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DEBBIE FLEMING, President Oklahoma Philharmonic Society, Inc. Welcome. We’re glad you’re here! The Philharmonic’s mission is to provide joy and inspiration through orchestral music… so whether you’re attending a Classics performance, a Pops concert, a Discovery Family Series Concert or The Christmas Show, we hope you are entertained and inspired by beautiful music. We’re exceptionally proud of our orchestra and musicians as they are recognized as one of the most successful orchestras in the country. This is our 28th season and we find ourselves in a time of transition. Joel Levine, our much-loved founding music director since 1988, has announced his intention to retire and we’re searching for a new Music Director. Guest candidates will conduct six of our Classics concerts this season and you will have the opportunity to help us in our evaluation following each concert. We have also transitioned to new offices located on the first floor of the new Arts District Garage. The Phil’s Board of Directors is grateful to you, our audience, as well as to all who help make our music happen - The Philharmonic musicians; our staff headed by executive director, Eddie Walker; our individual and corporate donors; endowment and foundation supporters. We are also very grateful to our volunteers including the Orchestra League and Associate Board. Your support and generosity make it possible for us to contribute to the vibrancy of Oklahoma City’s culture and lifestyle and to educate and expose young children to live orchestral music, often for the first time. Sit back, Listen and Enjoy! We hope this OKC Philharmonic performance is fun and inspiring and you will join us again soon for another Philharmonic experience.

JULIA HUNT, President Oklahoma City Orchestra League, Inc. On behalf of the Oklahoma City Orchestra League, let me welcome you to the 28th season of the OKC Philharmonic and express our gratitude to Maestro Joel Levine and our talented musicians for their gift of music! Orchestra League members are volunteers who share an appreciation for music and its gift to the human soul. We enjoy a unique relationship with the OKC Phil and together we work to provide programs that educate children and stimulate interest in orchestral music. The League also provides instrumental competitions, promoting our musicians of the future. We believe through education and awareness we can ensure the legacy of orchestral music. Providing support to the Phil and to our educational programs, the League members work throughout the year to bring fun and exciting events to the community. The popular Symphony Show House has been a spring tradition for over forty years! Our lavish fall event, the Maestro’s Ball, will be October 22nd. Join us by visiting www.okcorchestraleague.org. Thank you and enjoy the concert season!

CHRISTOPHER LLOYD, President Associate Board As the 28th season begins we once again have the opportunity to welcome something new. We have the chance to experience new sounds, new selections, new talent and for some develop a new love of orchestral music. As President of the Philharmonic’s Associate Board, it is my honor to welcome each of you and also celebrate the many talented musicians and hard-working staff and volunteers that are integral in the success of the Philharmonic. The function of the Associate Board is to engage young professionals into the mission and efforts of the Phil. The Phil is so much more than just concerts and we want the next generation to know. Additionally, through the Overture group, we hope to enhance relationships and community interaction through volunteer opportunities, networking events, concert attendance and hosting of the after-parties for selected performances. Thank you to each of you, not just for purchasing a ticket, but also for choosing to spend an evening with the incredible OKC Philharmonic!

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JOEL LEVINE Beginning his twenty-eighth season leading the Philharmonic, Joel Levine is the longest serving music director in our City’s history. Including his tenure with the Oklahoma Symphony, Maestro Levine is enjoying his thirty-eighth year on the podium at Civic Center Music Hall. Under his leadership, the orchestra has appeared on international, national and local television broadcasts and released several recordings. Maestro Levine’s reputation for exceptional musical collaboration has enabled the Philharmonic to present one of the country’s most distinguished series of world-renowned guest artists. He has collaborated with many of the greatest performing artists of our time and has been called a “remarkable musician and visionary” by Yo-Yo Ma. For three decades, Maestro Levine has conducted many of the city’s historic programs including “Porgy and Bess” with the legendary Cab Calloway, the Paris Opera Ballet starring Rudolf Nureyev, “Rodeo” for Ballet Oklahoma under the direction of Agnes DeMille, the Philharmonic’s 100th anniversary production of “La Boheme,” the State of Oklahoma’s official Centennial Celebration, and the National Memorial Service following the Oklahoma City bombing. He has also conducted Young People’s programs around the State for thousands of children, twenty-five OKC productions of “The Nutcracker” since 1980, and led programs featuring Oklahoma’s celebrated native stars including Vince Gill, Reba McEntire, Jimmy Webb, Patti Page, Blake Shelton, Toby Keith, Kristin Chenoweth, Kelli O’Hara, Megan Mullally, Sandi Patty, and Leona Mitchell. He has received international recognition for performances reflecting many different styles in the classical repertoire. His program of Schubert and Schumann symphonies with Germany’s Brandenburg Symphony Orchestra led the reviewer to write: “Joel Levine proved that he is an absolute master of his profession; the audience honored this impressive performance with much applause.” Engagements in the great European capitols include concerts with the Czech National Symphony in Prague’s Dvorák Hall, and the Symphony Orchestra of Portugal in Lisbon. Other international invitations have included orchestras in Spain, Israel, Belgrade, Bucharest, and an appearance with the Mexico City Philharmonic. Maestro Levine has conducted many of America’s major ensembles including three seasons with The National Symphony

Orchestra at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. and the orchestras of St. Louis, Detroit, Minneapolis, Baltimore, Indianapolis, Seattle, Denver, Nashville and New Orleans. The national press has praised his performances: “the orchestra played with clarity and energy” (Los Angeles Times), “fine musicianship” (Washington Post), “Levine brings the needed sheen and rhythmic verve to the music” (Minneapolis Star), “Levine drew a crisp, bold and tonally lustrous account of the varied score from the orchestra and full-throated chorus” (Houston Post). His Detroit Symphony performances received “four stars” - the highest rating from the Detroit News. Known for his work with major artists in the world of classical dance, he has conducted for three of the greatest male dancers: Rudolf Nureyev, Edward Villella, and Peter Martins. For the Kansas City Ballet, he collaborated with famed choreographer, Alvin Ailey, and conducted the first contemporary performance of a “lost” Balanchine ballet, “Divertimento.” Maestro Levine’s résumé includes collaborations with many of the immortal names of jazz, musical theater, film and television. Several of his recordings with Mexico’s Xalapa Symphony Orchestra are in international release and have been broadcast on the BBC. Maestro Levine has taken an active role in the cultural life of Oklahoma City since he arrived in 1976 as music director for Lyric Theatre. He worked actively for the passage of MAPS 1 and played a key role in the renovation of our hall. For his work as a founder of the Orchestra, he received The Governor’s Arts Award (1989), was named Oklahoma Musician Of The Year (1991), is a 2008 “Treasures of Tomorrow” honoree of the Oklahoma Health Center Foundation, received the 2014 Stanley Draper Award for his contributions to downtown Oklahoma City, and has received an Honorary Doctorate in Music from Oklahoma City University.

“Levine brings the needed sheen and rhythmic verve to the music.” — Minneapolis Star

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www.okcphil.org

E. L. & THELMA GAYLORD FOUNDATION PRESENTS

HAUNT THE PHIL SUNDAY, OCT 30, 2016 Come join us for a thrilling concert of Halloween music that will include such spooky selections as the Danse Macabre, A Night on Bald Mountain, and Ghostbusters! An afternoon filled with exciting tricks and treats for kids of all ages! Don’t forget to wear your favorite costume!

SUNDAY, JAN 29, 2017 Grammy Award winning Sugar Free Allstars will rock the house with your favorite, kid tunes with the positive messages we love! Don’t miss the fun as we rock with songs like Banana Pudding, Gotta Get Up, Ready to Give up Teddy, The Train Beat Song, He’s okay (The Spider Song), Monster Truck and More.

SUNDAY, MAR 26, 2017 The OKC Phil will present an energetic, fast-paced concert that highlights music and machines. From the driving rhythms of Beethoven, to musical depictions of trains, planes, automobiles, and MORE! This concert will take you on a wild ride and capture your inventive spirit as we explore how music and machines come together!


OKLAHOMA PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY, INC.

P R O V I D I N G

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O R C H E S T R A L

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THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS Officers

Lifetime Directors

Debbie Fleming President

Jane B. Harlow Patrick Alexander

Louise Churchill President Elect

Directors

Teresa Cooper Vice President Jeff Starling Treasurer Brent Hart Secretary Renate Wiggin Immediate Past President

Steve Agee Edward Barth Elliot Chambers Robert Clements Lawrence H. Davis Lori Dickinson Joseph Fleckinger Ryan Free Kirk Hammons Patricia Horn Julia Hunt Jane Jayroe Gamble Michael E. Joseph

Kathy Kerr Wesley Knight Brad Krieger Christopher Lloyd Carol McCoy David McLaughlin Don Rowlett Melissa Scaramucci John Shelton Glenna Tanenbaum Mark Taylor Donita Thomas Tony Welch Cheryl Brashear White

Honorary Directors Josephine Freede Mary Nichols Dick Sias

ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Simone Alexander Customer Service

Daniel Hardt Finance Director

Judy Smedley Administrative Assistant

Katie Barrick Education Coordinator

Stephen Howard Database/Records Manager

Chris Stinchcomb Concert Operations and P.R. Coordinator

Tara Burnett Development Coordinator

Kris Markes General Manager

Eddie Walker Executive Director

Pam Glyckherr Planned Giving Director

Jennifer Owens Development Director

Susan Webb Marketing & P.R. Director

Ulises Serrano Customer Service

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Classical KUCO 90.1 Garman Productions Heritage Press

Oklahoma City Police Association Production Essentials, Inc. Reynolds Ford Ryan Audio Services, LLC.

Stubble Creative, Inc. The Skirvin Hotel Tuxedo Junction

THE OKLAHOMA PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY, INC. 424 Colcord Drive, Ste. B • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73102 Tickets: 405-842-5387 • Administration: 405-232-7575 • Fax: 405-232-4353 • www.okcphil.org

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OKLAHOMA CITY ORCHESTRA LEAGUE, INC.

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE Julia Hunt Polly Worthington President Programs VP

Lisa Reed OCOL Executive Director, Ex-Officio

Carol McCoy Casey Hasenbeck President-Elect Membership VP

Eddie Walker Executive Director, Oklahoma City Philharmonic (Ex-Officio, Advisory)

Cinda Lafferty Judy Austin Governance VP & Secretary Ways & Means VP Sarah Sagran Deanna Pendleton Financial VP & Treasurer Past President, Ex-Officio

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Martha Pendleton Competitions Chair Linda Rowland-Woody Education Chair

Margaret Biggs Randy Buttram Rita Dearmon Jean Hartsuck Cheryl Hudak Dixie Jensen

Drake Keith Debbie Minter Judy Moore Pat Sholar Glenna Tanenbaum

Iva Fleck Priscilla Braun Susan Robinson Minna Hall Yvette Fleckinger June Parry Jean Hartsuck Grace Ryan Judy Austin LaDonna Meinders Dixie Jensen Lois Salmeron

Glenna Tanenbaum Debbie McKinney Anna McMillin Sue Francis Peggy Lunde Cathy Wallace Sharon Shelton Rhonda White Cindy Raby Debbie Minter Deanna Pendleton

PAST PRESIDENT’S COUNCIL Mary Ruth Ferguson Katherine Kirk Janelle Everest Lael Treat Josephine Freede Jane Harlow Jane Rodgers Joyce Bishop Ann Taylor Lil Ross Sandra Meyers Mona Preuss

ORCHESTRA LEAGUE OFFICE 3815 N. Santa Fe Ave., Ste. 105 • Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73118 Phone: 405-601-4245 • Fax: 405-601-4278 Hours: 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. • E-mail: orchleag@coxinet.net Website: www.okcorchestraleague.org

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JOEL LEVINE, Music Director and Conductor EDDIE WALKER, Executive Director

FIRST VIOLIN

Gregory Lee, Concertmaster Gertrude Kennedy Chair Marat Gabdullin, Associate Concertmaster Densi Rushing, Assistant Concertmaster Sam Formicola Hong Zhu Beth Sievers James Thomson Megan McClendon Deborah McDonald Janet Gorton Ai-Wei Chang Lu Deng

SECOND VIOLIN

Katrin Stamatis, Principal McCasland Foundation Chair Catherine Reaves Sophia Ro Brenda Wagner Sarah Brown Mary Joan Johnston Angelica Pereira Cindy Zhang Laura Young Sarah McKiddy June McCoy Hannah Murray

VIOLA

Royce McLarry, Principal Mark Neumann Joseph Guevara Kelli Ingels Steve Waddell Joseph Young Donna Cain Brian Frew Shaohong Yuan Derek Mosloff

CELLO

Jonathan Ruck, Principal Orchestra League Chair Tomasz Zieba, Associate Principal

Meredith Blecha-Wells Valorie Tatge Emily Stoops Jim Shelley Angelika Machnik-Jones Jean Statham Dorothy Hays Rob Bradshaw

BASS

George Speed, Principal Anthony Stoops, Co-Principal Larry Moore Parvin Smith Mark Osborn Jesus Villarreal Christine Craddock Kara Koehn

FLUTE

CONTRABASSOON Barre Griffith

HORN

Kate Pritchett, Principal G. Rainey Williams Chair Nancy Halliday Mirella Gauldin Frank Goforth

TRUMPET

Karl Sievers, Principal Jay Wilkinson Michael Anderson

TROMBONE

John Allen, Principal Philip Martinson Noel Seals, Bass Trombone

Valerie Watts, Principal Parthena Owens Nancy Stizza-Ortega

TUBA

PICCOLO

PERCUSSION

Nancy Stizza-Ortega

OBOE

Ted Cox, Principal David Steffens, Principal Patrick Womack Roger Owens

Lisa Harvey-Reed, Principal Dan Schwartz Katherine McLemore

TIMPANI

ENGLISH HORN

HARP

Dan Schwartz

Gaye LeBlanc Germain, Principal

CLARINET

PIANO

Bradford Behn, Principal Tara Heitz James Meiller

BASS/E-FLAT CLARINET James Meiller

Lance Drege, Principal

Peggy Payne, Principal

PERSONNEL MANAGER/LIBRARIAN Michael Helt

PRODUCTION MANAGER Leroy Newman

BASSOON

Rod Ackmann, Principal James Brewer Barre Griffith Larry Reed

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PLANNED GIVING

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The Oklahoma Philharmonic Society, Inc. is honored to recognize its Encore Society members — visionary thinkers who have provided for the future of the Oklahoma City Philharmonic through their estate plans.

Anonymous (3)

John and Caroline Linehan

Steven C. Agee, Ph.D.

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin C. Lunde, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Patrick B. Alexander

Mrs. Jackie Marron

Gary and Jan Allison

Mr. and Mrs. John McCaleb

Dr. Jay Jacquelyn Bass

Jean and David McLaughlin

Louise C. Churchill

R.M. (Mickey) McVay

Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Clements

Robert B. Milsten

Thomas and Rita Dearmon

W. Cheryl Moore

Dr. and Mrs. James D. Dixson

Carl Andrew Rath

Paul Fleming

Michael and Catherine Reaves

Hugh Gibson

Mr. and Mrs. William J. Ross

Pam and Gary Glyckherr

Drs. Lois and John Salmeron

Carey and Gayle Goad

Mr. and Mrs. William F. Shdeed

Mr. and Mrs. J.A. Gowman

Richard L. Sias

Carol M. Hall

Doug and Susie Stussi

Ms. Olivia Hanson

Larry and Leah Westmoreland

Jane B. Harlow

Mrs. Martha V. Williams

Dr. and Mrs. James Hartsuck

Mr. John S. Williams

Mr. and Mrs. Michael E. Joseph

Mr. and Mrs. Don T. Zachritz

Joel Levine

THANK YOU The Oklahoma Philharmonic Society, Inc. is grateful for the support of caring patrons who want to pass on a legacy of extraordinary music to future generations. You can join this special group of music enthusiasts by including a gift for the OKC Philharmonic’s future in your own will or estate plan. For more information on how to become an Encore Society member, contact Jennifer Owens at (405) 231-0148 or jennifer@okcphil.org or Eddie Walker at ewalker@okcphil.org.

