Szarkowski, Irving Penn, New York: MoMA, 1984 Irving Penn: Centennial, New York: The MET, 2017, pl. 206, p. 307

Irving Penn captures the exquisite Three Poppies with elegance and minimalism against his signature white backdrop. His seemingly uncomplicated composition places emphasis on the form, detail and structure of this opulent trio of ‘Arab Chief’ poppies, a variety that boasts massive nine-inch blooms of intense ruby red. Penn’s fowers graced the pages of the holiday issues of American Vogue from 1967-73 with each year’s issue celebrating a specifc fower. Poppies defned 1969. The culmination of this body of work was carefully compiled in his 1980 publication Flowers, which contained photographs not published by Vogue. As Penn notes in the introduction, he found liberty in working with a subject that was so foreign to him: ‘It has lef me free to react with simple pleasure just to form and colour, without being diverted by considerations of rarity or tied to the convention that a fower must be photographed at its moment of unblemished, nubile perfection.’ The knowledge Penn may have lacked in his subject matter is more than compensated by his mastery over every detail from the billowing edges of the poppy to the intricate rings of its stamen meticulously captured by his lens.

Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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Masterworks from an Important European Collection

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15. Irving Penn

American 1917-2009

Black and White Vogue Cover (Jean Patchett), New York, 1950 Platinum-palladium print, printed 1968. Approximately 43 x 34 cm (16 7/8 x 13 3/8 in.) Copyright credit blindstamp in margin; signed, initialled, titled, dated, numbered 11/34, annotated in pencil, Condé Nast copyright credit reproduction limitation and edition stamps on the verso. This work is number 11 from the edition of 34. As of this writing, the Art Institute of Chicago holds another print from this edition. Estimate £200,000-300,000 $287,000-430,000 €231,000-347,000 Provenance Christie’s, New York, 5 April 2012, lot 77 Private Collection, Italy Exhibited I Platini di Irving Penn: 25 Anni di Fotografa (Irving Penn Platinum Plates), Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna, Turin, 3 April - 31 May 1975; Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Bologna (now Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna), 18 June - 27 July 1975; The Photographers’ Gallery, London, 1 - 31 October 1975

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Literature ‘The Black and White Idea’, Vogue US, April 1950, cover ‘The Black and White Idea’, British Vogue, June 1950, cover I. Penn, Moments Preserved, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1960, p. 159 D. Palazzoli & M. Levi, I Platini di Irving Penn: 25 Anni di Fotografa (Irving Penn Platinum Plates), Turin: Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna di Torino, 1975, p. 21 P. Devlin, Vogue Book of Fashion Photography: The First Sixty Years, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1979, p. 90 H. Gee, Photography of the Fifies: An American Perspective, Tucson: Univeristy of Arizona, 1980, p. 153 J. Szarkowski, Irving Penn, New York: MoMA, 1984, pl. 48 M. Weaver ed., The Art of Photography: 1839-1989, Yale UP, 1989, pl. 441 M. Harrison, Appearances: Fashion Photography Since 1945, New York: Rizzoli, 1991, p. 59 C. Westerbeck, ed., Irving Penn: A Career in Photography, Chicago: AIC, 1997, pl. 4 ‘90 Years of Vogue’, British Vogue, December 2006, cover H. Koda & K. Yohannan, The Model as Muse: Embodying Fashion, New York: The MET, 2009, p. 27 N. Angeletti & A. Oliva, In Vogue: The Illustrated History of the World’s Most Famous Fashion Magazine, New York: Rizzoli, 2012, p. 129

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The legendary Irving Penn photographed at Vogue for over six decades, during which time he created an unprecedented 165 covers. The present image, Black and White Vogue Cover (Jean Patchett), graced the cover of the 1 April 1950 issue of American Vogue. It was not only his frst cover in black and white but also the magazine’s frst non-colour cover since May 1932. Vogue’s infuential Art Director Alexander Liberman called Penn’s photographs ‘stoppers’ for their arresting quality that would stop you in your tracks. This attribute is epitomised in Black and White Vogue Cover, which has undeniably become one of Penn’s most enduring images. At a time when his peers were creating fashion photographs with ornate settings, Penn’s seemingly minimalist approach was unconventional and distinctive. He replaced indulgent sets with plain backdrops that enabled him to extract the essence of his subjects. Black and White Vogue Cover perfectly exemplifes his emphasis on form, shape and line. The juxtaposition of black and white in this composition reveals his discerning eye and understanding of positive and negative space. Jean Patchett, the subject of this image and one of Penn’s favourite models, recalled his brilliance in constructing an entirely monochromatic vision: ‘My lips were black. I remember using eyebrow pencil on my lips.’

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Fig. 1. I Platini di Irving Penn: 25 Anni di Fotografia (Irving Penn Platinum Plates) Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna, Turin, 1975

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Part scientist, all artist, Penn experimented for years before arriving in 1967 at the perfect combination of platinum and palladium, which resulted in prints ‘far fner and sweeter’ than platinum alone. His unwavering dedication to the platinumpalladium process was demonstrated in his hand-coating of every print. ‘I myself brushed every single print,’ he recalls. ‘I’d be jealous of anyone else doing that. I printed many at night. I’d shake Lisa by the shoulder in bed. If she liked the picture, she’d reach up and pull me down for a kiss.’ Throughout his unparalleled career, Penn remained deeply interested in the printing process and the many ways in which a single negative can be interpreted. Black and White Vogue Cover was frst realised in platinumpalladium no later than 1968 in an edition of 34. It is likely that this image was one of the frst fashion images Penn printed using his newly perfected process. As indicated in his hand on the verso, the platinum-palladium print ofered here is the actual print that was exhibited in his frst international solo exhibition in 1975. Opening at Turin’s Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna (fg. 1) then travelling to Galleria d’Arte Moderna di Bologna (currently Museo d’Arte Moderna di Bologna) and London’s The Photographers’ Gallery, the show was dedicated to his platinum-palladium prints and featured fresh iterations of images he had originally created for Vogue. Later, in 1984, a gelatin silver edition not exceeding 16 was realised.

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In this provocative and erotically charged photograph by Helmut Newton, we are confronted by the quintessential Newton subject: a powerful nude woman wearing polished heels, lipstick, dark glasses and a net veil over her face, pointing a gun directly at the camera. She commands the space with an alluring and fantastical sensuality while projecting a calmly dominant and elegant air. By directing her gaze, and her gun, directly at us, Newton invites us to participate in the unfolding narrative of intrigue and seduction. This visually arresting image was taken in 1989 during a commissioned shoot for the frst calendar published by Max, the glossy Italian monthly magazine. The 1990 Max calendar, featuring 12 models photographed by Newton, included a variant image with the same nude holding the gun down for the month of March (fg. 1). In comparing these two versions of Panoramic Nude with Gun, the present image with the gun pointing at you can be read as the in-the-moment shot and the published image with the gun down as the moment afer. The Max calendar shoot took place at the Hotel Villa d’Este on Lake Como in Italy, considered to be one of the most beautiful examples of 16th century architecture. Newton had previously photographed there in 1975 and in 1980. The exclusivity of the location surely appealed to his desire to shoot in places ‘out of bounds for photographers’ (Helmut Newton: Work, 2000).

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Nearly a decade afer his Big Nudes, Newton created his Panoramic Nudes using a panoramic camera. These vertical panoramas were his version of the panoramic view. The model’s elongated body and the tall trunks of the palm trees reinforce the verticality of the composition. Four panoramic nudes from the 1990 Max calendar, including the image with the gun down, were published and exhibited in 1992 for Archives de Nuit. All four were also realised in an edition of 10 and an edition of 3. The vertical panorama ofered here measures 151.5 x 49.5 cm, which is the same size as the prints made in the edition of 3 of the published version. Newton has signed, titled and dated the verso of this print but it is not numbered. As of this writing, we do not know if this unpublished variant was realised in an edition and have not been able to locate any other prints of the image. This is a unique opportunity to rediscover this rare, possibly one-of, triumphant Panoramic Nude.

Fig. 1. Max 1990 Calendar, Milan: Rizzoli (March)

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‘Some people’s photography is an art. Mine is not. If they happen to be exhibited in a gallery or a museum, that’s fne. But that’s not why I do them. I’m a gun for hire.’ Helmut Newton, 2004

16. Helmut Newton

German-Australian 1920-2004

Panoramic Nude with Gun, Villa d’Este, Como, 1989 Gelatin silver print, fush-mounted. Image: 151.5 x 49.5 cm (59 5/8 x 19 1/2 in.) Frame: 170 x 69 cm (66 7/8 x 27 1/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. As of this writing, this work is the only known extant print of this unpublished variant. Estimate £250,000-350,000 $359,000-502,000 €289,000-405,000 ‡ Provenance Christie’s, New York, Photographs including the Property of Allegheny College, 27 April 2004, lot 371 Private Collection, Tokyo Literature Max Calendar, Milan: Rizzoli, 1990 (March), variant H. Newton, Archives du Nuit, Munich, Schirmer/Mosel, 1993, pl. 42, variant Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., variant Helmut Newton: Work, Cologne, Taschen, 2000, p. 227, variant

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O♦

17. Robert Mapplethorpe

American 1946-1989

Double Tiger Lily, 1977 Unique work, comprising two gelatin silver prints in artist’s original silk overmats and frame. Each image: 35.4 x 35.1 cm (13 7/8 x 13 7/8 in.) Frame: 58.3 x 107.5 cm (22 7/8 x 42 3/8 in.) Annotated ‘Lef’ and ‘Right’, respectively, in pencil on the reverse of each fush-mount. This work is unique. Estimate £150,000-250,000 $215,000-359,000 €174,000-289,000 ‡ Provenance Cheim & Read, New York, late 1990s Private Collection, Seoul Exhibited Flowers, Holly Solomon Gallery, New York, 12 - 30 November 1977 Mapplethorpe Retrospective, Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, 27 July - 23 October 1988 Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment, ICA, Philadelphia, 9 December 1988 - 29 January, 1989; Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, 25 February - 16 April 1989; Washington Projects for the Arts, Washington, D.C., 20 July - 13 August 1989; Wadsworth Atheneum, Hartford, CT, 21 October - 31 December

1989; University Art Museum, University of California, Berkeley, 17 January - 18 March 1990; Contemporary Arts Center, Cincinnati, OH, 7 April - 21 May 1990; ICA, Boston, 1 August - 4 October 1990 Robert Mapplethorpe, Tokyo Metropolitan Teien Museum, Tokyo, 2 June - 2 July 1992; Contemporary Art Gallery, Ibaraki, 18 July - 3 November 1993; Museum of Modern Art, Kamakura, 9 January - 7 February 1993; Nagoya City Art Museum, Nagoya, 13 February - 4 April 1993; Museum of Modern Art, Shiga, Otsu, 10 April - 23 May 1993; Weston Gallery, Tokyo Literature R. Marshall, Robert Mapplethorpe, New York: Whitney Museum of American Art, 1988, p. 58 J. Kardon, Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment, Philadelphia: ICA, 1989, p. 43 Robert Mapplethorpe, Tokyo: Asahi Shimbun, 1992, p. 68, pl. 26 Altars, London: Jonathan Cape, 1995, p. 63 Pistils, London: Jonathan Cape, 1996, p. 63 Mapplethorpe: The Complete Flowers, Düsseldorf: West Byfeet: teNeues, 2006, pls. 14-15 Mapplethorpe Flora: The Complete Flowers, London: Phaidon, 2016, pp. 280-281

Fig. 2. Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia, 1989

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‘I get something out of fowers that other people don’t get… I love the pictures of fowers more than I love real fowers.’ Robert Mapplethorpe

In 1977 Robert Mapplethorpe made his frst signifcant impact on the art world with his twin solo shows in New York: Portraits at Holly Solomon Gallery and a selection of male nudes and S&M images at The Kitchen. Later that year, Holly Solomon followed with Flowers, which debuted Double Tiger Lily, 1977, the unique, early masterwork ofered here. The total number of works included in the Flowers show is unknown. Aside from Tulips, 1977, which has twice appeared at auction, this is the only other known work from the show to date. Mapplethorpe embraced the sexuality of fowers and they were to become a permanent fxture in his oeuvre. His approach to fowers was similar to the way in which he photographed his human subjects in that he frequently isolated them in the frame as seen here. The elegant and charged lily, the subject of the present work, would feature prominently throughout his foral imagery. In Double Tiger Lily, he juxtaposes the shadowy realms of the lef image with a tonally light silk overmat, drawing out the halo of light that encircles the lily’s head. For the right-hand panel, he contrasts the lighter background of the close-up lily with a luxurious black silk overmat, underlining the dramatic nature of the composition. Double Tiger Lily demonstrates not only his exquisite handling of light and shadow but also his desire to reinforce the physicality of the work. At a time when the art market made clear distinctions between art and photography, Mapplethorpe sought to present his photographs as art with his intricate frames. For him, the frame was not merely the means by which to formally present a photograph, but formed a crucial part of his artistic practice. From the early 1970s, Mapplethorpe presented his artwork within expensive, custom designed wood frames and maintained a similarly discerning approach to the mats. He was known to spend hours at Bark Frameworks on Grand Street in New York (fg. 1), examining swatches of silk for the mats. ‘Robert’s frames were really more theatrical than anything else,’ observed owner Jared Bark, ‘but the mats also functioned as a door – a door to his inner life more than a window on the world’ (Mapplethorpe: A Biography, p. 179). Mapplethorpe’s selection of contrasting silk overmats for his dramatic Double Tiger Lily refects his refned and meticulous approach in the creation of his unique compositions. The significance of Double Tiger Lily within Mapplethorpe’s oeuvre is reflected in its impressive exhibition history. He selected this unique work to be included in two major retrospectives, both opening in 1988, just before the artist’s death, at the age of 42, from AIDS-related

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Fig. 1. Artist, gallery and exhibition labels and framer’s stamps on the reverse of the frame (detail)

complications. The frst was Robert Mapplethorpe, his maiden US retrospective, which opened at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York on 28 July and ran until 23 October 1988; the museum reported that it was one of the most highly attended events in its history. The second was Robert Mapplethorpe: The Perfect Moment, the groundbreaking and controversial exhibition that opened on 9 December 1988 at the Institute of Contemporary Art, Philadelphia (fg. 2) and then travelled to six other US cities: Chicago, Washington D.C., Hartford, Berkeley, Cincinnati and Boston. In 1992-93, Double Tiger Lily was also exhibited in his Japanese retrospective, which travelled to fve cities/prefectures in Japan. Acquired from Cheim & Read in the late 1990s, Double Tiger Lily, 1977, has been in the same private collection for two decades and is appearing at auction for the frst time.

Phillips Photographs extends our sincere thanks to the Robert Mapplethorpe Foundation and the Institute for Contemporary Art, Philadelphia for their assistance with our research.

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18. Peter Beard

American b. 1938

Downwind on the Tiva Lugga, Tsavo North near Kathamula, 1965 Unique mural-sized work, comprising gelatin silver print with ink and afxed gelatin silver, chromogenic, and Polaroid prints, with a feather, a sticker and a photocopied drawing, executed 2004. Sheet: 126.2 x 419.6 cm (49 5/8 x 165 1/4 in.) Frame: 149 x 442.3 cm (58 5/8 x 174 1/8 in.) Signed, dated and extensively annotated in ink on the recto; Peter Beard Studio copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso; signed in red ink on the reverse of the frame.

Provenance Fahey/Klein Gallery, Los Angeles, 2004 Private Collection, UK Literature Peter Beard, Cologne: Taschen, 2008, fg. no. 183, variant P. Beard, Zara’s Tales: Perilous Escapades in Equatorial Africa, New York: Knopf, 2004, pp. 56-57, variant

This work is unique. Estimate £150,000-250,000 $215,000-359,000 €174,000-289,000

If Peter Beard’s legendary 1965 publication The End of the Game could be condensed into a single work, it would be this monumental composition Downwind on the Tiva Lugga. Taken in 1965, the same year as the book’s release, the panoramic photograph at centre stage features the dry river Tiva in Kenya’s Tsavo region. At the time, Beard was working in Tsavo East National Park, where he witnessed and recorded the tragic die-of of elephants - the animal most deeply ingrained within The End of the Game. Yet contrary to his harrowing images of animal corpses and bones, this seemingly peaceful landscape recaptures ‘the life and spirit of a once unspoiled continent’. In this one moment captured by his camera, Africa’s wildlife exists in harmony with its natural environment. Written across the Kenyan sky in Beard’s distinctive hand are the words of British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace (1823 -1913): It seemed sad that, on the one hand, such exquisite creatures should live out their lives, doomed for ages yet to come to hopeless barbarism, while on the other hand, should civilised man ever reach those distant lands and bring moral, intellectual and physical light into the recesses of these virgin forests, we may be sure that he will so disturb the nicely balanced relations of organic and inorganic nature as to cause the disappearance and fnally the extinction of these very beings whose

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wonderful structure and beauty he alone is ftted to appreciate and enjoy (The Malay Archipelago, 1880). Beard’s appropriation of Wallace’s quote provides the narrative to this poignant work – man’s unique ability to appreciate and inevitably destroy the wonders of the natural world. Along the periphery of the composition is a collage of small photographs featuring traditional and Western hunters who came to Africa in the early 20th century to hunt big game. The intrusive presence and activities of these early Western hunters triggered an ecological and social disharmony that eventually resulted in the mass extinction of game in Africa. The struggle for dominance between man and animal, progress and nature as predicted by Beard back in 1965 continues to this very day. Downwind on the Tiva Lugga presents the quintessential Peter Beard – visual poet, alchemist, prophet – and epitomises his unique aesthetic and socially conscious approach. Once described as ‘Odysseus with a camera’, he is a visionary ahead of his time whose powerful work continues to resonate long afer its creation. Among the largest compositions created by Beard, the exceptional work ofered here has remained in the same collection since it was originally acquired in 2004 and is appearing at auction for the frst time.

