Page 1

Design

New York, 6 June 2019


87. Louise Nevelson


92. Edward Durell Stone


62, 63 & 64. John Ward


89. Sakiyama Takayuki


Design New York, 6 June 2019

Auction & Viewing Location

Design Department

450 Park Avenue New York 10022

Senior International Specialist Meaghan Roddy mroddy@phillips.com

Auction 6 June, 2pm

Viewing 2 – 6 June Sunday 12pm – 6pm Monday – Thursday 10am – 6pm

Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY050119 or Design.

Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Head of Department, New York Cordelia Lembo clembo@phillips.com Specialist Kimberly Sørensen ksorensen@phillips.com Administrator Georgina Walsh gwalsh@phillips.com


1. Max Ingrand


Our Team. Design New York.

Los Angeles.

Cordelia Lembo

Kimberly Sørensen

Meaghan Roddy

Head of Department, New York

Specialist

Senior International Specialist, Americas

clembo@phillips.com +1 212 940 1265

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London. Domenico Raimondo Head of Department, Europe & Senior International Specialist draimondo@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4016

Madalena Horta e Costa Head of Sale mhortaecosta@phillips.com +44 20 7318 4019

Marcus McDonald

Sofa Sayn-Wittgenstein

Nicola Krohman

Caroline Pedote

International Specialist

Senior Specialist

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Cataloguer

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Executives. Edward Dolman

Cheyenne Westphal

Chief Executive Ofcer

Global Chairwoman

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+44 20 7318 4044 cwestphal@phillips.com

Š Brigitte Lacombe

Senior Advisors. David Norman

Hugues Jofre

Arnold Lehman

Ken Yeh

Chairman, Americas

Senior Advisor to the CEO

Senior Advisor to the CEO

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Senior International Specialist

Deputy Chairmen & Chairwomen. Svetlana Marich

Jean-Paul Engelen

Robert Manley

Jonathan Crockett

Peter Sumner

Worldwide Deputy Chairwoman

Deputy Chairman, Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art

Deputy Chairman, Worldwide Co-Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art

Deputy Chairman, Asia, Head of 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Asia

Deputy Chairman, Europe, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art

+1 212 940 1390 jpengelen@phillips.com

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Miety Heiden

Vanessa Hallett

Vivian Pfeifer

Marianne Hoet

Deputy Chairwoman, Head of Private Sales

Deputy Chairwoman, Americas, Worldwide Head of Photographs

Deputy Chairwoman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas

+1 212 940 1243 vhallett@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

Deputy Chairwoman, Europe, Senior Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art

+44 20 7318 4010 smarich@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7943 mheiden@phillips.com

+852 2318 2023 jcrockett@phillips.com

+32 3257 3026 mhoet@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4063 psumner@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1257 kyeh@phillips.com


133. Ingrid Donat


Business Development. Americas.

Europe.

Vivian Pfeifer

Guy Vesey

Deputy Chairwoman, Americas, Head of Business Development, Americas

Head of Business Development & Marketing, Europe

+1 212 940 1392 vpfeifer@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7934 gvesey@phillips.com

Client Advisory. Americas. Philae Knight

Jennifer Jones

Liz Grimm

Client Advisory Director

Director of Trusts, Estates & Valuations

Business Development Associate

+1 212 940 1272 jjones@phillips.com

+1 212 940 1342 egrimm@phillips.com

Yassaman Ali

Vera Antoshenkova

Client Advisory Director

Client Advisory Manager

Giulia Campaner Mendes

+44 20 7318 4056 yali@phillips.com

+44 20 7901 7992 vantoshenkova@ phillips.com

+1 212 940 1313 pknight@phillips.com

Europe.

Asia. Jasmine Yan

Iori Endo

Client Advisory Director

Client Advisory Manager

+852 2318 2015 jasmineyan@phillips.com

+44 20 7318 4039 iendo@phillips.com

Associate Client Advisory Manager +44 20 7318 4058 gcampaner@phillips.com

Margherita Solaini Business Development Associate +39 02 83642 453 msolaini@phillips.com


International Specialists & Regional Directors. Americas. Cândida SodrÊ

Carol Ehlers

Lauren Peterson

Melyora de Koning

Blake Koh

Valentina Garcia

Regional Director, Consultant, Brazil

Regional Director, Specialist, Photographs, Chicago

Regional Representative, Chicago

Senior Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Denver

Regional Director, Los Angeles

Specialist, Miami

+55 21 999 817 442 csodre@phillips.com

+1 773 230 9192 cehlers@phillips.com

+1 310 922 2841 lauren.peterson @phillips.com

Cecilia Lafan

Maura Smith

Silvia Coxe Waltner

Regional Director, Consultant, Mexico

Regional Director, Palm Beach

Regional Director, Seattle

+52 1 55 5413 9468 clafan@phillips.com

+1 508 642 2579 maurasmith@phillips.com

+1 206 604 6695 scwaltner@phillips.com

Laurence Calmels

Clara Rivollet

Maria Cifuentes

Laurence Barret-Cavy

Regional Director, France

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, France

+33 142 78 67 77 mcifuentes@phillips.com

+33 633 12 32 04 lbarret-cavy@phillips.com

+41 22 317 81 83 nmonbaron@phillips.com

+1 917 657 7193 mdekoning@phillips.com

+1 323 383 3266 bkoh@phillips.com

+1 917 583 4983 vgarcia@phillips.com

Europe.

+33 686 408 515 lcalmels@phillips.com

+33 6 42 09 97 39 crivollet@phillips.com

Carolina Lanfranchi

Maura Marvao

Kalista Fenina

Regional Director, Senior International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Italy

International Specialist, Consultant, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Portugal and Spain

Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Moscow

+39 338 924 1720 clanfranchi@phillips.com

+351 917 564 427 mmarvao@phillips.com

Dr. Nathalie Monbaron Regional Director, Geneva

Dr. Alice Trier Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Germany +49 173 25 111 69 atrier@phillips.com

+7 905 741 15 15 kfenina@phillips.com

Asia. Kyoko Hattori

Jane Yoon

Sujeong Shin

Wenjia Zhang

Alicia Zhang

Cindy Yen

Regional Director, Japan

International Specialist, 20th Century & Contemporary Art, Regional Director, Korea

Associate Regional Representative, Korea

Regional Director, Shanghai

Associate Regional Representative, Shanghai

+82 10 7305 0797 sshin@phillips.com

+86 13911651725 wenjiazhang@phillips.com

+86 139 1828 6589 aliciazhang@phillips.com

Senior Specialist, Watches & Jewellery, Taiwan

+81 90 2245 6678 khattori@phillips.com

+82 10 7389 7714 jyy@phillips.com

Meiling Lee

Christine Fernando

Sandy Ma

International Specialist, Taiwan

Associate Regional Representative, Singapore

International Specialist, South East Asia

+886 908 876 669 mlee@phillips.com

+65 9128 6277 christinefernando @phillips.com

+852 2318 2025 sma@phillips.com

+886 2 2758 5505 cyen@phillips.com


1. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Ceiling light, model no. 2077/1 circa 1958 Chiseled glass, opaque glass, painted steel. 23 in. (58.4 cm) drop, 46 in. (116.8 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 1, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 41 “Stand di Fontana-Arte alla 39a Fiera di Milano,” Vitrum, no. 147, February 1965, pp. 28-29, 31 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 316

Please note the present ceiling light is the larger of two versions of the model produced by Fontana Arte, as specifed in the Fontana Arte sales catalogue.


Property from a Private American Collection Σ

2. Carlo Mollino

1905-1973

Set of six armchairs and two stools, from the Lutrario Ballroom, Turin circa 1959 Painted steel, brass, Honduran mahogany-veneered bent plywood, fabric upholstery. Each armchair: 29 3/4 x 24 5/8 x 21 1/4 in. (75.5 x 62.5 x 54 cm) Each stool: 17 3/4 x 16 1/2 x 10 3/8 in. (45 x 42 x 26.5 cm) Manufactured by Doro, Cuneo, Italy. Underside of each armchair and one stool with label printed SC - INTERNATIONAL/poltrone & arredi/MARINA DI MONTEMARCIANO. Estimate $20,000-30,000

Provenance Galerie Downtown, Paris Acquired from the above Christie’s, New York, “20/21 Design,” December 9, 2014, lot 589 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Fulvio Ferrari, Carlo Mollino Cronaca, Turin, 1985, p. 140 Giovanni Brino, Carlo Mollino: Architettura come autobiografa, Milan, 1985, pp. 144-45 Rossella Colombari, Carlo Mollino Catalogo dei Mobili Furniture Catalogue, Milan, 2005, p. 90 Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, The Furniture of Carlo Mollino, New York, 2006, pp. 153-55, 231 Fulvio Ferrari and Napoleone Ferrari, eds., Carlo Mollino Arabesques, exh. cat., Galleria Civica d’Arte Moderna e Contemporanea, Milan, 2007, pp. 95-97


3. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Pair of armchairs circa 1950 Walnut, fabric upholstery, brass. Each: 39 5/8 x 26 1/4 x 29 1/8 in. (100.5 x 66.6 x 74 cm) Probably manufactured by Melchiorre Bega, Bologna, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


4. Arredoluce Rare ceiling light 1960s Acrylic, brass. 37 in. (94 cm) drop, 20 in. (50.8 cm) diameter Manufactured by Arredoluce, Monza, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Monaco

The present lot has been registered in the Arredoluce Archives, Italy, as number 1693153.


5. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Desk circa 1950 Sapele-veneered wood, sapele. 31 x 102 x 35 1/2 in. (78.7 x 259.1 x 90.2 cm) Executed by Egidio Proserpio, Barzanò, Italy. Each lock impressed GHIANDA/BOVISIO. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Private collection, Cantù Literature “Il pannello-cruscotto per la scrivania di un dirigente d’azienda,” Domus, no. 228, September 1948, pp. 22-23 for a similar example Lisa Licitra Ponti, Gio Ponti: The Complete Works 19231978, London, 1990, p. 132 for a similar example Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti: L’arte si innamora dell’industria, New York, 2009, p. 190 for a similar example Daria Guarnati, ed., Aria D’Italia: espressione di Gio Ponti, Milan, 2011, p. 80 for a similar example


6. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Wall unit circa 1950 Sapele-veneered wood, painted steel. 59 x 115 1/4 x 15 1/2 in. (149.9 x 292.7 x 39.4 cm) Executed by Egidio Proserpio, Barzanò, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, Cantù

Literature “Il pannello-cruscotto per la scrivania di un dirigente d’azienda,” Domus, no. 228, September 1948, pp. 22-23 for a similar example Lisa Licitra Ponti, Gio Ponti: The Complete Works 19231978, London, 1990, p. 132 for a similar example Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti: L’arte si innamora dell’industria, New York, 2009, p. 190 for a similar example Daria Guarnati, ed., Aria D’Italia: espressione di Gio Ponti, Milan, 2011, p. 80 for a similar example


7. Gino Sarfatti

1912-1985

Adjustable foor lamp, model no. 1045 circa 1948 Painted aluminum, brass. As shown: 61 3/8 in. (156 cm) high Manufactured by Arteluce, Milan, Italy. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Disegno per l’industria,” Domus, no. 274, October 1952, p. 59 Marco Romanelli and Sandra Severi, Gino Sarfatti: Selected Works 1938-1973, Milan, 2012, pp. 166, 448

Please note the present lot may also be used as a wall light.


8. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Rare pair of armchairs circa 1947 Chestnut, fabric upholstery. Each: 30 1/4 x 29 1/4 x 28 3/4 in. (76.7 x 74.3 x 73 cm) Manufactured by Ariberto Colombo, Cantù, Italy. Reverse of each with manufacturer’s metal label printed COLOMBO FRANCO • CANTÙ • TEL 73/IMBOTTITURA DI/”gommapiuma m.r.”/Pirelli sapsa. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan

Literature “Due sedie una poltrona,” Domus, no. 274, October 1952, p. 22 Roberto Aloi, Esempi di arredamento moderno di tutto il mondo. Sedie, poltrone, divani. Seconda serie, Milan, 1953, fgs. 89-90 Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio 1950-1980. Immagini e contributi per una storia dell’arredo italiano, Milan, 1985, p. 64 Flaminio Gualdoni, ed., Ico Parisi & architetture, exh. cat., Galleria Civica, Bologna, 1990, p. 194 Roberta Lietti, Ico Parisi. Design catalogo ragionato/ catalogue raisonné 1936-1960, Como, 2017, pp. 212-13

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


9. Fontana Arte Wall mirror circa 1939 Mirrored glass, brass. 43 1/2 x 25 3/4 x 1 1/4 in. (110.5 x 65.4 x 3.2 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Reverse with partial manufacturer’s paper label printed GALVANIT/ FONTANA/ITALY/REGISTRATO/LUIGI FONTANA&C.S.p.A./MILANO-TORINO-GENOVA-CANTÙ-MESSINA/ GALVANIT È LO SPECCHIO DI CRISTALLO CON PROTEZIONE IN RAME CHE NE GARANTISCE LA DURATA. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Specchi e cristalli,” Domus, no. 143, November 1939, p. 61


10. Franco Albini

1905-1977

Rocking chaise, model no. PS 16 circa 1959 Walnut, fabric, cord. 29 3/4 x 65 x 27 1/2 in. (75.6 x 165.1 x 69.9 cm) Manufactured by Poggi, Pavia, Italy. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Fondazione Franco Albini. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Ugo La Pietra, “Design degli anni ‘50,” Domus, no. 578, January 1978, p. 38 Andrea Branzi and Michele De Lucchi, eds., Il Design Italiano Degli Anni ’50, Milan, 1985, p. 112 Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio del Design Italiano 1950-1980, Volume 1, Turin, 2003, p. 45


11. Angelo Lelii

1911-1979

Ceiling light circa 1959 Painted aluminum, brass, glass. 48 in. (121.9 cm) drop, 17 1/2 in. (44.5 cm) diameter Manufactured by Arredoluce, Monza, Italy. Interior of shade with manufacturer’s printed label. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Anty Pansera et. al., Arredoluce: Catalogo ragionato 1943-1987, Milan, 2018, pp. 212, 322

The present lot has been registered in the Arredoluce Archives, Italy as number 2012167.


12. Franco Albini and Ezio Sgrelli 1905-1977, 1904-2009 Pair of adjustable “Gala” armchairs circa 1951 Stained rattan, Indian cane. Each: 38 1/4 x 34 1/2 x 37 in. (97.2 x 87.6 x 94 cm) Manufactured by Vittorio Bonacina & C., Como, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Rome Literature Giuliana Gramigna, Repertorio del Design Italiano 1950-1980, Volume 1, Turin, 2003, p. 24 Giampiero Bosoni and Federico Bucci, Il design e gli interni di Franco Albini, Milan, 2016, pp. 69, 99 Giovanna Vitali, ed., Franco Albini: La continuità di un segno, Milan, 2017, pp. 72-73

The Gala armchair was designed in 1951 by Franco Albini and Ezio Sgrelli for the crafs and small industries organization’s section at the IX Milan Triennale. The presentation was a collection of furniture for the department store La Rinascente. The two designers worked with Vittorio Bonacina & C., a company founded in the nineteenth century specializing in rattan furniture, to create a distinctive design that combined readily available raw materials with traditional crafsmanship. Inspired by the basket-making techniques of southern Italy, Albini and Sgrelli exploited the elasticity of the rattan and cane to shape the elegant curves of the chair. Designed between 1951 and 1952, the present armchair is a second variation of the Gala model featuring an adjustable seat which enables the chair to adjust to a reclined position.


13. Luigi Zuccoli

1907-1985

Unique cofee table circa 1954 Persian travertine, brass. 18 3/4 x 27 7/8 x 16 5/8 in. (47.5 x 71 x 42.3 cm) Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, San Fermo building, Como

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.

Luigi Zuccoli’s signifcant contributions to postwar Italian Rationalism remain relatively unknown. Zuccoli was a student, trusted collaborator and friend of the architect Giuseppe Terragni. Following his mentor’s rationalistic approach, he designed many residential buildings and interiors in Como, including the completion of Terragni’s fnal project, Casa Giuliani-Frigerio, in 1940. Zuccoli’s interiors combine essential forms and refned materials, together creating works that are both functional and elegant.


14. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Floor lamp circa 1955 Walnut, brass, painted metal, fabric shade. 73 1/4 in. (186.1 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Max Ingrand, Du verre à la lumière, Paris, 2009, p. 155 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 398


15. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Rare ceiling light circa 1965 Glass, brass, painted metal, painted steel. 23 in. (58.4 cm) drop, 22 1/2 in. (57.2 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan

Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 1, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, pp. 22-23 for larger versions of the model “Stand di Fontana-Arte alla 39a Fiera di Milano,” Vitrum, no. 147, February 1965, pp. 28, 33 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 326 for a larger version of the model


16. Gino Sarfatti

1912-1985

Adjustable table lamp, model no. 565 circa 1956 Painted steel, chromium-plated steel, acrylic. 20 1/2 in. (52.1 cm) high Manufactured by Arteluce, Milan, Italy. Interior of fxture with manufacturer’s decal label printed AL/MILANO/ARTELUCE. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private collection, Varese Literature Domus, no. 413, April 1964, n.p., for an advertisement Marco Romanelli and Sandra Severi, Gino Sarfatti: Selected Works 1938-1973, Milan, 2012, pp. 274, 432

17. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Two-part wall unit circa 1955 Walnut-veneered wood, painted steel. 122 x 52 1/2 x 10 1/2 in. (309.9 x 133.4 x 26.7 cm), 122 x 52 1/2 x 20 1/2 in. (309.9 x 133.4 x 52.1 cm) Manufactured by Brugnoli Mobili, Cantù, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Particolari di interni,” Domus, no. 322, September 1956, pp. 38-39 Roberta Lietti, Ico Parisi Catalogue Raisonné, 1936-1960, Milan, 2017, p. 396

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


18. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Armchair, from the Fondazione Livio e Maria Garzanti, Forlì circa 1954 Elm, fabric upholstery. 30 1/4 x 24 x 32 in. (76.8 x 61 x 81.3 cm) Manufactured by ISA, Bergamo, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Fondazione Livio e Maria Garzanti, Forlì Literature Franco Bertoni, Gio Ponti: “Idee” d’arte e di architettura a Imola e in Romagna, Imola, Italy, 2012, p. 195


19. Venini Wall light circa 1950 Glass, painted steel. 17 3/8 x 14 1/8 x 6 3/4 in. (44 x 36 x 17.3 cm) Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Cinema San Marco, Venice


20. Venini Wall light circa 1960 Pezzato glass, brass. 17 x 8 3/4 x 9 1/4 in. (43.2 x 22.2 x 23.5 cm) Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Lampade,” Artecasa, no. 14, November 1960, n.p.


21. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Cofee table, model no. 1116, from the “Modern by Singer” furniture line circa 1951 Walnut-veneered wood, walnut, brass. 17 1/4 x 59 x 19 5/8 in. (43.8 x 150 x 50 cm) Interior of two legs impressed 23 and two impressed 24. Manufactured by Fratelli Rizzi, Intimiano, Italy for Singer & Sons, New York. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan

Literature “Across the seas collaborations for the new Singer collection,” Interiors, December 1951, pp. 121-22 William James Hennessey, Modern furnishings for the home, New York, January 1, 1952, p. 110 Modern by Singer, sales catalogue, New York, 1955, n.p. Roberta Lietti, Ico Parisi Catalogue Raisonné, 19361960, Milan, 2017, p. 143

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


22. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

“Dahlia” ceiling light, model no. 1563 circa 1958 Brass, glass. 18 in. (45.7 cm) drop, 53 in. (134.6 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Casa Buzzi Ceccato, Milan Literature “Nuovi negozi di vetri e cristalli d’arte,” Vitrum, no. 100, February 1958, p. 38 Quaderni Fontana Arte 1, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 25


23. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Unique table circa 1949 Sapele-veneered wood, sapele. 31 1/4 x 78 3/4 x 35 1/4 in. (79.5 x 200 x 89.5 cm) Manufactured by Fratelli Rizzi, Intimiano, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Como

Literature “Mobili semplici e mobili complessi,” Domus, no. 238, vol. VII, 1949, p. 43 for a variant of the model Roberta Lietti, Ico Parisi Catalogue Raisonné, 19361960, Milan, 2017, p. 275 for a variant of the model

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


24. Ico Parisi

1916-1996

Table circa 1950 Marble, walnut, brass. 29 1/2 in. (75 cm) high, 43 1/4 in. (110 cm) diameter Manufactured by Fratelli Rizzi, Intimiano, Italy. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Como Literature Roberta Lietti, Ico Parisi Catalogue Raisonné, 1936-1960, Milan, 2017, p. 280

Phillips would like to thank Roberta Lietti of the Archivio del Design di Ico Parisi for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


25. Franco Buzzi Pair of wall lights circa 1952 Polished and painted brass. Each: 11 1/2 x 11 1/8 x 5 1/2 in. (29.2 x 28.3 x 14 cm) Manufactured by O-Luce, Milan, Italy. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Private collection, Palermo Literature Gerhard Krohn and Fritz Hierl, Formschöne Lampen und Beleuchtungsanlagen, Munich, 1952, p. 140 Roberto Aloi, Esempi Di Decorazione Moderna Di Tutto Il Mondo, Illuminazione d’Oggi, Milan, 1956, p. 219


26. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Daybed, from the Fondazione Livio e Maria Garzanti, Forlì circa 1954 Elm, brass, fabric upholstery. 28 3/4 x 77 x 35 1/4 in. (73 x 195.6 x 89.5 cm) Manufactured by ISA, Bergamo, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Fondazione Livio e Maria Garzanti, Forlì, Italy


27. Cesare Lacca

b. 1929

Two foor lamps circa 1949 Painted wood, brass, fabric shades. Taller: 79 in. (200.7 cm) high Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Roberto Aloi, L’Arredamento Moderno, Quarta Serie, Milan, 1949, fg. 209 for a similar example


28. Pietro Chiesa

1892-1948

Ceiling light 1940s Brass, glass. 32 in. (81.3 cm) drop, 44 x 11 3/4 in. (111.8 x 29.8 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan


29. Osvaldo Borsani

1911-1985

Wall light circa 1944 Painted wood. 54 7/8 x 7 1/2 x 4 7/8 in. (139.4 x 19.1 x 12.4 cm) Manufactured by Arredamenti Borsani, Varedo, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Norman Foster, Tommaso Fantoni and Giampiero Bosoni, Osvaldo Borsani, exh. cat., Milan, 2018, p. 64


30. Seguso Ceiling light 1940s Corroso glass, painted brass. 27 7/8 in. (71 cm) drop Produced by Seguso Vetri d’Arte, Murano, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000


31. Flavio Poli

1900-1984

Large ceiling light 1950s Glass with gold leaf inclusions, painted steel. 14 3/4 in. (37.5 cm) drop, 56 1/2 x 33 1/2 in. (143.5 x 85.1 cm) Produced by Seguso Vetri d’Arte, Murano, Italy. Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance Hotel Bellavista, Menaggio


32. Flavio Poli

1900-1984

Pair of wall lights 1950s Glass with gold leaf inclusions, steel. Each: 15 1/2 x 14 x 5 in. (39.4 x 35.6 x 12.7 cm) Produced by Seguso Vetri d’Arte, Murano, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Hotel Bellavista, Menaggio


33. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Dressing table, from the Hotel Royal, Naples circa 1953 Oak, oak-veneered wood, brass, mirrored glass. 48 1/4 x 36 7/8 x 17 7/8 in. (122.6 x 93.7 x 45.4 cm) Manufactured by Dassi, Milan, Italy. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Hotel Royal, Naples Literature Domus, no. 317, April 1956; no. 318, May 1956; no. 325, December 1956 for advertisements Irene de Guttry and Maria Paola Maino, Il Mobile Italiano Degli Anni ‘40 e ‘50, Bari, 1992, p. 151 Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti: L’arte si innamora dell’industria, New York, 2009, pp. 367, 373


34. Venini Ceiling light, from the “Esprit” series circa 1966 Blown glass, chromium-plated steel. 59 in. (149.9 cm) drop, 29 in. (73.7 cm) diameter Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Domus, no. 436, March 1966, n.p. for an advertisement Franco Deboni, Venini Glass: Its History, Artists and Techniques, Catalogue 1921-2007, vol. 1, Turin, 2007, The Blue Catalogue (appendix), p. 245


35. Paolo Bufa

1903-1970

Pair of armchairs early 1950s Walnut, fabric upholstery. Each: 33 1/4 x 27 1/4 x 33 1/8 in. (84.5 x 69.2 x 84 cm) Frames impressed VIII and XII, respectively. Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Paolo Bufa Archive. Estimate $10,000-15,000

Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Roberto Aloi, L’Arredamento Moderno, quarta serie, Milan, 1949, fg. 366 for a similar example Roberto Rizzi, I mobili di Paolo Bufa, exh. cat., Mostra Internazionale dell’Arredamento, Cantù, 2002, n.p. for a similar example


36. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

Illuminated bar cabinet circa 1948 Maple-veneered wood, brass, glass. 52 3/4 x 43 1/4 x 17 3/4 in. (134 x 109.9 x 45.1 cm) Together with a certifcate of expertise from the Gio Ponti Archives. Estimate $12,000-18,000

Provenance Private collection, Italy Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 2004 Literature Ugo La Pietra, ed., Gio Ponti: L’arte si innamora dell’industria, New York, 2009, illustrated p. 136


37. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Pair of wall lights, model no. 1844 circa 1960 Glass, brass, painted metal. Each: 17 x 27 x 4 1/4 in. (43.2 x 68.6 x 10.8 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 1, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 71 Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 336


38. Venini Rare ceiling light, model no. 223 1931-1935 A canne cordonato glass, brass, painted steel. 5 1/2 x 62 x 15 1/2 in. (14 x 157.5 x 39.4 cm) Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Anna Venini Diaz de Santillana, Venini Catalogue Raisonné 1921-1986, Milan, 2000, The Blue Catalogue (appendix), pl. 126 Franco Deboni, Venini Glass: Its History, Artists and Techniques, Catalogue 1921-2007, vol. 1, Turin, 2007, The Blue Catalogue (appendix), pl. 126


39. Fontana Arte Floor lamp, model no. 2302 1960s Brass, glass, painted aluminum. 68 1/2 in. (174 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Rome Literature Quaderni Fontana Arte 6, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 111


Property from a Private East Coast Collection

40. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Table lamp circa 1956 Brass, glass, painted metal. 26 in. (66 cm) high Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Phillips de Pury & Company, London, “Design,” April 28, 2010 lot 127 Private collection, acquired from the above Wright, Chicago, “Design,” October 17, 2013, lot 241 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 372


41. Max Ingrand

1908-1969

Ceiling light circa 1955 Brass, glass, painted aluminum. 33 1/2 in. (85.1 cm) drop, 27 1/4 x 16 1/2 in. (69.2 x 41.9 cm) Manufactured by Fontana Arte, Milan, Italy. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Turin Literature Franco Deboni, Fontana Arte: Gio Ponti, Pietro Chiesa, Max Ingrand, Turin, 2012, fg. 310 for a similar example


Σ

42. Joaquim Tenreiro

1906-1992

Sideboard 1950s Brazilian rosewood-veneered wood, rosewood, painted wood. 33 1/4 x 157 1/2 x 17 1/4 in. (84.5 x 400.1 x 43.8 cm) Reverse with two paper labels printed Tenreiro Móveis e Decorações/Rue 7 de Março, 30 / 80 - A/Fab. N.°/ Enc. N.°/Pianta N.°/Valor:/INDUSTRIA BRASILEIRA, each with penciled numbers. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private collection, Rio de Janeiro Literature Soraia Cals, Tenreiro, Rio de Janeiro, 1998, p. 68 for a similar example Aric Chen, Brazil Modern: The Rediscovery of Twentieth-Century Brazilian Furniture, New York, 2016, p. 95 for a similar example


43. Angelo Mangiarotti

1921-2012

Table, from the “Eros” series circa 1971 Carrara marble. 28 x 95 x 28 in. (71.1 x 241.3 x 71.1 cm) Manufactured by Skipper, Milan, Italy. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Phillips de Pury & Company, New York, “Design,” 24 May 2007, lot 245 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature François Burkhardt, Angelo Mangiarotti: Opera completa- Complete works, Milan, 2010, p. 302


Property from a Private Collection, Florida

44. Stilnovo Adjustable wall light, model no. 2156 1960s Nickel-plated metal, painted aluminum, patinated brass, Perspex. As shown: 17 x 16 x 48.5 in. (43.2 x 40.6 x 123.2 cm) Manufactured by Stilnovo, Milan, Italy. Interior of shade with manufacturer’s paper label printed MILANO/STILNOVO/ITALY. Wall mount impressed stilnovo/PATENT. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Literature Stilnovo: apparecchi per l’illuminazione, sales catalogue, Milan, 1960s, p. 50


45. Venini Set of four “Balloton” ceiling lights circa 1957 Balloton glass, painted steel, brass. Each: 16 1/2 in. (41.9 cm) drop, 17 1/2 in. (44.5 cm) diameter Produced by Venini & C., Murano, Italy. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Carlo Bestetti, Forme Nuove In Italia, Rome, 1957, p. 204 for a similar example


46. Ettore Sottsass, Jr.

1917-2007

Pair of “Rocchettone” side tables, model no. T. 44 circa 1965 Stained teak, painted wood. Each: 17 in. (43.2 cm) high, 17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm) diameter Manufactured by Poltronova, Agliana, Italy. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature “Ettore Sottsass Jr.: una stanza da letto,” Domus, no. 426, May 1965, pp. 52, 55-56 “Ettore Sottsass Jr.: Mobili 1965 per Poltronova,” Domus, no. 433, December 1965, p. 42 Catalogo Produzione Poltronova, sales catalogue, Agliana, 1966/67, p. 32 Milco Carboni, Ettore Sottsass Jr. ’ 60 -’ 70, exh. cat., FRAC Centre, Orléans, 2006, pp. 88-89


47. Ettore Sottsass, Jr.

1917-2007

“Sandretta” table mirror, model no. SP.63 circa 1965 Stained and painted wood, mirrored glass, brass. 19 1/8 x 17 1/8 x 6 1/2 in. (48.5 x 43.5 x 16.5 cm) Manufactured by Poltronova, Agliana, Italy. Estimate $2,500-3,500

Provenance Private collection, Livorno Literature Catalogo Produzione Poltronova, sales catalogue, Agliana, 1966/67, p. 32 Claudia Neumann, Design in Italia, Milan, 1999, p. 67


Property from a New York Collection

48. Jorge Zalszupin

b. 1922

“Banco Onda” bench circa 1960 Stained wood-veneered plywood, chromium-plated metal, leather. 11 3/8 x 118 7/8 x 21 7/8 in. (29 x 302 x 55.5 cm) Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance Private collection, Brazil Galerie Chastel Maréchal, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Maria Cecília Loschiavo dos Santos, Jorge Zalszupin: Design Moderno no Brasil, São Paulo, 2014, pp. 180-81 Alberto Vicente, Marcelo Vasconcellos, et al., Brazilian Modern Design, São Paulo, 2017, pp. 382-83


49. Gino Sarfatti

1912-1985

Ceiling light, model no. 2119 circa 1961 Glass, painted brass, fabric cord. 38 1/4 in. (97.2 cm) drop, 17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm) diameter Manufactured by Arteluce, Milan, Italy. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Private collection, Milan Literature Marco Romanelli and Sandra Severi, Gino Sarfatti: Selected Works 1938-1973, Milan, 2012, p. 475


50. Gio Ponti

1891-1979

“Diamond” fatware service for twenty-four 1954-1958 Sterling silver, stainless steel. Largest utensil: 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm) Manufactured by Reed & Barton, Newport, USA and distributed by Arthur Krupp, Milan, Italy. Each fork and spoon impressed Reed & Barton/STERLING, each hollow handle piece impressed REED & BARTON/MIRRORSTELE/STERLING HANDLE. Comprising 24 dinner forks, 24 salad forks, 24 dinner knives, 24 butter knives, 24 soup spoons, 36 dessert spoons, 12 cocktail forks, 1 pickle fork, 1 sugar spoon, 6 serving utensils (176).

Estimate $12,000-18,000 Literature Sophie Bouilhet-Dumas, Dominique Forest and Salvatore Licitra, eds., Gio Ponti: archi-designer, exh. cat., Milan, 2018, p. 136


Property of a New York City Collector

51. Vladimir Kagan

1927-2016

Console table 1952 Walnut-veneered wood, walnut. 35 1/4 x 96 x 17 1/2 in. (89.5 x 243.8 x 44.5 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Wyeth, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2003

Phillips would like to thank the Vladimir Kagan Design Group for their assistance cataloguing the present lot.


