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Laurel the

FALL 2012

O F P H I K A P PA P A TA TAU AU

FOUNDATION UPDATE NATIONAL CONVENTION IN REVIEW FOUNDERS MONTH OF SERVICE RECAP

HOW TO HOST A SUCCESSFUL, MILESTONE CHAPTER EVENT


ADAM MONSON, CHAPMAN ’09, LOOKS ON AS TREVOR SULLIVAN, CHAPMAN ’09, HOISTS THE MAXWELL TROPHY ABOVE

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CONVENTION BROTHERHOOD BANQUET AT

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CENTER IN NASHVILLE, TENN. LEARN MORE ABOUT EPSILON SIGMA CHAPTER’S WIN AND THE ENTIRE EVENT ON PAGES 14-19.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


Contents The Laurel

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FALL 2012 VOL. 100, NO. 1 Editor-in-Chief Lane S Baldwin Copy Editor John Sayers, Bethany ’78 Graphic Designer Stacey Castle About The Laurel The Laurel is the exoteric publication of the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation. Published prior to 1919 as SIDELIGHTS, a journal devoted to topics related to higher education involving college and alumni interests, The Laurel is now published each year under the direction and authority of the Board of Trustees of the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation. The next issue of The Laurel will be Vol. 101, No. 1 and will be published in the winter of 2013. Printed in the USA | ISSN Number: 0023-8996 Printed by The Watkins Printing Company, Columbus, Ohio.

FEATURES 14

Phi Kappa Tau Hosts 60th National Convention A look at the Fraternity’s historic event

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Address Changes Visit www.phikappatau.org and choose “Update Your Information” or call (800) PKT-1906 or mail changes to: Phi Kappa Tau, 5221 Morning Sun Road, Oxford OH 45056 or e-mail Cindy Morgan at cmorgan@phikappatau.org Member Fraternity Communications Association

So You’re Planning a Reunion How to host a successful, milestone chapter event

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Founders Month of Service Recap A look at the Fraternity’s fourth annual month of service

DEPARTMENTS 4

Directory

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Perspectives

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News & Noteworthy

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Foundation Update

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We Are PKT

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Chapter Eternal

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Our Chapters

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Laurels

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

This Laurel is printed on 100-percent recycled paper and fits the Forest Stewardship Council’s requirements for environmentally mindful publications.

Cover photo taken at the Gamma chapter (Ohio State) Centennial by Evan Williams Roharik Productions. (From left to right) Mike Hablitzel ‘72, Dan McKee ‘71, John Stacy ’71, Jack Wallack ‘73, Curt Rubinstein ‘74 and Frank Giannola ‘75.

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Phi Kappa Tau 4

The mission of Phi Kappa Tau is to champion a lifelong commitment to brotherhood, learning, ethical leadership and exemplary character. The vision of Phi Kappa Tau is to be recognized as a leadership organization that binds men together and challenges them to improve their campuses and the world. FRATERNITY NATIONAL COUNCIL NATIONAL PRESIDENT Stephan M Nelson, Southern Mississippi ’73 NATIONAL VICE PRESIDENT Rick A Keltner, Sacramento State ’76 CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER *C Steven Hartman, Muskingum ’89 Joshua J Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ’96 William F Brasch, Louisville ’67 Michael D Dovilla, Baldwin-Wallace ’94 Sean J McManus, East Carolina ’94 David A Ruckman, Ohio State ’62 Thomas C Skena, Bethany ’81 Scott G Stewart, Nebraska-Kearney ’69 Cliff D Unger, Arizona ’98 UNDERGRADUATE ADVISORY BOARD PRESIDENT: Tyler T Vienot, Saginaw Valley State ’09 AJ Broderick, RIT ’11 Ryan Bruchey, Belmont ’10 Manuel A Davila-Molina, Cornell ’09 Jamison R Heard, Evansville ’12 Ken Johnson, Georgia ’11 Nathan A Shuler, Centre ’12 Trevor T Sullivan, Chapman ’09 Jack Van Bibber, Mount Union ’10 NATIONAL ADVISORS CHIEF ALUMNI OFFICER: Mark A Scher, Rider ’85 CHIEF LEARNING OFFICER: Wesley R Fugate, Centre ’99 HOUSING/ΦKT PROPERTIES: Jeff T Baird, Muhlenberg ’01 RECRUITMENT/RETENTION: Michael T Gabhart, Georgetown ’95 RITUALIST/CHAPLAIN: Fr. Nicholas R A Rachford, Cincinnati ’64 SERVICE: Jordan M Loeb, Indiana ’06 TREASURER: J Kenneth Loewen, Colorado ’80 National Advisors are ex-officio, non-voting members of the National Council.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

FOUNDATION BOARD OF TRUSTEES

EXECUTIVE OFFICES STAFF (800) PKT-1906 CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Steve Hartman, Muskingum ’89 shartman@phikappatau.org

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DIRECTOR OF CHAPTER SERVICES Tim Hudson, Truman State ’97 thudson@phikappatau.org

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DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT Tyler Wash, Georgetown ’06 twash@phikappatau.org

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DIRECTOR OF EDUCATIONAL INITIATIVES Sarah Rochford srochford@phikappatau.org

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FINANCE COORDINATOR Lisa Adams ladams@phikappatau.org

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COMMUNICATION COORDINATOR Lane S Baldwin lbaldwin@phikappatau.org

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COMMUNICATION ASSOCIATE Cole Yearwood, Oklahoma State ’09 cyearwood@phikappatau.org

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MULTIMEDIA ASSOCIATE Marty Dunning, Kentucky ’07 mdunning@phikappatau.org

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PROGRAMMING COORDINATOR Dustin Brown, Georgetown ’05 dbrown@phikappatau.org

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EXPANSION COORDINATOR Alex Koehler, Mount Union ’07 akoehler@phikappatau.org

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EXPANSION CONSULTANT Michael Lunkins, Washington ’08 mlukins@phikappatau.org

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RESOURCE AND DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Ray Sophie, Southern Illinois ’08 rsophie@phikappatau.org

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DEVELOPMENT COORDINATOR Julia McMurry jmcmurray@phikappatau.org

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EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT Cindy Morgan cmorgan@phikappatau.org

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT-CHAPTER SERVICES Lori Foister lfoister@phikappatau.org

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ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT-FOUNDATION Angie Van Winkle avanwinkle@phikappatau.org

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CHAIRMAN David A Ruckman, Ohio State ’62 FIRST VICE CHAIRMAN Scott G Stewart, Nebraska-Kearney ’69 SECOND VICE CHAIRMAN Bill Fisher, Miami ’80 TREASURER Brian T Hardy, Westminster ’93 SECRETARY James S Hamilton, Ohio State ’63 Steve W Chaddick, Georgia Tech ’70 John M Green, Nebraska Wesleyan ’60 *Steve Hartman, Muskingum ’89 Reza Hashampour, Georgetown ’82 Gregory M Heilmeier, Bethany ’86 Rick A Keltner, Sacrameto State ’76 Richard F Michael, Michigan Tech ’70 Stephan M Nelson, Southern Mississippi ’73 Jeffrey L Rivard, Central Michigan ’65 Brent W Vickery, Texas-Austin ’81 *non-voting DISTINGUISHED TRUSTEES Jack L Bartholomew, Ohio State ’55 Raymond A Bichimer, Ohio State ’53 Mark M Boyd, Miami ’71 William G Braund, Westminster ’54 Norman W Brown, Ohio State ’50 Gerald G Carlton Jr, Ohio ’58 Melvin Dettra, Ohio State ’45 F Fred Fether, Bowling Green ’51 Lawrence L Fisher, Ohio State ’60 Hugh C Fowler, Colorado ’45 John D Good, Ohio ’47 Jim K Heilmeier, Kent State ’47 Theodore A Hendricks, Bowling Green ’59 Gregory M Hollen, Maryland ’75 Dan L Huffer, Ohio State ’57 David W Lawrence, Miami ’61 Robert Leatherman, Akron ’60 James C McAtee, Ohio ’65 F L Mac McKinley, Oklahoma State ’51 Frederick E Mills, Ohio State ’66 Donald J Phillips II, Texas-Austin ’82 Fr. Nicholas R A Rachford, Cincinnati ’64 Joel S Rudy, Bethany ’60 Timothy F Smith, Bowling Green ’62 Donald E Snyder Sr, Cornell ’49 Carl D Vance, Miami ’67 Graydon D Webb, Ohio State ’69 THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


Perspectives 55

Like Madness Is the Glory of This Life On a conference call in the spring of 2011, Bob Mintz, Ohio State ’71, abandoned good judgment and agreed to chair Gamma chapter’s Centennial committee (page 22). Over the 12 months that followed, Bob and his team assembled a plan that culminated in 300 brothers and guests descending on The Ohio State University campus this past April. The attendees enjoyed a variety of events that were designed with a simple elegance—to give brothers and guests a chance to ‘reunion,’ to celebrate the spirit of brotherhood, and to rejoice in their collective Ohio State and Gamma chapter experiences. The weekend was filled with excited chatter and bursts of rollicking laughter. The guests were a modern cast of a Shakespearean play. Seated in one corner, I noted a stately gent in a grey suit holding court among a I was reminded of the lyrics of an old camphandful of peers. This same scene was surely depicted with the same characters decades earlier where fire song, “Make new friends but keep the old, he undoubtedly challenged his fellow brethren “to one is silver and the other’s gold.” The simplicity thine own self be true.” On the other side of the room, I noticed a of that verse so aptly describes what Phi Kappa 40-something free spirit burst into the reception to the excited cries of long-lost friends, a bowler hat Tau can bring to life, and why reunions are so thrown rakishly over a sheepish smile. Undoubtedly this was the Puck in our mid-spring night’s dream. important to our fraternal mission. The crowd around him would spontaneously burst with laughter for the next two hours as he told tales of travel and adventure. Talking to Bob after the event, he felt a sense of awe considering the life experiences and history that was being captured at that moment. Through all of the frustrations of planning such an event—deadlines, budgets, communication—Bob and the committee had provided the attendees the great gift of joy that can only come from genuine, organic friendship. Having attended the Gamma Centennial as a guest, and then having attended our National Convention two months later (page 14), I was reminded of the lyrics of an old campfire song, “Make new friends but keep the old, one is silver and the other’s gold.” The simplicity of that verse so aptly describes what Phi Kappa Tau can bring to life, and why reunions are so important to our fraternal mission. If you’re planning a milestone chapter reunion this year or in the coming years, I encourage you to turn to page 20 and learn from those who have “been there, done that.” They’ll admit that it’s not an easy job, but that it sure is rewarding.

Steve Hartman, Muskingum ’89, is chief executive officer.

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

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News & Noteworthy 6

PHI TAU HOSTS LEADERSHIP ACADEMY 2012 This summer, Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity held its two annual Leadership Academy sessions—the first at Camp Rock Eagle in Eatonton, Ga., and the second at Pilgrim Pines in Yucaipa, Calif. Nearly 100 undergraduates participated in this year’s program. Leadership Academy is Phi Tau’s premier, individualized leadershipdevelopment event. The curriculum guides students to think critically about important issues facing individuals, chapters and the Fraternity, while preparing them to be ethical leaders on their campuses and in their chosen fields. “Leadership Academy is designed to help Phi Tau leaders focus on their strengths,” said Leadership Academy Dean Don Stansberry, Ohio ’87. “For many participants, Leadership Academy was their first Phi Tau event beyond their chapters. The curriculum allows the men to meet brothers from around the country and to learn from each other.” Participants uncovered their strengths and learned how to use them in leadership roles and created personal visions for their chapters. The men participated in a brother-to-brother session, challenge course and Phi Kappa Tau’s traditional Candlelight Ceremony. There was also free time scheduled into each day, allowing participants the time to play basketball, swim, play football or just relax with new friends. “Leadership Academy, to me, is a chance for brothers from all across the nation to come together and build bonds with one another, and also to develop our leadership skills and then take them back to our chapters to help the group develop and grow,” said William Erskine, Shepherd ’12. One Leadership Academy tradition is to recognize a brother at each session with the Cosgrove Spirit and Leadership Award. The award recognizes participants who most clearly demonstrate the spirit of Leadership Academy. Ryan Johnson, Purdue ’12, and Brandon Peterson, Nebraska

LEADERSHIP ACADEMY ATTENDEES PARTICIPATE IN THE CHALLENGE COURSE.