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‘They are such small photographs, but each one is evidence that I have lived my life.’ Ishiuchi Miyako on this work

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Actual size

19. 石内都 Ishiuchi Miyako

Japanese b. 1947

絶唱 、横須賀ストーリー Yokosuka Story, 1976-1977 22 unique gelatin silver prints, printed 1979. Each sheet: 11.9 x 16.3 cm (4 5/8 x 6 3/8 in.) Each frame: 22 x 26 cm (8 5/8 x 10 1/4 in.) Each signed in rōmaji and dated in ink on the verso. This work is unique. These 22 prints were part of nearly 100 unique cabinet-card-sized prints of Yokosuka Story made by Ishiuchi in 1979 for a Nikon Salon exhibition in Paris that never materialised. Acquired by the present owner in 2010 – when these prints were frst made available – they represent the largest holding of this work in private hands. London’s Tate Modern acquired 40 prints in 2013 and the others are held privately and by the artist. This is the frst auction ofering of early prints from Yokosuka Story. Please note that the artist’s name appears in Japanese order with her surname before her forename. Estimate £70,000-90,000 $100,000-129,000 €81,000-104,000 ‡

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Provenance The Third Gallery Aya, Osaka Private Collection, Japan Exhibited 絶唱、横須賀ストーリー Yokosuka Story, Nikon Salon in Ginza, Tokyo, 26 April - 1 May, 1977, other prints From Yokosuka, 2nd New Yokosuka cabaret, Yokosuka, 29 April - 17 May 1981, other prints DuMont Foto 5: Die Japanische Photographie, Museum für Kunst und Gewerbe, Hamburg, 1984, other prints Ishiuchi Miyako: Postwar Shadows, Getty, Los Angeles, 6 October 2015 - 21 February 2016, other prints Literature Ishiuchi, 絶唱、横須賀ストーリー Yokosuka Story, Tokyo: Shashin Tsushinsha, 1979, pp. 10, 21, 24, 35, 41-42, 51, 56, 58, 83, variant crops Ishiuchi, Sweet Home Yokosuka 1976-1980, New York: PPP Editions, 2010, n.p., variant crops Ishiuchi Miyako: Postwar Shadows, Los Angeles: Getty, 2015, pl. 2, p. 34; pl. 11, p. 43, variant crops Ishiuchi Miyako: Grain & Image, Yokohama: Yokohama Museum of Art, 2017, pp. 228-229, variant crops

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‘Yokosuka was like a deeply haunting feeling of brutality, and onto hundreds of pure white photographic paper, I spewed it out in deep blacks.’ Ishiuchi Miyako in Yokosuka Story, 1979

In the autumn of 1976, Ishiuchi Miyako, a 29-year-old selftaught photographer, journeyed to her hometown of Yokosuka to photograph the port city where she had lived from the age of 6 until 19. Her 13 years in Yokosuka – the site of the largest U.S. naval base overseas – were tainted by grim memories of World War II and tensions caused by a dominant U.S. presence. It was her lingering loathing of Yokosuka that led her to choose it as the subject of her frst major project and photography was her tool of self-expression with which she purged her unwanted feelings and dark memories of her hometown. Her debut Yokosuka Story was born of this act of expelling her inner turmoil.

‘I am photographing the city of Yokosuka, but actually, I am not photographing the city of Yokosuka.’ Ishiuchi Miyako

In Yokosuka Story, Ishiuchi presents a fctional Yokosuka rendered in black and white. Dark, grainy and of-kilter, her photographs are quietly unsettling. Juxtapositions of close-up and faraway views, straight and oblique angles, derelict buildings and solitary fgures refect the tensions she felt growing up in the turbulent base town. On completing her project in March of 1977, Ishiuchi showed 100 Yokosuka photographs to Nobuyoshi Araki, whose introduction to Jun Miki, photographer and director of Nikon Salon, resulted in her maiden solo show 絶唱、横須賀ストーリー Yokosuka Story from 26 April to 1 May at Nikon Salon in Ginza, Tokyo. In 1978, Ishiuchi created the publishing company Shashin Tsūshinsha, fnanced with the three million yen her father had saved for her wedding, to self-publish her frst two photobooks, which included Yokosuka Story. The following year, 1979, was historically signifcant for Ishiuchi who became the frst woman to receive the Kimura Ihei Award, the most coveted photography award in Japan, and the only woman artist to

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be included in the group exhibition Japan: A Self-Portrait at the International Center of Photography in New York, which marked the frst presentation of her work abroad. This was also the same year in which she created the present work as part of nearly 100 unique cabinet-card-sized prints of Yokosuka Story for a Nikon Salon exhibition in Paris that never took place. Thin black borders frame each small photograph, and together, the 22 images can be read as a narrative – Ishiuchi’s own Yokosuka Story – woven with memories, experiences and histories.

‘I loved the darkroom. I took photographs so that I can be in the darkroom.’ Ishiuchi Miyako

For Ishiuchi, the tactile process of creating a photograph, an object, in the darkroom was highly personal and more important than the act of taking an image with a camera. Infuenced by her university education in weaving and textile dyeing, she focused on manipulating chemicals and exposure to create emotionally charged photographs. Her preferred language of grain, as seen in the photographs ofered here, was achieved through long hours spent in the darkroom. Her manipulation of the photographic image in the camera and in the darkroom enabled her to tell a personal story that also alludes to broader themes of alienation and disafection of urban life in post-war Japan, as well as beauty found in decay and in the shadows. Ishiuchi’s hometown of Yokosuka was the starting point of what would become a lifelong career in photography that began in 1975 and continues to this day. One of Japan’s leading artists, Ishiuchi represented Japan at the 2005 Venice Biennale and is a multiple award winner, including the 4th Kimura Ihei Award (1979), Japan’s Medal with Purple Ribbon (2013) and the Hasselblad Award (2014). Her work has been exhibited internationally since 1979 and recent museum retrospectives include Ishiuchi Miyako: Postwar Shadows at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles (2015-16) and Ishiuchi Miyako: Grain and Image at the Yokohama Museum of Art (2017-18). Her work is held in many prominent institutions, including the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; Yokohama Museum of Art; Tokyo Photographic Art Museum; J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art; The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; Museum of Modern Art, New York; and Tate Modern, London, which holds 40 unique cabinet-card-sized prints from Yokosuka Story.

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20. Kunié Sugiura

Japanese b. 1942

View from Dakota, executed 1979 Unique work in two parts, comprising gelatin silver emulsion and acrylic on canvas. 102 x 252 cm (40 1/8 x 99 1/4 in.) Signed, titled and dated in ink/pencil on the reverse of each canvas. This work is unique. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,700-43,000 €23,100-34,700 ‡ Provenance From the artist

from SAIC in 1967, Sugiura moved to New York, where she has lived and worked for the past fve decades. Her work was frst exhibited in 1972 in the Annual Exhibition of Contemporary American Painting at the Whitney Museum of American Art. As her creative process evolved, she discovered a new visual dynamic by arranging photographic images alongside monochrome paintings. In this body of work termed ‘photopainting’, Sugiura created a synergy between the two media.

‘Size matters. Material matters. Image matters.’ Kunié Sugiura

‘New York was very essential to me, I couldn’t think of being in another place. I appreciate the time I have spent here.’ Kunié Sugiura

In this remarkable work by New York-based Japanese artist Kunié Sugiura, two canvases are assembled side by side: one, measuring 191 cm wide, is painted with black acrylic and the other, measuring 102 cm high, is printed with a black-andwhite photograph. As the title suggests, the vertical view of the northwest corner of Central Park West, seen from an elevated perspective, was taken from the Dakota, Manhattan’s iconic co-operative building. Addressing the materiality of photographic emulsion in her work, Sugiura has combined photography and painting to create a unique visual experience. During the 1960s, Sugiura studied at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (SAIC) under Kenneth Josephson, who infuenced her to become the only undergraduate in her class to major in Photography. At a time when Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg were creating silkscreens on canvas, Sugiura began printing photographs onto canvas, driven by a desire to equate photography with painting. Afer graduating

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In order to print her photographs onto large canvases, Sugiura made her own liquid gelatin silver emulsion, with which she coated the canvas. She then exposed the photosensitive surface by using a black-and-white negative in an enlarger and a projector. Due to the large size of the canvas, the developing process involved directly applying the chemicals onto the surface. ‘I like to put enough photo emulsion on the canvas so I can get the images, but it’s not important to me whether it’s perfect or not,’ she explains. ‘Maybe that’s because I like things like kintsugi, which are broken [ceramics] but repaired with gold. It’s a Japanese idea.’ The resulting work bears the marks of its creation, challenging the idea that beauty is synonymous with perfection. View from Dakota is among the largest of Sugiura’s unique ‘photo-paintings’ and is her most signifcant work to be ofered at auction. Sugiura has exhibited internationally and her work resides in many prominent institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo; and Tate Modern, London. Her frst major retrospective will be held at the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum from 24 July to 24 September 2018.

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21. 西村多美子 Tamiko Nishimura Japanese b. 1948 しきしま Shikishima, 1970-1971 Unique gelatin silver triptych, printed 1971 Each: 36 x 42.8 cm (14 1/8 x 16 7/8 in.) Each signed in rōmaji, titled and dated in Japanese/English, all in pencil on the verso. Accompanied by a signed copy of Shikishima (Tokyo Photographic School, 1973). This is a unique triptych. Each print, made by Nishimura in 1971, is unique in this size. Aside from the present work, three small press prints – one per image – are known to exist and are held privately.

‘I think I’ve been drawn to what lies beyond the union of seer and seen, wanting to give shape to things that fall apart soon after they’re photographed. Or perhaps it’s the inefable attraction to the unseen. Only lately, very faintly, do these things occur to me.’ Tamiko Nishimura, 2012

Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,500 €11,600-17,400 ‡ Provenance From the artist Literature Camera Mainichi, November 1971 (Aomori), variant crop D. Moriyama, Kagero [Mayfy], Tokyo: Haga Books, 1972, n.p. (Uchinada), variant crop T. Nishimura, しきしま Shikishima, Tokyo: Tokyo Photographic School, 1973, n.p., variant crops T. Nishimura, しきしま Shikishima, Tokyo: Zen Foto Gallery, 2014, n.p. , variant crops M. Parr & G. Badger, The Photobook: A History, Volume III, London: Phaidon, 2014, p. 117 (photobook) R. Kaneko et al., The Japanese Photobook, 1912–1990, Gottingen: Steidl, 2017, pl. 258, p. 347 (photobook) T. Nishimura, しきしま Shikshima, Tokyo Photographic School, 1973

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This unique しきしま Shikishima triptych by Tamiko Nishimura consists of three highly emotive photographs taken in 1970-71 during her travels in the Hokkaidō, Tōhoku and Hokuriku regions of Japan. Her longing to visit these faraway places began during her childhood in Tokyo and her fascination with pictures of snowy landscapes and matsuri [festivals] depicted on the postcards her father would send her from his frequent business trips. Afer graduating from Tokyo Photographic College (currently Tokyo Visual Arts College) in 1969, the 21-year-old Nishimura set of on her frst of many journeys around Japan. The lef image of empty railway tracks was taken in spring 1971 in Asahikawa, Hokkaidō, the northernmost of Japan’s four main islands. Of this photograph, Nishimura remembers, ‘I was fascinated by the open landscape. Looking at the empty tracks, I imagined that the end of the line was Cape Sōya, the northernmost point of the island of Hokkaidō.’ The young woman in the centre was taken in summer 1970 in Aomori prefecture in Tōhoku region of Northeast Japan. She recalls, ‘I was photographing while in a taxi using a telephoto lens. When the taxi stopped at a red light, a face of a woman standing on the pavement jumped into my frame and I pressed the shutter. It was a feeting moment so this is the only shot.’ On the right is an almost abstract seascape taken in winter 1970 in Ishikawa prefecture in Hokuriku region of Northwest Japan. She visited the Uchinada sand dunes, where this image was shot, to see the relics of the ammunition storage facilities, which played a part in the 1952 ‘Uchinada Battle’ and the ensuing anti-US military base campaign. Afer her Hokkaidō trip in spring 1971, Nishimura returned to Tokyo where she printed the three large prints ofered here. Using lefover photographic papers from her 1969 graduation exhibition, she printed her three most favourite images at the time, representing three separate journeys, and pinned them to her wall at home. The pinholes, which are visible in the corners of each print, reveal the history of these prints. In 1972 she received an unexpected call from her alma mater Tokyo Photographic College with an ofer to publish her frst photobook, which resulted in しきしま Shikishima

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(1973), now a rare photobook. The title is an epithet used in classical Japanese Waka poetry for Yamato, the ancient name for Japan, and the book showcases her series of photographs taken in 1969-72 on her journeys around Japan’s Hokkaidō, Tōhoku, Hokuriku, Kantō, Kansai and Chūgoku regions. Working on image selection, sequencing and editorial design, Nishimura self-produced Shikishima. In the same year, her Uchinada seascape was published in Daidō Moriyama’s Kagerō [Mayfy] (1972), his photobook of nudes. She remembers that Moriyama came across her photographs while they were working on their respective book projects and requested two of her landscapes to include in Kagerō. Nishimura met Moriyama, Kōji Taki and Takuma Nakahira, three highly infuential members of the Provoke movement, in 1969 and assisted them in the darkroom and on shoots in between her travels up until 1971-72. Looking back on her career, Nishimura describes it as a sequence of journeys. At the end of one journey, she would return to Tokyo to earn money by publishing her photographs in magazines and in books. Once she had earned enough, she would set of again. Contrary to her male contemporaries, who were focused on releasing photobooks and exhibiting work, Nishimura continued with her nomadic lifestyle. In the preface to Shikishima, she writes: The weather changed ofen, with strong winds, sunshine, clouds and rain. I was strongly attracted by how the light shined, by the smell of fowers, and just by the atmosphere of the place, rather than what I actually saw. Even if I walk through the same place every day, each walk would be diferent, depending on whom I meet or how the light shines. It is not particularly about visiting somewhere new. Nishimura’s language of expression is poetic, spiritual and deeply personal, as discerned in this unique, early triptych. This is an unparalleled opportunity to acquire an important early work by Tamiko Nishimura, still relatively unknown outside of Japan, as the market for Japanese photography of the 1970s continues to unfold.

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22. Tomoko Sawada

Japanese b. 1977

School Days, 2004 Chromogenic diptych, each fush-mounted. Each image: 108 x 150 cm (42 1/2 x 59 in.) Each frame: 116.5 x 158.5 cm (45 7/8 x 62 3/8 in.) Each signed, numbered AP 2/2 in ink, printed title and date on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Signed in ink, printed title, date and number AP2 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Each print is AP2 from the sold-out edition of 3 + 2 AP. Each image is sold out in all sizes and editions. Estimate £25,000-35,000 $35,900-50,200 €28,900-40,500 ‡ Provenance From the artist Exhibited The Yebisu International Festival for Art & Alternative Visions 2017, Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, Tokyo, 10 - 26 February 2017, other prints Snacks, Power Station of Art, Shanghai, 16 July - 16 October 2016, other prints Tomoka Sawada, Kulturhuset, Stockholm, 5 November 2010 - 30 January 2011, other prints Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan, International Center for Photography, New York, 16 May - 7 September 2008, other prints Literature T. Sawada, School Days, Kyoto: Seigensha Art Publishing, 2006, n.p. C. Phillips & N. Fuku, Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan, New York: International Center of Photography, 2008, pp. 180-183

In School Days, 2004, Tomoko Sawada uses images of herself to reference the biannual class photographs that she endured throughout her six years at an all-girls school in Kobe, Japan. She recalls that the frst class photo would be taken in the spring, the start of the new school year in Japan, and the second one would be taken in early summer to correspond with the change in uniform. As seen in the present images, the spring version included sakura [cherry blossom], a symbol of the season in Japan, and the summer version showed green foliage. To create the 10 variations in the series, Sawada hired diferent sets of uniforms and other clothing to play 400 students and 10 teachers in total. The painstaking and laborious image-making process involved photographing herself 410 times – each time with subtle physical, sartorial or gestural distinctions – and the background images at her alma mater then digitally stitching them together. The School Days diptych was originally conceived for the 2008 Heavy Light: Recent Photography and Video from Japan at the International Center of Photography, New York. Sawada selected these two images, showing spring and summer, to represent her series and enlarged them to be exhibited at the ICP. Following the show, the diptych was released in an edition of 3 + 2 AP. In the oversized photographs ofered here, the individual character traits as portrayed by Sawada emerge as each fgure engages in a quiet struggle to manifest her unique identity against the group. Sawada is a recipient of various awards, including ICP’s Infnity Award (2004) and Japan’s prestigious Kimura Ihei Award (2004). Her work has been exhibited globally and resides in numerous institutions, including MoMA, New York; ICP, New York; and Brooklyn Museum. Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, SFMOMA and Getty Museum, Los Angeles, hold small-format School Days prints from the edition of 15. This is the frst time that the School Days diptych is appearing at auction.