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NICHOLS HILLS PLAZA 63RD & N. WESTERN RMEYERSOKC.COM

405.842.1478


GIFTS TO THE PHILHARMONIC The Oklahoma City Philharmonic Orchestra gratefully acknowledges the commitment and generosity of individuals, corporations, foundations, and government agencies that support our mission. To help us provide inspiration and joy to the community through performances and education programs, please contact the Philharmonic’s Development Office at (405) 232-7575. This Annual Fund recognition reflects contributions made between October 2015 and October 2016 and includes the 2015-2016 and 2016-2017 season. Contributions of $100 and above are listed through October 20, 2016. If your name has been misspelled or omitted, please accept our apologies and inform us of the error by calling the phone number listed above. Thank you for your generous support!

CORPORATIONS, FOUNDATIONS & GOVERNMENT Express their generous commitment to the community.

UNDERWRITER $40,000 & Above Allied Arts Foundation The Chickasaw Nation Inasmuch Foundation Kirkpatrick Foundation Inc. Oklahoma Arts Council Oklahoma City Orchestra League, Inc. The Oklahoman The Skirvin Hilton Hotel

PLATINUM SPONSORS $10,000 - $39,999 405 Magazine Ad Astra Foundation American Energy Partners American Fidelity Foundation Anschutz Family Foundation/ The Oklahoman Media Company BancFirst Bank of Oklahoma The Boeing Company Devon Energy Corporation E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation Express Employment Professionals HSPG and Associates, PC Love’s Travel Stops & Country Stores Mathis Brothers Furniture Co., Inc. MidFirst Bank OGE Energy Corp. Presbyterian Health Foundation Tri-State Industrial Group, LLC

Tyler Media Co./Magic 104.1FM and KOMA W&W Steel, LLC Williams Companies Wilshire Charitable Foundation

GOLD SPONSORS $5,000 - $9,999 The Crawley Family Foundation Garman Productions Mekusukey Oil Company, LLC The Metro Restaurant

GOLD PARTNERS $1,250 - $1,749 Flips Restaurant, Inc. The Fred Jones Family Foundation Morningstar Properties

SILVER PARTNERS $750 - $1,249

SILVER SPONSORS $3,000 - $4,999

Charles M. Zeeck, CPM M-D Building Products, Inc.

Clements Foods Foundation Gordon P. and Ann G. Getty Foundation Great Plains Coca-Cola Bottling Company Linn Energy, LLC. OK Gazette The Friday

BRONZE PARTNERS $300 - $749

BRONZE SPONSORS $1,750 - $2,999

BancFirst Trust Department

Anthony Flooring Systems Inc. The Black Chronicle Globe Life and Accident Insurance Company Norick Investment Company Oklahoma Allergy & Asthma Clinic

MATCHING GIFT COMPANIES AND FOUNDATIONS Double the impact of an individual’s gift. American Fidelity Corporation Bank of America Matching Gifts Program Ethics and Excellence in Journalism Foundation

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Paycom Testers, Inc. Wells Fargo

ExxonMobil Foundation Inasmuch Foundation

The Kerr Foundation, Inc. The Reserve Petroleum Company

BUSINESS MEMBERS $100 - $299 Special Thanks for assistance with our office relocation: Kirkpatrick Family Fund E.L. & Thelma Gaylord Foundation Presbyterian Health Foundation Oklahoma City Philharmonic Foundation


GIFTS TO THE PHILHARMONIC MAESTRO SOCIETY Providing leadership support.

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MAESTRO SOCIETY

Guarantor $10,000 and above Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Evans, II The Freede Family John and Claudia Holliman Jean and David McLaughlin Mary D. Nichols Nancy and George Records Mr. Richard L. Sias Mr. and Mrs. Richard Tanenbaum Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Wiggin

Benefactor $5,000 - $9,999 Mr. and Mrs. Patrick B. Alexander Mrs. Ann S. Alspaugh Mrs. Betty D. Bellis-Mankin Marilyn and Bill Boettger Priscilla and Jordan Braun Molly and Jim Crawley Mr. and Mrs. Douglas R. Cummings Mr. and Mrs. John A. Frost Mrs. Jane B. Harlow Mrs. Janice C. Jenkins Mr. Albert Lang Ms. Veronica Pastel-Egelston Mr. H.E. Rainbolt Mr. and Mrs. John Richels Mr. and Mrs. Douglas J. Stussi

INDIVIDUALS Providing essential support for the Annual Fund. Patron $3,000 - $4,999 Steven C. Agee, Ph.D. William I. and Louise Churchill Lawrence H. & Ronna C. Davis Mrs. Carlene Edwards Paul and Debbie Fleming Mrs. Bonnie B. Hefner Mr. Robert B. Milsten Mrs. Ruby C. Petty Scott and Janet Seefeldt Ms. Kathleen J Weidley Mrs. Martha V. Williams Mr. and Mrs. Richard Young

Sustainer $1,750 - $2,999 Dr. and Mrs. Dewayne Andrews Dr. and Mrs. John C. Andrus Dr. John E. Beavers Mr. Larry Blackledge Mr. and Mrs. Mike Borelli Dr. and Mrs. L. Joe Bradley Mr. and Mrs. Russal Brawley Dr. and Mrs. Robert C. Brown Mr. and Mrs. David G. Bryant Phil and Cathy Busey

Mrs. Teresa Cooper Mrs. Patty Empie Mr. and Mrs. George Faulk Mr. and Mrs. Joseph M. Fleckinger Mr. Jerry A. Gilbert Mr. and Mrs. Carey Don Goad Dr. and Mrs. James Hartsuck Mrs. Janice Singer Jankowsky and Mr. Joseph S. Jankowsky Tom and Cindy Janssen Kim and Michael Joseph Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Joseph Terry and Kathy Kerr Ms. Rita Lapham Mr. and Mrs. Harrison Levy, Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Patrick McKee Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meinders Ms. Annie Moreau Mrs. Robert Z. Naifeh Mr. and Mrs. J. Larry Nichols Mr. and Mrs. Ronald J. Norick Dr. Joseph H. Phillips Mr. and Mrs. Jerry W. Plant Drs. Gary and Mary Porter Mr. Joshua Powell Kathryn and Robert Prescott Mr. and Mrs. Steven Raybourn Mrs. Don F. Rhinehart Mr. and Mrs. William J. Ross

Mr. Donald Rowlett Lance and Cindy Ruffel Mr. Patrick J. Ryan Drs. Lois and John Salmeron Mr. and Mrs. Samuel Sanchez Mrs. Sally B. Saunders Ms. Jeanne Hoffman Smith Mr. and Mrs. John E. Stonecipher Mr. & Mrs. Frederick K. Thompson Mrs. Billie Thrash William P. Tunell, M.D. Mrs. Janet Walker Ron and Janie Walker John and Lou Waller Mr. Tom L. Ward Mrs. Anne Workman Mrs. Carol Wright

Associate $1,250 - $1,749 Mrs. Richard E. Adams, Jr. Mr. Barry Anderson Mr. J. Edward Barth Dr. and Mrs. William L. Beasley Mr. and Mrs. William Beck Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Benham Howard K. Berry, Jr. and Denise Berry Mr. and Mrs. John Biggs CONTINUED ON PAGE 61

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THE CHRISTMAS SHOW December 1, 2016 at 7:30 P.M. December 2, 2016 at 8:00 P.M. December 3, 2016 at 2:00 P.M. and 8:00 P.M.

POPS S P O N S O R E D BY

Family Fun with the OKC PHIL! Starring

Kelli O’Hara With

Cory Lingner, Sheridan McMichael, The Philharmonic Pops Chorale, The Mistletoes and students from Dance Unlimited JOEL LEVINE, MUSIC DIRECTOR AND CONDUCTOR DIRECTION AND CHOREOGRAPHY BY LYN CRAMER EDDIE WALKER, EXECUTIVE PRODUCER Choral Preparation: Vince Leseney, Technical Direction: Amanda Foust, Lighting Design/Programming: Brad Criswell, Set Design: Amanda Foust, Props: Courtney Strong, Costumes: Jeffrey Meek, Sound: George Ryan Productions, Production Stage Manager: Jenny Lang, Assistant Stage Managers: Hannah Blaile and A.J. Orth, Additional Choreography: David Scotchford, Additional Choral Arrangements: Don Clothier, Children’s Choreography: Amy Reynolds-Reed THIS CONCERT IS GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY:

American Fidelity Foundation SPECIAL THANKS TO:

E.L. and Thelma Gaylord Foundation I Amy Reynolds-Reed and Dance Unlimited PRE CONCERT LOBBY BELL CHOIRS: Church of the Servant, Cleveland Elementary School,

St. Charles Borromeo Catholic School and the Oklahoma City Handbell Ensemble Text PhilFun to 95577 to stay up to date on the latest Philharmonic info

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“THE CHRISTMAS SHOW” WADE............................................. O COME, ALL YE FAITHFUL The Philharmonic Pops Chorale BERLIN.......................................... HAPPY HOLIDAYS MEDLEY The Philharmonic Pops Chorale and The Mistletoes KENT............................................. I’LL BE HOME FOR CHRISTMAS Kelli O’Hara and The Philharmonic Pops Chorale LOESSER....................................... BABY, IT’S COLD OUTSIDE Kelli O’Hara and The Philharmonic Pops Chorale Men MARKS.......................................... ROCKIN’ AROUND THE CHRISTMAS TREE Cory Lingner MENDELSSOHN/Wasson................ HARK! THE HERALD TRUMPETS SING The Philharmonic RODGERS & HAMMERSTEIN........... A WONDERFUL GUY! Kelli O’Hara and The Philharmonic Pops Chorale Women HERMAN........................................ THE BEST CHRISTMAS OF ALL Kelli O’Hara and Sheridan McMichael LOESSER....................................... FUGUE FOR TOYHORNS The Elves, featuring Chad Anderson, Brian Hamilton and Greg White MARKS.......................................... RUDOLPH THE RED-NOSED REINDEER Kelli O’Hara and the students from Dance Unlimited SKLAR........................................... SPARKLEJOLLYTWINKLEJINGLEY The Elves, Kelli O’Hara and Santa GILLESPIE & COOTS....................... SANTA CLAUS IS COMING TO TOWN The Mistletoes featuring Cory Lingner INTERMISSION PRIMA........................................... MOONLIGHT SERENADE The Philharmonic, with Greg White RAYE & PRINCE............................. ROLLY POLLY SANTA CLAUS Mattie Joyner, Olivia Reid and Jenny Rottmeyer MARTIN & BLANE........................... HAVE YOURSELF A MERRY LITTLE CHRISTMAS Kelli O’Hara and The Philharmonic Pops Chorale HAGGART & BAUDUC..................... BIG NOISE FROM WINNETKA Mattie Joyner, Spencer Laboda, Ashley Mandanas, Patrick Nowak and The Mistletoes LOESSER....................................... WHAT ARE YOU DOING NEW YEAR’S EVE? Kelli O’Hara HANDY, W.C.................................... ST. LOUIS BLUES MARCH Bianca Bulgarelli, Conor Donnelly, Lena Owens and Daryl Tofa BASS............................................. GLORY TO GOD The Philharmonic Pops Chorale HOPKINS....................................... WE THREE KINGS The Philharmonic Pops Chorale TRADITIONAL................................ ANGELS WE HAVE HEARD ON HIGH Kelli O’Hara and The Philharmonic Pops Chorale ADAM............................................ O HOLY NIGHT Kelli O’Hara and Company BERLIN.......................................... WHITE CHRISTMAS Kelli O’Hara and Company

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KELLI O’HARA Kelli O’Hara has unequivocally established herself as one of Broadway’s great leading ladies. Her portrayal of Anna Leonowens in the critically acclaimed revival of The King and I recently garnered her the 2015 Tony Award for Best Leading Actress in a Musical, along with Drama League and Outer Critics nominations. The year before was an exceptionally busy year. Her performance as Francesca in the musical adaptation of The Bridges of Madison County earned her Tony, Drama Desk, Drama League, and Outer Critics Circle nominations. Additionally, she starred as Mrs. Darling in NBC’s live telecast of Peter Pan alongside Allison Williams and Christian Borle, and on New Year’s Eve, Kelli made her Metropolitan Opera debut in the production of The Merry Widow with Renee Fleming. A native of Oklahoma, Kelli received a degree in opera, and after winning the State Metropolitan Opera Competition, moved to New York and enrolled in the Lee Strasberg Institute. She made her Broadway debut in Jekyll & Hyde and followed it with Sondheim’s Follies, Sweet Smell of Success opposite John Lithgow, and Dracula. In 2003 Kelli committed to a production of The Light in the Piazza at Seattle’s Intiman Theatre. The show landed on Broadway in 2005 and earned Kelli her first Tony and Drama Desk Award nominations. She moved from one critical and commercial success to another when she joined Harry Connick on Broadway in the 2006 Tony Award-winning production of The Pajama Game, for which Kelli received Tony, Drama Desk, and Outer Critics Award nominations. Kelli starred in the Tony Awardwinning revival of South Pacific at Lincoln Center, enrapturing audiences and critics alike with her soulful and complex interpretation of Nellie Forbush, and garnering Tony, Drama Desk, and Outer Critics Award nominations. She later teamed up with Matthew Broderick in Broadway’s musical

comedy Nice Work if You Can Get It, earning Tony, Drama Desk, Drama League and Outer Critics Circle nominations, as well as the Fred Astaire Nomination for dance. Kelli has worked regionally and Off-Broadway in Far From Heaven at Williamstown Theater Festival and Playwrights Horizons, King Lear at the Public Theater, Bells Are Ringing at City Center Encores, Sunday in the Park with George at Reprise, My Life with Albertine at Playwrights Horizons and Beauty at the La Jolla Playhouse. Kelli received critical acclaim for her performances at the New York Philharmonic’s productions of Carousel and My Fair Lady as both Julie Jordan and Eliza Doolittle, respectively. She sold out her solo show at Carnegie Hall and Town Hall and has performed with symphonies and orchestras across the country. She is a frequent guest artist on the PBS Memorial Day and July 4th telecasts and has performed several times as part of the Kennedy Center Honors tributes for Barbara Cook, Jerry Herman and Barbra Streisand. Among her film and television credits are Sex & The City 2, Martin Scorsese’s short The Key to Reserva opposite Simon Baker, The Dying Gaul, Blue Bloods (NBC pilot), All Rise (NBC pilot), Alexander Hamilton (Maria Reynolds) starring Brian F. O’Byrne (PBS), NUMB3RS (CBS), All My Children, the animated series Car Talk, and numerous live performances on national television shows. Kelli’s voice can be heard on many cast album recordings including The Bridges of Madison County, Nice Work if You Can Get It, South Pacific (Sony), The Light in the Piazza (Nonesuch Records; Grammy nomination), The Pajama Game (Sony; Grammy nomination), The Sweet Smell of Success (Sony), My Life with Albertine (PS Classics), Dream True (PS Classics), Jule Styne Goes Hollywood (PS Classics). She has released two solo albums, Always and Wonder in the World.

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LYN CRAMER An Endowed Professor in the Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre at the University of Oklahoma, Lyn Cramer has been a teacher, director, and choreographer for over 35 years. OU productions include Thoroughly Modern Millie, La Cage aux Folles, The Drowsy Chaperone, On The Town, Seussical, A Chorus Line, Anything Goes, Sweet Charity, Cabaret, Company, Baby, Pal Joey, My One and Only, Good News, Nine, How to Succeed, Rent, and Urinetown. Cramer has directed and choreographed many shows for Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma including Little Mermaid, The Drowsy Chaperone, Dream Girls, Big Fish, The Will Rogers Follies, Bye Bye Birdie, Hairspray, 42nd Street, Swing, Smokey Joe’s Café, Cabaret, Singin’ in the Rain, The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas, The Sound of Music, Dames at Sea, Five Guys Named Moe, Grease, and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Other theatre credits include Casa Mañana, Music Theatre of Wichita, Oklahoma City Repertory Theatre and The Broadway Rose in Portland, Oregon. Favorite stage

roles include Mrs. Wilkinson in Billy Elliot, Becky Two Shoes in Urinetown the Musical and Bertha in Boeing-Boeing. Cramer’s professional acting career began in 1982, and she is a member of Actors Equity Association and The Stage Directors and Choreographers Society. Lyn received The Irene and Julian J. Rothbaum Presidential Professor of Excellence in the Arts award from the Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts and the Artistic Achievement Award from Chicago National Association of Dance Masters. Featured on Cathy Roe’s instructional tap and jazz videos, Cramer is master teacher throughout the United States, publishing curriculums in jazz and tap pedagogy. She has served as an adjudicator and master teacher in musical theatre dance at the Hong Kong Academy for the Performing Arts. Her students grace the Broadway stage, perform in national tours, international theatre, regional theatre, and cruise lines. She is the author of the book Creating Musical Theatre: Conversations with Broadway Directors and Choreographers.