Wesleyan ’12, were each honored with the award. Overall, participants had the opportunity to develop themselves as Phi Taus, as men and as leaders. Stansberry said he is excited to continue to help Academy develop as a national program and to aid in the development of Phi Tau’s future legacy through the men that attend Academy. “Academy,” he said, “continues to be a great opportunity for Phi Taus to come together to become better leaders and better men.”

PHI KAPPA TAU UPDATES BRAND Since the beginning of 2011, Phi Kappa Tau has worked with Power Creative, an advertising and design firm in Louisville, Ky. (owned and managed by Phi Kappa Tau alumnus David Power, Louisville ’90), to refresh all aspects of its current brand. At the 60th National Convention in Nashville, Tenn., the official Phi Kappa Tau Style Guide and phase one of the branding process was unveiled. Notable updates include a modernized coat of arms; new “informal brand,” which includes the greek letters; new Foundation lockup, or logo; and the style guide, which specifies font and color use, among other things. “Consistency is key for good brand management,” said Communication Coordinator Lane S. Baldwin. “With so many constituents in and around Phi Kappa Tau, consistency will always be a challenge, but that doesn’t mean we shouldn’t equip members with the best possible resources to help them succeed. The Fraternity’s updated brand and style guide, which outlines how the new branded resources should be used, will give Phi Kappa Tau better brand recognition, increased success at every level, and an overall cohesive look and feel.”

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The style guide is intended to ensure that members, associate members, volunteers, and Executive Offices staff are able to appropriately and accurately represent the Fraternity through internal and external communications, both printed and electronic. A digital version of the style guide and downloadable brand elements can be found at www.phikappatau.org under “About PKT,” “The Phi Kappa Tau Brand.” If you have questions about Phi Kappa Tau’s brand, please contact communications@phikappatau.org.

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


FOUR PHI KAPPA TAU CHAPTERS CHARTER

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“This group has worked hard to fulfill the requirements to be installed as a chapter, but even more importantly, they are building a A GAMMA UNDERGRADUATE chapter that all Phi Tau alumni would be impressed with,” Reese said. SIGNS THE CHAPTER’S CHARTER. “These men took the worst possible situation—losing a charter—and used it to form a truly worthy brotherhood. They have each achieved something unique and worth celebrating.” GAMMA CHAPTER originally joined Phrenocon in 1912. More than 100 years after Phi Tau’s third chapter originally formed, the Fraternity celebrated the group’s re-chartering in June 2012. Expansion Coordinator Alex Koehler, Mount Union ’07, said the re-chartering was not only a major accomplishment for the new initiates, but the alumni as well. “For me, seeing the alumni who have put forth a tireless effort advising these men is unforgettable,” Koehler said. “Their reactions when the men signed the charter signified what Phi Kappa Tau is all about.” The signing of the charter may be the end of the Phi Kappa Tau celebrated the re-charcolonization process for the newly initiated brothers, tering of four chapters since last year. but their work isn’t over. National officers, undergraduates and “Our goal this year was to put ourselves in the alumni of the Fraternity attended the best position for the start of next year, which meant installation and chartering weekends for CEO STEVE HARTMAN, MUSKINGUM ’89, AND recruiting as many quality guys as possible,” said Past each colony. NATIONAL PRESIDENT STEVE NELSON, SOUTH- Colony President Sean Hicks, Ohio State ’12. “That DELTA CHI CHAPTER held its ERN MISSISSIPPI ’73, DISPLAY LAMBDA CHAP- was always our goal, and if we were able to charter, so chartering on Founders Day, March TER’S CHARTERS. be it. We did it, and it definitely was satisfying. But it 17, 2012. The Fraternity’s 118th is only the beginning of what we will be accomplishchapter, Delta Chi originally charing at Ohio State.” tered in 1985. LAMBDA CHAPTER grew from two to 39 men by the time it char“It is fitting that we celebrated Delta Chi’s chartering on Phi Kappa tered in August 2012. The Fraternity’s 11th chapter, Lambda originally Tau’s Founders Day,” said Past National President Greg Heilmeier, Beth- chartered in 1920. any ’86, who presided over the chatering. “On March 17 we remembered “Signing the charter for us all was a culmination of all of our hard the Fraternity’s founders and what they gave us. These men of Delta Chi work coming to fruition,” said Past Colony President James Douglas are founders too, and just like Shideler, Boyd, Borradaile and Douglass, “Nalu” Camanse, Purdue ’12. “It was an amazing opportunity that I they will give their chapter more than anyone can imagine.” will forever remember. The chartering document itself is a very special Nicholas Benjamin, Rochester ’12, said the most memorable part of piece of parchment for our chapter’s history. It gains that honor as it the chartering was the Candlelight Ceremony that closed the day. serves as a physical representation of the strong foundation that the “With it brought an overwhelming sense of pride and joy, to which men of Lambda have crafted over the past year. To share the lines with the ambiance only added,” he said. “Seeing current brothers and dis- these men, for me, was a very humbling experience.” tinguished alumni coming together in such a ceremony solidified all Topher Endress, Purdue ’12, said the initiation ceremony was the of the other events of the day. In a greater sense, we further realized start of a new chapter for the men. that we were not only becoming a chapter, but we were adding to a “Being in the last group to go through the Ritual, it was easy to see group that I can only describe as brothers.” a clear difference in excitement before and after we were done,” EndBETA MU CHAPTER initiated 34 new members in April 2012. ness said. “While my brothers were naturally very excited to see [us] The Fraternity’s 60th chapter, Beta Mu originally chartered in 1949. finally become brothers, there was also an implicit understanding that Beta Mu Founding Father Jim Heilmeier, Kent State ’49, attended now that all of us had taken care of the individualistic parts, we could, the weekend events and spoke at the charter-signing ceremony on be- as a group, finally charter. In this moment of palpable excitement, I half of the original founding group. He told the new initiates that he could clearly see how important chartering was to this group.” was proud of all their hard work and knew that the rest of the 1949 In the fall of 2012, the Fraternity chartered chapters at San Jose, chartering class would also be proud. Nebraska Wesleyan, Charleston and Texas-Austin. The next Laurel Alumni Advisor Rob Reese, Kent State ’87, said he is impressed will include a story about these events. with the undergraduates too. THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

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FOUNDATION SCHOLARSHIPS The Phi Kappa Tau Foundation awarded $26,500 in scholarships for the 2012-13 academic year. There was an increase in applications this year compared to the previous year. Scholarship recipients were carefully chosen based on their academic success, commitment to the ideals of Phi Kappa Tau, and service to their campus, community and Fraternity. Financial assistance is provided to qualifying students pursuing bachelor’s, master’s and doctorate degrees. “It really is an impressive group across the board in terms of excellence,” Scholarship Chairman Rick Harrison, Ohio ’79, said. “They are excelling in the classroom, excelling outside the classroom, participating in a myriad of community-service initiatives and providing leadership to their chapters and colonies. We definitely had to make some very difficult decisions based on the quality of the applicants.” Harrison said the scholarships are an import aspect of Phi Kappa Tau’s dedication to academics. “They can be used as a recruitment tool and as a way to let parents, faculty, colleges and universities know that we appreciate good scholarship and academics,” he said. “Too often greek organizations get labeled with taking grades down, and I think with the kind of quality we saw in the applicants, it is the exact opposite. The complete list of recipients of this year’s Foundation scholarships can be found at www.phikappatau.org and will be published in the 2012 Annual Report. LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

FOUNDATION BOARD ANNOUNCES TWO NEW TRUSTEES Phi Kappa Tau Foundation Chairman David Ruckman, Ohio State ’62, announces that the Foundation Board of Trustees elected Jeff Rivard, Central Michigan ’65, and Greg Heilmeier, Bethany ’86, as trustees. The election of Rivard and Heilmeier took place during the May 11 meeting in Louisville, Ky.

JEFF RIVARD, CENTRAL MICHIGAN ’65 EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA GOLF ASSOCIATION

GREG HEILMEIER, BETHANY ’86 OWNER, TASTY PURE FOOD CO.

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PHI KAPPA TAU REKINDLES ALUMNI CLUBS In accordance with the Phi Kappa Tau strategic plan, the Fraternity is currently revitalizing and re-launching its alumni club initiative with a more efficient structure that can be replicated in major alumni areas throughout the country. Alumni clubs are composed of graduate members from all chapters in a specific geographic area with a key alumnus or alumni to coordinate its activities. There are four main purposes that drive the inception of an alumni club: • Career networking or development • Social or leisure opportunities • Civic or philanthropic desires • Expansion support The goal of an alumni club is to create a number of events to attract members from all cross sections of interest. “Our mission calls for a lifelong commitment,” said Director of Development Tyler C. Wash, Georgetown ’06. “Membership does not end when you walk across the stage at graduation. An alumni club is a vehicle for alumni to connect in meaningful ways. The values of Phi, Kappa, and Tau remain true at every stage of life and it is important for the overall strength of this Fraternity for alumni to celebrate

MICHAEL LUMMUS JOINS THE HERITAGE SOCIETY Michael Lummus, Belmont ’06, the 2007 Shideler Award winner, has been loyal to not only his chapter, but also the National Fraternity. Along with serving as the Mississippi Valley Domain Director since spring 2009, he has attended and facilitated numerous Fraternity events and Men of Character Programs, such as Leadership Academy. Lummus has also served as the chairman of the Borradaile Challenge committee, and in addition to giving his time, he has donated to the Foundation since 2008. His Phi Kappa Tau résumé became even more impressive when he was introduced as the newest member of the Heritage Society at the Recognition Reception during the 60th National Convention in Nashville, Tenn. “I believe in what we are doing as an organization and wanted to be a part of moving that forward,” Lummus said. “On top of that, I have developed a lot of great relationships over the years with people I have interacted with at the national scale. My involvement with Phi Kappa Tau has helped me not only help others, but also maintain those relationships. So it is a fun thing too.” A bequest to Phi Kappa Tau may be made through a will or living trust in the form of cash, securities, real estate, or other property. You should specify that the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation is to receive a certain amount or percentage of your estate or particular assets, or the remainder of your estate after providing for heirs. Please contact foundation@phikappatau.org if we can assist you and your attorney or financial advisor in establishing a bequest for the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation.

their lifelong bonds of brotherhood.” If you are interested in starting an alumni club in your area, contact Development Coordinator Julia McMurray at jmcmurray@phikappatau.org.

SUPPORT THE LEADERS OF TOMORROW A gift to the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation supports national, regional, and chapter educational- and character-building programs; undergraduate and graduate academic scholarships; and philanthropic gifts and volunteer stipends for the Fraternity’s national philanthropy—SeriousFun Children’s Network. The Foundation depends on gifts of any size to move Phi Kappa Tau, and its members, forward. Give today by visiting: www.phikappatau.org/givenow The leaders of tomorrow are counting on you!

DELTA THETA BROTHERS FROM GEORGETOWN MINGLE DURING THE FOUNDATION-SPONSORED RECOGNITION RECEPTION AT CONVENTION. (FROM LEFT TO RIGHT) FOUNDATION TRUSTEE REZA HASHAMPOUR ‘80, DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT TYLER WASH ‘06, PROGRAMMING COORDINATOR DUSTIN BROWN ‘05, NATIONAL RECRUITMENT ADVISOR MIKE GABHART ‘95. THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

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Three Phi Taus are making a name for themselves, and they haven’t forgotten their Fraternity roots.

The Singer-Songwriter

Chad Warrix Singer-Songwriter Nashville,Tenn.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

Chad Warrix, Eastern Kentucky ’12, has been making music for as long as he can remember. The country singer, who recently started a solo gig after enjoying success as half of the duo Halfway to Hazard, believes you’ve got to follow your heart, and he strives to do just that with his music. His mantra was also the reason he decided to join Phi Kappa Tau as an initiate at the Fraternity’s 60th National Convention in Nashville. “I’d heard about Phi Kappa Tau for awhile because my manager Josh Bleidt (Eastern Kentucky ’96) has been involved since he joined. He would talk about the great things Phi Taus were involved in, and at Convention, I heard about those things—philanthropy, learning, leadership, community. These are things I believe in, and if I didn’t know before, I knew then that my values aligned with this Fraternity’s. As a father, a husband, a musician, a philanthropist, I try to apply all these things to my family and my work. Thank you for making me a part of your family, and thank you for including me in your work.”

