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ich Excellence in Community ndon Award / Dwight I. k R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Jareo Award / Monroe Moosr to a Chapter / Outstanding cesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Roland Maxwell / Taylor A. Borradaile Underding New Member Award / Award / Academic Excellence THE mmunity Service Award / ComI. Douglass President’s Award / Hollen Colony President Award Scholarship Trophy / Order of y Advisor Award / Outstanding / Norm W. Brown Philannding Chapter Award / Sonny e Memorial Award / William H. g Housing Corporation Award der Award / George V. Voirvice Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing rs Four Chapters / Frederick R. E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo r / Outstanding Advisor to a ek Advisor Award / Pacesetter roll / Richard Massock Award ecruitment Award / Taylor A. Award / Outstanding New omas L. Stennis II Award / ich Excellence in Community ndon Award / Dwight I. k R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Jareo Award / Monroe Moosr to a Chapter / Outstanding cesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Roland Maxwell / Taylor A. Borradaile Underding New Member Award / Award / Academic Excellence mmunity Service Award / ComI. Douglass President’s Award / Hollen Colony President Award Scholarship Trophy / Order of y Advisor Award / Outstanding / Norm W. Brown Philannding Chapter Award / Sonny e Memorial Award / William H. g Housing Corporation Award der Award / George V. Voirvice Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing rs Four Chapters / Frederick R. E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo r / Outstanding Advisor to a ek Advisor Award / Pacesetter roll / Richard Massock Award ecruitment Award / Taylor A. Award / Outstanding New omas L. Stennis II Award / ich Excellence in Community ndon Award / Dwight I. k R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Jareo Award / Monroe Moosr to a Chapter / Outstanding cesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Roland Maxwell / Taylor A. Borradaile Underding New Member Award / Award / Academic Excellence mmunity Service Award / ComI. Douglass President’s Award / Hollen Colony President Award Scholarship Trophy / Order of y Advisor Award / Outstanding / Norm W. Brown Philannding Chapter Award / Sonny e Memorial Award / William H. g Housing Corporation Award der Award / George V. Voirvice Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing rs Four Chapters / Frederick R. E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo r / Outstanding Advisor to a IN ek Advisor AwardALSO / Pacesetter roll / Richard Massock Award ecruitment Award / Taylor A. Award / Outstanding New omas L. Stennis II Award /

Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Commu Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / G Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe M nick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstan Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Ne Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock Award / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile U graduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Awa Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excell / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Community Service Award / munity Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s A Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Or the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outst Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Phila | OF PHI KAPPA TAU ISSUE 4 |Outstanding OCTOBER 2018Award / S thropy Scroll / Richard MassockVOL. Award104, / Roland Maxwell Chapter Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / Wil Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation A / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. V novich Excellence in Community Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ew Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frede Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pace Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock A / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylo Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding N Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Commu Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / G Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe M nick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstan Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Ne Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock Award / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile U graduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Awa Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excell / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Community Service Award / munity Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s A Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Or the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outst Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Phila thropy Scroll / Richard Massock Award / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / S Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / Wil Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation A / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. V novich Excellence in Community Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ew Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frede Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pace Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock A / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylo Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding N Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Commu Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / G Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe M nick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstan Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Ne Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock Award / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile U graduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Awa Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excell / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. Voinovich Excellence in Community Service Award / munity Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ewing Brandon Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s A Founders Four Chapters / Frederick R. Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack Jareo Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Or the Star / Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outst Greek Advisor Award / Pacesetter Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Phila thropy Scroll / Richard Massock Award / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / S Strange Recruitment Award / Taylor A. Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / Wil Shideler Award / Outstanding New Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation A / Thomas L. Stennis II Award / Academic Excellence / Ross E. Roeder Award / George V. V novich Excellence in Community Service Award / Community Service Scroll / Dr. Edgar Ew P. 20 P.Brandon 10 Award / Dwight I. Douglass President’s Award / Founders Four Chapters / Frede Fletemeyer Prize / Greg Hollen Colony President Award / Harold E. Angelo Award / Jack HALL OF FAME HISTORICAL Award / Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy / Order of the Star / Outstanding Advisor Chapter / Outstanding Colony Advisor Award / Outstanding Greek Advisor Award / Pace INDUCTEES CHAMPAIGN Award / Paul Newman Award / Norm W. Brown Philanthropy Scroll / Richard Massock A / Roland Maxwell Outstanding Chapter Award / Sonny Strange Recruitment Award / Taylo CONVENTION Borradaile Undergraduate Memorial Award / William H. Shideler Award / Outstanding N Member Award / Outstanding Housing Corporation Award / Thomas L. Stennis II Award

FRATERNITY DONE RIGHT

MEET OUR AWARD WINNERS

P. 5 THIS ISSUE

A LEGACY OF SUCCESS


Stanley Wolczyk, Baldwin-Wallace ’46, a 101-year old Phi Tau joined brothers at the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame Friday evening at the 63rd National Convention to celebrate brotherhood, leadership, and service. Read our National Convention recap on page 16.

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good and loyal citizen. I shall try always to discharge the obligation to others which arises from the fact that I am a fraternity man. Phi Kappa Tau, by admitting me to membership, has conferred upon me a mark of distinction in which I take just pride. I believe in the spirit of brotherhood for which it stands. I shall strive to attain its ideals, and by so doing to bring to it honor and credit. I shall be loyal to my college and my chapter and shall keep strong my ties to them that I may ever retain the spirit of youth. I shall be a good and loyal citizen. I shall try always to discharge the obligation to others which arises from the fact that I am a fraternity man. Phi Kappa Tau, by admitting me to membership, has conferred upon me a mark of distinction in which I take just pride. I believe in the spirit of brotherhood for which it stands. I shall strive to attain its ideals, and by so doing to bring to it honor and credit. I shall be loyal to my college and my chapter and shall keep strong my ties to them that I may ever retain the spirit of youth. I shall be a good and loyal citizen. I shall try always to discharge the obligation to others which arises from the fact that I am a fraternity man.

16

FRATERNITY DONE RIGHT In our National Convention recap we celebrate the events, awards, and highlights of the last two years.

FEATURES 5 PERSPECTIVE John Green, Nebraska Wesleyan ’61, weighs in on Upsilon Chapter’s seventh Maxwell win and what makes their chapter outstanding. 10 FROM THE ARCHIVES Historical Champaign Convention 13 5 MINUTES WITH A MAXWELL PANELIST Allison Csonka, SeriousFun’s Director of Individual Giving, describes her experience as a Maxwell panelist and describes what makes Phi Tau and SeriousFun’s relationship so special. 14 NEW OFFICERS Phi Kappa Tau gladly welcomes five new additions to our National Officers slate.

DEPARTMENTS 4 | COO’s Letter 6 | Expanding Our Mission 7 | Undergraduate of Distinction 9 | Alumnus of Distinction 12 | By the Numbers 13 | 5 Minutes With... 24 | Laurels 28 | Chapter Eternal 30 | Sidelights


COO'S LETTER

MAILBOX THE LAUREL IS INTENDED TO START A CONVERSATION with brothers and friends. Content is carefully selected to engage and excite our readers. It is our hope that stories you read start a conversation with those in your life. Any comments are appreciated. You can submit your feedback— positive or negative, we want it all— to phikapptau.org/ laurelfeedback/. ~

PHI TAU TWEETS Will Schiltz @willschiltz4 Because of @PhiKappaTau I got the opportunity to meet lifelong friends that I am proud to call my brothers. Together, we have committed ourselves to learning, ethical leadership, and exemplary character. #myFraternity Kyle Greig @GreigKyle Before the spring of 2017, I was merely an insecure young man who had yet to tap into his potential. Nearly a year later and I am now confidently aware of my strengths and weaknesses, and have the ability to be the leader I want to be. #myFraternity Jake Vanderkar @Jake_vanderkar Phi Tau has been one of the best things that has happened in my collegiate career. It has inspired me and made me grow in so many different ways. My brothers made me confident in myself and also taught me to love myself for who I am. What’s more valuable than that? #myFraternity

[4] THE LAUREL || OCTOBER 2018

A WORD FROM THE EXECUTIVE OFFICES

RAISE THE BAR

L

ast fall, my wife and I organized a softball training camp for my daughter Charley’s Little League team, so the kids could practice after the season had ended. We were told that there was no demand for that, that everyone was done for the year. But every Sunday 10-15 kids showed up to improve their skills. Through the process of getting to know these kids and being around them longer, we realized there was an interest in a higher-level of competitive softball. This summer we put together a tournament team for Charley’s softball age group. She was surrounded by kids, many of them from the training camp, who had found something they were excited about and committed to, as were their parents. They were willing to put in the time to be better and it showed. Even the kids who were already pretty talented were doing things they had never done before when they were surrounded by other competitive kids. Watching kids play who were really passionate about softball was transformational. When we raised the bar, they improved to meet it. I can’t help but draw comparisons between that experience and the experience of some of our chapters. In this magazine you are going to read about some exceptional chapters and individuals who are setting new standards of Phi Kappa Tau excellence. I always remember that Charlie “Tremendous” Jones quote – “You will be the same person in five years as you are today except for the people you meet and the books you read.” This is something to take to heart; you are a result of the content you consume and the people you associate with.