THE WEITZENHOFFER SCHOOL OF MUSICAL THEATRE All of the Mistletoes and several members of the Pops Chorale are musical theatre majors from the Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre at the University of Oklahoma. The mission of the School is to provide an excellent education, training and varied production experiences to selected students to assure them the opportunity to be artistically competitive on a national level upon graduation from the University of Oklahoma. The School is committed to the development of new musical properties, cooperating with professional producers, companies and creative leaders in the field, in addition to regularly presenting works from the musical theatre repertoire. It is a comprehensive and balanced interdisciplinary B.F.A. degreegranting program that collaborates with other units in the Weitzenhoffer Family College of Fine Arts. musicaltheatre.ou.edu

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GUEST ARTIST CORY LINGNER Cory returns to The Christmas Show as a featured tapper during a break from New York City and Broadway engagements. Recent Broadway credits include An American In Paris (u/s Adam) and On The Town (u/s Chip & Ozzie). Other credits include, Off Broadway: Once Upon A Mattress (The Jester, Astaire Award Nomination); Television: 69th Annual Tony Awards, TODAY (NBC), Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, Saturday Night Live, and Hulu’s The Battery’s Down. Regional theatre credits include Sacramento Music Circus, MUNY, Music Theatre of Wichita, Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma, and OKC’s CityRep. Cory is a 2013 graduate of the Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre at the University of Oklahoma.

SHERIDAN MCMICHAEL Sheridan is a Kingston, New York-based composer and theatre artist. Originally from OKC, he has appeared at Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma, including, The Drowsy Chaperone, Fiddler on the Roof (Motel), The Fantasticks (The Mute), Pageant (Miss Great Plains), Big River (Tom Sawyer), Spring Awakening (Hanschen), and Call Me Madam; OKC Rep’s Avenue Q (Princeton/Rod [u/s]) and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum (Hero [u/s]); and the Chickasaw Nation’s touring production of Te Ata, based on the life of the famed Chickasaw actress and storyteller, which played the Rasmuson Theater in the Smithsonian Institution’s National Museum of the American Indian in Washington, D.C. His choreography has been seen at Oklahoma Children’s Theatre, OCCC, and OCU, where he received a Bachelor of Music summa cum laude in music theatre performance (’13). His original theatre scores include Mary McElroy, for which he also penned book and lyrics; Pageantry, a short ballet for chamber chorus, orchestra, and dancer-puppeteers; and Now We Are Six, based on the children’s works of A.A. Milne.

VINCE LESENEY This year marks Vince’s 19th production of the OKC Philharmonic’s The Christmas Show. In addition to directing the Pops Chorale, he is also professor of voice in the Weitzenhoffer School of Musical Theatre at the University of Oklahoma. Vince has performed in over thirty productions with Lyric Theatre of Oklahoma and played Franz Liebkind opposite Roger Bart and Brad Oscar in The Producers at Kansas City Starlight in 2010. In 2003 he performed at the opening of the Robert J Dole Institute of Politics at the University of Kansas before three former Presidents and several Congressional Medal of Honor recipients. Vince has been a guest artist with the Kansas City Symphony and the American Music Festival Orchestra. He also proudly serves as Minister of Music at Memorial Presbyterian Church in Norman.

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THE PHILHARMONIC POPS CHORALE Beth Adele Chad Anderson Sam Briggs Courtney Crouse Stephanie Easley Aaron Gooden Davy Green

Brian Hamilton Scott Hynes Mattie Joyner Spencer Laboda Ashley Mandanas Sheridan McMichael Patrick Nowak

Dalycia Phipps Olivia Reid Jenny Rottmayer Marita Stryker Nathan Stukey Greg White

Gordon Beingessner Bianca Bulgarelli Caroline Coffey

Conor Donnelly Lena Owens Daryl Tofa

THE MISTLETOES Taylor Bryant, Dance Captain and Cover for Ms. O’Hara Brick Ban

STUDENTS FROM DANCE UNLIMITED Caroline Coffey Makayla Fontaine Sara Hollis

Keyna Hoselton Suzie Linihan Macy McKown

Molly Rops Caroline Smith Nicole Vaughn


CONCERT PREVIEW SCHEDULE

CLASSICS 4 January 7, 2017 8:00 P.M.

CLASSICS

JANUARY 7, 2017:: David Lockington Guest Conductor

HYE-JIN KIM, VIOLIN DAVID LOCKINGTON, GUEST CONDUCTOR

FEBRUARY 4, 2017:: Andreas Delfs Guest Conductor MARCH 4, 2017:: Daniel Hege Guest Conductor MARCH 25, 2017:: Vladimir Kulenovic Guest Conductor APRIL 15, 2017:: Joel Levine Music Director, OKC Philharmonic

COPLAND ....................... Buckaroo Holiday from Rodeo SAINT-SAËNS ................. Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61

Allegro non troppo Andantino quasi allegretto Molto moderato e maestoso—Allegro non troppo

Hye-Jin Kim, violin

INTERMISSION

ELGAR ........................... Variations on an Original Theme (“Enigma Variations”), Op. 36

Theme I. (C.A.E.) II. (H.D.S-P) III. (R.B.T.) IV. (W.M.B.) V. (R.P.A.) VI. (Ysobel) VII. (Troyte) VIII. (W.N.) IX. (Nimrod) X. (Dorabella)—Intermezzo XI. (G.R.S.) XII. (B.G.N.) XIII. (* * *)—Romanza XIV. (E.D.U.)—Finale

[The movements are played without pause.]

Give us your feedback. Go to our web site okcphil.org to fill out our Guest Conductor Survey. THIS CONCERT IS GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY:

Text CLASSICS to 95577 to stay up to date on the latest Philharmonic info Listen to a broadcast of this performance on KUCO 90.1 FM on Wednesday, February 8 at 8 pm and Saturday, February 11 at 8 am on “Performance Oklahoma”. Simultaneous internet streaming is also available during the broadcast.

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HYE-JIN KIM Describing the artistry of violinist Hye-Jin Kim, winner of the 2009 Concert Artists Guild International Competition, The Strad lauded her “heart-stopping, unrivalled beauty” of sound and her “supremely musical playing, well-thought out, yet of the moment.” Ms. Kim’s sensitivity to the expressive and contextual components of the violin repertoire enables her to transport audiences beyond mere technical virtuosity, and this remarkable musical depth and passion brought her to international prominence when she was awarded First Prize at the Yehudi Menuhin International Competition at the age of nineteen. Ms. Kim has performed as soloist with the Philadelphia Orchestra led by Christoph Eschenbach and the New Jersey Symphony with Gerard Schwarz, as well as with the BBC Concert Orchestra, Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra, Pan Asia Symphony (Hong Kong), and Hannover Chamber Orchestra. She has appeared in major venues including Weill Recital Hall at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center Terrace Theater, Kimmel Center Verizon Hall, the Kravis Center, Salzburg’s Mirabel Schloss, St. John’s Smith Square, and Wigmore Hall in London. At the invitation of Korea’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, she performed at the U.N. Headquarters in Geneva and New York. Ms. Kim has also served as a cultural representative for Korea in Switzerland, Australia, New Zealand, Kazakhstan, and Uzbekistan through concert and outreach engagements. Concerto highlights in 2016-17 include her debut with this orchestra and a return engagement with the Roswell Symphony in New Mexico. Current and recent recitals include the Jefferson Academy of Music in Columbus, OH, Merkin Concert Hall in NYC, the Philadelphia Chamber Music Society, Melbourne Chamber Music Society in Florida, Pepperdine University Center for the Arts in Malibu, and the Omni Foundation in San Francisco.

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A passionate chamber musician, Ms. Kim has toured throughout the U.S. with Musicians from Marlboro and the United Kingdom with Prussia Cove Open Chamber Music. Her festival appearances include Four Seasons, Marlboro, Ravinia, Music from Angel Fire, Music at Menlo, Bridgehampton, Music in the Vineyards, and Prussia Cove, and she is a member of the Cooperstown Quartet with violinist Ara Gregorian, violist Maria Lambros, and cellist Michael Kannen. Ms. Kim’s debut CD, From The Homeland, was released in 2014 on CAG Records to much acclaim: “Kim’s playing is superb – warm, polished, expressive…this program gives you a particularly rewarding hour of enjoyment” (American Record Guide). The disc features music by Debussy, Sibelius, Smetana, and Janacek in a collaboration with pianist Ieva Jokubaviciute. Born in Seoul, Korea, Hye-Jin Kim began her violin studies with Dong-Hyun Kim at age 8 and subsequently studied with Ik-Hwan Bae and Dong-Suk Kang. At age 14, she entered the Curtis Institute of Music, studying with Jaime Laredo and Ida Kavafian, and then earned her Master’s degree with Miriam Fried at the New England Conservatory as a recipient of NEC’s prestigious Emma V. Lambrose Presidential Scholarship. She is currently Assistant Professor of Violin at East Carolina University (Greenville, NC) where she founded and directs the ECU Summer Chamber Music Institute. She plays a Gioffredo Cappa violin, crafted in Saluzzo, Italy in 1687. Beyond her musical activities, Ms. Kim enjoys traveling and exploring her love of literature as she tours the homes and haunts of the Bronte sisters, Jane Austen, Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, C.S. Lewis, and the like. Her other passion is baseball, and her years at Curtis made her a hardcore fan of the Philadelphia Phillies.


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DAVID LOCKINGTON Over the past thirty years, David Lockington has developed an impressive conducting career in the United States. A native of Great Britain, he served as the Music Director of the Grand Rapids Symphony from January 1999 to May 2015, and is currently the orchestra’s Conductor Laureate. He has held the position of Music Director with the Modesto Symphony since May 2007 and in March 2013, Mr. Lockington was appointed Music Director of the Pasadena Symphony. He has a close relationship with the Orquesta Sinfonica del Principado de Asturias in Spain, where he was the orchestra’s Principal Guest Conductor from 2012 through 2016, and in the 15/16 season was named one of three Artistic Partners with the Northwest Sinfonietta in Tacoma, Washington. In addition to his current posts, since his arrival to the United States in 1978 Mr. Lockington has held positions with several other American orchestras, including serving as Assistant Conductor of the Denver Symphony Orchestra and Opera Colorado, and Assistant and Associate Conductor of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. In May 1993 he accepted the position of Music Director of the Ohio Chamber Orchestra, assumed the title of Music Director of the New Mexico Symphony Orchestra in September 1995 and was Music Director of the Long Island Philharmonic from 1996 through 2000. Mr. Lockington’s guest conducting engagements include appearances with the Saint Louis, Houston, Detroit, Seattle, Toronto, Vancouver, Oregon and Phoenix symphonies; the Rochester and Louisiana Philharmonics; and the Orches-

tra of St. Luke’s at Carnegie Hall. Internationally, he has conducted the Northern Sinfonia in Great Britain, the Israel Chamber Orchestra, the China Broadcasting Symphony Orchestra in Beijing and Taiwan, and led the English Chamber Orchestra on a tour in Asia. Recent and upcoming guest conducting engagements include appearances with the New Jersey, Indianapolis, Vancouver, Utah, Pacific, Colorado, Nashville, San Diego, Santa Barbara, Edmonton, Alabama, Tucson and Kansas City symphonies, the Florida and Louisville orchestras, the National Arts Centre Orchestra in Ottawa and the Buffalo and Calgary philharmonics. Mr. Lockington’s summer festival activities include appearances at the Grand Teton, Colorado Music, Interlochen, Chautauqua and Eastern Music festivals. David Lockington began his career as a cellist and was the Principal with the National Youth Orchestra of Great Britain for two years. After completing his Bachelor of Arts degree at the University of Cambridge, where he was a choral scholar, Mr. Lockington came to the United States on a scholarship to Yale University where he received his Master’s degree in cello performance and studied conducting with Otto Werner Mueller. He was a member of the New Haven Symphony Orchestra and served as assistant principal cellist with the Denver Symphony Orchestra for three years before turning to conducting.

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Buckaroo Holiday from Rodeo Aaron Copland First performance: 2/19/1984 Conductor: Luis Herrera Last Performance: 3/4/2006 Conductor: Joel Levine Born: November 14, 1900, in Brooklyn, New York Died: December 2, 1990, in Peekskill, New York Work composed: The ballet Rodeo was written from June to September 1942 on commission from the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo Work premiered: The ballet was premiered October 16, 1942, at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York, with Franz Allers conducting. “Buckaroo Holiday” was first played as a concert excerpt on May 28, 1943, by the Boston Pops Orchestra, Arthur Fiedler conducting/ Instrumentation: Three flutes (second and third doubling piccolo), two oboes and English horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, cymbal, bass drum, xylophone, snare drum, wood block, slapstick, glockenspiel, triangle, celesta, piano, harp, and strings

A classical-music lover asked to describe what constitutes “the American sound” has some tough deciding to do. For well over two centuries American composers have been producing music that is so distinctive in its character that it couldn’t come from anywhere else. Fuging tunes by William Billings and his colleagues in Colonial New England, antebellum ballads by Stephen Foster, irresistible foot-lifters by John Philip Sousa, fearless experiments by Charles Ives and Carl Ruggles, boundary-breaking syntheses by George Gershwin and Leonard Bernstein, rhythmically vibrant

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effusions by William Bolcom and John Adams—they all play irreplaceable parts in what makes our nation’s “classical” music unique. And yet, if we had to boil it down to just one composer, most of us would agree that the essential summation of “the American sound” may be found in the scores of Aaron Copland. To a certain extent, the identification of Copland with the American sound is a chicken-and-egg conundrum. Would his tones have sounded so American if they had not been attached to subjects that illuminated such a breadth of specifically American places: the urban landscape in Quiet City, the heartland in Appalachian Spring, the American West in Billy the Kid and Rodeo? Or is there something deeply, inherently American in Copland’s musical vocabulary, rich as it usually is in rhythmic point, in widely spread voicing, in disjunct intervals shaping its melodies and harmonies? Copland composed Rodeo in 1942 as a ballet to be choreographed by Agnes de Mille for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. She initially described it to him as “the story of the Taming of the Shrew—cowboy style.” She continued: “It is not an epic, or the story of pioneer conquest. It builds no empires. It is a pastorale, a lyric joke … . There are never more than a very few people on the stage at a time … one must be always conscious of the enormous land on which these people live and of their proud loneliness.” To capture the profoundly national spirit of the subject, Copland drew directly from the well of American folksong, which was an obsession of American musicians at the time. Folk tunes (or melodies that mimic them) appear in quite a few Copland scores, but here they play a role almost constantly, drawn largely from the collections Our Singing Country (by John A. and Alan Lomax) and Traditional Music of America (by Ira Ford).

Rodeo—which Copland always pronounced “RO-dee-o,” although many people call this piece “Ro-DAY-o”—was a smash hit at its premiere in October 1942. Its folksong-infused score was perfectly in sync with wartime nationalism, but it has stood the test of time without fading. The following year Copland extracted an orchestral suite, which he titled Four Dance Episodes from Rodeo. Copland told his interviewer Vivian Perlis: “The first section, ‘Buckaroo Holiday,’ is the most complex of the four. Included are variations on two folk tunes, ‘If He Be a Buckaroo by his Trade’ and ‘Sis Joe.’ I used a rhythmic device to achieve a lilting effect that, together with some unprepared key changes, make for a comic touch, further emphasized by the use of a trombone solo in introducing the ‘Buckaroo’ folk song. Extended pauses further exaggerate the syncopation. ‘Sis Joe’ also undergoes rhythmic transformation before both tunes blend in a canonic treatment for full orchestra.”


