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IN THIS ISSUE:

YOUR GUIDE TO THE See the center spread for details or visit pittsburghsymphony.org/summer

SERIES! June 10 through July 23


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016


EVENTS 5.21 – 12pm ACTIVIST PRINT COMMUNITY DIALOGUE AND PROJECT LAUNCH A community dialogue and launch of Activist Print. FREE

5.26 – 11am POP GENERATION: GROWING UP WARHOL For the generation that inspired Warhol, Pop Generation features educational tours exclusively for older adults, age 65 and over. Email popgeneration@warhol.org or call Leah Morelli at 412.237.8389. Tickets $10/FREE Members

6.3 – 10am-10pm FREE COMMUNITY DAY & PUBLIC OPENING: ANDY WARHOL I AI WEIWEI Free general admission to celebrate the opening of Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei, a major international exhibition featuring two significant artists of the 20th and 21st centuries. Visit warhol.org for a full schedule of activities.

Ai Weiwei, At the Museum of Modern Art, 1987, From the New York Photographs series 1983–93, Collection of Ai Weiwei, © Ai Weiwei; Andy Warhol artwork © The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, Inc.

In Discussion:

6.4 – 7pm LGBTQ+ YOUTH PROM: DISRUPTION Co-presented with THRIVE of Southwest PA Tickets $10 online/$15 at the door This program is generously supported by American Eagle Outfitters, Inc. and The Keith Haring Foundation.

Ai Weiwei and Eric Shiner 6.2 – 8pm Carnegie Music Hall (Oakland)

Join us for a conversation between artist Ai Weiwei and The Warhol’s Director Eric Shiner. The conversation explores themes in the exhibition Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei, such as the influence of these two artists on modern and contemporary life, focusing on the parallels, intersections, and points of difference between their practices. This discussion is presented in conjunction with Andy Warhol | Ai Weiwei on view at The Warhol June 4– August 28, 2016, and with Ai Weiwei’s Circle of Animals I Zodiac Heads on view at Carnegie Museum of Art May 28–August 29, 2016. This program is co-presented with Carnegie Museum of Art. N E W S

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6.4 – 8pm FILM SCREENING: THE BLUE KITE Alphabet City Tent (North Side) Reserve a seat; visit http://cityofasylum.org/events/ or calling Hannah Waltz at 412.323.0278. FREE

The Andy Warhol Museum receives state arts funding support through a grant from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, a state agency funded by the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; the National Endowment for the Arts, a federal agency and The Heinz Endowments. Further support is provided by the Allegheny Regional Asset District.

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FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES 05.18/05.25.2016

{EDITORIAL}

VOLUME 26 + ISSUE 20

Editor CHARLIE DEITCH Arts & Entertainment Editor BILL O’DRISCOLL Music Editor MARGARET WELSH Associate Editor AL HOFF Multimedia Editor ASHLEY MURRAY Web Producer ALEX GORDON Listings Editor CELINE ROBERTS Staff Writers RYAN DETO, REBECCA NUTTALL Interns MEGAN FAIR, TYLER DAGUE, WILLIAM LUDT, LUKE THOR TRAVIS

For a Q&A with this week’s t, cover artis . visit www r. pghcitypape com

{ART} Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Production Director JULIE SKIDMORE Art Director LISA CUNNINGHAM Graphic Designers JEFF SCHRECKENGOST, JENNIFER TRIVELLI

{COVER ILLUSTRATION BY EMILY TRAYNOR}

[PULLOUT]

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Our Summer Guide will get you up to speed on the best our city has to offer from now until Labor Day

{ADVERTISING}

[NEWS]

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“We definitely have a mission here and it’s really about changing lives.” — Kiesha Lalama on the importance of the Gene Kelly Awards to young performers

[TASTE]

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“Spicy octopus is a new dish, and it was fantastic.” — Angelique Bamberg and Jason Roth review G&G Noodle Bar

“You can’t just go rolling in there, kicking in the door with facts and percentages about how someday you might get heart disease.” — Mark Jayne of Jump with Jill on teaching kids about nutrition

FRIDAY 27 | ARTISTREE SATURDAY 28 | MYSTIC RHYTHMS RUSH TRIBUTE

{MARKETING+PROMOTIONS}

SUNDAY 29 | TRES LADS

JUNE

FRIDAY 17 | DISCO 54 SATURDAY 18 | TUMBLIN DOWN JOHN MELLENCAMP TRIBUTE

{PUBLISHER} EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

the villain.” — Al Hoff reviews Money Monster

[ARTS] “I think of writing novels as an exercise in empathy.” — Jennifer Haigh on her fracking-themed novel Heat & Light

[LAST PAGE] pitched me his idea of a more 118 “He comics-focused show — putting the ‘comic’ back in comicon.” — Artist DJ Coffman on Todd McDevitt of New Dimension Comics and this weekend’s Three Rivers Comicon

{REGULAR & SPECIAL FEATURES} WEIRD PITTSBURGH BY NICK KEPPLER 12 CHEAP SEATS BY MIKE WYSOCKI 13 CITY PAPER 25 14 EVENTS LISTINGS 106 SAVAGE LOVE BY DAN SAVAGE 113 FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY 114 CROSSWORD BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY 116

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Circulation Director JIM LAVRINC Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN Interactive Media Manager CARLO LEO

criticism of the machine is 100 “Any subsumed by a procedural indicting

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Marketing Director DEANNA KONESNI Marketing Design Coordinator LINDSEY THOMPSON

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LIVE FROM THE

Director of Advertising JESSIE AUMAN-BROCK Senior Account Executives PAUL KLATZKIN, JEREMY WITHERELL Advertising Representatives ERICA MATAYA, DANA MCHENRY, MARIA SNYDER Classified Manager ANDREA JAMES National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2016 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds. PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.316.3342 FAX: 412.316.3388 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com www.pghcitypaper.com

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SUNDAY 3 | GREEN RIVER CCR TRIBUTE

MONDAY 4 | BON JOURNEY SATURDAY 16 | DON’T LOOK BACK BOSTON TRIBUTE

SLOTS | TABLE GAMES | DINING | NIGHTLIFE 777 CASINO DRIVE, PITTSBURGH PA 15212 RIVERSCASINO.COM DOWNLOAD OUR APP RIVERSCASINO.COM/PITTSBURGH/APP

GAMBLING PROBLEM? CALL 1-8 800-GAMBLER R. Mu ust be be 21 years yea s or olde l er to be e on on Rivers iver vers C Ca asino prope pertty. Acts A ts subject subj bject to cha chang ge.

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THIS WEEK

ONLINE

“QUALITY AND ART DOESN’T NECESSARILY HAVE TO COME FROM A BIG BUDGET AND MONEY.”

www.pghcitypaper.com

Families gathered Downtown for the EQT Children’s Theater Festival this weekend. Check out our photo slideshow of the kids and performers in action at www.pghcitypaper.com.

Comics artist Wayno tells us about his new City Paper feature, and we also speak to CP’s Bill O’Driscoll about a novelist’s take on fracking. Listen at bit.ly/citypaperpodcast or subscribe on iTunes.

CITY PAPER

{PHOTO BY JOHN COLOMBO}

Obama students Bryce Chisom and Marnie Quick are nominated for Gene Kelly Awards.

INTERACTIVE

SHOW TIME I

Instagrammer @adam_taylor_1121 captured this sign in Braddock. Tag your Instagram images from around the city as #CPReaderArt, and we just may re-gram you. Download our free app for the most popular events at your fingertips and for a chance to win great prizes. 6

N THE BROADWAY musical 9 to 5, three women kidnap their sexist, egotistical boss before taking charge of his company. The plot makes for a lot of laughs, but for Pittsburgh sophomore Bryce Chisom, who played one of the three women in Obama Academy’s adaptation of the musical this spring, it’s also a story of empowerment. “Seeing that three women did this all by themselves,” says Chisom, “seeing how they took action over such a powerful man was really inspiring.” Chisom is among the nine Pittsburgh Public Schools students nominated in this year’s Gene Kelly Awards, a regional

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

competition (named for the famed Pittsburgh-born entertainer) that recognizes student musicals in the Pittsburgh area. Winners will be announced at an event at the Benedum Center on May 28.

Gene Kelly Awards give Pittsburgh students a shot at the big time {BY REBECCA NUTTALL} “It was really amazing [to be nominated],” says Chisom. “I actually didn’t believe it. I started bursting out in tears

when I found out. I was really excited.” The students nominated this year are part of a 26-year tradition. Some past awardees from the region, like actor Zachary Quinto (Star Trek), have gone on to successful careers on Broadway and in television and film. “We definitely have a mission here, and it’s really about changing lives,” says Kiesha Lalama, director of the Gene Kelly Awards. “In the 26 years the Kellys have been going on, I continue to hear the stories over and over again about the positive impact it’s had on people’s lives.” That’s especially true for students in PPS, who have consistently been nominated


in their division year after year despite the less-than-stellar reputation urban school districts tend to have. The annual event gives PPS students a chance to shine, and more importantly, musical-theater supporters say, they’re learning skills they can’t find in the classroom. “The hours and hours they put into these performances — it shows their dedication, their work ethic, their passion,” says Lalama. “I think musical theater brings a sense of community, a sense of respect and value for one another. It goes well beyond developing performance skills. It really helps kids with social development and life skills.” NEARLY 30 SCHOOLS face off in this year’s Kelly Awards. They’re broken into divisions based on the estimated budget for their musicals, so that schools in lowincome communities aren’t wiped out by more affluent schools in the suburbs. “Some schools have very large budgets and other schools are working with pennies, scraping them together to make it work,” says Lalama. “We want to make it as fair as possible, making sure we are comparing apples to apples and oranges to oranges.”

Mindy Rossi-Stabler, CAPA High School’s theater coordinator, says her students notice the difference in budget between their school and others. But instead of being jealous, she says they feel camaraderie with competing schools. “They see the difference, especially in budget, when the other kids come with monogrammed

That doesn’t mean we don’t put out a good product.” Despite its budget, CAPA is consistently nominated and awarded at the Kellys, thanks in no small part to its musical-theater program. But Rossi-Stabler says the importance of musical theater and the arts should extend beyond CAPA. “We’re lucky at CAPA because this is what we concentrate on, but the other schools still put on really good products,” says Rossi-Stabler. “Throughout the public schools, the more arts we can give these kids, I think the better off they all are. The most successful people have really had a basis in some kind of art during their educational career.” {PHOTO COURTESY OF KELLY MCKRELL} That’s something CAPA senior Paul The cast of Obama Academy’s 9 to 5 Watt-Morse, who is nominated for best actor, agrees with. Next year, he’s movgarment bags for their costumes,” says ing on to the Boston Conservatory, where Rossi-Stabler. “Public schools just don’t he’ll study musical theater. “[Musical theater has] taught me a lot have that kind of money. It’s good for them to be about hard work,” says Watt-Morse. “It exposed to that, but also teaches you how to work together. I think to understand that qual- a lot of sports are super-competitive, but ity and art doesn’t nec- in musical theater you’re working toessarily have to come gether to accomplish a goal. Every person from a big budget and is super-important to the process.” And for Watt-Morse, the Gene Kellys money. We’re obviously in the low-budget [category] at the Kellys every year. are a culmination of his hard work at

“IT’S JUST SUCH AN AMAZING EXPERIENCE.”

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SHOW TIME, CONTINUED FROM PG. 07

CAPA. As a freshman, he says, he was in awe of a senior classmate who won a Kelly for his role in In the Heights. Now it could be his turn. “To think I’m almost where he was is a cool thought. It’s kind of surreal, but it’s great,” Watt-Morse says. “I think [the awards] serve as some extra motivation, and I think a lot of us reach for that because we won’t have that opportunity later in life. Whether we decide to do this for a living or not, we will rarely have the opportunity to see something tangible to recognize us for the work we’ve done. When you get it, it’s just an amazing feeling.” For sophomore Chisom, there’s no greater feeling than performing on the Benedum stage at the Gene Kelly awards. “I already feel like a really great pow-

er over me performing on the Obama [Academy] stage, but performing on the Benedum stage was like 10 times more exciting,” Chisom says. “Just seeing all those faces and all the lights, and just the adrenaline before coming on stage — it’s just such an amazing experience.” Students at Obama have had the opportunity to perform at the awards for the past two years because they were nominated for, and won, best musical. But unfortunately, despite nominations for best ensemble, best all-student orchestra, and two for actress, Obama didn’t receive that nomination this year. “It was a lesson we really had to sit down and talk about this year,” says Kelly McKrell, Obama’s director. “That was hard for me as their leader to tell them they didn’t get to perform this year.”

LANDMARKS PRESERVATION RESOURCE CENTER - A program of the Pittsburgh History & Landmarks Foundation Foundation

Join us at the Landmarks Preservation Resource Center for ongoing workshops in May as we continue programming on architecture, history, design, urban planning, and other topics related to how cities function and historic preservation as a tool of community development.

SATURDAY, MAY 21 • 10:00 AM – 1:00 PM

WORKSHOP: SAWS AND SAWING REGIS WILL: Vesta Home Services Most projects begin with sawing larger boards down to pieces of your project. Explore the different types of handsaws and their uses. You will also learn techniques to saw squarely and accurately to the line. Not just that, you will also learn techniques on how to identify saw teeth and when to choose which saw and why.

TUESDAY, MAY 24 • 6:00 PM – 7:30 PM

SPRING CLEANING: A GUIDE TO GREEN CLEANING CHELSEA HOLMES: Director, Community Education Women for a Healthy Environment May is Allergy Awareness Month. Because of that, Women for a Healthy Environment (WHE) is leading a discussion on how to clean your homes avoiding toxins commonly found in household cleaning products. Unfortunately, in the United States today, cleaning product manufacturers are not required to disclose their ingredients on the product, which means that there are known allergens, asthmagens, carcinogens, and even hormone disruptors lurking in many of our everyday products. This workshop is designed to raise awareness around potential toxins found in our home environments and to provide community members with the information and resources needed to make informed consumer choices regarding these products. ALL PROGRAMMING IS FREE TO PHLF MEMBERS. FOR MORE INFORMATION VISIT WWW.PHLF.ORG

RSVPS ARE APPRECIATED. CONTACT MARY LU DENNY AT 412-471-5808 EXT. 527 744 REBECCA AVENUE

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WILKINSBURG, PA 15221

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

412-471-5808

But rather than feeling defeated, Obama’s students used the disappointment to inspire them. “We actually found out about the nominations and still had to do three shows, and I’ve never seen students perform so well in my career,” says McKrell. “I was so afraid it would affect them negatively, but I’ve never seen so much energy from high schoolers in my career. I was very proud of them.” In an effort to stave off the disappointment students can feel when competing in such a high-profile competition, McKrell often tries to steer focus away from the Kelly Awards. “I was in the Kellys as a child,” says McKrell. “So I understand the feeling of being on that stage and having that opportunity, and I tell them it’ll be something that you’ll be able to tell your grandchildren, that you performed at the Benedum. So they do look at it like an honor, but I try not to make it the focus of the season, because I don’t want them to

see it as a competition.” Instead, she hopes students reflect on how performing in the musical has impacted their lives. “They open up to the audience on closing night, and they talk about how it changed their lives,” says McKrell. “They say things like, ‘I never thought I’d fit in,’ ‘I never thought I’d have another family or a safe place to go where I can be myself.’ Those comments really resonate with me.” Having performed in only her second musical at Obama, Chisom says she’s learning to balance her schoolwork with the pressures of rehearsal. And in the end, she says, what she’s learned from participating is what matters most. “It motivates you to be on top of your schoolwork even more” says Chisom. “Another great thing about musicals is if you’re passionate about it, you can be the same or even better than anyone at any other school. It comes from your passion and how much you love to do it.”

“SOME SCHOOLS HAVE VERY LARGE BUDGETS AND OTHER SCHOOLS ARE WORKING WITH PENNIES.”

RN U T TA L L @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

JENSORENSEN


On the move? New to town, or just a new neighborhood? If you haven’t tried transit before maybe now is the time. Port Authority has convenient and frequent service to and from the urban areas of Pittsburgh. East Liberty is the heart of the East End’s transit service. Many Port Authority bus routes use the East Busway to bypass local traffic including the P1 and P3 from East Liberty’s busway station which offer quick rides to Downtown and Oakland. Various other routes have stops on Penn Ave. and serve just about anywhere in the East End of the city. Living Downtown? You CAN get anywhere from here. You can catch a bus or T to almost anywhere in Allegheny County. Groceries in the Strip District, take the 88. For all the flavor of Lawrenceville the 91 works. Nearly all of Port Authority's 100 routes travel in and out of Downtown. For more neighborhoods go to onthemove.portauthority.org and make this town your own.

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5166 Butler St. Lawrenceville

BLOCKED DEVELOPMENT LG Realty’s acquisition of public park and development rights in East Liberty shot down {BY RYAN DETO} WHEN LG REALTY Advisors began evicting

Rx Glasses • Sunglasses All frames $95 Contact Lenses • Doctor on site Chromos Cares give back program

Call or schedule your eye exam online (412) 772-1473 • chromoseyewear.com COMMUNITY COLLEGE OF ALLEGHENY COUNTY

GET AHEAD OF THE CLASS WITH CCAC SUMMER COURSES

Classes begin: • May 23 • June 6 • July 5 admissions@ccac.edu • 412.237.3100

residents from its East Liberty Penn Plaza apartment complex last June, residents protested and the city intervened. The action highlighted the growing lack of affordable housing in the city. Subsequently, LG, which is owned by the Gumberg family, negotiated a deal with the city and Penn Plaza tenants. Language was included in the agreement that would recommend the sale of the adjacent 2.2-acre Enright Park to LG. It also suggested that LG be chosen to develop the nearby Mellon Orchard site, an agreement which would require at least 20 percent of the units there to be affordable. Critics of the deal questioned whether the c ity was giving up too much. As it turns out, however, the city isn’t giving up much of anything. Last month, Pittsburgh City Council voted to keep Enright Park as public land and last week the Pittsburgh Urban Redevelopment Authority awarded the Mellon Orchard site to TREK Development, even though LG entered a bid to develop the space. “The URA took a bold step,” says Bloomfield-Garfield Corp. executive director Rick Swartz. “The developer that everyone thought had the inside track did not have the inside track.” Kevin Acklin, Mayor Bill Peduto’s chief of staff and URA chair, says he was very pleased with the URA’s choice. “I think it was near-unanimous support for TREK.” TREK President Bill Gatti says its preliminary proposal will include 49 affordable units to residents at or below 60 percent of the area median income — in other words, about 47 percent of the proposed 104 units would be affordable. Additionally, Gatti says the remaining units will be priced at 10 percent to 15 percent below market rate. Monthly rents will range from $600 to $1,800, he says. Lillian Grate, of the Penn Plaza tenant council, sat on the URA committee that chose TREK. She says it was a “hard selection,” but TREK was exactly what they were looking for. She lauded the affordability measures, as well as TREK’s commitment to have a social worker on site and to include retail spaces that are

minority- and women-owned. “We are looking forward to collaborating with the community,” says Gatti. “We are very literate when it comes to affordable-housing funding, and we are intentional with the community; everyone gets a seat at the table.” Says Swartz: “TREK has always made a good-faith effort to work with the community. You can’t say the same for the Gumbergs. I think it is hard for them to realize in 2016 that things work a lot differently than in 1986 — they are still locked into that.” Jonathan Kamin, attorney for LG Realty Advisors, did not return calls seeking comment. Bill Bartlett, of advocacy group Action United, says the proposed rents at Mellon Orchard are supposed to reflect the range of rents at Penn Plaza, which residents said ranged from $470 to $850. Gatti, of TREK, says the subsidized rent levels for low-income residents will be worked out through a community process. TREK’s proposed number of affordable units exceeds the requirement in the Penn Plaza agreement. However, while 100-some households from Penn Plaza were given priority to move into Mellon Orchard, only 49 affordable units were earmarked. Bartlett still holds out hope for LG Realty’s future Penn Plaza development, however. “I am cautiously optimistic that they will replicate the rents at Penn Plaza and they will include rents for those at low- and extremely-low-income levels.” LG has said they plan to build a 400-unit mixed-use development. Because LG was not selected for Mellon Orchard, it is now not required to include any affordable units at the revamped Penn Plaza. LG is required to make “commercially reasonable efforts” to include affordable units at one of its Penn Plaza buildings, but only at levels set by city council, which has yet to finalize its affordablehousing recommendations. “We will have to cross that bridge when it comes,” says Acklin. “Clearly, the city remains committed to affordable housing in East Liberty, especially in areas such as Penn Plaza.”

“THE URA TOOK A BOLD STEP.”

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Weird Pittsburgh

SEND YOUR LOCAL WEIRD NEWS TO INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

{BY NICK KEPPLER}

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presents

PET of the

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As far as criminal pseudonyms go, Gingerbread Man doesn’t seem like it’d earn much respect on a cell block, or even among Spider-Man’s adversaries, yet that’s how Heath Emory Miller, wanted for a string of burglaries, described himself in social-media posts taunting police. Miller, 25, apparently spotted officers coming his way in a Springhill park and dashed into a wooded area. “They call me the gingerbread man,” he later wrote on Facebook, according to WPXI. “Catch me if u can. I’m running as fast as I can.” Police arrested his girlfriend on charges of sheltering him, but didn’t find the alleged nursery-rhyming thief at her residence then. “You gotta be quicker then [sic] that,” he posted soon after, adding “Lol. Gingerbread man.” The next day, police tracked Miller down to the attic of a North Side home, leaving his reputation in crumbs.

Photography Photo Courtesy of Linda Mitzel

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Cleo This wiggly girl is Cleo, a 5-year-old American Pit Bull Terrier mix. She is currently living in a foster home but is anxiously waiting to find a loving family to call her own! Cleo has a high level of energy, but is good in the home, occupying herself with bones and naps throughout the day. She would do best in a home without other pets or children as long as she has room to run around or a good jogging buddy!

Call Animal Friends today!

412-847-7000

Bird cams have become easy ways for nature-lovers to watch the progress of wild birds as they nest. Viewership usually peaks when eggs are expected to hatch. Watchers of the National Aviary’s Pitt Peregrine Falcon Nest Cam — recording a nest on the Cathedral of Learning — were shocked when the mother falcon, Hope, killed her second hatchling and fed its remains to her first. “I have never seen this behavior before and don’t know why it occurred,” wrote WQED employee and bird expert Kate St. John, who runs the cam, on the Aviary’s website. Art McMorris, the state Game Commission’s peregrine coordinator, was also baffled. An ornithologist “Ask the Expert” session at the Aviary was abruptly canceled as the team apparently has no answers anymore, just dark, existential questions.

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Well, at least they had good reasons: 73-year-old Loretta Jean Dennis-Jarrett of Pittsburgh allegedly stormed into her husband’s apartment and fired two shots at him, missing both times, but causing the man’s caretaker to take cover and his friend to awake from snoozing on the couch. After the 76-year-old husband wrestled away the pistol and police came, Dennis-Jarrett reportedly said she was mad he owed her money, was hiding her shoes and wouldn’t return her calls, reports TribLive.com. Meanwhile, New Sewickley Township police are looking for a driver who waved a gun at another motorist for driving too slow, reports the Beaver County Times. Lastly, David Allen Yingling, 61, of Indiana County, fatally shot his roommate because he “was tired of him calling [his] brother a retard,” police told TribLive.

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Last year, Pennsylvania enacted a law to stop the piling up of untested rape kits. Police departments are now required to pick up kits within three days of notice from a hospital, transfer them to a lab within 15 days and inform the state

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

Health Department when they receive a kit. Physician General Rachel Levine says that only a third of departments have complied with that last part. She bluntly told the Associated Press she suspects they’re trying to avoid a penalty for not processing the kits in time and “that their municipality knows they didn’t send us a report.” Tom Gross, executive director of the Pennsylvania Chiefs of Police Association, countered that “it’s mostly a question of awareness” and said that departments might not know about the new mandates — because, after all, why should a police department be expected to keep up with new laws?