Σ

52. Sergio Rodrigues

1927-2014

“Mucki” bench circa 1958 Brazilian rosewood, Brazilian rosewood-veneered wood. 11 7/8 x 98 1/8 x 23 5/8 in. (30.3 x 249.3 x 60 cm) Produced by Oca, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Private collection, São Paulo Literature Soraia Cals, Sergio Rodrigues, Rio de Janeiro, 2000, pp. 94-95, 253 for a larger version of the model


Σ

53. Sergio Rodrigues

1927-2014

“Sérgio Augusto” foor lamp circa 1965 Chromium-plated steel, chromium-plated metal, Brazilian rosewood, fabric shade. 57 3/4 in. (146.7 cm) high Produced by Oca, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Private collection, São Paulo Literature Soraia Cals, Sergio Rodrigues, Rio de Janeiro, 2000, p. 276 Adélia Borges, Sergio Rodrigues, Rio de Janeiro, 2005, p. 65


Martin Eisler was born in Vienna, and as the son of Max Eisler, the art historian and founding member of the Austrian Werkbund, he was exposed to the world of progressive modern art and design from a young age. He attended the School of Applied Arts in Vienna before immigrating to Buenos Aires in 1938. There, he pursued a career as a designer and became a partner in Carlo Hauner’s furniture company, Forma S/A Móveis e Objetos de Arte. Forma played a pivotal role in the development of the Brazilian modern design aesthetic, one that drew on European and American infuences while employing local materials. The frm positioned itself as an international purveyor of modern furniture, for example, acquiring the rights to make and sell Knoll International furniture in 1959. In the mid-1950s Hauner returned to Italy to open a branch in Brescia, and Eisler took over as creative director for the Latin American branches. The company’s Argentinian branch split of around 1959 to become Interieur Forma. With a grinning profle that transforms into a smirk, the present model Reversível armchair is an ingenious and comical take on the concept of an adjustable armchair. The construction is similar to Franco Albini and Ezio Sgrelli’s design for the adjustable Gala armchair (lot 12): each chair is adjusted by lifing the curved seat and placing it at the desired pitch on its conforming base. Materially and stylistically the armchair is purely of the 1950s, and its unique design refective of Eisler’s innovative work for Forma.

54. Martin Eisler

1913-1977

“Reversível” armchair circa 1956 Painted steel, fabric upholstery. 24 1/2 x 41 1/2 x 29 in. (62.2 x 105.4 x 73.7 cm) Manufactured by Forma, Brazil. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Literature “Nuovi mobili,” Domus, no. 322, September 1956, p. 46 “Design Brasiliano: un sottofondo nativo,” Domus, no. 1001, April 2016, p. 28 Jayme Vargas, Desenho da utopia: mobiliário moderno brasileiro, São Paulo, 2016, n.p. Alberto Vicente and Marcelo Vasconcellos, Brazilian Modern Design, São Paulo, 2017, pp. 228-29


55. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

Kinetic sculpture circa 1948 Copper, bronze, steel, spruce. 15 x 7 1/2 x 4 in. (38.1 x 19.1 x 10.2 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance The Estate of Harry Bertoia Wright, Chicago, “Modern Design,” October 6, 2009, lot 220 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Beverly H. Twitchell, Bertoia: The Metalworker, London, 2019, illustrated p. 146


56. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

Kinetic sculpture circa 1948 Copper, bronze, steel, spruce. 17 1/4 x 8 1/4 x 3 1/2 in. (43.8 x 21 x 8.9 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Provenance The Estate of Harry Bertoia Wright, Chicago, “Important Design,” December 8, 2009, lot 286 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Beverly H. Twitchell, Bertoia: The Metalworker, London, 2019, p. 146 for a similar example


57. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

“Sonambient” sounding sculpture circa 1972 Beryllium copper, bronze. 64 3/4 x 12 x 12 in. (164.5 x 30.5 x 30.5 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation. Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance Private collection, Denmark, acquired directly from the artist, 1972 Thence by descent Christie’s, Amsterdam, “Post-War and Contemporary Art,” April 20, 2016, lot 18 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Beverly H. Twitchell, Bertoia: The Metalworker, London, 2019, pp. 243-45 for similar examples


58. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

59. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

Sculpture circa 1968 Patinated bronze, copper. 5 x 5 3/4 x 1 3/4 in. (12.7 x 14.6 x 4.4 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation.

Study circa 1940 Redwood, steel. 7 1/8 x 1 3/4 x 2 1/8 in. (18.1 x 4.4 x 5.4 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation.

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Estimate $6,000-8,000

Provenance The Estate of Harry Bertoia Wright, Chicago, “Modern Design,” October 7, 2008, lot 201 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Provenance The Estate of Harry Bertoia Wright, Chicago, “Important Design,” December 8, 2009, lot 290 Acquired from the above by the present owner

The present lot was likely a study for a piece of jewelry.


60. Harry Bertoia

1915-1978

“Bush” sculpture circa 1972 Patinated bronze. 6 x 13 1/2 x 7 3/4 in. (15.2 x 34.3 x 19.7 cm) Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Harry Bertoia Foundation.

Provenance Doris Golden, acquired directly from the artist, 1978 Sotheby’s, New York, “Arcade Fine Arts: 19th Century to Contemporary Including American,” September 29, 2004, lot 312 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Estimate $8,000-12,000

Literature Beverly H. Twitchell, Bertoia: The Metalworker, London, 2019, p. 216 for a similar example


One of a Kind Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer Introduction by Glenn Adamson In 1981 the British Crafs Council staged a fascinating exhibition entitled The Maker’s Eye. The premise was simple: a range of contemporary craf artists chose works by their peers, presenting the objects in carefully arranged groups. It was an exercise in sensibility. One of the artist-curators included was the potter and writer Alison Britton. Of her selection, she said this: “I would like to make a comparison evident between ‘prose’ objects and ‘poetic’ objects; those that are mainly active and those that are mainly contemplative. To me the most moving things are the ones where I experience in looking at them a frisson from both these aspects at once, from both prose and poetry, purpose and commentary. These have what I call a double presence.”1 As it happens, 1981 marks an early stage in the formation of the Grainer collection. Several years prior, Marc Grainer had begun going regularly to London on business trips, which quickly became buying trips as well. His initial focus was on ceramics, which was not then the highly valued art medium it is today (he recalls bringing many of his early acquisitions home in carry-on luggage). The UK was a particularly open feld. The number of active collectors there was comparatively small, and the average consumer of “studio pottery” remained wedded to a traditionalist aesthetic, associated with the infuential Bernard Leach and his disciples. Grainer was one of very few Americans to realize that something new and exciting was happening in British ceramics. (Another was John Driscoll, who developed a scholarly collection of the Leach school, as well as more contemporary makers).2 The origins of this creative vitality can be located in the 1960s, with the work of

European émigrés Hans Coper, Ruth Duckworth, and preeminently, the Viennese-trained modernist Lucie Rie. Their turn away from the past, toward abstraction, paved the way for an extraordinary golden generation of ceramists who arrived on the scene in the 1970s. Among the leading protagonists, in addition to Britton herself, were Gordon Baldwin, whose explorations of the vessel indicate its huge potential as an arena of experimentation; John Ward, who creates lucid compositions with precisely delineated geometric surfaces; and Richard Slee, a wickedly funny satirist with an unerring sense of plastic form. Soon it was clear to both Marc and Diane Grainer that they were in deep—and that British ceramics was not the only feld they wanted to explore. They became involved in the institutional infrastructure of the craf movement in the USA, taking up various leadership roles with the James Renwick Alliance (a support group of the Renwick Gallery) in their home city, Washington DC, as well as the American Craf Museum (now the Museum of Arts and Design) in New York, and the American Craf Council. In 2010 they made a major gif of British ceramics to the Mint Museum of Art.3 In many respects they have been exemplary of another golden generation, of motivated craf collectors who also became institution-builders. All the while the Grainers’ collecting kept pace, with the synthesis that Britton described—prose and poetry, expression and functional allusion—always evident. They continued their early involvement with ceramics, acquiring not only fgures based in the UK, such as Nicholas Rena and Lawson Oyekan, but also luminaries of the American scene, such as the post-Pop trompe l’œil magician Richard Shaw. They also developed an

1. Alison Britton, untitled statement in The Maker’s Eye (London: Crafs Council, 1981); reprinted in Britton, Seeing Things: Collecting Writing on Art, Craf and Design (London: Occasional Papers, 2014). See also Tanya Harrod, The Crafs in Britain in the 20th Century (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1999), 403. 2. See “Pottery and Purpose,” in Glenn Adamson, Martina Droth, and Simon Olding, eds, Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2017). 3. Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Ceramics: The Grainer Collection (Charlotte, NC: Mint Museum/Yale University Press, 2010). 4. Bernard Jazzar and Hal Nelson, June Schwarcz: Invention and Variation (Washington DC: Smithsonian American Art Museum, 2017). 5. Alison Britton, “The Open-Minded Eye,” Crafs 150 (Jan/Feb. 1998); reprinted in Britton, Seeing Things.


interest in the brilliant Californian enamellist June Schwarcz, whose modest yet mighty works bear comparison with the best Abstract Expressionist sculpture.4 Gradually, they shifed up a few gears, not just living with pots but acquiring and commissioning major works of sculpture, lighting, and furniture, giving shape to a totally creative, hand-crafed environment. Today, as ceramics and limited-edition furniture achieve unprecedented levels of interest, it’s important to retain a sense of recent history. Artists who are newly gravitating to these disciplines could learn a lot from the previous generation. Witness the important Judy Kensley McKie Monkey Settee ofered here, featuring an unusual combination of carved walnut and cast bronze, and the artist’s customary mastery of line. Or Britton’s Pale Double Pot of 1995, which could almost have been made as an explicit manifestation of her principle of “double presence.” Composed of two contrasting yet conjoined volumes, the object calls to mind a pair of dancers in motion, with the kinetic energy enhanced by def swirls of slip on the surface. The interior volumes have equal interest to the exterior, and their mutual encounter is articulated by a fattened lip that courses complicatedly, stepwise, around the whole pot. While only 19 inches high, it’s a majestic thing—a miniature monument to its own intuitive making. Marc and Diane Grainer were exceptional in realizing the value of works like this when they were frst made. With the beneft of hindsight, their greatness is selfevident; but sometimes that clarity takes time. For, as Britton put it on another occasion, “things must come frst, that is what it is about.”5


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

61. Judy Kensley McKie

b. 1944

“Monkey Settee” 1994 Walnut, patinated bronze. 35 x 64 x 22 in. (88.9 x 162.6 x 55.9 cm) Bronze produced by Artworks Foundry, Berkeley, California. Number 4 from the edition of 12 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Underside incised © JKM 1994 4 / 12 Bench B. Estimate $70,000-90,000 Provenance Pritam & Eames, East Hampton Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1996 Literature “Collectors at Home: A Conversation with Marc and Diane Grainer,” American Craf, December 1999/ January 2000, illustrated pp. 52-53 Janet Wilson, ed., Skilled Work: American Craf in the Renwick Gallery, Washington, D.C., 1998, pp. 37, 150-51, 163

Monkey Settee has become an iconic representation of Judy Kensley McKie’s body of work, for the ultimate incorporation of animal forms in her furniture designs, and for its combination of fuency in woodworking and bronze casting. As McKie’s woodworking career progressed, she moved from carving animals in relief onto the surfaces of cabinets and tables, to carving animals out of the body of the form itself, becoming the arms, legs and back structural supports of her designs, to fully realized animal sculptures incorporated into her designs that appear to be in movement, simultaneously living within the object and among its users. Among the most successful executions of her vision, clues of her research into ancient art, Art Deco aesthetics, and international cultures abound in Monkey Settee. An example of Monkey Settee is in the permanent collection of the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, DC.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

62. John Ward

b. 1938

“Black and White Oval Pot” circa 1996 Hand-built glazed stoneware. 9 in. (22.9 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Contemporary Applied Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1996 Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 166

Immediately, the patterned surface decoration of John Ward’s ceramics recalls the pre-glazed pottery of ancient Egypt and China, but the pleasingly simple graphic element of his work belies the complex hand-building of each vessel he creates. His experimentation in cutting and rejoining clay bodies results in innovative forms and textured surfaces which are ofen inspired by the natural elements of the landscape in which he lives and works. Ward’s ceramic artwork is found in the permanent collections of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford, and The Museum of Modern Art, New York.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

63. John Ward

b. 1938

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

64. John Ward

b. 1938

“Black and White Vessel” circa 1995 Hand-built glazed stoneware. 9 in. (22.9 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal.

“Black and White Vessel” circa 1991 Hand-built glazed stoneware. 8 3/4 in. (22.2 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal.

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Provenance Peter Dingley Gallery, Stratford-upon-Avon Acquired from the above by the present owners

Provenance New Crafsman, St. Ives Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1991

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

65. Lucie Rie

1902-1995

Bowl circa 1983 Porcelain, golden manganese glaze with terracotta and turquoise bands. 8 1/2 in. (21.6 cm) diameter Underside impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance New Crafsman, St. Ives Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1983 Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Tony Birks, Lucie Rie, Yeovil, 1994, p. 200 for a similar example Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 126


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

66. Lucie Rie

1902-1995

Tall vase with faring lip and integral spiral 1984 Stoneware, mixed clays producing an integral pink and green spiral. 12 7/8 in. (32.7 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s seal. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Fischer Fine Art, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1984 Exhibited “Lucie Rie: Hans Coper,” Fischer Fine Art, London, July 5-August 3, 1984 “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Tony Birks, Lucie Rie, Yeovil, 1994, pp. 189-90 for similar examples


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

67. Gordon Baldwin

b. 1932

Estimate $4,000-6,000

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 “Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery,” The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, September 14-December 3, 2017

Provenance Liliana L. Epstein, London Christie’s, South Kensington, “The Mrs. Liliana L. Epstein Studio Pottery Collection,” April 27, 1998, lot 314 Acquired from the above by the present owners

Literature Glenn Adamson, Martina Droth, and Simon Olding, eds., Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery, exh. cat., The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 2017, illustrated p. 318

“Developed Bottle” 1985 Earthenware, painted slip. 13 3/4 in. (34.9 cm) high Underside signed in glaze GB/85 (partially obscured).


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

68. Gordon Baldwin

b. 1932

Two “Perched” vessels 1985 Earthenware, painted slip. Taller: 27 in. (68.6 cm) high Underside of taller (white) signed in glaze GB 85/-June-, the underside of the other example signed in red pencil GB 85/Feb-Apr. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Liliana L. Epstein, London Christie’s, South Kensington, “The Mrs. Liliana L. Epstein Studio Pottery Collection,” April 27, 1998, lots 318 and 319 Acquired from the above by the present owners Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

69. Alison Britton

b. 1948

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

70. Alison Britton

b. 1948

“Pink Jar” 1998 Earthenware, painted with slips and pigments, clear matte glaze. 17 1/2 in. (44.5 cm) high Underside incised Alison Britton 98.

“Blue Container” 2000 Earthenware, painted with slips and pigments, clear matte glaze. 18 3/4 in. (47.6 cm) high Underside incised Alison Britton 2000.

Estimate $2,000-3,000

Estimate $3,000-4,000

Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1999

Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 2000

A leading fgure in English ceramics, Alison Britton was part of a group of infuential ceramists who emerged from the Royal College of Art in the 1970s, including Richard Slee, Elizabeth Fritsch and Jacqueline Poncelet, whose work sought to re-establish the vessel as an abstract form. Rather than throw on a wheel, Britton hand-builds her pieces by assembling slabs in an asymmetrical, ofen architectural structure and paints them in energetic gestural patterns, combining sculpture with painting. Internationally recognized as a curator, writer and recipient of the Most Excellent Order of the British Empire, her ceramic artworks are held in the permanent collections of numerous institutions including the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, The Powerhouse Museum, Sydney, and the Los Angeles County Museum of Art.

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Linda Sandino, Complexity and Ambiguity: The Ceramics of Alison Britton, exh. cat., Barrett Marsden Gallery, London, 2000, illustrated p. 30


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

71. Alison Britton

b. 1948

“Pale Double Pot” 1995 Earthenware, painted with slips and pigments, clear matte glaze. 18 3/4 in. (47.6 cm) high Underside incised Alison Britton/95. Estimate $3,000-4,000 Provenance Indigo Gallery, Boca Raton Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1996

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 “Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery,” The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, September 14-December 3, 2017 Literature Linda Sandino, Complexity and Ambiguity: The Ceramics of Alison Britton, exh. cat., Barrett Marsden Gallery, London, 2000, illustrated p. 10 Glenn Adamson, Martina Droth, and Simon Olding, eds., Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery, exh. cat., The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 2017, illustrated p. 327


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

72. Ryoji Koie

b. 1938

“Oribe Tsubo” 2000 Glazed stoneware. 11 3/4 in. (29.8 cm) high Together with custom wood box inscribed with title and artist’s signature to top of lid, in Japanese calligraphy. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Yamaki Art Gallery, Osaka Acquired from the above by the present owners, 2000

Working from one of the oldest renowned centers of ceramic production in Japan, Ryoji Koie has overlapped Japanese ceramic tradition with experimental and ofen performance art to create an innovative body of work. Frequently exploring contemporary social and political themes, Koie uses traditional forms and glazes as a deliberate element of surprise in his work. Koie’s work is in the permanent collections of numerous institutions including the de Young Museum, San Francisco, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, and the National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

73. June Schwarcz

1918-2015

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

74. June Schwarcz

1918-2015

Pitcher 1995 Hammered, enameled, and patinated copper with electroplated texture. 10 in. (25.4 cm) high Underside incised Schwarcz/2066/1995.

Vessel 1998 Hammered, enameled, and patinated copper with electroplated texture. 9 in. (22.9 cm) high Underside incised 2121/Schwarcz/1998.