PROGRAM NOTES Rodeo in Progress Agnes de Mille recalled her first taste of Copland’s score for the new ballet on which they were collaborating: Aaron was teaching at Tanglewood, and he called when the score was ready and came over with a young friend. I didn’t know who he was. … While Aaron and his friend were at the piano, I looked around and realized there was nobody there to hear him. Not a soul but my mother and me! I thought, “This is very odd.” But Aaron said, “I have got to do it and go. It’s getting late.” So we started. I got more and more excited and finally I was just screaming, yelling and dancing. He’d written the music on transparent paper that kept slipping, and during the waltz it fell to the ground. The boy with Aaron kept pushing the music back in place. Aaron said to him, “Could you play the treble part? I can’t play it.” This boy played wonderfully. I said in the waltz part, “Aaron, this section is pretty dull.” He giggled, and said, “I think it is, too. I’ll do something about it.” The friend said, “You’d better!” I remember thinking, “Of all the impudence! To talk to the Maestro like that!” The boy was Leonard Bernstein.

over Saint-Saëns’ talents, Gounod might also have noted that he was a highly accomplished organist (who for two decades reigned in the loft at the Madeleine), a champion of forgotten earlier music and of contemporary composers, an inspiring teacher (who, as professor of the École Niedermeier in Paris, did much to shape the talents of Gabriel Fauré and André Messager), a gifted writer, a world traveler, and an aficionado of such disciplines as Classical languages, astronomy, archaeology, philosophy, and even the occult sciences.

— JMK

Violin Concerto No. 3 in B minor, Op. 61 Camille Saint-Saëns First performance: 2/26/1950 Violin: Robert Rudie Last Performance: 11/10/2001 Violin: Stephanie Chase Born: October 9, 1835, in Paris, France Died: December 16, 1921, in Algiers, Algeria Work composed: March 1880 Work dedicated: “A Monsieur P. Sarasate” Work premiered: October 15, 1880, in Hamburg, Germany, with Pablo de Sarasate as soloist and Adolf Georg Beer conducting the Philharmonisches Orchester Instrumentation: Two flutes (one doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani, and strings, in addition to the solo violin

“Monsieur Saint-Saëns possesses one of the most astonishing musical organizations I know of. He is a musician armed with every weapon. He is a master of his craft as no one else is. ... He plays, and plays with the orchestra as he does the piano. One can say no more.” So wrote the composer Charles Gounod of his fellow Frenchman, and in marveling

He started piano lessons at the age of two-and-a-half, soon began studying piano with a former pupil of Kalkbrenner’s and Mendelssohn’s, and embarked on composition and organ instruction at seven (by which time he was already performing Bach, Handel, and Mozart in public). In 1846, when he was ten, he played his formal debut recital at Paris’ Salle Pleyel, with a program that included piano concertos by Mozart and Beethoven. The applause was resounding, so he topped off the event by offering to play any of Beethoven’s piano sonatas from memory, as an encore. “He knows everything, but lacks inexperience,” lamented his friend Hector Berlioz. Saint-Saëns produced six works for violin and orchestra: his so-called Second Concerto, Op. 58, in 1858; his so-called First Concerto, Op. 20, in 1859 (these two not published in the order they were composed); his Third Concerto, Op. 61, in 1880; his famous Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso, Op. 28 (1863); and the rarely played Romance in C major, Op. 48, for Violin with Orchestra or Piano (1874), and Morceau de Concert in E minor, also for Violin with Orchestra or Piano (1880). Three of these— the Concertos Nos. 1 and 3 and the Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso—were written for, dedicated to, and premiered by the Spanish virtuoso Pablo de Sarasate.

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Saint-Saëns was immensely impressed by Sarasate, a decade his junior and only 15 years old when he introduced the First Violin Concerto in 1859. They became instant friends and remained so until the violinist’s death, in 1908. The composer had no compunction about consulting “his violinist” on technical matters relating to the instrument. This surely accounts for a measure of the general violinistic fluency displayed in the Third Concerto; and the last measures of the second movement, in which the soloist plays stratospheric arpeggios in harmonics, seem overtly crafted to reflect Sarasate’s muchremarked ability to negotiate passages in harmonics with unusual aplomb. Saint-Saëns later wrote: “Those who attended my Monday musical soirées have not forgotten the brilliant effect produced by my distinguished friend. This was so much the case that for several years after no violinists could be persuaded to perform at my home, so terrified were they of the idea of inviting comparison. Nor did he shine by his talent alone, but also by his brilliant intellect and the inexhaustible animation of his conversation, which was always interesting and suggestive.” Violinists were less bashful in the public sphere when it came to the Third Concerto, and it quickly became one of SaintSaëns’ most played and admired compositions. Sarasate performed it often, but Timothée d’Adamowski introduced it to America (in 1890, with the Boston Symphony) and it quickly entered the repertoires of such notable virtuosos as Eugène Ysaÿe, Jan Kubelík, Mathieu Crickboom, and Georges Enesco. Saint-Saëns applauded them all, but he was less happy about Emile Sauret, who effected substantial modifications to the solo part and then had the American firm of G. Schirmer publish his version as an “authorized edition.” Saint-Saëns went ballistic, but there was no stuffing the genie back in the bottle and that unquestionably unauthorized edition remains in print to this day.

Variations on an Original Theme (“Enigma Variations”), Op. 36 Edward Elgar First performance: 2/17/1946 Conductor: Victor Alessandro Last Performance: 9/15/2012 Conductor: Joel Levine Born: June 2, 1857, at Broadheath, Worcestershire, England Died: February 23, 1934, in Worcester, England Work composed: October 1898 through February 19, 1899; revised by July 12, 1899 (with a lengthened finale) Work dedicated: To “my friends pictured within” Work premiered: June 19, 1899, at Saint James’ Hall, London, with Hans Richter conducting; revised version premiered September 13, 1899, at the Three Choirs Festival at Worcester Cathedral, with Elgar conducting Instrumentation: Two flutes (second doubling piccolo), two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, snare drum, triangle, bass drum, cymbals, organ (optional) and strings.

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Inspiration Pablo Martín Melitón de Sarasate y Navascuéz (you may call him merely Pablo de Sarasate) was born in Pamplona, in the Spanish province of Navarra, on March 10, 1844, and died in Biarritz, in southwestern France, on September 20, 1908. Like Saint-Saëns, he was a child prodigy. He began violin lessons at five and, encouraged by his musical father (a military band director), played his debut recital in Pamplona at the age of only eight. He was swept off to pursue advanced study first in Madrid, then at the Paris Conservatoire. He concluded his work at the latter in 1859 and immediately embarked on the international concert circuit. By the 1870s, Sarasate had earned a spot among the leading virtuosos of his day. His profound preparation in the workings of compositions—rather than just in the intricacies of violin playing—endeared him to many leading composers. Among those who dedicated important works to him, apart from Saint-Saëns, were Max Bruch (his Violin Concerto No. 2 and Scottish Fantasy), Edouard Lalo (Symphonie espagnole and Concerto in F minor), Henryk Wieniawski (Violin Concerto No. 2), and Antonín Dvořák (Mazurek, Op. 49). Sarasate was noted for silken bowing, impeccable intonation, and elegant nonchalance that made him the toast of the salon set. These attributes are evident in the nine recordings he made in 1904, mostly of his own compositions but also bits of Bach and Chopin. When he died he bequeathed his two Stradivari violins to the conservatories of Madrid and Paris, but his other treasured possessions went to the city of Pamplona, where they can still be viewed in a museum constructed in his honor. — JMK

Edward Elgar holds sway as the ultimate representative of the Edwardian Era, the late-Imperialist moment of British history named after the monarch who reigned over it—Edward VII, who on July 4, 1904, turned the composer into Sir Edward. The son of an organist in Worcester, Elgar enjoyed a nonetoo-spectacular career early on, deputizing for his father in church lofts, picking up a bit of instruction on violin, serving as bandmaster at the Worcester County Lunatic Asylum, and, in 1882, acceding to the position of music director of the Worcester Amateur Instrumental Music Society. The following year, in Birmingham, he got a public performance of an orchestral intermezzo he had written, and very gradually he built a reputation from there. By the mid-1890s he was


PROGRAM NOTES deemed a name to reckon with, and in 1900 his oratorio The Dream of Gerontius, presented at the Birmingham Festival, established him as Britain’s leading composer, a perfect embodiment of the plushly comfortable, healthily vigorous spirit of the Edwardian moment.

verge on the certifiably batty. For his part, Elgar fanned the flames of speculation by dropping elusive comments such as “the theme is so well known that it is extraordinary that no one has spotted it,” as he remarked to Arthur Toye Griffith (portrayed in Variation VII); or, to Dora Penny (a.k.a. Mrs. Richard Powell, and the “Dorabella” of Variation X), that he was flabbergasted that “you, of all people,” had not solved the puzzle. At the same time, he resolutely refused to reveal anything definite about the solution, and whatever he did say tended to toss what may be red herrings into waters that were already muddy. For example, in a program note penned for a performance in Italy in 1911, Elgar wrote, “It may be understood that these personages comment or reflect on the original theme & each one attempts a solution of the Enigma, for so the theme is called.” At least part of Elgar’s enigma was solved quickly: the identities of the subjects portrayed by the variations leave not much room for doubt. Many believe that the larger enigma of these variations, the “dark saying” to which Elgar alluded, may be mere subterfuge: that the enigma cannot be guessed with certainty because no enigma exists. What there can be no doubt about is that in this work Elgar supplied the symphonic repertoire with one of its richest sets of orchestral variations, captivating in their working out, evocative in their instrumentation, elegant in their overall balance.

The year before Gerontius, the British public got its first taste of what would become the most performed—and most discussed—of Elgar’s major instrumental compositions, his Variations on an Original Theme (Op. 36), popularly known as the (“Enigma Variations”). The work’s title, as announced on the program at its premiere, was simply Variations for Full Orchestra. More mischief was afoot than that perfunctory title might suggest. The program note on that occasion revealed that Elgar had crafted each variation to describe some friend or acquaintance, but he would not reveal their identities. The connection was suggested by initials attached to each section, but it was understood that these might not be simplistic renderings of the initials of the names of the subjects or “portraits” but rather encodings of some more arcane sort (perhaps alluding to a nickname, for example). And then the composer suggested that something still deeper might be going on: The enigma I will not explain—its “dark saying” must be left unguessed, and I warn you that the apparent connection between the Variations and the Theme is often of the slightest texture; further, through and over the whole set another and larger theme “goes,” but is not played—so the principal Theme never appears, even as in some late dramas—e.g. Maeterlinck’s L’Intruse and Les Sept princesses—the chief character is never on the stage. This made everyone terribly curious, and a flurry of hypothesizing ensued, some of it so imaginative as to

In the Composer’s Words While he was sketching the (“Enigma Variations”) in October 1898, Elgar sent a scrap of music labeled “Theme” to his friend August Jaeger, an employee at the firm that published Elgar’s music, with the instruction that it was “to be critikised please.” Elgar elaborated, in oddly orthographed form: Since I’ve been back I have sketched a set of Variations (orkestry) on an original theme: the Variations have amused me because I’ve labeled ’em with the nicknames of my particular friends— you are Nimrod. That is to say I’ve written the variations each one to represent the mood of the ‘party’—I’ve liked to imagine ‘the party’ writing the var: him (or her) self and have written what I think they wd/ have written—if they were asses enough to compose—it’s a quaint idea & the result is amusing to those behind the scenes & won’t affect the hearer who ‘nose nuffin.’ — JMK

JAMES M. KELLER James M. Keller is Program Annotator of the New York Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony. From 1990-2000 he wrote about music on staff at The New Yorker, and in 1999 he received the prestigious ASCAP–Deems Taylor Award for his feature writing in Chamber Music magazine, which he serves as Contributing Editor. These essays previously appeared, in earlier forms, in the programs of the New York Philharmonic and are used with permission.

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DISNEY IN CONCERT: TALE AS OLD AS TIME JANUARY 27, 2017 AT 8:00 P.M. JANUARY 28, 2017 AT 2:00 P.M. AND 8:00 P.M.

POPS PETER STAFFORD WILSON, CONDUCTOR

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A Special Thank You to Bo Taylor Catering for providing Musicians’ catering services.

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DISNEY IN CONCERT: TALE AS OLD AS TIME

Disney Memories Overture................................................................... Arr. Brad Kelley (You Can Fly, You Can Fly, You Can Fly; The Second Star to the Right; Alice in Wonderland; I’m Late; Bella Notte; April Showers; Valse De Fleurs – Fantasia) Selections from Disney’s Tangles......................................................... Arr. Michael Starobin and Ted Ricketts (Kingdom Dance; When will my Life Begin; Music Alan Menken, Lyrics Glenn Slater I’ve Got a Dream; I See the Light) “Reflection”........................................................................................ Music and Lyrics Matthew Wilder and David Zippel Orchestrations Alexander Courage Enchanted Helpers Medley .................................................................. Arr. Danny Troob, Bruce Healey, A. Menken, (Friend Like Me; Under the Sea; Be Our Guest) R. Merkin, T. Pasatieri, and T. Ricketts Music Alan Menken, Lyrics Howard Ashman Villains Medley .................................................................................... Adapted and Orchestrated (Trust in Me; Poor Unfortunate Souls; Be Prepared) Carl Rydlund, Gordon Goodwin and Ted Ricketts Hercules Gospel Medley ...................................................................... Arr. Bruce Healey (Gospel Truth; Zero to Hero; A Star is Born) Music Alan Menken, Lyrics David Zippel

INTERMISSION

The Princess and the Frog Medley . ..................................................... Words and Music Randy Newman (Down in New Orleans (Prologue); Down in New Orleans; Orchestrations Ted Ricketts Friends on the Other Side; Almost There) They Finally Meet . .............................................................................. Arr. Carl Rydlund, Franck van der Heijden, (Kiss the Girl; Beauty and the Beast; So This is Love) and Ted Ricketts Battle with the Forces of Evil .............................................................. Adapted George Bruns Frozen Medley ..................................................................................... Words and Music Kirsten Anderson-Lopez and Robert Lopez (The Great Thaw; Elsa and Anna; Do You Want to Build a Snowman; Underscore Christopher Best For the First Time in Forever; In Summer; Let it Go) Orchestrations Dave Metzger, Adapted Ted Ricketts

Production Credits DISNEY IN CONCERT Tale as Old as Time is produced by Symphony Pops Music Sherilyn Draper, Director and Writer • Ted Ricketts, Musical Director Presentation licensed by Disney Concerts, © All rights reserved. © 2014 Walt Disney Music Company and Wonderland Music Company, Inc., © 1998 Wonderland Music Co, Inc. (BMI), 2009 Walt Disney Music Company, © 1996 Wonderland Music Co, Inc. (BMI), Walt Disney Music Co. (ASCAP), © 1952 Wonderland Music Company, Inc., and 2013 Wonderland Music Co., Inc.

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PETER STAFFORD WILSON Now in his fifteenth season as Music Director of Ohio’s Springfield Symphony Orchestra, Peter Stafford Wilson is one of the most exciting and talked about conductors of his generation. Concurrently, he holds the post of Music Director of the Westerville Symphony. As Associate Conductor of the Columbus Symphony Orchestra since 1995, his current season also includes numerous performances with the CSO, Columbus Symphony Youth Orchestra and BalletMet Columbus. Mr. Wilson also fulfills his fifth season as Principal Conductor of Tulsa Ballet, leading four productions, including holiday performances of Tchaikovsky’s The Nutcracker, with choreography by Artistic Director Marcello Angelini. Peter Stafford Wilson’s leadership of the Springfield Symphony Orchestra continues to elicit praise from the public, musicians and press. Its 2005 Agriculture and the Arts Growing Together brought international attention to the organization, as did the sequel, American Made: Celebrating Our Manufacturing Heritage, which premiered in November 2007. The orchestra’s innovative series, “Night Lights,” has enjoyed steadily increasing sales and attendance. The recent endowment of the Music Director chair with gifts totaling one million dollars is further testimony to the community’s expanding support. Mr. Wilson and the SSO are the recipients of a 2009-2010 ASCAP Award for Adventurous Programming. From 1990 to 2008, Peter Stafford Wilson held the posts of Assistant and Associate Conductor of The Columbus Symphony Orchestra. In Columbus, his duties included the leadership of the orchestra’s nationally recognized educational projects, which have been featured at national conferences of the American Symphony Orchestra League and Music Educators National Conference. He led programs on all of the orchestra’s classical and pops subscription series, and played a major role in its 1997 Viva Vienna Festival. Subsequently, he was named Artistic Director of the orchestra’s Festival Weeks @ The Southern, for which his innovative programming was consistently praised. He is the recipient of a 2010 Columbus Symphony Orchestra Music Education Award, given in recognition of his 20 years of dedication to the orchestra’s educational programming.