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23. Mika Ninagawa

Japanese b. 1972

earthly fowers, heavenly colors, executed 2018 Unique installation, comprising two chromogenic prints and two wall vinyl. Each image: 181.3 x 120.8 cm (71 3/8 x 47 1/2 in.) Each frame: 186 x 125.4 cm (73 1/4 x 49 3/8 in.) Each vinyl: variable size up to 250 x 166.6 cm (98 3/8 x 65 5/8 in.) maximum Signed in ink, printed title and date on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. This installation is unique and site specifc. Please note that the two wall vinyl will be printed afer the sale to the owner’s specifcations within the dimensions referenced above and can only be installed once. Estimate £30,000-50,000 $43,000-71,700 €34,700-57,900 ‡

In our frst Evening edition of ULTIMATE, we are thrilled to premiere earthly fowers, heavenly colors, 2018, a unique, site-specifc installation by Mika Ninagawa. The subject sakura [cherry blossoms] is one of the artist’s signature motifs. In this dynamic work, seemingly contrasting notions of life and death, natural and artifcial, traditional and contemporary converge. Through this portal, we are invited to enter Ninagawa’s distinctive world, populated by vivid colours and dense imagery. In Mika Ninagawa: In Conversation, Phillips’ Yuka Yamaji and the artist discussed beginnings, her springtime addiction to sakura and why she photographs.

Provenance From the artist Literature M. Ninagawa, 桜 /Sakura, Tokyo : Kawade Shobō Shinsha, 2011, n.p., variant crops M. Ninagawa, earthly fowers, heavenly colors, Tokyo: Matori Publishing, 2017, n.p., variant crops

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Mika Ninagawa: In Conversation

For over two decades, Mika Ninagawa has walked her own path, becoming the frst and only woman photographer to have attained pop icon status in Japan. Daughter of acclaimed theatre director Yukio Ninagawa, she frst came to prominence in the late 1990s as one of the leading lights of Japan’s ‘Girly Photo’ movement. Her work was frst exhibited outside Japan in 1997 at the iconic Parisian concept store Colette, and in 2001, at the age of 29, she received the 26th Kimura Ihei Award (Japan’s most prestigious photography award). Since then, Ninagawa has gone on to set new museum attendance records in Japan with her travelling exhibition Mika Ninagawa: earthly fowers, heavenly colors in 2008-10, as well as in Taiwan with her frst overseas retrospective, which was presented at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Taipei in 2016. Branching out into flmmaking in 2006, Ninagawa has directed two successful feature flms to date – Sakuran (2007) and Helter Skelter (2012) – and is set to release two new flms in 2019. In 2014, she was appointed to the executive board of the 2020 Tokyo Organising Committee for the Olympic and Paralympic Games by virtue of her contributions to Japanese art and culture. Ninagawa has published extensively, including nearly 100 photobooks to date, and her work is held in many prominent collections, which include the Tokyo Photographic Art Museum, Huis Marseille, Amsterdam and UBS Art Collection.

Beginnings. Yuka Yamaji: When we were walking together in London on your recent visit, we kept losing you whenever something would catch your eye and you would stop to shoot it. When did you frst realise that you were addicted to photography? Mika Ninagawa: I was in primary school. My father was a theatre director and my mother was an actress, so I wanted to become a person who

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Mika Ninagawa

can express something as soon as possible. I think it was a very primitive desire, a feeling close to impatience. I did a lot of things like drawing and crafing but taking photographs became a special thing.

YY: And what kind of pictures were you taking? MN: When I was about 10 years old, I used an ordinary point-and-shoot camera to photograph my own refections in the mirror or my muchloved Barbie dolls on top of volcanic rocks, which I also loved! [Laughs]

YY: What drew you to this particular medium? MN: How emotion and expression are directly connected... my emotions were captured, as if no impurities existed between what I felt and the camera, and that made me become increasingly addicted to photography. Even to this day, when I concentrate, I feel the boundary between what I am shooting and myself gently disappearing.

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YY: Tokyo in the late 1990s saw the rise of「女 の子写真」[Onnanoko shashin], the ‘Girly Photo’ movement, which was characterised by images refecting the personal and the everyday taken by young women photographers and you were brought into the limelight as one of its stars. What was that like? MN: Because I wanted to quickly become a person who expressed something, it was a very lucky movement for me. But at the same time, I was in a very dangerous situation of being easily consumed. I was conscious of that from the onset. But I also thought that if I were to be consumed by this then it was just that, so I consciously decided to ride the fow. It was a trend, but it was also a chance for my work to be seen.

YY: Did you identify yourself with this movement and with your contemporaries Yurie Nagashima and Hiromix? Did you feel then that you were part of a shared female experience? MN: I don’t know about the other two, but I think that each of us harboured complicated feelings. And I imagine it was quite difcult to swim without being swallowed by that current as I don’t think most of the legions of ‘girly’ photographers who were there at the time are still working today.

desires, the intense envy of the boys, the fact of being a woman – have greatly influenced my photographs that followed, as well as the movies I make.

YY: In 2001, you became a recipient of the 26th Kimura Ihei Award together with Yurie Nagashima and Hiromix. It was the first and the only time that the award was given to three photographers – to three young women photographers. How was that experience? You were only 29 at the time? MN: I thought, ‘Why am I not alone?’ I felt very dissatisfied. But I wanted to use this experience as a springboard for becoming an unrivalled existence.

YY: Did you see an immediate impact? MN: My photobook sold well. [Laughs] It also increased name recognition.

earthly fowers, heavenly colors.

YY: How did ‘Girly Photo’ begin?

YY: This is your frst installation that has been conceived and executed as a stand-alone work, outside of an exhibition context. What drew you to create this installation?

MN: I think it was the same for everyone… they

MN: When I’m focused on shooting, I sometimes

started not because it was a fad, but there was this atmosphere at the time, and many young women incidentally started to photograph. Taking a photograph was somehow seen as something ‘sparkly’.

feel that I am becoming more and more absorbed into the scenery seen from the viewfnder. For instance, if I’m photographing cherry blossoms, it’s as if I’m inside the cherry blossom or I’ve become the cherry blossom, existing at the boundary between this world and the other world. This feeling of my own contours melting… that nothing else exists in this world besides myself and what is photographed is unique to this process. I started this installation in order to experience this feeling and to share it.

YY: How do you see this experience today, 20 years later? MN: The experience of being in that whirlpool of craze was a good one. All that I felt at the time – the fear of being consumed, people’s

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Mika Ninagawa: In Conversation

YY: Your installation is called earthly fowers, heavenly colors. What is the meaning behind your title? MN: The title refers to that boundary between the two worlds where I sometimes fnd myself when shooting. Heaven and earth are closer than we imagine. Heavenly views can be found in the everyday as long as you can spot them.

YY: In the featured work, you have layered diferent images, colours, forms, perspective and materials. How did you arrive at the concept of layering in your installations?

YY: In Japanese history, culture and art, sakura is richly symbolic. MN: There is a legend in Japan that corpses are buried under the sakura trees. It comes from the opening line of the short story ‘Under the Cherry Trees’ by the modernist Motojirō Kajii. Sakura is a fower with mysterious appeal and one is convinced that there should be a reason why they can bloom such frighteningly beautiful fowers. YY: What meaning does it hold for you? MN: I photograph sakura every year, and each

MN: When we experience something, a lot of information comes in at the same time and it all becomes one experience. I sometimes show a single photograph but it’s more common for me to show a number of images together.

YY: The ‘earthly fower’ represented in this work is sakura [cherry blossom]. When I read your father Yukio Ninagawa’s obituary in The Guardian, it mentioned that his frst theatre production in the UK was Macbeth at the 1985 Edinburgh festival that caused a sensation with its cherry blossom-flled visual imagery. Do you recall when you frst saw this production? MN: My father’s Macbeth premiered in 1980, so I was eight years old at the time. In the opening scene, the threatening yet beautiful sakura seems almost alive as it sways in the wind and its petals fall… a frighteningly beautiful image of sakura.

year, what I capture is surprisingly diferent, which is one of its distinctive features. For me, photographing sakura is akin to the act of digging out my insides. By photographing the same motif over and over again, I feel that I’m getting closer to my inner self. When spring comes, I have to bear the suspense of wondering when sakura will bloom. During the sakura season, I run around photographing it.

YY: How is this year’s sakura? MN: I’ve just come back from photographing it. Sakura in Japan is in full bloom right now and I’m shooting it from early morning until evening. I can only imagine that I’m possessed by something. [Laughs] During this time, it feels as if I’m photographing until I collapse. I’m struggling to express in words the sense of unity or the enjoyable sensation of ‘I feel good’ that can only be experienced when photographing sakura.

YY: It’s clear that you vividly remember the sublime imagery of sakura. Did it somehow inform your own gravitation to sakura in your image-making? MN: That imagery is likely one of the reasons why I continue to relentlessly photograph sakura.

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Mika Ninagawa Museum of Contemporary Art Taipei, 2016

Image-Maker. YY: How has being born and raised in Tokyo shaped you as an image-maker? And how does it inform your creative output?

YY: You are renowned and sought after for your unique vision and distinctive visual language. Why do you think audiences fnd your world so alluring and intoxicating?

MN: Being born and raised in Tokyo where all sorts of things are mixed and consumed at a tremendous speed has greatly infuenced my creations. Human desire is one of my big themes and that to me is a very Tokyo-related theme. As a counterpart to Tokyo’s modernity, Japan’s traditional sense of beauty, the colours found in woodblock prints and kimonos, for example, are also my inspirations.

YY: You have achieved success in a number of industries, including art, flm, fashion and music. For a new audience being introduced to you and your work, how would you describe your creative process? MN: Photography is my foundation but I don’t believe in tying myself down or creating taboos. The idea that something must be a certain way hinders creativity. Even the thought of wanting to take a good picture is a hindrance. My creative process is closely aligned with a more primitive, intuitive and personal feeling… no extra thoughts are needed between the camera and myself.

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MN: Why do they think so? [Laughs] I don’t quite understand it myself. What I do know is that when I press the shutter, I want to imprint what I am feeling. YY: Since your debut in the late 1990s, you have continued to photograph on a near daily basis and have published nearly 100 photobooks to date. Why are you so dedicated to creating photographs? MN: Hmmm, I don’t know. But there are many things that can only be obtained through this process. It’s a very primitive emotion and I cannot think of the option of not photographing. YY: Lastly, what does photography mean to you? MN: It’s part of being alive… and a good portion at that.

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24

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25

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24. Calavas Frères (publishers) French, active 1875-1930 Lace, 1875-1890s Unique cyanotype photogram. Sheet: 92.2 x 49.5 cm (36 1/4 x 19 1/2 in.) Frame: 112.8 x 69.5 cm (44 3/8 x 27 3/8 in.) Plate number in the image. This work is unique. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,500 €11,600-17,400

While the cyanotype is one of the earliest photographic processes it has never outlived its appeal to artists and photographers. Christian Marclay, Robert Rauschenberg and Walead Beshty, among many others, have used this old but exceedingly fexible technique to create entirely new imagery. The remarkably large and striking cyanotype ofered here, created over one hundred years ago, is strikingly contemporary in its size and dramatic impact. It is a perfect illustration of the clarity and beauty the technique was capable of achieving in the hands of an expert practitioner. This cyanotype was originally made to document and showcase a sample of Point de Gaze lace. It is a photogram, made without the use of a camera by laying the lace directly onto sensitised paper and exposing it to light. Where the lace prevented light from reaching the paper a white image was created; where the paper was exposed to light it produced the vivid and distinctive Prussian blue colour that is the hallmark of the cyanotype. White pigment seems to have been carefully applied to some of the more intricate details in order to make the white outlines of the delicate foral lace pattern form a bold contrast against the majestic blue background. Technically and aesthetically, the cyanotype was the ideal medium to portray this sample of lace whose patterns cascade dramatically across the deep blue background.

Publisher’s label on the front pastedown in the original album (not included)

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In the late 19th Century, Calavas Frères published several folios and books of photographs for artists’ reference, notably fgure studies by Louis Igout. The frm also produced books relating to textiles, including lace, leather, and blinds. The present cyanotype photogram was originally published within a lavish album of lace samples. The exceptional scale of this work distinguishes it from other smaller examples. A slightly smaller cyanotype from the same album is held in the collection of the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

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25. Bruno V. Roels

Belgian b. 1976

A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree (672 Tiny Explosions), 2015 Unique work, comprising 672 gelatin silver prints mounted to board. Overall: 148 x 88.3 cm (58 1/4 x 34 3/4 in.) Frame: 179 x 109 cm (70 1/2 x 42 7/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in ink on the reverse of the mount. This work is unique. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,500-28,700 €17,400-23,100 ‡ ♠ Provenance Gallery FIFTY ONE, Antwerp Private Collection, Beirut Literature Bruno V. Roels: I Dreamt an Island, Antwerp: Gallery FIFTY ONE, 2015, pp. 82-83

672 tiny iterations of a palm tree’s fronds explode out of the frame, a dark swathe of prints cutting through the sofly toned upper and lower sections, producing a layer of visual abstraction. In A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree (672 Tiny Explosions) Bruno V. Roels creates a multifaceted composition from the repetition of a single image printed from one negative. Using darkroom techniques such as toning, solarising, dodging and burning, he prints a single motif in multiple variations. Each print is warm toned to avoid harsh contrasts and the imperfections in its trimming reveal the physical process of creation. Roels plays with photography’s inherent capability of infnite replication, reproducing a single image, in the case of the present work 672 times, and mounting them together in a grid to form a unifed work: ‘the irony is that by using the essence of photography (it can be reproduced) I create “original” pieces: it is impossible for me to make the same composition twice.’ The title A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree is A Palm Tree is a play on Gertrude Stein’s famous phrase ‘A Rose is a rose is a rose is a rose’, which Roels says highlights how ‘the name of a thing already invokes the imagery and emotions associated with it.’ The palm tree is a recurring motif in his work. Rather than photographing the entire plant, he prefers to focus on a detail. For him ‘palm trees evoke history, exotic locations, luxury, freedom, an Indiana-Jones-like mystery’. To date, the work ofered here is one of only three containing 600 to 700 prints and is the largest in terms of overall size; the other two works are held privately. Roels has exhibited widely and his work is held in various collections, including Milwaukee Art Museum and The Walther Collection, New York/Neu-Ulm.

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26. Tommy Ton

Canadian b. 1984

Werk! Qweens, 2017 Unique polyptych, comprising nine chromogenic prints, each fush-mounted. Each image: 59.5 x 48.6 cm (23 3/8 x 19 1/8 in.) Each frame: 65.5 x 54.6 cm (25 3/4 x 21 1/2 in.) Overall: 200.5 x 167.8 cm (78 7/8 x 66 1/8 in.) Signed and dated in ink, printed title and date on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. This work is unique. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,700-43,000 €23,100-34,700 Provenance From the artist Top: Meatball, Stephon ‘Steph’ Mendoza, Diana Dash Middle: Merrie Cherry, Shea Coulée, Unknown Bottom: Kim Chi, Unknown, Aja

The nine captivating photographs in Werk! Qweens were taken by Tommy Ton, one of the world’s most infuential street style photographers, outside the frst RuPaul DragCon in New York City in September 2017. Founded by RuPaul, one of America’s most famous drag performers, DragCon is the world’s largest drag convention and the event of the season for drag queens and their fans. Ton was there to record the vibrant colours and the energy as the drag queens focked to the streets. Stephon ‘Steph’ Mendoza poses elegantly in one of his signature hats while Brooklyn-based drag queen Merrie Cherry dances on the crosswalk. Shea Coulée, a former RuPaul Drag Race contestant and musician, stands her ground in the middle of the street, her blue fur coat billowing out behind her. Aja, another former RuPaul Drag Race contestant and founding member of the Haus of Aja, poses for the camera before dashing behind the parked cars. With his candid, witty and instinctive approach, Ton captures how fashion is used as an expression of individual creativity and identity. Since the launch of his fashion blog Jak & Jil (now tommyton.com) in 2007, Ton has continued to push the boundaries of street style photography, paving the way for a new digital generation. As seen in the present work, he is inspired by how people express themselves in the streets and his deep fascination with fashion infuences his eye for detail. Ton’s images have been widely published, appearing in The New York Times and The Boston Globe, as well as on Style.com and GQ.com. He has collaborated with many global brands, including Louis Vuitton, Michael Kors and Swarovski and is active as a social media infuencer with a unique take on fashion and culture. This unique work by Ton has been created exclusively for ULTIMATE and is available for sale for the frst time.