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A state court ruled that a Westmoreland County woman who walked out of her job after complaining about a coworker’s body odor did not have “necessitous and compelling” reasons to quit. Sherry Williamson was a production worker for Cook Inc., a

Vandergrift medical-supply company, reports PennLive.com, when the dispute over BO — and resultant HR hullabaloo — caused her to voluntarily leave. Judges ruled that the situation did not meet the threshold that would permit Williamson to collect unemployment compensation (though they never subpoenaed the coworker to come in to be sniffed).

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Police are seeking a burglary suspect whose attempt to rob a motorist outside a Kwik Fill station near Uniontown was disabled with a one-word retort. The man, disguised by a gray hoodie and camouflage bandanna, reportedly walked up, stuck his hands in his pockets as if he had a gun, and said, “Give me all the money now!” The victim continued pumping gas and said, “Really?” according to the AP, ending the encounter. The suspect was described as 5-foot-9, thinly built and utterly unimpressive.

WAYNOVISION


[THE CHEAP SEATS]

PITT IS IT

U N I V E R S I T Y

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P I T T S B U R G H

{BY MIKE WYSOCKI} CONGRATULATIONS TO the Cincinnati Bengals for drafting University of Pittsburgh wide receiver Tyler Boyd in this past month’s NFL Draft. It’s not often that the Bengals make a good move; the last one was in 1980, when they drafted the franchise’s only Hall of Famer, Anthony Munoz. So every 36 years the Bengals don’t bungle. All Cincinnati has to look forward to now is the 2052 NFL Draft. (That’s also the year that Donald Trump’s son Barron runs against Hillary Clinton’s granddaughter Charlotte in the presidential election.) The Bengals are so hapless that the word “Bengal” is now a verb. To Bengal means to prematurely celebrate a victory, then make a series of stupid moves to ensure that you lose. But the Bengals can at least celebrate until training camp starts. Tyler Boyd, the former Clairton Bear, was certainly one of the best players in recent Pitt football history. The Pitt Panthers have served as a reliable pipeline to the NFL for years, and Boyd is just the latest. In fact, there are 18 ex-Panthers on NFL rosters or practice squads right now. So, in celebration, here are the top eight Pitt players currently in the league. I based my rankings on accomplishments in the league to date, and not how good the player is right now. The number indicates the year each was drafted.

8) K’Waun Williams (2014): The Cleveland Browns defensive back is in football purgatory in the Mistake by the Lake, but is making the best of it. In two seasons, he has established himself as a competent player, which in Cleveland means really good. He’s already outlasted Johnny Manziel’s tenure there.

5) Jabaal Sheard (2011): He’s ahead of Donald only statistically. Sheard went from the Browns to the Patriots. That is the equivalent of playing guitar for Ugly Kid Joe, then signing on with Metallica. He’s accumulated 227 tackles and 31 sacks in his career, plus his new team is teaching him espionage techniques.

4) Andy Lee (2004): If Lee likes to punt, he’s on the right team. Cleveland routinely leads the league in punts, and also despair. Lee has kicked his way to three Pro Bowls and even once had an 82-yard punt. He is 13th all-time in punting yards and will move into the top 10 this season.

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Shady’s been to four Pro Bowls, led the NFL in rushing and became the Philadelphia Eagles’ all-time leading rusher after just six seasons there. If he gets 1,000 yards this season, he will pass backs like Larry Czonka and Herschel Walker on the all-time rushing list. Then he can focus on breaking some records on his current team, the Buffalo Bills, held by O.J. Simpson — rushing records, not arrest records.

Visit cgs.pitt.edu/cp today.

2) Darrelle Revis (2007): Only Darrelle and Gilligan have been special enough to have the word “Island” placed after their names. The Aliquippa Quip has seven Pro Bowls, 430 tackles, 28 interceptions and a Super Bowl on his Canton-bound resume. He has been one of the few things New York Jet fans have ever had a reason to be excited about.

1) Larry Fitzgerald (2004):

6) Aaron Donald (2014): The Los Angeles Ram is No. 6 and climbing rapidly. He’s already been to the Pro Bowl twice in as many seasons. Donald has compiled 117 tackles and 20 sacks along with accolades too numerous to list. By next year, the Penn Hills representative will probably be No. 3 on this list.

So when you go see the Pitt Panthers this fall, don’t just think of it as watching a college football game — think of it as an NFL futures game. I’m definitely going because the seats are cheap now, and when they get to the pros, I won’t be able to afford to see them live.

Clemmings was drafted in the fourth round last season by Minnesota. He’s already tied a franchise rookie record by starting all 16 games in his first season. The 309-pound tackle could probably eat a medium order of fries at the Dirty O all by himself. But not a large order — nobody can do that.

NEXT.

3) LeSean McCoy (2009):

The greatest Pitt player in the past 30 years. He has nine Pro Bowls, 98 touchdowns and 13,366 receiving yards. He’s so good that he helped the Arizona Cardinals get to the Super Bowl, a once-unthinkable task. They should just retire his number while he’s playing, because he’s the best player in that organization’s history. He is 11th all-time in receptions, and if he catches 60 passes this year, he will tie Terrell Owens for sixth in NFL history. His 98 touchdowns are also 11th all-time; 13 more and he will be sixth on that list as well.

7) T.J. Clemmings (2015):

WE’RE WHAT’S

M I K E W YS OC KI IS A STA NDUP CO MED I AN AN D MEMBER O F THE Q MO R NING SH O W E AC H W E E KDAY MOR NING ON Q 92.9 FM. FO LLO W HI M O N TWI TTER: @I T SMIK E WYSO C K I

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2016

THIS WEEK IN CITY PAPER HISTORY

In celebration of City Paper’s 25th Anniversary, each week we’re looking back at the headlines, pictures and people who graced our pages over the years.

BILKING COMPETITION (May 17, 1995) It seemed like an innocuous story at the time. Thrift Drug, a once-large regional drugstore chain, held a big-time annual cycling event in Pittsburgh. Alan Wallace wrote a story for CP about the event adding a women’s invitational. Also, in 1996, the event would be part of the selection process for the U.S. Olympic team. But the most fascinating item in this report is about a young cyclist named Lance Armstrong. Armstrong had won this event the three previous years, including in 1993, when he’d won $1 million for taking three races known as cycling’s Triple Crown — the first round of which was in Pittsburgh. Many years later, as allegations came out about Armstrong’s decades-long history of cheating, came the admission that he paid off opposing riders in the Thrift Drug Triple Crown to let him win.

WON’T YOU CUT MY NEIGHBOR? (May 16, 1996) John Gardner wrote about how WQED, the publictelevision station that brought Mr. Rogers to the world, was facing some hard business decisions in the face of a $12 million debt. QED was considering selling off its flagship publication, Pittsburgh Magazine (a move that wouldn’t happen for many years), and was looking for ways to cut its budget. Prior to this story, the station was hit with allegations of mismanagement and high pay for executives. Not much positive would come of this, however. There were staff and programming cutbacks from time to time, but the station’s debt remained high, as did

There are certain issues of City Paper that we publish annually, and finding original concepts can be challenging. Take our Summer Guide. Each year we try to come up with a great image that says: “Hey, it’s summer; pick me up and see all the awesome stuff going on from now until Labor Day!” On May 20, 2013, then-editor Chris Potter had a fun, quirky idea based on the old ads in the backs of comic books that sold Sea Monkeys — underwater creatures that could be “trained to do tricks” and “entertain.” Of course, the original product was something of a scam, and our spoof was so obviously fake that we thought nobody could mistake it for a real product. Artist Mario Zucca drew the cover, and an inside cover even included a description of the creatures and ordering information. The “Mon-Monkeys” could be trained to do “all sorts of things: waving tiny towels over their heads and voting for members of the Zappala family.” It also came with a water depurifier to “ensure there’s enough pollution to keep your Mon-Monkeys feeling right at home.” For $2.50, plus $1.50 shipping and handling, you could get a MonMonkey starter kit by sending the money and order form to the Allegheny Conference on Community Development. Sure, the ACCD was a real organization and we even printed its real address, but what’s the problem? It’s obviously a joke, right? Not only did we receive inquiries at City Paper offices about ordering the creatures, but the ACCD received several order forms in the mail that included real checks for a fake product. Two weeks later, CP issued a clarification under the headline: “Mon-Monkeys do not exist.” The mea culpa concluded: “Mon-monkeys do not exist, and the only purpose of this ‘ad’ was to create a loving satire of Pittsburgh life. We apologize to our readers who may have been confused and to the Allegheny Conference for any headaches caused by our ridiculous stunt.”

SummerFest tours around town JUNE 22-JULY 1. Expanding to Winchester Thurston School, Shadyside, JULY 7-24. Tickets start at $25.

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executive salaries, until 2015, when executive pay was cut and a quarter of the station’s staff was laid off. The remaining debt, about $5 million should be retired in 2030.

PATIENCE, MR. PEDUTO, PATIENCE (May 25, 2005) Chris Potter reported from the election-night campaign party of then-city councilor Bill Peduto, who had just been drubbed by newly elected Mayor Bob O’Connor. Peduto told reporters that a new political movement was coming. Potter wrote: “Every candidate says he’s building a platform for the future, of course. … But Peduto may actually deliver.” It didn’t happen four years later, but the 2013 campaign was filled with the buzzword “New Pittsburgh.”

THE HEALING POWER OF OHIO (May 15, 2008) CP writer Al Hoff decided to take a road trip as the main feature of our Summer Guide. But Hoff, never one for convention, toured religious attractions in Pennsylvania, Ohio, West Virginia and Maryland. Among the highlights was a visit to Ernest Angley’s ministry outside of Cleveland, in Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. She attended a Friday-night service, led by the famous/infamous Angley, that featured one of his classic healing sessions. Hoff reported: “I see no genuine miracles. A young man with crutches discards them, then limps a few steps. Angely pronounces him healed but returns the crutches, telling him to ‘use them ’til you don’t need to anymore.’ Well, duh.”


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SPICY OCTOPUS IS A NEW DISH, AND IT WAS FANTASTIC

FORK AND FARM {BY ASHLEY MURRAY} The latest opportunity in dining farm-to-fork comes from Frankferd Farms in Saxonburg, Pa. What started as a small farm and flour mill in the mid-20th century is now a thriving organic-foods and -flour distributor. This summer, the more-than-100-year-old barn will be open for a dinner series. “We love to share food,” says Terra Ferderber, whose parents still own the farm where she is now the manager of special projects. “It’s our livelihood obviously, but we’ve always found that our favorite social gatherings and some of our best friendships were born over food.” From June to September, Ferderber will partner with four of the business’ clients to present themed meals. These include: Randita’s (vegan dinner), 412 Food Rescue (charity dinner), Franktuary and Spak Brothers. Wigle Whiskey will provide the cocktails; Narcisi Winery will pour out, of course, the wine; local breweries will feature beer; and even the live music will be locally sourced. “It’s a pretty rustic setting,” Ferderber says. “The barn that the dinners are in is, I think, 125 years old, but with a little bit of a modern twist. We have solar panels on it now.” Tables will be communal, and Ferderber says she’s hoping that “people leave with new friends and a deeper respect or understanding of what it takes to get food from a farm onto a dinner plate.”

{PHOTO BY VANESSA SONG}

Beef shank ramen with a soft egg, leeks, pickled Chinese cabbage and toasted garlic chips

LESS IS MORE

AMURRAY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Farmer’s Fork Dinner Series. June 25, July 23, Aug. 20 and Sept. 24. $80-95. www.showclix.com/event/farmersfork-dinner-series

{BY ANGELIQUE BAMBERG + JASON ROTH}

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Make It for Lunch: In a bowl, mix chickpeas, fresh lemon juice, a splash of olive oil, chopped bell peppers, crumbled feta cheese, minced fresh parsley and seasonings (salt, pepper, zatar mix). Refrigerate. Before eating, add pita chips for crunch.

RIT & GRACE opened two-and-a-

half years ago promising to “push opposites to the extreme,” as suggested by the name and demonstrated by a menu that brought together disparate global cuisines, classic and ultra-modern techniques, and ingredients from lobster to Cheez-Its. It mostly nailed it, but a recent rebranding and menu revamp confirms our hunch that food might be one area where most people are not looking for an extreme experience. Under the more casual banner of G&G Noodle Bar, not all of the original concept has been jettisoned. There are still daily dim sum offerings, a blend of sharing plates and entrees, and even certain specific dishes have been held over. But like a brash youth putting on the responsible suit of adulthood, G&G’s menu has quit

its global adventuring and settled firmly in the inspirational territory of East Asia. Dishes hew more closely to their traditional antecedents, and molecular gastronomy has evaporated.

G&G NOODLE BAR 535 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-281-4748 HOURS: Mon.-Thu. 11:30 a.m.-10 p.m.; Fri.-Sat. 11:30 a.m.-11 p.m.; Sun. brunch 10:30 a.m.-2 p.m., dinner 4-9 p.m. PRICES: $5-15 LIQUOR: Full bar

CP APPROVED One of our favorites from Grit & Grace to survive this transition was short rib on a split cream-cheese biscuit with hollandaise. The biscuit was richly tender and crisp-edged, the beef utterly supple and

succulent, and the hollandaise decadently creamy, though the new sesame inflection was so subtle as to be in name only. Another former favorite didn’t acquit itself quite so well this time around. Dim sum pork-belly bites were served in an orange-chili-garlic-ginger glaze that was syrupy, but not very sweet, and dotted with a spicy, creamy sauce. This was all good, but the meat itself was uniformly chewy where, on our previous visit, it had been tender with faintly crisp edges. Spicy octopus was the first of the new dishes we tried, and it was fantastic, despite several ingredients that, not unlike the old menu, made us say “hmm”: celery, candied cashews and egg custard. While none of these is an obvious accompaniment to cephalopod salad, they worked together wonderfully against the tender CONTINUES ON PG. 16

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LESS IS MORE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 15

sliced tentacles flavored with garlic and chili oil. The celery consisted of leaves and pale, non-stringy slices of heart, while the egg custard was in small, firm cubes that recalled tofu, but richer. The nutty sweetness of the chopped cashews brought welcome counterpoint to this salad’s bitter, salty and spicy notes. Pork potstickers have become de rigueur on menus from bars to bistros, so common they hardly resister as Asian anymore. G&G’s surpassed most with their beautifully browned wrappers and flavorful filling studded with zingy green onions; they were served in a shallow film of soy sauce flavored with astringent Chinese vinegar. Chicken satay was in meatball format, drizzled with teriyaki and plated with smears of butter-like peanut sauce, with some pickled shallot for texture and brightness. The meatballs were plump and juicy, but also too salty, alas. Salt was also an issue with the fivespice roasted pork shoulder that accompanied our ramen. There are three traditional ramen bowls on the menu, but this dish came on a plate, with slices of pork, a mound of noodles and a dipping bowl of broth. The noodles were studded with chili, ginger and scallion, while the broth was slightly piquant and simply luscious. But on the pork, the cumulative warmth of star anise, cinnamon, cloves, fennel, and Sichuan peppercorns was overwhelmed by salt, as if the meat had been both brined and rubbed. Seafood coconut curry with rice noodles sounded like it would be soupy, but instead clung almost invisibly to flat, perfectly al dente noodles. The sauce was perceptible mainly by its wonderful flavor, delicate and aromatic, punched up by plenteous slices of red jalapeño. The dish’s shrimp and mussels were beyond reproach, but the curry itself was brilliant. Dandan, a Chinese street-food noodle dish featuring spicy ground pork in a nutty sesame-based sauce, also shone in an almost dry preparation that highlighted the textures as well as the flavors of its other ingredients: crunchy, juicy bean sprouts; pungent pickled Chinese cabbage; and a dippy egg that melted into the noodles when its yolk was broken. In a sense, it’s a shame that the striving ambition so evident in Grit & Grace’s original incarnation has been replaced by the comfort-food cliché of the moment, noodles. But it’s hard not to love noodles as good as these, and the kitchen’s underlying intelligence shone through in almost every dish we tasted. Grit & Grace is done and gone; long live G&G Noodle Bar. INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

On the RoCKs

{BY CELINE ROBERTS}

OWNING IT Employee ownership at Voodoo Brewery Voodoo Brewery in Homestead buzzed with excited employees on the night of May 4 when the company officially launched its new employee-ownership program. General Manager Jake Voelker and the ownership group spent a year working with financial advisers to develop the program that would best suit the company’s 17 employees. Eligible staff will now own stock in the business, with an increasing percentage over a six-year period.

“MY EMPLOYEES ARE LIKE A FAMILY.” Given the food and beverage industry’s high employee-turnover rate, Voodoo’s Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) is meant to reward employees who stay with the company and to inspire vested interest in its day-to-day operation. Voelker felt strongly about the program and rewarding his employees’ investment of time and dedication in building Voodoo. “This is a proud day for me. This is more than just a job; my employees are like a family,” said Voelker. Voodoo Brewery is now one of the country’s smallest employee-owned businesses. With nine years under its belt, Voodoo was one of the earlier craft breweries in Western Pennsylvania. The original location is in Meadville; the Homestead location opened in 2015. The brewery also launched a food truck, doubled its brewing capacity and expanded distribution to all of Pennsylvania’s counties and into two new states. Voodoo places a high priority on creativity and harnessing the ideas of everyone in the company to produce a superior product and experience. For instance, staff and management collaborate on events — including themed food-truck roundups — that happen weekly at both locations. The brewery’s motto is to create beers that are “fun, flavorful and thought-provoking.” Its products also tend to have a higher ABV than an average domestic. (The alcoholby-volume content of Voodoo’s regularly available beers ranges between 7 and 12.5 percent.) The beer bottles are decorated with colorful labels and provide backstories on the product. This move toward employee ownership shows that Voodoo is dedicated to making its work environment, like its brews, “fun, flavorful and thought-provoking.” CELINE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


THE FOLLOWING DINING LISTINGS ARE RESTAURANTS RECOMMENDED BY CITY PAPER FOOD CRITICS

Thank you City Paper readers for voting us one of the Best Chinese Restaurants in Pittsburgh

DINING LISTINGS KEY J = Cheap K = Night Out L = Splurge E = Alcohol Served F = BYOB

China Palace Shadyside

CAFÉ DELHI. 205 Mary St., Carnegie. 412-278-5058. A former Catholic church in Carnegie now houses an Indian café, with a menu ranging from dosa to biryani to palak paneer. From a cafeteria-style menu, order street snacks (chaats, puris), or the nuggetlike, spicy fried “Chicken 65.” Hearty fare includes chickpea stew, and a kebab wrapped in Indian naan bread. JF CURRY ON MURRAY. 2121 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-422-3120. The menu here is fairly standard Thai, featuring your favorites but also offering few surprises. So alongside satay, larb salad, pad Thai and the popular street-food noodle dish, pad see ew, look for moo dad deaw, a fried pork appetizer or a pumpkin-tofu curry. KF MEAT AND POTATOES. 649 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-325-7007. This restaurant combines several current trends, including revisiting staples of the American pantry, the gastro-pub and nose-to-tail cooking, all in a lively Downtown space. Expect everything from marrow bones to burgers, flatbreads and chicken pot pie, as well as pots of rhubarb jam and hand-crafted cocktails. LE

Featuring cuisine in the style of

Peking, Hunan, Szechuan and Mandarin

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VEGETARIAN DISHES!

Café Delhi {CP FILE PHOTO BY HEATHER MULL} offerings tucked away under “Specialties” and “Chef’s Specials.” Appetizers include corn fritters and steamed dumplings, and among the less-common entrees are tropical bird’s nest (with a shredded potato base) and tamarind tofu. KF POOR RICHARD’S WEXFORD ALEHOUSE. 10501 Perry Highway, Wexford. 724-9359870. This bar and restaurant delivers top-notch pub grub, plus a well-curated beer menu. Among the offerings: the Buffalo, N.Y. classic sandwich, roast beef on weck, a Germanic roll with caraway seeds; and mac-andcheese, made with Buffalo hot sauce. Well-prepared burgers, wings, fish and chips, and sandwiches round out the menu. KE

NAYA. 2018 Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-4211920. At this storefront restaurant, diners can PROPER BRICK explore the depths of www. per OVEN AND TAP Syrian cuisine as well a p ty ci h g p ROOM. 139 Seventh as a few Middle .com St., Downtown. Eastern favorites, such 412-281-5700. This cozy baba ghanoush. Among Downtown spot offers a menu the entrees: samaka harrah of snacks, pizzas and pastas, but (“spicy Syrian fish”), shawarma strives to be about as refined served with rice pilaf, and lamb as that workmanlike trinity can in a fruit sauce paired with be. Some cheeses and pasta are mashed potatoes. KF housemade, and many starters are closer to tapas or antipasti OISHII BENTO. 119 Oakland than to pub grub. More than Ave., Oakland. 412-687-3335. 30 beers are on tap, as well. KE Bamboo walls and a low counter with colorful cloth cubes for THE RED RING. 1015 Forbes seating denote a place for Ave., Uptown. 412-396-3550. moderately priced Japanese This Duquesne University venue food, including sushi. Oishii also is a decided cut above student adds a few Korean dishes for dining. The dining room is variety and spice; those seeking spacious, with a handsome a little heat might consider fieldstone bar. The fare is bulgogi, the Korean BBQ. JF contemporary American cuisine, with a thoughtful selection of PITTSBURGH THAI internationally inflected classics RESTAURANT BY BORIS. like chipotle barbecue pork ten321 South Ave., Verona. derloin and blackened chicken 412-828-0339. Expect to find alfredo. Artisanal touches like with the standard array of Thai a side dish of “chef’s grains” curries, noodle dishes and complete the picture. KE stir fries, with more unusual

FULL LIST ONLINE

SAUSALIDO. 4621 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. 412-683-4575. Casual elegance is the byword at this neighborhood venue, where the fare is inspired by Northern California cuisine, with seasonal ingredients combined into New American and Continental dishes. The preparations vary widely, from ultra-traditional offerings like crab-stuffed shrimp to au courant updates like duck with orange-apricot balsamic glaze. LF SUKHOTHAI BISTRO. 5813 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8989. This restaurant merges the traditional flavors and preparations of Thailand with modern European-bistro aspirations. The menu features an assortment of curries and rice and noodle dishes, peppered with a few more intriguing options among the chef’s specials and entrée lists. KF TANA ETHIOPIAN CUISINE. 5929 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. 412-665-2770. The menu offers a variety of stewed meats, legumes and veggies, all rich with warm spices. Order the sampler platters for the best variety of flavors, and ask for a glass of tej, a honey-based wine that is the perfect accompaniment. KE VILLAGE TAVERN & TRATTORIA. 424 S. Main St., West End. 412-458-0417. This warm, welcoming, and satisfying Italian restaurant is a reason to brave the West End Circle. The menu offers variety within a few narrowly constrained categories: antipasti, pizza and pasta, with the pasta section organized around seven noodle shapes, from capelli to rigatoni, each paired with three or four distinct sauces. KE

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LOCAL

“NOT ONLY IS JUMP WITH JILL EDUCATIONALLY SOUND, IT IS COMPLETELY ROCK AND ROLL.”