Estimate $3,000-5,000

Estimate $3,000-5,000

Provenance Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998

Provenance Susan Cummins Gallery, Mill Valley Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998

Literature Bernard N. Jazzar and Harold B. Nelson, Little Dreams in Glass and Metal: Enameling in America, 1920 to the Present, exh. cat., The Enamel Arts Foundation, Los Angeles, 2015, pp. 210-11 for similar examples

June Schwarcz was an experimental enamelist whose extensive body of work showcased the evolution of her innovative practice. Afer training as an industrial designer at Pratt Institute, she encountered enameling en route to Sausalito, where she would spend the next several decades defning the craf and cementing her status as one of the leading fgures of the feld. She used electroplating and electroforming techniques to produce varied textures in her work and ofen employed folding and stitching to further experiment with form and surface. Her work is in the permanent collections of multiple institutions including The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, the Renwick Gallery of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington, DC, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

75. Richard Shaw

b. 1941

“Book with House of Camels” 1984 Porcelain with over-glaze decals. 5 1/4 x 9 1/8 x 6 3/4 in. (13.3 x 23.2 x 17.1 cm) Underside signed in pencil Richard Shaw/1984. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Mobilia Gallery, Cambridge Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998 Literature Martha Drexler Lynn, American Studio Ceramics: Innovation and Identity, 1940 to 1979, New Haven, 2015, p. 308 for a similar example

A student of both Peter Voulkos and Robert Arneson, Richard Shaw was a leading proponent of the Super Object movement in California ceramics, known for its exaggeration of everyday objects. Inspired by eighteenthcentury English Stafordshire porcelain and his fellow student Ron Nagle’s use of china paints, Shaw experiments with airbrushing, underglaze painting, and photo-silkscreening to ultimately achieve his signature trompe l’œil style. Shaw’s meticulously detailed still life sculptures address, in his own words, “a person memorializing their identity using the objects from their personal narrative… their pastimes, intellectual pursuits, sins, habits good and bad, obsessions, etc.” Shaw’s sculptures are in the permanent collections of the Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, among others.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

76. John Cederquist

b. 1946

“2-D Thonet II” 1985 Baltic birch plywood, maple, embuia inlay, aniline dyes. 35 3/4 x 15 x 18 in. (90.8 x 38.1 x 45.7 cm) Leg inlaid with artist’s cipher. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Franklin Parrasch Gallery, New York Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

77. Lawson Oyekan

b. 1961

“Passage Pot (Af Ika Af Eke) Saworo” 1993 Earthenware, manganese slip. 10 1/2 in. (26.7 cm) high Underside incised Lawson/Oyekan/93. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Provenance Margaret Lipworth Fine Art, Boca Raton Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1998

Exhibited “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 “Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery,” The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, September 14-December 3, 2017 Literature Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 117 Glenn Adamson, Martina Droth, and Simon Olding, eds., Things of Beauty Growing: British Studio Pottery, exh. cat., The Yale Center for British Art, New Haven, 2017, illustrated p. 384

A recurring theme in Lawson Oyekan’s work is the human experience. His ceramic vessels are ofen unglazed and pierced, the perforations allowing for the passage of light and air, simultaneously presenting as wounded and raw while symbolizing the act of breathing and persisting. In the artist’s own words: “My intent is to express human endurance and deliver a message of reassurance: that human sufering can be healed.” Oyekan’s work is in the permanent collections of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

78. Nicholas Rena

b. 1963

“Choir,” from the “Flyover” series circa 2003 Press-molded earthenware, painted and polished. 5 3/4 x 18 1/4 x 7 in. (14.6 x 46.4 x 17.8 cm) Estimate $1,500-2,000 Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 2003

Nicholas Rena studied architecture before studying ceramics, an infuence visible in the precision of form and surfaces of his work. The simplicity with which Rena combines a familiar form (a vessel) with an abstract form (a vessel lying on its side, thus rendering it functionless), immediately questions its intended purpose. This mystery is emphasized by the polished smoothness of the surface, leaving the focus of the work to the space it inhabits and displaces. Rena’s work is held in the permanent collections of the Louvre, Paris and the Victoria & Albert Museum, London.


Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

79. Richard Slee

b. 1946

“Boy in Field” 1997 Hand-built glazed earthenware, found object. 9 1/2 x 16 x 10 1/2 in. (24.1 x 40.6 x 26.7 cm) Underside signed in pencil under the glaze Richard Slee. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Contemporary Applied Arts, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 1997 Exhibited “Richard Slee: Tempting Ceramics,” The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent, September 13-November 2, 2003 “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Garth Clark and Cathy Courtney, Richard Slee, exh. cat., The Potteries Museum & Art Gallery, Stoke-on-Trent, 2003, illustrated p. 104

British ceramist Richard Slee’s infuences derive from the eighteenth-century pottery manufactories around Stoke-on-Trent in England known for mass-produced wares in the style of German, Dutch and Chinese porcelain. Decidedly non-functional, Slee’s work slyly references these styles and their decorative lack of purpose, but infuses contemporary imagery, conversing between the familiar and the ornate, to ofen humorous result. Slee’s work is in the permanent collections of multiple institutions, including the Victoria & Albert Museum, London, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston.

Property from the Collection of Diane and Marc Grainer

80. Richard Slee

b. 1946

“Carpet Duck” 2003 Hand-built glazed earthenware. 10 in. (25.4 cm) high Estimate $3,000-5,000 Provenance Barrett Marsden Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owners, 2004 Exhibited “Richard Slee - Panorama,” Tate St Ives, February 8-May 11, 2003, then traveled to Ruthin Craf Centre, North Wales, May 24-July 13, 2003 “Contemporary British Studio Ceramics: The Grainer Collection,” The Mint Museum of Craf + Design, Charlotte, North Carolina, October 1, 2010-March 13, 2011 Literature Richard Slee: Grand Wizard, exh. cat., Tate St Ives, 2003, illustrated, n.p. Lesley Jackson, “Richard Slee - Panorama,” Crafs, September/October, 2003, illustrated p. 60 Annie Carlano, ed., Contemporary British Studio Ceramics, exh. cat., Mint Museum of Craf + Design, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 143


Property from a Private Collection, Los Angeles

81. Peter Voulkos

1924-2002

Untitled 1958 Sand, epoxy, and mixed media on canvas. 49 1/2 x 33 3/4 in. (125.7 x 85.7 cm) Reverse signed Voulkos/58’. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the artist by the present owner, circa 1958

Phillips would like to thank Sam Jornlin, archivist and representative of the Voulkos estate, for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


eschewing traditional forms and notions of ceramics and engaging fully and physically in the manipulation of clay into abstract sculpture. In 1958, the year the present lot was painted, Voulkos was sharing a studio in Los Angeles with fellow ceramist John Mason. The two worked closely together, experimenting with new techniques, surfaces, and working on ever larger scale sculptures, developing the necessary equipment together. From the composition and coloring of the present painting, compared with Mason’s iconic monumental Blue Wall (1959), one can surmise that Voulkos’s and Mason’s collaboration extended beyond material to concept as well.

Peter Voulkos’s artistic career began in the late 1940s following his service in the US Army Air Corps as a result of the G.I. Bill, an educational beneft provided by the government which he used to enroll in ceramics, painting and printmaking courses at Montana State College. While practicing in these media, Voulkos excelled in ceramics and became a “prodigious natural potter and a producer of elegantly thrown functional earthenware,” according to The New York Times, ofen borrowing skills and techniques from painting and printmaking and applying them to his ceramic artworks. Peter Voulkos’s virtuosic skill as a ceramist won him numerous awards in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and in 1953 he was invited to teach a ceramics course at Black Mountain College, the progressive art school in Asheville, North Carolina, ofen seen as an incubator of twentiethcentury artistic talent. At Black Mountain, he met poet Charles Olson, artists Robert Rauschenberg and John Cage, and dancer Merce Cunningham. He then traveled to New York City at the behest of poet MC Richards, where he encountered painters Willem de Kooning, Franz Kline and Philip Guston. These excursions away from his home base in Montana into the throes of American Abstract Expressionism were pivotal—the movement was already well underway in painting but it had not yet taken hold in clay and Voulkos, tiring of traditional constraints within the ceramic craf, and freshly inspired by these encounters, was primed to be its conduit. These early years—the 1950s up through 1968—are what scholar Glenn Adamson defned as Peter Voulkos’s “breakthrough years.” During this time, he was creating his most important and infuential body of ceramic work,

During this time of tremendous artistic experimentation, Voulkos continued to paint in abstraction, and the materials he used in his paintings—epoxy, sand, brightly colored paints—he ofen used on his ceramic sculptures. He debuted his groundbreaking ceramic sculptures, alongside paintings, at the Pasadena Art Museum in 1958, and subsequently at the Frank Landau Gallery in Los Angeles in 1959. In exhibiting the two media together, he demonstrated how intertwined and supportive of each other they were among his oeuvre. It is evident now that it was necessary then for Voulkos to use multiple modes to transcribe his artistic urges—whatever could not be expressed in one medium would fnd relief in being expressed in another, and thus the paintings during this period continue to be an important connective study with his groundbreaking work in ceramics.

Peter Voulkos, Rondena, 1958. Sold, Phillips, New York, Design Evening Sale, December 12, 2017, lot 229. Artwork © Voulkos Family Trust. Above: Installation of the exhibition Ceramics, Sculpture and Paintings by Peter H. Voulkos at the Pasadena Art Museum. From lef to right: Zapata, Burnt Smog (aka Funiculated Smog), Rondena. Artwork © Voulkos Family Trust. Image courtesy of the Voulkos & Co. Catalogue Project.


82. Chris Schanck

b. 1975

83. Chris Schanck

b. 1975

Unique mirror, from the “Alufoil” series 2014 Resin, polystyrene, aluminum foil, mirrored glass. 45 x 45 x 6 1/2 in. (114.3 x 114.3 x 16.5 cm)

Unique pair of tables, from the “Alufoil” series 2014 Resin, polystyrene, aluminum foil. Each: 22 1/2 x 26 1/4 x 26 1/4 in. (57.2 x 66.7 x 66.7 cm)

Estimate $2,000-3,000

Estimate $4,000-6,000


The idea for “Alufoil” came to the designer in 2011, at the tail end of graduate school at Cranbrook Academy of Art, located just twenty miles away but worlds apart from his studio today. “Alufoil” began with what were essentially lefovers: scavenged bits of discarded wood, Styrofoam, metal, cast-ofs from factory-made furniture. Schanck was looking for a way to bind them together; for them to be seen, he explains, “as a whole, and not parts of other things.” So one day he wrapped them in plain old Reynolds Wrap from the grocery store. It had, he says, “all the material properties of something I was looking for: very immediate and very alien.” But, as Schanck is quick to point out, “It’s not immediate now. It takes thousands of hours.” Lightweight yet strong, it is found in everything from architecture to aluminum cans to the auto bodies of Detroit, and elsewhere. Almost endlessly recyclable, nearly seventy-fve percent of all aluminum produced is still in use today. As a design choice in furniture,

examples throughout the twentieth century abound— from the streamlined styling of the Machine Age, to Charles and Ray Eames’s mid-century classic Aluminum Group chairs, to the fuidity of Marc Newson’s 1988 iconic Lockheed Lounge. Schanck brings a personal history to the material as well. Like many “aha” moments that are seemingly plucked from nowhere, the “Alufoil” technique actually has deep roots. He grew up in Dallas, “in the shadow of the aluminum plant,” he recalls. His father was an aluminum salesman; his older sister worked in the front ofce; and his older brother managed the anodized aluminum division, which he remembers as being “total alchemy when I was young.” Schanck worked in the factory too, punching parts during his summer breaks. In fact, the foiling in his studio could be thought of as a through-the-looking-glass version of the family tradition. —Elizabeth Essner, excerpted from “In the Studio: Chris Schanck,” Metalsmith Magazine, Winter 2018


84. Betty Woodman

1930-2018

Untitled sculpture (vase on wall bracket) circa 1990 Glazed earthenware. 28 1/2 x 17 x 8 in. (72.4 x 43.2 x 20.3 cm) Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Michael O’Connor, United Kingdom Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Betty Woodman, et al., The Ceramics of Betty Woodman, Freedman Gallery, Albright College, 1985, p. 4 for a similar example Janet Koplos, et al., Betty Woodman, New York, 2006, pp. 98, 100-1 for similar examples Betty Woodman, et al., Betty Woodman: Theatre of the Domestic, Milan, 2016, pp. 26, 34 for similar examples


85. Wendell Castle

1932-2018

Unique “Butterfy Love Seat” 1967 Stack-laminated oak. 18 1/4 x 49 x 19 in. (46.4 x 124.5 x 48.3 cm) Base incised WC 67. Estimate $60,000-80,000 Provenance Lee Nordness, New York Private collection, United States Acquired from the above by the present owner Exhibited “Handcrafed Furniture by Wendell Castle—New York Debut,” Lee Nordness Gallery, New York, 1968 Literature “Wendell Castle,” Mobilia, no. 157, August 1968, n.p. Alastair Gordon, Wendell Castle Wandering Forms—Works from 1959-1979, exh. cat., Aldrich Contemporary Art Museum, New York, 2012, illustrated p. 203 Emily Evans Eerdmans, Wendell Castle, A Catalogue Raisonné 1958-2012, New York, 2014, illustrated p. 137

The present lot was formerly in the collection of Lee Nordness, the New York-based curator and gallerist who organized the exhibition Handcrafed Furniture by Wendell Castle – New York Debut, Castle’s frst exhibition in New York City. Butterfy Love Seat was among just ten pieces of furniture Castle designed for the show, which The New York Times reviewed, allowing him to explain his process: “I begin with an idea and sketch of what I want. Each piece of furniture is done one-inch layer by one-inch layer, cutting and gluing as I go. There is a point where it is difcult to imagine where a chair is going.” Following the success of the exhibition, just one year later, Nordness cast him in an even bigger role. He included Castle’s work in the seminal exhibition Objects: USA, a traveling survey of American craf from the Johnson Collection. One of the most important exhibitions of American design in the twentieth century, the show traveled across America and Europe over fve years and thirty venues, and Castle rapidly rose to international acclaim. At the time Nordness declared Castle “largely responsible for the recent renaissance of wood as a creative medium.” Fify years later, his work is still leading the charge.


86. Donald Judd

1928-1994

“Forward Slant Chair 84” and “Backward Slant Chair 84” designed 1982, executed 1987 Pine. Each: 30 x 15 x 15 in. (76.2 x 38.1 x 38.1 cm) Executed by Cooper/Kato, New York. Number 2 from the edition of 30 and number 4 from the edition of 30. Undersides impressed JUDD • 1987/F • 86-1 • DF • 2 / 30/COOPER / KATO/I.K. and JUDD • 1987 F • 85-14 • DF • 4 / 30 COOPER / KATO I.K. respectively. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Seomi Gallery, Seoul Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature Donald Judd, Donald Judd Furniture: Retrospective, exh. cat., Museum Boymans-van Beuningen, Rotterdam, 1993, pp. 9, 49, 76, 80, 101 Donald Judd, Todd Eberle, et al., Art + Design Donald Judd, exh. cat., Museum Wiesbaden, Wiesbaden, 1993, pp. 60, 136 Peter Noever ed., Donald Judd: Architecture Architektur, Ostfldern-Ruit, 2003, p. 116


Property from an American Family Collection

87. Louise Nevelson

1899-1988

Unique “Night Mountain” tapestry 1977 Wool, metallic thread. 49 x 79 1/2 in. (124.5 x 201.9 cm) Woven by Dovecot Studios, Edinburgh, Scotland and produced by Gloria F. Ross Tapestry, New York. Number 1 from the edition of 1. Signed in the weave Louise Nevelson, reverse with weaver’s paper label signed Gloria F. Ross and Louise Nevelson along with edition number, dimensions and title. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Pace Editions, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 1981 Literature Ann Lane Hedlund, Gloria F. Ross & Modern Tapestry, New Haven, 2010, illustrated p. 223


Property from a Private Collection, Maine

88. After Marcel Breuer

1902-1981

Dining table from the Soriano house 1980s African padauk, maple, glass. 30 x 71 x 60 in. (76.2 x 180.3 x 152.4 cm) Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Liliane and Jose M. Soriano, Greenwich Thence by descent Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2013

Several years following the completion, in 1973, of their Greenwich, Connecticut home designed by Marcel Breuer and Tician Papachristou, Liliane and Jose M. Soriano decided to order a second table based on the plans that Breuer had drawn up for their dining table, already in place in the house. As it is not clear to what extent Breuer or his ofce may have been involved with the production of the second table, we have chosen to present it as “afer Marcel Breuer.”