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27. Kim Heewon

Korean b. 1982

Someone’s Chandelier 01, 2013 4K video, 75 inch LED display, black wood frame, custom electronics and installation instructions. Duration: 7:50:16 hours Monitor: 168.9 x 97.1 x 6.6 cm (66 1/2 x 38 1/4 x 2 5/8 in.) Frame: 173.5 x 102.5 x 7 cm (68 1/4 x 40 3/8 x 2 3/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number AP1 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. This work is AP1 from the sold-out edition of 6 + 1 AP. Please note that the artist’s name appears in Korean order with his surname before his forename. Estimate £15,000-25,000 $21,500-35,900 €17,400-28,900 Provenance From the artist

We commence with darkness. A hand holding a lit match enters the frame and slowly lights the candles one by one. For over seven hours the candles of the two-tiered chandelier burn until each one has burned out, returning to darkness. Kim Heewon’s Someone’s Chandelier 01 is a stunning video work that represents its subject in actual scale and in real time. This hypnotic work induces a feeling of tranquillity in the viewer as the candles gently burn and the light fades. While living in Paris in the early days of his practice, Kim Heewon deliberately turned of his electricity, choosing to live by candlelight. Fascinated by the fickering light and how it made him feel, he embarked on this on-going series, which began with candles then evolved into chandeliers – a larger light source and a symbol of luxury in a bygone era. His use of the latest technologies to evoke certain emotions associated with the past enabled him ‘to connect the past to the present both in function and communication.’ The present work is the frst chandelier video in the series. The chandelier, featured in the video, was sourced by a European antique collector in Korea and the flming took more than three days: The average burning time for a candle is seven hours, but there are so many variables – the wax may melt in the wrong way distorting the visibility, for example, or some candles may burn faster or longer than others – that it takes an extensive amount of additional time adjusting and re-flming.

Stills from Someone’s Chandelier 01

Kim Heewon is a multimedia artist whose creative output spans multiple felds, including photography, video and design. In 2012 he collaborated with Moss, New York’s legendary design mecca, for the Venice Architecture Biennale and his work has been exhibited at Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris and National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art in Korea. His work resides in various collections, including Rossana Orlandi Collection, Italy and National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art, Korea. 00:00:20

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Photographs Day Sale Lots 28 – 172, 3pm UK_PHOTOGRAPHS_APR18_56-105.indd 62

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Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

The career of Michel Strauss is not to be underestimated. During his near 40 years in the Impressionist and Modern Art Department at Sotheby’s London, he was at the forefront of the market and its expansion into what it is today. At the age of 25, the Frenchman joined the Department frst as a Cataloguer, swifly rose to Department Head, then Chairman, and was involved in some of Sotheby’s most important and highest-grossing sales. Michel was brought up with a deep respect and admiration for art. This was a genetic inheritance from his grandfather Jules Strauss, a distinguished collector of Impressionist painting, and his grandmother who taught him that to truly appreciate an artwork, one frst had to touch it – a tendency that did not delight the guards of the Louvre. The guiding principle behind Michel and Sally’s Contemporary Photography Collection is deeply rooted in the appreciation of the Renaissance. It was Isaiah Berlin, Michel’s step-father and a visiting professor, who encouraged the young Michel to study Art History at Harvard, sparking a lifelong interest that would shape the content of the Collection. Key Renaissance motifs are featured prominently and reverberate throughout the Collection. From the immensity of landscapes in Cliford Ross’s Mountain III (lot 31) and Elger Esser’s Loire et Cher (lot 32) to the exploration of light and shadow in James Casebere’s Green Staircase #1 (lot 35) and the ornate interiors of Matthias Schaller’s Controfacciata, Palazzo Mocenigo (lot 36), Michel and Sally have assembled works by acclaimed contemporary artists whose recognition and interpretation of their own art historical heritage refect the Strauss’s own fascination and passion in collecting works of this premier calibre. A visionary in the realm of art, Michel Strauss has integrated his vast knowledge and acute sensibility to consistently stay at the cutting edge of the feld. His unique vision predicted and directed the rhythm and fow in his professional endeavours, and it is with that same insight and discernment that this collection has been lovingly and thoughtfully created. This sale represents a rare opportunity for collectors to acquire exemplary photographs from contemporary artists who are being cemented as the prolifc image-makers of the 21st century.

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28. Edward Burtynsky

b. 1955

Rice Terraces #2, Western Yunnan Province, China, 2012 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 121.5 x 162.8 cm (47 7/8 x 64 1/8 in.) Frame: 124.5 x 165.3 cm (49 x 65 1/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/6 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 †

How does water shape us? And how do we shape water? Edward Burtynsky has spent the best part of 30 years examining man’s relationship to the natural world. In Water, his most recent body of work, he presents us with breathtaking aerial views in an attempt to answer such questions. This image is appearing at auction for the frst time.

Provenance Flowers Gallery, London, 2013 Literature Burtynsky Water, Gottingen: Steidl, 2013, p. 131

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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29. Michael Wolf

b. 1954

Architecture of Density #119, 2009 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 177 x 239.6 cm (69 5/8 x 94 3/8 in.) Frame: 186 x 248.5 cm (73 1/4 x 97 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/3 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 ♠ † Provenance Flowers Gallery, London, 2014

In a city where the only way to build is up, Michael Wolf depicts the immensity of Hong Kong’s architecture. Using specifc stylistic devices to eliminate horizon and sky, Wolf creates a metaphor for the megacity; the vastness of the buildings remains elusive to our eyes. Works from this series featured in his recent major retrospective at the Fotomuseum den Haag, The Hague (20 January – 22 April 2018), and was premiered during the 2017 Rencontres de la Photographie d’Arles.

Literature M. Wolf, Architecture of Density, Hong Kong: Asia One Books, 2014, p. 33 Michael Wolf Works, Berlin: Peperoni Books, 2017, pp. 70-71

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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‘Mountain Redux is an attempt to depict my subjective reaction to the landscape of Mount Sopris – an attempt to reach a deeper truth.’

31

Cliford Ross

30

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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30. Cliford Ross

b. 1952

31. Cliford Ross

b. 1952

Hurricane XVII, 2000 Gelatin silver print, fush-mounted. Image: 89 x 111.3 cm (35 x 43 7/8 in.) Frame: 126 x 153.4 cm (49 5/8 x 60 3/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 4/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Mountain III, 2005 Mural-sized chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 150 x 299 cm (59 x 117 3/4 in.) Frame: 180 x 330 cm (70 7/8 x 129 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/6 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount.

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900

Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 †

Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York, 2002

Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York, 2012

Literature C. Ross, Wave Music, New York: Aperture, 2005, n.p. C. Ross, Seen and Imagined: The World of Cliford Ross, Massachusetts: Mass MoCA, 2015, p. 68

Literature C. Ross, Seen and Imagined: The World of Cliford Ross, Massachusetts: Mass MoCA, 2015, p. 194

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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32. Elger Esser

b. 1967

Loire et Cher, Frankreich, 2000 Chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 138.2 x 192 cm (54 3/8 x 75 5/8 in.) Frame: 184 x 236.7 cm (72 1/2 x 93 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/7 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 ♠ Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York, 2001

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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33. Nadav Kander

b. 1961

Chongqing IV (Sunday Picnic), Chongqing Municipality, 2006 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 116.3 x 148.3 cm (45 3/4 x 58 3/8 in.) Frame: 150 x 183 cm (59 x 72 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/3 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 ♠ Provenance Flowers Gallery, London, 2009 Literature S. Barber & P. Pictet, Earth, Kempen: TeNeues, 2009, cover (variant), p. 66

The tranquillity of the vast Yangtze River is contrasted by the miniaturised human presence, reminding us of the historic connection between the people and this indomitable waterway. An image whose classical references have led Michel Strauss to nickname it Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe, this Sunday picnic is a key work from the Yangtze, The Long River series and showcases Kander’s desire to parallel the insignifcance of man with the might of nature. In 2009, Kander won the Prix Pictet for his portfolio submission of Yangzte, The Long River, in which this image featured prominently.

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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34. Robert Polidori

b. 1951

La Méridienne, Marie-Antoinette’s Bed, Château de Versailles, France, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 162.2 x 130.1 cm (63 7/8 x 51 1/4 in.) Frame: 186.4 x 155.7 cm (73 3/8 x 61 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/5 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ♠

Robert Polidori’s love afair with the Château de Versailles began in 1985, when he won an exclusive contract to document its restoration. In Versailles, a project which has spanned over 30 years, Polidori captures the decadence, extravagance and ultimate transformation of the palace from a symbol of monarchy to a modern museum. La Méridienne was so named for MarieAntoinette’s fondness for taking a rest at midday.

Provenance Edwynn Houk Gallery, New York, 2009

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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35. James Casebere

b. 1953

Green Staircase #1, 2002 Chromogenic print, printed 2018, fush-mounted. Image: 228.6 x 182.9 cm (90 x 72 in.) Frame: 238.6 x 192.9 cm (93 7/8 x 75 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/3 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 ‡

Provenance Sean Kelly Gallery, New York Christie’s, New York, First Open: Post-War and Contemporary Art, 13 September 2006, lot 21 Literature James Casebere: Works 1975-2010, Bologna: Damiani Editore, 2011, p. 201

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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36. Matthias Schaller

b. 1965

Controfacciata, Palazzo Mocenigo, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 164.6 x 164.6 cm (64 3/4 x 64 3/4 in.) Frame: 183.2 x 183.2 cm (72 1/8 x 72 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/6 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ♠ Provenance Ben Brown Fine Arts, London, 2008 Literature Matthias Schaller Controfacciata, Munich: Steidl, 2008, pl. 10

37. Candida Höfer

b. 1944

Biblioteca de la Real Academia de la Lengua Madrid I, 2000 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 119.5 x 119.5 cm (47 x 47 in.) Frame: 155 x 155 cm (61 x 61 in.) Signed in pencil on the reverse of the frame; printed title, date and ‘AP II’ on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. From an edition of 6 + 3 AP. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 ♠ Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York, 2001 Literature Candida Hofer: A Monograph, London: Thames & Hudson, 2003, p. 65 C. Höfer, Libraries, London: Thames & Hudson, 2005, p. 235

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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‘I am interested in the presentation of culturally-made objects in spaces... There are, of course, special presentation types for presenting special objects, libraries being such a case.’ Candida Höfer

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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‘You can never really own a place. Even the camera can’t. And if we take its pictures, we’re only borrowing the place’s appearance for a little while, nothing but its outer skin, its surface.’ Wim Wenders, Pictures from the Surface of the Earth

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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38. Wim Wenders

b. 1945

The Road to Emmaus, near Jerusalem, 2000 Mural-sized chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 134.5 x 407.9 cm (52 7/8 x 160 5/8 in.) Frame: 182.7 x 452.8 cm (71 7/8 x 178 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/6 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 ♠ Provenance Haunch of Venison, London, 2006 Exhibited Camera Sacra: Capturing the Soul of Nature, Israel Museum, Jerusalem, 21 April – 3 December 2005, another Literature Wim Wenders: Pictures from the Surface of the Earth, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 2003, pl. 38

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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39. Mikhael Subotzky

b. 1981

Cell 33, E2 Section (1), Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison, 2004 Archival pigment print, fush-mounted. Image: 46.5 x 126 cm (18 1/4 x 49 5/8 in.) Frame: 59 x 137.5 cm (23 1/4 x 54 1/8 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 6/9 in pencil in the margin. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Flowers Gallery, London, 2006

This claustrophobic image of inmates sharing beds in an overcrowded cell in Pollsmoor Maximum Security Prison formed Mikhael Subotzky’s 2004 thesis project at the University of Cape Town. He visited inmates, getting to know them and teaching them photography. The visits resulted in this project; its title The Four Walls refers to prisoners’ slang for the enclosing facades. In 2005, on South African Independence Day, these photographs were exhibited inside the prison itself, creating a unique experience by transforming a penitentiary into an environment for expression and exploration.

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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40. Simon Norfolk

b. 1963

North Gate of Baghdad, 2003 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 100.5 x 125.7 cm (39 5/8 x 49 1/2 in.) Frame: 104.5 x 129.7 cm (41 1/8 x 51 1/8 in.) Signed and numbered 2/10 in ink on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 ♠ Provenance The Photographers’ Gallery, London, 2004

41. Angel Marcos

b. 1955

In Cuba 7, 2004 Chromogenic print, printed 2018, Face-mounted and fush-mounted. 175 x 124 cm (68 7/8 x 48 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated, and numbered 4/5 in ink on an artist label accompanying the work. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ♠ Provenance Galerie Ernst Hilger, Vienna, 2004

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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42. Massimo Listri

b. 1955

Galleria delle Statue, Museo Pio Clementino, Musei Vaticani X, 2011 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 180.4 x 225.4 cm (71 x 88 3/4 in.) Frame: 186 x 231 cm (73 1/4 x 90 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/5 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Etro, London, 2012

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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43. Jef Bark

b. 1963

44. Paul Hodgson

b. 1972

Untitled (Fawn), 2006 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 119 x 159.4 cm (46 7/8 x 62 3/4 in.) Frame: 130 x 171.9 cm (51 1/8 x 67 5/8 in.) Signed, titled and numbered 7/8 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Botanist, 2003 Archival pigment print, fush-mounted. Image: 181.3 x 117 cm (71 3/8 x 46 1/8 in.) Frame: 187.3 x 123 cm (73 3/4 x 48 3/8 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 1/3 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount.

Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800

Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠

Provenance Michael Hoppen Gallery, London, 2007

Provenance Marlborough Graphics, London, 2007 Literature Paul Hodgson: Sovereign Rights, London: Marlborough Fine Art, 2007, p. 5

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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45. Naoya Hatakeyama

b. 1958

River Series/Shadow #68, 2002 Chromogenic print. 53.4 x 48.7 cm (21 x 19 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/7 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 Provenance Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, 2004

46. Trine Søndergaard

b. 1972

Interior no. 36; Interior no. 32, 2008-2012 2 archival pigment prints, each fush-mounted. Each image: 119 x 119 cm (46 7/8 x 46 7/8 in.) Each frame: 123 x 123 cm (48 3/8 x 48 3/8 in.) Each signed in ink, printed title, date, and number 1/5 and 3/5 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying each work. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ♠ † Provenance Martin Asbæk Gallery, Copenhagen, 2014

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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47. Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard b. 1970 and b. 1972 How to Hunt; Kromann Beat, 2005-2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 158.5 x 198.5 cm (62 3/8 x 78 1/8 in.) Frame: 166.5 x 206.5 cm (65 1/2 x 81 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/3 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Martin Asbæk Gallery, Copenhagen, 2007 Literature Trine Søndergaard & Nicolai Howalt: How to Hunt, Ostfldern: Hatje Cantz, 2010, p. 51

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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48. Faisal Samra

b. 1956

Performance #13 from Distorted Reality, 2007 Three chromogenic prints, each fush-mounted. Each: 37.1 x 49.1 cm (14 5/8 x 19 3/8 in.) Each signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/4 in ink on the reverse of the frame. Estimate ÂŁ4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 â‚Ź4,600-6,900 Provenance XVA Gallery, Dubai, 2007

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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49. Malerie Marder

b. 1971

Untitled from Inland Empire, 2004/5 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 120.5 x 174.5 cm (47 1/2 x 68 3/4 in.) Frame: 125.2 x 179 cm (49 1/4 x 70 1/2 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 5/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £3,000-4,000 $4,300-5,700 €3,500-4,600 Provenance Maureen Paley, London, 2005

50. Tom Hunter

b. 1965

The Glass of Wine, 1997 Dye destruction print, fush-mounted. Image: 152.1 x 121.5 cm (59 7/8 x 47 7/8 in.) Frame: 165 x 134.8 cm (64 7/8 x 53 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 4/5 in ink on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠ Provenance Jay Jopling, London Christie’s, New York, 25 April 2006, lot 193

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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Lots 51 – 77: To be sold with no reserve 51. Darren Almond

b. 1971

Fullmoon @ Loch Awe, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 119.8 x 119.8 cm (47 1/8 x 47 1/8 in.) Frame: 127.5 x 127.5 cm (50 1/4 x 50 1/4 in.) Signed in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount, printed titled, date and number 3/5 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 • ♠ Provenance White Cube, London, 2007

52. Darren Almond

b. 1971

Fullmoon @ Malin Head, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 119.7 x 119.7 cm (47 1/8 x 47 1/8 in.) Frame: 127.5 x 127.5 cm (50 1/4 x 50 1/4 in.) Printed title, date and number 3/5 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 • ♠ Provenance White Cube, London, 2008

53. Nicolai Howalt and Trine Søndergaard b. 1970 and b. 1972 How to Hunt; Tvedelykkemarken (Bjornemosen), 2005-2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 63 x 79.7 cm (24 3/4 x 31 3/8 in.) Frame: 66.3 x 83.2 cm (26 1/8 x 32 3/4 in.) Signed and numbered 2/5 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £2,000-3,000 $2,900-4,300 €2,300-3,500 • ♠ Provenance Martin Asbæk Projects, Copenhagen