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


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Rob Bironas Placekicker,Tennessee Titans Nashville,Tenn.

The Athlete Though Rob Bironas, Eastern Kentucky ’12, heard about Phi Kappa Tau in college, he was too focused on football to join a Fraternity. That focus paid off. Today, Bironas is known for his precision as a placekicker for the Tennessee Titans, a trait that came with much perseverance and hard work. And years later, that fraternity he’d heard about around the Auburn campus was still interested in recruiting him. At Phi Kappa Tau’s 60th National Convention in Nashville, Bironas joined Chad Warrix, Eastern Kentucky ’12, as an initiate. “Phi Tau does a lot of great things and has strong name recognition for the work it does in the community. That’s what originally drew me to the organization, because I do a lot of philanthropy with my own charity, the Bironas Fund. I didn’t really understand philanthropy when I first got into the league, but as I keep getting involved, I find more and more passion in helping others. Getting out and giving back to the community is a huge thing in my eyes because one autograph, one picture, one hour of my time is not a big deal to me, but it makes a big impact in the lives of those who really need it. Collectively, we can all make an even bigger difference.”

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

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The Entrepreneur After being unexpectedly laid off at the end of 2008, Shaun Walker, Southern Mississippi ’03, (left) and business partner Reid Stone founded HERO|farm, a marketing strategy and design agency. Having been named one of YFS Magazine’s Top 20 Young Entrepreneurs of 2011 and to a local publication’s 40-under-40 list, among other accolades, Walker and Reid really just have one goal: Do great work for good people. “It’s a simple philosophy, but one that we live by every day at HERO|farm. We’ve come to realize how beneficial advertising can be for the viewer when it is paired with clients who have good missions of their own. When you add value to a person’s everyday life, you do more than just sell a product; you create a lasting relationship of goodwill and a connection that goes far beyond sell-buy-consume. Our goal with HERO|farm is to help evolve advertising into something people don’t run from, but applaud. “Being a Phi Tau, I got to be a part of something bigger than myself and I try to incorporate that same mindset into everything I do, especially with HERO|farm. Through my experiences with the Fraternity, like fundraising for SeriousFun, I learned that in seeking happiness for others, I could easily find it for myself. What people genuinely remember most at the end of the day is how you made them feel, not how much money you have or how famous you are. If you’re not trying to change the world for the better or having some kind of positive impact on it, all you’re doing is taking up space. Phi Tau taught me the value of truly connecting with people, for which I am forever grateful.”

Shaun Walker, Southern Mississippi ’03 Creative Director, HERO|farm New Orleans, La.

Get in touch with Shaun via shaun@hero-farm.com or facebook.com/herofarm.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


The journey. Starting from the ground up. Helping to nurture continued growth. This is the unique experience of a founding father. 146 chapters in our history. More than 90,000 initiated members. It all began with an idea. Hopes. Dreams. Perseverance. Dedication. For the honored founders, reaching their goal was only the beginning. You can help us continue upward. Help create the future of Phi Kappa Tau by… …referring a potential founding father on a campus without an active chapter. …referring a potential member to an existing chapter. …volunteering to help coordinate an expansion.

Find out more at www.phikappatau.org/createthefuture

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ore than 400 undergraduates, alumni and friends of Phi Tau traveled from across the country to attend the Fraternity’s 60th National Convention July 25-29, 2012, at the Hilton Downtown in Nashville, Tenn. Attendees spent the week in brotherhood, moving the Fraternity forward. Business on the Convention floor included electing national officers, determining National Constitution and Statutes changes, and making recommendations on the policies and operation of the Fraternity. Phi Kappa Tau also unveiled new programs, including a revitalized alumni club program and a brand restructuring (see The following members were elected to, page 6). or changed positions on, the National Other Convention activities Council: included a Recognition • Steve Nelson, Southern Mississippi ’73, National President Reception at the Hard Rock • Rick Keltner, Sacramento State ’76, Café, a service project at a National Vice President community garden, and alumni • Bill Brasch, Louisville ’67 excursions to the Country Music • Tom Skena, Bethany ’81 Hall of Fame and other local attractions. The following members completed Downloadable Convention their National Council term: pictures are available under • Greg Heilmeier, Bethany ’86 “Programs,” “National • Wes Fugate, Centre ’99 Convention” on the national • Ken Loewen, Colorado ’81 website. The following members were elected to Convention videos, the Undergraduate Advisory Board: including the full Brotherhood • Jamison Heard, Evansville ’12 Banquet, can be viewed on • Ken Johnson, Georgia ’11 the Phi Kappa Tau’s YouTube • Nathan Shuler, Centre ’12 channel at youtube.com/ • Ryan Bruchey, Belmont ’10 phikappatauhq. • Trevor Sullivan, Chapman ’09

FRATERNITY ELECTS NEW OFFICERS

The following members completed their Undergraduate Advisory Board term: • Steven Binzel, Case Western ’08 • Mike Disotell, Westminster ’08 • Phil Frandina, RIT ’08 • Jason Lustig, Cornell ’08 • Matt Marone, Florida State ’08 • Trey Pippin, Louisville ’09

Learning. Leading. Serving.

FOUNDATION ACTIVE AT CONVENTION

This year, the Phi Kappa Tau Foundation played a big role in the Fraternity’s National Convention. Along with having a Foundation information booth set up outside the Convention floor, the Foundation sponsored the Recognition Reception at the Hard Rock Café, hosted the Foundation Donor Reception at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center prior to the Brotherhood Banquet and ran a silent auction. “The Fraternity and the Foundation have always enjoyed a wonderful partnership,” said Foundation Director of Development Tyler C. Wash, Georgetown ’06. “The stronger the Foundation is, the stronger the Fraternity is, and vice versa. It was great to see the Foundation play a more visible part in the 60th National Convention. A majority of the members of the Foundation Board of Trustees were present and a lot of interest was driven by the Foundation booth and the interaction that members had with trustees and staff.” The silent auction, which was held from July 25-28, featured past Convention memorabilia, a custom guitar with a 60th National Convention design, and various autographed sports and music memorabilia donated by National Councilor Josh Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ’96. “This was the first year for a silent auction at Convention and it could not have gone better,” said Foundation Development Coordinator Julia McMurray. “We were able to generate nearly $2,000 for the Foundation from this auction alone, which will go a long way in supporting the leaders for tomorrow.” Beyond the silent auction, Bleidt had another fundraising idea: offering a limited number of commemorative footballs with the Convention logo, which were signed by Tennessee Titans placekicker Rob Bironas, Eastern Kentucky ’12. The Foundation raised an additional $2,500 from the footballs that also benefited The Bironas Foundation, which is a children’s charity. McMurray, the Foundation staff’s newest addition, said she was impressed with how passionate Phi Tau alumni are. “Phi Tau has a lot of dedicated, creative and hardworking alumni,” McMurray said. “They are truly passionate about getting back to the roots of Phi Tau and what this Fraternity stands for. They know that Phi Tau shouldn’t have to end after four undergraduate years. They want to keep this legacy and tradition alive, and I cannot wait to help them with that.”

“I PLEDGE TO YOU TO CONTINUE TO STEER DOWN THE NARROW PATH THAT LIES AHEAD, AND AS YOUR PRESIDENT, I WILL CONTINUE TO STEER THE SHIP ON THE PATH LAID OUT FOR US BY OUR STRATEGIC PLAN,” —STEVE NELSON, SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI ’73 THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


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SIX ALUMNI JOIN HALL OF FAME

Phi Kappa Tau inducted six alumni who are distinguished in their fields of endeavor into the Hall of Fame at the National Convention’s Brotherhood Banquet. This ever-growing program demonstrates the dedication of distinctive Phi Tau professionals and stewards. The newest inductees are: • Ken Buzbee, Southern Illinois ’56, retired lieutenant colonel in the United States Marine Corps and a former Illinois state senator • Joe Goulden, Texas-Austin ’53, award-winning journalist and best-selling author • Larry Huang, Georgia Tech ’70, CEO of Unique Square—an e-commerce retailer that focuses on selling music equipment • Dan Metzler, Georgia Tech ’69, architect, homebuilder and founder of Dan Metzler Homes • James Poss, Southern Mississippi ’80, major general in the United States Air Force • Mike Power, Louisville ’62, entrepreneur and founder of Power Creative— an advertising agency Buzbee, who was the only inductee able to attend Convention, said it was an “incredible honor and privilege” to be installed. “When you look at the varied alumni that [Phi Kappa Tau] has inducted [into the Hall of Fame], to be in the same company with Paul Newman and people of that magnitude … my goodness, what a great honor,” Buzbee said.

FRATERNITY INITIATES FOUR MEN

Phi Kappa Tau Fraternity initiated four exemplary men during the 60th National Convention in Nashville, Tenn. The newest honorary initiates are Rob Bironas, Eastern Kentucky ’12, Andy Dulman, Southern California ’12, Chad Warrix, Eastern Kentucky ’12, and Ben Williamson, Eastern Kentucky ’12. All four were recommended for initiation because they independently embodied the Fraternity’s values and expressed a desire to become a part of the strong brotherhood. Both Bironas, the Tennessee Titans placekicker, and Warrix, a recording artist, became interested in membership after talking with their manager, National Councilor Josh Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ’96, about his experience and the Fraternity’s purpose. “I have been able to spend a lot of time with each, understanding their views on life, happiness, philanthropy, loyalty and friendship amongst others,” Bleidt said. “I look at the long-term fraternal relationships I have with many of my brothers and I feel the same about these guys. On top of that, add their drive to help others, raise money for significant causes, and do whatever they can to better their communities, I felt it only lacked the initiation process. “ Dulman, a film student, was introduced to the Fraternity by Regional Conferences Dean Ray Carlos, Cal State-Fullerton ’01, when he began seeking advice to better his professional cinema fraternity. Carlos said that it was in the men’s weekly meetings that Dulman’s character became apparent. “Here is a member of a professional fraternity who is utilizing our THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

resources to progress his own fraternity toward greatness and in the process, fell in love with Phi Kappa Tau,” Carlos wrote in a letter to the National Council. “Andy is a work horse. He is a visionary. He is an entrepreneur. He is all things that we look for as qualities of a member in Phi Kappa Tau.” Williamson, a registered nurse, has developed relationships with brothers while playing the drums for Atomic Solace. Kyle Moon, Eastern Kentucky ’04, said the band had performed at numerous Phi Tau events, including Delta Rho homecoming festivities and various stops on a 2010 tour. “As members of the same band, I have been able to repeatedly witness Mr. Williamson displaying the selfless character of which we were founded upon,” wrote Moon in a letter to the National Council. “He has always possessed many leadership qualities and has never been hesitant to take on responsibilities to ensure the success of a particular endeavor.” All four men began their Phi Tau experience with active roles at the Convention. Bironas and Warrix signed memorabilia that was part of a silent auction, which raised money for the Foundation. Dulman assisted communications staff with video interviews. Atomic Solace performed at the Foundation-sponsored Recognition Reception and Phi Tau concert, and Warrix also performed several of his songs at the Brotherhood Banquet. LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


16 16 EPSILON SIGMA WINS MAXWELL TROPHY The Epsilon Sigma chapter brothers were anxious at Phi Kappa Tau’s 60th National Convention, and rightfully so. The men made the trip from Orange, Calif., to Nashville, Tenn., to represent their brotherhood and present for the Maxwell Trophy, awarded to the most outstanding chapter in the nation. “We freaked out when we heard our chapter called,” said Chapter President Adam Monson, Chapman ’09. “We ran up on stage and we were just trembling with excitement. For the rest of the ceremony we all were switching from looking at the person on stage and staring at this trophy in the middle of our table to make sure it was actually there.” The chapter had just received one of the Fraternity’s highest honors. “The thing we felt going into it and coming out of it is that we are so grateful and honored to be named the No. 1 chapter, because there are tons of chapters that are doing things on incredible levels that [make us aspire to be better],” Monson said. Amid the numerous “congratulations” spread across every imaginable communication platform, there were also reminders. “There was a flood of excitement, but there was a good amount of people bringing us back down and reminding us that this didn’t just happen because we are a fun-loving group of goofy guys, but that we worked our tails off and we have to keep doing that,” Monson said. What resulted in the Chapman representatives being called up to the Schermerhorn Symphony Center stage had started years earlier. Facing an uncertain future, the chapter turned to recruitment as the necessary answer to its problems. “I think a huge part of it is that when my class came in—fall of 2009— we were essentially the new breath of the chapter,” Monson said. “When we got in, we were half the house. We had a huge influx of leaders.” Those new leaders helped change the chapter’s culture. “The influx of new members brought a completely new dynamic to the chapter, with brothers getting involved in leadership positions early on and becoming invested in the chapter, leading them to take on greater roles later,” said Past Chapter President Trevor Sullivan, Chapman ’09. “This new attitude that the new leadership brought was all about analyzing our chapter, in the sense that we wanted to keep what was working, and improve what was holding back our potential. The recruitment focus didn’t stop in 2009. Though instead of survival, it was for progress.