BEAT

{BY ALEX GORDON}

Walk into Heinz Hall this Sunday and you’ll see a huge video screen over the stage in lieu of the musicians, dancers or comedians who usually perform there. Four-thousand-something miles away in Berlin, the musicians of the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra will be preparing for a night of Rachmaninoff, Beethoven and Tchaikovsky. At 2 p.m. EST, the PSO connects the two for its first live, public streaming of an overseas concert — available free to viewers at Heinz Hall or on pittsburghsymphonyorchestra.com. “[The Berlin Philharmonic has] an incredible technical set-up there which is equivalent to the Met broadcast from the Metropolitan Opera,” says Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra President Melia Tourangeau. “So what we’re doing is basically taking advantage of that system and doing a live feed of the concert back to Heinz Hall in real time. It will be as if you’re sitting in Berlin watching the Pittsburgh Symphony.” The simulcast is a product of good timing — 8 p.m. in Berlin lines up nicely with a matinee in Pittsburgh — and the robust digital infrastructure of the Berlin Philharmonic. Its Digital Concert Hall program, which provides live streams of performances across a number of online platforms, is a standout, even as digital streaming has become more common in classical music. “At the beginning, HD streaming on the Internet was a tough challenge,” Tobias Möller, director of marketing and communications for Berlin Phil Media, wrote via email. “You need to invest continuously in all kinds of platforms because customers expect you to present your content on all media.” Classical music is expensive to produce. The quality of the instruments, the number of performers, the reliance on good acoustics — it all adds up to a pricey ticket. While a live stream might not match the power of an in-the-room performance, it does allow the organization to reach a new audience and share its music beyond the confines of ticket price. “We’re really one of the premiere ambassadors of the city and the region,” says PSO’s Tourangeau. “So the purpose of this broadcast back to Heinz Hall is to say, ‘Come and see what the world is actually seeing while we’re out and about.’” ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PSO CONCERT LIVE STREAM 2 p.m. Sun., May 22. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Free, reservations required. 412-392-4900 or pittsburghsymphony.org/berlin

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The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra {PHOTO COURTESY OF MICHAEL SAHAIDA}

AUDIO/VISUAL

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JUMP WITH JILL}

Jump with Jill creator Jill Jayne

HEALTH ROCK {BY REBECCA NUTTALL}

I

T’S EASY TO see why Jump with Jill, the

internationally touring rock ’n’ roll nutrition show, appeals to kids. A music video for the song “Sweet Beat” features everything you’d expect from a chart-topping hip-hop hit: break-dancing, a DJ on turntables and a car displayed in the background. Another video, for “Get Me Going,” features a rapping Pitbull-esque character complete with suit and bling, and Jump with Jill creator Jill Jayne belting out Jennifer Lopez-esque vocals. “Not only is Jump with Jill educationally sound, it is completely rock and roll,” Jill Jayne wrote in an email to Pittsburgh City Paper while on tour. “We reach kids in a way that actually interests them. The timing of our program is also extremely relevant to our success. Now, more than ever, our society is interested in nutrition and wellness. This allows us so many opportunities to bring Jump with Jill to kids all over the world to enjoy and learn from.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

Jump with Jill specializes in teaching nutrition and physical-activity habits through music and dance, with the goal of getting “kids to remember a song about water instead of a jingle about soda,” Jayne says. The idea originated as part of her master’s thesis at Columbia University. For more information visit

WWW.JUMPWITHJILL.COM “Jump with Jill comes from a really honest place,” says Mark Jayne, Jill’s brother, who plays the role of DJ. “We originally were tasked with teaching classes of innercity kids in New York City about nutrition, and you can’t just go rolling in there, kicking in the door with facts and percentages about how someday you might get heart disease. We had to develop something immediately to reach these kids. And that’s why it’s special, it’s why it works, because it’s not some corporate product.”

Mark and Jill were both in college, touring in rock bands while they worked on their degrees in communications and nutrition respectively, when the idea for Jump with Jill emerged. What started as a street show in Central Park in 2006 is now celebrating its 10th anniversary. And through the years, it’s been a way for the two to stay connected to their passion for music. “When you’re a musician there’s so many things that are running through your head about what’s important. Is it superstardom, is it money, is it response to art?” says Mark Jayne. “Jill and I always felt like we just wanted people to interact with our art and interact with our music and that’s what we have with Jump with Jill. We always respond to that connection.” And now their business has grown to three casts touring internationally. Locally, they’ve performed for the Woodland Hills, New Kensington and Pittsburgh Public school districts. As Pittsburgh natives, CONTINUES ON PG. 20


05|23

BECCA STEVENS BAND

06|09

DALE AND ZDUBS

06|11

NAUGHTY PROFESSOR

06|18

CHARLIE WHEELER BAND

06|26

CON BRIO

09|09

MOJOFLO

M AY 18 | 21+

MAY 20 | 18 +

J U N E 1 | 21+

J U N E 3 | 21+

J U N E 2 3 | 21+

J U N E 10 | A L L AG E S

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HEALTH ROCK, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

LISTEN UP! You read City Paper’s music coverage every week, but why not listen to it too? Each Wednesday, music editor Margaret Welsh crafts a Spotify playlist with tracks from artists featured in the music section, and other artists playing around town in the coming days.

Find it on our music blog, FFW>>, at pghcitypaper.com

these are some of their favorite shows. “As a kid, [nutrition is] something that never really stood out to me, and I think as adults Jill and I really understood the need to make nutrition education interesting and fun,” says Mark Jayne. “Reflecting on when we were kids, [nutrition] was really square and really boring. We really do try to leverage what … gets them excited.” The background of the cast of Jump with Jill is diverse, including an improv comedian, school teachers and dieticians. But the one major requirement for cast members is to stay up to date on pop culture. “Every year the show changes. The attention span of young people today is getting shorter and shorter, so you have to be saying the right things, playing the right songs, having the right jokes,” says Mark Jayne. “Everybody who works here, no matter how old you are, you have to know the Top 40 songs that the kids are singing. Staying current is the difference between a group of kids staring at you versus them thinking you’re the coolest person ever because you played the right song at the right time, and they realize they can relate to you.” While Jump with Jill’s songs and videos are stylized in a vein similar to Kidz Bop covers of pop hits, the lyrics have more messages than today’s vapid Top 40 tunes. Lyrics include, “I eat fruit because it’s sweet / Make a fruit salad / It’s so sweet” and “Grabbing up my spoon and bowl / pouring in my cereal / Splash it with some low-fat milk.” “Music speaks to everyone young and old,” says Jill Jayne via email. “We feel here at Jump with Jill that no one likes to be bored, especially kids. Music is that universal language that immediately connects us. From there, we are able to open the larger conversation about nutrition and why it rocks so hard!” Ultimately, for Mark, Jill and their fellow cast members, being a part of Jump with Jill is a way to fight against the mass promotion of unhealthy foods. They also say it helps promote the importance of ensuring that children have access to healthy foods. “I’ve always had a passion for inspiring and educating students, so being able to put my passion for teaching with my passion for performing together to empower students to make healthy choices for themselves is incredible,” says Hailey McDonell, who plays the role of Jill in the mid-Atlantic cast. “I have performed the show over 300 times, and I still get chills when the kids are screaming for vegetables and nature’s candy. It’s absolutely incredible and such an amazing opportunity not only for me but also for the kids that get to see the show.” R NU T TAL L @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

NEW RELEASES {BY ANDREW WOEHREL}

AUBREE NICOLE DIARY OF AUBREE (TAYLOR WAY ENTERTAINMENT) WWW.DIARYOFAUBREE.COM

It’s tempting at first to make shallow comparisons between Aubree Nicole and Adele: They both have “A” names and were born in the U.K. Nicole, however, moved to Pittsburgh to pursue a career as a pop singer (move over, Los Angeles!). And on this five-song debut EP, Nicole shows that she is no Adele knockoff: On the track “So Fly,” in particular, she takes more inspiration from Beyoncé. Nicole has a smoky voice that sounds more mature than her 21 years, and her slinky and modern R&B beats are a consistent highlight. Though Diary of Aubree feels a bit unfinished (several songs just seem to fade out without a proper conclusion) and has some dated-sounding production choices, it’s clear that this is the work of a young singer with a lot of aspiration and drive.

SOUR WINE CULT POSCA (ARMED PUSSY CAT RECORDS) WWW.FACEBOOK.COM/SWCROCKS

Remember when Scott Weiland died back in November, and people started thinking about Stone Temple Pilots again? I don’t think the members of Sour Wine Cult ever stopped thinking about Stone Temple Pilots. (This actually makes sense: Sour Wine Cult formed during STP’s heyday, in 1993, then broke up, then reformed two decades later.) Posca sounds like an artifact from a certain time and place, namely a stereo tuned to a modern-rock radio station sometime in the ’90s. It’s hard to believe that this record came out this year, because it’s such a dead ringer for postgrunge bands like Seven Mary Three, Candlebox or Collective Soul — though Sour Wine Cult thankfully lacks the pomposity and pretentiousness of many of those bands. INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM


{PHOTO COURTESY OF SHAWN BRACKBILL}

Zombi: Steve Moore (left) and Anthony Paterra

REANIMATOR ROCK {BY MARGARET WELSH} FOR MOST BANDS, a physical separation is

the same as a breakup. For Zombi, it was just the beginning of a new era. After forming in Pittsburgh around 2000, Zombi spent several years making a name for itself, helping put Pittsburgh music on the map, mostly through steady touring. Then things began to slow down. In 2009, bassist Steve Moore moved to New York City while drummer Anthony Paterra stayed behind to work on his own projects. But the two continued to make music, via file-sharing: In Zombi, synthesizers essentially take the place of guitars, so Paterra would record drums for synth tracks, and Moore would add bass tracks, or vice versa.

ZOMBI, TROXUM, BROUGHTON’S RULES 10 p.m. Sat., May 21. Spirit. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $12-15. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

“When we first started doing that, it was fun, it was really freeing,” says Paterra. They recorded two well-received records that way — 2009’s Spirit Animal and 2011’s Escape Velocity. But eventually that approach started to get old: The distance affected the music. Those records still sounded like Zombi, but they were a bit more sterile, a little less human. “There was that period where it seemed like everything became a little too produced or clean,” Paterra says. “[We both played] in these kind of post-punk bands back in the day, and we still like that rawness to come across.” From the beginning, Paterra and

Moore’s musical partnership was built on a love of the British prog rock of King Crimson and Yes, and the band Goblin, which scored the soundtracks to horror movies like Dawn of the Dead. Those are the influences most evident in Zombi’s eerie, spaced-out jams, but a strong affection for bands like Van Halen and Deep Purple also shines through. Words like synthwave are invariably used to describe Zombi, but the duo wants listeners to remember that it is, first and foremost, a rock band. To that point, last year’s Shape Shift was written and recorded with both members in the same room, and the result might be the most rocking and fully realized entry to the band’s catalog. “When you get away from [playing and recording in person], you kind of lose a lot of the intricacies … that you would write if you were continually playing together,” Paterra says. “Those little bits of personality are lost when you’re just writing things on your own and then saying, ‘Here’s a finished song, just put drums to this.’” It’s also notable that, unlike those last couple records, most of the songs on Shape Shift can be recreated live. “We wrote it with that in mind, and that sets certain limitations on what we can do, but it is nice knowing that we can pull it off in a live setting.” Zombi remains a long-distance band — Moore lives in New York state and Paterra’s solo project, Majeure, will hit the road with Vancouver’s Black Mountain in June — so tours are rare. Last November, the duo went out for two weeks, for the first time in two years. This tour, built around an appearance at Moogfest in Durham, N.C., is just eight shows. But playing together in person always feels good. “I love it,” Paterra says. “I know Steve missed it as well. ... We’ve played so many shows that now to go out and do less than 10 shows is kind of a nice thing.” MWELSH @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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ANN

HALFWAY TO HALLOWEEN

CRITICS’ PICKS {PHOTO COURTESY OF JULIE PINZUR}

6THUAL

SAT., MAY 21

BAR CRAWL

GO TEAM MIKE!

CREEPY CRAWL SPONSORS

PARTICIPANTS WILL RECEIVE:

CARMELLA’S

LIMTED EDITION T-SHIRT

3:00 PM -4:00 PM

ONLY 100 MADE! FIRST COME FIRST SERVED!

4:00 PM -5:00 PM

BENNY FIERRO’S PIZZA RAFFLE TICKETS FOR AMAZING PRIZES! JEKYL & HYDE’S AFTER CRAWL PARTY 9PM

SMOKING JOE’S SALOON 5:00 -5:00

TICKETS:

PM

STEEL CACTUS 6:00 PM -7:00 PM

PREGAME 7:00 PM -8:00 PM

RUSTY BARREL 8:00 PM -9:00 PM

ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE LEUKEMIA & LYMPHOMA SOCIETY $15 TO PRE REGISTER $20 DAY OF CRAWL MUST BE 21 WITH VALID I.D.

140 S. 18TH STREET

|

412-488-0777

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LIKE US ON FACEBOOK!

[POP] + FRI., MAY 20 Equal parts gloomy and charming, Peach Kelli Pop’s sound is overflowing with infectious melodies. The band has mastered the art of combining driving punk with pop sensibilities, and that combination allows for thrashy tunes like “Hundred Dollar Bill� to exist in tandem with the lilting waltz of “Stuck in a Dream.� This spring tour rides on the recent release of Halloween Mask, a 7-inch out on Lauren Records, and will be stopping tonight at the Mr. Roboto Project. Filling out the lineup is the fuzzy-rock darlings Dream Phone, noise-rockers Dumplings and garagedwellers The Spectres. Meg Fair 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $10. All ages. www. robotoproject.org

[INDIE ROCK] + FRI., MAY 20

May 20 |

6–10 pm

Dig out that vvintage Prom attire, dance the night away, awa and pose for a Prom photo in front fron of our green screen! Cash bars, snack snacks available for purchase, DJ, IRXUçRRUVRIH[KLELWVVFLHQFHIXQDQG12.,'6 IRXUçRRUVRIH[KL INFO + REGISTRATION: &DUQHJLH6FLHQFH&HQWHURUJ &RVWLQDGYDQFHGD\RIWKHHYHQW &RVW

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

The Tilt Room is celebrating the release of its new record, Nostalgic Future. The Pittsburgh-based indie-rock project is guided by the acoustic The Tilt guitar work of vocalist Room Mike Swindell. The album features whispers of prog rock, and it ebbs and flows between energetically hopeful and laid-back. Joining the Tilt Room at Club CafÊ is 3 Dudes Chillin’, a mellow, stripped-down trio with hints of reggae and acoustic rock. MF 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $8. 412-431-4950 or www.clubcafelive.com

[ROCK] + SUN., MAY 22 Coif your Morrissey swoop and ready yourself: DIIV is bringing its bouncy, saccharine rock to Spirit. Grooving bass lines and chorus-pedalladen guitars guide the memorable riffs and floating vocals on DIIV’s latest release, Is the Is Are. The atmospheric sound marries well with the brooding, intimate lyrics of the project’s leader, Zachary Cole Smith. The Paranoyds will

complement the new-wave-drenched sounds of DIIV with a grimier rock sound. Mysterious third opener bring her is sure to fit right in. MF 7 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $15. 412-586-4441 or www.spiritpgh.com

[GOTH] + SUN., MAY 22 Philadelphia’s Haldol stops at the Rock Room tonight to share its goth post-punk and dark political warnings. Starting with “Hasbara,� a song about the reason behind Israel’s public-relations effort, the band self-titled LP dismantles topics like oppression, violence and organized religion. Haldol’s sound would be aptly personified by the image of a deeply stern and disappointed grim reaper. Locals Empty Beings, whose brief, aggressive tracks are accented by haunting vocals and eerie licks, will open the show. MF 8 p.m. 1054 Herron Ave, Polish Hill. $5. All ages. 412-683-4418 {PHOTO COURTESY OF SALENE MAZUR KRAEMER PHOTOS}

TIKI LOUNGE PM

Peach Kelli Pop

[PUNK] + WED., MAY 25 The Urinals, appearing tonight at Howlers, are true punks. The band formed in the late ’70s as a joke but went on to perform with bands like Black Flag, carving out a nook in SoCal’s influential punk history. Lately, the Urinals’ sound is a bit less lo-fi and grimy than the characteristic blistering punk of, say, its ’97 release Negative Capability ‌ Check It Out!, but it still carries the same energy and wit. Next Year at Marienbad, from 2014, offers a more straightforward rock sound, with tracks like “Water / Bloodâ€? even expressing some pop leanings. Garage-rock locals Love Letters and a punk-rock-inspired indie rapper from New Jersey, JE Double F, open. MF 9 p.m. 4509 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. $10. 21 and over. 412-682-0320 or www.howlerspittsburgh.com


presents

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS

PITTSBURGH PREMIERE LIVE CONCERT VENUE

412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

it lives, it breathes

{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

MAY 27 | 7:00 | AA

ROCK/POP THU 19 ALTAR BAR. Blue October, Danny Malone. Strip District. 412-263-2877. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. The Garment District, Meeting of Important People, Mars Jackson. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CLUB CAFE. Delicious Pastries, Tuff Sunshine, Wreck Loose. South Side. 412-431-4950. CORNER CAFE. Shake it Like a Caveman. South Side. 412-488-2995. HOWLERS. The Big Easy, Ouais, Thanks Dad. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. LINDEN GROVE. Good Guys. Castle Shannon. 412-882-8687. REX THEATER. Foundation of Funk, feat. George Porter Jr. & Zigaboo Modeliste, Eric Krasno & Neal Evans. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. The Vagrants Acoustic. North Side. 412-231-7777. SMILING MOOSE. Venus in Furs & Those Gorgeous Bastards. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOONWOOD BREWING COMPANY. Good Brother Earl. Bethel Park. 412-833-0333.

FRI 20 ARENA SPORTS GRILL. Lenny Smith & The Instant Gators. North Huntingdon. 724-382-4915.

BLOOMFIELD BRIDGE TAVERN. ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. Black Tie Stereo. Those Gorgeous Bastards, Alter Lawrenceville. 412-260-6968. the Design & Lunatics. Bloomfield. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Smokin Gun. 412-682-8611. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. CLUB CAFE. The Tilt Room w/ CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. The 3 Dudes Chillin’. CD release show. Milk Carton Kids w/ Margaret Early. Nameless In August w/ Glaspy. Oakland. Hey Mavis. Late. South Side. CLUB CAFE. Dom Flemons 412-431-4950. w/ The Early Mays. South Side. HARD ROCK CAFE. Mike Mains 412-431-4950. & the Branches, Cape Cod, ELLIOTT’S BBQ & STEAKHOUSE. How to Rob a Bank. Station Daniels & McClain. Square. 412-481-7625. Pleasant Hills. HOWLERS. Ruby & the EXCUSES BAR & Hatchet, Cruces and GRILL. Bill Toms & Argus. Bloomfield. Hard Rain. South Side. 412-682-0320. . w ww per 412-431-4090. JAMES STREET a p ty ci h pg GOOSKI’S. GASTROPUB & .com Del Rios, Six Speed SPEAKEASY. Cold Roses. Kill, Midnight Chaser, North Side. 412-904-3335. Weapons of Choice. NIED’S HOTEL. The GRID. Polish Hill. 412-681-1658. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. HAMBONE’S. The Goodfoots. PITTSBURGH WINERY. The Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. Commonheart w/ Billy Price. HOWLERS. Fetish Noir with Strip District. 412-566-1000. Open Hearts & Meg Pennington RIVERS CASINO. Jeff Jimerson & The Misfit Toys. Bloomfield. Duo. North Side. 412-231-7777. 412-682-0320. SHELBY’S STATION. Dave & JAMES STREET Andrea Iglar Duo. Bridgeville. GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. STAGE AE. Alice Cooper. Billy Price. Ballroom. North Side. 412-229-5483. Dan Bubian. Speakeasy. North Side. 412-904-3335. KOPPER KETTLE. King’s Ransom. ALTAR BAR. Enter Shikari, Hands Washington. 724-225-5221. Like Houses, The White Noise, THE MEADOWS. Velveeta. False Accusations. Strip District. West Mifflin. 412-650-9000. 412-263-2877. MR. SMALLS THEATER. Hayes Carll w/ Emily Gimble. Millvale. 412-821-4447. NATRONA HEIGHTS VFW POST 894. The Shiners. Hoka Hey Challange Fundraiser. Natrona Heights. 724-487-3852. NIED’S HOTEL. Slim Forsythe & The Turbosonics. Lawrenceville. 412-781-9853. OAKS THEATER. The Rip Chords. Oakmont. 412-828-6322. OBEY HOUSE. The Bo’Hog Brothers. Crafton. 412-922-3883. PARK HOUSE. Blackwater Mojo. North Side. 412-224-2273. THE R BAR. Mr. B’s Bad Boyz. Dormont. 412-942-0882. RIVERS CASINO. The Hobbs Sisters. North Side. 412-231-7777. STAGE AE. Jonathan Jackson + Enation. North Side. 412-229-5483. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. The Clock Reads, Shaq Nicholson Sound. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

FULL LIST ONLINE

Written by John Henry Redwood Directed by Eileen J. Morris

T.S.O.L.

MAY 29 | 8:00 | 21+

MEGHANN WRIGHT &

AND THE SURE THING

JUNE 3 | 7:00 | 21+

CRUCIBLE

May26th (Preview) May 27th- June 5th

JUNE 22 | 7:00 | AA

hotel books

JUNE 29 | 7:00 | AA

In World War II Harlem, a 55 year old spinster takes in a young male roomer, against the wishes of her sister who lives with her. When one sister gets involved with the young man against the approval of the other, old wounds are exposed as the sisters now work to begin the healing.

OXYMORRONS

JULY 1 | 7:00 | AA

Famous last words

CARNEGIE LIBRARY AUDITORIUM 7101 Hamilton Avenue Pittsburgh PA 15208

JULY 18 | 7:00 | AA

FOR TICKETS VISIT

LIVEATDIESEL.COM

Tickets on sale newhorizontheater.org, (412) 431-0773 and Dorsey’s on Frankstown

1601 E E. CAR CARSON ST | PITTSBURGH

412-431-8800

SAT 21

MP 3 MONDAY

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LANE RAMAGE}

MAYTIDE

SUN 22

Each week we bring you a new song from a local artist. This week’s track comes from local garage-y, power-pop-y rock band Maytide; stream or download “Pretty Little Fool” for free at FFW>>, the music blog at www.pghcitypaper.com.

ALTAR BAR. Sebastian Bach, Santa Cruz, 11:05, Skratch, Eliza Furnace. Strip District. 412-263-2877. THE R BAR. BTK, Tom Lagi. Dormont. 412-942-0882. CONTINUES ON PG. 98

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PENS PLAYOFF POSTER – REMOVE FROM PAPER – HANG PROUDLY 24

NEW WILMINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA | 724.946.7100 | www.westminster.edu

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016


Whether it’s your everyday commute or a weekend ride, we’re ready to help you get your bike on. All Port Authority buses are now equipped with bike racks. Bikes can also be taken on Port Authority's Light Rail System (T) seven days a week and on the Monongahela Incline at any time with no restrictions. More great ways to ride out the summer. There are no bike racks on the T or Incline. Bikes must be stowed in the designated wheelchair spaces on the T and Incline. Persons in wheelchairs have priority over bicycles.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

we like bikes

Summer’s here and the time is right for bikin’ in the street.


Join us for the coolest Sundays all summer.

: Presenting Sponsor

Presenting Foundation:

Presenting Organization:

Walk, run, bike, skate, shop or dance at OpenStreetsPGH. On three Sunday mornings this summer Pittsburgh streets will open for pedestrians to enjoy by temporarily closing the roads to motorized trafďŹ c. Come for Zumba. Stay for brunch. Bring the kids! Everyone is welcome at OpenStreetsPGH.