I think we have to remember to be deliberate. You should spend your time doing things on purpose and with a purpose. Think about what you want to read about, the people or organizations that are interesting or inspirational, and spend your time learning about them instead of wasting time. The people you surround yourself with should be intentional, too. You should surround yourself with people that are going to push you, encourage you, and support you. Disassociate with the people who are going to hold you back or bring you down to make themselves feel better. You have a say in the people you surround yourself with, so make sure they are positive people. The relationships that work are the ones that make you a better person. Your fraternity brothers and your mentors should be no different. You have to find and surround yourself with people who are better than you; people who are smarter than you, harder workers, more ethical – whatever it is that’s going to make you a better person, because those people will rub off on you. Any member of a chapter has the capabilities to make their chapter excellent. It’s a matter of surrounding yourself with like-minded brothers who have similar goals, ideas, and standards for excellence. Go Far,

TRAVIS ROBINSON CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER


PERSPECTIVES

JOHN GREEN

A LEGACY OF SUCCESS

J

ohn Green, Nebraska Wesleyan ’61, is a fixture of Phi Kappa Tau. From his undergraduate days at Nebraska Wesleyan to his time as Executive Director, his tenure as National President, and the recent conclusion of his nine-year term on the Foundation Board of Trustees, it’s hard to find an aspect of Phi Kappa Tau that John hasn’t been involved in. In 1961, Upsilon chapter won the first Roland Maxwell Award. In Cleveland this summer, fifty-seven years later, they won it for the seventh time. We called up John to see if he would be kind enough to give a perspective on the nearly sixty-year evolution of the award process, how standards of excellence have changed, and what makes Upsilon unique. John, you initiated into Upsilon chapter in 1960. Were you a part of the team that won the Maxwell in 1961? What was the atmosphere like after that first win? I would have been living in the house, but I’m not sure how involved I was in the competition, I had only been around for a year. But the atmosphere – it was elation. The atmosphere was one of strong congeniality. Everyone was always willing to help each other when you came in as a new member. It was pretty clear you were expected to excel in many areas and be involved on campus and in the chapter. You were given a senior member as an advisor. Coming in as a young man, it was exactly what you needed at that time. Plus, we had strong alumni advising. That same atmosphere has returned. It’s back and I think it’s one of the reasons they’ve won the Maxwell as often as they have. How have the requirements and expectations changed for a winning chapter since then? We have higher expectations for excellence now.

Obviously, the process is much longer and much more involved now. It’s different. It’s more involved, no question. We have not always had the Founders Four, do you think that makes the process more or less effective? Oh, it’s much better the way it is now. The competition lasts longer and it’s cleaner. As it is now, it gives young men the chance to perform. They get to develop a presentation and include videos or whatever is available to them. It’s much more competitive. I think one of the good things is how a chapter picks their best team – it’s the people who are going to make the best presentation. They want to send people with substance, someone who is going to win. It’s more difficult now to win, you have to do a better, more professional job. It’s evolved to a much better process. What do you think about the judge’s panel? Who should be on it, should it be reoccurring, etc.? I think there should be different people all the time, although maybe some repetition of good folks. This year we brought in outsiders. We had two ladies with us that were involved with SeriousFun. So, an outsider really with no currency in terms of involvement with the Fraternity is kind of a good thing. They are not necessarily going to be influenced by what they already know about the chapters. Having outsiders and a change of judges makes the men have to try their best each time.

THE LAUREL OF PHI KAPPA TAU SEPTEMBER 2018 VOL. 104, NO. 4

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Lilly Steger COPY EDITOR John Sayers, Bethany ’78 CONTRIBUTORS Travis Robinson, Eastern Kentucky ’98 Tim Hudson, Truman State ’97

UPCOMING EDITIONS Phi Kappa Tau publishes the Laurel three times a year. Each edition focuses on an aspect of the Phi Kappa Tau experience. The schedule below identifies upcoming delivery dates. March 2019; September 2019 ADDRESS CHANGES Visit phikappatau.org/address to update your current mailing information. LAUREL ARCHIVES Past Laurel publications can be found online at phikappatau.org/laurel. Individuals can browse and view all past editions that are available.

THE LAUREL || PHIKAPPATAU.ORG [5]


EXPANDING OUR MISSION

FALL 2018 COLONIZATIONS FUTURE EXPANSIONS

PENNSYLVANIA STATE UNIVERSITY State College, Pennsylvania TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY Lubbock, Texas If you would like to volunteer with one of Phi Kappa Tau’s colonies, visit phikappatau.org/volunteer.

EXISTING COLONIES

OMEGA COLONY University of Wisconsin Madison CHI COLONY North Carolina State University

P

PI COLONY University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California

COLUMBUS STATE COLONY Columbus State University ALPHA NU COLONY Iowa State University ALPHA RHO COLONY Georgia Institute of Technology ALPHA THETA COLONY College of William & Mary BOSTON COLONY Boston University DELTA RHO COLONY Eastern Kentucky University

BQ

BETA THETA COLONY University of Kansas, Lawrence Kansas

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If you know a young man attending school at one of the institutions, recommend him to Phi Kappa Tau by visiting phikappatau.org/join.


UNDERGRADUATE OF DISTINCTION

DREW COOPER, OHIO STATE ’15 FORMER IFC PRESIDENT THE OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY COLUMBUS, OH Drew Cooper, Ohio State ’15, has a resumé long as one can be for a twenty-two-year-old. Drew’s most impressive accomplishments include his work in the House of Representatives in DC, the Office of State Representative John Buchy, and most recently at the Ohio House of Representatives. Drew also served as the Membership Orientation Officer for the Gamma chapter of Phi Kappa Tau. He has worked for the chapter as Vice-President for Membership Development, as well as Scholarship Chair. Additionally, he served a term as the IFC President and one as Chief Justice. He has been awarded the Ohio State Outstanding Senior Award, the Ross Gainer Interfraternity Council Man of the Year Award, and was on the Ohio State Homecoming Court. Drew’s most recent accolade is our very own William H. Shideler Award, Phi Kappa Tau’s highest honor awarded annually to a graduating senior. In his acceptance speech at the 63rd Convention in Cleveland last July, Drew spoke affectionally about his love of history, drawing parallels between the strife faced by the Founding Fathers at the Constitutional Convention to the struggles facing Greek organizations in the 21st century. A full transcript of his speech can be found on the Phi Kappa Tau website. Drew has recently accepted a full-time position working for the Speaker in the Ohio House of Representatives. “If you ever find yourself in Columbus look me up,” he said, “I give a pretty good tour of the State House.”

THE LAUREL || PHIKAPPATAU.ORG [7]


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ALUMNUS OF DISTINCTION

JOHN CHRISTOPHER, KENTUCKY ’86 PARTNER, MANLEY BURKE LPA CINCINNATI, OH John Christopher, Kentucky ’86, of Fraternal Law Partners has dedicated his career to serving the Greek community. A lawyer based out of Cincinnati, John found himself involved in fraternity law after first obtaining his law degree from Northern Kentucky, and then his Master of Laws in Taxation from the University of Florida. His interest in taxation lead him to the non-profit area and, after a partner at an old firm reached out for help with her practice, which included fraternity and sorority law, he knew he had to accept. Besides his professional work for the Greek community at-large, John also volunteers his time as Treasurer on the NICF board (recently renamed the Foundation for Fraternal Excellence). He’s finishing up a 5-year term, something he describes as “a great experience.” John’s service to the Greek community stems from his time at the Kappa chapter. “The opportunities that were given to me by virtue of signing onto that group of guys provided me with so much opportunity, support, and encouragement. It’s a lot more than the social experience,” John said. Phi Kappa Tau gave John leadership experience he does not feel he would have gotten elsewhere. As an undergraduate, he was encouraged to run for the IFC on campus and won. He also served on the Southeastern IFC. “You learn about yourself and how to work with other people,” he said. “I find that’s a key element to success, personally and professionally – being able to interact with people with diverse ideas.”