Property of a Private Collector, New York

89. Sakiyama Takayuki

b. 1958

“Listening to the Waves” vessel 2007 Stoneware, sand keiseki glaze. 17 1/4 in. (43.8 cm) high Underside impressed with artist’s cipher. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Joan B. Mirviss, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2007 Literature John T. Carpenter, Designing Nature: The Rinpa Aesthetic in Japanese Art, New York, 2012, p. 127 for a similar example


Property of a Private Collector, New York

90. George Nakashima

1905-1990

Table lamp Walnut root, walnut, holly, fberglass shade. 19 7/8 in. (50.5 cm) high Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Moderne Gallery, Philadelphia Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 2003


91. Frank Lloyd Wright

1867-1959

“Peacock” side chair circa 1916 Oak, vinyl upholstery. 38 1/4 x 15 3/4 x 17 3/4 in. (97.2 x 40 x 45.1 cm) Reverse with metal label numbered 226. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Imperial Hotel, Tokyo Private collection, Tokyo Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Cary James, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel, New York, 1968, pp. 35, 42-43 David A. Hanks, The Decorative Designs of Frank Lloyd Wright, New York, 1979, p. 133 Bruce Brooks Pfeifer, Frank Lloyd Wright: The Complete Works, 1917-1942, vol. 2, Cologne, 2010, pp. 33, 35

The present Peacock chair was designed for the Peacock Banquet Room in Frank Lloyd Wright’s Imperial Hotel in Tokyo. Part of an efort by Japan’s elite to ofer luxury accommodation to Western visitors, Wright was commissioned to design the hotel in 1915, with the opulent structure fnally opening in 1922. The earliest version of the Peacock chair had a caned or fabric seat, but heavy use by the throngs of visitors wore away at the delicate materials and many chairs were eventually reupholstered with leatherette. The distinctive hexagonal shape of the chair back, seat, and legs responded to the architectural program on the exterior and interior of the building. As a tribute to Japanese design, which Wright regarded as a model of simplicity and dignifed beauty, he had departed from the Prairie School style with a poured concrete and stone façade featuring a molded cornice. A prescient choice, as the hotel is now notable for its survival of the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake that leveled many other buildings in Tokyo. Though eventually demolished in 1968, the building remains an icon of early twentieth-century Tokyo’s cosmopolitan life as well as Wright’s interest in East Asian forms, with the lobby faithfully preserved in the Meiji Mura Museum, Inuyama.


Property from a Private Collection, Virginia

92. Edward Durell Stone

1902-1978

Rare cofee table circa 1951 Oak. 14 7/8 x 40 1/2 x 40 1/2 in. (38 x 103 x 103 cm) Manufactured by Fulbright Industries, Fayetteville, Arkansas. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Jan and Rocco DiMarco, Bloomfeld Hills, acquired directly from the architect Thence by descent to the present owner Literature Edward Durell Stone, The Evolution of an Architect, New York, 1962, pp. 70, 72, 103 Mary Anne Hunting, “From Craf to Industry: Furniture Designed by Edward Durell Stone for Senator Fulbright,” The Magazine Antiques, May 2004, pp. 111-12


The present table is a rare example from the Fulbright Industries furniture line designed by Edward Durell Stone, produced between 1950 and 1952. The formal qualities of Stone’s architecture – consecutive lines, a motif based on a square divided into quadrants – are evident in the structure and pattern of the tabletop. The bentwood base echoes the porticos that lined the lower portion of many of his iconic building facades. In 1949, Stone was asked by his childhood friend, United States Senator James William Fulbright, who was also president of J.H. Phipps Lumber Company, if he would design some pieces to be produced by the new furniture division of his company, Fulbright Industries. The business had been in decline for decades as the wagons and plows that the company had historically supplied with parts were replaced by tractors. Fulbright hoped a new product line directed at a growing market might re-invigorate the business. His concept brought together Stone (by then an internationally-recognized architect), his company’s lumber stock and manufacturing capabilities, and the craf traditions of the Ozarks. The resulting designs incorporated wagon and plow parts such as yokes and wheel spokes with regional basket-weaving techniques into pared-down furniture forms. There must have been some nostalgia in this partnership between old friends, alongside a hope that in bringing their shared history and professional interests together they might be able to address the challenges their home town was then facing.

The El Panama Hotel, Panama City. Photograph by Ezra Stoller. Image © Ezra Stoller/Esto.

Unfortunately, it was not a seamless endeavor, as the designs required a higher level of skilled workmanship and modern technology than anticipated. Though critically well-received, complexities of production ultimately inhibited the line from receiving the attention and commercial success that it deserved. Production delays resulted in it missing the deadline for the 1952 “Good Design” selection committee meeting of The Museum of Modern Art, New York. It also failed to be included in the Architectural League of New York’s March 1950 exhibition on the El Panama Hotel which had been designed by Stone with the Panama City architectural frm Méndez & Sander. The interior decorator Florence Bates Hayward had flled the porticoed lounge of the hotel with Fulbright Industries furniture, but it was decided that there was no reason to advertise furniture not yet ready for sale. Department stores and the major furniture companies of the period, such as Knoll and Herman Miller, declined to ofer the line. Eventually it was picked up by Gordon Waldron, but the marketing emphasized the furniture’s suitability to modern tastes and living rather than the intersection of American traditional crafs and international modernism that had informed its conception. Advertising proclaimed it as “the perfect answer to your quest for furniture that is at once forthright, sophisticated and comfortable,” and yet it was perceived as rustic outdoor furniture too simple to demand the price that its construction demanded. The line was therefore short-lived, and few remaining examples have come to market. Mary Anne Hunting writes that Stone “made a concerted efort to endorse the furniture— to both institutional and private clients as well as to friends and employees.” It seems plausible that the original owner, Jan DiMarco, a friend and colleague of Stone’s, may have been a member of this audience. DiMarco was a painter and interior designer who studied at Cranbrook and whose Bloomfeld Hills home, a converted indoor pool with an attached ballroom and a kitchen from an eighteenth-century American farmhouse, which they named “The Deep End,” had been designed by Edward Durell Stone. A 1960 article in the Detroit News Pictorial Magazine on the home quotes Mrs. DiMarco as saying “we have one house covering three periods of America.” A ftting context for the present table, which elegantly merged the best of American craf and modernism.


93. James Harvey Crate

1925-2009

Table Lamp, model no. T-3-C circa 1951 Aluminum, painted aluminum, stainless steel, cork. 24 3/4 in. (62.9 cm) high Manufactured by The Heifetz Company, New York. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Wright, Chicago, “Modern Design,” March 20, 2005, lot 348 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature “Results: Lamp Competition,” Arts & Architecture, May 1951, p. 28 “Lamp Competition: Results announced by Museum of Modern Art,” Interiors, April 1951, p. 137 Cara Greenberg, Mid-Century Modern: Furniture of the 1950s, New York, 1984, p. 45


Property from a Private Collection, Florida

94. Isamu Noguchi

1904-1988

Rare chess table, model no. IN-61 circa 1947 Ebonized plywood, painted cast aluminum, acrylic inlays. 18 3/4 x 24 x 24 in. (47.6 x 61 x 61 cm) Produced by The Herman Miller Furniture Company, Zeeland, Michigan. Estimate $150,000-250,000 Provenance Private collection, Ohio Acquired by the present owner circa 1999

Literature “Sculptor Noguchi Designs Free-from Tables,” House and Garden, January 1948, p. 82 The Herman Miller Collection, sales catalogue, Zeeland, 1948, p. 55 Nancy Grove and Diane Botnick, The Sculpture of Isamu Noguchi, 1924–1979: A Catalogue, New York, 1980, cat. no. 810 Derek E. Ostergard, George Nakashima: Full Circle, exh. cat., American Craf Museum, New York, 1989, p. 134 Martin Eidelberg, ed., What Modern Was: Design 19351965, New York, 1991, pp. 107-8 Bruce Altshuler, Noguchi, New York, 1994, p. 52 Alexander von Vegesack, et al., eds., Isamu Noguchi: Sculptural Design, exh. cat., Vitra Design Museum, Weil am Rhein, 2001, pp. 78-79, 126-27, 287 Larry List, ed., The Imagery of Chess, exh. cat., The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, Long Island City, 2005, cover, pp. vi, 129, 131 Ghislaine Wood, Surreal Things: Surrealism and Design, exh. cat., Victoria and Albert Museum, London, 2007, p. 305 Amy Wolf, On Becoming an Artist: Isamu Noguchi and his Contemporaries, 1922-1960, exh. cat., The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, Long Island City, 2011, pp. 77-78


Playing With Form: A Sculptural Chess Table by Isamu Noguchi By Luke T. Baker

Throughout his sixty-year career, Isamu Noguchi eluded creative categorization, working as a sculptor, set designer, landscape artist, and a designer of light fxtures, furnishings, interiors, and consumer goods. Noguchi didn’t subscribe to any one aesthetic school or believe in boundaries between fne and applied arts, writing in a 1936 treatise that sculptors and painters “should not forever be concerned with pure art or meaningful art, but should inject their knowledge of form and matter into the everyday, usable designs of industry and commerce.” To that end, Noguchi approached his product and furniture designs with the same humanistic sensualism and graceful monumentality of his sculptural works, creating some of the most enduring icons of modern design, including his Radio Nurse baby monitor system from 1933, and his IN-50 cofee table, designed in 1944 and still in production today. As a holistic extension of his sculptural practice, Noguchi would ofen incorporate the same forms, materials, and techniques in his design projects, efectively creating scalable, functional sculptures for the domestic sphere. The present lot, the rare IN-61 chess table, is an object that intentionally blurs the line between design and sculpture. Originally conceived as a functional artwork, the table was designed in 1944 for the seminal Surrealist exhibition, The Imagery of Chess, organized by Marcel Duchamp and Max Ernst, and held at the eponymous Midtown gallery of Julien Levy, a friend and patron of Noguchi’s. From December 1944 through January of the following year, the table was displayed alongside chess-inspired works by fellow members of Noguchi’s Avant Garde coterie of artists and intellectuals, among them Andre Breton, John Cage, Alexander Calder, Yves Tanguy, and Frederick Kiesler.

Noguchi’s design does away with the rigid formalism of the traditional chess board, sofening its lines with his signature biomorphic organicism. Regular geometries are all but abandoned, and even the rectilinear grid is replaced by a feld of inlaid dots of colored plastic. Constructed of veneered plywood—a wartime industrial material—Noguchi treated the table with a lacquer-like ebonized fnish to further emphasize its sculptural silhouette. The table’s legs, two curvaceous plywood shapes intersecting at a right angle to form a cross-like support, are directly related to the sculptures and set pieces Noguchi was developing around this period. His suite of sculptural elements for Hérodiade, a production by modern dancer and longtime collaborator Martha


Isamu Noguchi pictured with the present model, circa 1948. Artwork © The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York/Artist Right Society (ARS), New York. Photograph by Geofrey Baker. Image © Condé Nast.

It was George Nelson, the noted midcentury designer, who would transform this one-of art object into one of Noguchi’s earliest furniture designs to become available to the public. Nelson was so taken by the chess table upon encountering it the on the exhibition’s opening night that he purchased the piece on the spot, presumably for his personal collection and use. Nelson’s storied afliation with Herman Miller began soon thereafer when, as design director, he would commence recruiting designs from some of the most important fgures of the postwar period, including Ray and Charles Eames, Alexander Girard, and his friend Isamu Noguchi.

Graham, which were designed just a few months earlier, used abstract, fat shapes notched together to create dimensional forms. A set of acetate chess pieces Noguchi designed for the exhibition table also reveal the infuence of the of the Hérodiade sets in their similarly expressive forms and notched construction. Noguchi would continue this exploration of interlocking shapes until 1948, creating an important series of sculptures in slabs of marble and slate.

Under Nelson’s oversight, Noguchi’s chess table went into commercial production in 1947. Capitalizing on the post-war boom in casual furnishings for the home, the company shrewdly chose not to market the table for its original highly specialized function (and thus did not reproduce Noguchi’s Surrealistic chess pieces). Instead, it was described as “ideal as a small cofee table,” or even as an intimate dining surface. A publicity photograph from the period also illustrates it in use as a sewing table, its handy metal pockets used as holds for bobbins and other accoutrements. Unfortunately, it was this cast aluminum tray that proved ultimately too costly to manufacture, and in 1949 the design was discontinued.

Rotating the tabletop reveals scooped pockets of cast and painted aluminum—clever storage for chess pieces, cards, cigarettes, and other small objects. With its hill-and-dale contours, this molded tray bears similarity to the topographical sculptures, interior surfaces, and playground designs Noguchi was working on in the during the 1940s, such as This Tortured Earth, a wartime elegy to a bombed-out landscape produced in 1943, or his undulating sculptural ceiling for the Time Life Building, designed around 1947.

Noguchi would go on to develop other successful designs, such as the Rudder cofee table for Herman Miller (1949), the Akari paper lamps (beginning in 1951), and the Cyclone series of tables and seating for Knoll (1954). Though his renown grew as more of his furniture went into production, Noguchi never considered himself a designer. “Everything is sculpture,” he asserted in 1949, reinforcing his position that, whether designing a table or an artwork, both are to be approached as “fundamental problems of form that…express human and aesthetic activity.”


95. Edvard Kindt-Larsen and Tove Kindt-Larsen 1901-1982, 1906-1994 Rare sofa circa 1956 Teak, fabric upholstery. 34 x 79 7/8 x 26 7/8 in. (86.5 x 203 x 68.5 cm) Executed by cabinetmaker Thorald Madsen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside with brass label impressed THORALD MADSEN/Snedkeri/ København, back apron impressed 1740. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Private collection, Denmark, acquired 1956 Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature “Snedkerlaugets udstilling 1956,” Dansk Kunsthaandværk, no. 29, August-September 1956, p. 157 Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 3: 1947-1956, Copenhagen, 1987, p. 377

The present model was exhibited at the Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild, Kunstindustrimuseet, Copenhagen, September 20-October 7 1956, stand 7.


96. Attributed to Ilmari Tapiovaara 1914-1999 Ceiling light circa 1949 Brass. 5 1/2 in. (14 cm) drop, 28 3/4 x 11 3/8 in. (14 x 73 x 29 cm) Manufactured by Idman, Helsinki, Finland. Interior with partial manufacturer’s mark stamped Idman. Estimate $5,000-7,000


97. Flemming Lassen

1902-1984

Pair of armchairs circa 1940 Ash, sheepskin. Each: 29 1/4 x 29 x 31 in. (74.3 x 73.7 x 78.7 cm) Executed by cabinetmaker Jacob Kjær, Denmark.

Literature Hans Chr. Hansen, “Snedkerlaugets 14. Møbeludstilling,” Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 11, November 1940, p. 171 Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 2: 1937-1946, Copenhagen, 1987, p. 116

Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Copenhagen, acquired 1950s Acquired from the above by the present owner

The present model was exhibited at the Copenhagen Cabinetmakers’ Guild, Kunstindustrimuseet, Copenhagen, September 20–October 6 1940, stand 14.


98. Flemming Lassen

1902-1984

Sofa circa 1940 Ash, sheepskin. 30 x 60 x 33 in. (76.2 x 152.4 x 83.8 cm) Executed by cabinetmaker Jacob Kjær, Denmark. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Copenhagen, acquired 1950s Acquired from the above by the present owner

Literature Hans Chr. Hansen, ‘Snedkerlaugets 14. Møbeludstilling’, Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 11, November 1940, p. 171 for the armchair version of the model Grete Jalk, ed., Dansk Møbelkunst gennem 40 aar, Volume 2: 1937-1946, Copenhagen, 1987, p. 116 for the armchair version of the model


99. Paavo Tynell

1890-1973

Ceiling light, model no. 9068 1950s Painted steel, brass, glass. 9 1/2 in. (24.1 cm) drop, 15 7/8 x 15 7/8 in. (24 x 40.2 x 40.2 cm) Manufactured by Taito Oy, Helsinki, Finland. Interior of fxture impressed TAITO. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Literature Idman, sales catalogue, no. 136, Helsinki, 1954, p. 77


100. Paavo Tynell

1890-1973

Floor lamp, model no. 10506, from the “Concerto” series circa 1955 Brass, brass-covered steel. 78 1/2 in. (199.4 cm) high Manufactured Taito Oy, Helsinki, Finland. Interior of coupe impressed MADE IN FINLAND/OY TAITO AB/TT/OR 706. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Private collection, Brooklyn Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Finland House Lighting: harmony in lighting for harmony in living, original designs by Paavo Tynell, sales catalogue, New York, n.p. Idman, sales catalogue, no. 138, Helsinki, 1955, p. 73


Property from a Private Collection, California Σ

101. Hans J. Wegner

1914-2007

Set of eight “China” chairs, model no. 4283 designed 1944, executed 1968 Brazilian rosewood, Niger leather upholstery. Each: 32 1/8 x 21 5/8 x 21 5/8 in. (81.5 x 55 x 55 cm) Manufactured by Fritz Hansen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Underside of each with manufacturer’s label printed FH/MADE IN DENMARK/BY FRITZHANSEN/ FURNITUREMAKERS/DANISH/CONTROL and with four-digit date codes. Estimate $30,000-40,000

Provenance Fritz Hansen, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, circa 1968 Literature Af Jørn Rubow, “Udstillingen i Kunstindustrimuseet,” Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 6, June 1944, p. 90 Ingvar Bergström, “Danskt i Röhsska Konstslöjdmuseet,” Nyt Tidsskrif For Kunstindustri, no. 10, October 1945, p. 119 Christian Holmsted Olesen, Wegner: just one good chair, exh. cat., Design Museum Denmark, Copenhagen, 2014, pp. 114, 121


The young Hans Wegner, seeing an illustration of an eighteenth-century Chinese chair for export in Ole Wanscher’s Møbeltyper (1932), was impressed by the harmonious relationship between the solid square seat and legs and the delicate and airy arms and back. Following this initial inspiration, Wegner’s designs in the late 1930s for a China chair refected his colleague Arne Jacobsen’s 1934 piece—rectilinear and solid, utilizing steam-bent beech wood, a wood typical to Danish furniture. In the 1940s, the furniture frm Fritz Hansen

sought to mitigate wartime beech wood shortages, asking Wegner to design a chair with a rounded top rail that could be made from two pieces instead of one long piece. Wegner’s answer was this updated China chair, incorporating a steam-bent top rail, tapered legs, and a curvilinear appearance that merges Danish simplicity with the elegance and angularity of traditional Chinese chair forms. Wegner continued to draw from this formal dynamic, following the China chairs with a design for his iconic Wishbone chairs in 1949.