“We kept recruiting better and better guys, high-quality leaders and really outstanding gentlemen,” Monson said. “That helped us with recognition on campus and people knowing who Phi Taus were, which helped us get better social standing, more participation in our philanthropy events and enabled us to participate in other philanthropy events because we had the manpower to do so. There was a real unified vision that we had a lot more potential than what we were fulfilling. So we really pushed to see that potential the last three years.” It was a total group effort from the chapter that allowed it to grow. “Our members were ambitious, excited and completely supportive of our goal to reach Maxwell-level status, and that constant encouragement and desire to contribute to that accomplishment helped our chapter to succeed,” Sullivan said. “We all wanted to volunteer more, raise more money, and better ourselves not because we wanted to check off boxes on the Borradaile Challenge, but because as a chapter, we believed that the things we were doing really were for the betterment of the chapter, the community and ourselves.”

EPSILON SIGMA BOG MEMBERS:

Mark Horiuchi, Chapman ’98, BOG Chairman • Tristan Hilpert, Cal State-Fullerton ’03, Chapter Advisor Joe Meyer, Cal State-Fullerton ’03, Alumni Advisor • Andrew Kemp, Chapman ’08, Member-at-Large Clint Kehr, Chapman ’02, Risk Management Advisor

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


Phi Kappa Tau thanks Michael Lummus, Belmont ‘06, and Gabriel Mudd, Belmont ‘06, for their tireless efforts in creating a memorable 60th National Convention. Thank you, also, to the other host committee members:

BEN DONLON WINS SHIDELER AWARD Ben Donlon, Louisville ’09, didn’t know what to expect going into recruitment. “I knew absolutely nothing about Phi Tau coming out of high school,” Donlon said. “I really didn’t know much about greek life at all. I played a lot of sports in high school, so when I came into college I hadn’t had many leadership roles and hadn’t been exposed at all to greek life. “I didn’t even think I would go greek. Honestly, I just went through it because my RA was greek and he said the worst thing I was going to come out of it with was free food.” Initially enticed by food, Donlon found much more that he liked than just a couple of free meals. “Whenever I came to Phi Tau it was very diverse and very open,” Donlon said. “After seeing it and seeing the potential benefits not only for my college career, but for the rest of my life, I definitely felt like Phi Tau at Louisville was the best fit at that point.” Awards Committee Chairman Les Fugate, Centre ’99, said Donlon had immense potential from the beginning. “He is one of those guys that when he first got into the chapter, you could tell he wanted to go to another level, personally and with the chapter,” Fugate said. “You look at someone like him and you know there is potential, but you never know if they will reach it. There were two or three people in the class that I knew had the potential to be really big, and he happened to be the guy to step up.” Donlon went on to be the chapter’s scholarship chairman, special events chairman, community service chairman and treasurer. Along with his Phi Tau commitments, he was active with campus organizations such as Men of P.E.A.C.C., Student Activities Board, student government and Interfraternity Council. One of his greatest individual accomplishments during his undergraduate career was the completion of more than 1,000 community service hours. “Ben has gone from quiet freshman to influential leader,” said Past Chapter President Tyler Chesser, Louisville ’08. “Once he got his feet underneath himself, which didn’t take long, he began to find ways to use his strengths. He decided that he wanted to touch as many different groups on campus as possible and through that, he has built relationships for life. He has also strengthened several organizations that will reap the benefits for the foreseeable future.” Donlon was nominated for one of the Fraternity’s most prestigious awards during one of the most competitive years. “It was an extensive pool and probably one of the largest candidate pools we have had for the Shideler in a long time,” Fugate said.” The committee was very pleased with not only the sheer number of applicants but also the quality of applicants this year, and sometimes that doesn’t happen.” It was Donlon’s involvement that made him stand out. “We want Phi Taus to be more than just leaders from within the Fraternity,” Fugate said. “We can find a lot of great individual Phi Tau leaders, but the Shideler has to go above and beyond.” Donlon was presented the Shideler Award on stage during the 60th National Convention’s Brotherhood Banquet at the Schermerhorn Symphony Center. Although an individual award, he said he couldn’t have won it without support. “I definitely couldn’t have done it without the guys in Beta Beta and people at the national level,” Donlon said. “All of them really contributed to my fraternal experience and letting me know that there was something bigger I could do. I am extremely honored and proud to be able to say I’m a Shideler winner. And I will hopefully use that to inspire others through my story to build up Phi Tau.” THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

• • • • • • • • • •

Chase Armstrong, Belmont ‘08 Josh Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ‘96 Matthew Carrier, Belmont ‘06 Andy Cole, Belmont ‘11 Nathan Dudney, Ole Miss ‘04 Tim Holman, Georgia Tech ‘77 David Kells, Evansville ‘94 Evan Moore, Belmont ‘10 John Richardson, Tennessee ‘97 Peter Streiff, Belmont ‘06

THREE ALUMNI RECEIVE PALM AWARD Phi Kappa Tau recognized three of its most dedicated alumni with the Palm Award at the 60th National Convention Brotherhood Banquet July 28 in Nashville, Tenn. One of the Fraternity’s most prominent awards, it is presented to alumni, after a nomination and vote of the National Council, who have shown exemplary service and dedication to the national organization. The newest honorees are: • William Braund, Westminster ’54 • Jim Heilmeier, Kent State ’49 • Jay McCann, Spring Hill ’74 (posthumous) Foundation Distinguished Trustee Braund has been loyal to the Fraternity since his initiation. Since December 2009, he has been the Beta Phi House Corporation president. He also served as the House Corporation treasurer, Beta Phi alumni advisor and scholarship advisor, Foundation trustee, and national committee member. Foundation Distinguished Trustee Heilmeier has served as National Councilor and Domain Director, as well as on the Foundation board. At the Brotherhood Banquet, he thanked the organization for the award and challenged undergraduates with a call to action when he accepted the award on stage. “It has been a privilege to serve my chapter and chapters I was Domain Director for,” Heilmeier said. “I would like to ask all undergraduates that are here in attendance, don’t give up once you graduate. Your Fraternity is looking for men that will serve the Fraternity and their chapter, along with other chapters.” The final Palm Award was presented in memorium to Past National President McCann (see page 25). His Phi Tau legacy is one of incredible loyalty. He served the organization in almost every capacity: National President, Foundation trustee, National Councilor, Domain Director, chapter volunteer and committee member. McCann’s mother, Emily, accepted the award on behalf of her son. “I know Jay would appreciate this award,” Mrs. McCann said when she accepted the award. “My family is deeply appreciative of this award and I can see why Jay loved his Phi Kappa Tau. He loved every one of you.” LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

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2012 AWARD

WINNERS BASED ON THE 2011 CALENDAR YEAR

The Phi Kappa Tau Awards Committee announced the recipients of the 2012 awards during the Fraternity’s 60th National Convention in Nashville, Tenn. Chairman Les Fugate, Centre ’99, oversaw the presentation ceremonies, which were held during the SeriousFun Children’s Network Dinner on July 26, Foundation-sponsored Recognition Reception on July 27 and Brotherhood Banquet on July 28. Previously, all awards were given based on chapter performance in the metrics of the Borradaile Challenge over the academic year. Beginning last year, the National Council voted to alter the Borradaile Challenge reporting calendar to align with the calendar year and the terms of chapter officers. Thus, all awards are now based on the 2011 calendar year.

ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE

Presented to those chapters and colonies that exhibit an outstanding record of academic achievement. The chapter or colony must be 0.1 above the all-men’s average GPA. Epsilon, Mount Union; Eta, Muhlenberg; Mu, Lawrence; Nu, UC Berkley; Alpha Delta, Case Western; Alpha Tau, Cornell; Alpha Omega, Baldwin-Wallace; Beta Beta, Louisville; Beta Iota, Florida State; Beta Mu, Kent State; Beta Omicron, Maryland; Gamma Beta, Cincinnati; Gamma Mu, Bradley; Delta Tau, Cal Poly-Ponoma; Delta Omega, Truman State; Epsilon Gamma, College of New Jersey; Epsilon Kappa, Rutgers, Epsilon Mu, UNC-Pembroke; Epsilon Sigma, Chapman; Zeta Alpha, Belmont

ADMINISTRATIVE EXCELLENCE

Presented to those chapters and colonies that exhibit an outstanding record of compliance with administrative reporting. The chapter or colony must file 100 percent of required reports, 90 percent on time. Delta, Centre; Epsilon, Mount Union;

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

Eta, Muhlenberg; Theta, Transylvania; Phi, Bethany; Alpha Delta, Case Western; Alpha Kappa, Washington State; Alpha Tau, Cornell; Alpha Phi, Akron; Alpha Omega, Baldwin-Wallace; Beta Beta, Louisville; Beta Epsilon, Southern Mississippi; Gamma Alpha, Michigan Tech; Gamma Beta, Cincinnati; Gamma Omicron, Cal-StateFullerton; Gamma Tau, Old Dominion; Delta Theta, Georgetown; Delta Tau, Cal Poly-Ponoma; Epsilon Mu, UNC-Pembroke; Epsilon Sigma, Chapman

JACK L. ANSON UNDERGRADUATE AWARD

Presented to an undergraduate for outstanding interfraternal service. Rohullah Latif, Cal State-Fullerton ’11

BOARD OF GOVERNORS AWARD

Presented to up to three BOGs for outstanding contribution to their chapters. Epsilon Delta, Virginia Wesleyan

BORRADAILE UNDERGRADUATE AWARD

Presented to the undergraduate who, by his actions, has shown leadership and a true understanding of brotherhood. Kenneth Babcock, Cornell ’10

CLINTON D. BOYD VICE PRESIDENT OF ALUMNI RELATIONS AWARD

Presented to the undergraduate who implements the best alumni relations program. Corey Geer, Cal Poly-Pomona ’10

DR. EDGAR EWING BRANDON AWARD

Presented to a chapter advisor who has shown outstanding service to the Fraternity. Brian Smith, Cal Poly-Pomona ’91

COMMUNITY SERVICE AWARD

Presented to the chapters and colonies that accumulate the most hours per man, as well as the most cumulative chapter hours. Each of these groups averaged more than 20 hours of community service per member—earning them Maxwell status. Delta, Centre; Epsilon, Mount Union; Eta, Muhlenberg; Phi, Bethany; Alpha Rho, Georgia Tech, Alpha Tau, Cornell;

Alpha Omega, Baldwin-Wallace; Beta Iota, Florida State; Beta Xi, Georgia; Beta Phi, Westminster; Beta Chi, Southern Illinois; Delta Lambda, Muskingum; Delta Tau, Cal Poly-Pomona; Epsilon Tau, Arizona HOURS PER MAN Epsilon, Mount Union—91 hours TOTAL HOURS Beta Iota, Florida State—3,432 hours

DWIGHT I. DOUGLASS PRESIDENT’S AWARD

Presented to up to three chapter presidents who demonstrates general administrative excellence. Matthew Ferns, Cal Poly-Pomona ’09

FREDERICK R. FLETEMEYER PRIZE

Presented to the Fraternity’s most outstanding colony. Lambda colony, Purdue

GREG HOLLEN COLONY PRESIDENT AWARD

Presented to the colony president who demonstrates general administrative excellence. Brendon Vickery, Texas-Austin AM

JACK JAREO AWARD

Presented in recognition of the most outstanding alumni-produced newsletters and alumni programming. Gamma Lambda, Central Michigan

WILLIAM D. JENKINS INTERFRATERNITY EXCELLENCE AWARD

Presented to a non-member undergraduate for outstanding contribution to the greek community. Brett Haider, Tau Kappa Epsilon (nominated by Delta Epsilon chapter at St. Cloud)

RICHARD MASSOCK AWARD

Presented to the chapter with the most outstanding chapter-produced newsletters and alumni programming. Gamma Omicron, Cal State-Fullerton

THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


National Councilor Josh Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ’96, presents the Outstanding Advisor to a Chapter Award to Tristan Hilpert, Cal State-Fullerton ’03.