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FROM THE ARCHIVES

LILLY STEGER

HISTORICAL CHAMPAIGN CONVENTION Secretary Bowers, Mount Union ’15, complained about the use of maroon in an advertisement and sent a case of Winston cigarettes to the editor to describe the proper color. Additionally, an award was given to Gamma rguably the most importat Ohio State for submitting ant National Convention the best song and it was decidfor the identity of Phi Kappa ed that a songbook should be Tau was in 1917, eleven years Delegates to the 1917 National Convention at Champaign, Illinois. Front row: Bowers, published. Alumni dues were after the Fraternity was formed. Henry, Murphy, Beekley, Schactsman, Ander, Yeager. Back row: Odgen, Knappenberger, set at $2 a year (the equivalent It was held at the University Shideler, Fletemeyer, Sandler, Troutman, Shonkwiler of about $40 in 2018) and of Illinois at Champaign in were to be given to the chapter December, Zeta chapter’s secretary annually. stomping ground. It was Zeta that called Founder Shideler was elected as grand for a convention; they had specific ideas historian, a position that was created at about the direction Phi Kappa Tau should the same convention. Old Phrenocon be heading and they were disappointed stationary containing the coat of arms in the fraternity’s slow progress with both was to be sent to the official secretary to expansion and alumni involvement. fraternity, it was the Campaign convention be destroyed, the first case of rebranding Just a few days before this historic that took steps to establish that fact from in Phi Kappa Tau history. The office convention, Phi Kappa Tau became a naan organizational standpoint,” Ball writes. of grand field secretary was created to tionally recognized fraternity at the ninth Indeed, many of the facets that makes Phi promote expansion. It was given a yearly annual meeting of the National InterfraterTau so recognizable to us today were estabbudget of $400 minimum and $500 nity Council (NIC). C.B. Richeson, Mount lished at this convention. The attendees maximum. Grand Secretary Bowers was Union ‘16, and Joseph Bachelor, Miami ’06, revised the order in which the cardinal given a steel strongbox to keep important had to go to bat for Phi Kappa Tau at this principals are introduced during initiation records, embellished with the Greek letters meeting – Phi Tau’s legacy as the non-fraand added “much drama” to the then-simPhi, Kappa, and Tau, as well as his letters ternity organization was seriously harming ple ceremony. They proposed the jeweled – R.K.B – in gold. It is still located at the its prospects for membership. But very Phi Kappa Tau badge with the diamond Executive Offices in Oxford. fortunately, Reverend Albert H. Wilson, become both the official and plain badge 101 years and 62 National Conventions a national officer of Sigma Nu at Mount and decided the star be changed from gold later, Phi Taus gathered in Cleveland, Ohio Union, was very familiar with the success to white. They made major changes to the to discuss issues large and small. Our conof Epsilon chapter and gladly vouched coat of arms and presented a half-size sister cerns may have morphed and evolved over for Phi Tau on behalf of the Council. Phi badge, which could be given to girlfriends the span of a century, but a deep commitKappa Tau was admitted as a full member or wives of members. Harvard red and old ment to the future and wellbeing of Phi of the NIC. gold were also established as the official Kappa Tau will always bring an audience “If NIC membership confirmed that colors of Phi Kappa Tau, after Grand of brothers back together. Phi Kappa Tau was a full-fledged national

(The following information and quotes have been taken from Old Main to New Century: A History of Phi Kappa Tau by Charles T. Ball, Miami ’82.)

A

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CHAPTER OF DISTINCTION

UPSILON CHAPTER UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA WESLEYAN / LINCOLN, NEBRASKA Upsilon chapter at Nebraska Wesleyan begins the 2018 school year fresh off their seventh Roland Maxwell Award. Upsilon chapter sent a 4-man delegation to compete at National Convention, where they got to boast about their campus leadership, philanthropic donations, and their intensive risk management policies. Last year Upsilon chapter sent 10 officers to Heartland Regional Conferences, and sent members to both President and Leadership Academy. In 2017 they also raised over $5,000 for SeriousFun, $1,900 for Relay for Life, and $1,200 for Children’s Miracle Network. They have begun the 2018 school year by recruiting fifteen new Phi Taus.

CHAPTER INFORMATION

CAMPUS INFORMATION

CHARTERED: 1923

ESTABLISHED: 1887

CHAPTER MEMBERS: 45

STUDENT ENROLLMENT: 1,800

CHAPTER GPA: 3.5

AREAS OF STUDY: 63

ALUMNI: 1,820

IFC FRATERNITIES: 3

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BY THE NUMBERS

PHI KAPPA TAU BY THE NUMBERS

90 Phi Kappa Tau continues to offer outstanding leadership opportunities and provide service for the greater good.

Phi Kappa Tau FACEBOOK / 7,515 FOLLOWERS

@PhiKappaTau INSTAGRAM / 3,015 FOLLOWERS

@PhiKappaTau TWITTER / 5,221 FOLLOWERS

CHAPTERS AND COLONIES

97,000+ 4,400 TOTAL MEMBERS

[12] THE LAUREL || OCTOBER 2018

UNDERGRADUATE MEMBERS

@PhiKappaTau1906 SNAPCHAT / 300 FOLLOWERS


FIVE MINUTES WITH...

ALLISON CSONKA

5 MINUTES WITH A MAXWELL PANELIST

A

llison Csonka is the Associate Director of Individual Giving at SeriousFun headquarters in Connecticut and Phi Kappa Tau’s liaison between the two organizations. Allison has worked at SeriousFun for three years and has attended the 62nd National Convention in Sacramento, 2017 Conclave, and most recently the 63rd National Convention in Cleveland, where she served as a judge for the Roland Maxwell Award presentations alongside Clea Newman. • What brought you to SeriousFun? I came to SeriousFun for the mission. Helping kids with serious illnesses is something that I’m passionate about, I think it’s a very compelling cause. I’ve always worked with health originations – specifically the AMS Society and the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society – but when this job opportunity came up I just loved the idea that it’s an immediate positive impact for the kids. I also really loved that there’s a volunteering culture here; employees are encouraged to go help out at camp throughout the year. •  What was your experience at your second Phi Kappa Tau convention compared to your first in Sacramento? At the first convention everything

was new to me. I had just started working on the partnership, so it was great getting to meet all the people I had been talking to on the phone or emailing. At this one in Cleveland I kind of felt like I was coming home. I knew a lot of people and it was like seeing old friends and family. It was great catching up with people and seeing what they were doing and how they were doing. It was also interesting being there with Clea because I got to see what our partnership meant through the eyes of what people were saying to her. They would come up with so much sincerity and say, “Thank you so much for all you do. We love having this partnership it adds legitimacy to the work we’re doing.” They love being connected to Paul Newman through this. •  What were you looking for in a winning Maxwell chapter? I went in with an open mind – I had seen two sets of Maxwell presentations before, one at my first Convention and one at Conclave, and they’re actually my favorite part of these events, I think they’re the cream of the crop. I wanted them to know their details, give a strong presentation, and really connect with the audience and judges. • Were there any opportunities you thought were missed by the presenters? I would just say to make sure what you’re doing works. You want to try new things, but you have to make sure that you consider if your approach is going to be a hit or if it’s going to alienate the audience. Also, don’t underestimate the importance of the Q&A section. That’s where we get to find out more and see your personalities, and really see how much

they knew about the works they’re doing. It becomes very obvious if it’s just one guy who knows all the answers. I would advise groups to make sure all members are versed in different areas as well as making sure their answer relates back to the original question. • Finally, what do you think makes the relationship between Phi Kappa Tau and SeriousFun so unique? Well we have the longevity, which is amazing. We also have this wonderful man who was associated with both organizations, as a product of one and a founder of the other. It’s this wonderful tie that keeps us moving forward together. I also think there’s a lot of mutual admiration. We admire Phi Tau for the skills and leadership they instill in young men. It makes for these great male volunteers that we are always in such need of. And I think Phi Tau admires all the great work we’re doing and the lives we’re changing. So many Phi Taus stay involved with SeriousFun for the rest of their lives.

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MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

LILLY STEGER

NATIONAL OFFICERS ELECTION Kappa Tau. “We were great at everything. We didn’t win it all, but we competed at everything,” Bill said. “Excellence was what counted. The group was successful therefore its members were successful.” Fifty-one years after joining Phi Tau, Bill was elected the 49th National President at the 63rd National Convention in Cleveland. This elected position follows his term as National Vice President.