Property of a Private Collector, New York

102. Wilhelm Kåge

1889-1960

“Dragonfsh” vase, from the “Farsta” series 1953 Glazed stoneware. 24 1/4 in. (61.6 cm) long Produced by Gustavsberg, Sweden. Underside incised KAGE and with date mark, impressed with studio mark and FARSTA STUDIO GUSTAVSBERG. Estimate $4,000-6,000 Provenance Antik, New York Scott Rudin, New York Christie’s, New York, “A Private Collection of French Mid-Century Design,” December 7, 2005, lot 90 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Nils Palmgren, Wilhelm Kåge, konstnär och hantverkare, Stockholm, 1953, p. 223 for a similar example Gisela Eronn, Wilhelm Kåge: Keramikens mästare, Stockholm, 2006, p. 93 for similar examples

Property from a Private American Collection

103. Marianne Richter

1916-2010

“Rubirosa, blå” rug designed 1958, executed 1963 Handwoven wool on a linen warp. 143 1/4 x 87 in. (364 x 221 cm) Produced by Märta Måås-Fjetterström AB, Båstad, Sweden. Woven by Berta Nylander and Dorit Johansson. Woven with manufacturer’s mark AB MMF and artist’s initials MR. Estimate $12,000-18,000 Literature Tyra Lundgren, Märta Måås-Fjetterström och väv-verkstaden I Båstad, Stockholm, 1968, no. 71

Phillips would like to thank Angelica Persson and Martin Chard from Märta Måås-Fjetterström AB, for their assistance cataloguing the present lot.


Property from an Important New York Collection

104. Verner Panton

1926-1998

105. Egon Eiermann

1904-1970

Set of fve “Flower Pot” ceiling lights, model no. 16562 circa 1968 Painted steel, painted aluminum, fabric cord. Each: variable drop, 8 5/8 in. (22 cm) diameter Manufactured by Louis Poulsen, Copenhagen, Denmark. Interior of one shade with manufacturer’s label printed LOUIS POULSEN & CO. A / S/MADE IN/DENMARK.

Rare pair of “Korbsessel” chairs, model no. E20 circa 1958 Painted rattan. Each: 26 1/4 x 34 1/2 x 26 7/8 in. (66.6 x 87.5 x 68.5 cm)

Estimate $2,000-3,000

Literature Annemaries Jaeggi, ed., Egon Eiermann 1904-1970: Architect and Designer, Berlin, 2004, p. 171 Immo Boyken, Wulf Schirmer, et al., Egon Eiermann, 1904-1970: Bauten und Projekte, Stuttgart, 2002, p. 260 Immo Boyken, Egon Eiermann/ Sep Ruf: Deutsche Pavillons, Brüssel 1958, Stuttgart, 2007, pp. 39, 41, 53-55

Literature Niels-Jørgen Kaiser, Verner Panton, Basel, 1986, n.p. Alexander von Vegesack and Mathias Remmele, eds., Verner Panton: The Collected Works, Weil am Rhein, 2000, pp. 109-11, 130, 137, 192, 215, 288

Estimate $4,000-6,000

The present model was exhibited at the West German Pavilion, Brussels World’s Fair, 1958.


106. Eero Aarnio

b. 1932

“Abakus” bed, model no. 33030 circa 1970 Painted birch. 43 1/4 x 70 3/4 x 82 1/2 in. (109.9 x 179.7 x 209.6 cm) Produced by Asko, Finland. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Literature Asko sales catalogue, 1970s, n.p.


Property from an Important New York Collection

107. Verner Panton

1926-1998

“Ball” ceiling light, model no. Typ H circa 1970 Steel, acrylic. 31 1/2 in. (80 cm) drop, 18 1/8 in. (46 cm) diameter Manufactured by J. Lüber AG, Basel, Switzerland. Estimate $2,000-3,000 Literature Alexander von Vegesack and Mathias Remmele, eds., Verner Panton: The Collected Works, Weil am Rhein, 2000, p. 290


Property from the Collection of Raf Simons

108. Pierre Chapo

1927-1986

Table, model T20 circa 1965 Elm. 29 x 117 x 40 in. (73.7 x 297.2 x 101.6 cm) Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance Collection of the designer, Gordes Artcurial, Paris, “Design”, May 15, 2012, lot 50 Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property of a Private Collector, New York

109. Georges Jouve

1910-1964

Bowl circa 1950 Glazed stoneware. 10 3/4 in. (27.3 cm) diameter Estimate $5,000-7,000 Literature Philippe Jousse and Galerie Jousse Entreprise, Georges Jouve, Paris, 2005, p. 155 for a similar example

110. Georges Jouve

1910-1964

“Chinois” table lamp circa 1943 Glazed stoneware, brass, paper shade. 20 in. (50.8 cm) high Underside signed with artist’s cipher. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Literature Michel Faré, Georges Jouve, Paris, 1965, p. 45 for a similar example Philippe Jousse and Galerie Jousse Entreprise, Georges Jouve, Paris, 2005, pp. 92, 113 for a similar example


Property of a Private Collector, New York

111. Charlotte Perriand

1903-1999

“Tokyo” bench circa 1956 Pine, wool upholstery. 22 1/2 x 82 5/8 x 28 5/8 in. (57.2 x 209.9 x 72.7 cm) Issued by Galerie Steph Simon, Paris, France. Together with a copy of a letter from Bernard Prouvé, son of Henri Prouvé, confrming the bench was acquired by his father from Galerie Steph Simon and used in his ofce until 1979. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Henri Prouvé, acquired from Galerie Steph Simon in the 1950s Bernard Prouvé Marc Dancoisne, acquired from the above, 2005 Private collection, Europe Christie’s, New York, “Important 20th Century Decorative Art & Design,” December 19, 2006, lot 1025 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Jacques Barsac, Charlotte Perriand: Complete Works Volume 2, 1940-1955, Paris, 2015, pp. 442, 470, 473 for a larger version of the model


112. Maison Desny Brûle-parfum (perfume burner) circa 1929 Silver-plated metal, ebonized wood, glass. 4 3/4 in. (12 cm) high, 2 3/4 in. (7 cm) diameter Manufactured by Maison Desny, Paris, France. Underside impressed DESNY PARIS/MADE IN FRANCE/DEPOSE. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Literature Guillaume Janneau, Le Luminaire Et Les Moyens D’Éclairages Nouveaux, 2ème Série, Paris, 1929, pl. 9


113. Georges-Henri Pingusson The present armchair is from the Hôtel Latitude 43 in Saint Tropez, Georges-Henri Pingusson’s famous and perhaps most-admired building design, where this model was used in guest rooms and the hotel lobby. Pingusson was a member of the U.A.M. (Union des artistes modernes) and was a prolifc architect and designer who was active through the postwar period. He is also well-known for designing the Mémorial des Martyrs de la Déportation, a memorial to the 200,000 people deported from Vichy France during World War II that was inaugurated in 1962 on the Île de la Cité in Paris. An example of the present model armchair is in the permanent collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris.

1894-1978

Rare armchair, from the Hôtel Latitude 43, Saint Tropez circa 1932 Painted steel, beech. 29 7/8 x 26 5/8 x 38 1/4 in. (76 x 67.7 x 97 cm) Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Hôtel Latitude 43, Saint Tropez Galerie Ulrich Fiedler, Berlin Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature G. H. Pingusson, “Un Hôtel à Saint-Tropez: Latitude 43,” Architecture d’aujourd’hui, no. 9, December 1932, p. 19 Arlette Barré-Despond, UAM: Union des Artistes Modernes, Paris, 1986, p. 486 Simon Texier, Georges-Henri Pingusson, Paris, 2011, pp. 82-83, 108


114. Jean Prouvé

1901-1984

“Flavigny” table circa 1945 Painted steel, stained walnut-veneered wood. 31 1/8 x 64 1/8 x 32 1/4 in. (79.2 x 163 x 82 cm) Estimate $30,000-40,000 Provenance DeLorenzo 1950, New York Dimitri Levas, New York, acquired from the above Wright, Chicago, “The Design Collection of Dimitri Levas,” June 8, 2017, lot 201 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Peter Sulzer, Jean Prouvé: Œuvre complète / Complete Works, Volume 2: 1934-1944, Basel, 2000, p. 297


115. Pierre Jeanneret

1896-1967

Illuminated reading table, model no. PJ-TAT-10-B, designed for the Assembly and the University Library, Chandigarh 1963-1966 Teak-veneered wood, teak, opaque glass, painted steel, painted aluminum. 46 1/4 x 96 5/8 x 48 5/8 in. (117.5 x 245.5 x 123.5 cm) Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Punjab University, Chandigarh Private collection, France Phillips, New York, “Design,” June 12, 2008, lot 86 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure: Design-ArtArchitecture, Paris, 2010, pp. 368, 370-72, 580

Dining tables set the stage for elaborate public displays and the design of a chair can speak volumes about the person seated in it, but perhaps no other furniture form broadcasts the principles and values of its owner more than the library table, the focal point of a room that represents knowledge, education, and culture. To this end, William Henry Vanderbilt, the son of railroad tycoon Cornelius Vanderbilt, commissioned an elaborately carved and inlaid library table from Herter Brothers (now in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art) dripping with symbols of his power and prestige. About twenty years later, Gustav Stickley designed an entirely diferent version, his leather-topped, hexagonal library table, model no. 625, which featured exposed joinery in keeping with the Arts and Crafs credo of honest crafsmanship, and which he included in his own residence, Crafsman Farms, in Morris Plains, New Jersey. Half a century later, Pierre Jeanneret was tasked with designing the furniture for the administrative and university buildings of the city of Chandigarh, the newly-formed capital of Punjab, for which his cousin Le Corbusier served as master city planner. The princely states having been dissolved following Indian independence, Le Corbusier envisioned Chandigarh as a modernist utopia for the people of the region. In keeping with Le Corbusier’s modernist program, Jeanneret created solid, minimal designs that were beautiful yet functional, drawing on local materials and crafsmen for the execution of his designs. While Vanderbilt and Stickley’s library tables were luxury products, albeit in very diferent ways, the present illuminated reading table is design with a social conscience, created to serve a large population. Through an economy of means that emphasizes form and surface over ornament, Jeanneret achieved his own elegant interpretation of what a library table can represent.


116. Serge Mouille

1922-1988

Three-armed adjustable ceiling light with “Casquette” shades circa 1958 Painted aluminum, painted steel, brass. 26 1/8 in. (66.4 cm) drop, 58 1/4 in. (148 cm) diameter Manufactured by Atelier Serge Mouille, Paris, France. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private collection, Paris, acquired directly from the designer Literature Alan and Christine Counord, Serge Mouille: Luminaires, 1953-1962, Paris, 1983, pp. 18, 28, 35 Alan and Christine Counord and Anthony DeLorenzo, Two Master Metalworkers/Deux Maîtres du Métal: Jean Prouvé, Serge Mouille, New York, 1985, pp. 111, 132 Pierre Émile Pralus, Serge Mouille: A French Classic, Saint Cyr au Mont d’Or, 2006, pp. 66, 116, 194-95, 197


Property from the Collection of Raf Simons

117. Pierre Jeanneret

1896-1967

“Executive” desk, model no. PJ-BU-10-B, designed for the administrative buildings, Chandigarh circa 1960 Teak. 28 x 54 1/4 x 27 1/8 in. (71.1 x 137.8 x 68.9 cm) Estimate $7,000-9,000 Provenance Administrative buildings, Chandigarh Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure: Design-Art-Architecture, Paris, 2010, p. 574


Property from the Collection of Raf Simons

118. Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret 1887-1965, 1896-1967 Sofa, model no. LC/PJ-SI-42-B, designed for the High Court and Assembly, Chandigarh 1955-1956 Teak, fabric upholstery. 31 x 65 x 30 1/4 in. (78.7 x 165.1 x 76.8 cm) Estimate $30,000-50,000 Provenance High Court and Assembly, Chandigarh Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure: Design-ArtArchitecture, Paris, 2010, pp. 228, 244-45, 567


Property from the Collection of Raf Simons

119. Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret 1887-1965, 1896-1967 Pair of armchairs, model no. LC/PJ-SI-42-A, designed for the High Court and Assembly, Chandigarh 1955-1956 Teak, fabric upholstery. Each: 31 x 28 7/8 x 28 3/4 in. (78.7 x 73.3 x 73 cm) Estimate $40,000-60,000 Provenance High Court and Assembly, Chandigarh Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier, Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure: Design-ArtArchitecture, Paris, 2010, pp. 228, 231, 244-45, 567


120. Le Corbusier and Pierre Jeanneret 1887-1965, 1896-1967 “Committee” table, model no. LC/PJ-TAT-14-B, designed for the Assembly, Chandigarh 1963-64 Teak-veneered wood, teak. 27 5/8 x 108 1/8 x 54 1/8 in. (70.2 x 274.6 x 137.4 cm) Estimate $70,000-90,000 Provenance The Assembly, Chandigarh Artcurial, Paris, “Design for Living,” April 15, 2008, lot 46 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Eric Touchaleaume and Gerald Moreau, Le Corbusier Pierre Jeanneret, The Indian Adventure, Design-ArtArchiteture, Paris, 2010, pp. 246-47, 582


Property from an Important New York Collection

121. Félix Agostini

1912-1974

Pair of “Titus” wall lights circa 1960 Bronze, paper shades. Each: 76 3/8 in. (194 cm) Reverse of each with signed with artist’s initials. Estimate $12,000-18,000

Literature Félix Agostini by Charles Paris: Amour, vol. 1, Paris, pp. 11, 20

Phillips would like to thank Dominique Kerguenne-Agostini for her assistance cataloguing the present lot.


Σ

122. Eugène Printz

1889-1948

Cabinet circa 1925 Brazilian rosewood-veneered wood, brass. 48 x 32 1/2 x 13 3/4 in. (121.9 x 82.6 x 34.9 cm) Estimate $35,000-45,000

Provenance Anne-Sophie Duval, Paris, 1992 David and Nayda Utterberg Sotheby’s, New York, “Important Design,” December 16, 2015, lot 28 Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property of a Private European Collector ∆

123. Rose Adler

1892-1959

Letter tray circa 1930 Macassar ebony-veneered wood, galuchat, glass. 2 x 10 x 7 7/8 in. (5.1 x 25.4 x 20 cm) Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Galerie Anne-Sophie Duval, Paris Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Louis Cheronnet, “Rose Adler,” Art et Décoration, April 1930, p. 125


124. Jean-Michel Frank

1895-1941

Pair of “Croisillon” table lamps circa 1940 Painted iron, paper shades. Each: 18 1/8 in. (46 cm) high Manufactured by Comte, Argentina. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Comité Jean-Michel Frank. Estimate $15,000-25,000

Provenance Private collection, Mar del Plata Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean-Michel Frank: The Strange and Subtle Luxury of the Parisian Haute-Monde in the Art Deco Period, New York, 2006, pp. 139, 156, 199, 250, 252 for similar examples


Property from a Private Collection

125. Eckart Muthesius

1904-1989

Important sideboard, from the Maharaja of Indore’s Banquet Hall, Manik Bagh Palace, Indore circa 1931 Stained American walnut-veneered wood, stained American walnut, sycamore, nickel silver drawer handles, white metal inlays. 37 1/8 x 78 7/8 x 19 3/4 in. (94.4 x 200.2 x 50.3 cm) Executed by Tischlerei Johann Eckel, BerlinLankwitz, Germany. Bow of key modeled with the Maharaja’s monogram YH. Estimate $200,000-300,000 Provenance Maharaja Yeshwant Rao Holkar II of Indore Private collection, acquired from the above, 1980s Thence by descent to the present owner

Illustrated “Indisches Märchenschloß 1933, Eine Berliner Architekt baut den Palast des Maharadschas von Indore,” Berliner Illustrierte Zeitung, November 1933, n.p. Agnolodomenico Pica, “Eckart Muthesius in India, The avant-garde meets history,” Domus, April 1979, pp. 6-7 Patricia Bayer, Art Deco Interiors: Decoration and Design Classics of the 1920s and 1930s, London, 1990, pp. 138-39 Reto Niggl, Eckart Muthesius 1930: The Maharaja’s Palace in Indore, Architecture and Interior, Stuttgart, 1996, pp. 82-83 Amin Jafer, Made for Maharajas: A Design Diary of Princely India, London, 2006, p. 267

Please note the present lot has been requested by the curators of the forthcoming exhibition “Le Maharaja d’Indore, l’Inde au déf de la modernité,” scheduled to take place at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, from September 26, 2019 to January 12, 2020.