ROLAND MAXWELL SCROLLS

Presented to those chapters that meet Maxwell expectations within the Borradaile Challenge. Delta, Centre; Epsilon, Mount Union; Alpha Tau, Cornell; Alpha Omega, BaldwinWallace; Beta Beta, Louisville; Gamma Omicron, Cal State-Fullerton; Gamma Tau, Old Dominion; Delta Tau, Cal PolyPomona; Epsilon Sigma, Chapman

ROLAND MAXWELL FOUNDERS FOUR PLAQUES

OUTSTANDING ADVISOR TO A CHAPTER AWARD

Presented to the most outstanding chapter advisor who has served in the role for a minimum of two years. Tristan Hilpert, Cal State-Fullerton ’03

OUTSTANDING ADVISOR TO A COLONY AWARD

Presented to the most outstanding colony advisor. Warren Mattox, Nebraska Wesleyan ’69 Larry Sabourin, Michigan Tech ’60

Presented to those chapters that meet Maxwell expectations within the Borradaile Challenge and are selected to present for the Roland Maxwell Trophy as the Founders Four. Epsilon, Mount Union; Alpha Omega, Baldwin-Wallace; Beta Beta, Louisville; Epsilon Sigma, Chapman

OUTSTANDING GREEK ADVISOR AWARD

ROLAND MAXWELL TROPHY

PALM AWARD

Presented to the most outstanding chapter in the Fraternity. Epsilon Sigma, Chapman

MONROE MOOSNICK SCHOLARSHIP TROPHY

Presented to the chapter that has the highest cumulative GPA. Alpha Tau, Cornell—3.49 GPA Mu, Lawrence—3.44 GPA Eta, Muhlenberg—3.22 GPA

PAUL NEWMAN AWARD

Presented to the chapter that raises the highest dollar amount to benefit SeriousFun Children’s Network. Beta Beta, Louisville

ORDER OF THE STAR CHAPTERS

Presented to those chapters that meet Order of the Star expectations within the Borradaile Challenge. Eta, Muhlenberg; Theta, Transylvania; Alpha Delta, Case Western, Alpha Kappa, Washington State; Alpha Pi, Washington; Delta Theta, Georgetown; Epsilon Mu, UNC-Pembroke; Zeta Beta, Saginaw Valley State THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

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Past National President Greg Hollen, Maryland ’75, presents the Greg Hollen Colony President Award to Brendon Vickery, TexasAustin AM.

Presented to a greek advisor in recognition of their tremendous contribution to our Fraternity and their respective greek community. David Conner, advisor to Epsilon Gamma chapter at College of New Jersey Presented to alumni who show outstanding service to the national organization. William Braund, Westminster ’54 Jim Heilmeier, Kent State ’49 Jay McCann, Spring Hill ’74 (posthumous)

PHILANTHROPY/SERIOUSFUN CHILDREN’S NETWORK CAMP CERTIFICATES

Presented to those chapters that raise funds to assist both local philanthropic causes and SeriousFun Children’s Network, Phi Kappa Tau’s national philanthropy. The following is in order of amount donated ($2,000 minimum). Delta Lambda, Muskingum ($15,000); Gamma Omicron, Cal State-Fullerton ($14,850); Delta, Centre ($14,371); Beta Iota, Florida State ($10,300); Beta Beta, Louisville ($9,640); Eta, Muhlenberg ($7,120); Delta Tau, Cal Poly-Ponoma ($5,157.88); Gamma Tau, Old Dominion ($4,545); Alpha Tau, Cornell ($4,413); Epsilon, Mount Union ($3,124); Beta, Ohio ($3,105); Epsilon Mu, UNC Pembroke ($2,575); Alpha Eta, Florida ($2,555); Alpha Delta, Case Western ($2,393.05); Beta Mu, Kent State ($2,335); Epsilon Gamma, College of New Jersey ($2,130); Delta Beta, Evansville ($2,000); Delta Theta, Georgetown ($2,000)

Chief Learning Officer Wes Fugate, Centre ’99, presents the Monroe Moosnick Scholarship Trophy to Alpha Tau chapter at Cornell (UAB member Manuel DavilaMolina, Cornell ’09, accepts the award).

RECRUITMENT PACESETTER AWARD

Presented to those chapters that set the pace for the largest recruitment classes in the country. The following chapters recruited and initiated at least 15 men with a 100 percent retention rate or more than 20 men with at least 75 percent retention rate. Beta Omega, Cal State-Chico (15 of 15); Epsilon, Mount Union (16 of 16); Gamma Tau, Old Dominion (18 of 18); Beta Xi, Georgia (20 of 20); Eta, Muhlenberg (20 of 21); Gamma Mu, Bradley (23 of 23); Beta Chi, Southern Illinois (20 of 24); Epsilon Gamma, College of New Jersey (22 of 24); Alpha Tau, Cornell (24 of 24); Delta, Centre (25 of 27); Omicron, Penn State (26 of 27); Alpha, Miami (27 of 27); Epsilon Nu, Clemson (25 of 28); Alpha Eta, Florida (27 of 28); Epsilon Sigma, Chapman (27 of 28)

SONNY STRANGE RECRUITMENT PLAQUE

Presented to the chapter that initiated the most brothers, maintaining more than 75 percent retention. Beta Iota, Florida State

WILLIAM H. SHIDELER AWARD

Presented to the most outstanding graduating senior in Phi Kappa Tau, this is the Fraternity’s highest undergraduate honor. Ben Donlon, Louisville ’09

THOMAS L. STENNIS II AWARD

Presented to the Domain Director with the most outstanding domain program. Michael Lummus, Belmont ’06

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


20

So

H OW TO H OST

A SUCCESSFUL, M I L ESTO N E

CHAPTER EVENT

The banner on Eta’s new website proclaims our chapter was founded in 1914. It wasn’t until we looked at the banner about a thousand times that it hit us: we have a pretty big birthday coming up. In less than two years’ time, we turn 100 years old. Yikes. Eta chapter, to the knowledge of anyone I have spoken to, has never held a major reunion. Luckily, there is some experience in Phi Kappa Tau. As a first step in our planning process, I called four chapters to talk about their milestone reunions and learn from their experiences: Beta chapter at Ohio (100th anniversary, 2011), Gamma chapter at Ohio State (100th, 2012), Alpha Tau chapter at Cornell (75th, 2004), and Beta Beta chapter at Louisville (50th, 1998). I also attended Delta Omega chapter’s 25th anniversary (Truman State) and I talked to a Sigma Phi Epsilon member planning a 75th anniversary at Muhlenberg for next year. Since we’ll have more Centennial Celebrations in the years to come, and I know Eta chapter can’t be the only chapter looking for advice, I put together a guide on how to pull off a successful milestone reunion. Here’s what I learned:

IT’S ABOUT THEIR FRIENDS

I asked each person the same question: What was the most successful thing that drove attendance at your event? The an-

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

BY B Y JEFF BAIRD, MUHLENBERG ’01

swers all hit on the same theme: members want to see their friends. National Councilor Bill Brasch, Louisville ’67, planned his chapter’s epic 50th reunion in 1998 with a total attendance of 850 people. “They’re not coming to see the house; they’re not coming to see the undergrads; they’re not coming to see Jeff Baird,” he said, needling me. “It’s all about friendships. That’s what people care about.” He makes a good point. The first thing I thought about was what events we might plan. But the more important focus early on is to develop a recruitment strategy. Most people I talked to started by merging roster information from the Executive Offices with data from the university’s alumni office, and then attacking the list by cohort. “Take a felt-tip pen and a straight edge and draw a line through each pledge class,” Brasch said. “Then go through every group and find one guy in each subset to see if he can contact the others in his group.” In addition, Brasch called and asked each member to attend. “I made a personal commitment to myself that I would call three members each day” and ask them to come, he said. He also wouldn’t take “no” for an answer. Many members said that the reunion plans were nice, but it had been too long and they had lost contact with most of their friends. Brasch took this as a challenge. “Hypothetically,” he would tell a dissenting alumnus, “if you were to come, who would you want to see there?” He would then offer to call whomever the member named. If that wasn’t enough, Brasch would mail the alumnus the hard copy roster, showing the member’s contemporaries who were already signed up.

START EARLY

Beta and Gamma chapters both started planning their reunions about two years ahead of time. Brasch started planning Beta Beta chapter’s five years ahead of time, but the first two years were spent planting the seed that a big event was coming. Beta chapter sent its first “save the date” about one year out, though it had been in the planning stage for about a year before that. Alpha Tau chapter started one year in advance and relied on postcard mailings, a trifold brochure, and a phone bank. A word of caution from Brasch: “Twitter and Facebook just don’t work for older folks. If someone’s over 45, you’d better send him a piece of hard mail.”

ASSEMBLE A COMMITTEE

Brian Breitholtz, Ohio ’83, who chaired Beta chapter’s Centennial, said his first objective was to assemble a committee and break down the roles of each member. He had committees focused on: • • • • • • •

Recruitment Promotion via social media Accommodations Ritual Final banquet Registration Commemoration (which gathered pictures, videos and memorabilia for display)

Beta chapter’s committee was comprised of about 20 members, with 10 taking more active roles. The group relied on many who lived in Ohio, but also others who were more remote. About 300 members attended Beta’s Centennial. Bob Mintz, Ohio State ’71, who chaired Gamma chapter’s Centennial, lives in New THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


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Jersey, a day’s drive from Columbus, Ohio, where Ohio State is located. He was able to lead the effort remotely, but relied on several members who were close to campus, including a few who worked in the alumni office. He said the important thing to ask about volunteers for a committee is, “What’s their genius and how can they bring it to you? “On our committee, everyone came together in their own way and brought their own genius to the process,” Mintz said. “I knew one person on the committee before the committee was formed, but within 15 minutes of our first meeting in Columbus, it was like we had all been in the chapter together. We were very different demographics, but you had to respect each other’s individual experience and not just extrapolate from your own.”