Bill Brasch, Louisville ’67

I

f you ask Bill Brasch, Louisville ’67, how he came to Phi Tau, he begins with his brother. “I went through life with a twin — we were classmates, we were teammates, we were roommates, and we were fraternity brothers.” Bill and his brother, John Brasch, Louisville ’67, were first generation college students who went to a relatively new high school, one that was always fighting for its seat at the table among bigger and better schools. When they arrived at the University of Louisville in the fall of 1967 they were eager to be a part of a team that didn’t have to struggle for recognition. After a successful recruitment, their choices were narrowed down to two fraternities: Phi Kappa Tau, which was one of the bigger fraternities on campus, and one small group that was

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still unestablished and unproven. They chose Phi Tau. “Joining Phi Kappa Tau was our way of being winners,” Bill says. Even among an ambitious class — according to Bill, eight went off to medical school, two to dental school, seven to law school, and three to graduate school — Bill stood out. He was elected as President of his pledge class, got a seat on the Student Senate as a Freshman, and participated on the Student Activities Board. His brother, next to him, was also elected to the Student Senate as a Freshman. “In fact, I might be the first National President who was not a Chapter President — my twin was,” Bill says, fondly. Their goal of joining a Fraternity that would allow them to excel was accomplished in the Beta Beta chapter of Phi

D  ALE HOLLAND, KENT STATE ’87 Dale Holland has held his current position as Vice President of Business Development at Satcom Direct Communications since 2013, after his retirement as an Air Force Colonel. Prior to retirement Dale served as the 89th Airlift Wing Vice Commander, directing transportation coordination for POTUS, the First Family, and other high-ranking officials in congress, the military, and foreign government officials. Dale returned to Phi Kappa Tau in 2006 after being inducted into the Hall of Fame. “I was a Lieutenant Colonel at the


time and I had been thinking for a while it was time to get back to my fraternity – it was time to get involved again. Once I retired, President Keltner asked if I would be a National Leadership Advisor and I told him I was planning on running for National Councilor. He said he thought that was a great idea.” Dale served as a National Councilor from 2014 until he was elected to Vice President this past July. He has been a six-time facilitator at President’s Academy, a program he swears by. Dale was also a founding father when Phi Kappa Tau recolonized at Kent State in 1989. Dale is also a Boles level donor for the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation. “I really believe in what we’re doing,” he said. Dale is eager to support President Brasch and the programs he plans on implementing throughout his term as President.

and higher education. While earning his Doctorate of Education in Organizational Leadership from the University of Southern California, Ray also worked as their Associate Director of Fraternity and Sorority Life. Ray has experience working at the Executive Offices where he spent a year as Volunteer Programs Coordinator. He is currently the Director of Student Life at San Bernardino Valley College. Ray has volunteered as a Dean of Regional Conferences, Lead Facilitator at the Building Men of Character Retreats, and previously served as a Domain Director before becoming a National Councilor. He also has experience as a Board of Governors member for three different chapters — Pi, Epsilon Phi, and Gamma Omicron.

Phi Kappa Tau also gladly welcomes the newest additions to our National Council. The following men have been heavily involved with Phi Kappa Tau both as undergraduates and alumni volunteers. Some of their many accomplishments are listed below:

RAY CARLOS, CAL STATE-FULLERTON ‘01 Ray Carlos has spent the majority of his career working to improve Greek life

MICHAEL FRENCH, KENT STATE ‘88 Before his election as National Councilor at Convention, Michael French served as a Domain Director for seven years. He has participated in the colonization of Georgia, Alabama, Georgia Tech, and Columbus State and facilitated at Leadership Academy, Southeast Regional Conference, and Leaders Conference. Michael formed the Atlanta Area Alumni Group and works hard to get alumni engaged. He also served as Member Orientation Officer and House

Manager for the Beta Mu chapter as an undergraduate. Besides his work with Phi Kappa Tau, Michael is active within the Boy Scouts and serves as an Atlanta Area Council Member. He is currently a Senior Consultant at Pragmatic Works and works as Business Intelligence Team Lead.

R  ICKY BAILEY, FLORIDA ’03 As an undergraduate, Ricky was a founding father of the Beta Iota chapter and volunteered at Boggy Creek. Since then he has served as a Chapter Advisor to Beta Iota and as a Board of Governors Chair. He helped establish the Undergraduate Advisory Board during the 59th National Convention in Denver and has been a facilitator for Presidents Academy, Leadership Academy, and Regional Conferences. Ricky also served as a Domain Director before becoming a National Councilor. Ricky is currently a Business Manager in the Office of the Vice President for Student Affairs at Florida State University. His biggest goal as a National Councilor is to continue to use the strategic plan to propel Phi Kappa Tau forward.

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FEATURE

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Maxwell winners, Upsilon chapter


T

he 63rd National Phi Kappa Tau Convention opened on Wednesday afternoon in Cleveland, Ohio with

words by Brian Breittholz, Ohio ’83. A Borradaile winner himself, Brian is a man who has spent over 30 years as a Greek Advisor, working from the University of Akron, to Miami University, to Cleveland State. Brian’s work as an alumnus volunteer as well as a Greek professional puts him in a uniquely juxtaposed position to analyze the changes that have transformed fraternity life in the past several decades. Brian recognizes, as do we all, that the future of fraternity life is in a time of jeopardy. “The fight for our future is a legitimate fight,” he addressed the crowd seriously. But in an empowering theme that would continue all weekend, Brian spoke to the idea of hope, “Fraternity done right can be a transformative, life changing experience that shapes young men to be principled leaders throughout their lifetimes. Fraternity done right.”

Fraternity Done Right BY LILLY STEGER

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FEATURE

After Brian stepped down, outgoing President Mike Dovilla, Baldwin-Wallace ’94, took the mic. He spoke about accomplishments during his 2016-2018 term – namely a reinforced brand, creed, and visual representation through brand identity, the first ever use of vlogging through Tuesday Tau Talks, and increased involvement in service hours and giving by 5% – as well as the areas in which he believes we have fallen short. But he finished his speech with a call to action for our current challenges, “Be optimistic, hardworking, and abnormal; refuse to accept the status quo as good enough.” Wednesday evening, brothers broke off into committee meetings for Recruitment, Leadership, Service, Education, and Ritual, among others. These groups would meet several times throughout the week to discuss their agenda items and ways in which they can be improved and implemented their plans in the next two years. The second day of National Convention began early, as undergraduates and alumni made their way from the hotel to Voinovich Park on Lake Erie to participate in a Sunrise Memorial Service. It was still cool out when brothers Mike Dovilla and National Chaplin Dave Lapinski, Penn State ’74, read a list of chapters who have had brothers pass since the 2016 National Convention in Sacramento. As their chapters were called, delegates from the given chapter stepped forward to place a piece of evergreen on a Phi Kappa Tau table. Brothers stood solemnly as they waited for their chapters to be called. Every deceased Phi Tau in the last two years had a brother to represent him in the ceremony. Spirits were lifted shortly, however, when brothers returned to the floor to begin the confirmation process for National Officers. Bob Ragsdale, Georgia ’66, took the mic to nominate Bill Brasch, Louisville ’67, his friend and incumbent National Vice President for the Presidency. The motion was approved unanimously, and Bill ascended to the position of National President. After Bill, National Councilor Dale Holland, Kent State ’87, received the vote of acclimation by the Nominating Committee to become the National Vice President. Bill Brasch and Dale Holland will hold their respective positions until National Convention 2020. AAdditional changes to the National Officers slate included the election of Michael French, Kent State ’88, and Ray Carlos, Cal State-Fullerton ’01, at Convention. Ricky Bailey, Florida State ’03, was elected later that month to fill a two-year vacancy. All three of these men have been active members since their initiation and worked extensively as Phi Kappa Tau alumni volunteers since graduating. Thursday afternoon the floor rested while brothers made their way to the Huntington Event Center, where Clea Newman