A native of North Carolina, Peter Stafford Wilson studied at the University of Cincinnati’s College-Conservatory of Music, where his primary mentor was the late Thomas Schippers. During his years at CCM, he became a leading exponent of contemporary music, often collaborating with faculty and student composers, including the Conservatory’s Visiting Professor of Composition, Lukas Foss. Mr. Wilson also studied at the Aspen Music School, where he studied with Dennis Russell Davies, Eastern Music Festival (on whose faculty he subsequently served), Pierre Monteux School, Boris Goldovsky Summer Opera Institute and Rome’s Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, where he was associated with Franco Ferrara. After his advanced studies, he was appointed Assistant, and later Associate, Conductor of the Canton Symphony Orchestra. Peter Stafford Wilson has guest conducted the orchestras of Bozeman, Charlotte, Chautauqua, Dallas, Detroit, Erie, Indianapolis, Kansas City, Louisville, North Carolina, Phoenix, Roanoke, Seattle, Syracuse, Tucson, Tulsa, West Virginia, Wheeling and Youngstown. He also led the Independence Day Concert with Peter Nero’s Philly Pops Orchestra and the Northeastern Pennsylvania Philharmonic’s highly popular “Awesome Classics” series, as well as programs with Orquesta Filarmónica de Montevideo and Hong Kong Sinfonietta. No stranger to the lyric theater, Mr. Wilson has held the positions of Principal Conductor of South Carolina’s Opera Charleston and Music Director of the Ohio Light Opera and conducted performances at Spoleto Festival USA, Young Artists Opera Theater, College Light Opera, Canton Lyric Opera and Otterbein College Opera Theatre. He also enjoys an on-going association with BalletMet in Columbus. Peter Stafford Wilson and his wife, Barbara Karam Wilson, reside in Westerville, Ohio. When not conducting, he enjoys traveling, golf and reading. He is also a wine enthusiast and an avid gourmet cook.

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AARON PHILLIPS Aaron is very excited to be part of this wonderful production. Aaron is an Ovation Award nominated actor/singer, proud member of Actor’s Equity, and can frequently be seen on film and TV. Past theatre credits include: Jekyll and Hyde (John Utterson), Batboy: The Musical (Batboy/Edgar), Songs for a New World , and Les Misérables (Foreman/Combeferre). Opera credits include: La Boheme with the Greensboro Opera Company, conducted by Valery Ryvkin, Pirates of Penzance (Pirate King) and Lakme (Frederic) by Delibes. Aaron recently appeared in a staged reading of The Bone

Wars (O’Conner) with the prestigious New York playwright group, Youngbloods. You may have seen Aaron as Carl, half of the duo that is the face of Lipton Iced Tea. He is also an accomplished voice-over talent and can be heard in video games such as World of Warcraft, Grand Theft Auto V, Red Dead Redemption and Lord of the Rings. He is a man of many voices for commercials, cartoons, and music sessions everywhere. Aaron has been a Disney fan his entire life and is happy to help bring this music to fans of all ages.

ANDREW JOHNSON Andrew is a Disney kid at heart and is humbled to share the music and magic from the stage! He has toured all over the United States, Europe, and Asia as a lead vocalist and dancer, and his performances have been broadcast on national and international television. Andrew has performed on FOX’s The X-Factor, The Conan O’Brien Show, and the MTV Video Music Awards. He has sung background for artists such as Demi Lovato, Fifth Harmony, LeAnn Rimes, and Florence and the Machine. His theatrical credits include Rent (Benny), Five Guys Named Moe

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(Four-Eyed Moe), and Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat (Joseph, Asher), Andrew has shared the stage with singers/actresses Shirley Jones and Bernadette Peters and has performed live duets with recording artists Patti LaBelle and Erykah Badu and singer/actress Jodi Benson (the original voice of Ariel in The Little Mermaid). He is a singer/songwriter and recording artist, and his music is available worldwide on iTunes under his artist name Drew Michael.


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LISA LIVESAY Lisa is thrilled to be a part of Disney in Concert. Lisa recently lit up the stage in a headliner performance at the Kennedy Center Millennium Stage entitled Laughs, Love & Light. She has been seen in the role of Glinda in the national tour of Wicked. Other theatre credits include Monteen in Jason Robert Brown’s Parade (LA Music Center), Olive in 25th...Spelling Bee, Peter Pan in Peter Pan, Cathy in The Last Five Years, and Belle in Disney’s Beauty and the Beast. Lisa

recently starred in the feature film Monday Nights at 7 with Edward James Olmos. Lisa has also performed with the San Francisco Symphony, Houston Symphony, Dallas Symphony and Oregon Symphony, among many others. You can spot Lisa with Bigfoot on a TOYOTA commercial, and occasionally, you’ll hear her voice on select films and TV shows. She resides in New York City. Lisa is a firm believer in hard work and kindness!

WHITNEY CLAIRE KAUFMAN Whitney recently completed two years with the North American tour of the Broadway smash-hit Mamma Mia! (ensemble, understudy for Sophie and Lisa). Her performance as Sophie garnered rave reviews from the Boston Globe. Whitney has performed as guest soloist with the Malaysian Philharmonic Orchestra, the Pacific Symphony Orchestra, and the Florida Orchestra, and has appeared in Cabaret (Sally Bowles), A Midsummer Night’s Dream (Peaseblossom), Marisol (June), The Los Angeles Theatre Ensemble’s production of Wounded, as well as many other theatrical productions. TV credits

include General Hospital and the hit ABC series Modern Family. As both a singer and voice-over performer in film and television, Whitney has been heard in productions including That Championship Season, The Secret of NiMH 2, and two MGM animated series: All Dogs Go to Heaven and Noddy. She recently recorded songs written by Oscar-winning composer Dimitri Tiomkin. Whitney graduated with honors from Chapman University with a BFA in Theater Performance. Her favorite Disney movie is The Little Mermaid, with Cinderella as a close second.

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OKLAHOMA PHILHARMONIC SOCIETY, INC. ASSOCIATE BOARD Christopher Lloyd , President Jenni Fosbenner, Past President Kevin Learned, VP of Fundraising Ashley Wilemon, VP of Events Lisa Perry, Treasurer Kate Cunningham, Secretary Robyn Berko Laura Cunningham Allison Goodman Danny O’Donnell Patrick Randall Marti Ribeiro Jessica Robins Cyndi Tran Dwayne Webb Cheryl White

CLASSICS 5 February 4, 2017 8:00 P.M.

CLASSICS CHRISTINE LAMPREA, CELLO ANDREAS DELFS, GUEST CONDUCTOR

Emerging Artist Series

DEBUSSY.............................Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un faune (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun) TCHAIKOVSKY......................Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33 for cello and orchestra (original version)

Introduction: Moderato assai quasi Andante Thema: Moderato simplice Variation I: Tempo della Thema Variation II: Tempo della Thema Variation III: Andante Variation IV: Allegro vivo Variation V: Andante grazioso Variation VI: Allegro moderato Variation VII: Andante sostenuto Variation VIII and Coda: Allegro moderato con anima

TCHAIKOVSKY..................... Andante Cantabile for cello and string orchestra (from String Quartet No. 1 in D, Op. 11)

*First performance on this series

Christine Lamprea, cello

INTERMISSION

SHOSTAKOVICH....................Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47

nichols hills plaza

Moderato Allegretto Largo Allegro non troppo

Give us your feedback. Go to our web site okcphil.org to fill out our Guest Conductor Survey. THIS CONCERT IS GENEROUSLY SPONSORED BY:

shoes . handbags . clothing . accessories www.ckandcompany.com 405.843.7636

Text CLASSICS to 95577 to stay up to date on the latest Philharmonic info Listen to a broadcast of this performance on KUCO 90.1 FM on Wednesday, March 8 at 8 pm and Saturday, March 11 at 8 am on “Performance Oklahoma”. Simultaneous internet streaming is also available during the broadcast.

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CHRISTINE LAMPREA Hailed a “firebrand” (Incident Light.com) and noted for her “supreme panache” (The Boston Musical Intelligencer), Colombian-American cellist Christine Lamprea was the First Prize winner of the 2013 Sphinx Competition. She joined the roster of the Sphinx Soloists Program, and as such is presented as soloist with major orchestras worldwide. She has also received awards from the National Foundation for Advancement in the Arts, the Young Texas Artists’ Competition, and captured First Prize at the 2013 Schadt National String Competition. A winner of Astral’s 2013 National Auditions, Ms. Lamprea has appeared as soloist with the Costa Rica National Symphony, Houston Symphony, New Jersey Symphony, San Antonio Symphony, and toured with the Sphinx Virtuosi across the U.S. in such venues as Carnegie Hall and the Kennedy Center. Engagements in the 2016-2017 season include appearances as soloist with the Bucks County Symphony Orchestra, Detroit Symphony Orchestra, Ensemble 212, Mid-Texas Symphony, this orchestra and the Owenboro Symphyony Orchestra, in repertoire of Dvořák, Elgar, Saint-Saëns, Tchaikovsky, and a concerto written for Ms. Lamprea by acclaimed composer Jeffrey Mumford. As a recitalist, Ms. Lamprea has appeared on prestigious series at Illinois’ Krannert Center for the Performing Arts, Florida’s Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, Pepperdine University, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Washington Performing Arts Society. In demand as a chamber musician, she performs regularly with the Jupiter Symphony Chamber Players, and has performed with such

musicians as Shmuel Ashkenasi, Itzhak Perlman, Roger Tapping, and Carol Wincenc. Ms. Lamprea strives to expand her musical boundaries by exploring many genres of music and non-traditional venues for performance and teaching. She has worked with member of Baroque ensemble Les Arts Florissants, and studied sonatas with fortepiano with Audrey Axinn. She has premiered several works by composers at the Juilliard School and the New England Conservatory, and was a member of a small ensemble that worked with jazz musician Anthony Coleman on avant-garde composer John Zorn’s game piece Cobra, for musical improvisers and prompter. A passionate teacher, Ms. Lamprea workded with Ecuadorian youth in the cities of Quito and Guayaquil, as part of a residency between the Juilliard School and “Sinfonia Por La Vida,” a social inclusion program modeled after Venezuela’s El Sistema program. She continued to pursue musical outreach as Gluck Community Service Fellow at Juilliard, performing in hopitals and nursing homes in and around New York City as part of a mixed ensemble of dancers, actors, and musicians. Christine Lamprea is the recipient of a Paul and Daisy Soros Fellowship for New Americans, which supported her studies at the New England Conservatory, and a Sphinx MPower Artist Grant, which supports her study with acclaimed cellist Matt Haimovitz. She studied with Bonnie Hampton at the Juilliard School and holds a Master’s degree from the New England Conservatory, where she studied with Natasha Brofsky. Previous teachers include Ken Freudigman and Ken Ishii.

“San Antonio Symphony Orchestra and fierce cellist shine...The indefatigable cello soloist was Christine Lamprea...Lamprea brought limpid beauty of tone to the demanding solo part...she has impressed with the fearless intensity of her musicianship...Undiminished were the bright, limpid beauty of her tone, the gorgeousness of her vibrato, and the security of her technique.” —Classical Voice North America

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ANDREAS DELFS Andreas Delfs currently holds the position of Conductor Laureate of the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra where, during twelve seasons as Music Director, he was instrumental in the orchestra’s rise to national prominence. He has held chief artistic posts with several orchestras both in North America and Europe. He led the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra as Music Director (2001-2004) and Artistic Consultant (2004 -2006). He served as General Music Director of Hannover, Germany (1995-2000), conducting the symphony orchestra and opera company. Prior to his time in Hannover, Andreas Delfs was Music Director of the Bern Opera, resident conductor of the Pittsburgh Symphony (during the tenure of Lorin Maazel) and Music Director, at an early age, of the Orchestre Suisse des Jeunes. Born in Flensburg, Germany, Andreas Delfs began studying piano and music theory at age five. He studied with Christoph von Dohnányi and Aldo Ceccato at the Hamburg Conservatory. At 20 Andreas Delfs became the youngest ever Music Director of the Hamburg University Orchestra and Musical Assistant at the Hamburg State Opera. Enrolling at the Juilliard School, Andreas Delfs studied with Jorge Mester and Sixten Ehrling and won the Bruno Walter Memorial Scholarship. Andreas Delfs keeps an active guest conducting schedule. Recent highlights have included appearances with the Tonkünstler-Orchester Vienna, RTÉ National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Radio Chamber Orchestra, Copenhagen Philharmonic, NCPA Orchestra China, NHK Symphony Orchestra Tokyo, Hong Kong Philharmonic Orchestra, Singapore Symphony, Staatsorchester Rheinische Philharmonie, Calgary Philharmonic, the Phoenix and Alabama Symphonies and National Symphony Orchestra Washington. He conducted the Britten Sinfonia in a performance of Elijah at London’s Barbican Hall as well as two new operatic productions, namely Turandot at Opera Lyra Ottawa and Carmen at Opera North. In March 2016 he will be leading a new production of Ariadne auf Naxos at Palm Beach Opera.

Having conducted numerous world premieres Andreas Delfs has close links with many of today’s composers. He counts among his profound musical inspirations musicians such as John Corigliano, Philip Glass, Roberto Sierra and Hans Werner Henze. He is the frequent partner to many of the world’s most renowned solo artists, including Emanuel Ax, Joshua Bell, Yo-Yo Ma and Renée Fleming. Andreas Delfs’ more recent recording projects include Beethoven’s Violin Concerto in D with Susanne Hou and the London Symphony Orchestra, Robert Sierra’s Missa Latina with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra on the Naxos label and Beethoven Piano Concertos with the London Symphony Orchestra and pianist John O’Conor on the Telarc label. Other recording projects have included a collection of sacred songs with Renée Fleming for Decca, a production of Humperdinck’s Hansel and Gretel with the Milwaukee Symphony Orchestra for Avie, as well as a recording of Mozart’s Requiem with the Saint Paul Chamber Orchestra. Over the years Andreas Delfs has led numerous distinguished ensembles. He has conducted orchestras such as the Frankfurt Radio Symphony Orchestra, London Philharmonic, Leipzig Gewandhaus Orchestra, Tonhalle Orchestra of Zurich, Danish National Symphony Orchestra, Netherlands Philharmonic, Philadelphia Orchestra, San Francisco Symphony, Los Angeles Philharmonic, Sydney Symphony and the Taipei Symphony Orchestra. Among Andreas Delfs’ most notable operatic achievements have been his highly praised debut with the New York City Opera conducting performances of Carmen, a production of the uncut version of Hans Werner Henze’s monumental König Hirsch for the Württemberg State Theatre in Stuttgart and a highly acclaimed production of Ariadne auf Naxos with Washington National Opera. He led four productions at the Aspen Music Festival and gave the Swiss premiere of György Ligeti’s Le Grand Macabre, which received special praise from the composer.