PLAN A VARIED SCHEDULE

As for the event itself, most reunions last for a long weekend, with some events on a Friday afternoon and evening and extending into Sunday morning. Beta Beta chapter scheduled their reunion for a homecoming weekend so that other college activities would already be planned, allowing alumni the chance to partake in varied events. Alpha Tau chapter took advantage of its chapter traditions and geography to have a lake cruise and a mud slide. Delta Omega chapter included a golf outing, barbeque at the house, evening banquet, and even a wine tasting. Other popular features include private campus tours, a model initiation and “mini-reunions,” where different age groups plan their own get-togethers at different venues throughout the weekend. (Eta chapter has a few standing reunions among cohorts, and we will try to wrap them all into the CenTHE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

LET THE EXECUTIVE OFFICES HELP!* Contact Development Coordinator Julia McMurray at jmcmurray@phikappatau.org for: • Contact lists • 25-, 50- and 75-year certificates and pins Contact Multimedia Associate Marty Dunning, Kentucky ’07, at mdunning@phikappatau.org for help publicizing your event via: • Phi Tau’s national event calendar at phikappatau.org • Social media *A full chapter reunion planning guide will be published at the beginning of 2013. Contact McMurray in the new year for a copy of the guide.

tennial Celebration in 2014.) Many reunions included a final banquet-style dinner, a few presentations, brief remarks from the university and national Phi Kappa Tau officials, and the Fraternity’s popular Candlelight Ceremony. At the same time, this is your chapter’s reunion, so feel free to think outside the box. Gamma chapter did not plan a banquet—which meant no speeches, Mintz was quick to point out—but instead made the Ohio State spring game the centerpiece of the weekend. When I raised the point that every Ohio State football game is probably a mini Gamma chapter reunion, Mintz agreed only somewhat. Many Phi Taus are used to returning for Buckeye football games—the spring game was a “safe weekend” for a reunion, Mintz said—but the pledge class of 1946, whose members are almost 90, returned to campus for the first time in a long time. And they weren’t alone. Many others of the 450 attendees were on campus for the first time in decades. For that reason, Bob wanted to make the weekend worth it with a variety of events. He also made sure to have a relaxing opening to the weekend to set

the right tone, knowing some might be worried about whether they’d know anyone or whether they’d have fun. The most formal anyone dressed was “resort casual” and that worked well for Gamma chapter. And finally, Breittholz emphasized the importance of budgeting properly and making sure all costs are accounted for so you can host the events you want. However, he cautioned not to undercut the costs: “Don’t be cheap.” My sense from talking to everyone was that it’s important to produce a high-quality, well-run event. But the most important thing is not to produce a spectacular event. Let old friendships redevelop. Most of us didn’t join Phi Kappa Tau for the parties or events anyway; we joined for the people. So now the hardest part of Eta chapter’s planning begins: laying the groundwork for our recruitment next year by taking out our felt-tip pen and calling individual members. Brasch had a final word of encouragement: one part of this exercise would not be difficult. “Who will be the easiest guys to get there?” Brasch asked at the end of our conversation. Then, not waiting for me to answer, he told me: “The older guys. They know life is short.” LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


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GA M M A CELEBRATES 100 YEARS SEVEN DECADES OF GAMMA chapter brothers came together in April for the Centennial Celebration of Phi Kappa Tau at The Ohio State University. Remembering the past and celebrating the future was especially poignant for the men as the then-colony was gearing up to re-charter just a few weeks later. “The fact that [the Centennial] was occurring while the re-colonization process was taking place gave us renewed commitment to make [Centennial] great,” said Centennial Chairman Bob Mintz, Ohio State ’71. “These guys were killing themselves trying to make a [chapter], so this for many of them was their first taste of what fraternity life could be and they were, I think, really amazed.” The celebration consisted of five events at different venues: the Friday night kickoff, Saturday morning open house at the chapter house followed by the Ohio State football spring game, formal Saturday evening Centennial event, and Sunday morning brunch. More than 400 guests attended the events, and the chapter had representatives from all coasts, plus one brother who traveled from Germany. “It was like a giant homecoming,” said Foundation Board of Trustees Secretary Jim Hamilton, Ohio State ’63. “I graduated in 1965 and haven’t seen some of these brothers since, so it was a moving experience and a joy to my heart to have the chance to go through this Centennial experience with them.” Planning started almost a year before the big event when Phil Robertson, Ohio State ’54, reminded area alumni about the importance of the year 2012 and Jeff Cabot, Ohio State ’67, subsequently recruited a Centennial committee. The nine-person committee, which even included a Phi Tau alumnus from another chapter, created a website, secured hotels and event locations, created an itinerary for the weekend, and communicated frequently with members, among many other things. The committee decided to do things a little LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

“...IT WAS A MOVING EXPERIENCE AND A JOY TO MY HEART TO HAVE THE CHANCE TO GO THROUGH THIS CENTENNIAL EXPERIENCE WITH THEM.” —JIM HAMILTON, OHIO STATE ‘63

differently from the start, including not hosting a formal banquet. “We all agreed that we didn’t want [the Centennial] filled with chicken and hours of speeches,” Mintz said. “We just wanted to create a weekend with different types of events where people could just hang out together with the people they wanted to hang out with and tell stories and bring back memories. The third Ohio State greek organization to turn 100, Mintz also mentioned that the celebration was “much deeper than a party.” “We tend to think about our [fraternity] experience based on the years that we are there and the close friendships we had at the time,” he said. “The result of all this made me appreciate those 100 years in a way that I hadn’t before. You realize that for 100 years, each year, someone had to raise the money, make budget, pay bills and keep it going. You realize over 2,000 guys had some hand in creating something that you are just kind of a steward of for the future and to make sure you perpetuate something that all of those guys would be proud of. When you watched guys from pledge classes from the ’40s engage with each other and the tears and the hugs, it’s mind blowing. Absolutely mind blowing to look at each generation and see that connection.” Then-Colony President Sean Hicks, Ohio State ’12, said the event helped the associate members put everything in perspective. “It’s a great experience to be a part of a chapter with such a long history,” he said. “It gives you a strong sense of pride in the chapter, and in the Fraternity as a whole, which is very motivating. It was special to re-charter soon after the Centennial, namely because we had so many alumni who were dedicated to making sure the Centennial was a success, and this gave us an opportunity to say thank you.” Mintz said he learned many things from the event, but the biggest? “Don’t wait another 100 years to do it again!” THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org


2012OF SERVICE

FOUNDERS MONTH

& NATI O NA L CO M M U N IT Y S E RV I C E E V E N T

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his year was another record-breaking one for Phi Kappa Tau’s Founders Month of Service. rvice. More than 1,400 volunteers gave 11,109 hours of their time and donated more than $258,000 8,000 to charity in March 2012. Founders Month of Service was established in 2008 as a national service initiative that would honor the Fraternity’s founders each March. For the whole month, brothers and Phriends of Phi Tau are encouraged to give back to their communities to better understand Phi Kappa Tau’s founding principles. This year also marked the second annual National Community Service Event, held in conjunction with Founders Month of Service. More than 130 undergraduates and alumni from 18 chapters helped get Flying Horse Farms in Mt. Gilead, Ohio, ready for summer sessions. UNDERGRADUATES VOLUNTEER “These national events are so important because you get to see the big picture of Phi Kappa ppa AT FLYING HORSE FARMS DURING Tau,” said National Service Advisor Jordan Loeb, Indiana ’06. “Every time I go to one, I meet eet THE SECOND ANNUAL NATIONAL COMMUNITY SERVICE EVENT. many great brothers that I instantly have a connection with because of the Fraternity. It also o provides awareness for our national philanthropy—SeriousFun Children’s Network. These camps need male volunteers and, as Phi Taus, we need to step it up and work with them more. It will change hange your life!” Plans are already underway for the 2013 Founders Month of Service and National Community Service Event. To accommodate the increase in participants in the National Community Service Event, two service weekends will be held next March at Flying Horse Farms: March 15-17 and 22-24. Registration will open in the coming weeks. Contact Loeb at jloeb@phikappatau.org with questions about either event.

2012 FOUNDERS MONTH OF SERVICE PARTICIPATION • Beta Chi chapter at Southern Illinois and Presidents Academy Dean Andy Fruth, Southern Illinois ’08, helped with tornado clean-up efforts in Harrisburg, Ill. • Six Gamma Tau brothers from Old Dominion volunteered at Victory Juntion. • Jonathan Fong, San Jose ’12, served food at a homeless kitchen. • Charleston colony hosted a blood drive. • National Councilor Josh Bleidt, Eastern Kentucky ’96, and more than 30 volunteers raised $205,000 during a telethon for Eastern Kentucky tornado relief. • Chris Behrens, Idaho AM, went on Alternative Spring Break and fed more than 10,000 people in need. • Epsilon Sigma chapter at Chapman hosted its annual Red and Gold Week and raised nearly $3,500 for SeriousFun Children’s Network. • Past National President Bill Macak, Florida State ’73, volunteered at Camp Boggy Creek. • BMC Retreat Dean Allyn Shaw, Michigan State ’85, helped raise $18,000 at the Michigan State University Museum wine-tasting event. • Delta Tau chapter at Cal Poly-Pomona volunteered at the local Susan G. Komen Race for the Cure. • Foundation Distinguished Trustee Jerry Carlton, Ohio ’58, helped plant trees with the East Dallas Community Organization. • Omicron chapter at Penn State hosted a cookout for SeriousFun Children’s Network. THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

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CHAPTER ETERNAL PA S T N AT I O N A L P R E S I D E N T M E L D E T T R A E N T E R S C H A P T E R E T E R N A L

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PAST NATIONAL PRESIDENT MEL DETTRA, OHIO STATE ’45, (RIGHT) HELPS INDUCT COMEDIAN AND ACTOR SHELLEY BERMAN, SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ’05, INTO THE PHI KAPPA TAU HALL OF FAME AT THE CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION IN 2006.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

n Dec. 28, 2011, Phi Kappa Tau’s oldest living Past National President, Mel Dettra, Ohio State ’45, entered Chapter Eternal. He was 85 years old. A devoted brother and Phi Kappa Tau Hall of Fame member, Dettra served his Fraternity as National President from 1968-70. During that time, he presided over 13 expansions. Prior to that esteemed position, he served as a domain chief (now Domain Director) and national councilor. After his National President post, Dettra continued to stay involved. He was scholarship advisor and finance advisor to Alpha Phi chapter at Akron, a Phi Kappa Tau Foundation trustee and then distinguished trustee, loyal donor to the Foundation, and active member at local and national events. Dettra even attended the Fraternity’s 59th National Convention in Denver and participated in Phi Kappa Tau’s traditional Handshake with History, where all members who ever shook hands with a founder start a handshake around the Brotherhood Banquet room so everyone might have a link to the founders. “This is a sad day for my family and members of Phi Kappa Tau,” said Past National President Greg Heilmeier, Bethany ’86, last December. “My family lost a beloved friend of more than 60 years, and our Fraternity lost one of its greatest supporters. Mel Dettra was a living embodiment of our Cardinal Principles, and anyone who had the good fortune of spending time with Mel is the better for it. He always believed that as a Phi Tau volunteer, one had to ‘think of themselves as sculptors, only our clay is HUMAN.’ We all lost a mentor, friend, brother and sculptor in Mel.” Dettra played a huge part in steering Phi Kappa Tau’s IMPACT program, the forerunner to Leadership Academy. After spending his entire term on the National Council working towards the leadership-development program, he realized the fruits of his efforts when the inaugural IMPACT was held in 1968 at Indiana University in Bloomington, Ind. “Mel was an important role model, friend, and mentor of mine and so many others,” said Past National Councilor Bob Mintz, Ohio State ’71. “This was a man with a big presence! When Mel was around, everyone paid attention. He demanded excellence and principled leadership from us and had an unusual ability to see the potential in each person he encountered. But he didn’t stop there. Mel insisted that each of us work diligently to pursue our highest sense of the possible, as human beings and as an organization.” A long-time executive with the Cleveland-based Blue Cross and Blue Shield, Dettra was also involved with the Episcopal Diocese of Ohio Department of Missions as a lay member. Dettra is survived by his wife, Grace; son, Dale; and grandsons, Jonathan and Paul.