In 1926 Yeshwant Rao Holkar II (1908-1961) assumed the position of Maharaja of Indore, following his father’s deposition and exile to France. He was only twenty-two years old when he returned to India and took on ruling responsibilities. Having completed his studies in England and traveled throughout Europe, he brought with him a modern perspective to his leadership as well as to the design and decoration of his palace, Manik Bagh, or “Garden of Precious Stones.” He had begun to develop a network of like-minded visionaries in the felds of art, architecture and fashion. Foremost among his European connections was the German architect Eckart Muthesius, whom he had


Lef to right: Eckart Muthesius, Exterior of the Manik Bagh Palace. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild Kunst, Bonn. Bernard Boutet de Monvel, The Maharaja of Indore in traditional Maratha Dress, circa 1929. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ ADAGP, Paris.

Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Portrait of Maharani Sanyongita Devi of Indore, circa 1929. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ ADAGP, Paris. Bernard Boutet de Monvel, Portrait of Yeshwant Rao Holkar II of Indore, circa 1929. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP, Paris.


Eckart Muthesius, Banquet hall of the Manik Bagh Palace, Indore. Artwork © 2019 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/VG Bild Kunst, Bonn.

befriended while studying at Oxford in the 1920s. The son of the renowned architect Hermann Muthesius (1861-1927), the younger Muthesius was enmeshed in the progressive architecture and design of his father’s generation and captivated by the budding International Style architecture of his own. The Maharajah and the architect shared a similar frame of reference and afnity for the European avante-garde. Yeshwant Rao thus hired his friend to design his new palace and the two worked closely together to build a ground-breaking homage to the Maharajah’s past, present and future legacy. Structured like a traditional Mughal palace around a central garden, Manik Bagh was otherwise modernist in every way, though

the most functionalist aspect–the pitched roofs necessary to withstand monsoons– were so ofensive to the Maharajah that the sketches used to publicize the project depicted it with fat roofs instead. Local brick and rare woods from the forests of Indore were employed to striking efect. The fnishes and features were as modern and extravagant as technology and budget could bear, with air-conditioning (the frst in India), metal-framed and tinted windows, hydraulic doors, machined marble and modern plumbing throughout the enormous structure. Most notably, the palace was flled with exceptional pieces of 1920s and 1930s modernist furniture by U.A.M. (Union des artistes modernes) members such as Le Corbusier and René Herbst, Bauhaus architects Each cabinet opens to eight sycamore drawers with nickel silver handles.


like Marcel Breuer and Ludwig Mies van der Rohe and the Art Deco designer Émile-Jacques Ruhlmann. A number of these works have gone on to become icons of twentieth-century design, setting record prices at auction, including Eileen Gray’s Transat chair from the Maharaja’s bedroom (sold at Phillips, New York, “The Collector: Icons of Design,” December 16, 2014, lot 15) and Ivan da Silva Bruhns’s enormous carpet in the palace’s red and black color scheme (sold at Phillips, London, “Modern Masters: Design Evening Sale,” April 27, 2016, lot 12). Photographs taken by Muthesius upon completion of the project show that the present lot was originally situated, along with another longer example, in the magnifcent ground foor banquet hall. Imposing in its austerity, the room included an expansive dining table that stretched the length of the room and

Personal monogram of Yeshwant Rao Holkar II, inscribed on the key shown at the right.

featured illuminated recesses for foral arrangements and tableware by Jean Puiforcat. The stained walnut veneers of both sideboards were inlaid with white metal marquetry in sun motifs, representing the Rajput ancestry that the Holkars of Indore claimed. The motif also appears within the monogram that Muthesius redesigned for Yeshwant Rao Holkar. In the 1970s the palace was rediscovered, shortly before the Maharajah’s privileges were revoked by the Indian government. Muthesius had long ago been forced to leave India during the Second World War, and the Maharajah had rarely occupied the palace in the intervening years. The palace went to the state, and in 1980 Sotheby’s Monaco famously sold a portion of its contents. The present cabinet, however, was not included in the Monaco auction and has remained in the same private collection since the 1980s.


Property from a Private Collection, France

126. Alberto Giacometti

1901-1966

“Tête de femme” table lamp designed circa 1933, later cast Patinated bronze, paper shade. Height of cast: 19 7/8 in. (50.4 cm), including shade: 27 7/8 in. (70.7 cm) high Reverse impressed AG 33. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Comité Giacometti. Estimate $130,000-150,000 Provenance Private collection, Paris, circa 1946 Thence by descent to the present owner Literature Michel Butor, Diego Giacometti, Paris, 1985, p. 59 Françoise Francisci, Diego Giacometti: Catalogue de l’œuvre, vol. 1, Paris, 1986, n.p. Daniel Marchesseau, Diego Giacometti, Paris, 1986, pp. 11, 35 Diego Giacometti, Möbel und Objekte aus Bronze, exh. cat., Museum Bellrive, 1988, Zurich, p. 30 Christian Boutonnet and Rafael Ortiz, Diego Giacometti, exh. cat., L’Arc en Seine, Paris, 2003, p. 35

The present lot is registered by the Fondation Alberto and Annette Giacometti in the online Alberto Giacometti Database (AGD) under the number AGD 4003.


The present model Tête de Femme table lamp belongs to a group of decorative objects that Alberto Giacometti created for Jean-Michel Frank between 1932 and 1940. These works are deeply associated with Frank’s minimalist, ofen surrealist, interiors. Frank positioned Giacometti’s lamps and vases in prominent locations, as works of art meant to stand out from their stark surroundings, the sole recognizable elements in spaces largely defned by the anonymity of their forms. Recalling an architectural caryatid, the now iconic form of the present table lamp features the thoughtful detail and simplicity for which Giacometti’s decorative work is prized. The artist frst conceived of his Tête de femme lamp in plaster around 1937, from which he later cast a version in bronze. The original plaster model of the lamp is now held in the collection of the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris. The original owner of the present lamp was a Parisian decorator, famous for his designs for cafés, drugstores, hotels and shops in France and abroad. In the early 1940s he worked with Jacques Adnet, then head of the Compagnie des Arts Français, as a decorative painter and collaborated with him on the decoration of the Galeries Lafayette department store windows. He acquired the present Tête de Femme in the 1940s and it has remained in his family’s collection ever since.


Property from a Private Collection, London

127. Line Vautrin

1913-1997

Mirror Talosel resin, mirrored glass, convex mirrored glass. 15 3/8 x 16 1/2 x 1 1/4 in. (39 x 42 x 3.2 cm) Reverse of frame incised Line Vautrin. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance David Gill Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner


Property from a Private Collection, Argentina

128. Jean-Michel Frank

1895-1941

Pair of guéridons circa 1938 Brass. Each: 28 3/8 (72.1 cm) high, 15 5/8 in. (39.7 cm) diameter Produced by Comte, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from the Comité Jean-Michel Frank. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Buenos Aires, acquired from Casa Comte, circa 1938 Thence by descent to the present owner

Literature Roger Lannes, “Exégèse poétique de Jean-Michel Frank,” Art et Décoration, no. 1, January 1939, p. 12 for a similar example Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean-Michel Frank: l’étrange luxe du rien, Paris, 2006, pp. 28, 68, 131, 149, 162, 216, 293 for similar examples Léopold Diego Sanchez, Jean-Michel Frank, Paris, 2017, pp. 28, 75, 180, 205, 249 for similar examples


129. Georges Jouve

1910-1964

Pair of table lamps circa 1950 Glazed stoneware, paper shades. Each: 26 1/4 in. (66.7 cm) high Underside of each signed with artist’s cipher and JOUVE. Estimate $15,000-20,000


130. Jean Royère

1902-1981

“Curule” stool circa 1937 Sycamore, velvet upholstery. 19 1/2 x 25 1/2 x 16 in. (49.5 x 64.8 x 40.6 cm) Estimate $4,000-6,000 Literature “Le Pavillon des Esembles Mobiliers,” Mobilier et Décoration, Paris, January 1937, p. 362 for a similar example Pierre-Emmanuel Martin-Vivier, Jean Royère, Paris, 2017, p. 92 for a similar example


131. Ingrid Donat

b. 1957

“Miroir Carrés” 2018 Mirrored glass, patinated bronze. 66 3/8 x 28 1/2 x 1 1/8 in. (168.5 x 72.5 x 3 cm) Produced by Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Cast by Markovstudio, Sofa, Bulgaria. Artist’s proof 1B from the edition of 20 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Reverse impressed with artist’s cipher and 1B / 20/AP 2018. Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner


132. T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings

1905-1976

Pair of “Trapeza” tables circa 1961 Patinated bronze, black marble. Each: 19 x 23 x 34 in. (48.3 x 58.4 x 86.4 cm) Manufactured by Elefherios Saridis, Athens. Estimate $10,000-15,000 Provenance Private collection, Brussels, acquired from Elefherios Saridis, 1960s Literature “U.S. Designer Looks Back to Ancient Greece to Create New Classics,” Life, vol. 51, no. 11, September 15, 1961, pp. 80-81 “A Lost Greek Look Retrieved,” Vogue, no. 141, February 15, 1963, p. 122 T. H. Robsjohn-Gibbings and Carlton W. Pullin, Furniture of Classical Greece, New York, 1963, pp. 27, 100-1

Beginning in 1960, T.H. Robsjohn-Gibbings collaborated with the Athens frm Elefherios Saridis to reconstruct furniture designs from ancient Greece, including chairs, tables, and stools. For the present pair of Trapeza tables, Gibbings took castings from a bronze leg in the Palermo Museum, Sicily, while the design of the table came from a kylix in the Berlin Museum dating to the frst half of the ffh century BCE.


133. Ingrid Donat

b. 1957

“Commode Galuchat” 2014 Patinated bronze. 36 2/ 5 x 42 x 15 7/ 10 in. (92.5 x 106.7 x 39.9 cm) Produced by Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Cast by Markovstudio, Sofa, Bulgaria. Number 6 from the edition of 8 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Reverse impressed with artist’s cipher, foundry stamp, and cwg-2014-6 / 8. Estimate $100,000-150,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Anne Bony, Ingrid Donat, Paris, 2016, p. 103


French-Swedish artist Ingrid Donat has lived and worked in Paris since she moved there to study sculpture at the École des Beaux-Arts in 1975. Following this formal artistic education, she soon found mentors in Sylva Bernt (the partner of André Arbus) as well as Diego Giacometti, who introduced her to the art of cast bronze furniture and encouraged her to create her own designs. Donat prefers an open-ended, creative approach to designing furniture; beginning by carving and engraving wax panels in a gestural manner not unlike drawing, she allows the patterns that emerge to dictate the eventual forms of the cast bronze furniture, lending a warm, tactile quality to an otherwise cold and heavy material. Donat’s patterning draws inspiration from the subtle details and crafsmanship of Art Deco design, as well as tribal tattoos, among other sources. “For me,”

she has written, “I like the idea that tribal art has an instinctive quality, like folk art, and is independent of the formal academics of Western art. I am drawn to the African tradition of scarifcation—creating marks upon skin—and the intricate repetition of a graphic motif, which translates well to bronze.” In 2005 Donat made a conscious shif towards abstraction in her work, eschewing fgurative references (bronze caryatids having previously played a prominent role in her furniture) for minimalist designs. The present commode, created in 2013, falls into this latter category. In its form and galuchat-style patterning, it clearly references André Groult’s galuchat-covered case pieces of the 1920s. However, not unlike Marc Newson’s Pod of Drawers (1987), with the Commode Galuchat Donat has reinterpreted and built on the Art Deco tradition for a new era of collectors.


134. Marcel Wanders

b. 1963

“Bon Bon Gold” chair, from the “Personal Editions” series 2010 Crocheted rope coated with epoxy resin and precious metal. 21 1/4 x 41 3/4 x 41 3/4 in. (54 x 106 x 106 cm) Number 8 from the edition of 20 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Base with metal label impressed with designer’s facsimile signature and 8 / 20. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner

Marcel Wanders’s reputation for applying unexpected twists to high-end archetypes of furniture is fully present in his Bon Bon Gold chair, which combines crocheted rope—a process with traditional, home-spun associations—with a compact rounded shape. Continuing in the vein of his other woven rope-and-resin pieces, such as the Crochet (2006), Fishnet (2001) and Knotted (1996) chair models, the Bon Bon chair refects Wanders’s own postmodern sensibilities, in which he subverts a candy-colored pop art aesthetic, with lightness, versatility, and formal sophistication. Referring to himself as “a showman,” the Dutch Wanders ofen works with recognizable design forms and tropes—in this case Eero Aarnio’s Pastil chair (1967)—replacing the glossy fberglass fnish of the original with an almost anti-modern textile. Having previously paid homage to Aarnio with the brocaded dog-shaped Courage chair (2006), the present piece is typical of Wander’s work with the conceptual Droog Collective, and the equally inventive design frm he co-founded with Casper Vissers in 2001, Moooi.


135. André Dubreuil

b. 1951

Pair of “Trévise” chairs circa 1988 Painted aluminum, painted steel, mohair. Each: 37 x 27 3/4 x 26 3/4 in. (94 x 70.5 x 68 cm) Produced by Galerie Yves Gastou, Paris. From a limited edition of 20. Estimate $4,000-6,000

Provenance Betty Lee and Aaron Stern, New York Phillips, New York, “The Betty Lee and Aaron Stern Collection,” December 17, 2013, lot 49 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Pierre Kjellberg, Le Mobilier du XXe Siècle, Dictionnaire des Créateurs, Paris, 1994, p. 181 Jean-Louis Gaillemin, André Dubreuil poète du fer, Paris, 2006, nos. 39, 40, 128


136. André Dubreuil

b. 1951

“Ram” chair circa 1987 Painted iron, hide. 35 1/2 x 26 3/8 x 35 in. (90.3 x 67 x 89 cm) Produced by A.D. Decorative Arts Ltd, London. Estimate $3,000-5,000 Literature “Rassegna,” Domus, no. 741, September 1992, n.p. Jean-Louis Gaillemin, André Dubreuil poète du fer, Paris, 2006, pp. 26, 123


137. Frederik Molenschot

b. 1981

“CL-2-The Wall” light 2012 Patinated and polished bronze. 94 1/2 x 29 x 34 in. (240 x 73.7 x 86.4 cm) Number 2 from the edition of 8 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Frame impressed FREDERIK MOLENSCHOT 2. Estimate $25,000-35,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner


138. Maarten Baas

b. 1978

Unique “Smoke” writing desk 2013 Charred pre-existing writing desk, clear epoxy resin, brass. 46 7/8 x 50 3/4 x 25 1/4 in. (119 x 129 x 64 cm) Produced by Baas & den Herder, the Netherlands. Proper lef side with inset metal lettering BAAS. Estimate $6,000-8,000

Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Marcus Fairs, 21st Century Design New Design Icons From Mass Market to Avant-Garde, Dubai, 2013, p. 92 for a similar example


139. Rick Owens

b. 1962

“Stag” stool 2009 Elm plywood, moose antler. 29 3/8 x 30 1/2 x 17 3/8 in. (74.5 x 77.5 x 44 cm) Artist proof number 3 from the edition of 20 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Underside with metal label with facsimile signature and impressed 3 / 4. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Michele Lamy, Rick Owens Furniture, New York, 2017, n.p. for other examples from the series Natalie Kovacs, Carpenters Workshop Gallery: contemporary design icons, New York, 2017, p. 247 for another example from the series


Property from an Important New York Collection

140. Maria Pergay

b. 1930

Daybed circa 1968 Stainless steel, suede. Including cushions: 14 3/4 x 117 3/4 x 33 1/4 in. (37.5 x 299.2 x 84.5 cm) Produced by Design Steel, Paris, France. Estimate $80,000-120,000 Provenance Demisch Danant, New York Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2006 Literature Design Steel, sales catalogue, Paris, 1970s, ref. no. 004 Suzanne Demisch, Maria Pergay: Between Ideas and Design, Verona, 2006, pp. 30, 44 Suzanne Demisch and Stephane Danant, Maria Pergay: Complete Works 1957-2010, Bologna, 2011, pp. 114, 192