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Prélude à l’Après-midi d’un faune (Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun) Achille-Claude Debussy First performance: 2/21/1938 Conductor: Ralph Rose Last Performance: 4/5/2008 Conductor: Joel Levine Born: August 22, 1862, in St. Germain-en-Laye, just outside Paris, France Died: March 25, 1918, in Paris, France Work composed: Begun in 1892—perhaps as early as 1891—and completed by October 23, 1894 Work premiered: December 22, 1894, at a concert of the Société Nationale de Musique in Paris, with Gustave Doret conducting Instrumentation: Three flutes, two oboes and English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two harps, antique cymbals, and strings

A Piece to Reckon With The Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun became the most popular of Debussy’s symphonic compositions and it inspired a river of commentary that continues to flow to this day. Here’s an appreciation from the composer Pierre Boulez: “It has been said often: the flute of the Faune brought new breath to the art of music; what was overthrown was not so much the art of development as the very concept of form itself, here freed from the impersonal constraints of the schema, giving wings to a supple, mobile expressiveness, demanding a technique of perfect instantaneous adequacy. … The potential of youth possessed by that score defies exhaustion and decrepitude; and just as modern poetry surely took root in certain of Baudelaire’s poems, so one is justified in saying that modern music was awakened by L’Après-midi d’un faune.” — JMK

the imprimatur of the Prix de Rome in 1884 (for his cantata L’Enfant prodigue), enabling him to spend the next two years in Italy; had inhaled the Wagnerian breezes of Bayreuth in 1888 and 1889; had grown enamored of the sounds of the Javanese gamelan at the Paris International Exposition of 1889; and had composed a great many songs and piano pieces, some of which are ensconced in the repertoire today.

Claude Debussy achieved his musical maturity in the final decade of the 19th century, a magical moment in France when partisans of the visual arts fully embraced the gentle luster of Impressionism, poets navigated the indirect locutions of Symbolism, composers struggled with the pluses and minuses of Wagner, and the City of Light blazed even more brightly than usual, enflamed with the pleasures of the Belle Époque. Several early Debussy masterpieces of the 1890s have lodged in the enduring repertoire, including most strikingly the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun. Debussy was hardly a youngster when he composed it. He had begun studying at the Paris Conservatoire in 1872, when he was only ten; had served as resident pianist and musical pet for Nadezhda von Meck, Tchaikovsky’s mysterious patron, in Russia and in her travels during the summers of 1880-82; had finally gained

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While it defined the composer’s distinctive voice, this ten-minute piece baffled many listeners. Debussy’s fellowcomposer Alfred Bruneau wrote of it: “[It] is one of the most exquisite instrumental fantasies which the young French school has produced. This work is too exquisite, alas! it is too exquisite.” Even at the distance of a century, listeners can appreciate Bruneau’s concern. Debussy—or at least the Debussy of the 1890s—sometimes seemed so obsessed with minute details of timbre that other musical concerns appeared to be overlooked; everything threatened to implode into a mass of sensual loveliness. Of the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun the composer Ferruccio Busoni said (I think as a compliment), “It is like a beautiful sunset; it fades as one looks at it.” Debussy’s eventual style was not to display the sort of firm, unmistakable architecture that most composers up until that time had cherished. His method would evolve into something more intuitive, with themes that invite little development, with harmonies inspiring momentary excitement rather than underscoring long trajectory. Although he is sometimes called a musical Impressionist, his esthetic affinities would seem to be more allied to the Symbolists, those poets and artists of the late-19th century who disdained the purely expository or representational and sought instead to evoke a specific, fleet-


PROGRAM NOTES ing emotional illumination in the reader or viewer through mysterious metaphors. One of the highpoints of Symbolist poetry was L’Après-midi d’un faune (The Afternoon of a Faun), by Stéphane Mallarmé. The poem first appeared in 1865 under title Monologue d’un faune and then kept evolving until it reached a definitive version in 1876. At that point Mallarmé published it, under its new title, in a slim volume embellished with a drawing by Édouard Manet. Vintage Symbolism it is: a faun (a rural deity that is half man and half goat) spends a languorous afternoon observing, recalling, or fantasizing about—it’s not always clear which—some alluring nymphs who clearly affect him in an erotic way. The poem became iconic in its time (though it was merely a point of departure for Mallarmé’s further, even more revolutionary poetry) and Debussy fell beneath its spell by the early 1890s, when he seems to have discussed with Mallarmé the idea of creating a musical parallel. Debussy appears to have embarked on the project sometime in 1892. The score was complete by October 23, 1894, and the piece was premiered two months later, to such acclaim that it was immediately encored on the same program. Certainly it was radical in its unremitting sensuality, but the work’s harmonic implications were also profound. In retrospect, the Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun may be taken as a harbinger of the musical century that lay ahead.

Variations on a Rococo Theme, Op. 33 for cello and orchestra (original version) Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky First performance: 11/24/1959 Cello: Mstislav Rostropovich Last Performance: 10/9/2010 Cello: Julie Albers Born: April 25 (old style)/May 7 (new style), 1840, in Votkinsk, Vyatka Province, Russia Died: October 25/November 6, 1893, in St. Petersburg, Russia Work composed: December 1876 Work premiered: December 18/30, 1877, in Moscow, with cellist Wilhelm Fitzenhagen as soloist and Nikolai Rubinstein conducting a concert of the Russian Musical Society Dedication: “À Mr Guillaume Fitzenhagen” Edition Used: The most commonly played edition of this piece is the “Fitzenhagen version,” issued in 1889 by Tchaikovsky’s publisher, Pyotr Ivanovich Jurgenson. In this concert, however, we hear Tchaikovsky’s original version, which not published until 1956, in the Russian edition PSSM (Chaikovskii: Polnoe sobranie sochinenii). Instrumentation: Two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, and strings, in addition to the solo cello

Tchaikovsky composed his Variations on a Rococo Theme (sometimes called the Rococo Variations) with a specific cellist in mind: Wilhelm Fitzenhagen, a 28-year-old German musician who since 1870 had served as principal cellist of the Moscow division of the Imperial Russian Music Society

and who also was cello professor at the Moscow Conservatory. Tchaikovsky wrote the piece quickly, as he was often wont to do, and Fitzenhagen played the premiere in Moscow, on December 18 (old style)/30 (new style), 1877.

It appears that what he played on that occasion was the Rococo Variations as Tchaikovsky created it: an orchestral introduction, a presentation of the theme (featuring solo cello), a working-out of the theme’s possibilities in the course of eight variations, and a concluding coda. When it came time for the work to be published, Fitzenhagen apparently forgot that he himself was not the composer. He worked through a copy of Tchaikovsky’s manuscript, entered all manner of alterations into the solo part (essentially re-writing it in places), and then had a go at the work’s structure. He deleted one of the variations entirely, re-ordered the remaining seven (only the first and second remained where Tchaikovsky had envisioned them), and sliced a substantial cut out of the coda. Then he took it upon himself to present these alterations to Tchaikovsky’s publisher with a demand that they be incorporated. “Horrible Fitzenhagen insists on changing your cello piece,” wrote the publisher to Tchaikovsky. “He wants to ‘cello’ it up and he claims you gave him permission. Good God! Tchaikovsky revu et corrigé par Fitzenhagen! [Tchaikovsky revised and corrected by Fitzenhagen!]” Another composer might have put his foot down and brought an end to the meddling, but Tchaikovsky, typically given to selfdoubt, decided that Fitzenhagen must be listened to—and so it was that the piece was published, in both its orchestral and its cello-and-piano editions, in a version we might more accurately say is by Tchaikovsky-Fitzenhagen. As it is, Fitzenhagen’s name does appear above Tchaikovsky’s on the first page of that score—as the dedicatee. CONTINUED ON PAGE 50

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Tchaikovsky grumbled a good deal about Fitzenhagen’s presumption in revising his piece, but on the whole he tolerated the situation. What’s more, a decade later, in 1887, he invited a replay of the whole experience by sending Fitzenhagen a manuscript of his Pezzo capriccioso (Op. 62), also for cello and orchestra, so that the cellist could have a look-through while changes could still be made. That he grew to accept the Rococo Variations in their Fitzenhagened form is made clear from a conversation reported by the cellist Yulian Poplavsky, who visited the composer about two weeks before he died: “We, seeing his particularly good spirits, approached him with our perpetual request—that he should write a cello concerto. ‘Why don’t you play my [Rococo] Variations?’ was always the one and the same reply. I repeated the old line about how some of the variations were uncomfortable for the cellist, that in them there was little singing. ‘They can’t play them, and so they pester me,’ Pyotr Ilich joked.” A report from the Fitzenhagen pupil Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov sheds light on Tchaikovsky’s frustration over the revisions. He wrote that he visited Tchaikovsky in 1889, as the piece was moving toward its initial publication. “On one of my visits to Pyotr Ilyich,” he wrote, “I found him very

Tchaikovsky’s “Rococo” Theme The “rococo theme” that runs through Tchaikovsky’s Variations was composed by Tchaikovsky himself. It would seem that his goal here was not to duplicate or emulate the musical style of the “rococo” period—which in the history of music fell in the middle of the 18th century—but rather to portray a sort of fantasy about its courtly charm. Tchaikovsky was greatly drawn to that period. His reverence for Mozart was utter and unshakable, and in his opera The Queen of Spades he actually composed an episode in more-or-less strict Mozartian style. (At least it sounds more Mozartian than does his Fourth Orchestral Suite, titled Mozartiana, though the latter actually incorporates themes by the early master.) In any case, the Rococo Variations are well mannered, even if the specific sound of the piece seems derives more from Schumann than from early Mozart or other Rococo types. The variations are not strictly in the “Classical” mode; rather than embellish or otherwise elaborate the melody within its defined proportions, Tchaikovsky has no compunction about extending his material as the case demands, yielding a set of variations in which each section defines very much its own musical world. — JMK

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upset, looking as though he was ill. When I asked: ‘What’s the matter with you?’—Pyotr Ilyich, pointing to the writing desk, said: ‘Fitzenhagen’s been here. Look what he’s done with my composition—everything’s been changed!’ When I asked what action he was going to take concerning this composition, Pyotr Ilyich replied: ‘The Devil take it! Let it stand as it is.’” A later generation of musicologists stood up for Tchaikovsky to a degree he was unwilling to himself. Looked at objectively, the Rococo Variations were carefully plotted and elegantly balanced just as the composer wrote them. “With the cuts, inserted passages and tempo changes in Fitzenhagen’s work,” wrote the mid-20th-century musicologist G.S. Dombaev, “this could be called a distortion of the careful and clear construction of the former Variations.” Tradition dies hard, to be sure, and teachers tend to pass along knowledge in the form they acquired it. And yet, an increasing number of cellists today are breaking with the past, throwing out their old “Fitzenhagen” copies, and discovering Tchaikovsky’s piece as he envisioned it.

Andante Cantabile for cello and string orchestra (from String Quartet No. 1 in D, Op. 11) Pyotr Ilich Tchaikovsky First Performance On This Series Work composed: This Andante Cantabile originated as the second movement of Tchaikovsky’s String Quartet No. 1 in D major, which he composed in February 1871 and which was premiered on March 16/28 of that year in Moscow, played a quartet of members of the Russian Musical Society: violinists Ferdinand Laub and Ippolit Prianishnikov, violist Ludwig Minkus, and cellist Wilhelm Fitzenhagen. Tchaikovsky created this arrangement of the Andante Cantabile in early 1888 and it was first performed on February 28, 1888, at the Paris mansion of Nikolai Benardaky, with Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov as cello soloist and the composer conducting. Work dedicated: To Tchaikovsky’s friend Sergey Rachinsky, a botanist with literary pretensions Instrumentation: Solo cello plus a standard orchestral string section of first and second violins, violas, cellos, and double basses

On the heels of his graduation from the St. Petersburg Conservatory, Tchaikovsky moved to Moscow in 1865 to become Professor of Music Theory at the newly founded Moscow Conservatory. During his first decade in Moscow, his new works were generally premiered without undue delay and many were well received. Nonetheless, he enjoyed little financial security. He thought an all-Tchaikovsky concert might be just the thing to raise his profile—and his professional prospects—but the idea of hiring an orchestra for such an occasion was unrealistic. Instead, he set his sights on a more modest program of solo and chamber works and applied himself to writing a string quartet. The concert was a great success both artistically and financially. n Turgenev attended thanks to enthusiastic comments about Tchaikovsky he had heard while abroad. When the Quartet was repeated in St. Petersburg that October the composer reported that it “created a furore.”


PROGRAM NOTES When Tchaikovsky composed his String Quartet No. 1, he was going through a relatively nationalistic phase. These come most to the fore in the Andante Cantabile, the second of the work’s four movements. It employs a Russian folk tune, “Sidel Vanya,” that the composer had heard and written down two years earlier while visiting his sister in Kamenka, Ukraine. The words of the song start off “Vanya sat on a sofa and smoked a pipe of tobacco,” but the melody is far more gorgeous than you might expect from lyrics like that. It manages to combine elegance with a sense of the primitive or folkish—the former thanks to its beautifully crafted melodic contour and its hushed dynamics, the latter through a striking amalgam of duple and triple meters plus a few modal harmonies. The tune reigns over the opening and then alternates with another beautiful theme—entirely original to Tchaikovsky—to chart a straightforward A-B-A-B structure. The repetitions of the two themes are not literal, however, and much of the fascination of this deceptively simple piece involves the subtle alterations Tchaikovsky introduces in the accompanying parts when the themes recur. The Quartet was the first of his compositions to achieve widespread acclaim—and particularly the Andante Cantabile movement, which soon became an independent chestnut appearing in all sorts of arrangements by other musicians. Writing of a concert presented just following Tchaikovsky’s death, the Grand Duke Konstantin Konstantinovich, president of the Russian Musical Society, wrote: “[Leopold] Auer played the Violin Concerto, and then, for an encore, played the Andante from the String Quartet in a transcription for violin and orchestra. It was marvelous, and it seems that many in the audience wept.” The arrangement Auer played was one of the first to be made of this movement—he had been programming it since 1873—but other transcriptions quickly followed from the violinist Ferdinand Laub and the cellist Wilhelm Fitzenhagen (the future dedicatee of the composer’s Variations on a Rococo Theme), both of whom had participated in the Quartet’s premiere. A catalogue of Tchaikovsky’s works issued in 1897 by the composer’s principal Moscow publisher, Jurgenson, offered no fewer than eight versions of this movement available through that imprint alone, and that was just a fraction of all the published editions that were floating around by that time. An arrangement not mentioned in Jurgenson’s listings is the one made by Tchaikovsky himself in February 1888 for cello and strings; it remained unpublished until 1956. At the beginning of 1888, Tchaikovsky undertook a three-month European tour as a conductor-composer, in the course of which he met such of his contemporaries as Brahms, Grieg, Mahler, Richard Strauss, Busoni, Gounod, Massenet, Delibes, and Widor. This arrangement was introduced at the first Paris concert of that tour, a private affair held at the palatial home of Nikolai Benardaky, a wealthy Russian expatriate who was an active patron in Parisian musical

circles. The cello soloist was Anatoly Andreyevich Brandukov (who we have met in connection with the Rococo Variations); he appeared that evening as the soloist in not only the new arrangement of the Andante Cantabile but also the premiere of Tchaikovsky’s Pezzo capriccioso for Cello and Orchestra (Op. 62). He had studied at the Moscow Conservatory, where his teachers included Fitzenhagen for cello and Tchaikovsky himself for music theory. In 1878, Brandukov had left for Paris, but he returned more or less annually to Russia, thereby maintaining an indispensable place in musical life in both Eastern and Western Europe. Eventually he re-established himself full-time in Moscow and served for some years as a professor at the Moscow Conservatory.

About Tchaikovsky’s Transcription In arranging his Andante Cantabile, Tchaikovsky followed the precedent of Fitzenhagen’s considerably earlier version for cello and piano by transposing the movement up a semitone, from the original B-flat major to B major. This yielded a brighter and arguably more amenable key for the solo instrument, whose naturally mellow timbre can in fact benefit from a boost to stand out from an orchestra. Apart from that, Tchaikovsky’s revision is almost entirely limited to orchestration. In the string-quartet setting the melodies were predominantly entrusted to the first violin; here they are transferred to the solo cello, and the accompanying parts are redistributed among the orchestral string sections. The composer expands his strings to include double basses, which were not represented in the original quartet scoring and here assume a modest role, mostly (though not entirely) reinforcing the orchestral cellos. Tchaikovsky instructs all the instruments, including the soloist, to play with mutes installed throughout, and, lest there remain any doubt about the generally hushed halo of sound he desired, he marked gradations of dynamics meticulously, including two passages in which the orchestra is to be scarcely audible at pppp (pianissississimo). —JMK

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saw and loathed his opera Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and reduced him to nothingness until the composer contritely offered his Fifth Symphony (1937) as “the creative reply of a Soviet artist to justified criticism” (not really Shostakovich’s words, though often attributed to him). The adventures would continue through the rest of his life. In the wake of his rehabilitation he would be awarded the Stalin Prize twice in succession, in 1940 and 1941. In 1945, his star would fall again when his Ninth Symphony struck the bureaucrats as an insufficient reflection of the glory of Russia’s victory over the Nazis. He rebounded with yet another Stalin Prize in 1949, but nonetheless squirreled away private masterpieces in his desk drawer until Soviet cultural policies began to thaw after the dictator’s death in 1953. Only in 1960 would he feel confident enough to hazard the series of searing, poignant works rich in musical autobiography that would characterize the final years of his earthly tragedy.