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CHAPTER ETERNAL PA S T N AT I O N A L P R E S I D E N T J AY M C C A N N E N T E R S C H A P T E R E T E R N A L

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n May 13, 2012, Foundation Trustee and Past National President Jay McCann, Spring Hill ’74, entered Chapter Eternal. He was 56 years old. The quintessential Phi Tau, McCann was devoted to his Fraternity. He served the organization in almost every capacity: National President, Foundation trustee, national councilor, Domain Director, chapter volunteer and committee member. As many of his Phi Tau brothers attested, McCann wasn’t looking for notoriety, he simply wanted to move his beloved Fraternity forward. “Jay was never one to just serve, he led by example,” said Past National President Greg Heilmeier, Bethany ’86. “He won the Stennis Award as a Domain Director and the Key Award for outstanding contributions to a chapter other than his own. He was very active while in various roles on the National Council and was a generous contributor to our Foundation, both monetarily and through being an active trustee.” Perhaps what he loved most about Phi Kappa Tau was his “second chapter,” a term he used to describe the bond all members can have with brothers from chapters other than their own—essentially a second chapter at the national level. “His major focus was always on getting more alumni involved in the Fraternity, and he loved to travel and meet members—for whom he had an incredible memory for faces and names,” said Past National President Charlie Ball, Miami ’82. “His happiest moments as president were those on the road at charterings, Conventions, Regional Conferences and the like.” In addition to getting alumni re-engaged, he brought non-members into the fold. At the 2002 National Convention in New Orleans, McCann led his father’s honorary initiation ceremony. “It was one of his happiest moments as National President,” Ball said. “He was thrilled to have his parents and so many close friends at the final banquet of the Convention in one of his favorite cities.” On a professional level, McCann’s résumé was equally impressive. He worked as a financial services provider for MassMutual Financial Group. In addition, McCann was involved with various charitable and community organizations, including the Pittsburgh Area Jesuit Alumni Club, Massachusetts Mutual Agents Association and Spring Hill College Alumni Association. “Personally, he was the reason my wife and I moved to Pittsburgh and I got into the financial advising field with MassMutual,” said Adam Goetz, Clemson ’95. “I was always impressed that Jay did things his own way and liked working with ‘regular people,’ never wanting to get into fancy options. He got to know his clients like

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nobody else and always had his home phone number on his card as he knew how important the work we did was.” One of McCann’s most notable personal hobbies was following the Pittsburgh Pirates, and his friends agree that it’s one of the first things they associate with him … although the list is long. “His passion really knew no bounds,” said National Vice President Rick Keltner, Sacramento State ’76. “He was passionate about baseball in general and the Pittsburgh Pirates in particular. In his home office, Jay kept a collection of baseball bats autographed by many Pirate greats. They were, I think, the only trophies that he didn’t keep stored in a filing cabinet somewhere.” But above all else, people, and the relationships he nurtured, were most important. “For Jay, life was all about relationships—relationships to other people and to important institutions and organizations,” Ball said. “And I think that is why he was so committed to Phi Kappa Tau—it is an organization that is fundamentally about forming and nurturing personal relationships. Jay was the walking, talking embodiment of brotherhood. Though he will be deeply missed, he will live on to the degree that others of us model what we learned from him.” At Phi Kappa Tau’s 60th National Convention in Nashville, Tenn., McCann was posthumously awarded the Palm Award for outstanding service to the national organization. His mother, Emily McCann, accepted the award on his behalf.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


CHAPTER ETERNAL THE FOLLOWING MEMBERS WERE REPORTED DECEASED TO THE EXECUTIVE OFFICES BETWEEN OCT. 25, 2011, AND JULY 1, 2012.

26

AKRON

John S Ballard ’41 Richard W Staiger ’43 Philip J Allison ’46 William R Bachman ’56

AUBURN

John Depalma ’36 C G Dobbs ’58

BETHANY

Donald L Riggin ’43 John N McLaughlin ’50 Frederick M Kopf ’53 Arthur D Blumberg ’60 Christopher James Chamberlin ’94

BRADLEY

Michael G Bair ’99

CAL STATE-FULLERTON Patrick O’Keefe ’66

CASE WESTERN

Gabriel Biguria ’60

COLGATE

Peter T Dyer ’62

COLORADO STATE

Andrew D Fairbairn ’40

CORNELL

Eugene J Lynch ’49

EAST CENTRAL OKLAHOMA Scott Damron ’69 James R Robbins ’73 Mark Pruiett Liddell ’76

FLORIDA

Rembert B Cooper ’47 Benjamin T Key ’48 John R Alliason ’51 Barry E Anderson ’56 Ronald C Laface ’59

FLORIDA STATE

James B Finney ’57

FRANKLIN & MARSHALL

Walter E Warner ’38 William F Moore ’47 Randolph L Smallwood Jr ’53

GEORGETOWN

Michael E McCune ’73 Phillip R McCamy ’82 John Edwin Weekly ’82

GEORGIA

Horace B Bibb Jr ’49 Oscar L Taylor Jr ’52 Raymond T Manley Jr ’64

HOBART

Allen W Swain ’59

IDAHO

Bruce Michael Lingren ’81

ILLINOIS

Harold Ernst ’29 Donan C Kirley ’32 Donald M Peddycord ’49 Leonard D Walberg ’53

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

INDIANA

Myron B James ’48 Frank D Keen ’48 Don C Stefoff ’49 James T Sprengelmeyer ’54 James S Gatewood Jr ’59 Robert G Meeks ’60 Richard W Byrd ’67 John T Belcher ’68 John D Michos ’73

IOWA STATE

Irvin E Nathlich ’40 James A Stanley ’54

KANSAS STATE

Norman J Sollenberger ’31 Wayne C Bogard ’39

KENT STATE

Frank Fetchet ’49 Frank J Barber Jr ’50 Dwight D Goodman ’52

KENTUCKY

Edwin J David ’38 Stephen E Lile ’62

LAWRENCE

John C Haugner ’43 Richard P Holleran ’54 David R Hensley Jr ’62

LOUISVILLE

Montrose D Justice Jr ’47 Robert B George ’51 Jack R Meade ’53 Don W Millure ’53 Robert L Davies ’58

MARYLAND

James L Sinclair ’50

MIAMI

Karl A Zipf ’36 Robert F Wessel ’41 Matthew J Yuricich ’46 John L Wills ’47 Larry L Crist ’57

MICHIGAN STATE

George F Nemetz ’47 Thomas R Neblett ’49 Roger P Martin ’52 George T Swartz ’54

MICHIGAN

Jacques G De Laurier ’40

MICHIGAN TECH

Tom Kaderabek ’70

MIDDLEBURY

Robert L Ducharme ’52

MISSISSIPPI STATE

Donald M Byrd ’56 Frank A Carlton III ’84

MOUNT UNION

Kenneth Pelton ’50 Timothy D Picciotti ’84

MUHLENBERG

John R Bogert ’45 Leon F Huebner ’52 David W Giltner ’60 Louis P Nasif ’63 Frank Baldino Jr ’72

MURRAY STATE

Andrew J Denning ’05

MUSKINGUM

Quincy A Conner ’99

NEBRASKA WESLEYAN

Boyd R Moline ’49 William Hill Jr ’53 Dean Stewart ’59 Richard Alan Mickle ’75

NEW MEXICO HIGHLANDS William J Goepfert ’73

NEW MEXICO STATE

Robert W Boebinger Jr ’49 Gilbert H Ferran ’54 Robert H Beers ’56 Ross T Gill ’60 Louis Albert Corsiglia Jr ’77

OHIO STATE

Donald V Heckman ’33 Edward J Jun ’37 Warren G Van Dorn ’43 Melvin Dettra ’45 Robert R Ruthenberg ’51 Bernard H Booms ’57 Jan H Zimmerman ’61 William R Fox ’83

OHIO

Homer C Dorman ’31 Norman C Valodin ’31 William O Rowland ’40 William E Blackie ’43 William A Ehrlich ’47 Thomas E Lake ’51 Bruce L Humphrey ’53 Joe M Smith ’54 Robert L Degenhart ’56 Charles R Mayes ’57 Laurence G Wise ’58

OHIO WESLEYAN

Gontran Lamberty ’55

OKLAHOMA STATE

Clayton E Dobson ’49

OLD DOMINION

William T Lee ’69

PENN STATE

Louis J Borges Jr ’42 Verne M Willaman ’49 Stanley C Jay ’55

PURDUE

Roger W Carlson ’43 David B Yingling ’80

RIDER

Matthew Arthur Coyle ’90 Matthew J Maggi ’03

RIT

Thomas J Mooney ’73

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA Albert L Stephens Jr ’33 H Phillip Dexheimer ’48 Bruce H Bell ’49

SOUTHERN ILLINOIS Harlon Seats ’53

SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI

Bobby F Rivers ’66 Raymond E Hartfield ’68 Robert Jones ’93

SPRING HILL

John E Oswald ’73 Joseph J McCann Jr ’74 Sterling A Tatum ’98

ST. JOHN’S

John N Shioris ’60

TENNESSEE

Jonathan G Powell ’03

TEXAS-AUSTIN

H Roger Phillips ’56

TEXAS-EL PASO

Arthur La Capria Jr ’55 Alden J Pipkin ’55 Leland P Rowe Jr ’62

TEXAS STATE-SAN MARCOS John A Worthington ’68

TRANSYLVANIA

Eddy Hodgetts ’37 Richard Francis McAuliffe Jr ’87

U OF MIAMI

Wallace W Coburn ’48

UC BERKELEY

Kenneth A Coates ’40 Peter F Newell ’58 Bruce R Quarton ’64

UCLA

Richard L Shelton ’49

WASHINGTON STATE

Lester L Greenwood ’28 Fred W Blackwell ’55

WEST VIRGINIA

T Stephen Crawford ’28

WEST VIRGINIA TECH Michael C Ratliff ’01

WESTMINSTER

Donald Lammers ’50

RENSSELAER

Charles J Husum ’48 Peter D Hollenbeck ’61

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H. PHILLIP DEXHEIMER, Southern California ’48, died Nov. 7, 2011, at age 86. A Phi Kappa Tau Hall of Fame member, Dexheimer was the former CEO of Dexco Financial Service, which helps professional service organizations put together their workplace operations in the most efficient manner. He was a WWII veteran and served in Manila, Philippine Islands. At the University of Southern California, Dexheimer received a degree in business and communications, as well as an Interfraternity Gold Scholarship Key, which recognizes student-leaders around the world. Dexheimer used his degree to become a leader in the finance and insurance services industry for more than 40 years. He was nationally recognized in the areas of estate and employee benefits planning and was a member of the Million Dollar Round Table. Dexheimer has received many other awards for his work, including the Travelers Agent of the Year and Order of the Tower. Outside of his professional life, Dexheimer was a Mason and Shriner. He was an active historian and art collector and enjoyed worldwide traveling. Dexheimer is survived by his wife, Maria da Graca Fernandes Dexheimer, son, James Phillip Dexheimer, grandson and granddaughter.

MONTROSE JUSTICE, Louisville ’47, died Feb. 6, 2012, at age 84. After high school, Justice served in the Navy during World War II. After his time in the Navy, he enrolled in and graduated from the University of Louisville. Upon his retirement he was a rose garden enthusiast, and invented a fertilizer known as “Monty’s Joy Juice.” Justice also founded Monty’s Plant Food Company. VERNE WILLAMAN, Penn State ’49, died June 9, 2012, at age 83. Willaman served in the Korean War with the U.S. Navy after he graduated from Penn State with a degree in biological chemistry. Afterwards, he joined the Ortho Pharmaceutical Corporation, where he eventually served as chairman and president. Post-retirement, Willaman turned his attention to philanthropy and was a generous benefactor of Penn State. THOMAS NEBLETT, Michigan State ’49, died Sept. 8, 2011. Neblett attended Michigan State University, the University of Louisville and Wayne State University. During his time at these universities, Neblett earned an undergraduate degree, completed a master’s degree in bacteriology, and received a doctorate in microbiology and public health. He later served on staff at the Henry Ford Hospital, operating as a senior associate and later the head of the microbiology division. Most recently he was self-employed as a microbiologist consultant. THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

MATTHEW YURICICH, Miami ’46, died May 28, 2012, at age 89. A Phi Kappa Tau Hall of Fame member, Yuricich worked in the movie industry and in 1976, received an Oscar for visual effects in “Logan’s Run.” “Matt is probably the only football player and art major in the history of college football that won an Oscar, and he was a very proud Phi Tau,” said his chapter brother Harold Paul, Miami ’46. “Coming out of the service I had no interest in joining a Fraternity and I know that Matt didn’t either. We didn’t even think about it, but as we spent more time on the football team and with other athletes, it was just natural for us to join the Phi Taus also.” Yuricich lived an accomplished life. Once he graduated from Miami in 1949, he moved to California to attend graduate courses at UCLA and pursue a career in the movie industry. His time in the industry resulted in work on more than 200 films, including “Close Encounters of the Third Kind,” “Blade Runner” and “Die Hard.” He was nominated for five Academy Awards throughout his career. Yuricich received an honorary doctorate degree from Miami, and the school also selected him as a past Alumnus of the Year. Yuricich is survived by his children, Lisanna; Tanja; Mark; Dirk and Dana, eight grandchildren and brothers, Frank and Joe.