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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54. Simon Norfolk

b. 1963

English Bay Road looking towards Sisters Peak, Ascension Island, 2003 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 100.5 x 126.4 cm (39 5/8 x 49 3/4 in.) Frame: 104.5 x 130.4 cm (41 1/8 x 51 3/8 in.) Signed and numbered 2/10 in ink on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 • ♠ Provenance The Photographers’ Gallery, London, 2004

55. Simon Norfolk

b. 1963

River Drinjača, Bosnia, 2005 Chromogenic print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 100 x 125 cm (39 3/8 x 49 1/4 in.) Signed and numbered 1/10 in ink on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 • ♠ Provenance The Photographers’ Gallery, London, 2005

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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56. Naoya Hatakeyama

b. 1958

Atmos #07303, 2003 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 69.3 x 89 cm (27 1/4 x 35 in.) Frame: 103 x 122.7 cm (40 1/2 x 48 1/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/8 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £2,000-3,000 $2,900-4,300 €2,300-3,500 • Provenance Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, 2004

57. Dan Holdsworth

b. 1974

California 01, 2004 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 49 x 59 cm (19 1/4 x 23 1/4 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 2/4 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £2,000-3,000 $2,900-4,300 €2,300-3,500 • ♠ Provenance Store Gallery, London, 2005

58. Veronica Bailey

b. 1965

Selected works, 2003-2007 Two chromogenic prints, each fush-mounted. Each varying dimensions from Lef: 85.5 x 57.2 cm (33 5/8 x 22 1/2 in.) Right: 179.6 x 119.5 cm (70 3/4 x 47 in.) Each signed, numbered 1/3 and 4/4 in ink, printed title and date on an artist label each afxed to the reverse of the frame. One with copyright credit blindstamp on the recto. Estimate £2,000-3,000 $2,900-4,300 €2,300-3,500 • ♠ Provenance The Blue Gallery, London, 2004; Colnaghi London, 2009

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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59. John Riddy

b. 1959

Selected works, 2004-2012 Four prints, including three chromogenic prints and one archival pigment print, each mounted. Image: varying sizes from 46 x 59 cm (18 1/8 x 23 1/4 in.) to 73.5 x 92 cm (28 7/8 x 36 1/4 in.) Frame: varying sizes from 84 x 94.4 cm (33 1/8 x 37 1/8 in.) to 102.5 x 103.3 cm (40 3/8 x 40 5/8 in.) Each signed, titled, dated, variously numbered in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the frame. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 • ♠ Provenance Frith Street Gallery, London, 2004-2012

Titles: Maputo (Three Boys), 2002; Shin-Foui (Field), 2005; Chandigrah (High Court), 2007; Palermo (Piazza Marina), 2012

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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60. Karen Knorr

b. 1954

The Invention of Tradition from The Connoisseurs, 1989 Dye destruction print, mounted. 60.3 x 59.5 cm (23 3/4 x 23 3/8 in.) Signed, titled ‘from Connoisseurs’ in ink; printed, title and number 2/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £2,000-3,000 $2,900-4,300 €2,300-3,500 • ♠

63. Nick Waplington

b. 1965

Rock Pool No. 1, 2004 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. 95 x 119.2 cm (37 3/8 x 46 7/8 in.) Signed and numbered 5/5 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

61. Esko Männikkö

b. 1959

Organized Freedom 105, 1999-2005 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. 88 x 71.9 cm (34 5/8 x 28 1/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/20 in pencil on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

64. Boyd & Evans

b. 1944 and b. 1945

Warm Springs in Winter, 2004 Archival pigment print. 89.5 x 111.6 cm (35 1/4 x 43 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 10/10 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

62. David Hughes

b. 1967

Still Life, Cammell Laird Shipyard, 2003 Chromogenic print, printed 2018. 71 x 90.7 cm (27 7/8 x 35 3/4 in.) Signed and numbered 2/5 in ink on the reverse of the frame. Estimate £500-700 $710-1,000 €580-810 • ♠

65. Herbert Ponting

1870-1935

Penguins and Iceberg, Antartica, 1910-1913 Blue-toned carbon print. 58.5 x 74.4 cm (23 x 29 1/4 in.) Captioned ‘Summertime the opening up of the Sea’ in an unidentifed hand in ink on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the mount; annotated in an unidentifed hand (partially visible) in ink in the margin. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 •

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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66. Justine Kurland

b. 1969

67. Brian McKee

b. 1977

Parade across the Dune, New Zealand, 2001 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. 75.6 x 101 cm (29 3/4 x 39 3/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/8 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Castle View, North Afghanistan, 2002 Chromogenic print, printed 2018, fush-mounted. 125.5 x 162 cm (49 3/8 x 63 3/4 in.) Signed, numbered 4/5 in ink, printed title and date on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount.

Estimate £1,500-2,500 $2,100-3,600 €1,700-2,900 •

Estimate £1,500-2,500 $2,100-3,600 €1,700-2,900 •

69. Martin Usborne

b. 1973

Tiger, Rag, Johnny and Emma from Dogs of Hoxton, 2009 Archival pigment print. 57.5 x 75.2 cm (22 5/8 x 29 5/8 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 3/15 in pencil on the verso. Estimate £500-700 $710-1,000 €580-810 • ♠

70. Jeremy Rata

b. 1967

Road Workers in Old Delhi, 2012 Archival pigment print. 38.5 x 58 cm (15 1/8 x 22 7/8 in.) Signed, numbered 1/25 in ink, printed title and date on a Certifcate of Authenticity afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £500-700 $710-1,000 €580-810 • ♠

68. Simon Roberts

b. 1974

Outdoor Market, Grozny, Chechnya from Motherland, 2004-2005 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. 68.8 x 86.9 cm (27 1/8 x 34 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/6 on an artist label and a Certifcate of Authenticity, both accompanying the work. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

71. Sarah Michael

b. 1979

Burn Howe Rigg, 2007 Archival pigment print, fush-mounted. 99.5 x 195.5 cm (39 1/8 x 76 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/3 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £500-700 $710-1,000 €580-810 • ♠

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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72. Linda McCartney

1941-1998

Paul, Stella and James, Scotland, 1982 Platinum print, printed later. 39.6 x 59.7 cm (15 5/8 x 23 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, numbered 24/25 in pencil and copyright credit blindstamps in the margin. Estimate £1,500-2,500 $2,100-3,500 €1,700-2,900 •

75. Kurt Markus

b. 1947

Dunes QQ, Namibia, 2002 Toned gelatin silver print. 33 x 42.5 cm (12 7/8 x 16 3/4 in.) Signed in pencil in the margin; signed, titled, dated and copyright credit in pencil on the verso. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 •

73. Simon Chaput

b. 1952

Selected works, 2002 Two gelatin silver prints, each mounted. Each: 20.8 x 55.1 cm (8 1/4 x 21 3/4 in.) Each signed, titled, dated, numbered 2/5 and 9/15 respectively in ink and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the mount. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

76. Lynn Geesaman

b. 1938

Annevoie, Belgium (4-04-3-2), 2004 Gelatin silver print. 48 x 48 cm (18 7/8 x 18 7/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £800-1,200 $1,100-1,700 €920-1,400 •

74. Pierre Radisic

b. 1958

Marilou, 1984 Selenium toned gelatin silver print. 55.5 x 45.5 cm (21 7/8 x 17 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 4/8 in pencil on the verso. Estimate £1,000-2,000 $1,400-2,900 €1,200-2,300 • ♠

77. Chip Hooper

b. 1962

Cape Foulwind Beach, Tasman Sea, New Zealand, 2003 Gelatin silver print, mounted. 50 x 60 cm (19 5/8 x 23 5/8 in.) Signed and numbered 4/25 in pencil on the mount; signed, titled, dated, numbered 4/25 in pencil and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the mount. Estimate £500-700 $710-1,000 €580-810 •

Michel and Sally Strauss Contemporary Photography Collection

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78. Henri Cartier-Bresson

1908-2004

Siphnos, Greece, 1961 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 23.7 x 35.5 cm (9 3/8 x 13 7/8 in.) Signed in ink and copyright credit blindstamp in the margin. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 ♠ Provenance Michael Shapiro Gallery, San Francisco Christie’s, New York, 26 April 2005, lot 242

79. Henri Cartier-Bresson

1908-2004

Brussels, Belgium, 1932 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 29.6 x 44.2 cm (11 5/8 x 17 3/8 in.) Signed in ink and copyright credit blindstamp in the margin. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris, 2004

80. Henri Cartier-Bresson

1908-2004

Alberto Giacometti, Paris, France, 1961 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 35.7 x 23.5 cm (14 x 9 1/4 in.) Signed in ink and copyright credit blindstamp in the margin. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Galerie Claude Bernard, Paris, 2005

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81. Henri Cartier-Bresson

1908-2004

82. Henri Cartier-Bresson

1908-2004

Gardens of the Palais Royal, Paris, 1959 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 44.5 x 29.5 cm (17 1/2 x 11 5/8 in.) Signed in ink and copyright credit blindstamp in the margin.

Behind the Gare Saint Lazare, 1932 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 45.7 x 30.2 cm (17 7/8 x 11 7/8 in.) Signed in ink and copyright credit blindstamp in the margin.

Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 ♠

Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 ♠

Provenance HackelBury Fine Art, London, 2003

Provenance HackelBury Fine Art, London, 2003

83. André Kertész

1894-1985

Washington Square Park, 1954 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 24.6 x 18 cm (9 5/8 x 7 1/8 in.) Signed and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ‡ ♠ Provenance Private Collection, Japan

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84. Martine Franck

1938-2012

Swimming Pool Designed by Alain Capeilleres, Le Brusc, South of France, 1976 Gelatin silver print, printed 2012. 49.2 x 74.5 cm (19 3/8 x 29 3/8 in.) Signed and numbered 3/10 in ink in the margin; signed, titled ‘Le Brusc, Piscine’, dated and numbered 3/10 in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Peter Fetterman Gallery, Santa Monica Literature Martine Franck: One Day to the Next, London: Thames & Hudson, 1998, cover, pp. 6-7

85. Bill Brandt

1904-1983

86. Bill Brandt

1904-1983

Nude, London, 1956 Gelatin silver print, printed 1970s, mounted. 33.8 x 28.8 cm (13 1/4 x 11 3/8 in.) Signed in ink on the mount.

Nude, London, July, 1956 Gelatin silver print, printed 1970s, mounted. 33.9 x 29 cm (13 3/8 x 11 3/8 in.) Signed in ink on the mount.

Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠

Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠

Provenance Halsted Gallery, Bloomfeld Hills, MI, 1975 Heritage Auctions, New York, 1 May 2012, lot 74119

Provenance Phillips, New York, 9 April 2011, lot 63

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87. Robert Heinecken

1931-2006

14 or 15 Bufalo Ladies #2, 1969 Lithograph with chalk and ink on paper. Approximately 31.5 x 20 cm (12 3/8 x 7 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 8/11 in pencil in the margin. Estimate ÂŁ6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 â‚Ź6,900-9,200 Provenance Galleria Documenta, Torino, 1980s Literature M. Durant & R. Heinecken, A Material History, Tucson: Center for Creative Photography, 2003, p. 62, variant Robert Heinecken, Carmel: Friends of Photography, 1980, p. 41

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88. Harry Callahan

1912-1999

Wabash Avenue, Chicago, 1958 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 18.3 x 28.6 cm (7 1/4 x 11 1/4 in.) Signed in pencil in the margin. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ‡ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 1980s

89. Harry Callahan

1912-1999

Chicago, 1949 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 20 x 24.6 cm (7 7/8 x 9 5/8 in.) Signed in pencil in the margin. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ‡ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 1980s

90. Harry Callahan

1912-1999

Eleanor, Aix-en-Provence, France, 1958 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 20.5 x 16.1 cm (8 1/8 x 6 3/8 in.) Signed in pencil in the margin. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ‡ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 1980s

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91. Saul Leiter

1923-2013

Foot on the El, 1954 Chromogenic print, printed later. 34.2 x 23.1 cm (13 1/2 x 9 1/8 in.) Signed in ink on the verso. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 † Provenance Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York Literature Saul Leiter, Göttingen: Steidl, 2008, p. 147 S. Leiter, Colors, Lausanne: Musée de l’Elysée, 2011, p. 37 S. Leiter, Early Color, Göttingen: Steidl, 2015, n.p.

92. Saul Leiter

1923-2013

Through Boards, 1957 Chromogenic print, printed later. 34.2 x 22.5 cm (13 1/2 x 8 7/8 in.) Signed in ink on the verso. Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 † Provenance Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York Literature Saul Leiter, Göttingen: Steidl, 2008, p. 41 S. Leiter, Colors, Lausanne: Musée de l’Elysée, 2011, p. 60 S. Leiter, Early Color, Göttingen: Steidl, 2015, cover (variant), n.p.

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These early prints of Self Portrait, Westport, Connecticut, 1968 (lot 93) and Galax, Virginia, 1962 (lot 94) showcase the hallmarks of Lee Friedlander’s prolifc photographic oeuvre. While working as a freelance photographer at the start of his career, Friedlander’s shadow would inevitability fall within the frame of the picture he was about to shoot. Thus a typical accident in photography turned into his art. In Self Portrait, Westport, Connecticut, he skilfully layers his shadow and refection over the store window advertisement; both photographer and model mirror one another while holding their cameras, providing a rich and playful execution of the artist’s self portrait. Friedlander’s iconic Galax, Virginia depicts his interest in the American social landscape. He presents an unembellished interior that captures a human subject through the small frame of the television – emphasising the proliferation of televisions in 1960s America. In both of these classic Friedlander images, his photographic wit and sensibility are unwavering.

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93. Lee Friedlander

b. 1934

Self Portrait, Westport, Connecticut, 1968 Gelatin silver print, printed 1970s, fush-mounted. 23.2 x 15.4 cm (91/8 x 61/8 in.) Titled and dated in pencil in the margin; signed in pencil and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 Provenance Daniela Palazzoli, Milan, 1970s Literature Lee Friedlander: Self Portrait, New York: D.A.P., 1998, p. 28 L. Friedlander, In the Picture: Self Portraits 1958-2011, New Haven: Yale UP, 2011, p. 86 P. Galassi, Friedlander, New York: MoMA, 2015, p. 142

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94. Lee Friedlander

b. 1934

Galax, Virginia, 1962 Gelatin silver print, printed 1963. 18.2 x 27.8 cm (7 1/8 x 10 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated in pencil and copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 Provenance Sotheby’s, New York, 17 April 1991, lot 424 Literature Like a One-Eyed Cat: Photographs by Lee Friedlander, 1956-1987, New York: Abrams, 1989, pl. 29 P. Galassi, Friedlander, New York: MoMA, 2005, pl. 75

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Edward Weston made Kale–Halved in December 1930 and recognised its importance immediately. Weston, always alert to the power of natural forms, wrote that he had ‘found the most extraordinary curly-leaved cabbage... kale I think the variety is called,’ which he then halved and photographed. He made his frst print of the image in a marathon printing session on December 17th, along with other vegetable and nature studies; he wrote, ‘without question, any one of them could go into a one man show of my best’ (Daybooks, pp. 198-9). Kale-Halved was illustrated in Merle Armitage’s 1932 The Art of Edward Weston, the frst monograph of the photographer’s work, and was shown in February and March of that year in Weston’s solo exhibition at Delphic Studios gallery in New York City.

In the 1930s, Delphic Studios was one of a very select group of forward-thinking galleries in New York City that showed photographs in addition to more traditional media. Delphic was an important venue for Mexican art, in addition to showing work by photographers such as Weston (in 1930 and 1932) and Moholy-Nagy (in 1931). Founder Alma Reed’s correspondence with Weston, now in the collection of the Center for Creative Photography, demonstrates her active promotion of Weston’s work in the early 1930s and her desire to make Delphic Studios a venue for photography. In the months leading up to the 1932 exhibition, Reed wrote to Weston, ‘I feel with the interest now aroused in your work that the Delphic Studios can hold its place as a photography center.’

The print ofered here bears notations by Delphic Studios owner Alma Reed on its verso and is almost certainly connected to the 1932 exhibition there. This exhibition was an important one for Weston in terms of publicity and print sales. The New York Times praised the show, calling Weston ‘one of the best known of the younger Americans’ and ‘an avowed exponent of “die neue sachlichkeit.”’ The review stated that Weston’s ‘technique is perfectly clear cut and unafected,’ and applauded the ‘halved head of kale enormously magnifed’ (New York Times, 3 March 1932).

Prints of Kale–Halved are rare. According to Weston’s negative log at the Center for Creative Photography, Weston made only eight numbered prints from the projected edition of 50. In Edward Weston: Photographs Amy Conger locates prints in the collections of the Center, the Art Institute of Chicago, the Special Collections of the University of Santa Cruz and the St. Louis Museum of Art. Of these institutions, the print held at the St. Louis Museum of Art is the only one confrmed as an early edition print. Phillips Photographs extends our sincere thanks to the Center for Creative Photography for their assistance with our research.