SUNDAYS May 29 Downtown to Lawrenceville

June 26 Downtown to Lawrenceville

July 31 Downtown to West End

openstreetspgh.org

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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SUMMER — ON BUTLER —

Men’s clothing, luggage, grooming and accessories Tues-Sat:11-7 Sun:12-4

MEN’S CLOTHING 5124 BUTLER ST

Hours of Operation Monday: By Appointment Tuesday: Closed Wednesday: 11-6 Thursday: 11-6 Friday: 11-6 Saturday: 11-6 Sunday: 12-5

5104 Butler Street Pgh, PA 15201 412.450.0578 thegildedgirl.com

Senti • Restaurant & Wine Bar

3473 Butler Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412.586.4347 | sentirestaurant.com

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


Organic seedlings & soils. Air plants, succulents, terrariums, bonsai, cacti & houseplants. Unique handmade gifts. City Grows is an urban organic garden shop in the Pittsburgh neighborhood of Lawrenceville, home to some of the city’s most unique small businesses, restaurants, and boutiques. We have been providing gardening products for city dwellers since August of 2014. p g organic g g

City Grows, LLC Organic Garden & Gift Shoppe

5208 Butler Street Pittsburgh, PA 15201 412-781-2082

www.citygrowspgh.com

Sip and paint at Pinot’s Palette – Taste authentic Italian and traditional European flavors at Senti – Experience what fine casual means at The Vandal – Explore innovative beauty products at The Gilded Girl – Shop quality men’s clothing at Vestis – Find your green thumb at City Grows – Discover an inspired collection of fine goods at Von Walter & Funk – Coffee and cake, open late at The Butterwood Bake Consortium – Try out local craft brews at Full Pint – Have a glass of wine with a side of art at Allegheny Wine Mixer

CLASS OUT THE GLASS

WINE

BEER NOMS

COCKTAILS

412-252-2337

5326 Butler St. Upper Lawrenceville

www.alleghenywinemixer.com

Drop by and enjoy a few sugary nibbles or take them on the fly! 5222 Butler Street • Pittsburgh, PA 15201

www.thebutterwoodbakeconsortium.com PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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STAGE

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32

MUSIC 08

KID 7 S 0

OORS OUTD

66

FILM 28

FAIRS, FESTIVALS +SPECIAL EVENTS

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ILLUSTRATIONS BY EMILY TRAYNOR

Now offering

BOTOX Allegheny City Market • Atria’s • Chateau Cafe & Cakery • Hog’s Head Bar and Grill • Huszar • James St. Gastropub and Speakeasy • Legends of the North Shore • Max’s Allegheny Tavern • Nana’s Hot Dogs • North Shore Deli • Penn Brewery • Rivers Casino • Scratch • Young Brother’s Bar

AND

DERMAL FILLERS CALL FOR A FREE CONSULTATION IMPLANTS | INVISALIGN | WHITENING WE OFFER SEDATION OPTIONS | SAME-DAY EMERGENCY VISITS MYPITTSBURGHDENTAL.COM | 355 FIFTH AVE | SUITE 1500 | DOWNTOWN | 412.281.3546

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


SATURDAY, MAY 21

FRIDAY, JUNE 10

JUNE 26

JUNE 28

FRIDAY, JULY 8

SAT, JULY 9

JULY 13

FRI, JULY 15

SAT, JULY 16

JULY 17

JULY 19

JULY 21

FRI & SAT, JULY 22-23

SAT, JULY 30

AUGUST 2

FRI, AUGUST 5

AUGUST 10

SAT, AUGUST 13

SAT, AUGUST 20

AUGUST 23

AUGUST 25

SAT, AUGUST 27

AUGUST 28

FRI, SEPTEMBER 9

SAT, SEPTEMBER 24

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT ALL TICKETMASTER LOCATIONS, ONLINE AT LIVENATION.COM OR CHARGE BY PHONE AT 800-745-3000

ON SALE SOON!

FACEBOOK.COM/FIRSTNIAGARAPAVILION

FN_PAVILION

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


MUSIC VENUES ALTAR BAR. 1620 Penn Ave.,

JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE. 103

Strip District. 412-206-9719

Slade Lane, Warrendale. 724-799-8333

AUGUST WILSON CENTER. 980

MANCHESTER CRAFTMEN’S GUILD. 1815 Metropolitan St.,

Liberty Ave., Downtown. 412-471-6070

SUMMER MUSIC Highly Suspect. Altar Bar

Texas Hippie Coalition. Hard

Josh Ritter, July 24

Rock Café

Sister Grotto.

{PHOTO COURTESY OF LAURA WILSON}

Howlers

The Rainbow End. James Street Stacked Like Pancakes. Jergel’s

Blue October. Altar Bar Delicious Pastries. Club Café The Big Easy. Howlers Grandadchilds. James Street Ronnie Baker Brooks.

BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. 412-291-8994 BRILLOBOX. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. 421-621-4900 BYHAM THEATER. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

412-368-5225

CARNEGIE LECTURE HALL. Schenley

Nahko and Medicine for the People.

MAY 19

BAYARDSTOWN SOCIAL CLUB. 3008 Penn Ave., Strip District.

CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. 510 E. 10th St., Munhall.

Rhythm Grille

Terrapin Flyer, Melvin Seals, Mark Karan. The Rex Theater Sixx:A.M. Stage AE

412-325-6769

www.bayardstown.com BELVEDERE’S. 4016 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2555 BENEDUM CENTER. 237 7th St., Downtown. 412-456-6666

MAY 18

Mr. Smalls Theatre The Still Tide. Pittsburgh Winery

BACKSTAGE BAR AT THEATER SQUARE. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown.

Drive, Oakland. 412-622-3114

CATTIVO. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. 412-687-2157 CLUB CAFÉ. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. 412-431-4950 CONSOL ENERGY CENTER. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. 412-642-1800 CONSOL ENERGY PARK. 1 Washington Federal Way, Washington. 724-250-9555 DIESEL. 1601 E Carson St., South Side. 412-431-8800 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. 665 Rt. 18, Burgettstown. 724-947-7400

Meghann Wright & The Sure Thing, June 3 {PHOTO COURTESY OF LUCAS HUANG}

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Roger Harvey. The Mr. Roboto Project Foundation of Funk. Rex Theater Darrell Scott. The Roots Cellar at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts Hit the Lights. The Smiling Moose

MAY 20 Jelly Roll. Altar Bar Sean Jones. August Wilson Center Robin Vote. Bayardstown Social Club The Tilt Room. Club Café Nameless in August. Club Café Mike Mains and the Branches. Hard Rock Café

Ruby and the Hatchet. Howlers Reggie Watkins, Cold Roses. James Street Ferris Bueller’s Revenge. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Peach Kelli Pop. The Mr. Roboto Project Chris Duarte. Moondog’s The Commonheart. Pittsburgh Winery BUKU. Rex Theater Alice Cooper. Stage AE Man’Dance. Thunderbird Café

THE FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze.

MAY 21 Enter Shikari. Altar Bar The Milk Carton Kids. Carnegie Lecture Hall of Oakland Dom Flemons. Club Café Zac Brown Band. First Niagara Pavilion SourMash. Hard Rock Café Brian Simpson. Hill House Kaufmann Center

Billy Price Band, Dan Bubien Band. James Street Candlebox, Sponge. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Gloria Reuben. Manchester Craftsmen’s Guild Hayes Carll. Mr. Smalls Theatre Gizel Xanath. Pittsburgh Winery Zombi. Spirit Hall Jonathan Jackson. Stage AE The Clock Reads. Thunderbird Café

412-371-0600 GOOSKI’S. 3117 Brereton St., Polish Hill. 412-681-1658 HAMBONE’S. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318 HARD ROCK CAFÉ. 230 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. 412-481-7625 HARTWOOD ACRES. 200 Hartwood Acres, Indiana Township. 412-351-2528 HEINZ FIELD. 100 Art Rooney Ave., North Side. 412-322-9662 HEINZ HALL. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. 412-392-4900

HIGHLAND PARK, CITIPARKS RESERVOIR OF JAZZ SERIES. www.citiparks.net

HOWLERS. 4509 Liberty Ave.,

MAY 22

Bloomfield. 412-682-0320

Sebastian Bach. Altar Bar Chris Isaak. Carnegie Homestead Pittsburgh Hip Hop Showcase. Howlers

North Side. 412-904-3335

JAMES STREET GASTROPUB AND SPEAKEASY. 422 Foreland St.,

North Side. 412-322-1773

MELLON PARK, CITIPARKS BACH BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH SERIES. www.citiparks.net

MELLON SQUARE, CITIPARKS MELLON SQUARE CONCERT SERIES. www.citiparks.net MOONDOG’S. 378 Freeport Road, Blawnox. 412-828-2040 THE MR. ROBOTO PROJECT. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. www.therobotoproject.org MR. SMALLS THEATRE. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. 412-821-4447 PALACE THEATRE. 21 W. Otterman St., Greensburg. 724-836-8000 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. 412-622-6914 PITTSBURGH WINERY. 2815 Penn Ave., Strip District. 412-566-1000 PNC PARK. 115 Federal St., North Side. 412-321-2827 REX THEATER. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-381-6811 RIVERS CASINO. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. 412-231-7777

RIVERVIEW PARK, CITIPARKS STARS AT RIVERVIEW JAZZ SERIES. www.citiparks.net ROCK ROOM. 1054 Herron Ave., Polish Hill. 412-683-4418

THE ROOTS CELLAR AT PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. www.calliopehouse.org

ST. CLAIR PARK. 135 N. Maple Ave., Greensburg. 724-838-4323

SCHENLEY PARK, CITIPARKS WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES. www.citiparks.net SHADYSIDE PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 5121 Westminster Place, Shadyside. 412-682-4300

SHADYSIDE NURSERY. 510 Maryland Ave., Shadyside. 412-363-5845 THE SMILING MOOSE. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. 412-431-4668 SOUTH PARK AMPHITHEATRE. South Park. 412-835-4810 SPIRIT. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. www.spiritpgh.com STAGE AE. 400 North Shore Drive, North Side. 412-229-5483 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-471-6070 THUNDERBIRD CAFE. 4023 Butler St., Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177

CONTINUES ON PG. 10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

9


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 09

MAY 29

Fruition, The Bones of JR Jones. The Rex Theater

The Summer Set. Altar Bar T.S.O.L. Diesel Stump Tail Dolly and Mickey and The SOBs. Hambones Middle Children. Howlers Granati Brothers. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Here Comes the Kraken. The Smiling Moose Linear Downfall. Spirit The Spark. Stage AE

My Ticket Home. The Smiling Moose DIIV. Spirit Hall Steel Panther. Stage AE

MAY 23 Berner. Altar Bar Becca Steven Band. James Street Antoinette Manganas Jazz Duo. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Deche. Rock Room Prozak. Rex Theater

MAY 30 Before You Exit. Altar Bar Ex-Cult. Howlers Eagles of Death Metal. Mr. Smalls Theatre

MAY 24 Salsamba. Backstage Bar at Theaterr Square Peter Case. Club Café Six Speed Kill. Howlers

MAY 31 (Hed)Pe, The Veer Union. Altar Bar Tony DePaolis. Backstage Bar

MAY 25

at Theater Square

Rising Appalachia. Club Café Beyoncé. Heinz Field Don Aliquo Jr. James Street

Elizabeth & the Catapult. Club Café The Railsplitters. Hard Rock Café The Urinals. Howlers Thomas Wendt. James Street Scott, Rob & Greg of The Clarks.

Wye Oak, Aug. 6 {PHOTO COURTESY OF SHERVIN LAINEZ}

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

William Forrest. The Mr. Roboto Project The Vaccines. Mr. Smalls Theatre Steve Poltz. Pittsburgh Winery Radiator Greys. Rock Room Tiny Moving Parts. Smiling Moose Palm. Spirit

MAY 26 Curren$y. Altar Bar Hanba, Death Has a 1000 Ears. Brillobox Miner. Cattivo

Twin Peaks. Club Café Merle Allin & the Murder Junkies. Howlers

Memphis Hill. James Street Honey Island Swamp Band. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Left Behind. The Mr. Roboto Project Cahal Dunne. The Palace Theatre The Tillers. Pittsburgh Winery Fried Egg. The Rock Room

Whiskey Shivers. Pittsburgh Winery Homesafe. The Smiling Moose

JUNE 01

MAY 27 Jacob Whitesides. Altar Bar Unknown String Band. Bayardstown Social Club

Scroll Downers. Brillobox Demos Papadimas and His Band. Club Café The Dustbowl Revival. Club Café It Lives, It Breathes. Diesel The Rents. Hambones John Petrucelli Quartet. James Street My Hero Zero.

The Dear Hunter. Altar Bar All Dogs. Cattivo Caveman. Club Café Mark Strickland. James Street The Outlaws. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Nick DeCesare. Pittsburgh Winery The New Mastersounds, Kung Fu. Rex Theater

Pittsburgh Youth Symphony Orchestra Chamber Ensemble. Shadyside Presbyterian Church

Twenty One Pilots. Stage AE

Jergel’s Rhythm Grille

Summer FESTIVALS AND EVENTS

Kids’ Mud on the Mountain Doo Wop Weekend Comedy Night w. Greg Hahn Rib & Wing Festival Mountain Beer Fest Comedy Night w. Ian Bagg Wine Festival Mutts on the Mountain Mother Earth News Fair Autumnfest Marathon on the Mountain

May 28 June 3-4 June 18 July 15-17 August 6-7 August 20 August 26-28 September 3 September 23-25 1st Four Oct. Weekends November 5

7springs.com

The World Is a Beautiful Place and I Am No Longer Afraid to Die. The Mr.

JUNE 02 Songwriters in the Round. Club Café Kenny Chesney.

Roboto Project

Miike Snow. Mr.

Heinz Field

Smalls Theatre Nick Moss. Moondog’s

Tom Tallitsch. James Street

Hear Tonight. Mellon Square

Warriors Rock w/ Gary Racan.

Dowsing. The Mr. Roboto Project

West Holliday Trip. The

The Palace Theatre

Jude Benedict & the Last Drop.

Palace Theatre

Redhead Express.

Pittsburgh Winery

Pittsburgh Winery

Artistree. Rivers Casino Superheaven. The Smiling Moose Pet Clinic. Spirit

Whiskey Daredevils. Spirit 28 North. Thunderbird Café

MAY 28 Goblin. Altar Bar Twist. Black Forge Coffee House Brewer’s Row. Club Café Jennifer Knapp. Club Café The Cheer’ly Men. Hambones Mosaic Foundation. Howlers Travlin’. James Street Bon Journey. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille The Chop Shop. Pittsburgh Winery Mystic Rhythms Rush Tribute.

Jesus Piece. The Smiling Moose Femi Kuti and the Positive Force, July 28

JUNE 03 Gift Horse. Bayardstown Social Club Pandemic vs. American Pop Hits. Brillobox Tengger Cavalry. Belvedere’s Blackbird Bullet. Club Café Chris Smither. Club Café Meghann Wright & The Sure Thing. Diesel Quinn Sullivan. Hard Rock Café Jackson Brown. Heinz Hall Paul Luc and Jordan DePaul. Pittsburgh Winery

Marco Benevento, Superhuman Happiness. Rex Theater Wax Idols, King Woman.

Rivers Casino

The Smiling Moose

HAIM. Stage AE

Pittsburgh Opera. South Park Amphitheater CONTINUES ON PG. 12

10

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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11


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 10

Nahko and Medicine for the People, May 18 {PHOTO COURTESY OF JOSUE RIVAS FOTOGRAPHER}

Bruce Katz. Schenley Park Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons. Heinz Hall God Module. Howlers New View Trio. James Street Motion City Soundtrack. Mr. Smalls Theatre Daniel Champagne. Pittsburgh Winery Kara Cornell, Abigail Eagleson. Shadyside

Paddy the Wanderer, Delicious Pastries. Spirit The Outer Vibe. St. Clair Park Leon Bridges. Stage AE Michael Franti & Spearhead. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 03-04 Layer Cake Music Festival. Multiple venues

Presbyterian Church

JUNE 04

Three Rivers Arts Festival

Joe Grushecky and the Houserockers. Club Café

Charles Bradley & His Extraordinaries.

JUNE 09 Theories, Immortal Bird. Black

Crack the Sky. Jergel’s

Forge Coffee House

Rhythm Grille

John Doe Band.

Jimmy Thackery.

Club Café

Moondog’s

Rap Round Robin feat. Height. Howlers Dale & ZDubs.

Songwriters in the Cellar. Pittsburgh Winery Latia Ø LXII. Rex Theater

James Street

Don McLean. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Artist TBA. Mellon Square

David Grisman Sextet. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 05

Houndmouth. Mr. Smalls Theatre

Pro-Pain. Altar Bar JMSN. Club Cafe Boilermaker Jazz Band. Hardwood Acres Ibeyi. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 06 Subhumans, Pears. Cattivo Whilk & Misky. Club Café M83. Stage AE

Switch Acoustic. The Palace Theatre

Kevin Garrett. Rex Theater DIIV, May 22 {PHOTO COURTESY OF SANDY KIM}

JUNE 07 Venom Inc. Altar Bar Hatebreed. Mr. Smalls Theatre Dashboard Confessional, Taking Back Sunday. Petersen Events Center Carl Verheyen Band. Pittsburgh Winery Leftover Salmon. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 08 Good Old War. Cattivo Damien Jurado & the Heavy Light. Club Café

12

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Beth Orton. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 10 FLAG. Altar Bar Mavens. Bayardstown Social Club Matt Aquiline. Club Café Dixie Chicks. First Niagara Pavilion SIMO. Hard Rock Café Riff Mitchell & the Soul Survivors. Moondog’s Jimbo and the Soupbones. Pittsburgh Winery

Aesop Rock. Rex Theater SHEL. St. Clair Park Joe Grushecky & The Houserockers. South Park Amphitheater Guster. Three Rivers Arts Festival


JUNE 10-12 The Earth: An HD Odyssey. Heinz Hall

JUNE 11 The Red Jumpsuit Apparatus. Altar Bar Cold Weather, Arlo Aldo. Club Café Wei Zhongle. Gooski’s Logan Brill. Hard Rock Café Genuine. Mr. Smalls Theatre The Nicole B Band. Moondog’s Highway 4’s. Rex Theater Tania Grubbs Quartet. Riverview Park Hivelords. The Smiling Moose Eddie Manion. The Strand Theater Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 12 Bleubird & ECID. Belvedere’s Beauty Slap, Memphis Hill. Hartwood Acres

Shooter Jennings. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Brett Dennen. Mr. Smalls Theatre Armadillos. Shadyside Nursery Lydia. Smiling Moose Ray LaMontagne. Stage AE Ruby Amanfu, Lake Street Dive. Three Rivers Arts Festival

JUNE 13 Jamison Williams Quartet, Machine Listener, Matthew Ryals. Howlers Birdy. Mr. Smalls Theatre Blitzen Trapper. Stage AE

JUNE 14 Andy Black (of Black Veil Brides). Altar Bar The Hotelier. Cattivo Violent Femmes. Mr. Smalls Theatre Vinnie Caruana (of I am the Avalanche). Smiling Moose

Macklemore, Ryan Lewis. Stage AE

JUNE 15 James McCartney. Club Café The Bleil Brothers. Schenley Park Monaco & Alameda. Pittsburgh Winery Ellen Fast. Shadyside Presbyterian Church The Dwarves, The Queers. The Smiling Moose

Black Milk, Nat Turner. Spirit

JUNE 16 Stryper. Altar Bar Hackensaw Boys. Club Café Ratt. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Rachel B. Mellon Square Saint Motel. Mr. Smalls Theatre Michael Christopher. The Palace Theatre Jeffery Austin. Pittsburgh Winery Emo Night. Spirit

JUNE 17 Gene The Werewolf. Altar Bar Chris Theoret’s David Bowie Show. Byham Theater

The Mavericks. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall

Brad Wagner and the Barflys. Club Cafe Meeting of Important People. The Frick Art & Historical Center

Tommy James and the Shondells. The Palace Theatre

Stu Hamm. Pittsburgh Winery Pete Davidson. The Rex Theater CONTINUES ON PG. 14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

13


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 13

Curren$y, May 26

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mercuriosgelatopizza.com

Disco 54. Rivers Casino The David Bach Consort. St. Clair Park And the Kids. The Smiling Moose Walt Maddox & The Marcels. South Park Amphitheater The So So Glos. Spirit

JUNE 17-19 Honeck Conducts Mahler. Heinz Hall

JUNE 18 Master P. Altar Bar The Gotobeds. Brillobox The Mavericks. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall

Miss Tess & the Talkbacks. Club Café Emily Rodgers. Club Café Charlie Wheeler Band. James Street Clash of the Decades: ’80s vs. ’90s. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Hatful of Hollow. Moondog’s

Mark Dignam, Mark Hohman, Ben Valasek, Luke Gallagher. Pittsburgh Winery

Tumbling Down John Mellencamp Tribute. Rivers Casino Bobby Short. Riverview Park Summer Recess (20 local bands). Spirit Haley Reinhart. Stage AE

JUNE 19 Eve 6. Altar Bar Adia Victoria. Brillobox Bonnie Bishop. Club Café Pittsburgh Philharmonic. Mellon Park The Midnight Horns. Pittsburgh Winery King Fez, Essential Machine. Shadyside Nursery

JUNE 20 Nervosas. The Mr. Roboto Project Big Thief. Spirit

Barenaked Ladies. Stage AE

JUNE 21 The Bumper Jacksons. Club Café A$AP Ferg, Tory Lanez. Stage AE

JUNE 22 Modern Baseball. Altar Bar Jess Klein. Club Café Crucible. Diesel Rachel B. Schenley Park Ben Goldberg’s Hocus Pocus. Howlers Soul Asylum, English Beat. Jergel’s Rhythm Grill Sleep. Mr. Smalls Theatre

The Chamber Choir of the Pittsburgh School for the Choral Arts. Shadyside Presbyterian Church Trophy Wives. The Smiling Moose Not Blood Paint. Spirit Joywave. Stage AE

JUNE 23 Emo Night Live. Altar Bar The Lowest Pair. Club Café NP Presley & The Ghost of Jesse Garon. Howlers Artist TBA. Mellon Square Detention, Gashouse Annie. The Palace Theatre

Benny Benack Jr. Phipps Conservatory Big Mean Sound Machine. Rex Theater Psycroptic. The Smiling Moose Kino Kimino. Spirit

JUNE 24 Lotus Land. Altar Bar Dos Santos Antibeat Orchestra. Bayardstown Social Club Julianna Barwick. Club Café The Kardasz Brothers. The Frick Art & Historical Center CONTINUES ON PG. 16

14

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


3WS

alleghenycounty.us/summer

South Park

June 3 June 10 June 17 June 24 July 2 July 8 July 15 July 22 July 29 Aug. 5 Aug. 12 Aug. 19 Aug. 26 Sept. 2

Pittsburgh Opera Joe Grushecky & The Houserockers with Milly (Rock) Walt Maddox & The Marcels (Doo Wop) Lit with The Hawkeyes (Alternative Rock) Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (starts at 8:05 p.m.) BNY Mellon Jazz presents The Bad Plus with special guest David Throckmorton (Jazz) Randy Bachman, founding member of The Guess Who and Bachman Turner Overdrive, with Hard Rain (Rock/Blues) Summer of Love Experience celebrating the songs of the Woodstock generation The Cactus Blossoms with Molly Alphabet (Rockabilly/Country/Americana) Ruthie Foster with Brooke Annibale (Blues/Folk) Jana Kramer with Township Road (Country) Duquesne University Tamburitzans (Eastern European Folk Music & Dance) Think Pink Floyd (Classic Rock) River City Brass Band (Classical/Pops/Jazz)

June 5 June 12 June 19 June 26

Boilermaker Jazz Band (Swing) Beauty Slap with Memphis Hill (Electro Brass/Funk/Rock Dance) No Concert Due to U.S. Open Post-Father’s Day Car Cruise & Concert featuring Jimmie Ross & The Jaggerz (Oldies) – Car Cruise 2:00-7:00 p.m. Concert at 7:30 p.m. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra (starts at 8:15 p.m.) Delta Rae with Jeanne Jolly (Roots/Country Folk) The Ohio Players (Funk/Disco/R&B/Soul) Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band with Ferdinand the Bull (Folk Rock) Randall Baumann’s Ramble (Roots Rock) BNY Mellon Jazz presents Lee Ritenour Booker T’s Stax Revue (Soul) Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Flow Tribe (Funk/Rock/Psychedelic/Blues) 17th Annual Allegheny County Music Festival featuring Rusted Root with Nevada Color, Jim Donovan &The Sun King Warriors and Brightside - $20 per vehicle donation benefits the Allegheny County Department of Human Services. Opening acts at 5:00 p.m. Rusted Root at 7:30 p.m.