HARLON SEATS, Southern Illinois ’53, died May 22, 2012, at age 79. Seats received a football scholarship to Southern Illinois University Carbondale. He was drafted after earning a bachelor’s degree in political science. Once released from military service, Seats taught political science and coached football and baseball. The Harlon Seats Memorial Fund was arranged to assist one Harrisburg, Ill., student in attending Southern Illinois University Carbondale. GILBERT FERRAN, New Mexico State ’54, died Feb. 17, 2012, at age 82. Ferran served in the Korean War, earning the Bronze Star during his time of service. He later went to New Mexico State University, where he graduated with a bachelor’s degree in biology in 1958. Ferran went on to work for Los Alamos National Laboratories for 33 years. He also served as vice chairman of the New Mexico Republican Party and became a member of the Human Rights Commission. LELAND ROWE, Texas-El Paso ’62, died Feb. 12, 2012, at age 68. Rowe received a bachelor’s at the University of Texas El Paso before going on to serve in the Marine Corps Reserves. He retired from D & H Pump Service Company in Farmington, N.M. DAVID HERNDON, Kentucky ’68, died June 15, 2011, at age 62. A Kentucky native, he graduated with honors and a bachelor’s

degree in mathematics from the University of Kentucky before going on to earn an MBA from the University of Louisville. Herndon worked for AT&T companies for more than 40 years, including serving in the launch of Optus in Australia in 1992. He also served as the Director of Network Planning at AT&T in Atlanta. ROBERT JONES, Southern Mississippi ’93, died May 27, 2012, at age 41. Jones worked in executive advertising sales and was cocreator of the lifestyle magazine Going Coastal Mississippi that heralded today’s South Mississippi Living. He later excelled in his work with Verizon Wireless and continued to work as long as he was able. CHRISTOPHER CHAMBERLIN, Bethany ’94, died May 14, 2012, at age 38. Chamberlin was born in Spain but attended college preparatory schools in New York and New Hampshire before enrolling at Bethany College. He later moved to southern New Mexico. Chamberlin served as media coordinator for New Mexico State University. ANDREW DENNING, Murray State ’05, died June 1, 2012, at age 29. Denning was developing Denning Enterprises—a small business—and was involved with a bowling league, his church, and his Fraternity and alma mater.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

27


OUR CHAPTERS 28

A REVIEW OF CHAPTER NEWS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY SUBMITTED TO THE LAUREL BY CHAPTERS THEMSELVES. VISIT WWW.PHIKAPPATAU.ORG TO READ MORE NEWS.

New Member Class, Fraternity President of the Year (Drew Dement, Transylvania ’10) and Excellence in Service. ALPHA DELTA CHAPTER at Case Western held its fifth annual Founders Day banquet in March. The group celebrated its success, including associating 10 new members, implementing the first overnight spring retreat and sending volunteers to SeriousFun camps. ALPHA PI CHAPTER at Washington hosted its annual Haunted House philanthropy event in October and raised $1,500 for Camp Korey, a SeriousFun camp.

Gamma Lambda chapter at Central Michigan was named the school’s 2012 Greek Week champions. The group’s best events were the chalking competition and Mock Rock, where teams compete in choreographed dance.

BETA CHAPTER at Ohio raised more than $1,000 for SeriousFun Children’s Network during Warrior Week. The men were awarded Outstanding Philanthropy Award for their efforts. The group also hosted its first Founders Day celebration in more than 10 years. More than 60 undergraduates and alumni attended.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

DELTA CHAPTER at Centre hosted its fifth annual St. Balderick’s Day head-shaving philanthropy event at the college’s Spring Carnival. The group raised $6,500 for the St. Balderick’s Foundation—a volunteer-driven organization that raises funds for childhood cancer research. EPSILON CHAPTER at Mount Union received four awards at the school’s Greek

Awards: Highest Chapter GPA, Excellence in Recruitment, the challenge—a year-long annual event created to improve greek participation in events across campus, and Outstanding Chapter President (Ben Russell, Mount Union ’09). THETA CHAPTER at Transylvania received three awards at the school’s Greek Award Ceremony: Outstanding

BETA BETA CHAPTER at Louisville hosted its fourth annual Cornhole Tournament that benefits SeriousFun Children’s Network. In addition to the tournament, which attracted 45 teams this year, the chapter hosted a silent auction and grill-out to raise $3,000. GAMMA ALPHA CHAPTER at Michigan Tech won its fifth straight first place in the fraternity division of the statue competition at the school’s 2012 Winter Carnival. The group’s statue was called “Don’t Underestimate the Dreams of Detroit,” inspired by Detroit’s three major sports teams.

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29 DELTA GAMMA CHAPTER at Ole Miss was honored with the IFC’s Service Day Award for its participation in the University of Mississippi Big Event—a service project that gives back to the county and community. More than 3,000 students volunteered with the Big Event, and Delta Gamma chapter had the most participation out of all greek organizations on campus. The IFC awarded SeriousFun Children’s Network $300 in the group’s name. Upsilon Colony President Steven Anderson, Nebraska Wesleyan ’12, was named to the Capital One NAIA Academic All-America College Division Football Team. Anderson was one of four Nebraska Wesleyan football players named to the first team.

GAMMA TAU CHAPTER at Old Dominion took home seven awards from the university’s 2012 Fraternity and Sorority Life Awards: Most Improved IFC Chapter, Most Improved Chapter Overall, 2012 Greek Week champions, Outstanding Senior Award (Membership Orientation Officer Casey Morris, Old Dominion ’08), Outstanding New Member of the Year Award (VPAR Fred Tugas, Old Dominion ’11), Dr. Dana Burnett Fraternity Man of the Year Award (President Collin Rodino, Old Dominion ’08), and Donald K. Marchand Outstanding Alumni Award (Chapter Advisor Dan Dauer, Old Dominion ’67). THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

DELTA EPSILON CHAPTER at St. Cloud held its 11th annual Freeze-a-Thon in February. The group raised more than $1,000 for SeriousFun Children’s Network by sitting in the Minnesota cold for nearly 100 consecutive hours. EPSILON LAMBDA at Longwood received two awards at the school’s greek awards: Outstanding New Member (Thomas Bulifant, Longwood AM) and Outstanding Fraternity President (Peter Mancuso, Longwood ’08). EPSILON RHO CHAPTER at Indiana U of Pennsylvania hosted its first Lift-a-Thon philanthropy event. Participants lifted as many reps as possible at their specified weight to garner donations for SeriousFun camps. More than $1,000 was raised.

Five brothers from four chapters volunteered at Camp Boggy Creek’s Epilepsy Week. (From left to right) Keith Shea, St. Cloud State ’03, Kenny Johnson, Georgia ’11, Alex Icardi (non-member), Evan Ernst, Florida State ’09, Luke Nantz, Case Western ’09, and David Karnick, Case Western ’07.

EPSILON CHI CHAPTER at Virginia Tech held a change drive on campus to raise money for the USO’s (United Service Organizations) United Through Reading Military Program. The men raised enough money to provide 18 children with a book and video of their deployed parent reading them a story. NORTH TEXAS COLONY won Program of the Year for its philanthropy event Chatter: The Words We Speak—a dance concert to raise money and awareness for teen suicide and sexual abuse. The group raised more than $1,000 for Children’s Advocacy Center and local outreach programs. The men also received a certificate for 90 percent or more of their chapter participating in and donating to the Greek Gives Scholarship Award.

Zeta Alpha chapter at Belmont won the school’s 2012 Greek Week, their first win since 2009. The group finished with the most points by winning and placing high in different challenges.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


LAURELS 30

HONORING PHI KAPPA TAU ALUMNI IN THEIR PROFESSIONAL AND PERSONAL ACCOMPLISHMENTS. VISIT WWW.PHIKAPPATAU.ORG TO READ MORE NEWS.

1960 •

DAVID SAMS, Louisville ’64, became the vice chairman of G2 Investment Group in New York. Previously, he served as president of Sammons Enterprises, Inc., and chairman of the company’s board of directors.

Beta Alpha colony at Texas-Austin hosted its first alumni event since recolonizing. Five decades of alumni attended, including those from other chapters across the nation. •

1940 •

BROWN CULLEN, Louisville ’49, was inducted into the Kentucky Golf Hall of Fame. A retired lifetime member of the Kentucky PGA Section, Cullen competed in seven PGA Professional National Championships and three Senior PGA Professional National Championships.

1950 •

DICK BEACH, Muhlenberg ’52, was honored during Rider University’s Reunion Weekend

in June. The professor emeritus of chemistry had a classroom dedicated in his name, along with a bench dedication by alumni of Delta Psi chapter at Rider.

JIM LAHMANN, Central Michigan ’65, was inducted into the Michigan High School Softball Coaches Association Hall of Fame for his success with the New Lothrop High School softball team. A founder of Gamma Lambda chapter at Central Michigan, Lahmann led the team to six district titles and four regional crowns, plus a Class C state championship. JOHN WALKER, Delta State ’69, was named editor and publisher of The Daily Southerner newspaper in Tarboro, N.C. Prior to joining The Daily Southerner, Walker owned and operated The Walker Company, LLC—a communications and customer service consulting firm—and My WP News, LLC—an online news site in Southeast Louisiana. •

C.J. Slicklen, Cornell ’06, manages a retirement community in Chicago and met two Phi Taus at a recent resident dinner: Ellis Murphy, Purdue ’42, and Bert Robins, Miami ’53, respectively. The trio exchanged Fraternity stories and laughed about fun times as Phi Tau undergraduates.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.

1970 •

STEVE CONRAD, Louisville ’76, was named chief of the Louisville Metro Police Department. He came back to Louisville for the job after having served as chief in Glendale, Ariz., since 2005.

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31

Alpha chapter alumni from the class of 1962 and their wives and guests visited campus and the chapter house during Miami University’s 2012 Alumni Weekend. LLP prior to his appointment. MARK LOGRIPPO, St. John’s ’88, was recently elected to town council in Westfield, N.J. He had been appointed to a six-month term last summer. • John Green, Nebraska Wesleyan ’60, and Rodney Wartig, Iowa State ’60, ran into each other while vacationing at The Hacienda del Mar Resort in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico. •

1980 •

JAMES PAROBEK, Miami ’81, was named senior vice president of clinical integration for Jewish Hospital & Saint Mary’s HealthCare Inc., and president of Sts. Mary & Elizabeth Hospital in Louisville, Ky. He has more than 20 years of experience in healthcare leadership. TIMOTHY BARNES, Miami ’86, was appointed to a 14-year term as U.S. bankruptcy judge for the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Illinois. He served as partner at Curtis, Mallet-Prevost, Colt & Mosle THE LAUREL | www.phikappatau.org

While on separate trips in Petra, Jordan, John Green, Nebraska Wesleyan ’60, and Don Carper, Cal State-Chico ’64, discovered over lunch that they were Fraternity brothers.

1990 •

WES FUGATE, Centre ’99, successfully defended his dissertation at the Institute of Higher Education of the University of Georgia. •

2000 •

MARK KANDRA, Florida State ’03, was named to Florida State University Alumni Association’s inaugural Thirty Under 30 class. He works as a federal advisory for KPMG LLP in Washington, D.C.

Michael Oliver, Cal State-Chico ’59, published a novel, Through the Headlights: An Auto-Biography. The story follows the main character, Leroy, through his life and is told from the perspective of the cars he owns. Learn more at www.henwaypublishing.com.

J.J. LEWIS, Central Michigan ’04, became a certified fundraising executive (CFRE). He serves Phi Kappa Tau as the young professionals giving advisor.

LEARNING. LEADING. SERVING.


Phi Kappa Tau Foundation 5221 Morning Sun Road Oxford, OH 45056

NON-PROFIT ORGANIZATION U.S. POSTAGE PAID COLUMBUS, OH PERMIT # 4416

Change Service Requested

PHI KAPPA TAU IS SEARCHING FOR

VOLUNTEERS Phi Kappa Tau is currently searching for Domain Directors in the following domain:

Local chapters are continually searching for dedicated volunteers to support the undergraduates.

• • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • •

Cornhusker (Nebraska Area) Great Plains (Kansas Area) Lone Star North (Northern Texas Area) Lone Star South (Southern Texas Area) Ohio Valley (Southwest Ohio Area) Palouse (Idaho Area) Patriot (New England/New York Area) Rocky Mountain (Colorado Area) Shenandoah (Virginia Area)

Board of Governors Chairman Alumni Advisor Chapter Advisor Financial Advisor Recruitment Advisor Risk Management Advisor Scholarship Advisor

To learn more about the open positions, contact Director of Development Tyler C. Wash, Georgetown, ’06, at twash@phikappatau.org

Fall 2012 Laurel  

How to Host a Successful, Milestone Chapter Event

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