Print verso

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95. Edward Weston

1886-1958

Kale–Halved, 1930 Gelatin silver print, likely printed no later than 1932. 18.9 x 24 cm (7 1/2 x 9 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, dated, numbered ‘35V’ by the artist and annotated by Alma Reed, owner of Delphic Studios, all in pencil on the verso. Estimate £40,000-60,000 $57,000-85,500 €46,200-69,300 Provenance Christie’s, New York, 4 October 2001, lot 124 Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2002 Andrew Smith Gallery, Sante Fe, 2010

Literature M. Armitage, The Art of Edward Weston, New York: E. Weyhe, 1932, pl. 22 B. Maddow, Edward Weston: Fify Years, New York: Aperture, 1973, p. 152 K. Foley, Edward Weston’s Gifs to His Sister, Dayton: Dayton Art Institute, 1978, pp. 18, 45 B. Maddow, Edward Weston: His Life and Photographs, New York: Aperture, 1979, p. 152 B. Newhall, Supreme Instants: The Photography of Edward Weston, Tucson: Center for Creative Photography, 1986, pl. 32, p. 147 A. Conger, Edward Weston: Photographs, Tucson: Center for Creative Photography, 1992, fg. 622/1930

Exhibited Edward Weston, Delphic Studios, New York, 29 February – 13 March 1932, another Supreme Instants: The Photography of Edward Weston, SFMOMA, San Francisco, 7 November 1986 - 4 January 1987, and other locations, another

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96. Man Ray

1890-1976

Untitled (Solarised walnuts), 1930-1931 Solarised gelatin silver print. 29 x 23 cm (11 3/8 x 9 in.) ‘Photograph Man Ray’ [Manford M25] credit stamp on the verso. Estimate £30,000-50,000 $42,800-71,300 €34,700-57,800 Provenance Collection of Juliet Man Ray, Paris, 1980s Private Collection, Switzerland Yann Le Mouel, 6 May 2009, lot 32 Serge Plantereux, Paris Literature Man Ray, Milan: Skira, 2001, p. 203 S. Manford, Behind the Photo: 42 Man Ray Stamps, Paris: Carnet de Rhinocéros jr, 2008, n.p. (stamp)

‘I would photograph an idea than an object, and a dream rather than an idea.’ Man Ray

Starting in the 1920s and continuing into the 1930s, Man Ray increasingly focused on organic forms in his photography. Studies of trees, fruit, rocks and fowers – like his famed solarised Calla Lilies, 1930 – are all examples of these explorations, as is the study of walnuts ofered here. Many of these are featured in the opening passage of his frst monograph Photographs by Man Ray 1920 Paris 1934, including a variant still life that pairs a walnut with Man Ray’s engraved cigarette lighter. In addition to exemplifying Man Ray’s investigation of natural forms, this masterful still life stands as a premier example of his use of the photographic technique of solarisation. Also known as the Sabattier efect, solarisation is a phenomenon in which the tones of an image are reversed when light is introduced during the development process. In the late 1920s Man Ray began utilising this technique in his nudes, portraits, and stilllife photographs to create images that were representational yet divorced from reality. In Man Ray’s hands, solarisation became an ideal tool with which to create surreal photographs. Other photographers – such as Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, and other members of the f.64 group in America, and Albert Renger-Patzsch in Germany – also trained their cameras on organic forms during this same period. While these photographers strove to portray their subjects in clarion detail, Man Ray pursued similar subject matter in the service of a more complex agenda. He was a master at unlocking the dreamlike and uncanny aspects of everyday objects to create a heightened artistic experience. The walnuts and their shells, with their curves, undulations, and corresponding positive and negative shapes, were ideal surrealist subject matter. As of this writing, we are aware of three other walnut images created around the same time as the work on ofer here. Aside from the aforementioned study reproduced in Photographs by Man Ray 1920 Paris 1934, two other variants have appeared at auction, both of which focus solely on the walnuts. In the photograph ofered here, Man Ray incorporates a glass vase to create a dynamic and dense visual landscape. His def use of solarisation accentuates the contours of the nuts and creates a subtle and enigmatic reversal of tones, heightening the dreamlike quality of the composition and placing it squarely in the realm of surrealism.

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97. Irving Penn

1917-2009

Butchers, Paris, 1950 Platinum-palladium print, printed 1976. 41.3 x 31.8 cm (16 1/4 x 12 1/2 in.) Signed, initialled, titled ‘Bouchers’, dated, numbered 15/33 and annotated in pencil, Condé Nast copyright credit and edition stamps on the verso. Estimate £30,000-50,000 $42,800-71,300 €34,700-57,800 ‡ Provenance Private Collection, Chicago Literature ‘Visages et métiers de Paris,’ Vogue Paris, June 1951 I. Penn, Moments Preserved, New York: Simon & Schuster, 1960, p. 175 J. Szarkowski, Irving Penn, New York: MoMA, 1984, pl. 88 I. Penn, Passage: A Work Record, New York: Knopf, 1991, p. 89 V. Heckert & A. Lacoste, Irving Penn: Small Trades, Los Angeles: Getty, 2009, pl. 167

‘Taking people away from their natural circumstances and putting them into the studio in front of a camera did not simply isolate them, it transformed them. Sometimes the change was subtle; sometimes it was great enough to be almost shocking. But always there was transformation.’ Irving Penn

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98. Frank Horvat

b. 1928

Givenchy Hat C, Paris, 1958 Archival pigment print, printed later, fush-mounted. Image: 77 x 117.5 cm (30 3/8 x 46 1/4 in.) Frame: 88 x 128.5 cm (34 5/8 x 50 5/8 in.) Signed and numbered 8/12 in ink in the margin. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Literature Horvat: Fify One Photographs in Black & White, London: Dewi Lewis, 1998, cover, p. 21

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99. Irving Penn

1917-2009

Woman in Feather Hat (B), New York, Nov. 11 1991 Selenium toned gelatin silver print, printed 2005, fush-mounted. 48 x 48 cm (18 7/8 x 18 7/8 in.) Signed, initialled twice, titled, dated, numbered, annotated ‘Hat Designed by Philip Treacy/Worn by Model Linda Evangelista’ in ink, credit, copyright credit (courtesy of Vogue) reproduction limitation and edition stamps on the reverse of the fush-mount. One from an edition of 10. Estimate £25,000-35,000 $35,600-49,900 €28,900-40,400 ‡ Provenance Jackson Fine Art, Atlanta

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‘I don’t think photography has anything remotely to do with the brain. It has to do with eye appeal.’ Horst P. Horst

100. Horst P. Horst

1906-1999

Still Life, Oyster Bay, Long Island, 1948-1950 Dye transfer print, printed later. 59.3 x 46.1 cm (23 3/8 x 18 1/8 in.) Signed by the artist in pencil and annotated AP by the artist’s studio in ink on the verso; annotated #3 by the studio in red crayon in the margin. One from an edition of 10 + 2 AP. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 Provenance Hamiltons Gallery, London, 1990 Literature Horst: Sixty Years of Photography, London: Thames & Hudson, 1991. pl. 108

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101. René Burri

1933-2014

São Paulo, Brazil, 1960 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 29 x 43.3 cm (11 3/8 x 17 in.) Signed in ink in the margin; numbered 98/100 in ink on the verso. Accompanied by a signed and numbered copy of René Burri Photographs, Collector’s Edition (Phaidon, 2004). Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Phaidon, London, 2005 Literature René Burri Photographs, London: Phaidon, 2004, cover (variant), pp. 192-193

102. Manuel Álvarez Bravo

1902-2002

Frida Kahlo, 1930 Gelatin silver print, printed later. 23.9 x 18.1 cm (9 3/8 x 7 1/8 in.) Signed, titled ‘Frida Kahlo con globe’ and copyright credit in pencil on the verso. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ‡ Provenance Private Collection, Japan

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103. Sebastião Salgado

b. 1944

Herd of Bufalo, Kafue National Park, Zambia, 2010 Gelatin silver print. 75 x 53.5 cm (29 1/2 x 21 1/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 ‡ ♠ Literature Sebastião Salgado: Genesis, Cologne: Taschen, 2013, p. 279

104. Sebastião Salgado

b. 1944

Chinstrap Penguins (Pygoscelis Antarctica), Deception Island, Antarctica, 2005 Gelatin silver print. 51.2 x 37.8 cm (20 1/8 x 14 7/8 in.) Copyright credit blindstamp in the margin; signed, titled ‘Antartica’ [sic] and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 ‡ ♠ Literature S. Salgado, Genesis, Cologne: Taschen, 2013, p. 86

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105. Susan Meiselas

b. 1948

Matagalpa, Nicaragua, 1978 Dye transfer print, printed 1989. 44.5 x 67.1 cm (17 1/2 x 26 3/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in ink on the verso. Number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance RoseGallery, Santa Monica Literature Susan Meiselas, Gothenburg: Hasselblad Center, 1994, back cover S. Meiselas, Nicaragua, New York: Aperture, 2008, cover & p. 26

106. Steve McCurry

b. 1950

Sharbat Gula, Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1984 Chromogenic print, printed 2011. 52.3 x 35.7 cm (20 5/8 x 14 in.) Signed in ink on the verso; printed date on an artist label afxed to the verso. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 Provenance Chris Beetles Fine Photographs, London, 2011 Literature National Geographic, Vol. 167, No. 6, June 1985, cover

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107. Shirin Neshat

b. 1957

Untitled (Zarin Series), 2005 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 152.5 x 121.2 cm (60 x 47 3/4 in.) Frame: 160.3 x 134.6 cm (63 1/8 x 52 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/5 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate ÂŁ12,000-18,000 $17,100-25,700 â‚Ź13,900-20,800 Provenance Lumen Travo, Amsterdam, 2007 Literature Shirin Neshat: 2002-2005, Milan: Charta, 2005, p. 66 Shirin Neshat, New York: Rizzoli, 2010, p. 203

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108. Mikhael Subotzky

b. 1981

‘Fuck Me’, Toekomsrus, Beaufort West, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 128.4 x 105.3 cm (50 1/2 x 41 1/2 in.) Frame: 154.5 x 125 cm (60 7/8 x 49 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 5/9 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 Provenance Goodman Gallery, Cape Town Literature M. Subotzky, Beaufort West, London: Chris Boot, 2008, p. 41

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109. Zanele Muholi

b. 1972

Thembeka I, New York Upstate from Somnyama Ngonyama, 2015 Gelatin silver print, fush-mounted. Image: 49.1 x 37.6 cm (19 3/8 x 14 3/4 in.) Frame: 68 x 56.5 cm (26 3/4 x 22 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 4/8 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town

110. Malick Sidibé

1936-2016

Regardez-moi, 1962 Gelatin silver print, printed 2007, fush-mounted. Image: 97.1 x 98.5 cm (38 1/4 x 38 3/4 in.) Frame: 117.9 x 117.9 cm (46 3/8 x 46 3/8 in.) Signed, initialled, titled and dated in ink in the margin. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 Provenance Galerie MAGNIN-A, Paris

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111. Roger Ballen

b. 1950

Two Figures, 2000 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 112.1 x 112.1 cm (44 1/8 x 44 1/8 in.) Frame: 115 x 115 cm (45 1/4 x 45 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/1 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work. Estimate £3,500-4,500 $5,000-6,400 €4,000-5,200 Provenance Goodman Gallery, Cape Town

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ÔIt is a very strange, surreal place, where time seems suspended.Õ Pieter Hugo

Ghana’s Agbogbloshie dump, a vast wasteland of discarded electronics, is the setting of Pieter Hugo’s Permanent Error series, which focuses on the local people who sort through and burn down the e-waste, extracting small bits of metal for resale amidst the toxic air. Using a mediumformat camera, Hugo captured these striking images, giving his powerful fgures and the noxious landscape equal presence within the frame.

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112. Pieter Hugo

b. 1976

113. Pieter Hugo

b. 1976

Al Hasan Abukari, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana from Permanent Error, 2009 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 82 x 82 cm (32 1/4 x 32 1/4 in.) Frame: 101 x 101 cm (39 3/4 x 39 3/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/10 on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work.

Aissah Salifu, Agbogbloshie Market, Accra, Ghana from Permanent Error, 2010 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 81.6 x 81.6 cm (32 1/8 x 32 1/8 in.) Frame: 104 x 104 cm (40 7/8 x 40 7/8 in.) Signed in ink, titled, dated and numbered 7/10 on an artist label accompanying the work.

Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300

Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900

Provenance Stevenson Gallery, Cape Town

Provenance Yossi Milo Gallery, New York

Literature P. Hugo, Permanent Error, Munich: Prestel, 2011, p. 25 Pieter Hugo: This Must be the Place, Munich: Prestel, 2012, p. 153

Literature P. Hugo, Permanent Error, Munich: Prestel, 2011, p. 67

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‘I wanted to make photographs that you could not describe, you could not remember but were still, nevertheless, very sharp and clear.’ James Welling

114. James Welling

b. 1951

Untitled from Aluminum Foil, 1980-1981 Eight gelatin silver contact prints, printed 1980s, mounted. Each 11.7 x 9.6 cm (4 5/8 x 3 3/4 in.) or the reverse. Each initialled, titled, dated by the artist and four prints annotated in another hand, all in ink on the mount. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 Provenance Xavier Hufens, Brussels Literature James Welling: Monograph, New York: Aperture, 2013, pp. 212-213, 217 James Welling: Photographs 1974-1999, Columbus: Wexner Center for the Arts, 2000, n.p.

Titles: August 16a (B78), 1980; January 8 (B2), 1980; (B91), 1980; (B24), 1980; Spiral (B3), 1980; Crescendo (B89), 1980; (B38), 1980; August 16B (B79), 1980

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Afer moving to New York in late 1978, James Welling worked shifs in a restaurant kitchen to support himself as he experimented with his art. During one shif in late December 1979, he noticed a piece of butter wrapped in aluminium foil and photographed it against a white background. Just over a year later on 1 January 1980, he started working on his seminal Aluminum Foil series. Over an intensive 16-month period, he conducted a material investigation of foil, making over 200 negatives, around 50 of which he printed, and 38 of which he exhibited at New York’s Metro Pictures in March 1981. To create these disorienting, seemingly abstract contact prints, Welling photographed the interplay of light on the dark background of aluminium foil that he had densely crumpled and then unfolded. He describes the foil as having a ‘glittering sensuality’ – the direct result of his decision to carefully underexpose the prints during the printing process. In the 1980s he printed these images in two sizes, choosing the smaller 4 x 5 inch format ofered here in order to maintain the ambiguity of the images and encourage the viewer to unmask their hidden meanings.

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115. Thomas Struth

b. 1954

North Garland Court I, Chicago, 1990 Gelatin silver print. 44 x 54.6 cm (17 3/8 x 21 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/10 in pencil on the verso. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 ♠ Provenance Galerie Meert Rihoux, Brussels Literature Thomas Struth, Strassen: Fotografe 1976 bis 1995, Cologne: Wienand Verlag, 1995, p. 121 Thomas Struth, New York: D.A.P., 2017, p. 168

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116. Thomas Struth

b. 1954

River-Mouth of Daning Wushan, 1997 Chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 140.3 x 180.2 cm (55 1/4 x 70 7/8 in.) Frame: 187.5 x 224.9 cm (73 7/8 x 88 1/2 in.) Signed in pencil, printed title, date and number 1/10 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £25,000-35,000 $35,600-49,900 €28,900-40,400 ♠ Provenance Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich

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‘My images are not images of reality, but show a kind of second reality, the image of the image’ Thomas Ruf

117. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

Substrat 16-I, 2003 Chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 260 x 160 cm (102 3/8 x 62 7/8 in.) Frame: 286 x 185.4 cm (112 5/8 x 72 7/8 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 3/3 in pencil on the verso. Estimate £40,000-60,000 $57,000-85,500 €46,200-69,300 ‡ ♠ Provenance Blain Southern, London Literature Thomas Ruf, Turin: Castello Di Rivoli Museo d’Arte Contemporanea, 2009, p. 103

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118. Thomas Ruf

b. 1958

L’Empereur, 1982 Eight chromogenic prints, each mounted. Each: 9.7 x 13.7 cm (3 7/8 x 5 3/8 in.) Mount: 30 x 40 cm (11 3/4 x 15 3/4 in.) each Each signed, sequentially numbered 1-8 and 2/4 or 4/4 in pencil on the reverse of the mount. Contained within a grey card folio with printed title on the cover. Estimate £25,000-35,000 $35,600-49,900 €28,900-40,400 ♠ Provenance Private Collection, Germany, late 1980s Exhibited Thomas Ruf, Ausstellungsräume Brückenstraße 7, Dusseldorf, 7 - 13 September, 1985, another Thomas Ruf: Photographs 1979 - 2017, Whitechapel Art Gallery, London, 27 September 2017 - 21 January 2018, another

Staged in his studio while on residency in Paris, Thomas Ruf’s L’Empereur is comprised of eight sequenced selfportraits. Consistently exploring the role and utilisation of the photographic medium, the artist approaches the work with a juxtaposition of the minimal studio setting while positioning himself in incongruous positions. Each pose gives extreme movement and dynamisms to an otherwise unassuming interior. Created in 1982, this work emanates from a time when the artist is transitioning in series from Interiors (19791983) to his renowned oversized Portraits (1981-1991). L’Empereur was executed in an edition of 4.