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was waiting to speak on behalf of her father, our esteemed alumnus Paul Newman, Ohio ’43, as well as present the Paul Newman Award, which is given annually to the chapter with the highest funds raised for SeriousFun Children’s Network. Clea is elegant and well-spoken, the perfect head for her father’s charity. Guests ate a SeriousFun sponsored lunch before Clea took the podium to speak about the partnership between the two organizations. “My father was so proud of being a fraternity brother,” she began. “The fact that these two partnerships have come together… It’s truly life changing.” Clea thanked the audience with undeniable sincerity, not just for our donation money ($1.6 million in lifetime donations), but for the high number of male volunteers we send annually to SeriousFun camps, which they always need in high demand. Clea’s testament to the power of SeriousFun is personal. “I always joke that I drove to Hole in the Wall Gang Camp a spoiled brat, and I left ten days later a completely different person. It changed the entire trajectory of what I wanted to do with my life.” Most importantly, Clea is aware of the strength organizations like Phi Kappa Tau and SeriousFun embed in their members. This understanding began with her father; “He was so lucky, because he actually became a member before he went into the military. The relationships he made and the support he got was something he carried throughout his tour. It gave him the strength to go through what he went through, which was not easy.” She recognizes this sort of cohesive strength in her campers as well. Clea recounted a story about one of her very first campers, Sophia, who had been given a diagnosis of Sickle Cell that only projected her life expectancy into her early twenties. But at a 25-year camp reunion there she was – with a great job and a beautiful family. She said to Clea, “Your camps literally changed my life. It gave me the hope and strength to get through my illness and I can’t tell you how grateful I am.” “Of course,” Clea recognized, “It had very little to do with me. It had to do with the strength she had and the relationships she made at camp. Phi Kappa Tau does that as well.” With that as her final statement, Clea presented Beta Beta chapter at the University of Louisville with the Paul Newman Award for raising over $20,000 in 2017 for SeriousFun. Thursday evening, Clea Newman joined Phi Kappa Tau in taking over Cleveland’s Progressive Field. Decked out in custom convention gear, brothers gathered at one of the stadium’s patios to enjoy a buffet table and bobbleheads before watching the Cleveland Indians take on the New York Yankees.


“...we believe these traditions position our fraternity to be the ideal twenty-first century fraternity, grounded in our organizational values and committed to constant improvement.”

Gamma chapter members

PRESIDENT JEFF MORRIS, OHIO STATE ’16 The Roland Maxwell presentation commenced Friday afternoon when Gamma chapter took the stage. They opened their presentation with a news clip documenting the suspension of all Greek life from Ohio State’s campus in the Fall of 2017. “As news crews descended on our Greek row, rather than embarrassing ourselves or our letters, the men of Gamma took our suspension in stride and immediately set ourselves to the task of improving the Greek community,” said Drew Cooper, Ohio State ’15, when the clip finished. After some major policy overhaul — including a realignment of new member process and a shift to have more recruitment and other social events occur at dry locations — Gamma chapter was the first of 37 Greek organizations to regain official recognition from the University in January 2018. Other accomplishments of Gamma chapter during the 2017 school year include two successful bylaw changes; one that increases the minimum service hour requirement from 20 per man to 35, and another that requires all members be involved in either another organization on campus, have an internship, or obtain a job in the Columbus area. Gamma chapter raised $4,000 for an on-campus Dance-A-Thon, participated in a spring cleanup of SeriousFun’s Flying Horse Farms, and sent members to participate five days a week at the local Boys and Girls Club to mentor and tutor. Their most ambitious goal is one that would require implementation on the national level: a policy that requires chapters to develop a chapter action plan every three years that details recruitment, new member education, and risk management.

“We understand this undertaking would not be easy,” concluded President Jeff Morris, Ohio State ’16, “But we believe these traditions position our fraternity to be the ideal twenty-first century fraternity, grounded in our organizational values and committed to constant improvement.” The second chapter to compete was Upsilon at Nebraska Wesleyan. Their story is also one that begins with turmoil. “In 2006, a fire in the chapter facility lead to the death of an Upsilon brother, a four-year suspension from campus, and severe damage to the chapter house. It took nearly six years to rebuild, recolonize, and re-charter. This tragedy is a part of Upsilon’s story,” began Creighton Schoening, Nebraska Wesleyan ’16. Last fall, they were reminded again of how easy it would be to make headlines. After a social media incident made campus news, Upsilon buckled down and seriously examined their risk management strategy. “Risk management begins with risk avoidance,” Creighton said. Through sanctions, mandatory education classes, loss of privileges, ineligibility for elections, as well as appointing a chair to organize specifically-dry events, Upsilon not only encourages but insists upon the responsibility of its members. However, despite these mistakes, Upsilon is committed to being a positive force on the Nebraska Wesleyan campus. Upsilon brothers were in charge of the student newspaper, held 15 seats on the Student Affairs Senate, participated in seven athletic teams – all while achieving the highest fraternity GPA on campus, a 3.5. Upsilon upped their philanthropic efforts, volunteering for Ladles

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FEATURE

of Love (a local charity), SeriousFun, and Relay for Life. In 2017 they raised $5,000 for SeriousFun, the most money raised by a chapter on campus that year. Upsilon’s story is one of redemption and they are determined to see that apply to the greater Greek community. Past President Evan Marshall, Nebraska Wesleyan ’15, said on the continuing value of Greek life, “We get higher grades, we do more community service, and we are better prepared for life after campus than those who are not in a fraternity.” Colin Hensel, Nebraska Wesleyan ’16 continued, “Fraternities can allow men to create the best versions of themselves and those around them, and challenge and inspire them to long term success.” After Upsilon, the third chapter to go was Epsilon at Mount Union. They began their presentation by expressing a commitment to finding the very best men to become Phi Taus. “Through

“Fraternities can allow men to create the best versions of themselves and those around them, and challenge and inspire them to long term sucess.” COLIN HENSEL, NEBRASKA WESLEYAN ’16

Brothers pose for a photo with Stanley Wolczyk, Baldwin-Wallace ’46.

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our values-based recruitment, we are able to identify these qualities, bring them to the forefront, and develop men of distinction,” explained Brandon Truhn, Mount Union ’15. Mount Union has a competitive Greek life and Epsilon’s determination to being the best is evident in their collective resume. Two high Greek honors — one, Outstanding Man on Campus and, the other, Most Inter-Fraternal Man — were both bestowed on Epsilon members last year. “Epsilon brothers want to be the face of the campus,” according to Brandon. They are tour and program guides, they hold positions of athletic leadership (including two swim team captains), they have pioneered diversity and inclusion programs, and they have roles in student government (the president and vice president are both Epsilon members). They, too, do regular cleanups of Flying Horse Farms, as well as volunteer at a domestic abuse center in Alliance. In 2017 they sent brothers to the Greek Leadership Institute, The Office of Active Citizenship and Service camps, and to the Undergraduate Interfraternity Institute. “The men of Epsilon strive tirelessly to prove we are more – we are more than outsiders perceive us to be, more than campus expects us to be, and more than we expect of ourselves,” Brandon concluded before handing over the mic. The final group of the Founder’s Four was a new face to the competition. Cameron Hughes, Cal State-Long Beach ’17, and Sean Hughes, Cal State-Long Beach ’17, flew from California to represent Beta Psi for the first time at the Maxwell Awards. “We’re relatively new to the block, but we’re comfortable in our underdog skin,” started senior Cameron Hughes. The current Beta Psi members did not inherit their fraternity in great shape; between 2012-2014 membership fell, hitting its all-time low at 28 men. They struggled with forming alumni relationships and, most debilitatingly, inherited $15,000 worth of debt from previous chapter management. However, in the past four years Beta Psi has pulled itself out of a bad situation. They have paid off their debt — now they are even in the black with a savings account. While doing that they were also able to raise $5,000 in philanthropy for SeriousFun as well as establish a partnership with Red Cross. The relationship with Red Cross was particularly monumental last year; after a particularly disastrous hurricane season and the awful shooting in Las Vegas, Beta Psi originated two separate blood drives to help victims. “We instituted a mandate that said social events are not available to you unless you participate in community and philanthropic events,” Cameron explained. Sean continued “We are confident we can eradicate any negative stigma around Greek life at Long Beach.” If there was anything to take from the Maxwell presentations


it was that although Greek life may be under fire, Phi Taus are prepared to handle it. The young men currently heading their chapters are innovative problem-solvers with a critical eye for improvement. They are proactive and take steps to combat problems before they occur. They are also generous; they think nothing of giving time to their community and view service as a pleasure instead of an obligation. These men are prepared to tackle any threat that may come their way and, if the Maxwell presentations are an indicator, the future of Phi Kappa Tau is in good hands. With spirits high after a series of excellent presentations, Phi Taus left the floor and headed for the famous Rock & Roll Hall of Fame, a unanimous hit among attendees. The museum was rented out with exclusive access for guests to browse exhibits on The Beatles, Michael Jackson, and Jimi Hendrix while enjoying a series of appetizer stations. But the star of the night was a surprise special guest, brother Stanley Wolczyk, Baldwin-Wallace ’46, a 101-year old Phi Tau who made the trip up from Wadsworth with his daughter, Penny. Stanley was spry and lively, and kept his audience entertained with his own stories about his days as a Phi Tau undergraduate. Saturday morning, eager brothers hopped on a bus heading for Cleveland’s Lakewood neighborhood to meet Ian Andrews, Mount Union ’01. Ian heads the nonprofit Lakewood Alive which works to foster and sustain communities in the Lakewood area. In preparation for a charity 5k later that day, Phi Taus spent the morning pulling weeds, picking up trash, and setting up equipment for a block party following the race. The convention floor was not open on Saturday and by 4:00pm it had been transformed into a banquet hall. Guests would gather for the Brotherhood Banquet that night, but not