July 3 July 10 July 17 July 24 July 31 Aug. 7 Aug. 14 Aug. 21 Aug. 28 Sept. 4

Hartwood acres Park

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

15


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 14

BUY, SELL & TRADE NEW AND USED! GUITARS - BASSES - UKES AMPS - LESSONS - REPAIRS

Holy Ghost Tent Revival. St. Clair Park Lit. South Park Amphitheater

JUNE 24-26 Pittsburgh JazzLive International Festival. Chick Corea w/ Christian McBride and Brian Blade, Buika, Eddie Palmieri Big Salsa Orchestra, and many more. Downtown, multiple venues

Historical Center Billy Joel. PNC Park Child Bite. The Smiling Moose

JUNE 25 Damien Escobar. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall

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Pere Ubu. Club Café Oxymorrons. Diesel Kahil El Zabar’s Ritual Trio. David Gerald. The Frick Art &

Heinz Hall

SOUTH SIDE

JULY 01 First Unitarian Church

The Film Music of Howard Shore.

1305 E. CARSON ST.

Artist TBA. Mellon Square Hamilton Ave. The Palace Theatre The Pollies. Pittsburgh Winery

Beverly, Flowers. Club Café David Olney Duo. Club Café Colleen Green, Cassie Ramone. Howlers Guitar Heaven. The Palace Theatre Buzz Poets. Pittsburgh Winery Kea Michaels. Riverview Park The Red Western. Spirit The Clarks. Stage AE

JULY 02 Upchurch The Redneck. Altar Bar Civil Twilight. Club Café The Bleil Brothers. Riverview Park Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. South Park Amphitheater

JULY 03 Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

JUNE 26

Hartwood Acres

Robert Ellis.

Community Band South. Mellon Park Green River CCR Tribute.

Club Café

Darius Rucker. First Niagara Pavilion

Rivers Casino

Jimmie Ross & The Jaggerz.

Peter Mawanga & The Amaravi Movement.

Hartwood Acres

Con Brio.

St. Clair Park

James Street

Weezer, Panic! At the Disco. Stage AE

Allegheny Brass Band. Mellon Park Community Band Celebration.

JULY 04 Bon Journey. Rivers Casino

The Palace Theatre

Vine Rewind Festival.

Julien Baker, July 25

Pittsburgh Winery

Miramar. Shadyside Nursery Turnover. The Smiling Moose

JUNE 27

{PHOTO COURTESY OF JAKE CUNNINGHAM}

Screaming Females. Cattivo Turnover. The Smiling Moose The International Noise Conference. Spirit

JUNE 28

2 6 t h a n n u a l c e lt i c c e l e b r at i o n

Malfunction, Lost Souls. Black Forge Coffee House Rodrigo y Gabriela. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Dolly Parton. Consol Energy Center Bad Company, Joe Walsh. First Niagara Pavilion Sam Lewis. Pittsburgh Winery I Set My Friends On Fire. The Smiling Moose

september 9-10-11, 2016

JUNE 29

pittsburgh’s bridge to

ireland featuring live music by Skerryvore, Screaming Orphans, The Step Crew, Socks in the Frying Pan, Makem and Spain, Ruaile Buaile, and more acts to be announced!

Ferla-Marcinizyn Duo. Schenley Park Alto!. Howlers Andrew Leahey & the Homestead. Pittsburgh Winery

Seth Beckman, Mark Houghton. Shadyside Presbyterian Church

Kutt Calhoun, Whitney Peyton. Riverplex 1000 Sandcastle Drive, West Homestead, PA 15120

PghIrishFest.org

The Smiling Moose

JUNE 30 Mike Farris and the Roseland Rhythm Review. August Wilson Center Pat Benatar, Neil Giraldo. Heinz Hall

JULY 05 Brand New, Modest Mouse. Stage AE

JULY 06 Melodime. Club Café Jahouija Bones. Schenley Park Alexander Jean. Hard Rock Café Back to the Future with the PSO. Heinz Hall

Mark Strickland. James Street The Yardbirds. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Guided By Voices. Mr. Smalls Theatre

JULY 07 Sharam. Altar Bar Go Fight!, Interface, The Dark Clan, Spider Lillies. Cattivo Mothers. Club Café Hey Monea. Hard Rock Café Peter Cetera. Heinz Hall Darryl & Kim. The Palace Theatre AWOLNATION. Stage AE

JULY 08 KT Tunstall. Altar Bar Richie Ramone. Cattivo Callan. Club Café Def Leppard, REO Speedwagon, Tesla. First Niagara Pavilion Dancing Dream. St. Clair Park The Bad Plus. South Park Amphitheater

JULY 08-09 Deutschtown Music Festival. Multiple venues CONTINUES ON PG. 18

16

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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17


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 16

Beth Orton, June 9 {PHOTO COURTESY OF TIERNEY GEARON}

JULY 09 Culture Shock, World/Inferno Friendship Society. Cattivo The Iguanas. Club Café Dave Matthews Band. First Niagara Pavilion Tony Bennett. Heinz Hall The Temptations. The Palace Theatre Liz Longley. Pittsburgh Winery Jay Vonada Trio. Riverview Park

JULY 10

Randy Bachman, Bill Toms & Hard Rain. South Park Amphitheater Black Lips. Spirit

JULY 15-17 Ladyfest. Multiple locations

JULY 16 Journey, The Doobie Brothers. First Niagara Pavilion

The Magical Music of Harry Potter.

letlive. Altar Bar John Carpenter. Carnegie of

Heinz Hall

Homestead Music Hall

James Street

Delta Rae, Jeanne Jolly. Hartwood Acres River City Brass. Mellon Park Hurray For The Riff Raff. Mr. Smalls Theatre Beagle Brothers. Shadyside Nursery Undergang, Spectral Voice. Spirit

JULY 12 Future Thieves. Club Café Guns N’ Roses. Heinz Field

JULY 13 James McMurtry. Club Café Justin Bieber. Consol Energy Center The Dead & Company. First Niagara Pavilion L’Lamint. Schenley Park New View Trio. James Street Old Soles and Seedy Players. Spirit Ryan Adams, Noel Gallagher. Stage AE

JULY 14

Simon and Garfunkle Tribute. Don’t Look Back Boston Tribute. Rivers Casino

Kenny Blake. Riverview Park The Ruins of Beverast. The Smiling Moose

JULY 17 Hey Mercedes, Prawn. Club Café Steely Dan. First Niagara Pavilion The Ohio Players. Hartwood Acres Tom Roberts and the Allegheny City Ragtime Orchestra. Mellon Park Dawes, Kathleen Edwards. Mr. Smalls Theatre

Feed More Festival. Stage AE

JULY 18 Intronaut. Altar Bar Kian & JC. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall White Denim. Club Café

JULY 19

Macy Gray. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Nelly. Heinz Hall Molly Hatchet. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Diluted Youth. Mellon Square Bad Boy Blues Band. The Palace Theatre Fitz & the Tantrums. Stage AE

JULY 20

JULY 15

GumBand. Schenley Park Moose Blood. The Smiling Moose

Los Lonely Boys. Altar Bar Tiny Rhythm. Bayardstown Social Club Speedy Ortiz, Alex G. Cattivo Shakey Graves. Club Café Vans Warped Tour. First Niagara Pavilion Bel Suono Ensemble. The Frick Art & Historical Center T’Monde. Pittsburgh Winery Girls Guns and Glory. St. Clair Park

John Moreland. Club Café Disturbed, Breaking Benjamin. First Niagara Pavilion

JULY 21 The Paper Kites. Club Café Heart, Joan Jett and The Blackhearts, Cheap Trick. First Niagara Pavilion The Music of the Eagles with the PSO. Heinz Hall

Mike Adams at His Honest Weight. Howlers CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

19


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 18

Nobel Hops Band. Mellon Square The Bricks. The Palace Theatre

The Cactus Blossoms. South Park Amphitheater

Bush, Chevelle. Stage AE

JULY 22 Amy Winehouse Tribute. Altar Bar Red Western. Bayardstown Social Club Quilt. Club Café Luke Bryan. First Niagara Pavilion Penntera: A Tribute to Pantera. Hard Rock Café

JULY 30 The Besnard Lakes. Club Café Slipknot, Marilyn Manson. First Niagara Pavilion

Lee Robinson, Iska. Riverview Park

The Music of David Bowie with the PSO.

JULY 31

Heinz Hall

Plebeian Grandstand.

Jam Messengers g . Howlers Kaleo. Mr. Smalls Theatre The Honey Island Swamp Band. St. Clair Park Summer of Love Experience. South Park

Black Forge Coffee House

Randall Baumann’s Ram Ramble. Hartwood Acres

Big Bad Voodoo Daddy. Jergel’s Rhythm Gri Grille Klezlectic. Mell Mellon l o Park

Amphitheater

AUG. 01

JULY 22-24

Architects. Archite

RePunk Festival.

Altar Bar

Multiple locations

AUG. 02 Josh Groban, Sarah McLachlan.

JULY 23 The Mutiny. Club Café Luke Bryan. First Niagara Pavilion PSO Classical Summer Party. Heinz Hall Roger Humphries & RH Factor. Riverview Park

The Gibson Brothers. The Roots Cellar at Pittsburgh Center for the Arts

JULY 24 Josh Ritter & The Royal City Band. Hartwood Acres

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Aeolian Winds. Mellon Park Meeting of Important People. Shadyside Nursery Wet Brain. Spirit

Melanie Martinez. Stage AE

JULY 25 Daughter, Julien Baker. Mr. Smalls Theatre Bloc Party. Stage AE

JULY 26 All Them Witches, King Buffalo. Club Cafe

Janet Jackson. Consol Energy Center er Parachute. Mr. Smalls Theatre

JULY 27

PA Medical Marijuana Business Seminars June 11th and 12th

Jon Bellion. Altar Bar Mobley. Diesel The Squirrel Hillbillies. Schenley Park Diet Cig. Spirit

JULY 28 Femi Kuti and the Positive Force. Altar Bar

Artist TBA. Mellon Square Gary Pratt. The Palace Theatre Lindsey Stirling. Stage AE

JULY 29

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Drake Vs. Kanye Night. Altar Bar Unknown String Band. Bayardstown Social Club

Lisa Ferraro, Erick Luckett. Club Cafe HillSong United. Consol Energy Center The Regan Years. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Kelsey Waldon. St. Clair Park

First F Niagara Pavilion

Sam Vicari. Howlers Phillip Phillips, Ma Matt Nathanson. Stage AE

AUG. 03 AUG The Plot in You. Altar Bar White Lung. Club Café Kea Michaels. Schenley Park Mark Strickland. James Street

AUG. 04 Coldplay. Consol Energy Center Southside Johnny & the Asbury Jukes. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Dimwit. Mellon Square

Neon Swing X-Perience. The Palace Theatre

AUG. 05 Brad Paisley. First Niagara Pavilion The English Channel. St. Clair Park Ruthie Foster, Brooke Annibale. South Park Amphitheater O.A.R. Stage AE What Cheer Brigade. Venue TBA

AUG. 06 Wye Oak. Club Café Feastival Food, Music & Art Festival. McKees Rocks Municipal Lot

Olga Watkins. Riverview Park

AUG. 07 Full Circle. Highland Park Lee Ritenour. Hartwood Acres Mon Valley Community Band. Mellon Park NOTHING. Cattivo

AUG. 08 Drug Church, Donovan Wolfington. The Smiling Moose

Old Soles and Seedy Players. Spirit

AUG. 09 The Happy Together Tour. The Palace Theatre

The Ghost Wolves. Spirit Halsey. Stage AE CONTINUES ON PG. 22

20

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

21


SUMMER MUSIC, CONTINUED FROM PG. 20

AUG. 10

Dick Dale. The Rex Theater TRAVLIN’. Riverview Park Blues Traveler, The Wallflowers. Stage AE

The Fall of Troy. Altar Bar Snoop Dogg, Wiz Khalifa. First Niagara Pavilion

Anjroy. Schenley Park Rum Rebellion. Howlers Bob Seger Tribute. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille New View Trio. James Street

AUG. 11 Chris Knight. Hard Rock Café The Bacon Brothers. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Maniac Soul. Mellon Square Supper Break String Band. The Palace Theatre

AUG. 21 Griffin House. Club Café Mark Strickland Quartet. Highland Park

AUG. 23 Bayside, The Menzingers. Altar Bar Buckwheat Zydeco. Club Café Jimmy Buffett. First Niagara Pavilion The Melvins. Rex Theater Mars Red Sky. Spirit

AUG. 24

AUG. 12

Seventh Nova. Schenley Park

Bob Log III. Cattivo Selwyn Birchwood Band.

AUG. 25 Brian Wilson. Benedum Center Chris Young.

St. Clair Park

Jana Kramer. South Park

CONSOL Energy Park

Amphitheater

Korn, Rob Zombie.

AUG. 12-14

First Niagara Pavilion Artist TBA. Mellon Square Jeff Perigo. The Palace Theatre

R.A.N.T. – Rock All Night Tour. Lawrenceville, multiple locations

AUG. 26

AUG. 13 Toby Keith. First

Luke Wade.

Niagara Pavilion America. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille Rachel B. Riverview Park

St. Clair Park

Think Pink Floyd. South Park Amphitheater

AUG. 27

AUG. 14

Melinda, Kristian Habenicht. Club Café Florida Georgia Line.

Booker T’s Stax Revue.

Meet. Eat. Repeat.

Hartwood Acres Kinetic. Highland Park

East Winds Symphonic Band. Mellon Park

Morning Martyrs. Spirit

Wiz Khalifa, Aug. 10 {PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

AUG. 16 Rich Robinson (of Black Crowes). Hard Rock Café

Ted Nugent. Stage AE

AUG. 17 Yes. Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall Drake. Consol Energy Center Shinizyn. Schenley Park Old 97’s. Mr. Smalls Theatre

AUG. 18 Eric Sommer. Club Café Artist TBA. Mellon Square Tim Litvin Band. The Palace Theatre Emo Night. Spirit Gov’t Mule, Blackberry Smoke. Stage AE

22

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AUG. 19

First Niagara Pavilion

Periphery. Mr. Smalls Theatre Big Fat Jazz. Riverview Park

AUG. 28 Blink-182. First Niagara Pavilion Flow Tribe. Hartwood Acres Firm Roots. Highland Park

AUG. 29 Kublai Khan. The Smiling Moose

AUG. 31 The John Trumaine Show. Schenley Park

SEPT. 01 Mac Sabbath. Altar Bar Advance Base. Howlers

SEPT. 02 Trio+, Shad Ali. The Frick Art & Historical Center The Birds of Chicago. St. Clair Park River City Brass Band. South Park Amphitheater

Judy Kasper. Club Café Rachel B. & the Boys. The Frick Art &

SEPT. 04

Historical Center

Hartwood Acres

Scotty McCreery. The Palace Theatre The Banditos. St. Clair Park Duquesne University Tamburitzans.

Daniel May, Zero Ted. Highland Park

South Park Amphitheatre

Celtic Thunder. Benedum Center

AUG. 20

SEPT. 09

Soul Low. Black Forge Coffee House Brantley Gilbert. First Niagara Pavilion

Allegheny County Music Festival.

SEPT. 07 Joshua Davis. Club Café Rascal Flatts. First Niagara Pavilion


Outdoor DINING

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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SUMMER FILMS {BY AL HOFF}

Recovery is a journey, not a destination. THEY CALL summer the “lazy days,” and the big studios sure do exhibit such tendencies: The number of sequels, remakes and reboots this season is epic. Let’s start with the sequels: Johnny Depp and Mia Wasikowska continue the fantastical Victorian journey in Alice Through the Looking Glass (May 27); that same day, X-Men: Apocalypse begins, helmed by Bryan Singer. It’s another round with the crimefighting amphibians in TMNT: Out of the Shadows (June 3), and more underwater fish-based fun with Pixar’s Finding Nemo follow-up, Finding Dory (June 17). On June 10, paranormal investigators take on another spooky house, this one in 1970s London, in The Conjuring 2; and the snarky band of professional magicians are back in Now You See Me 2. Also baaaaack — the Earth-pummeling aliens of Independence Day. But so is Jeff Goldblum, so see what happens in Independence Day: Resurgence, exploding into theaters on June 24. In this third outing, The Purge: Election Year (July 1), it is now legal to kill elected officials. (For more upbeat political fare, try Southside With You, on Aug. 19, a dramedy imagining the first date of Barack and Michelle Obama.) A pair of familiar franchises return on July 22: Star Trek Beyond charts the future via space travel, while Ice Age: Collision Course checks in with the past and a worrisome asteroid. Matt Damon and director Paul Greengrass team up again for the further spy adventures of Jason Bourne (July 29). Other assorted remakes and reboots include: the videogame Warcraft, which becomes a movie June 10; The Legend of Tar-

Southside With You, Aug. 19

The Conjuring 2, June 10

zan (July 1), starring Alexander Skarsgard as the vine-swinger; the all-female Ghostbusters (July 15), with Kristen Wiig and Melissa McCarthy; the big-screen version of the 1990s cult TV hit Absolutely Fabulous: The Movie (July 22); the DC comic Suicide Squad (Aug. 5); a do-over of Disney’s Pete’s Dragon (Aug. 12); and another round of chariot-racing in Ben-Hur (Aug. 19), from Timur Bekmambetov. Hopefully, the tedium of so much revisiting will be relieved by some decent comedies. Andy Samberg stars in the mockumentray Pop Star: Never Stop Never Stopping, out June 3. Dwayne Johnson and Kevin Hart portray mismatched spies in Central Intelligence (June 17). It’s more CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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SUMMER FILMS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 28

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Ghostbusters, July 15

laughs in July with a pair of self-explanatory titles: Mike and Dave Need Wedding Dates (July 8) and Bad Moms (July 29). Meryl Streep can do anything, even portray an untalented entertainer in the comedic bio-pic Florence Foster Jenkins, out Aug. 12. Also that day: Sausage Party, an R-rated animated comedy about talking food. The ripped-from-real-life War Dogs (Aug. 19) finds Jonah Hill and Miles Teller riffing on arms merchants. For fresher drama, look for The Shallows (June 24), in which a woman fends off a shark at sea. Also on June 24, Matthew McConaughey heads up the Civil War drama Free State of Jones. The shot-inPittsburgh drama Fathers and Daughters, starring Russell Crowe and Amanda Seyfried, opens July 8. And on Aug. 5, look for Pittsburgh’s favorite son, Michael Keaton, in The Founder, about Ray Kroc and the birth of McDonald’s. Slim pickings for kids this season: Steven Spielberg adapts Roald Dahl’s tale, The BFG, about a “big friendly giant”; nt”; it’s out July 1. On July 8, The Secret Life of Pets, who live in New York City, gets exposed in this animated comedy. Another animated work, the e stop-motion Kubo and the Two Strings (Aug. 19), is a fantastical adventure set in ancient Japan. The local art and rep houses will offer fare beyond explosions. During the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh Filmmakers’ Harris Theater will screen the three-part River of Fundament, Matthew Barney’s adaptation of Norman Mailer’s 1983 novel Ancient Evenings. And check the Filmmakers website for other indie, offbeat and classic films this summer (www. pghfilmmakers.org).

The Secret Life of Pets, July 8

The Hollywood in Dormont is: hosting a hip-hop/film event on June 17 (Jasiri X scoring the 1925 film Body and Soul); highlighting the 40th anniversary of Logan’s Run (June 23); and serving cat-video fans with Kitty Kat Theater (July 2) (with live cat ttricks) and the Internet Cat Video Festival (Aug. 26). Lawrenceville’s Row House Cinema celebrates its second birthday in June with a sidewalk carnib val; upcoming weekly series include: Staff Favorites, Coming-of-Age Films and Concert Films, with Gimme Shelter and Wild Style. The warmer weather means area drive-ins are open, and Pittsburghers can also walk to several city parks for outdoor films: The Dollar Bank Cinema in the Park (www.citiparks.net) series returns on June 5, with recent films including Concussion and Minions, plus Spark!, a slate of eight films designed to encourage discussion; Wednesday-night Schenley Park screenings are preceded by live music. A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


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CarnegieScienceCenter.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

31


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SUMMER ARTS CURRENT Associated Artists of Butler County. Annual Spring Art Show, through Fri., May 20. Future Tenant. Creative Byproducts: Dual Exhibition by Anna Brewer & Sam Berner, through Sat., May 21. North Hills Art Center. Open Studio Gallery Show, through Sat., May 21. Mattress Factory. Chiharu Shiota: Trace of Memory (house-sized installation), through Sun., May 22. Factory Installed Part II (room-sized installations by Rob Voerman, Bill Smith, Lisa Sigal and Marnie Weber), through July 3. Plus permanent installations. Assemble Artspace. Control Freak (installation by electronic-music artist Echo Lightwave Unspeakable), through May 28 (May 27 closing party). Jewish Community Center. Pittsburgh 10 + Friends (group show of contemporary work in various media), through May 26. BOOM Concepts. More Than Media: Mute The Stereo(type) (photographic portraits by Curtis Reaves), through May 27. Neue Kirche Contemporary Art Center. The Seen and Unseen: Three Artists Visualizing the Boundary of Space and Place (Matthew Conboy, Lori Hepner and Jimmy Riordan), through May 27. Gallery 4. Salon Show 2016 (annual group show with some two dozen artists), through May 28. Panza Gallery. James P. Nelson (paintings and works on paper), through May 28. Mendelson Gallery. Portals (an exhibition by Izzie Carpenter), through May 28.

Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery. Teapots!

Art by Marion Di Quinzio at Gallery 4, June 11-July 30

Artists Image Resource.

Art by Lindsay Feuer at Gallerie Chiz through June 25

(10th annual teapot-inspired art by some 75 artists), through May 28. The Rum Room. Swoon’s Braddock Tiles (community ceramics project founded by the famed street artist), through May 28.

32

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Don’t Say That Shit Out Loud (new work by Vanessa German), through May 29. Spinning Plate Gallery. Best of Shows (retrospective of etchings, drawings and sculpture by Richard Claraval), through May 29. UnSmoke Artspace. You Are Warming Weather (mixed-media drawing and textiles by Katie Ford), through May 29. Galerie Werner. Donald Deskey (paintings by the influential American artist and designer), through May 30. Most Wanted Fine Art. Café Con Leche (art by Latino artists): Jason Mendez, Hoesy Corona and Grey Gary, through May (with

May 20 and 22 artist talks).

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. The Art of Healing Exhibition: Reflections 2016, through June 3. be Galleries. Weather (work by Robert Qualters), through June 4. SPACE Gallery. Degrees of Separation (group show about distance, juried by Kristen Letts Kovak), through June 5.

Westmoreland Museum of American Art. Making the Westmoreland Museum of American Art (about the design process for the original building and its recent renovation), through June 5. Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-Century American Art (highlights from the New York Historical Society’s collection), through June 19.