Property from an Important New York Collection

141. Michel Boyer

1935-2011

Pair of “X” stools circa 1968 Stainless steel, vinyl. Each: 15 1/4 x 19 3/4 x 19 3/4 in. (38.7 x 50.2 x 50.2 cm) Produced by Rouve, France. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Literature Les Assises du Siège Contemporain, exh. cat., Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, 1968, p. 39 Anne Fourny, “Un événement dans le mobilier contemporain, l’acier inoxydable,” Plaisir de France, no. 363, January 1969, p. 49 Patrick Favardin and Guy Bloch-Champfort, Les décorateurs des années 60-70, Paris, 2007, pp. 92-93 Anne Bony, Meubles et Décors des Années 70, Pamplona, 2005, p. 169


142. Sebastian Brajkovic

b. 1975

“Lathe Table 450 Dark Grey” 2010 Anodized aluminum. 25 5/8 in. (65.2 cm) high, 21 3/4 in. (55.3 cm) diameter Prototype number 2 from the edition of 20 plus 4 artist’s proofs and 2 prototypes. Underside incised S.B./PROTO/2. Estimate $5,000-7,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Natalie Kovacs, Carpenters Workshop Gallery: contemporary design icons, 2017, p. 115 for another example from the series


Property of a Private Collector ∆

143. Marc Newson

b. 1963

Set of four “Komed” chairs 1996 Painted steel, leather upholstery. Each: 35 1/4 x 21 x 27 in. (89.5 x 53.3 x 68.6 cm) Manufactured by Colber, Renate Brianza, Italy. Estimate $15,000-20,000

Provenance Wright, Chicago, “Modern Design,” March 28, 2013, lots 262 and 263 Private collection Bonham’s, New York, “Modern Decorative Art & Design,” December 14, 2017, lots 89 and 90 Acquired from the above by the present owner Literature Alice Rawsthorn, Marc Newson, London, 1999, pp. 136-41 Conway Lloyd Morgan, Marc Newson, London, 2002, pp. 76, 137, 187 Alison Castle, Marc Newson Works, London, 2012, pp. 93-94


144. Mattia Bonetti

b. 1953

Prototype “Yo-Yo” low table 2007 Polished aluminum. 17 3/4 in. (45 cm) high, 55 1/8 in. (140 cm) diameter Editioned by David Gill Gallery, London. Prototype number 2 from the edition of 30 plus 2 artist’s proofs and 2 prototypes. Underside of top section with two roundels impressed DAVID GILL/London and with facsimile signature and P2 respectively. Estimate $20,000-30,000 Provenance Private collection, London Phillips, London, “Design,” September 25, 2008, lot 6 Seomi Gallery, Seoul Private collection, Seoul Acquired from the above by the present owner


145. Marc Newson

b. 1963

“Event Horizon” table 1992 Polished aluminum, painted aluminum. 31 4/ 5 x 71 x 37 5/8 in. (80.8 x 180.3 x 95.6 cm) Produced by POD Edition, UK. Number 3 from the edition of 10 plus 3 artist’s proofs. Tabletop impressed MARC NEWSON POD EDITION·EVENT HORIZON·1992. Underside impressed MARC NEWSON/POD EDITION/POD/3 / 10. Estimate $150,000-250,000 Provenance Private collection, USA Literature “Marc Newson Tavolo Event Horizon”, Domus, no. 741, September 1992, pp. 67-69 Alice Rawsthorn, “An Australian in Paris,” Blueprint, no. 104, February 1994, p. 31 Marc Newson: Bucky, dalla chimica al design, exh. cat., Triennale di Milano, 1995, fg. 10 Alice Rawsthorn, Marc Newson, London, 1999, pp. 64-69, 213 Conway Lloyd Morgan, Marc Newson, London, 2002, pp. 150-51, 157, 170-71 Louise Neri, ed., Marc Newson, exh. cat., Gagosian Gallery, New York, 2007, p. 64 Alison Castle, Marc Newson Works, London, 2012, pp. 58-63

The present model table will be included as number MN-13EHTR-1992 in the forthcoming catalogue raisonné of Marc Newson’s editioned works produced by Galerie kreo, Paris.


Designed as part of a series with Orgone chair, Orgone Stretch chair, and Alufelt chair (1993), the Event Horizon table is emblematic of Newson’s ambitious retro-futurist aesthetic. The table was produced for Ikepod (also known as Pod), Newson’s and Oliver Ike’s innovative watch company. The aluminum and enameled interior of the table seems to take on an almost life-like sense of motion, with its ductile surfaces and curvilinear edges confusing the boundaries between the object and the space around it. Achieving this sleek, space-age efect required Newson to return the aviation technologies that had long inspired him. As an early adopter of AutoCAD sofware for furniture design, the development of Newson’s signature style transcends appearance, but is defned by its conception and fabrication. Afer studying sculpture and jewelry design at Sydney College of the Arts, Newson applied a DIY ethos to metalwork, adapting industrial techniques and appearances to whatever tools he could aford and

wherever he set up his makeshif studios in Sydney, Tokyo, and London. For this series, Newson experimented with manufacturing methods, frst using an aircraf factory in France before fnally settling on an Aston Martin subcontractor in Buckinghamshire, in order to achieve the polished fuidity and seamlessness that he had been striving for since his LC1 Lounge of 1986. Like a jet-engine, the smooth angles of the Event Horizon table transition efortlessly into equally compelling interior spaces, with the glowing red enamel core of the piece seeming to ebb and fow like plasma. The tapered hollow legs appear as though they have been pulled from the molten form of the table, highlighting the advanced making techniques employed by Newson. Many of Newson’s works play with dimensionality, revealing voids and centers as liquid and gleaming as the exteriors. Furthermore, in Newson’s words, these exposed cores are “a good way of revealing some high quality manufacturing!”


146. Fernando Campana and Humberto Campana b. 1961, b. 1953 “Panda Puf” stool 2010 Stufed toy animals, brushed stainless steel. 18 7/8 in. (48 cm) high, 42 1/2 in. (108 cm) diameter Manufactured by Estudio Campana, Brazil. Number 38 from the edition of 150. Underside embroidered Campana/PANDA PUFF # 038 / 150. Estimate $8,000-12,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner

Literature Sophie Lovell, Limited Editions, Prototypes, One-Ofs, and Design Art Furniture, Basel, 2009, p. 176 for the chair Campana Brothers, Complete Works (So Far), New York, 2010, p. 273 for the chair

Phillips would like to thank Daniel Kini of the Campana Studio for his assistance cataloguing the present lot.


147. Sebastian Brajkovic

b. 1975

“Lathe V Red” chair 2008 Painted bronze, embroidered silk. 38 7/8 x 38 3/4 x 21 5/8 in. (99 x 98.5 x 55 cm) Artist’s proof 1 from the edition of 8 plus 4 artist’s proofs. Interior incised SB EA I / IV and impressed CWG. Estimate $18,000-24,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Natalie Kovacs, Carpenters Workshop Gallery: contemporary design icons, New York, 2017, p. 110


Property of a Private Collector ∆

148. Marc Newson

b. 1963

“Micarta Chair” (Wingless) 2006 Linen phenolic composite. 29 x 245 x 31 1/4 in. (73.7 x 622.3 x 79.4 cm) Number 7 from the edition of 10. Underside with metal label signed and impressed ‘Wingless/Micarta chair/ Marc Newson/ 7 / 10. Estimate $35,000-50,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer, circa 2007 Literature Alison Castle, Marc Newson Works, London, 2012, p. 146

The challenge of creating a chair out of a single uninterrupted material has preoccupied designers throughout the twentieth century. Bent plywood, glass, fberglass, plastics have all been enlisted, with varying degrees of success. With the design of the present Micarta chair in 2006, Newson cleverly turned the familiar form of these experiments of the previous century inside out, placing a void between the seat and back, rather than the seat and base, implying a fexible seat that is in reality rigid. Like his later Extrusion works in marble appearing cut from a length, the Micarta chair suggests a crosssection. Its subtly striated rich brown tone presents at frst as a polished hardwood, a trompe l’œil efect so ofen required of new materials in design history, from Formica® to Caesarstone®. This one takes it a step further, as its photosensitivity allows it to develop patina as a natural material might. But there is nothing superfcial about Micarta, which combines fber and resin to create a highly durable material used in a myriad of functional and decorative purposes, from warheads to knife handles. Micarta was developed by George Westinghouse in the early twentieth century,

and, while no longer new, it has been re-developed and improved upon for decades. Newson, like Westinghouse, is a pioneer of engineering, materials and processes, though rather than inventing, he ofen re-visited or re-invented, once saying “…for me, ‘newness’ means taking something out of one context and putting it into another.” Newson did not seek out “new” materials, but he did utilize material developments of the twentieth century and earlier through modern technology, for example, the riveted metal of the Pod of Drawers and Lockheed Lounge, the sculptural upholstery and bent tubular steel of the Komed chairs, and the neoprene of the Embryo chairs. Design history is ofen told through narratives of technological progress and marketing. For example, not long afer Westinghouse developed Micarta, he promoted it with fve cocktail trays designed by George Switzer. The tray was said to be highly durable, resistant to the wear and tear a cocktail set must endure. One hundred years later, Newson did something similar, promoting his Micarta designs on the basis of the material’s qualities–with a slight twist, as the design itself was now the primary product to be marketed.


149. Studio Job—Job Smeets and Nynke Tynagel b. 1970, b. 1977 “Banana” lamp, model F 2015 Polished bronze, painted bronze, etched glass, LED. 4 3/8 x 12 7/8 x 12 5/8 in. (11 x 33 x 32 cm) Produced by Carpenters Workshop Gallery. Number 3 from the edition of 6 plus 2 artist’s proofs. Reverse impressed JOB 3 / 6 CWG. Estimate $6,000-8,000 Provenance Acquired directly from the designer by the present owner Literature Job Smeets, Studio Job: Monkey Business, exh. cat., Museum of Arts and Design, New York, 2016, p. 249 Natalie Kovacs, Carpenters Workshop Gallery: contemporary design icons, New York, 2017, p. 321


Property from an Important Collection, United Kingdom

150. Fernando Campana and Humberto Campana b. 1961, b. 1953 “Banquete” chair 2006 Stufed toys, stainless steel. 37 x 55 x 45 in. (94 x 139.7 x 114.3 cm) Manufactured by Estudio Campana, Brazil. Number 30 from the edition of 150 plus 5 artist’s proofs and 3 prototypes. One animal embroidered “Campana/N. 30/2006”. Together with a certifcate of authenticity from The Campana Studio.

Estimate $15,000-20,000 Provenance Michael Hue-Williams Gallery, London Acquired from the above by the present owner, 2008 Literature Sophie Lovell, Furnish: Furniture and Interior Design for the 21st Century, Berlin, 2007, p. 238 Campana Brothers, Complete Works (So Far), New York, 2010, pp. 186–87, 266


Sale Information Design Sale Auction and Viewing Location 450 Park Avenue New York 10022 Auctions 6 June, 2pm Viewing 2 – 6 June Sunday 12pm – 6pm Monday – Thursday 10am – 6pm Sale Designation When sending in written bids or making enquiries please refer to this sale as NY050119 or Design. Absentee and Telephone Bids tel +1 212 940 1228 fax +1 212 924 1749 bidsnewyork@phillips.com

Auction License 2013224 Auctioneers Hugues Joffre - 2028495 Sarah Krueger - 1460468 Henry Highley - 2008889 Adam Clay - 2039323 Jonathan Crockett - 2056239 Samuel Mansour - 2059023 Rebecca Tooby-Desmond - 2058901 Susan Abeles - 2074459 Aurel Bacs – 2047217 Blake Koh – 2066237 Susannah Brockman – 2058779 Rebekah Bowling - 2078967 Catalogues catalogues@phillips.com New York +1 212 940 1240 London +44 20 7318 4024 Hong Kong +852 2318 2000 $35/€25/£22 at the gallery Client Accounting Sylvia Leitao +1 212 940 1231 Michael Carretta +1 212 940 1232 Buyer Accounts Dawniel Perry +1 212 940 1317 Seller Accounts Carolina Swan +1 212 940 1253

Design Department Head of Design, Europe Senior International Specialist Domenico Raimondo draimondo@phillips.com Senior International Specialist, Americas Meaghan Roddy mroddy@phillips.com Head of Department, New York Cordelia Lembo clembo@phillips.com Head of Sale, London Madalena Horta e Costa mhortaecosta@phillips.com International Specialist Marcus McDonald mmcdonald@phillips.com Senior Specialist Sofa Sayn-Wittgenstein ssayn-wittgenstein@phillips.com Specialist Kimberly Sørensen ksorensen@phillips.com Senior Cataloguer Nicola Krohman nkrohman@phillips.com Cataloguer Caroline Pedote cpedote@phillips.com

Client Services 450 Park Avenue +1 212 940 1200

Administrators Georgina Walsh gwalsh@phillips.com Antonia King antonia.king@phillips.com

Shipping Steve Orridge +1 212 940 1370 Anaar Desai +1 212 940 1320 Daren Khan +1 212 940 1335

International Business Manager Adam Clay aclay@phillips.com

Photographers Kent Pell Matthew Kroening Jean Bourbon Alex Braun

Senior Property Manager Oliver Gottschalk ogottschalk@phillips.com Property Manager Jack Ryan jryan2@phillips.com International Ceramics Consultant Ben Williams bwilliams@phillips.com

Front cover Eckart Muthesius, Important sideboard, from the Maharaja of Indore’s Banquet Hall, Manik Bagh Palace, Indore, circa 1931, lot 125 (detail) Back cover Flavio Poli, Large ceiling light, 1950s, lot 31 (detail)


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Jewels

Auction 7 June 2019 New York Public viewing 31 May - 6 June at 450 Park Avenue, New York. Enquiries jewels@phillips.com +1 212 940 1378

An Important Art Deco Emerald and Diamond Brooch, Cartier New York

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Important Design London Auction, 17 October 2019 Public Viewing 12–17 October 2019 Berkeley Square, London W1J 6EX Enquiries Antonia King antonia.king@phillips.com

Piero Fornasetti Unique "Architettura" chest, early 1970s

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Index Aarnio, E. 106

Jeanneret, P. 115, 117–120

Rena, N. 78

Adler, R. 123

Jouve, G. 109, 110, 129

Richter, M. 103

Agostini, F. 121

Judd, D. 86

Rie, L. 65, 66 Robsjohn-Gibbings, T.H. 132

Albini, F. 10, 12 Arredoluce 4

Kagan, V. 51

Rodrigues, S. 52, 53

Kåge, W. 102

Royère, J. 130

Baas, M. 138

Kindt-Larsen, E. 95

Baldwin, G. 67, 68

Kindt-Larsen, T. 95

Sarfatti, G. 7, 16, 49

Bertoia, H. 55–60

Koie, R. 72

Schanck, C. 82, 83 Schwarcz, J. 73, 74

Bonetti, M. 144 Borsani, O. 29

Lacca, C. 27

Seguso 30

Boyer, M. 141

Lassen, F. 97, 98

Sgrelli, E. 12

Brajkovic, S. 142, 147

Le Corbusier 118–120

Shaw, R. 75

Breuer, M. 88

Lelii, A. 11

Slee, R. 79, 80 Sottsass Jr., E. 46, 47

Britton, A. 69–71 Bufa, P. 35

Maison Desny 112

Stilnovo 44

Buzzi, F. 25

Mangiarotti, A. 43

Studio Job 149

McKie, J.K. 61 Campana, F. 146, 150

Molenschot, F. 137

Takayuki, S. 89

Campana, H. 146, 150

Mollino, C. 2

Tapiovaara, I. 96

Castle, W. 85

Mouille, S. 116

Tenreiro, J. 42

Cederquist, J. 76

Muthesius, E. 125

Tynell, P. 99, 100

Chiesa, P. 28

Nakashima, G. 90

Vautrin, L. 127

Crate, J.H. 93

Nevelson, L. 87

Venini 19, 20, 34, 38, 45

Newson, M. 143, 145, 148

Voulkos, P. 81

Chapo, P. 108

Donat, I. 131, 133

Noguchi, I. 94 Wanders, M. 134

Dubreuil, A. 135, 136 Durell Stone, E. 92

Owens, R. 139

Ward, J. 62–64

Oyekan, L. 77

Wegner, H. 101 Woodman, B. 84

Eiermann, E. 105 Eisler, M. 54

Panton, V. 104, 107

Wright, F.L. 91

Parisi, I. 8, 17, 21, 23, 24 Fontana Arte 9, 39

Pergay, M. 140

Zalszupin, J. 48

Frank, J.M. 124, 128

Perriand, C. 111

Zuccoli, L. 13

Pingusson, G.H. 113 Giacometti, A. 126

Poli, F. 31, 32 Ponti, G. 3, 5, 6, 18, 26,

Ingrand, M. 1, 14, 15, 22,

33, 36, 50

37, 40, 41

Printz, E. 122 Prouvé, J. 114


91. Frank Lloyd Wright


34. Venini


65. Lucie Rie


74. June Schwarcz


80. Richard Slee


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DESIGN [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the Design sale on 6 December 2019 in New York.

DESIGN [Catalogue]  

Phillips presents the Design sale on 6 December 2019 in New York.