before making a detour to take a photo in front of the Fountain of Life statue. After a banquet dinner, the final ceremony of the weekend was opened by Phi Kappa historian and Executive Offices staffer Charles T. Ball, Miami ’82, who spoke briefly about the success of past National Conventions and the importance of gathering to celebrate brotherhood. After Charlie spoke, the Phi Kappa Tau Warblers preformed the Brotherhood Song and other favorites. The mic went to Dale Holland to announce the newest recipient of the William H. Shideler Award, Drew Cooper. Drew, a member of the Gamma delegation for the Maxwell Award, took the stage to thank the audience. He gave a well-delivered speech that thoughtfully paralleled other times in history when groups had to work together to overcome obstacles to the contemporary need for collaborative problem solving in Greek life. (A full profile on Drew can be found on page 7.) Next, Tom Skena, Bethany ’78, took the stage to present Beta Psi with the Angelo Award. After clearing their debt, making investments in their financial wellbeing, and establishing new relationships with philanthropic causes, Cal State-Long Beach is a well-deserved recipient for most-improved chapter. After an acceptance speech from the Beta Psi delegates, new National President Bill Brasch had the honor of announcing that Upsilon Chapter at Nebraska Wesleyan would be the newest recipients for the Roland Maxwell Award for their outstanding efforts in leadership, risk management, and philanthropy. Before the floor was officially closed, CEO Tim Hudson, Truman ’97, announced that the next time brothers would gather for National Convention would be held at the Hilton in Fort Worth, Texas. u

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HALL OF FAME

INDUCTEES The following members were announced at National Convention as incoming inductees to the Phi Kappa Tau Hall of Fame 2018. 1 1 JEFFREY AMESTOY, HOBART ’65 Former Chief Justice, Vermont Supreme Court

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After obtaining both a J.D. from the University of California and a Master of Public Administration from Harvard, Amestoy began his public service career in 1974, when he was appointed legal counsel for the Governor’s Commission on the Administration of Justice. In 1982 he was appointed Vermont’s Commissioner of Labor and Industry, until his successful 1984 run for Attorney General. He served as Vermont Attorney General from 1985 to 1997. In 1997 Amestoy was appointed Chief Justice of the Vermont Supreme Court, a position he held until his retirement in 2004.

4 JAMES HENRY, COLORADO STATE ’37 Board of Directors, Western Stock Show

2 DENNY CLUNK, MOUNT UNION ’48 President, National College of Probate Judges

5 DAVID ISHEE, SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI ’82 Associate Justice, Supreme Court of Mississippi

Judge Clunk was admitted directly to the Supreme Court of Ohio in 1955, right after graduating with an LLB from Case Western Reserve. He held this position until 1962, when he joined the United State District Court – Northern District of Ohio. In 1985 he was admitted to the United States Court of Appeals, Sixth Circuit. From 1985 until his retirement in 2003, Denny served as the Stark County Probate Court Judge.

Justice Ishee swore into the Mississippi Supreme Court on September 18th, 2017. Prior to this appointment, he served on the Mississippi Court of Appeals for 13 years. Upon graduating from the University of Mississippi School of Law, Justice Ishee entered private law practice for 14 years. He also teaches business law and professional ethics at the University of Southern Mississippi Gulf Coast Campus and criminal litigation and trial practice at both the University of Mississippi School of Law and Mississippi College School of Law.

3 SCOTT DIAMOND, GEORGETOWN ’85 Chief Executive Officer, Unified Technologies

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tions industry, beginning his career as a sales representative. He quickly became top sales producer — a position he held for 13 years. In 2002, Scott co-purchased US Voice & Data, which has since gained a reputation as a telecommunication industry leader in the Midwest.

Scott Diamond was drawn away from his hometown of Cincinnati to play baseball for the Georgetown College Tigers. After his graduation, he moved to Louisville where he established himself in the telecommunica-

James “Jim” Henry was a 1940 graduate from Colorado State, with a degree in Animal Science. He served for over four decades on the Board of Directors of the National Western Stock Show, one of the world’s premier livestock expositions. He was also the first chair of the National Western’s Scholarship Committee. In 2000, Henry was recognized as “Alumni of the Century” by Colorado State and a fully endowed scholarship was established in his name.

6 TRENT KELLY, OLE MISS ’87 U.S. Representative, 1st District of Mississippi Trent Kelly joined the National Guard in 1985 before obtaining degrees from Eastern Central Community


College and later the University of Mississippi, where he joined Phi Kappa Tau. Kelly went on to graduate from University of Mississippi Law School in 1994 and received a master’s degree from the United States Army War College in Pennsylvania in 2010. In 1990 he mobilized as a Combat Engineer for Desert Storm and in 2005 he deployed as a Major during the Iraq War. From 2009-2010 he served as a Lieutenant Colonel in Iraq as the Battalion Commander of Task Force Knight. Kelly has received two Bronze Stars, the Combat Action Badge, and the DeFleury Medal. Kelly was elected in 2015 to the House of Representatives in a special election and was reelected in 2016. Kelly was playing third base during the 2017 Congressional baseball shooting in Virginia and is reported as the first person to raise alert to the rest of the team. 7 ROBERT LOEFFLER, MUHLENBERG ’67 Orthopedic Surgeon, Doctors Without Borders Dr. Loeffler is currently an orthopedic surgeon for Doctors Without Borders, where he has provided aid and medical assistance after natural disasters in Haiti and El Salvador, as well as to refugees from the Syrian/Jordanian border. Before working working with Doctors Without Borders, Dr. Loeffler specialized in Sports Medicine in private practice and as the head team physician for the University of Denver athletic teams. He has also taught in the University of Colorado’s orthopedic department for over 20 years. He has been included on the US News & World Report’s “The Best Doctors in America Award: Sports Medicine” and twice in Denver Magazine’s “Top Sports Medicine Doctor in Denver” award. 8 RICHARD LUDWICK, EVANSVILLE ’83 President, St. Thomas University Dr. Richard Ludwick has recently been appointed the President of the University of St. Thomas Houston. Prior to this appointment, Dr. Ludwick was president of the Independent Colleges of Indiana, the oldest state association of private colleges in America. He has also served as commissioner of the Midwest Higher Education Compact and a board chair for the Coalition for College Cost Savings. Dr. Ludwick holds a BA in History from the University of Evansville, a MA in Higher Education Administration from Teachers College of Columbia University, a Doctor of Jurisprudence from Indiana University,

and a Doctor of Education in Policy Management and Organization of Higher Education Administration from the University of Oregon. 6 9 THEODORE OLSON, THE UNIVERSITY OF PACIFIC ’61 Former Solicitor General of the United States Olson, a graduate of the University of Southern California Law School, began his career by serving 3 years as Assistant Attorney General in the Reagan administration. He was Legal Counsel to President Regan during the Iran-Contra Affair’s investigation. Olson argued a dozen cases before the Supreme Court before being appointed Solicitor General in 2001, when he was nominated by President Bush. His work in 2009 challenging Proposition 8, the California law banning same-sex marriage, earned him a spot on the Time 100’s Greatest Thinkers list. In 2011 he was awarded the ABA Medal, the highest award of the American Bar Association.

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8 10 DAVID RICKS, PURDUE ’86 President, Chairman & CEO, Eli Lilly and Company David Ricks was promoted to CEO of Eli Lilly and Company on January 1st, 2017 and was appointed chairman of the board of directors June 1st of the same year. Ricks has been working at Lilly for over 20 years. He began his career at the company in 1996 as a business development associate and has since worked his way up the company ladder, serving as president of Lilly Bio-Medicines for four years, president of Lilly USA for 3, and president and general manager of Lilly China for 1, among other roles.

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11 LEE SOLOMON, MUHLENBERG ’72 Associate Justice, Supreme Court of New Jersey Lee Solomon, a graduate of Muhlenberg College and Widener University School of Law, served as a member of the New Jersey General Assembly from 1992 until 1996. He also worked as a prosecutor and a Deputy U.S. Attorney for the New Jersey District. In 2006, he was appointed to be a judge in the Supreme Court from Camden Country, first in the Family Division and later in the Criminal Division. Solomon was elected by Governor Christie to the Supreme Court in 2014 and was appointed by the Senate in a 36 to 2 vote.