MUSEUMS +GALLERIES 707 PENN GALLERY. Downtown, 412-325-7017

AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Squirrel Hill, 412-521-8010

THE ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. North Side, 412-237-8300 ASSEMBLE ARTSPACE. Garfield, www.assemblepgh.org ASSOCIATED ARTISTS OF BUTLER COUNTY. Butler, 724-283-6922 BE GALLERIES. Lawrenceville, 412-687-2606 BOOM CONCEPTS. Garfield, www.facebook.com/boomconcepts BOXHEART GALLERY. Bloomfield, 412-687-8858 CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Oakland, 412-622-3131 FILMMAKERS GALLERIES. North Oakland, 412-681-5449 FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Point Breeze, 412-371-0600 FUTURE TENANT. Downtown, 412-325-7037 GALERIE WERNER. Shadyside, 412-716-1390 GALLERIE CHIZ. Shadyside, 412-441-6005 THE GALLERY 4. Shadyside, 412-363-5050 GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Lawrenceville, 412-683-6488 HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ARTS. New Castle, 724-652-2882 HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Oakland, 412-268-2434 IRMA FREEMAN CENTER FOR IMAGINATION. Bloomfield, 412-924-0634 JAMES GALLERY. West End, 412-922-9800 MATTRESS FACTORY. North Side, 412-231-3169 MENDELSON GALLERY. Shadyside, 412-361-8664

Christine Frechard Gallery. Paintings by Byelorussian artist Artur Vasilevich, through June 10. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Interwoven States Exhibition (juried group show for regional fiber artists), through June 10. Gallery on 43rd Street. Domestic Detritus (paintings by Joseph Shepler), through June 18. 707 Penn Gallery. Inside Out (paintings by Scott Turri), through June 19. Wood Street Galleries. All Around Us: Installations and Experiences Inspired by Bugs (group show), through June 19. Boxheart Gallery. Floodgates for Hydra (paintings by Jennipher Satterly) and That was

THE MINE FACTORY. Point Breeze, www.minefactory.com MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS. Shadyside, 412-441-5200 MOST WANTED FINE ART. Garfield, 412-328-4737 NORTH HILLS ART CENTER. Ross Township, 412-364-3622 PANZA GALLERY. Millvale, 412-821-0959 PHOTO ANTIQUITIES. North Side, 412-231-7881 PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Shadyside, 412-361-0873 PITTSBURGH GLASS CENTER. Friendship, 412-365-2145 SILVER EYE CENTER FOR PHOTOGRAPHY. South Side, 412-431-1810 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Strip District, 412-261-7003 SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT SATELLITE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-261-7003 SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT JOHNSTOWN. 814-269-7234 SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART AT LIGONIER VALLEY. 724-238-6015 SPACE GALLERY. Downtown, 412-325-7723 SPINNING PLATE GALLERY. Friendship, rclaraval@gmail.com SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Sewickley, 412-741-4405 THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL. Downtown, www.3riversartsfest.org TOONSEUM. Downtown, 412-232-0199 UNSMOKE ARTSPACE. Braddock, www.unsmokeartspace.com WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Greensburg, 724-837-1500 WOOD STREET GALLERIES. Downtown, 412-471-5605

the River, This is the Sea (work by Joshua Hogan, James Shipman and Daria Sandburg), both through June 24. Gallerie Chiz. Narratives: Reveries of Reality (porcelain by Lindsay Feuer, cast glass by Elizabeth Fortunato, black-and-white photography by Brian Sesack), through June 25. American Jewish Museum. Sanctuary & Sustenance: The Story of Many Journeys (multimedia presentation about refugees around the world, featuring images by photojournalist Julia Rendleman), through June 30. Filmmakers Galleries. The Photography Intensive Student Show, through June 30.

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Childe Hassam (1859–1935), The Outer Harbour, 1909, Oil on canvas, 28 x 26.1875 inches, Mary Marchand Woods Memorial Fund, 1964.1

Your country. Your art. The bigger, better Westmoreland Museum of American Art is now open. So, get into it.

Telling Tales: Stories and Legends in 19th-century American Art Through June 19 Demonstrating the great storytelling capabilities of visual art and introducing modern audiences to the broad range of styles and narrative themes that appealed to 19th-century Americans. This exhibition has been organized by the New-York Historical Society.

A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America Opening July 9 Telling the story of the extraordinary work created by self-taught or minimally trained artists in New England, the Midwest, the Mid-Atlantic and the South between 1800 and 1925. The exhibition is drawn from the Barbara L. Gordon Collection and is organized and circulated by Art Services International, Alexandria, VA.

For more info visit thewestmoreland.org Telling Tales and A Shared Legacy are supported by the Hillman Exhibition Fund of The Westmoreland Museum of American Art.

CONTINUES ON PG. 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

33


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

from around the world), through Aug. 21. James Gallery. The gallery will host “an evoling, curated display of works by regional and national artists throughout the summer.”

MAY ToonSeum. This Campaign Is Yuuuge! Cartoonists Tackle the 2016 Presidential Race, Fri., May 20-Aug. 28. Carnegie Museum of Art. Alison Knowles (first museum survey of the performance and multimedia artist’s career), Fri., May 20-Oct. 24. Ai Weiwei: Circle of Animals/Zodiac Heads (dissident Chinese artists’ iconic installation takes over the Hall of Architecture), May 28-Aug. 29. Mattress Factory. Factory Installed (new installations by David Bown, Kevin Clancy, Wendy Judge and Lauren Kalman, in the museum’s Monterey Street annex), Fri., May 20-Feb. 12. Shadyside Art & Craft Festival. Sat., May 21, and Sun., May 22. www.artfestival.com Associated Artists of Butler County. Art & Geology in Badlands National Park (work inspired by research in South Dakota), May 27-June 24 (May 27 reception). Silver Eye Center for Photography. The Hereditary Estate: Daniel Coburn + Homo bulla: Megan Ledbetter (two solo exhibitions), May 27-July 30. Gallery on 43rd Street. Inside and Outside Sale, May 29 and June 26.

JUNE Andy Warhol/Ai Weiwei opens June 4 at The Andy Warhol Museum {PHOTO COURTESY OF THE COLLECTION OF AI WEIWEI}

Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation. Great Expectations (works from the collection about plant development), through June 30. Photo Antiquities. Glass Lantern Slides (hand-painting photographic slides from 1890-1920), through June 30. Historic Pittsburgh (30 previously undisplayed 19thcentury photos of the city), through March.

Society for Contemporary Craft BNY Mellon Satellite Gallery. Pattern and Place: Art Quilts by Valerie Goodwin, through July 4. August Wilson Center. I Wish I Knew How It Felt to Be Free (first Pittsburgh show for the internationally exhibited, Chicago-based artist Hebru Brantley), through July 8. Hoyt Center for the Arts. His Stories & Her Stories (children’s-book illustrators John

Manders and Stacey Hogue) and Watercolors by Kathleen Zimbicki, both through July 30. Hoyt Exhibitions at the Confluence: Photography by Rachel Solomon, through July 3; Watercolors by Tammy Bauder, through July 1.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier Valley. Linda Arnold: Visions of the Natural World, through Aug. 7.

The Andy Warhol Museum. Exposures: Zhiwan Cheung: Hanging Fruit (window installation), through Aug. 14. Also: permanent exhibits. Carnegie Museum of Art. Teenie Harris Photographs: Great Performances Offstage (photographs of local African-American life from the Carnegie’s collection), through July. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh 105th

Annual Exhibition (group show with 56 artists), through Aug. 15. Hot Metal Modern: Design in Pittsburgh and Beyond (design objects from Pittsburgh), through Oct. 2. ToonSeum. Captain America: 75 Years of the Sentinel of Liberty (original comic art th and ephemera about the Marvel superhero), a through Aug. 14. th Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Arts in P Education (artists-in-residence projects in area Ed high schools), through July 31. Marcellus Shale Documentary Project: An Expanded View (new photography and video on the impacts of gas drilling), through July 31. Fiberart International 22nd Triennial (work by 79 artists from around the world), through Aug. 21. Society for Contemporary Craft. Fiberart International 22nd Triennial (work by 79 artists

First Friday Artwalk. Monthly gallery crawl on Ellsworth Avenue in Shadyside, June 3. Also July 1, Aug. 5 and Sept. 2. Unblurred. Monthly gallery crawl on Penn Avenue in Bloomfield, Friendship and Garfield, June 3. Also July 1, Aug. 5 and Sept. 2. Mine Factory. Art by Deborah Hosking, June 3-18. BOOM Concepts. The Perpetual Propaganda Collection (new and unreleased art from FKBGNM), June 3-26 (June 3 reception, with pop-up shops June 11 and 17). Dollar Bank Three Rivers Arts Festival. With performances, public art, a juried visual-art exhibition and more, June 3-12. Most Wanted Fine Art. Café Con Leche (art by Latino artists): Elizabeth Barreto Ortiz and Justin Waltenbaugh, June 3-30. Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Recent Works by Tom Mosser & Sarah Zeffiro (paintings and drawings), June 3-July 1. CONTINUES ON PG. 38

34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


HEADLINE CONCERTS 6/3 MICHAEL FRANTI & SPEARHEAD + CAROLINE ROSE

6/4 DAVID GRISMAN SEXTET 6/5 IBEYI 6/6 THE MENDELSSOHN CHOIR & STEVE HACKMAN 6/7 LEFTOVER SALMON 6/8 CHARLES BRADLEY & HIS EXTRAORDINAIRES + PETER WOLF AND THE MIDNIGHT TRAVELERS

6/9 BETH ORTON 6/10 GUSTER 6/11 PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 6/12 LAKE STREET DIVE

VISUAL ARTS ARTIST MARKET PRESENTED BY 4+ PUBLIC ART INSTALLATIONS 12+ INDOOR/OUTDOOR EXHIBITIONS JURIED VISUAL ART EXHIBITION ART ON FILM

CREATIVITY ZONE

PRESENTED BY

HANDS-ON ACTIVITIES ARTIST DEMONSTRATIONS

ART + TECH CREATE FESTIVAL

THEATER + DANCE INDOOR + OUTDOOR SPACES

+ RUBY AMANFU

TRUSTARTS.ORG/TRAF PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

35


36

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

RETURNS!

BENDIX-BALGLEY

NOAH

T H U R S D AY

AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor An outdoor concert at Point State Park featuring popular classics!

DOLLAR BANK THREE RIVERS ARTS FESTIVAL

Saturday, June 11 at 8:05 p.m.

S AT U R D AY

7KH3LWWVEXUJK6\PSKRQ\Ĺ?VIRUPHUFRQFHUWPDVWHU1RDK %HQGL[%DOJOH\UHWXUQVWRSHUIRUP0R]DUWDQGKLV KDXQWLQJQHZ.OH]PHUVW\OHG9LROLQ&RQFHUWR7KH HYHQLQJFRQFOXGHVZLWK0DKOHUĹ?VKHDUWZUHQFKLQJ)LIWK Symphony conducted by Manfred Honeck.

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Arnie Roth, conductor Pat Benatar and Neil Giraldo join the Pittsburgh Symphony live in FRQFHUW(YHU\DQWKHPIURPWKHLU \HDUSDUWQHUVKLSĹ?/RYHLVD%DWWOHĆ“HOGĹ? Ĺ?:H%HORQJĹ?DQGPRUH

Francesco Lecce-Chong, conductor; Katy Shackleton Williams, vocalist; Ricky Manning, vocalist; Marcel Walker, visual artist Open to people of all ages and abilities but designed especially for individuals with autism spectrum disorders, sensory sensitivities, or other GLVDELOLWLHVWKLVVHQVRU\IULHQGO\SHUIRUPDQFHZLOODOORZSDWURQVWRHQMR\ a symphony concert experience – featuring music that celebrates superheroes, astronauts, athletes, teachers, and other extraordinary characters and individuals – together with family and friends in a relaxed environment.

HEROES AND INSPIRATIONS

SENSORY FRIENDLY CONCERT

PAT BENATAR & NEIL GIRALDO

7KULOOWRWKHPXVLFIURPFRPSRVHU+RZDUG6KRUHĹ?VOHJHQGDU\ VFRUHVWR7KH/RUGRIWKH5LQJVWULORJ\DQGWKHZRUOGSUHPLHUH of music from The Hobbit, SHUIRUPHGOLYHIRUWKHĆ“UVWWLPH anywhere, ZLWKVFRUHVIURPKLVĆ“OPV7KH$YLDWRU0UV'RXEWĆ“UH 7KH6LOHQFHRIWKH/DPEV+XJRDQGPDQ\PRUH7KLVLVDQHSLF HYHQLQJĆ“OOHGZLWKDPD]LQJPXVLFDQGDQRQVWDJHLQWHUYLHZZLWK Mr. Shore himself — a unique experience not to be missed!

Saturday, June 25 at 2:30 p.m.

The Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra Howard Shore, special guest Ludwig Wicki, conductor Jon Burlingame, interviewer

THE FILM MUSIC OF HOWARD SHORE

PNC POPS

Friday, June 24 at 8:00 p.m. / Saturday, June 25 at 8:00 p.m. / Sunday, June 26 at 2:30 p.m.

Manfred Honeck, conductor Noah Bendix-Balgley, violin

NOAH BENDIX-BALGLEY RETURNS!

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

SUPPORTED BY:

SHORE

HONECK

Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (debut) +HDU&RSODQGĹ?VEl Salon MĂŠxico, 3URNRĆ“HYĹ?VLieutenant KijĂŠ and conclude with The Earth, with HD NASA footage. Soar over glaciers and witness volcanoes HUXSWWRWKHPXVLFRI6WUDXVVĹ?Also sprach ZarathustraDVIHDWXUHGLQĹ?$ Space Odyssey.â€?

THE EARTH: AN HD ODYSSEY

Sunday, June 12 at 2:30 p.m.

S U N D AY

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

Friday, June 17 at 8:00 p.m. / Saturday, June 18 at 8:00 p.m. / Sunday, June 19 at 2:30 p.m.

Giancarlo Guerrero, conductor (debut) +HDU&RSODQGĹ?VEl Salon MĂŠxico, 3URNRĆ“HYĹ?VLieutenant KijĂŠ and conclude with The Earth, with HD NASA footage. Soar over glaciers and witness volcanoes HUXSWWRWKHPXVLFRI6WUDXVVĹ?Also sprach ZarathustraDVIHDWXUHGLQĹ?$ Space Odyssey.â€?

THE EARTH: AN HD ODYSSEY

BNY MELLON GRAND CLASSICS

Friday, June 10 at 8:00 p.m.

F R I D AY

Thursday, June 30 at 7:30 p.m.

THE FILM MUSIC OF

AN HD ODYSSEY

THE EARTH:

W E D N E S D AY

AT HEINZ HALL

JUNE 10 JULY 23 THROUGH


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

37

OFFICIAL AIRLINE:

MEDIA SPONSORS:

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor )HVWLYLWLHVVWDUWZLWKSUHFRQFHUWHQWHUWDLQPHQWDQGGULQNVSHFLDOVIROORZHGE\D FRQFHUWKLJKOLJKWLQJWKHIDYRULWHVIURPWKHXSFRPLQJ%1<0HOORQ*UDQG&ODVVLFV VHDVRQ%ULQJWKHZKROHIDPLO\DQGJHWWKHLQVLGHVWRULHVRQWKHPXVLF DVWKHPXVLFLDQVWHOOWDOHVIURPWKHVWDJH,WĹ?VDOOIROORZHGE\7FKDLNRYVN\Ĺ?VĹ? 2YHUWXUHĹ?Ĺ&#x160;OLYHLQFRQFHUW$VWKHVXQJRHVGRZQHQMR\SRVWFRQFHUWIXQDQGMD]]LQ the Heinz Hall Garden.

CLASSICAL SUMMER PARTY: â&#x20AC;&#x153;1812 OVERTUREâ&#x20AC;? & MORE!

Saturday, July 23: Party starts at 6:00 p.m., Concert starts at 7:30 p.m.

These performances are brought to the community, in part, through the generosity of the following public agencies:

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Brent Havens, conductor David Bowie was one â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and only. A symphonic musical odyssey exploring WKHUDQJHRI%RZLHĹ?VPXVLFLQFOXGLQJ Ĺ?&KDQJHVĹ?Ĺ?6SDFH2GGLW\Ĺ?Ĺ?)DPHĹ? Ĺ?+HURHVĹ?DQGĹ?5HEHO5HEHOĹ?1HDUO\ classics. From A to Ziggy.

THE MUSIC OF DAVID BOWIE

THE MUSIC OF THE EAGLES WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Brent Havens, conductor 'RQ+HQOH\*OHQQ)UH\7KHLUVRQJV KDYHGHĆ&#x201C;QHGRXUWLPH7KLVLVĹ?7KH0XVLF RI7KH(DJOHVĹ?OLYHLQFRQFHUWĹ?7DNHLW (DV\Ĺ?Ĺ?/\LQĹ?(\HVĹ?Ĺ?'HVSHUDGRĹ?Ĺ?+RWHO Californiaâ&#x20AC;? and more.

Friday, F id July J l 22 at 7:30 7 30 p.m.

Thursday, July 21 at 7:30 p.m.

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Francesco Lecce-Chong, conductor ,W V*HWWLQJ+RWLQ+HUUHĹ?*UDPP\DZDUG ZLQQLQJUDSSHUVLQJHUVRQJZULWHU Nelly joins the Pittsburgh Symphony for DQHYHQLQJRIWDLOIHDWKHUVKDNLQJZLWKD symphonic twist!

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor A young boy with a great destiny proves his worth while DWWHQGLQJ+RJZDUWV6FKRRORI:LWFKFUDIWDQG:L]DUGU\ Selections from the majestic scores across the series of LFRQLFĆ&#x201C;OPVZLWKPXVLFE\-RKQ:LOOLDPVDQGPRUH'UHVV V as a wizard, sorcerer or other Hogwarts favorite DQGGHOLJKWLQWKHSUHFRQFHUWDFWLYLWLHV

THE MAGICAL MUSIC OF HARRY POTTER

NELLY

Saturday, July 16 at 8:00 p.m.

iÂ&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;â>Â?Â? Â&#x153;Ă?"vwViU{ÂŁĂ&#x201C;°Ă&#x17D;Â&#x2122;Ă&#x201C;°{Â&#x2122;ääUÂŤÂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192;LĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;}Â&#x2026;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x201C;ÂŤÂ&#x2026;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x17E;°Â&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;}Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;Â&#x201C;iĂ&#x20AC;

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AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor An outdoor concert at Hartwood Acres featuring popular classics!

COUNTY PARKS SUMMER CONCERTS: HARTWOOD ACRES

AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor An outdoor concert at South Park featuring popular classics!

COUNTY PARKS SUMMER CONCERTS: SOUTH PARK

Sunday, July 3 at 8:15 p.m.

S U N D AY

Saturday, July 2 at 8:05 p.m.

S AT U R D AY

A NIGHT OF SYMPHONIC HIP HOP FEATURING

AndrĂŠs Franco, conductor Celebrate America with the Pittsburgh Symphony's return to Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall in Oakland. Bring the IDPLO\ZDYH\RXUĹ´DJDQGVLQJDORQJ with your red, white and blue favorites!

SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL

AN AMERICAN CELEBRATION: IN HONOR OF OUR SERVICEMEN & WOMEN

Friday, July 1 at 7:00 p.m.

F R I D AY

Thursday, July 14 at 7:30 p.m.

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Arnie Roth, conductor More than two dozen top 20 hits. 0XOWLSODWLQXPVDOHV(YHU\VRXOIXO Cetera ballad. See this Grammy $ZDUGZLQQHUOLYHLQFRQFHUWĹ?,I<RX /HDYH0H1RZĹ?Ĺ?%DE\:KDWD%LJ 6XUSULVHĹ?Ĺ?<RXĹ?UHWKH,QVSLUDWLRQĹ? and so many more.

PETER CETERA

WITH THE PITTSBURGH SYMPHONY Francesco Lecce-Chong, conductor Fans old and new will experience the thrill of Back to the Future in HD with the Pittsburgh Symphony performing the dazzling musical score live! Now including the additional music by composer Alan Silvestri written especially for the 30th anniversary presentation.

Thursday, July 7 at 7:30 p.m. Thursday pm

BACK TO THE FUTURE

T H U R S D AY

Wednesday, July 6 at 7:30 p Wednesday p.m. m

W E D N E S D AY


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

Proudly serving Mercurio’s Artisan Gelato along with all of your other old-time favorites! Gourmet Caramel Apples - Hand-Dipped Chocolates - Nostalgia Candy

BOOTCAMP

Join us for our 3-day camp that will teach your child to make sweet classics, ics,, play p y games, g , and have fun! SESSION #1: June 21, 22, 23 SESSION #2: June 28, 29, 30 SESSION #3: July 19, 20, 21 SESSION #4: JJulyy 26,, 27,, 28 9–11:30AM for children ages 6 and up.

1597 Washington Pike, Bridgeville, PA 15017 412-564-5416

Limited spots are available.

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Pennsylvania Wine Cellar

Art by Valerie Goodwin, through July 4 at the Society for Contemporary Craft BNY Mellon Satellite Gallery

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Summer…

time for t-shirts & wine slushies! WINE TASTING DAILY

Wines from Christian Klay Winery & Heritage Wine Cellars

38

The Waterfront

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HOMESTEAD 412-462-4646

PITTSBURGH 412-642-9212

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Future Tenant. New Order: Collage Now (group exhibition curated by Sonja Sweterlitsch and Mundania Horvath), June 3-July 3. Pittsburgh Glass Center. Turned On: Lighting Hooks Up With Sculpture (group show), June 3-Sept. 11. Spinning Plate Gallery. Photography by Lonnie Graham and Jennifer Weihmann (landscape photography), June 4-24 (June 4 reception). North Hills Art Center. Regional Juried Art Exhibit (Dianne Bauman, judge), June 4-July 1. The Andy Warhol Museum. Andy Warhol/Ai Weiwei (major international touring exhibit comparing the two iconic artists), June 4-Aug. 28. Westmoreland Museum of American Art. John Schlimm: The Smile That Changed the World (is yours) (interactive installation), June 7-July 3.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Susan Severson: City of Dreams, June 10-Aug. 5. Frick Art Museum. Killer Heels: The Art of the High-Heeled Shoe (exhibit of historic and contemporary footwear organized by the Brooklyn Museum), June 10-Sept. 4. Christine Frechard Gallery. Collective

exhibition and Off the Wall Show (includes gallery collection), June 11-July 29 (June 10 reception). Gallery 4. Full Spectrum Ahead! (traditional painting and 3-D rendering, featuring Marion DiQuinzio and Carolyn Frischling), June 11-July 30. Mattress Factory. “Acupuncture” (Hans Peter Kurh’s new permanent public art installation), opens June 17. Also: Annual insta Garden Party, June 17, and Community Garden Party, June 19.

South Side Art Crawl. More than 30 venues and 25 bands are scheduled along East Carson Street, June 18.

Sweetwater Center for the Arts. Summer Solo Exhibition (regional artist TBA), June 18-Aug. 5. SPACE. John Reigert (250 portraits of the local resident in a variety of media by 250 artists), June 24-Sept. 4. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. yArt (annual outdoor yard sale, with work by some 80 local artists), June 26.

JULY BOOM Concepts. Tim Powell: Paizley Mind, July 1-29 (receptions July 16 and 29). CONTINUES ON PG. 40


FRIDAY NIGHT IN THE CITY August 26, 7:00 PM - Downtown JOIN US FOR A DIFFERENT KIND OF HAPPY HOUR*

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afterdark.carnegiemnh.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

39


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 38

DON’T MAKE THEM BEG TO COME TO

PUPS—N—PINTS Social

Bakery Sqaure 6450 Penn Ave., Pgh, PA 15206

“Yapp y” Hour!

June 16 July 21 August 11 September 22 5pm-8pm

Art by LaToya Ruby Frazier in Strength in Numbers, at the Carnegie Museum of Art, July 16-Feb. 17

Tito’s Vodka drink specials “Spay Breeze” special The official drink of the Animal Rescue League

FUN GAMES PAMPERING YOUR PUP Attend all four Yappy Hours to be registered to win some great prizes!

JOIN US FOR “A DOG GONE GOOD TIME!”