The Composer Speaks Symphony No. 5 in D minor, Op. 47 Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich First performance: 10/15/1963 Conductor: Guy Fraser Harrison Last performance: 4/9/2011 Conductor: Joel Levine Born: September 12/25, 1906, in St. Petersburg, Russia Died: August 9, 1975, in Moscow, Russian Soviet Federative Socialist Republic Work composed: April 18 to July 20, 1937 Work premiered: November 21, 1937, in the Great Hall of the Leningrad Philharmonic, with Yevgeny Mravinsky conducting the Leningrad Philharmonic Instrumentation: Two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets and E-flat clarinet, two bassoons and contrabassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani, triangle, snare drum, cymbals, bass drum, tam-tam, glockenspiel, xylophone, celesta, two harps, piano, and strings

The biography of Dmitri Dmitrievich Shostakovich reads like something out of a particularly nightmarish Russian novel: Dostoyevsky, perhaps, but with more ironic jokes. His gifts were unmistakable—the world has agreed that, along with Sergei Prokofiev, he was the Soviet Union’s greatest composer—but he spent practically his whole career falling in and out of favor with the Communist authorities and he ended up battered and paranoid in the process. Only the most perverse novelist could have dreamed up the life that lay ahead following the success of his pert Symphony No. 1 (1924-25): how in 1930 Shostakovich’s satirical opera The Nose would run afoul of Soviet politicos, being denounced by the Russian Association of Proletarian Musicians for its “bourgeois decadence”; how he would redeem himself through his charming Piano Concerto No. 1 in 1933; how his fortunes would crash again in 1936, when Stalin

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In a commentary published on January 12, 1938, in Literaturnaya Gazeta, Shostakovich spoke of his newly premiered Fifth Symphony: My latest work may be called a lyrical-heroic symphony. Its basic ideas are the sufferings of man, and optimism. I wanted to convey optimism asserting itself as a world outlook through a series of tragic conflicts in a great inner, mental struggle. During a discussion at the Leningrad section of the Composers’ Union, some of my colleagues called my Fifth Symphony an autobiographical work. On the whole, I consider this a fair appraisal. In my opinion, there are biographical elements in any work of art. Every work should bear the stamp of a living person, its author, and it is poor and tedious work whose creator is invisible. On the same day, Sovetskoye iskusstvo published a different article, in which the politically aware Shostakovich proclaimed the requisite cliché: There is nothing more honorable for a composer than to create works for and with the people. The composer who forgets about this high obligation loses the right to this high calling. … The attention to music on the part of our government and all the Soviet people instills in me the confidence that I will be able to give everything that is in my power. —JMK


Shostakovich composed his Symphony No. 5 in the period of three months of 1937, at a moment when he was effecting a rebound from official disgrace. Who knows what he was really thinking when he wrote this piece? Lots of people have suggested lots of answers—there is probably no composer about whom musicologists debate with such virulence—but in the end, Shostakovich did an excellent job of covering his tracks. If we choose, we may take at face value the comments he provided in an article published just before the work’s premiere: “The birth of the Fifth Symphony was preceded by a prolonged period of internal preparation. Perhaps because of this, the actual writing of the symphony took a comparatively short time (the third movement, for example, was written in three days) …. The theme of my symphony is the development of the individual. I saw man with all his sufferings as the central idea of the work, which is lyrical in mood from start to finish; the finale resolves the tragedy and tension of the earlier movements on a joyous, optimistic note.” No doubt self-preservation played a role in Shostakovich’s crafting this piece as he did. In fact, the officially sanctioned review of the premiere, in the publication Izvestia, found in it the stuff of a Socialist-Realist program. It identified the opening movement as a depiction of toiling miners and massive factory machinery subjugating nature, the scherzo as a picture of the athleticism of happy Soviet citizens, and so on. Probably Shostakovich had nothing so specific in mind. On the other hand, he didn’t raise his voice in protest, since his making a livelihood as a composer depended to a large degree on the official acceptance of this symphony. The Fifth has proved the most popular of Shostakovich’s 15 symphonies. It provides an excellent introduction to his sound world, which in this case is rich in satire and grotesqueries yet taut in its classical formality (or even “neoclassical” formality, in the second movement). The music is propelled with a driving sense of momentum throughout, nowhere more than in the energetic finale, whose pounding impact rarely fails to bring down the house. JAMES M. KELLER James M. Keller is Program Annotator of the New York Philharmonic and the San Francisco Symphony. From 1990-2000 he wrote about music on staff at The New Yorker, and in 1999 he received the prestigious ASCAP–Deems Taylor Award for his feature writing in Chamber Music magazine, which he serves as Contributing Editor. The Debussy and Shostakovich essays previously appeared in the programs of the New York Philharmonic and are used with permission.

Your membership includes pre-concert lobby gatherings, choice seating with other young professionals, catered after parties, happy hours and opportunities to volunteer to benefit music education in our community!


SINATRA AND BEYOND WITH TONY DESARE FEBRUARY 24, 2017 8:00 P.M.

POPS JOEL LEVINE, CONDUCTOR

SINATRA AND BEYOND WITH TONY DESARE

This concert is generously sponsored by:

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A special Thank You to Raising Cane’s Chicken Fingers for providing musicians’ catering services

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First half selections announced from stage.

INTERMISSION

Come Fly with Me...................................Heusen/Cahn arr. Billy May, trans. Tedd Firth Luck Be a Lady........................................Loesser arr. Bill May I Have Dreamed......................................Rodgers/Hammerstein arr. Nelson Riddle/Tedd Firth Just in Time............................................Styne/Cahn arr. Fred Barton Kiss..........................................................Prince

How Deep is Your Love...........................Barry, Robin and Maurice Gibb arr. DeSare/Firth Something’s Gotta Give.........................Mercer It was a Very Good Year.........................Drake arr. Don Costa/Tedd Firth Fly Me to the Moon................................Howard arr. Quincy Jones/Jack Everly One for My Baby.....................................Arlen/Mercer arr. Chris Byers My Way....................................................Francois/Revaux English lyrics by Paul Anka, orch. Tedd Firth

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TONY DESARE Tony DeSare performs with infectious joy, wry playfulness and robust musicality. Named a Rising Star Male Vocalist in Downbeat magazine, DeSare has lived up to this distinction by winning critical and popular acclaim for his concert performances throughout North America and abroad. From jazz clubs to Carnegie Hall to Las Vegas headlining with Don Rickles and major symphony orchestras, DeSare has brought his fresh take on old school class around the globe. DeSare has three top ten Billboard jazz albums under his belt and has been featured on CBS’s The Early Show, NPR, A Prairie Home Companion, the Today Show and his music has been posted by social media celebrity juggernaut, George Takei.
 Notwithstanding his critically acclaimed turns as a singer/ pianist, DeSare is also an accomplished award-winning composer. He not only won first place in the USA Songwriting Contest, but has written the theme song for the motion picture, My Date With Drew, several broadcast commercials and has composed the full soundtrack for

the December 2016 film Love Always, Santa. His sound is romantic, swinging and sensual, but what sets DeSare apart is his ability to write original material that sounds fresh and contemporary, yet pays homage to the Great American Songbook. His compositions include a widerange of romantic, funny, and soulful sounds that can be found on his top-selling recordings. DeSare’s forthcoming appearances include the Houston Symphony, The Philly Pops, Minnesota Orchestra, Charleston Symphony, Manship Theatre in Baton Rouge, Napa Valley Performing Arts Center and the Wengler Center for the Arts in Malibu. DeSare releases new recordings, videos of standards and new originals every few weeks on his YouTube channel, iTunes and Spotify. Follow Tony on Facebook, Twitter and subscribe on YouTube to stay connected.
 Tony DeSare is a Yamaha Artist.

LOMA (Local Oklahoma Music Association) is a foundation created to provide local Oklahoma elementary and secondary school music programs with financial aid for instruments, instrument repair, print music, and equipment. Through the “Win A Steinway” fundraiser, students have sold tickets to be included in a grand prize drawing for a new Steinway piano! Second prize will be a Gibson acoustic guitar and third prize, a Bach Stradivarius trumpet. Prize winners and alternates will be selected at random drawings, February 24 & 25, 2017, during the Oklahoma City Philharmonic Pops Concert Series. 100% of all donations and student fundraising for LOMA goes to Oklahoma school music programs. For more information email info@loma.rocks or visit www.loma.rocks

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A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR

Jim Meiller - Clarinet

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NCORE SOCIETY M E M B E R S

LET’S TALK MUSIC EDUCATION The OKC PHIL has deep roots and a humble legacy of giving back through music education. With over 18 education programs, in partnership with the Oklahoma City Orchestra League, there is something for everyone. Pictured here, Playing with the Pros, is a community outreach event that allows amateur musicians to participate in rehearsal on stage, mentored by a professional musician. This free program is open to those 25 and older. Family and friends are encouraged to attend this shared community experience.

The Philharmonic extends a very special thank you to members of its Encore Society – to each one of you whose passion for orchestral music has caused you to think and plan ahead in support of the Philharmonic’s future. Through your deferred gift included in your will or estate plan, you have expressed a shared vision to ensure that our music will continue far beyond your own lifetime, giving future generations the same opportunity to experience the extraordinary music you enjoy so much today. Our past Encore Society members continue to make an impact in the orchestra’s annual success. Their bequests received became a part of the Philharmonic’s Endowment Funds, and those funds have been continually re-invested, while only a small percentage of the earnings are distributed annually to help support the orchestra’s music and education programs – programs that provide inspiration and joy to over 135,000 in our community each season. The OKC Phil will be playing its music for decades to come, thanks in part to today’s music visionaries – our Encore Society members. We cannot thank you enough for the thoughtful and generous commitment you have made to your orchestra and its future!


GIFTS TO THE PHILHARMONIC

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 23

INDIVIDUALS Providing essential support for the Annual Fund. Dr. and Mrs. Philip C. Bird Ms. Pamela Bloustine MAJ. GEN. William P. Bowden, Rt. Mr. and Mrs. Del Boyles Ms. Betty Bridwell Mr. and Mrs. Randy Buttram Bruce and Deann Campbell J. Christopher and Ruth Carey Dr. John M. Carey Mr. and Mrs. Elliot Chambers Mrs. Anita Clark-Ashley and Mr. Charles Ashley Mr. and Mrs. Robert H. Clements Mr. Rodney Coate and Mr. Juan Camarena Nancy Coats and Charlie Ashley Mr. and Mrs. Jack H. Coleman Dr. Thomas Coniglione Ms. Barbara Cooper Mr. John Crain Ms. Betty Crow Mr. Jim Daniel Mr. and Mrs. Mike Darrah Mr. and Mrs. Charles T. Davis Mr. and Mrs. William E. Davis Mr. and Mrs. T. A. Dearmon Mr. and Mrs. David C. DeLana Mrs. Lori Hatfield Dickinson Mr. and Mrs. Sidney G. Dunagan Mr. and Mrs. Joe Edwards Dr. and Mrs. Robert S. Ellis Dr. and Mrs. Royice B. Everett Ms. Carolyn Frans Mr. and Mrs. Gerald L. Gamble Mrs. Linda Gardner Mr. and Mrs. Jason Garner Mr. and Mrs. Kelly George Mr. Jack Golsen Mr. and Mrs. Don Greiner Drs. Stephen and Pamela Hamilton Mr. and Mrs. Royce M. Hammons Mr. William Hartwig Walt and Jean Hendrickson Mr. and Mrs. John D. Higginbotham Mr. and Mrs. Joe R. Homsey, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. J. Clifford Hudson Mr. and Mrs. Carlos Johnson Mrs. Ruth Ann Kalbfleisch Mr. Dan Kennedy and Dr. Diana Kennedy Mrs. Lou Kerr Bishop and Mrs. Ed Konieczny Dr. and Mrs. H. T. Kurkjian Mr. Scott Davis and Mr. David Leader Dr. and Mrs. Jay E. Leemaster Drs. Jason and Julie Lees Mr. and Mrs. Duke R. Ligon Press and Susan Mahaffey Mr. and Mrs. William Matthey Mr. and Mrs. John A. McCaleb Cindy and Johnny McCharen Mr. and Mrs. Tom J. McDaniel

Mr. Nathan McDonald Mr. Jeffrey McDougall Bruce and Claire McLinn Mr. and Mrs. John P. McMillin Mr. and Mrs. K. T. Meade, Jr. Mrs. Deann Merritt Parham Mr. and Mrs. Harry Merson Mr. and Mrs. Stewart E. Meyers, Jr. Tom and Katherine Milam Mrs. Donna W. Miller Chip and Michelle Mullens Dr. and Mrs. Gene L. Muse Bill and Tracy Nester Mrs. Elissa Norwood Mr. J. Edward Oliver Mr. Chip Oppenheim Mr. William G. Paul Mrs. Barbara Pirrong Mr. Virgil Lee Powell Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Pringle Dr. Steven V. Richards Mrs. Carol Ricks Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Salyer Mr. Fred Schmitt Janet and Frank Seay Mr. and Mrs. John M. Seward Mr. and Mrs. William F. Shdeed Sharon and John Shelton Robert and Susan Shoemaker Mr. Jerrod Shouse Drs. Paul and Amalia Silverstein Dr. Richard V. and Jan Smith Rick and Amanda Smith Ms. Jane Smythe Dr. and Mrs. Brian E. Snell Mr. and Mrs. John S. Spaid Sr. Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Starling Ms. Betsy Timken Mrs. June Tucker Drs. Richard and Betty Van Horn Robert Varnum and Sharon Varnum, LCSW Mr. Robert Weiss Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth K. Wert Mr. John S. Williams Mr. Larry Willis Robert and Lorraine Wilson Dr. James B. Wise M. Blake and Nancy Yaffe Michael and Laura Young Mr. and Mrs. Ron Youtsey

Friend $750 - $1,249 Anonymous Hugh G. and Sharon Adams Ms. Lois Albert Gary and Jan Allison Ms. Zonia Armstrong

Ms. Patrice Aston Mr. and Mrs. Van A. Barber Mr. and Mrs. B. Billington Beals J. M. Belanger and Sarah Sagran Dr. and Mrs. William G. Bernhardt Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Blumstein Don and Grace Boulton Mr. and Mrs. Gary W. Bowker Carole and Deal Bowman Dennis and Chris Box Mr. and Mrs. Bob G. Bunce Mr. and Mrs. Robert M. Calvert Ms. Annette Clifton Joseph and Valerie Couch Ms. Barbara Crabtree Dr. and Mrs. Anthony W. Czerwinski Dr. Nancy Dawson Tony and Pam Dela Vega Mr. Joel Dixon Mr. and Mrs. Richard Dugger Ms. Anna Eischen Bruce and Joanne Ewing Dr. Thurma J. Fiegel John and Sue Francis Dr. and Mrs. Ralph G. Ganick Mr. and Mrs. Nick S. Gutierrez, Jr. ,M.D. Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence K. Hellman Frank and Bette Jo Hill Colonel and Mrs. Dean C. Jackson Mr. David R. Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Drake Keith Ms. Claren Kidd Mr. and Mrs. Brad Krieger Mr. and Mrs. Owen Lafferty Ms. Mary Jane Lawson Mr. Joel Levine Mr. and Mrs. Paul Lindsey Brad and Janet Marion Dr. Gary L. Massad J. Thomas and Anita R. May Ms. Vickie McIlvoy Mr. and Mrs. Stuart P. Milsten Dr. and Mrs. William L. Parry Donita and Curtis Phillips Mrs. Linda Kennedy Rosser and Mr. Ronald McDaniel Carl and Deborah Rubenstein Dr. and Mrs. Olaseinde Sawyerr Ms. Madeline E. Schooley Mr. and Mrs. Don Sherman Mr. Frank J. Sonleitner Mr. James Stelter Dr. and Mrs. James B. Stewart Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Stott Paula and Carl Stover Dr. John Stuemky Mr. and Mrs. Dale Toetz Mr. Phillip S. Tomlinson CONTINUED ON PAGE 62