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LAURELS

LAURELS

~ SCOTT STEWART, NEBRASKA-KEARNEY ’69, Gamma Rho brothers from the 1960s gathered in Kearney on August 1st for dinner and reminiscing.

[1947] Gordon Young, Ohio, Gordon and his wife Carol, longtime Kiwanis members, were selected as Grand Marshalls to lead the annual Stow Fourth of July Parade. [1965] Wayne Edmiston, Cal State Chico, Wayne has written his debut novel, a historical-fantasy fiction called Unfatally Dead: To Thaw or Not to Thaw. It follows Samuel Clemens and Walt Disney as they decide if Walt Disney should unthaw and return to Earth or remain

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as head of Heaven’s Creative Department. It went on sale on Amazon September 1st.

funded by the Commonwealth of Virginia and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

[1967] Daniel Dauer, Old Dominion, Dr. Dauer was recognized by the President of Old Dominion at the annual State of the University address for exceeding over $30M in external research funding to Old Dominion through 175 awards and 42 years of research. Daniel also works as Director of the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Monitoring Program for Virginia,

[1973] Les Akers, Florida State, Les has been elected as one of the new National Board of Directors by the Florida State University Alumni Association. Les is the Principal Dealer of Legacy Toyota in Tallahassee and his son, Ryan Akers, Florida State ’07, is also a Phi Tau.


[1980] George Manhan, Bethany, (above) George was honored with a proclamation from the City of Charleston for his outstanding philanthropic work on behalf of Parkinson’s Disease. George has lived with Parkinson’s for many years and has been a leading advocate and fundraiser in his community.

[1996] John J. Felber, Wright State, John was selected for a promotion to Lieutenant Colonel by his Brigade Commander in July. [1999] Wes Fugate, Centre, Wes has started a new position as Vice President for Student Affairs and Dean of Students at Randolph College. Wes is Vice Chair of the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation.

PETER KRULL, BETHANY ’93, Peter, Founder and CEO of Earth Equity Advisors, was recognized by Investopedia as one of the 100 Most Influential Financial Advisors in the United States. ~

[1990] John Mountz, Penn State, John received the award for Outstanding Higher Education Professional from Phi Mu Delta Fraternity. He accepted this award at their centennial conclave in Vermont.

[1985] Richard Briggs, Bethany, Richard, an educator in the Fort Cherry School District in McDonald, Pennsylvania was featured in NASPAA Newsletter as “The Voice of the Rangers.” Richard is the first and only P.A. Announcer for basketball at Fort Cherry, a position he has held since 1995. Since 2013 he has also been announcing for volleyball and wrestling. [1985] Gregory Cooper, Tennessee, Greg has been promoted to a Black Belt in Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu.

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LAURELS

[2008] Mike Disotell, Westminster, Mike was recognized as Orrick’s Community Responsibility Award Recipient for 2017. Mike organized a Pride in Wheeling Event that brought together over 200 people for a day of service and raised awareness on the importance of diversity and inclusion in Wheeling, West Virginia. Christopher Todd, Eastern Kentucky, Chris and his wife Laura welcomed their daughter Darcy Joe Todd on May 15th, 2018.

~ GUILLERMO FLORES, SOUTHERN ILLINOIS ’08, Guillermo has joined Michigan State University as the Assistant Director for Greek Life. He started his new job in July. He previously worked as the Fraternity & Sorority Housing Cordinator at the University of Houston.

[2001] Brandon VanWaeyenberghe, Evansville, Brandon accepted the position of Director of Finance at the Charlotte Symphony Orchestra. He will be moving east after living in Texas for 10 years. [2003] Nick Zappitelli, Florida State, Nick and his wife Megan welcome their son Dominick Daniel on July 18th, 2018. [2006] Josh Vieyra, Georgetown, Josh and his wife Bethany had their son Lincoln Joshua on June 25th. [2007] Joshua Johnson, Georgetown, Joshua and his wife Katherine welcomed their daughter Madelynn on July 6th, 2018.

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[2010] Thomas Wolfe, Georgetown, Thomas married Jessica Perry on July 21st. [2012] Andrew Dulman, Southern California, Andrew Dulman has signed on to direct commercials with ArtClass, a production company held by Geno Imbrale and Vincent Peone. [2013] Caleb Nicol, Georgetown, Caleb was appointed Assistant Director of Student Involvement at Young Harris College. Austin Shaw, Purdue, Austin Shaw married Jessica Hollister on June 1st, 2018.

AJ Kelly, Old Dominion, AJ was presented the National Distinguished Service Award by the Order of the Arrow, Boy Scouts America. Only 1,000 men out of over 1 million Boy Scouts have been presented this award since 1915.

[2014] Andrew Hayden, Louisville, Andrew Hayden helped the University of Louisville Men’s Club Volleyball team to win the National Championships, becoming the first club sport at Louisville to ever win a national competition.


AWARD WINNERS

AND THE WINNER IS...

P

hi Kappa Tau takes pride in recognizing those brothers who are truly distinguished and chapters that are excelling inside and outside of the classroom. The following awards were presented to undergraduates, alumni and volunteers at this summer’s Convention in Cleveland, Ohio.

ROLAND MAXWELL TROPHY This trophy is presented to the most outstanding chapter in the country. The Roland Maxwell Trophy is the highest honor a chapter can receive. Upsilon Chapter, Nebraska Wesleyan FOUNDERS FOUR CHAPTERS Founders Four-designated chapters are those selected by the awards committee to compete for the Roland Maxwell Trophy on the basis of their performance in the previous calendar year. Upsilon Chapter, Nebraska Wesleyan Epsilon Chapter, Mount Union Gamma Chapter, Ohio State Beta Psi, Cal State Long Beach

TAYLOR A. BORRADAILE MEMORIAL AWARD This award is presented to an undergraduate member recognized for outstanding contribution to the chapter’s overall success, leadership by example and demonstration of a true understanding of brotherhood. Stephen Pollock, South Carolina ’17 PAUL NEWMAN AWARD This award is presented to the chapter that raises the greatest dollar amount to benefit the SeriousFun Children’s Network. Beta Beta, Louisville

ROSS E. ROEDER BOARD OF GOVERNORS AWARD Gamma, Ohio State OUTSTANDING HOUSING CORPORATION AWARD Alpha Chi, Mississippi State OUTSTANDING GREEK ADVISOR AWARD Leslie Merritt, Middle Tennessee OUTSTANDING ADVISOR TO A CHAPTER Heather Dykes, Purdue

GEORGE V. VOINOVICH EXCELLENCE IN COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD Zeta Gamma, San Jose

OUTSTANDING COLONY ADVISOR AWARD Earl Deadmon, South Carolina

DWIGHT I. DOUGLASS AWARD Evan Marshall, Nebraska Wesleyan ’15

THOMAS L. STENNIS II AWARD Sasha Kanevsky, Rutgers ’05

JACK JAREO AWARD Alpha Tau, Cornell

FREDERICK R. FLETEMEYER AWARD University of South Carolina

RICHARD MASSOCK AWARD Alpha Omega, Baldwin-Wallace

WILLIAM H. SHIDELER AWARD This award is presented to the most outstanding graduating senior in Phi Kappa Tau and is the highest undergraduate honor that the Fraternity bestows. Andrew Cooper, Ohio State ’15

SONNY STRANGE AWARD Psi, University of Colorado

HAROLD E. ANGELO AWARD This award is presented to the most improved chapter in the country. Beta Psi, Cal State Long Beach

MONROE MOOSNICK TROPHY Alpha Theta, College of William & Mary

OUTSTANDING NEW MEMBER AWARD Jake Severyn, Ohio State ’17

DR. EDGAR EWING BRANDON AWARD Justin Wampach, St. Cloud ’94

GREG HOLLEN COLONY PRESIDENT AWARD Garrett Daniels, Arizona State ’18 ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE SCROLL Multiple Chapters ORDER OF THE STAR SCROLL Multiple Chapters RECRUITMENT PACESETTER AWARD Multiple Chapters NORM W. BROWN PHILANTHROPY SCROLL Multiple Chapters

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CHAPTER ETERNAL

CHAPTER ETERNAL The followed members were reported deceased to the Executive offices between June 19, 2018 and August 24, 2018.