PROCEEDS BENEFIT THE ANIMAL RESCUE LEAGUE SHELTER AND WILDLIFE CENTER

Most Wanted Fine Art. Café Con Leche (art by Latino artists): Maggie Negrete and Alison Zapata, July 1-31 (July 15 and 17 artist talks). Photo Antiquities. Pictorialist Photography: Photography as Fine Art (images from the 19th and early 20th centuries), July 1-Aug. 30. BoxHeart Gallery. Love Songs: Symphonic Painting (paintings by Susan Constance) and Childhood Feedback (mixed-media paintings by Shawn Watrous), both July 5-Aug. 12 (reception July 16). Gallery Crawl. Quarterly Pittsburgh Cultural Trust event; includes Cosmopolitan Pittsburgh party. Downtown. July 8. Mine Factory. Art by Dan Reidy, July 8-24. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. 3rd Annual Art Brew Event, July 9. Spinning Plate Gallery. Collective Independence — Slippery Rock University (juried exhibition for Slippery Rock faculty, staff, alumni and students), July 9-31 (July 9 reception). Hoyt Center for the Arts. Arts on the Riverwalk Competition, July 9-Aug. 26. Westmoreland Museum of American Art. A Shared Legacy: Folk Art in America (self-taught and minimally trained artists from 1800-1925), July 9-Oct. 16.

Carnegie Museum of Art. Strength in Numbers: Photography y in Groups (photographs from the Carnegie museums, exhibited in groups), July 16-Feb. 17. Christine Frechard Gallery. African art exhibition (includes ancient and recent sculptures), July 29-Sept. 2 (July 30 reception).

AUGUST Spinning Plate Gallery. IUP Alumni Show (curated by Richard Claraval, Cathy Berard and Ron Donoughe), through Aug. 31. Hoyt Center for the Arts. Shaping Ceramics: Daniel Rhodes, Aug. 2-Oct. 22 (Aug. 5 reception). 4th Annual Expressions of Courage, Aug. 30-Oct. 28. BOOM Concepts. Art by Roopa Singh, Aug. 5-14 (Aug. 5 reception). Most Wanted Fine Art. Café Con Leche (art by Latino artists): Boris Balsindes-Urquiola and Marcel Lamont Walker, Aug. 5-31 (Aug. 19 artist talk). Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Robert W. Knauer Family Exhibit (work by the late Knauer and his children Brynn Gminder and Evan Knauer), Aug. 5-Sept. 2. CONTINUES ON PG. 42

40

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


UPMC & UPMC Health Plan Anonymous Allegheny Health Network & Highmark Blue Cross Blue Shield CGI AIO (Associates in Ophthalmology) Dr. Lisa Cibik and Bernie Kobosky J.A. Sauer Co. McGuireWoods, LLP Peoples PNC A-1 Realty, Inc. Allegheny General Hospital Medical Staff Atlas Dental Specialists CentiMark First National Bank First Niagara Bank Jones Day Susan and Scott Lammie PJ Dick Radiant Hall Schell Games LLC

500 SAMPSONIA WAY PITTSBURGH PA 15212

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

41


SUMMER ARTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 40

FEATURING

TRUDY LYNN JEVON RUSHTON RICHIE COLE PLUS 6 MORE BANDS

MAY 28 | INDIANA, PA 10:30 AM—LATE

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June 30,July 1,2,& 3 FREE ADMISSION Thursday - Saturday 11 a.m. - 8 p.m. Sunday 11 a.m. - 6 p.m. Twin Lakes Park, near Greensburg Shuttle bus service available from St. Vincent College, University of Pittsburgh at Greensburg, Nicely Elementary School, and Downtown Greensburg near the public bus terminal.

Visit www.artsandheritage.com for complete details.

Be a part of the next chapter in the DC Comics Universe from the beginning! Starting May 25 with an 80 page one-shot, the future (and past) of the DC Universe kicks off. The best part? Every book is only $2.99. To celebrate, South Side Comics is offering discounts on the new titles. Save up to 25% if you preorder all the title! Bring in this ad and get the DC Rebirth #1 for free!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Associated Artists of Butler County. Annual Invitational Show, Aug. 10-26 (Aug. 12 reception). Mine Factory. Art by Elizabeth Rudnick, Lindsay Scherloum, Zena Ruiz, Sarah Laponte and Natalia Gomez, Aug. 12-Sept. 2. Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Johnstown. Allied Artists of Johnstown 84th Annual Juried Art Exhibition, Aug. 12-Dec. 18 (Aug. 12 reception). Mattress Factory. New installation by Dennis Maher, opens Aug. 12.

Southern Alleghenies Museum of American Art at Ligonier Valley. Places and People: Nora and Stuart Thompson, Aug. 19-Nov. 6. Sweetwater Center for the Arts. ReMix: The Art of Reuse (juried show with upcycled materials), Aug. 20-Sept. 16. ToonSeum. Draw Me! The Art of the Cartooning Schools (surveying a century of cartooning schools and instruction courses), Aug. 20-Oct. 23. BoxHeart Gallery. Recent Work (paintings and sculpture by Thomas Bigatel) and Recent Work (print media and multimedia installation by Keith Garubba), both Aug. 23Sept. 30 (reception Aug. 27).

SEPTEMBER Associated Artists of Butler County. Nature & Wildlife Show, Sept. 2-30 (Sept. 2 reception). Photo Antiquities. Women in Photographs 1839-1939, Sept. 1-Nov. 30. Most Wanted Fine Art. Café Con Leche (art by Latino artists): Genevieve Barbee rbee and Marcel Lamont Walker, Sept. 2-30.

OTHER EXHIBITS Carnegie Museum of Natural History. Pterosaurs: Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs, through May 22. 50 Greatest Photographs (exhibit of iconic National Geographic photos), June 18-Sept. 11. Plus Dinosaurs in Their Time and other permanent exhibits. Museum After Dark (21-and-over event): Indiana Jones … After Dark (with costume contest, whip artist, scavenger hunt, movie screenings and more), June 10. Carnegie Science Center. Permanent exhibits including Highmark SportsWorks, roboworld and Rangos Omnimax Theater. Also: H2Oh! Why Our Rivers Matter, Spaceplace, Exploration Station and more. Center for Postnatural History. Exhibits about genetic engineering and the like, ongoing. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. Permanent exhibits plus attractions and activities including: TapeScape 2.0, through Sun., May 22, and Tough Art (original interactive artworks), ongoing. Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood: A Grr-ific Exhibit, opens June 11. Fort Pitt Museum. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th-Century Frontier, through Oct. 2. Plus permanent exhibits on the French and Indian War and more. Living History programs include: 18th Century Recreation (a game of cricket), Sat., May 21; Artillery and Artificers, June 4 and 5,

OTHER VENUES CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY. Oakland, 412-622-3131 CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER. North Side, 412-237-3400 CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL HISTORY. Garfield, www.postnatural.org CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-322-5058 FORT PITT MUSEUM. Downtown, 412-281-9284 MEADOWCROFT ROCKSHELTER AND HISTORIC VILLAGE. Avella, Pa., 724-587-3412 NATIONAL AVIARY. North Side, 412-323-7235 PHIPPS CONSERVATORY AND BOTANICAL GARDENS. Oakland, 412-622-6914 RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Swissvale, 412-464-4020 SEN. JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Strip District, 412-454-6000

and June 18; Fife and Drum, June 11; Fourth of July celebration, July 4; Artillery and Artificers, July 9, 23; Fife and Drum, Aug. 6; Artillery and Artificers, Aug. 13 and 20.

Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. Permanent exhibits include archaeological site with 16,000 years of human habitation and recreations of a Native American village and 19th-century settlers’ village. Also: Walk Through Prehistory (guided nature hike), June 11; 19th Annual Atlatl Competition (stone-age spear-throwing implement), June 18; Insider Tour of Meadowcroft Rockshelter, June 25 and Aug. 27; Vintage 1860s baseball game, Aug. 13. National Aviary. Nature’s Voice (free-flight live bird show), ongoing. Plus Penguin Point, Tropical Rainforest, Wetland and other permanent exhibits.

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Garden. Butterfly Forest, through Sept. 7. Summer Flower Show, through Oct. 2. Tropical Forest Congo, ongoing.

Rivers of Steel National Heritage Area. Saturday and Sunday tours of historical Carrie Blast Furnace continue weekly through October. Friday tours of Carrie start June 3 and continue weekly through August. See website for other tours and events. Sen. John Heinz Regional History Center. Toys of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, through May 31. Golf Learning Lab, through June 19. Visible Storage (artifacts from the museum’s collection), ongoing. Also: From Slavery to Freedom (African-American history) and other ongoing exhibits. Also houses the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum.


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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You don’t need to buy a plane ticket to escape from the city. Gather your family or friends together and visit any of these drivable p the p g to find yyour next vacation spot... p destinations. Flip pages

Get out of town and experience something new! AMERICAN MOUNTAIN THEATER

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ARTS ON THE RIVERWALK 724.652-2882 HoytArtCenter.org

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ASHTABULA COUNTY 800-3-DROP-IN VisitAshtabulaCounty.com #AshtabulaCounty #GOTL

Welcome to Ashtabula County ... Where Our Lake Awaits! :LWKWKLUW\PLOHVRI/DNH(ULHVKRUHOLQH HLJKWHHQSLFWXUHVTXHFRYHUHGEULGJHV LQFOXGLQJ$PHULFD¶VORQJHVWVSDQQLQJ )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQRQVFHQLFWUDLQ VL[KXQGUHGWKLUWHHQIHHWDQGVKRUWHVW ULGHVFDOORUYLVLW DPHUHIHHWDQGWKHODUJHVWJUDSH ZZZ0WQ5DLOFRP JURZLQJUHJLRQLQWKH6WDWHRI2KLR 9LVLWZZZDPHULFDQPRXQWDLQWKHDWHUFRP ZHKDYHDORWWRRIIHURQ\RXUQH[W YDFDWLRQ,I\RXOLNHIHVWLYDOVZHKDYH RUFDOOIRUPRUH RYHUWZHQW\LQRXUKLVWRULFGRZQWRZQV LQIRUPDWLRQRQVKRZV$07DOVRRIIHUV

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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FOUR SEASONS RESORT

FOUR SEASONS RESORT 3 Camp Resort Road, West Finley, PA 15377 724.428.4407 / email: info@campfourseasonsresort.com

Themed Themed Activities Activities Every Every Weekend! Weekend! 46

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Perfect for families, day trips, or vacations! Check website for all MountainRail Adventure destinations.

   MTN-RAIL.COM


B&B CCotta B&B, Cottages, ttages, FFull-Service ll S i SSpa, Crosswinds Grille Restaurant, & Winery

New “ZIP ZONE” Zipline! Enjoy the Beaches, Fun, & Sun! We offer marinas, public boat launches, fishing, wineries, covered bridges, and more! 4th of July Fest: 6/30–7/3; Fireworks 7/3 D-Day Weekend: 8/19–20 Rib Burn-Off: 9/9–11

Make your Summer reservations now, before we’re booked! Packages available. 440.466.8668 www.TheLakehouseInn.com

www.VisitConneautOhio.com

M – EEat – Sh Meet Shop h – EEnjoy j Along the Waterfront

Amusements, Restaurants, Just one mile west of Rt. 11 on Rt. 531 Live Music, Shops, Wineries, Camping, Farmers Market: Sundays thru 10/9 Lodging, and the Mile-Long Beach Glass Fest: 6/25–26 Entertainment Strip on Lake Erie TABS Fest: The Arts on Bridge Street: 7/30–31 Wine & Walleye Fest: 8/27–28

800.862.9948 www.VisitGenevaontheLake.com

www.Bridgestbula.com

440.466.3555 www.AdventureZoneFun.com

A Picturesque it & SSecluded l d d Wi Winery Extensive Lunch & Dinner Menus, Outdoor Patio Seating Live Entertainment: Thurs – Sun. Open 7 days a week. 440.298.9838 www.GrandRiverCellars.com

Stay on Lake Erie... Play in Wine Country!

Award-winning wine & full-service restaurant overlooking Lake Erie!

109 Rooms, Indoor & Outdoor Pools, Lake Front Dining, Live Music, Wine Shuttle, 25 Cottages B&B Packages starting at $139+ tax, mid-week.

Live music: Seven days-a-week in summer Open daily all year-long 1.800.UnCork.1 www.OldFirehouseWinery.com

www.VisitAshtabulaCounty.com

Go Carts, The Rock, Bungee Tramp, Batting Cages, Adventure Golf, Blaster Bumper Boats, Arcade, AND MORE! Open 7 days a week: Memorial Day – Labor Day Weekends only: May & September

866.826.9975 www.TheLodgeAtGeneva.com

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800.337.6746

WIN A WINE COUNTRY GET GETAWAY ETA AWAY ffor two! Enjoy the amenities of The Lodge at Geneva-on-the-Lake while you experience Ohio’s premier viticulture region: Ashtabula County! Enter online at: www.VisitAshtabulaCounty.com

#ashtabulacounty PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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MERCER COUNTY

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MOUNTAINRAIL ADVENTURES 866-882-6507 MTN-RAIL.com &RPHDQGH[SHULHQFH:HVW9LUJLQLD¶VUXUDO PRXQWDLQVFHQHU\E\UDLO$GYHQWXUHLQWR IRUHVWVRIVSUXFHWUHHVRYHUWRSPRXQWDLQ ULGJHVDQGWKURXJKQDUURZULYHUYDOOH\V DORQJVRPHRIWKHPRVWUXUDODQGXQLQKDE LWHGDUHDVRI:HVW9LUJLQLD¶VKLJKPRXQWDLQ FRXQWU\±DOOE\KLVWRULFWUDLQ7KHDurbin & Greenbrier Valley Railroad offers Mountain Rail Adventures from (ONLQV&DVVDQG'XUELQHDFK$SULO WKURXJK1RYHPEHUZLWKWUDLQULGHV WKDWDUHSHUIHFWIRUFRXSOHVIDPLOLHV VPDOOFKLOGUHQDQGSKRWRJUDSKHUV :LWKVHYHUDOVSHFLDOHYHQWVWKURXJKRXW WKH\HDUQRZLVWKHWLPHWRSODQ \RXUSHUIHFWMountain Rail getaway to the highlands of West Virginia

ZANESVILLEMUSKINGUM COUNTY 800-743-2303 VisitZanesville.com 7UDYHOHDVWRI=DQHVYLOOH2KLRWRH[SHUL HQFHAdamsville7RXU2KLR¶VODUJHVW 6XULDOSDFDIDUPAlpacas of Spring Acres7DNHD'XGH5DQFKYDFDWLRQDW KD Guest Ranch. Choose from over K\EULGL]HGGD\OLOLHVDWDorsets N Daylilies6KRSIRUKHUEDOSURGXFWVDQG DQWLTXHVDWSpiker Springs3XUFKDVH pasture raised food at Bush Valley Farm)LQGEHDXWLIXOÃ&#x20AC;RZHUVDQGPRUH at McDonaldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Greenhouse & Corn MazeDQGGifts from the Garden. 'LVFRYHUDODUJHVHOHFWLRQRIXQLTXHLWHPV at Millâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bulk Food & Deli(QMR\WKH VFHQLFGULYHRQ2+6WDWH5RXWHRII ,QWHUVWDWH&DOOIRU IUHHLQIRUPDWLRQ

Come visit the Midwestâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only art gallery dedicated to the imaginative world of fantasy. Located in the heart of the Canton Arts District.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


Relax & Enjoy the

Breathtaking Views on Mercer County

Trails

Wine & Brew Trail The Mercer County PA area is home to 8 family owned wineries and is on the verge of a burgeoning brew pub scene. Gather a group of your closest friends and travel the wine & brew trail in Mercer County. Taste the difference when savoring distinctive regionally produced and bottled wines. Enjoy personal service, tasting, educational programs and special events at our locally owned and operated wineries. Also explore the growing micro brewery scene in Mercer County. Each of our breweries have their own distinctive atmosphere and personality and the same could be said of their beer. In addition to great hand crafted beer, enjoy a wide selection of sandwiches, burgers, artisan pizza, small plates and specials at our breweries. In season some of the breweries offer entertainment.

Upper Shenango River Water Trail Enjoy 23 miles of scenic pleasures on the Shenango River from Pymatuning State Park to Shenango Lake. Numerous access points and outstanding outfitting services make planning your water adventure easy.

Mercer County Golf Trail One of America’s Top Golf Destinations offering a great selection of middle to high end courses, low green fees and a variety of accommodations centrally located to the courses. To request a golf package quote go to GolfMercerCountyPA.com.

John C. Oliver Multi-Purpose Trail at Maurice K Goddard State Park This 12 mile loop paved trail and roadway offers many vistas that overlook Lake Wilhelm. The scenic trail runs from the dam to Lake Wilhelm Road.

VisitMercerCountyPA.com (click on Things To Do) or call 724-346-3771 to receive FREE guides to plan an amazing adventure in Mercer County!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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Trust Cool NATION BEAT NYC, BRAZIL-NEW ORLEANS COLLISION

BOULEVARDS

SUMMER STAGE

RALEIGH NC, FUNK AND SOUL

DJ SMI/ BELEZA

PITTSBURGH BRAZILIAN DANCE

SLOW DANGER

PITTSBURGH SONIC MOVEMENT

Friday, July 8 • August Wilson Center TrustArts.org/Cosmo • 412-456-6666

The Down and Dirty Dance Party A one-night-only dance party celebrating Attack Theatre. Get down. Get dirty. When: Friday, May 20, 2016, 8 PM - 2 AM Where: Spirit, 242 51st Street, Lawrenceville Featuring: Eye Jay the DJ, Pandemic Pete, DJ Bamboo, and Selecta, Attack Theatre pop-up performances, and cash bar of cold drinks and hot pizza. Get down. Get dirty. www.attacktheatre.com/downanddirty Made possible in part by:

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Photo credit: Mark Knobil

NOW ON STAGE Two Tales of Horror. Adaptations of Poe’s “The Tell-Tale Heart” and “The Fall of the House of Usher,” through Fri., May 20 (PICT Classic Theatre). Jeeves Intervenes. Margaret Raether’s adaptation of the P.G. Wodehouse stories, about a faithful valet rescuing his playboy boss from an unwanted wedding, through May 21 (Little Lake Theatre Co.). The Musical of Musicals. The cult-favorite spoof of famous Broadway composers, through May 21 (Off the Wall). Assassins. Sondheim’s revue-style 1990 take on John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald and other presidential assassins (or would-be assassins), through May 22 (Stage 62). The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas. The 1978 musical comedy, through May 22 (McKeesport Little Theater). The Giver. It’s the world premiere of this adaptation of Lois Lowery’s Newberry-winning young-adult novel about a boy coming of age in a dystopian society, through May 22 (Prime Stage Theatre Co.). Tru. One-man show depicting Truman Capote in 1975, through May 22 (Pittsburgh Public Theater). Cock. Local favorites Sam Tsoutsouvas and Erika Strasburg star in British playwright Mike Bartlett’s award-winning 2010 comedy about a love triangle, through May 29 (Kinetic Theatre Co.). The Lion. Benjamin Scheuer wrote and stars in this one-man musical memoir, through June 5 (City Theatre).

MAY The 13th of Paris. Romantic comedy about a guy who goes to Paris with his late grandparents’ love letters, Thu., May 19-June 4 (South Park Theatre). Serpentine. Interactive theater — a “film-noir style alternate-reality game that examines a true Pittsburgh cold case,” Thu., May 19-June 11 (Uncumber Theatrics).

Benjamin Scheuer in The Lion, at City Theatre through June 5 {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW MURPHY}

Whitney Maris Brown in Venus in Fur, at Pittsburgh Public Theater, June 2-26

The 39 Steps. Four actors play 150 roles in this madcap comedic take on Hitchcock’s classic wrong-man thriller, May 20-Aug. 14 (CLO Cabaret). The Foreigner. Larry Shue’s farce about a pathologically shy Brit in rural Georgia posing as someone who speaks no English, May 20-June 4 (Apple Hill Playhouse). Enchanted April. Proper British ladies find themselves in a Mediterranean adventure, May 26-June 11 (Little Lake). From My Hometown. Classic R&B tunes provide the score for this play about three newcomers to New York ambitious to sing at the Apollo, May 27-June 5 (New Horizon Theater). Spitfire Grill. James Valcq and Fred Alley’s popular 2001 musical about a young woman


SUMMER SIZZLES AT THE O’REILLY THEATER

APPLE HILL PLAYHOUSE. Delmont, 724-468-5050 ARCADE COMEDY THEATER. Downtown, 412-339-0608 BENEDUM CENTER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 BRICOLAGE THEATRE. Downtown, 412-394-3353 BYHAM THEATER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL. Munhall, 412-462-3444 CITY OF ASYLUM/PITTSBURGH. North Side, 412-323-0278 CITY THEATRE. South Side, 412-431-2489 CLUB CAFÉ. South Side, 412-431-4950 CLO CABARET. Downtown, 412-281-3973 FRONT PORCH THEATRICALS. North Side, www.frontporchpgh.com HEINZ HALL. Downtown, www.pittsburghsympony.org JOHNNY APPLESEED CHILDREN’S THEATER. Delmont, 724-468-5050 KELLY-STRAYHORN THEATER. East Liberty, www.kelly-strayhorn.org KINETIC THEATRE CO. North Side, www.kinetictheatre.org LITTLE LAKE THEATRE. Canonsburg, 724-745-6300 LOOKING GLASS THEATRE. Canonsburg, 412-561-4402 MCKEESPORT LITTLE THEATER. McKeesport, 412-673-1100 NEW HORIZON THEATER. Homewood, www.newhorizontheater.org

just out of prison trying to start her life over, May 27-June 5 (Front Porch Theatricals). Matilda. Award-winning Broadway musical based on Roald Dahl’s popular children’s book about a young girl and her imagination, May 31-June 12 (CLO Cabaret).

JUNE Mother Lode. Linda Haston stars in Virginia Wall Gruenert’s new one-woman show about a mother-daughter relationship and end-of-life decisions, June 2-5 and Aug. 11-14 (Off the Wall). The Consorts. A condemned British archbishop and his otherworldly visitors are the main characters in Timohty Ruppert’s dark comedy set in 16th-century England, June 2-12 (The Summer Company). Squabbles. Marshall Karp’s romantic comedy about a mismatched pair of in-laws living with their married kids, June 9-25 (South Park).

IT HURTS SO GOOD COMPANIES + VENUES NEW HAZLETT THEATER. North Side, 412-320-4610 OFF THE WALL PRODUCTIONS. Carnegie, 724-873-3576 SUMMERFEST (OPERA THEATER OF PITTSBURGH). 412-621-1499 PICT CLASSIC. Oakland, 412-561-6000 PITTSBURGH CLO. Downtown, 412-325-1582 PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS THEATER CO. Downtown, www.pghplaywrights.com PITTSBURGH PUBLIC THEATER. Downtown, 412-316-1600 PLAYHOUSE JR. Oakland, 412-621-4445 PRIME STAGE THEATRE. North Side, www.primestage.com RAGE OF THE STAGE PLAYERS. McKeesport, www.rageofthestage.com SOUTH PARK THEATRE. South Park, 412-831-8552 STAGE 62. Carnegie, 412-429-6262 THE SUMMER COMPANY. Uptown, www.thesummercompany.com THE THEATRE FACTORY. Trafford, 412-374-9200 THROUGHLINE THEATRE COMPANY. Lawrenceville, www.throughlinetheatre.org TRUST ARTS EDUCATION CENTER. Downtown, 412-456-6666 TWELVE PEERS. Lawrenceville, www.12peerstheater.org UNCUMBER THEATRICS. www.uncumbertheatrics.com

Venus in Fur. David Ives (All in the Timing) had a hit with this play about a theatrical audition that takes an unexpected turn, June 2-26 (Public).

Theatre Festival in Black and White. The long-running festival of new one-acts that pairs white playwrights with black directors and vice versa, free this year as part of the Three Rivers Arts Festival, June 4-11 (Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Co.). Judgment at Nuremburg. Abby Mann’s 1961 drama about Nazis on trial, June 10-18 (Throughline Theatre Co.). Sin, Sex & the CIA. Michael and Susan Parker’s farce about the CIA, foreign dignitaries, a fundamentalist preacher and a sexy neighbor, all in the Virginia mountains, June 16-25 (Apple Hill). Light Up the Sky. Moss Hart’s 1949 backstage farce about the premiere of an overly earnest play, June 16-July 2 (Little Lake).