Literature Thomas Ruf: Fotografen 1979-heute, Cologne: Verlag der Buchhandlung Walther König, 2001, p. 254 Thomas Ruf, London: Whitechapel Art Gallery, 2017, pp. 2-3

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119. Candida Höfer

b. 1944

120. Axel Hütte

b. 1951

Schauspielhaus Dresden IV, 2002 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 119.9 x 157.7 cm (47 1/4 x 62 1/8 in.) Frame: 154.8 x 192.2 cm (60 7/8 x 75 5/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/6 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Yellow Water, Australia, 1999 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 107 x 189.8 cm (42 1/8 x 74 3/4 in.) Frame: 157 x 237 cm (61 3/4 x 93 1/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/4 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount.

Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 ♠

Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 ‡ ♠

Provenance Galerie Rüdiger Schöttle, Munich

Provenance Galerie Max Hetzler, Berlin

Literature Candida Höfer: Dresden, Dresden: Kupferstich-Kabinett, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen, 2002, p. 16

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120

121. Axel Hütte

b. 1951

Bryant Park, New York, 2002 Duratrans and mirror. Image: 102.1 x 134 cm (40 1/4 x 52 3/4 in.) Frame: 147 x 187 cm (57 7/8 x 73 5/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/4 in ink on the reverse of the frame. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Waddington Custot, London

121

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122. Yves Ullens

b. 1960

Enchantment #2, Brussels (Belgium), 2008 Chromogenic print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 120 x 164.5 cm (47 1/4 x 64 3/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/3 on a Certifcate of Authenticity afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900

123. Niko Luoma

b. 1970

1966A, 2010 Archival pigment print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 170 x 140.2 cm (66 7/8 x 55 1/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 5/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ♠ Provenance Atlas Gallery, London

This artist is appearing at auction for the frst time.

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‘I want my work to be seen as a homage to the art, literature and music that has infuenced my mind and the way I see the world.’ Idris Khan

124. Idris Khan

b. 1978

every…William Turner postcard from Tate Britain, 2004 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 96 x 133 cm (37 3/4 x 52 3/8 in.) Frame: 121 x 158.1 cm (47 5/8 x 62 1/4 in.) Signed, dated in ink, printed title and number 2/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 ♠ Provenance MW Projects, London Literature Idris Khan: every…, Bielefeld: Kerber, 2008, p. 19

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125. Ruud van Empel

b. 1958

126. Desirée Dolron

b. 1963

World #6, 2005 Dye destruction print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 105.5 x 151 cm (41 1/2 x 59 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/9 in pencil on the reverse of the fush-mount.

Xteriors V, 2001-2009 Chromogenic print, Diasec and fush-mounted. 172.5 x 125 cm (67 7/8 x 49 1/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/8 in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount.

Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 ♠

Estimate £30,000-50,000 $42,800-71,300 €34,700-57,800 ♠

Provenance Flatland Gallery, Amsterdam

Literature W. Pijbes & C. Cotton, Desirée Dolron, Amsterdam: Raven, 2017, n.p.

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‘It needs to be big enough you can actually get lost in one corner without getting distracted by the other corner.’ Florian Maier-Aichen

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127. Florian Maier-Aichen

b. 1973

128. Florian Maier-Aichen

b. 1973

Untitled, 2003 Chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 120 x 151.4 cm (47 1/4 x 59 5/8 in.) Frame: 128.8 x 160.3 cm (50 3/4 x 63 1/8 in.) Signed, dated, numbered 3/6 in ink, printed title, date and number 3/6 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Untitled, 2004 Chromogenic print, face-mounted. Image: 120 x 152.5 cm (47 1/4 x 60 in.) Frame: 124 x 156.5 cm (48 7/8 x 61 5/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 5/6 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame.

Estimate £30,000-40,000 $42,800-57,000 €34,700-46,200 ‡ ♠

Estimate £20,000-30,000 $28,500-42,800 €23,100-34,700 ‡ ♠

Provenance Blum & Poe, Los Angeles

Provenance Victoria Miro Gallery, London

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129. Alex Prager

b. 1979

Crowd #11 (Cedar and Broad Street), 2013 Archival pigment print, fush-mounted. Image: 149.5 x 142 cm (58 7/8 x 55 7/8 in.) Frame: 153.5 x 146 cm (60 3/8 x 57 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 6/6 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £25,000-35,000 $35,600-49,900 €28,900-40,400 Provenance Lehmann Maupin, New York Literature A. Prager, Face in the Crowd, Washington, D.C.: Corcoran Gallery of Art, 2013, pp. 22-23

On the frst day of flming, I showed up to set and I basically saw every wig and every costume and every prop that I had collected over the past twelve years since I started, and it was really this moment for me where I felt like all of the pictures I had taken over the years were kind of like a lesson, or a study, on how to make these ‘crowd’ photos because, if you crop out one person out of the crowd you can get the sense of my earlier images, or I get that sense, and everything I had been collecting over the years was on set that frst day. Alex Prager on flming Face in the Crowd

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130. Alex Prager

b. 1979

Lois, 2009 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 121 x 177.8 cm (47 5/8 x 70 in.) Frame: 125.4 x 182.2 cm (49 3/8 x 71 3/4 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/3 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 ‡ Provenance Michael Hoppen Gallery, London

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131. Alex Prager

b. 1979

June, 2010 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 61.3 x 83 cm (24 1/8 x 32 5/8 in.) Frame: 63.6 x 85.2 cm (25 x 33 1/2 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 6/7 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 Provenance Heritage Auctions, New York, 1 May 2012, lot 74192

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132. Ryan McGinley

b. 1977

Grace (Teeth), 2009 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 100.1 x 152.8 cm (39 3/8 x 60 1/8 in.) Frame: 104.7 x 157.7 cm (41 1/4 x 62 1/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 1/3 on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400 ‡ Provenance Galerie du Jour, Agnès B, Paris

133. Lieko Shiga

b. 1980

Still Unconscious, 2010 Chromogenic print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 98.7 x 179.3 cm (38 7/8 x 70 5/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 2/3 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ‡ Provenance Christophe Guye Galerie, Zurich

134. Vanessa Beecroft

b. 1969

VB 43.018, 2000 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 228.7 x 181.5 cm (90 x 71 1/2 in.) Frame: 231.2 x 183 cm (91 x 72 in.) This work is number 1 from an edition of 3. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 • ♠ Provenance Christie’s, London, Post-War and Contemporary Art, 10 February 2005, lot 263 This lot is sold with no reserve.

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135. Christopher Bucklow

b. 1957

Guest, circa 2000 Unique dye destruction print, fush-mounted. Image: 144.7 x 102 cm (56 7/8 x 40 1/8 in.) Frame: 146.5 x 103.5 cm (57 5/8 x 40 3/4 in.) Signed, titled and annotated AP in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

136. Christopher Bucklow

b. 1957

Tetrarch, 2001 Unique dye destruction print, fush-mounted. Image: 96.4 x 252 cm (37 7/8 x 99 1/4 in.) Frame: 98.1 x 253.4 cm (38 5/8 x 99 3/4 in.) Signed, titled and dated in ink on the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

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137. Paolo Ventura

b. 1968

War Souvenir #4, 2005 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 126 x 100.4 cm (49 5/8 x 39 1/2 in.) Frame: 130 x 104.4 cm (51 1/8 x 41 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 1/5 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

138. Paolo Ventura

b. 1968

Winter Stories #30, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 100.5 x 125.5 cm (39 5/8 x 49 3/8 in.) Frame: 104.5 x 129.5 cm (41 1/8 x 50 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 3/5 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £4,000-6,000 $5,700-8,600 €4,600-6,900 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist

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139. Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs b. 1979 and b. 1979 Book Cam 2, 2013 Unique work, comprising books, camera lens, flm compartment and wood. With original wood stand. Camera: 26.5 x 41.1 x 19 cm (10 3/8 x 16 1/8 x 7 1/2 in.) Stand: 130 x 42 x 26 cm (51 1/8 x 16 1/2 x 10 1/4 in.) Printed title and date on a Certifcate of Authenticity accompanying the work.

‘We wanted to build a camera that is constructed from words about photography, not photographic equipment. The idea is to be able to photograph through a collected body of knowledge.’

Estimate £7,000-9,000 $10,000-12,800 €8,100-10,400

To construct Book Cam 2, part of a series of camera-sculptures fashioned from unlikely objects, Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs hollowed out a carefully chosen selection of signifcant writings on photography. Imitating the form of a 19th century wooden view camera, with the books arranged in descending size order, the creative duo questions the concept of the camera.

Provenance Feldbusch Wiesner Rudolph Galerie, Berlin

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Taiyo Onorato & Nico Krebs

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140

140. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Ribidoux Drive-In, Ribidoux, 1993 Gelatin silver print, mounted. 41.6 x 53.5 cm (16 3/8 x 21 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated, numbered ‘1/25, 729’ in pencil on the mount; blindstamp title and number ‘1/25, 729’ in the margin. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 Provenance Sonnabend Gallery, New York, 1995 Literature Hiroshi Sugimoto: Theaters, Bologna: Damiani, 2016, p. 111

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141. Hiroshi Sugimoto

b. 1948

Imax Tempozan, Osaka, 1999 Gelatin silver print, mounted. 42.2 x 54.3 cm (16 5/8 x 21 3/8 in.) Signed in pencil on the mount; blindstamp title, date and number ‘8/26 271’ in the margin. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ‡ Provenance Gallery Koyanagi, Tokyo Literature Hiroshi Sugimoto: Theaters, Bologna: Damiani, 2016, p. 138

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141

142. Daido Moriyama

b. 1938

How to Create a Beautiful Picture 6: Tights in Shimotakaido, 1987 Gelatin silver print, printed 2011. 58.2 x 40.1 cm (22 7/8 x 15 3/4 in.) Signed in Japanese and rōmaji in pencil on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo, 2011

142

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143. Albert Watson

b. 1942

Breaunna in Cat Mask, Las Vegas, Nevada, April 2001 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 151.3 x 121.5 cm (59 5/8 x 47 7/8 in.) Frame: 174 x 142 cm (68 1/2 x 55 7/8 in.) Signed, dated and numbered 1/5 in ink on the reverse of the frame. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ♠ † Provenance Sotheby’s, London, 15 November 2005, lot 133

144. Miles Aldridge

b. 1964

Bold Gold #2, 2006 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 72.3 x 101.7 cm (28 1/2 x 40 in.) Frame: 93 x 121 cm (36 5/8 x 47 5/8 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 7/10 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 ♠ Provenance Christophe Guye Galerie, Zurich

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145. David LaChapelle

b. 1963

Gisele Bündchen: See-Through Coat, 2000 Chromogenic print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. 144 x 104 cm (56 3/4 x 40 7/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and numbered 2/3 in ink on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 † Provenance Guy Hepner, New York Literature David LaChapelle: Rétrospective, Firenze: Giunti, 2009, p. 250

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146. Sante D’Orazio

b. 1956

Kate Moss, Glen Cove, NY, 1995 Gelatin silver print, face-mounted and fush-mounted. Image: 154 x 100 cm (60 5/8 x 39 3/8 in.) Frame: 185.5 x 131.6 cm (73 x 51 3/4 in.) Signed in ink, printed title, date and number 3/10 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £10,000-15,000 $14,300-21,400 €11,600-17,300 † Provenance Acquired directly from the artist, 2008 Literature Sante D’Orazio: A Private View, Photographs & Diary, New York: Penguin Studio, 1998, p. 108

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147. Guy Bourdin

1928-1991

Untitled (Guy Bourdin’s archive), n.d. Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 100.5 x 100.5 cm (39 5/8 x 39 5/8 in.) Frame: 122.5 x 121 cm (48 1/4 x 47 5/8 in.) Signed in ink and numbered 1/1 by Samuel Bourdin, Executor, in ink and Estate copyright credit stamp on a Certifcate of Authenticity afxed to the reverse of the fush-mount. Estimate £30,000-40,000 $42,800-57,000 €34,700-46,200 ♠ Provenance Unseen Guy Bourdin, Phillips de Pury & Company, London, 2007 Literature Unseen Guy Bourdin, London: Phillips de Pury & Company, London, 2007, pl. 13

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‘Guy had a wicked sense of humor... You just stood and watched him make his fantasies real.’ Grace Coddington, 2001

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148. Nick Knight

b. 1958

Lily, 2008 Hand-coated pigment print, fush-mounted. Image: 133.4 x 101.4 cm (52 1/2 x 39 7/8 in.) Frame: 155 x 115 cm (61 x 45 1/4 in.) Signed, dated, numbered 2/5 in ink, printed title, date and number 2/5 on an artist label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £50,000-70,000 $71,300-99,800 €57,800-80,900 ♠ Provenance Christophe Guye Galerie, Zurich Literature ‘Unbelievable Fashion’, British Vogue, December 2008, p. 265 Nick Knight, New York: Collins Design, 2009, pl. 141, captioned ‘Lily Donaldson, British Vogue, December 2008’ Nick Knight Image, Seoul: Daelim Museum, 2016, p. 94, titled Pink Powder, Lily Donaldson wearing John Galiano

‘A lot of people I worked with in fashion bring such a world to me, such a nourishing, such an incredible world to me that it is something you would really be foolish not to get involved in it.’ Nick Knight

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Visionary image-maker Nick Knight’s brilliance in concept and execution of his fashion photographs and flm has led to prolifc collaborations with the most preeminent designers, predominately Alexander McQueen and John Galliano. Knight frst collaborated with Galliano shortly afer they met in 1996 – as Galliano became the Creative Director for Dior – with the A/W 1997-98 advertising campaign. The two continued to work together on many campaigns, some of which included videos produced for SHOWStudio, the award-winning fashion website, founded and directed by Knight. Here, model Lily Donaldson dons an ensemble from Galliano’s Spring 2003 Ready-to-Wear collection, which debuted on the runway with an explosion of vibrant colours from head to toe. As described in the Vogue summary of the show, ‘For his fnale, he sent out girls whose voluminous outfts were covered in colored powders used in Indian festivals. As the models twirled, the audience was showered – and, incredibly, responded with laughter. As Galliano said, “It’s about time for a bit of joie de vivre, isn’t it?”’ With his collaborative acumen, Knight delivers a perfectly frozen moment in this image – encapsulating Galliano’s desired essence – as the powder and fabric whirl together, creating a sof blur of pinks that radiate from the seemingly weightless Lily. This marks another premier example of Knight’s boundless creative vision as he presents an elegant burst of joie de vivre. Knight’s work has been exhibited widely, including London’s Tate Modern and V&A, and in 2010, he was awarded an OBE for his services to the arts.

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149. Nobuyoshi Araki

b. 1940

Tokyo Comedy, 1997 Chromogenic print, printed later, fush-mounted. Image: 38 x 57.5 cm (14 7/8 x 22 5/8 in.) Frame: 47.4 x 66.8 cm (18 5/8 x 26 1/4 in.) Signed in ink on the recto. Estimate £15,000-20,000 $21,400-28,500 €17,300-23,100 ‡ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Literature Araki by Araki, The Photographer’s Personal Selection, 1963-2002, Tokyo: Kodansha International, 2003, p. 356, variant Araki: Self, Life, Death, London: Phaidon, 2005, p. 650, variant

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150. Nobuyoshi Araki

b. 1940

Colourscapes, 1991 Chromogenic print, printed 2006, fush-mounted. Image: 42.1 x 33.5 cm (16 5/8 x 13 1/4 in.) Frame: 46 x 37 cm (18 1/8 x 14 5/8 in.) Signed in ink on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £8,000-12,000 $11,400-17,100 €9,200-13,900 ‡ Provenance Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo Literature Araki by Araki: The Photographer’s Personal Selection, 1963–2002, London: Kodansha, 2003, p. 276 Nobuyoshi Araki: Self, Life, Death, London: Phaidon, 2005, p. 322 J. Sans, Araki, Cologne: Taschen, 2007, cover, p. 25

151. Nobuyoshi Araki

b. 1940

67 Shooting Back, 2007 Chromogenic print, fush-mounted. Image: 130.2 x 102.7 cm (51 1/4 x 40 3/8 in.) Frame: 135.1 x 107.8 cm (53 1/4 x 42 1/2 in.) Signed in pencil on a gallery label afxed to the reverse of the frame. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Taka Ishii Gallery, Tokyo Literature Araki by Araki, The Photographer’s Personal Selection, 1963-2002, Tokyo: Kodansha, 2003, p. 292, titled Personal Photographic Emotionalism: Shino, variant

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POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection. Following on from lots � –�� in the ULTIMATE Evening Sale

Actual size

152. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Prunella and Sylvie on the Quai d’Orsay for Playboy, Paris, 1977 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 7.2 x 9.5 cm (2 7/8 x 3 3/4 in.) Sheet: 8.5 x 10.2 cm (3 3/8 x 4 in.) Signed by the artist and printer’s notations, all in pencil on the verso.

Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/ Mosel, 1992, p. 104 H. Newton, Sleepless Nights, London: Quartet Books, 1978, p. 29, titled Mannequins Quai d’Orsay, variant Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., titled Mannequins Quai d’Orsay, variant

Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2005

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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153. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Untitled (Saint Tropez), 1975 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 7.2 x 9.4 cm (2 7/8 x 3 3/4 in.) Sheet: 8.5 x 10.7 cm (3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.) Signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2006 Christie’s, New York, Icons of Glamour & Style: The Constantiner Collection, 16 - 17 December 2008, lot 57

Actual size

154. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Paris by Night with Georgette, Suzette and ‘Le Con’, August 1980 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 7.2 x 9.4 cm (2 7/8 x 3 3/4 in.) Sheet: 8.5 x 10.7 cm (3 3/8 x 4 1/4 in.) Dated ‘Août - 1980’ in ink in the margin; signed by the artist in ink and printer’s notations in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2006 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/ Mosel, 1992, p. 50 Actual size

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Actual size

155. Helmut Newton

Actual size

1920-2004

Domestic Nude III, In the Laundry Room, Chateau Marmont, Hollywood, 1992 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.5 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed by the artist in pencil and dated in another hand in ink on the verso, titled ‘Domestic Nudes’ and dated in another hand in ink on a label afxed to the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Christie’s, New York, Photographs from the Collection of Gert Elfering, 10 April 2008, lot 94 Literature H. Newton, Archives de Nuit, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1993, pl. 33, variant The Best of Helmut Newton, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1996, fg. 67, variant Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., variant

156. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Gunilla Bergström in a room in the Hôtel Raphael, Paris, 1977 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed by the artist and printer’s notations, all in pencil/ink on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2005 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 140, captioned ‘During the years 1977-78 I became obsessed with the idea of ftting my models into surgical corsets, minerves and artifcial limbs. Gunilla Bergström, a favourite of mine, a wonderful model, in the Hotel Raphael, Paris, 1977.’ Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., titled Gunilla, Hotel Raphael, Paris, variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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157. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Arielle, Azzedine’s Glove for French Vogue, Paris, 1982 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Titled and dated ‘1981’ [sic] in ink in the margin; signed by the artist in ink and printer’s notations in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Christie’s, New York, Photographs from the Collection of Gert Elfering, 10 April 2008, lot 67 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 35, captioned ‘The dating can’t be right – it was 1982. Arielle was one of my favourite girls at the time. She made my camera sizzle.’ Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., titled Fashion Azzedine Alaïa, French Vogue, Paris, variant

Actual size

Actual size

158. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Sailor, Ramatuelle, 1977 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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159. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Sylvia in my studio, Paris, 1981 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed in ink on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2005 Literature Z. Felix, ed., The Best of Helmut Newton, New York: Thunder’s Mouth Press, 1996, pl. 63, variant M. Heiting, ed., Helmut Newton: Work, Cologne: Taschen, 2000, p. 206, variant Helmut Newton: Private Property, Munich: Schirmer/ Mosel, 2003, pl. 31, variant Helmut Newton: Big Nudes, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 2004, cover, variant

Actual size

Actual size

160. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Modelling fashion for Vogue Hommes, Vogue Studio, Paris, 1981 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed in ink, titled ‘Vogue Studio, Paris’, dated by the artist in blue pencil and printer’s notations in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Christie’s, South Kensington, London, 21 May 2010, lot 66 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 13, captioned ‘Modelling fashion for Vogue Hommes with some of my favourite girls of those days. Vogue Studio, Paris, 1981.’

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Actual sizes

161. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

French Vogue, Paris, 1996 Two unique Polaroid prints. Each image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Each signed in pencil and one with printer’s notations in ink on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Each acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami; Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2005 (lef) Camera Work, Berlin, 2005 (right) Literature Helmut Newton: SUMO, Cologne: Taschen, 1999, n.p., titled Fashion Mugler, French Vogue, Paris, variant (right) Helmut Newton: Polaroids, Cologne: Taschen, 2015, p. 104, titled French Vogue, Paris

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Actual size

162. Helmut Newton

Actual size

1920-2004

Daryl Hannah for U.S. Vogue, Malibu Beach, California, 1984 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Signed, titled ‘Daryl Hanna [sic] Malibu Beach, Calif’, dated by the artist and printer’s notations in ink/pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2008 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 75, captioned ‘A photo-novelette for U.S. Vogue, starring Daryl Hannah, Malibu, California, 1984.’ H. Newton, Pages from the Glossies: Facsimiles 19561998, Zurich: Scalo, 1998, p. 475, captioned ‘American Vogue 5/84’, variant Vogue: The Editor’s Eye, New York: Abrams, 2012, pp. 124-127, captioned ‘In a swimwear shoot with Daryl Hannah, a narrative plays out with a baby, a lover, and a polo-playing husband’, variant

163. Helmut Newton

1920-2004

Jerry Hall, Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas, n.d. Unique Polaroid print. Image: 9.4 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Titled in ink in the margin; signed by the artist and printer’s notations, all in pencil on the verso. Estimate £6,000-8,000 $8,600-11,400 €6,900-9,200 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Private Collection, Miami Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York, 2008 Literature H. Newton, Pola Woman, Munich: Schirmer/Mosel, 1992, p. 73, captioned ‘Jerry Hall in Caesar’s Palace, Las Vegas, who knows when.’

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Actual size

164. Peter Beard

b. 1938

Magritte Rammé and World Record Cow Elephant Tusk, 1976 Unique Polaroid print with ink and paint, executed later. Image: 11.3 x 8.7 cm (4 1/2 x 3 3/8 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.5 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated, annotated by the artist and inventory number, all in ink on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Kamel Mennour, Paris Literature Peter Beard: Fify Years of Portraits, New York: Arena Editions/ D.A.P., 1999, p. 153, titled ‘Tusk’ (World Record Cow Ele) with Magritte Rammé, Montauk, 1976, variant P. Beard & K. Iizawa, Diary, Tokyo: Libro Port, 1993, n.p., variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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165. Peter Beard

b. 1938

Iman at Hoggers, Kenya, 1984-1985 Unique Polaroid print with ink and paint, executed later. Image: 11.3 x 8.7 cm (4 1/2 x 3 3/8 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.5 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Signed and titled ‘Iman’ in ink on the recto; signed, titled by the artist in ink, inventory number in another hand in pencil and Peter Beard Studio copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Kamel Mennour, Paris

166. Peter Beard

b. 1938

Fayel Tall at Loingalani, Lake Rudolf, Kenya, February, 1987 Unique Polaroid print with paint and ink, executed 2004. Image: 11.3 x 8.8 cm (4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.5 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Signed, captioned ‘@Church Estate, Montauk’ by the artist in ink, dated ‘May 24 ‘04’ and inventory number in other hands in ink/pencil on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Phillips de Pury & Company London, Photographs: Including the Brits, 20 November 2007, lot 40 Literature Peter Beard, Taschen, 2008, pl. 1, variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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167. Peter Beard

b. 1938

Andy Warhol at Home in Montauk, 1972 Unique Polaroid print with ink and paint, executed later. Image: 11.3 x 8.5 cm (4 1/2 x 3 3/8 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.5 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Signed, dated and annotated ‘A.W.’ in ink on the recto; signed by the artist, inventory number in another hand, all in ink and Peter Beard Studio copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Fahey/Klein, Los Angeles Literature Peter Beard: Fify Years of Portraits, New York: Arena Editions/D.A.P., 1999, p. 67, titled Andy Warhol, August 6, variant

168. Peter Beard

b. 1938

Machine in the Garden, Tsavo, Kenya, 1972 Unique Polaroid print with ink and paint, executed later. Image: 11.3 x 8.9 cm (4 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.) Sheet: 14.5 x 10.5 cm (5 3/4 x 4 1/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in ink on the recto; signed by the artist in ink, inventory number in another hand in pencil and Peter Beard Studio copyright credit reproduction limitation stamp on the verso. Estimate £5,000-7,000 $7,100-10,000 €5,800-8,100 Provenance Kamel Mennour, Paris Literature P. Beard & K. Iizawa, Diary, Tokyo: Libro Port, 1993, n.p., variant Peter Beard, Cologne: Taschen, 2008, pl. 366, variant Peter Beard: The End of the Game, Cologne: Taschen, 2008, p. 7, variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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169. Paolo Roversi

b. 1947

Kate pour Vogue, Paris, March 1994 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 23.9 x 18.9 cm (9 3/8 x 7 1/2 in.) Sheet: 27.1 x 21.2 cm (10 5/8 x 8 3/8 in.) Signed, titled and dated in pencil on the verso. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠ Provenance Phillips de Pury & Company, London, Photographs: Including the Brits, 20 November 2007, lot 151

170. Paolo Roversi

b. 1947

Eva Herzigová, Studio 23 rue des Martyrs, Paris, 6 April 2002 Unique Polaroid print. Image: 23.9 x 18.9 cm (9 3/8 x 7 1/2 in.) Sheet: 27.1 x 21.2 cm (10 5/8 x 8 3/8 in.) Signed, titled, dated and annotated ‘Original Unique Polaroid 8 x 10’ in pencil on the verso. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠ Provenance Acquired directly from the artist Literature P. Roversi, Studio, Gottingen: Steidl, 2005, n.p., variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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171. Sarah Moon

b. 1941

Yohji Yamamoto, 1996 Two unique Polaroid prints. Each image: 9.5 x 7.2 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.8 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.) Each signed in pencil on the verso. Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠ Provenance Galerie Camera Obscura, Paris Literature Sarah Moon 12345, London: Thames & Hudson, 2008, pp. 401-403, variant S. Moon, Coincidences: Photographs by Sarah Moon, London: Thames & Hudson, 2001, pp.121, 143, variant Lef: Yohji Yamamoto for Elle Right: Yohji Yamamoto for IO Donna

172. Carlo Mollino

1905-1973

Untitled, 1960s Two unique Polaroid prints, each fush-mounted to board. Each image: 9.5 x 7.3 cm (3 3/4 x 2 7/8 in.) Each sheet: 10.7 x 8.5 cm (4 1/4 x 3 3/8 in.)

Estimate £3,000-5,000 $4,300-7,100 €3,500-5,800 ♠ Provenance Photology, Milan Literature C. Mollino & F. Ferrari, Polaroids, Sante Fe: Arena Editions, 2002, pp. 30-31, 65, 112, 156, 196, variant

POLAROIDS from the Piero Bisazza Collection

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Sale Information ULTIMATE Evening & Photographs Day Sales Auction and Viewing Location 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX Auctions 18 May 2018 Photographs Day Sale Lots 28 - 172, 3pm ULTIMATE Evening Sale Lots 1 - 27, 6pm Viewing 10 – 18 May Monday – Saturday 10am – 6pm Sunday 12pm – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as UK040118 or Photographs. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +44 20 7318 4045 fax +44 20 7318 4035 Susanna Brockman +44 20 7318 4041 Anne Flick +44 20 7901 7927 bidslondon@phillips.com

Photographs Department +44 20 7318 4087 Deputy Chairman, Americas and Worldwide Head of Photographs Vanessa Hallett vhallett@phillips.com Co-Head of Department, Europe Genevieve Janvrin gjanvrin@phillips.com Co-Head of Department, Europe Yuka Yamaji yyamaji@phillips.com Associate Specialist, Head of Sale Sophie Busby sbusby@phillips.com Administrator Naomi Cooperman ncooperman@phillips.com Senior Property Manager Andy Clydesdale aclydesdale@phillips.com Photography Marta Zagozdzon Charlie Sheldon Jean Bourbon Kent Pell Matt Kroenig

Auctioneers Sarah Krueger Susanna Brockman Adam Clay Henry Highley Hugues Jofre Ross Thomas Rebecca Tooby-Desmond Catalogues New York +1 212 940 1240 London +44 20 7901 7927 catalogues@phillips.com £22/€25/$35 at the gallery Client Accounting Richard Addington, Head of Client Accounting +44 20 7901 7914 Jason King, Client Accounting, Director +44 20 7318 4086 Buyer Accounts Carolyn Whitehead +44 20 7318 4020 Seller Accounts Surbjit Kaur +44 20 7318 4072 Client Services 30 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX +44 20 7318 4010 Shipping Andrew Kitt +44 20 7318 4047 Kyle Buchanan +44 20 7318 4081 Rita Matos +44 20 7901 7906 Creative Services Eve Campbell, Creative Services Manager Moira Gil, Graphic Designer Grace Neighbour, Graphic Designer

Front cover Lot 19, Ishiuchi Miyako Yokosuka Story, 1976-1977 (detail) Back cover Lot 23, Mika Ninagawa earthly fowers, heavenly colors, executed 2018 (detail)

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20/04/18 09:45


25. Bruno V. Roels

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30 Berkeley Square, London, W1J 6EX phillips.com +44 20 7318 4010 bidslondon@phillips.com Please return this form by fax to +44 20 7318 4035 or email it to bidslondon@phillips.com at least 24 hours before the sale. Please read carefully the information in the right column and note that it is important that you indicate whether you are applying as an individual or on behalf of a company. Please select the type of bid you wish to make with this form (please select one):

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Editions. Evening & Day Sales London, 7 June 2018

Phillips defines the Editions category, starting our tenth-anniversary year with our highest ever sale total and propelling the market for museum-quality, original artist prints and multiples. We look forward to another decade of innovative, recordbreaking auctions and invite collectors across the globe to join us. Viewing 31 May – 7 June Monday to Saturday 10am–6pm Sunday 12pm–6pm

Roy Lichtenstein, Refections on Girl, from Refections Series, 1990 Lithograph, screenprint and relief in colours metallized PVC collage and embossing Estimate £60,000–80,000

Enquiries +44 207 318 4069 editionslondon@phillips.com

© Estate of Roy Lichtenstein/DACS 2018

phillips.com

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Index Aldridge, M. 144 Almond, D. 51, 52 Araki, N. 7, 149, 150, 151 Arbus, D. 12 Bailey, V. 58 Ballen, R. 111 Bark, J. 43 Beard, P. 18, 164, 165, 166, 167, 168 Beecrof, V. 134 Bourdin, G. 147 Boyd & Evans 64 Brandt, B. 85, 86 Bravo, M. A. 102 Bucklow, C. 135, 136 Burri, R. 101 Burtynsky, E. 28 Calavas Frères 24 Callahan, H. 88, 89, 90 Cartier-Bresson, H. 78, 79, 80, 81, 82 Casebere, J. 35 Chaput, S. 73 Dolron, D. 126 D’Orazio, S. 146 Esser, E. 32 Franck, M. 84 Friedlander, L. 93, 94 Geesaman, L. 76 Hatakeyama, N. 45, 56 Heinecken, R. 87 Hodgson, P. 44 Höfer, C. 37, 119 Holdsworth, D. 57 Hooper, C. 77 Horst, H. P. 100 Horvat, F. 98 Howalt, N. and Søndergaard, T. 47, 53 Hughes, D. 62 Hugo, P. 112, 113 Hunter, T. 50 Hütte, A. 120, 121

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Ishiuchi, M. 19 Kander, N. 33 Kertész, A. 83 Khan, I. 124 Kim, H. 27 Knight, N. 148 Knorr, K. 60 Kurland, J. 66 LaChapelle, D. 145 Leiter, S. 91, 92 Listri, M. 42 Luoma, N. 123 Maier-Aichen, F. 127, 128 Männikkö, E. 61 Man Ray 96 Mapplethorpe, R. 1, 13, 17 Marcos, A. 41 Marder, M. 49 Markus, K. 75 McCartney, L. 72 McCurry, S. 106 McGinley, R. 132 McKee, B. 67 Meiselas, S. 105 Michael, S. 71 Mollino, C. 172 Moon, S. 171 Moriyama, D. 142 Muholi, Z. 109 Neshat, S. 107 Newton, H. 8, 9, 10, 11, 16, 152, 153, 154, 155, 156, 157, 158, 159, 160, 161, 162, 163 Ninagawa, M. 23 Nishimura, T. 21 Norfolk, S. 40, 54, 55

Radisic, P. 74 Rata, J. 70 Riddy, J. 59 Roberts, S. 68 Roels, B. V. 25 Ross, C. 30, 31 Roversi, P. 169, 170 Ruf, T. 117, 118 Salgado, S. 103, 104 Samra, F. 48 Sawada, T. 22 Schaller, M. 36 Shiga, L. 133 Sidibé, M. 110 Søndergaard, T. 46 Struth, T. 115, 116 Subotzky, M. 39, 108 Sugimoto, H. 140, 141 Sugiura, K. 20 Ton, T. 26 Ullens, Y. 122 Usborne, M. 69 van Empel, R. 125 Ventura, P. 137, 138 Waplington, N. 63 Warhol, A. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 Watson, A. 143 Welling, J. 114 Wenders, W. 38 Weston, E. 95 Wolf, M. 29

Onorato T. & Krebs, N 139 Penn, I. 14, 15, 97, 99 Polidori, R. 34 Ponting, H. 65 Prager, A. 129, 130, 131

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26. Tommy Ton

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11. Helmut Newton

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phillips.com

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ULTIMATE Evening & Photographs Day Sales [Catalogue]  

London Auction 18 May 2018

ULTIMATE Evening & Photographs Day Sales [Catalogue]  

London Auction 18 May 2018