MIAMI David Arnold ’56 Stephen Ruppert ’42 OHIO Chuck Nicklas ’55 Thomas Kumpf ’59 OHIO STATE Wade Beyerly ’59 MOUNT UNION Fred Machmer ’59 MUHLENBERG Dale Beatty ’43 UC BERKELEY Robert Raban ’50

SYRACUSE Alan Royer ’50 NEBRASKA WESLEYAN David Munro ’12 BETHANY Harry Walker ’58 Jim Collins ’48 Scott Lesiak ’79 COLORADO William Hinkley ’55 David Brackett ’46 Erwin Cramp ’46 CASE WESTERN RESERVE Daniel Whipple ’62

FRANKLIN & MARSHALL Joseph Krall ’51

FLORIDA Leroy Myhre ’48 Eugene Sego ’61 Charles Brame ’55

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA John Pope ’49 Richard Meese ’75 Joseph Wilson ’65

WILLIAM & MARY Tom Boles ’39

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AUBURN John Prickett ’66 Dan Bray ’60 Joe Hildreth ’52 AKRON Thomas De Mita ’55

IDAHO Roger Olson ’52 SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI Thomas MacDermott ’69

MISSISSIPPI STATE Jerry Jacks ’52

BOWLING GREEN Alexander Angelle ’69 Thomas Rasbach ’61 Tom Ruble ’50

BALDWIN-WALLACE Boyd Warnsman ’60

CAL STATE CHICO Hal Jones ’64

TEXAS Robert Beck ’53 Paul Clinkscales ’54

NORTHERN MICHIGAN John Neeb ’68

LOUISVILLE Ben Birkhead ’56 John Horan ’52 Louis Rowe ’58 Richard Hymowitz ’69 George Huskamp ’55 Timothy Snyder ’79

EAST CAROLINA John Aldridge ’62 WESTERN MICHIGAN Robert Claffey ’63 CAL STATE-FULLERTON James Leachman ’73

NEBRASKA-KEARNEY Louis Hirsh ’66 Michael Sears ’73 EVANSVILLE Jeff Werner ’96 BUFFALO Guy Mallory ’88


WHY I GIVE

T

he Monroe Moosnick Endowed Prize Fund was created to honor Theta Faculty Advisor Dr. Monroe Moosnick for over 30 years in chapter advising. Tim Collins, Transylvania ’78, a fundraising professional, was monumental is establishing the fund in 1983 and continuing to maintain it today. Dr. Moosnick was the Chairman of the Division of Natural Science and Mathematics as well as an Organic Chemistry professor at Transylvania University in Kentucky. According to Collins, he would often pay out of pocket for newly recruited brothers to cover the cost of membership. The Moosnick Endowment was created to continue this legacy of generosity. However, a recently change of policy at Transylvania University prohibited the oversight of funds that pay dues-related costs directly to a fraternity. The Monroe Moosnick fund is now being overseen by the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation. But this move has allowed for a

change in policy and in the 2018-2019 school year, the Endowment’s overseers plan to expand the grant to include an academic scholarship. The success of the Moosnick Endowment is due primarily to the man whose name it shares; when word spread that a fund was being created in Dr. Moosnick’s honor there was no shortage of donations and today the fund holds over $100,000 dollars. But careful oversight has led to the success of this fund – the principal of the account has never been touched, only the earnings. At present, Theta undergraduates receive between $3,000-$5,000 from the account annually and that money is expected to be a resource for many years to come. “Fundraising succeeds when you have something real or valuable – something that touches people in some way. Respond to what matters and help change a small corner of the world,” said Collins.

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SIDELIGHTS

SIDELIGHTS Phi Kappa Tau 2020: Focusing Our Vision is Phi Kappa Tau’s strategic plan. Created by the National Council and Executive Offices staff, the plan was ratified in 2016 by the 62nd National Convention in Sacramento, Calif. The plan focuses the organization on five strategic imperatives.

GOVERNANCE RECRUITMENT/RETENTION EDUCATION LEADERSHIP SERVICE Giving back to Phi Kappa Tau is one of the finest traditions of our Fraternity. With strong strategic plans in place for both the Fraternity and Foundation, it is an exciting time to be a Phi Tau. Support the mission, vision and strategic direction of our Fraternity by donating today. You will be glad you did!

phikappatau.org/2020

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Tim Hudson, Truman ’97, and Mike Gabhart, Georgetown ’95 at Wrigley Field.

LEADERSHIP MESSAGE

WORKING COLLECTIVELY

W

ith the summer coming to a close, it’s an exciting time for those of us who are baseball fans. As a lifelong Cub’s fan, I will admit that the past few years have been exceptional for me. That said, I have always been favorable to the National League (NL) style of play – no offense to those who root for the American League teams. When it comes time to root for a team in the All-Star game or the World Series (the Cubs having only provided me one opportunity to do so in my lifetime), it’s easy to align with the NL. The likelihood of sports fans having a league or conference allegiance has a parallel in the fraternity world. Our conference is the North American Interfraternity Conference (NIC). We have 66 members. In my opinion, this is one of our most important associations as a fraternity. In fact, Phi Kappa Tau receives resources from the Conference and the interaction with peers at the highest level of staff and volunteer leadership proves invaluable in helping to push our organization, as well as the industry, forward. The NIC is focused on the following items: advocacy government relations, education and leadership development, campus support, data-driven processes, and public relations efforts.


“The NIC is focused on the following items: advocacy goverment relations, education and leadership development, campus support, data-driven processes, and public relations efforts.”

CALENDAR OF EVENTS Presidents Academy and Volunteer Development Institute Fort Worth, TX [January 4-6, 2019] Regional Conferences Pacific Northwest University of Washington [Jan. 26, 2019] Capital Old Dominion University [Feb. 2, 2019] Red River Oklahoma State University [Feb. 2, 2019] Leaders Flying Horse Farms [Feb. 9, 2019]

Providing resources around each of those focus areas is a large undertaking. The old phrase “no single individual can do everything” certainly rings true in helping to ensure the fraternal experience. All Greek letter organizations share in the challenges and triumphs of our peers. It’s less about being competitive with one another and more about being collaborative. Yes, each of our organizations provides a unique experience (just like each of our host institutions), but we are better for the successes we see around us and should actively work to celebrate our achievements as a group. I encourage you to visit the NIC website to learn more about the important work they do for Phi Kappa Tau. Throughout the upcoming year, engage in the public relations campaign #myFraternity on social media, created by the NIC, to emphasize the positives of your fraternity experience.

WM. TIM HUDSON CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

West Coast Chapman [Feb 9, 2019] Southeast Georgia Tech [Feb. 16, 2019] Bluegrass University of Kentucky [Feb. 16, 2019] New England Rutgers [Feb. 23, 2019] Heartland Southern Illinois [Feb. 23, 2019] Conclave Oxford, Ohio [July 12-14, 2019]

If your chapter is hosting an anniversary celebration, alumni event or other major event, submit the event to communications@phikappatau.org for publication in the Laurel or website.

DIRECTORY NATIONAL PRESIDENT Bill Brasch Louisville ’67 bbrasch@phikappatau.org NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Dale Holland Kent State ’87 dholland@phikappatau.org FOUNDATION CHAIRMAN Dick Michael Michigan Tech ’70 dmichael@phikappatau.org FOUNDATION VICE CHAIRMAN Wes Fugate Centre ’99 wfugate@phikappatau.org CEO Tim Hudson Truman State ’97 thudson@phikappatau.org COO Travis Robinson Eastern Kentucky ’98 trobinson@phikappatau.org EDITOR Lilly Steger lsteger@phikappatau.org

Contact information for the Executive Offices Staff, Fraternity National Council, Foundation Board of Trustees, National Advisors, Domain Directors and Educational Deans can be found online at phikappatau.org/connect.

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PHI KAPPA TAU FOUNDATION Ewing T. Boles Executive Offices 5221 Morning Sun Road Oxford, OH 45056 Change Service Requested

YOUR LEGACY. OUR FUTURE. Please consider making the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation a Beneficiary: If you’ve ever opened a bank account, set up a retirement plan, or taken out an insurance policy, you may have completed a form to indicate who will inherit the money in those accounts. The opportunity to designate those assets for a charity like the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation is an opportunity too good to pass up. It’s a simple form, done right on the spot, and it keeps your money out of probate. There is no limit to the amount you can leave to individuals or to a charity, and there may be significant tax savings for your estate. It’s your money and you deserve the right to say what happens to it. It’s a simple, powerful way to provide long-lasting support for the future of our mission. All it takes is a signature.

INTERESTED? For more information on how to leave your legacy for Phi Kappa Tau, please contact us today. Charlie Ball, Director of Philanthropy 800-PKT-1906 | cball@phikappatau.org www.phikappatau.org/foundation/

Not intended as legal or investment advice

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID OXFORD, OH PERMIT # 13

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