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GIFTS TO THE PHILHARMONIC CONTINUED FROM PAGE 61

INDIVIDUALS Providing essential support for the Annual Fund. Mrs. Dorothy J. Turk Mrs. Donna Vogel Larry L. and Leah A. Westmoreland Denver and Yvonne Woolsey Jim and June Young Mr. and Mrs. Don T. Zachritz

Partner $300 - $749 Dr. Gillian Air John and Nancy Alsup Tom and Fran Ayres Ms. Sherry K. Barton Ms. Karen J. Beckman Jackie and Jerry Bendorf Mrs. Mary C. Blanton Mrs. Katherine Bushnell Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Buxton Ms. Janice B. Carmack Ms. Katherine Cates Mr. and Mrs. Earl J. Cheek Drs. Fong Chen and Helen Chiou Mr. and Mrs. Ed Cunningham Dr. Shirley E. Dearborn Ms. Melinda Finley Mrs. Betty Foster Mr. & Mrs. Gary F. Fuller Mr. and Mrs. Keith G. Golden Melvin & Bobbie Gragg Mr. Herbert M. Graves Mr. and Mrs. Ronald Greenberg LTC and Mrs. Walter A. Greenwood George M. and Jo Hall Mr. Brent Hart and Mr. Matt Thomas Carol and George Hoebing Mr. Roger Farrell and Mrs. Trish Horn Lois and Roger Hornbrook Mrs. Lily R. Hummel Mr. and Mrs. Stephen Johnson Greg and Mary Joan Johnston L. M. Johnston, Ph.D. Mr. Wes Knight Mr. Dan Little Mr. Joe A. McKenzie Ronald L. and D. Yvonne Mercer Dorman and Sheryl Morsman Mr. and Mrs. John Santore Mr. James Nix Larry and Deanna Pendleton Mike and Cathy Perri Mr. and Mrs. Ray H. Potts Mrs. Donald G. Preuss Dr. and Mrs. Laurance Reid Mr. and Mrs. Sheldon M. Reznik Shirley and Ben Shanker Mr. Lee Allan Smith Mr. and Mrs. Paul A. Specht

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Reta and Richard Strubhar Mr. and Mrs. Larry Thomas Mrs. Evelyn Margaret Tidholm Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Towell Mr. Curtis VanWyngarden Mr. and Mrs. Albert Weise Mr. and Mrs. John White Jim and Polly Worthington

Member $100 - $299 Carol and Kerry Alexander Mrs. Joan Allmaras Ms. Beth M. Alonso Dr. and Mrs. Henry M. Asin Mr. and Mrs. Earl Austin Mr. Paul D. Austin and Jane Ford Austin Mrs. Pamela S. Bale Judy Barnett Paul B. and Terry Bell Dr. Paul and Bonnie Benien Ms. Marcia M. Bennett Ms. MarEllen Benson Mrs. Lillian Boland Alan Booth and Debbie Kelly Harry S. and Elaine Boyd Rev. Thomas Boyer Mrs. Betty L Brady Mrs. Carole S. Broughton Roger and Debbie Brown Ms. Judith Butler Mrs. Jo Carol Cameron Ms. Kathryn Carey Mr. and Mrs. Jack Carpenter Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Carpenter Dr. and Mrs. Don R. Carter Mr. Michael P. Cassidy Dr. and Mrs. Douglas C. Chancellor Ms. Henrie Close Mrs. Victoria Cobb Mrs. Emogene Collins Mrs. Frances Daffer Ms. Carol A. Davito Mr. and Mrs. Sam Decker Mr. James DeWarns Mr. W. Samuel Dykeman Mr. and Mrs. Richard Ehlers Ms. Elizabeth K. Eickman Dr. and Mrs. Robert B. Epstein Mr. Sam Escobedo Mrs. Barbara Eskridge Irving and Sandy Faught Mike and Deb Felice Mr. and Mrs. Mead Ferguson Mr. and Mrs. John Fischer Judge and Mrs. Stephen P. Friot Mr. Hugh Gibson

Mr. and Mrs. M. Charles Gilbert John and Judy Gorton Jesse and Jordan Gould Mr. and Mrs. Gary Graham Mr. Steven Graham and Ms. Vicky Leloie Kelly Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Greer Mr. Bob Gregory Mr. and Mrs. John T. Greiner, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Barre Griffith Mr. and Mrs. John Gunter Mr. Allen K. Harris Mr. and Mrs. David Haskett Ms. Zoe Haskins Major and Mrs. John M. Heitz David and Marilyn Henderson Mr. Jerome A. Holmes J.M. and R.C. Hunt Mrs. Julia Hunt Ms. Mary Lu Jarvis Mr. and Mrs. L.J. Johnson Judy and Jerry Johnson Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Karchmer Mr. Bill Kemp Ms. Young Y. Kim Edith and Michael Laird Mrs. Patricia Legako Mr. Robert Leveridge David and Lynne Levy Bob and Kay Lewis Rosemary and Paul Lewis Roy and Sharon Love Mr. and Mrs. Paul J. Lutes Mr. and Mrs. Ronald M. Manning Mr. and Mrs. Bob Maples Mrs. Patricia Matthews Mrs. M. Geraldine Mayes Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth R. McAlister Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. McKown Ms. Ann McVey Lt. Col. Terry L. Mock Mr. L. E. Montgomery Ms. W. Cheryl Moore Mr. Cole Morgan Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Morrison David Miller & Barbara Neas Rudi Nollert and Mary Brodnax Ms. Sylvia Ochs Mr. Robert G. Oltmanns Dan and Chris Owens Mrs. Mildred B. Parsons Robert and Karen Petry Dr. and Mrs. Marvin D. Peyton Mr. William Powell Roger and Joy Quinn Gary and Tommie Rankin Ms. Rhea Rath Ms. Lisa Reed


SPECIAL GIFTS Honor loved ones, celebrate occasions, recognize achievements and support the Philharmonic’s mission. Tom and Fran Roach Ms. Joanne M. Roan-Wismer Mr. William Robinson III Mr. Arthur J. Rus Ms. Carol Sander Hank and Anne Schank Ms. Gayle Scheirman Ms. Geraldine Schoelen Mr. and Mrs. A. Lee Segell Fred and Carolyn Selensky Mr. Robert R. Shaw Dr. and Mrs. Richard Shifrin Mr. and Mrs. Richard Shough Judy Smedley Mr. Robert E. Simmons Mr. and Mrs. R. Emery Smiser Jody and Pat Smith Mr. Jay Smith Ms. Amy Sommer Tom and Venita Springfield Ms. Kathleen Starrett Mrs. Joyce Statton Mr. Keith Stelting Jonathan and Andrea Stone Ms. Xiao-Hong Sun and Mr. Xiaocong Peng Mrs. Ann Taylor Duke and Jill Thomas Mr. and Mrs. Sammy Todd Ms. Pam Troup LTC Ret. and Mrs. George B. Wallace Dr. and Mrs. D. A. Weigand Mr. and Mrs. Ted Wernick Mr. Don Wester Dr. Ellen Jayne Wheeler Ms. Linda Whittington Mrs. Matha A. Wilkerson Ms. Ghita Williams Ms. Lonnie F. Williams Ms. Julie Young Ruth and Stanley Youngheim

In Memory of Victor Alessandro Mr. Hugh Gibson

In Memory of John and Suzanne Hebert Greg and Mary Joan Johnston

In Memory of Charles R. Bale Mrs. Pamela S. Bale

In Memory of Betty Johnson Ms. Katherine Cates

In Memory of Robert H. Brady Betty L. Brady

In Recognition of Mr. Karen Khanagov as a teacher, musician, and composer. Kim and Michael Joseph

In Memory of Ben and Marie Brandt Mr. and Mrs. Gary Graham In Memory of Martin and Gladys Brechbill Ms. Janice B. Carmack In Memory of Bill Broughton Mrs. Carole S. Broughton In Memory of Jackson Cash Pam and Gary Glyckherr In Memory of William B. & Helen P Cleary Steven C. Agee, Ph.D. Louise Churchill Mr. and Mrs. Andrew J. Evans, II In Memory of Mary Clements Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Wiggin In Memory of James O. Edwards, Jr. Mrs. Carlene Edwards In Memory of Patricia Folmar Ms. Jo Harris In Memory of Jack Gunter Carol and Kerry Alexander Mr. and Mrs. Bob Bramlett Roger, Debbie, Grayson, and Seth Brown Ms. Carol C. Davis Mr. and Mrs. Sam Decker Mr. and Mrs. David Eischen J.M. and R.C. Hunt Colonel and Mrs. Dean C. Jackson Mr. and Mrs. Bob Maples Mr. and Mrs. Wayne M. Osmond Hollis Anne and Mark B. Price Ms. Rhea Rath Carole and Michael Read Ms. Joanne M. Roan-Wismer Mr. and Mrs. Kevin Rother Mr. and Mrs. L.C. Sleeper Ms. Genie Strakal Ms. Pam Troup Mr. Phillip Truss Mrs. Evelyn Wilcoxson

In Honor of Margaret and Drake Keith Mr. and Mrs. Wayne Cranford In Memory of Aubrey K. McClendon Pam and Gary Glyckherr Kim and Michael Joseph In Memory of Wendell Miles Mr. Joe Howell and Ms. Jennifer Owens In Memory of Mrs. Barbara B. Paul MAJ. GEN. William P. Bowden, Rt. Mr. and Mrs. William Frankfurt Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth G. Greer Mr. and Mrs. Royce M. Hammons Mrs. Jane B. Harlow Ms. Elinor Lottinville, Ph.D. Robert and Donna McCampbell James P. O’Gorman Mr. William Robinson III Mr. and Mrs. Leo M. Rodgers, Jr. Mr. Richard L. Sias Lee Allan Smith Ms. Amy Sommer Phyllis Stough and Family Duke and Jill Thomas Kent and Sally Trentman Mrs. Donna K. Vogel Mrs. Anne Workman Carolyn and Don Zachritz BancFirst Trust Department In Memory of Ila Belle Raby Ms. Judith Butler Mrs. Patricia Legako In Memory of Berta Faye Rex Mr. and Mrs. William F. Shdeed In Memory of Grace Ryan Sharlene S. Branham Colonel and Mrs. Dean C. Jackson In Honor of Jeff and Nanette Shultz Ms. Elizabeth L. Shultz In Memory of Earl Statton Mrs. Joyce Statton

In Honor of Jane Harlow Dr. and Mrs. Roberts S. Ellis Mrs. Linda Kennedy Rosser and Mr. Ronald T. McDaniel

In Memory of John A. “Jack” Taylor Mrs. Ann Taylor

In Honor of Miss Molly Haskett Mr. and Mrs. David Haskett

In Honor of Bart, Lola, Mart, and Ruth Woods John and Judy Gorton


ORCHESTRA LEAGUE UPDATE

Each year since 1958, the Oklahoma City Orchestra League, Inc., sponsors a Music Competitions event. The goal of the competitions is to recognize and showcase talented young musicians residing in the state of Oklahoma. The students are offered the opportunity to compete in an educational and rewarding environment. Students in grades one through twelve are eligible to enter competitions in piano, strings, classical guitar, harp, woodwind, brass, and percussion. Winners receive medals and cash awards and then perform in a Winners’ Concert at a later date. Simon Brown of Davis, who was the Buttram violin winner in 2016, was invited by Maestro Joel Levine to play in the Side-by-Side concert. Competitions and the concert are held in the Wanda L. Bass School of Music at Oklahoma City University and are possible through the generous support of our underwriters: Mr. Randy & Kathy Buttram —The Buttram Senior Strings Competition Mrs. William Abney—The Carver Competition for woodwind, brass, harp, and percussion Mr. and Mrs. Mike Gilliam—The Gilliam Junior Piano Competition Mr. William H. Haire and family—The Donna Marie Haire Competition for classical guitar Mr. and Mrs. R. Drake Keith—The Keith Junior Strings Competition Mr. Herman Meinders—The Meinders Senior Piano Competition The 2016 competition involved 94 students, 21 judges, members of OCU Sigma Alpha Iota fraternity and Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia fraternity and many Orchestra League volunteers Additional OCOL volunteers provided food for contestants, their families, and volunteers. It was a busy exciting day and a thrill to hear these amazing young musicians. The 2017 Music Competitions will be held on February 5th and the Winners’ Concert will be on February 19th. All young Oklahoma musicians are invited to participate. Competition details and entry information may be found on the League website: www.okcorchestraleague.org 2017 Competitions Chair is Martha Pendleton; co-chairs are: Jean Sanford and Dorothy Hays, Buttram; Dwayne Webb and Larry Buss, Carver; Phyllis Morrow and JonEvah Murray, Gilliam; Cheri Weintraub and Carol Bowman, Haire; Casey Hasenbeck and Margaret Biggs, Keith; Janice Carmack and Mary Ann Williams, Meinders.

For membership application visit www.okcorchestraleague.org Check out our twitter and facebook locations : www.twitter.com/orchestraleague I www.facebook.com/orchestraleague Contact us at: 405.601.4245 or admin@okcorchestraleague.org

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HOUSE NOTES

RESTROOMS are conveniently located on all levels of the theater. Please ask your usher for guidance. LATECOMERS and those who exit the theater during the performance will be seated at intermission or during the first convenient pause as determined by the management. ELECTRONIC DEVICES must be turned off and put away before entering the theater (no calling, texting, photo or video use please). Cameras, recording devices and food are not permitted inside the theater. FOOD AND BEVERAGES: Bottled water is permitted in the theater at the Classics Series concerts. Beverages are permitted in the theater at the Pops Series concerts; however, bringing coffee into the theater is discouraged due to the aroma. Snacks, drinks and desserts are available at the Civic Center CafÊ and snack bar on the main floor. SMOKING in the Civic Center Music Hall is prohibited. The Oklahoma City Philharmonic promotes a fragrance-free environment for the convenience of our patrons. FIRE EXITS are located on all levels and marked accordingly. Please note the nearest exit for use in case of an emergency. ELEVATORS are located at the south end of the atrium of the Civic Center Music Hall. CHILDREN of all ages are welcome at the Philharmonic Discovery Family Series and Holiday Pops performances; however, in consideration of the patrons, musicians and artists, those under five years of age will not be admitted to evening Classics and Pops concerts unless otherwise noted. BOOSTER SEATS for children are available in the Civic Center event office. Please inquire at the ticket office. COLLEGE STUDENT RUSH TICKETS are $6 each and available with a college or university I.D. and email address at the box office 45 minutes prior to the start of each Philharmonic performance. Tickets are offered based on availability only and seats are located throughout the theater. VIDEO MONITORS are located in the lobby for your convenience. WHEELCHAIR AVAILABLE SEATING: Persons using wheelchairs or with walking and climbing difficulties will be accommodated when possible. Those wishing to use the designated wheelchair sections may purchase the wheelchair space and a companion seat. Please inform the Philharmonic Ticket Office staff of your need when ordering tickets so that you may be served promptly and appropriately. Please request the assistance of hall ushers to access wheelchair seating. LOST & FOUND is located in the Civic Center Office (405-297-2584) weekdays 8:30 a.m. – 5:00 p.m. PHILHARMONIC TICKET OFFICE may be contacted by calling 405-TIC-KETS (405-842-5387) or you can visit the Philharmonic Ticket Office located on the first floor of the Arts District Garage at 424 Colcord Drive in Suite B. The Philharmonic Ticket Office is open Monday through Friday, 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. and concert Saturdays from 10:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. CIVIC CENTER TICKET OFFICE hours are Monday through Friday, 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and two hours prior to each performance. (405-297-2264) Programs and Artists are subject to change without notification.


OKC PHIL program magazine 2016-2017 edition 2  

Concert programs of the OKC PHIL featuring guest artist bios and programs for December 2016 through February 2017

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