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 51

Front Porch Theatricals Presents

May 27-29 & June 2-5 New Hazlett Theater Directed by

RACHEL M. STEVENS

The Spitfire Grill is presented by special arrangement with Samuel French, Inc. Produced by Bruce. E. G. Smith, Leon S. Zionts & Nancy D. Zionts

Book and Music by James Valcq Lyrics and Book by Fred Alley

Tickets: www.frontporchpgh.com or 1-888-71-TICKETS Ticket prices: $30 online, $35 at door, $24 Students & Groups

A ZANY, SCREW BALL COMEDY FOR EVERYONE FROM 9 TO 99! Chicago at Pittsburgh CLO, June 17-26 {PHOTO COURTESY OF JEREMY DANIEL}

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Stars) stars in Kander & Ebb’s perennial favorite about crime and corruption in the big city, June 17-26 (CLO). Carmen the Gypsy. Bizet’s opera is re-imagined for the Opera Theater of Pittsburgh’s annual Summerfest, at various venues, June 22-July 9 (Summerfest). Bloody Hell. Company specializes in dark phantasmagoria takes on Prince Vlad and his vampire consorts, June 24-July 9 (Rage of the Stage). Church Basement Ladies. Musical comedy about the volunteers in a church kitchen in rural Minnesota in 1965, June 30-July 16 (South Park).

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Damn Yankees. Classic Adler & Ross musical about ambition, baseball, selling your soul and Lola getting what Lola wants, July 5-10 (CLO Cabaret). The Gin Game. D.L. Coburn’s Pulitzer-winning two-hander about nursinghome residents who bond over cards, July 7-16 (Apple Hill). Anna in the Tropics. Nilo Cruz’s drama about life in a cigar factory in 1920s Florida, won the Pulitzer in 2003, July 7-23 (Little Lake). Kiss Me, Kate. Cole Porter’s backstage musical riffing on The Taming of the Shrew, at Falk Auditorium, July 8-23 (Summerfest). Anything Goes. Classic Cole Porter musical featuring tunes like the title number, “I Get a Kick Out of You” and “You’re the Top,” July 8-24 (Theatre Factory). Little Red Riding Hood. Opera Theater of Pittsburgh production of the world’s most-performed children’s opera, July 9, 16 and 23 (Summerfest). Come Back, Little Sheba. William Inge’s

1950 drama about a trouble Midwestern married couple and their young female boarder, July 14-24 (Summer Company). Julius Caesar. Handel’s opera about Caesar and Cleopatra, July 15, 17 and 23 (SummerFest). Shrek The Musical. Adaptation of the hit film about an ogre and a donkey on a mission to rescue a princess, July 15-24 (CLO). Jesus Christ Superstar. Andrew Lloyd Weber and Tim Rice’s 1970 rock musical, July 21-31 (Stage 62). The Tin Woman. Drama about a woman who tracks down the family of the young man who supplied her new heart, July 21-Aug. 6 (South Park). (So JJulius Caesar. Et tu, Brute? Shakespeare’s cclassic tragedy set in ancient Rome, July 22-July 30 (Throughline). Ju The Silent Woman. Strauss’ comic opera T about abo a man who thinks he’s marrying a shy young woman, July 22 and 24 (SummerFest). The Hound of the Baskervilles. Local favorite David Whalen plays Sherlock Holmes in this adaptation of the famous story, July 23-Aug. 7 (Kinetic). Elton John & Tim Rice’s Aida. The musical about forbidden love in ancient Egypt, July 26-31 (CLO Cabaret). The Spitfire Grill. James Valcq and Fred Alley’s popular 2001 musical about a young woman just out of prison trying to start her life over, July 28-Aug. 6 (Apple Hill). The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie. Jay Presson Allen’s drama about an eccentric girls’-school teacher in 1930s England, July 28-Aug. 13 (Little Lake).

AUGUST The Birds. Contemporary playwright Conor McPherson’s adaptation of the Daphne du Maurier story about marauding birds in small town, Aug. 4-21 (Twelve Peers). CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 52

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH

SADULTS SU MM M E R R RE E A D I N NG LTS • TEENS • KIDS

South Pacific. Rodgers & Hammerstein, a

Loot. Joe Orton’s classic satirical farce

tropical island, World War II, washing that man right out of your hair, etc., Aug. 5-14 (CLO). Peribañez. Tanya Ronder’s contemporary adaptation of the 1614 Lope de Vega tragicomedy about an aristocrat who meddles in a peasant wedding, Aug. 5-28 (Quantum Theatre).

about bumbling bank-robbers, Aug. 18-Sept. 3 (Little Lake). Floyd Collins. In 1925, a man trapped in a Kentucky cave became America’s first media circus; the incident inspired Adam Guettel and Tina Landau’s acclaimed 1996 musical, Aug. 26-Sept. 4 (Front Porch).

Weekend Comedy.

SEPTEMBER

Middle-aged marrieds and a carefree young couple find themselves in the same remote rental cabin for the weekend, Aug. 11-27 (South Park).

This Is Why We Can’t Have Nice Things. Heidi Nagle’s one-woman The Pillow show about growing up Project’s in Amish country, Aug. 18-20 Thought Pockets, (Off The Wall). June 3 The Cemetery Club. Three Jewish widows disagree about how to move forward in life in Ivan Menchell’s comedy, Aug. 18-27 (Apple Hill). A History of the American Film. Hollywood archetypes — the good girl, the tough guy, the wisecracking friend — get a going-over in Christopher Durang’s madcap 1978 comedy, Aug. 18-28 (Summer Company).

Better Late. M*A*S*H* TVseries creator Larry Gelbart’s 2008 comedy finds a man forced by illness to cohabitate with his ex-wife and her husband, Sept. 1-17 (South Park). Shirley Valentine. Willy Russell’s 1989 Tony-winner is a one-character play about a middle-aged British housewife, before and after an adventure abroad, Sept. 1-17 (PICT).

DANCE

Artcity: Reed Dance Intensive. Showcase for students ages 8-12, July 18-23 (Byham Theater). Also Aug. 16 (Kelly-Strayhorn Theater). CONTINUES ON PG. 56

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Bruce Mason’s adaptation of the classic Judy Blume book about a boy and his irritating brother, through Sun., May 22 (Playhouse Jr.).

Pierini’s recent (nonmusical) adaptation of the popular fable, July 20-Aug. 6 (Looking Glass). The Magical Land of Oz. Wizard of Oz adaptation, July 18-27 (South Park). Looking Glass Land. An adaptation of Alice in Wonderland, July 26-Aug. 5 (Johnny Appleseed).

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The Enchanted Sleeping Beauty. The classic fairy tale, July 5-15

Stone Soup. Musical adaptation of the classic folk tale, through Sun., May 22 (Playhouse Jr.).

adaptation, June 20-29 (South Park Children’s Theatre). The Tiger Who Came to Tea. Musical based on Judith Kerr’s book, about an unusually large feline guest, June 29-July 16 (Looking Glass Theatre). Oh, Jack. A musical-comedy twist on Jack and the Beanstalk, June 14-24 (Johnny Appleseed).

JULY The Frog Prince. Adaptation of the popular fable, July 5-13 (South Park).

AUGUST Snow White and the Seven Fairy Godmothers. A twist on the classic fable, Aug. 1-10 (South Park). A Surprise for Lydia. A little girl debates whether to open a large, mysterious box in this new play by Sunny Disney Fitchett, Aug. 10-27 (Looking Glass).


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fireWALL dance theater, July 7-9 and 14-16 {PHOTO COURTESY OF OFF THE WALL PRODUCTIONS}

Bodiography Center for Movement. Spring Concert (Bodiography dance students), June 4 (Byham Theater). The Frick Art Museum Presents Bodiography (site-specific work), July 29. Carnegie Performing Arts Center. Annual student recital, June 4 and 5. Carnegie, 412-279-8887 fireWALL dance theater. EFF.UL.GENTS (premiere of Elisa-Marie Alaio’s work set to music by Monteverde), July 7-9 and 14-16 (Off the Wall Productions). The Pillow Project. Thought Pockets (day-long, immersive public performance-art installation on Strawberry Way), June 3. Downtown. www.pillowproject.org p p j g Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre. The troupe’s

Terry Jones, July 9 at Slapsticks Comedy Club and Aug. 11 at the Pittsburgh Improv

annual Ballet Under the Stars performance at Hartwood Acres, Aug. 21. www.pbt.org Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre School. The spring dance performance including classical and contemporary works performed by students from both student and preprofessional divisions, May 20 and 21 (Byham). Texture Contemporary Ballet. Song of the Earth, with dance accompanying chamber orchestra Resonance Works of Pittsburgh’s performance of Mahler’s classic, Fri., May 20, and Sun., May 22 (Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland). www.textureballet.org

COMEDY

Arcade Comedy Theater. Bonus Stage, Arca Sun., May 22- July 31. Beta Stage, Sat., May 212 June 25. Dinner with the Nolens, June 4, July 2, Aug. 6 and Sept. 3. Knights of the Arcade: Arcad Epic D&D Comedy, Sat., May 21. Improv Pop-Up Pop-U Night, Thu., May 19. Mixed Doubles, Fri., May M 20. The Playlist: Music-Inspired Improv, Thu., May 19. Comedy Royale, Fri., May 20. The Justin & Jerome Experience, Fri., May 20. J Comic Comi Wars, Sat., May 21. Sketchville, May 26-28. Gab Bonesso, July 16. Downtown, 2 412-339-0608 412-3 Club Café. The Loaded Show (featuring Aaron Aar Kleiber and others), Sat., May 21. Alex Ale Stypula Live Album Recording, June 11. South Side, 412-431-4950 So DVE Comedy Festival. Featuring DV Chris D’Elia, Roy Wood Jr., Bret Ernst and Ch Jimmy Shubert, June 24 (Byham). Jim Comedy Sauce Showcase. Hosted by C Aaron Kleiber every Monday. Pleasure Bar, Aa Bloomfield. 412-682-9603 Blo Billy Gardell. Standup show by the Bill sitcom sitco star and Pittsburgh native, May 19-21 (Monroeville Convention Center). (Mon www.latshawproductions.com www Chris Hardwick. The TV host and comic, June 10 (Carnegie of Homestead Music Munhall). Hall, M Bill M Maher. The TV host returns July 8 (Heinz Hall). (Hein CONTINUES ON PG. 58

56

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 56

Goodwill NOW HIRING! Full-time and part-time positions available! Many stores accessible with Pittsburgh bus lines! The Second City at Pittsburgh Public Theater, Aug. 26 and 27 {PHOTO COURTESY OF TODD ROSENBERG}

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Krish Mohan. The former Pittsburgher performs An Indian Comedian: How Not to Fit In (also live album recording), May 28 (Hambone’s Restaurant, Lawrenceville). Nick Offerman and Megan Mullaly. The comedians and marrieds bring their tour Summer of 69: No Apostrophe, Aug. 21 (Benedum Center). Off the Wall Productions. Luck It We’ll Do It Five (new show by Off the Wall’s resident sketch-comedy troupe, The Harvey WALLbangers), June 17-19. Pittsburgh Comedy Showcase. For pros and amateurs, hosted by Tom Kupiec. Corner Café, South Side, 412-488-2995 Pittsburgh Improv. Joey Diaz, Thu., May 19-Sat., May 21. Gary Owen, May 26-29. Adam Ferrara, June 2-5. Josh Tryhane & Brennen Taylor, June 4. Marauders Baseball Fundraiser, June 8. Craig Shoemaker, June 10-12. Jay Mohr, June 15. Bruce Bruce, June 17-19. Danny Palumbo, June 22. Big Jay Oakerson, June 23-26. John Henton, June 30-July 3. Guy Torry, 7-10. 14-17. July 7 10. Rocky Laporte, July 14 17. Brent Morin, July 28-30. Candidates Comedy, Aug. 10. Terry Jones, Aug. 11. Jon Lovitz, Aug. 12-14. Tony Rock, Aug. 18-21. West Homestead, 412-462-5233 Pittsburgh Improv Jam. Thursdays

58

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Pittsburgh Public Theater. Famed Chicago-based sketch and improv troupe The Second City visits for three performances of Free Speech! (While Supplies Last), including new and classic material satirizing politics, Aug. 26 and 27. Jerry Seinfeld. The standup legend does two shows Sat., May 21 (Benedum). Slapsticks Comedy Club. Steve Sabo S and a Derrick Knopsnyder, May 21 (Rose Bar & Grille, White Oak). Lamp Theatre (Irwin) shows: John Evans, Mike Wysocki and Mike Sasson, June 4; Derrick Knopsnyder, Terry Jones and Matt Light, July 9; Shaun Blackham, T-Robe and David Kaye, Aug. 6. www.slapsticksproductions.com

LITERARY +TALK

3 Rivers Comicon. Inaugural comics convention hosted by New Dimension Comics, May 21 and 22, Century III Mall, West Mifflin. www.3riverscomicon.com

Barnes & Noble South Hills Village. Children’s-

at Cabaret at Theater Square, Downtown, 412-281-3973

book author Anastasia Higginbotham (Death Is Stupid), d June 4. 412-835-0379

Bruce Bruce, June 17-19 at the Pittsburgh Improv

Reading Extravaganza (free family activities and entertainment), June 5, Oakland. 412-622-3151

Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Summer


City of Asylum/Pittsburgh. Cave Canem Poets (annual reading by the collective for African-American poets, with Lyrae Van Clief-Stefanon, Evie Shockley, Kevin Young and Major Jackson), June 16. Women Writers of Northview Heights (local collective), June 21. Evening of Kool Poetry (readings by Umbra/Pittsburgh writers accompanied by drummers in celebration of Black Arts Movement poets), July 19. North Side. www. cityofasylum.org Classic Lines Bookstore. Six Gallery Press Book Launch for Elijah Benedict Brown and John Thomas Menesini, May 26. Bonnie Friedman (Hospital Warrior), June 23. Squirrel Hill. 412-422-2220

Creative Nonfiction.

Dormont Public Library. Nurse and author Theresa Brown (The Shift), Wed., May 25. www.dormontlibrary.org

An Evening of Oakland Storytelling (hosted by Rick Sebak and curated by Caliban Book Shop and The Moth in Pittsburgh). June 10. Western

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Pennsylvania School for Blind Children, Oakland. www.opdc.org

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Free Jesus Poems About Jesus. Latest in a series of poetry events with different themes, June 18 (Most Wanted Fine Art, Garfield). freepoems aboutpoems. wordpress.com

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TIME TO BUY! Plenty of Manufacturer Rebates & Incentives.

Hemingway’s Summer Poetry Series. Squirrel Hill

Jon Lovitz,

Aug. 12-14 1 at Writing Away the Stigma the Pittsburgh Pitt readings (for Mental Health Improv Awareness Month), Sat., May 21 (Carnegie Library — Lawrenceville) and Sun., May 22 (East Liberty Presbyterian Church). Creative Nonfiction Writers Conference (workshops and discussions), May 27-29. www.creativenonfiction.org

Poetry Workshop readers (M. Soledad Caballero, Erin Garstka, Nancy Esther James, Joseph Karasek, Pam O’Brien, Rosaly DeMaios Roffman and Arlene Weiner), May 24. David Blair, Jeff Oaks, Ellen McGrath Smith, Judith Vollmer and Bob Walicki, May 31. Toi Derricotte, Richard St. John, Philip Terman and Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, June 7. Bottom Dog Press Tribute Reading (Jeanne Byrne, Jim Daniels, Liane Ellison Norman, publisher Larry Smith and Jimmy Cvetic), June 14. Joan E. Bauer, CONTINUES ON PG. 60

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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SUMMER STAGE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 59

Daniela Buccilli, Joseph Fasano, Rina Ferrarelli, Rachel Mennies and Adriana Ramirez, June 21. Craig Czury, Roberta Hatcher, Nancy Krygowski, Walt Peterson and Michael Wurster, July 5. Sundress Poets (Kelly Andrews, Margaret Bashaar, Jennifer Jackson Berry, Jill Khoury and Erin Elizabeth Smith), July 12. Charlie Brice, Jay Carson, Ann Curran, Timons Esaias, Mary Soon Lee, Judith Robinson and John Stupp, July 19. Grand Finale: Kristofer Collins, Angele Ellis, Celeste Gainey, Richard Gegick, John Grochalski, John Korn, Jason Mendez and Don Wentworth, July 26. Hemingway’s Café, Oakland, jbauer103w@aol.com The Moth StorySLAM. Themed storytelling nights: “Fathers,” June 7. Rex Theater, South Side, www.themoth.org

Mystery Lovers Bookshop.

What does your child buy at convenience stores?

Coffee & Crime: Mary Kay Andrews, Sat., May 21. Book launch for Joshua Bellin’s Scavenger of Souls, Aug. 20. Oakmont. Steel City Slam. Spoken-word poetry competition, every Judy Blume, Tuesday through Aug. 16. July 12 at Championship, July 15. Pittsburgh Arts & Capri Pizza, East Liberty. Lectures www.pghpoetry.org Penguin Bookshop. Melanie Potock (Raising a Happy, Healthy Eater), Thu., May 19. Memoirist Paul Hertneky (Rust Belt Boy), Sat., May 21. Novelist Jennifer Haigh (Heat and Light), Mon., May 23. An evening with Stephen King (rare appearance by the author, at an off-site location), June 8. Sewickley. www.penguinbookshop.com

 Children who complete the study will be compensated for their time and effort with $50 in gift certificates. Parking and travel compensation is provided.  If you are interested and want to learn more about the study, please call 412-545-3005, e-mail c-storestudy@rand.org or visit us at www.rand.org/storestudy.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

C O R P O R AT I O N

Sewickley Library. Memoirist Paul Hertneky, Mon., May 23. 412-741-6920 Tales Under the Trees. An afternoon of all-ages storytelling featuring nationally known Jim May, plus storytelling contests, June 4 (Tall Trees Amphitheater, Monroeville). www.facebook.com (search “Storyworks”). TEDx Pittsburgh. Thirteen local speakers discuss the “ideas worth spreading in the Steel City,” Sat., May 22 (Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, Oakland). www.tedxpittsburgh.org Versify. Monthly poetry reading series at East End Book Exchange, Sat., May 21. Bloomfield. www.eastendbookexchange.com WordPlay. Quarterly series blending true stories with live DJ, hosted by comic Alan Olifson, Aug. 27 and 28 (Bricolage).

OTHER



The RAND Corporation, in Pittsburgh, is conducting a research study to learn about what children, ages 11–17, purchase at convenience stores. Participation requires one 20 minute phone/internet survey and one 90 minute visit to the RAND study center.

Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Museum director and author Nancy Moses (Stolen, Smuggled, Sold), June 9. Nurse and author Theresa Brown (The Shift), June 21. Famed author Judy Blume, July 12. Young Adult and Middle Grade Authors in Conversation (Siobhan Vivian, Jonathan Auxier, Nick Courage), July 26. Fiction writer Sherrie Flick (Whiskey, Etc.), Aug. All at Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh, Oakland. 412-622-8866 Pittsburgh Park Summer Reading Series. Organized by Autumn House Press. Judith Vollmer, Kevin González and Israel Centeno, June 12 (Allegheny Commons Park, North Side); Ed Ochester, Adrianna Ramirez and Sherrie Flick, July 16 (Reservoir Drive Walk, Highland Park); and Patricia Jabbeh Wesley, Gerry LaFemina and Craig Bernier, Aug. 14 (Elliot Overlook, Elliot). www. autumnhouse.org

PERFORMANCE The Long Song. Local artist Jennifer Nagle Myers’ “collaborative composition,” a two-hour performance artwork featuring 21 performers — one on each block of Penn Avenue between Main Street and Highland Avenue, May 22. www.jennefire.com

RuPaul’s Drag Race. Touring revue based on the hit TV series, June 1. Carnegie Music Hall, Homestead.

The Smokin’ Hot Summer Show. Local troupe Smokin’ Betties Burlesque presents its tribute to the season, at Club Café (June 10).

An Evening with Broadway’s Michael Cerveris & Seth Rudetsky.

Cirque du Soleil. Toruk: The First

One-night Pittsburgh CLO fundraiser with Tony-winning actor and musician Michael Cerveris and radio host Seth Rudetsky, May 23 (CLO Cabaret).

Flight (new internationally touring circus show based on the film Avatar), June 22-26. Consol Energy Center, Uptown. www.cirquedusoleil.com


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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SUMMER FAIRS,

FESTIVALS+SPECIAL EVENTS ONGOING Pittsburgh Neighborhood Festivals. Held throughout the city through fall. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net for complete list

MAY 28-29 Pyrofest. Fireworks festival, Cooper’s Lake. www.pyrofest.com

MAY 29 Open Streets. Recreate on more than four miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

MAY 30 Memorial Day Celebration. Soldiers

Three Rivers Arts Festival, June 3-12 {PHOTO BY MIKE SCHWARZ}

& Sailors Hall, Oakland. 412-621-4253

Tropical Forest Congo Festival. Phipps

JUNE 03-12

Conservatory, Oakland. phipps. conservatory.org

Three Rivers Arts Festival. Downtown. Visual-art exhibitions, public art installations, music and dance performances, and arts-andcrafts market. 412-456-6666 or www.3riversartsfest.org

JUNE 11

JUNE 26 Classic Car Show. Pennsylvania Pittsburgh Irish Festival, Sept. 9-11

Riverview Park Heritage Day. Family fun, games, crafts, more. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

{PHOTO COURTESY OF ALL POINT IMAGES}

Harmony Herb and Garden Fair. Harmony Museum,

JUNE 30-JULY 03

locations. Vintage car races and shows. www.pittsburghvintagegrandprix.com

JULY 09 Doo Dah Nights: Stephen Foster Music and Heritage Festival. Spirit Lounge, Lawrenceville. www.doodahdays.com

JULY 11 Vintage Grand Prix Car Show. Walnut Street, Shadyside. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

JULY 16

Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

Westmoreland Arts and Heritage Festival. Twin Lakes

Polish Hill Arts Festival. Brereton Street, Polish Hill. 412-255-2493 or o www.citiparks.net

JUNE 12

Park, Greensburg. 724-834-7474 or www.artsandheritage.com

JJULY 16-17

JULY 01-09

H Harambee Ujima Black Arts and C Culture Festival. Kelly Street, Homewood.

Big Butler Fair. Butler County Fairgrounds.

412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

Head for the biggest fair ’round these parts. 724-865-2400 or www.bigbutlerfair.com

JULY 23

Pride Awareness March and PrideFest. Downtown. www.pittsburghpride.org

JUNE 18 Atlatl Competition. Meadowcroft, Avella, Pa. Try your hand at the ancient hunting implement. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

JUNE 25 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

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Trolley Museum, Washington. 877-728-7655 or www.pa-trolley.org Open Streets. Recreate on more than four miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

JULY 08-17 Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix. Various

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

JULY 02 Independence Day Celebration. Meadowcroft, Avella, Pa. Games, food and demonstrations of 19th-century rural celebrations. 724-587-3412 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

JULY 24-30 Bedford County Fair. Bedford County Fairgrounds, Bedford. 814-623-9011 or www.bedford-fair.com


tomorrow exchange buy * sell*trade

Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix, July 8-17 {PHOTO COURTESY OF MATTHEW LITTLE}

JULY 28-AUG. 06 Fayette County Fair. Fayette County Fairgrounds, Dunbar. 724-628-3360 or www.fayettefair.com

JULY 29 142nd Annual Rain Day. Waynesburg, urg, Greene County. 724-627-8111 or www.raindayfestival.com

JULY 30 Pittsburgh VegFest. Allegheny Commons mmons Park East, North Side. www.pittsburghvegfest.org

JULY 31 Open Streets. Recreate on more than four miles of closed city streets from Downtown to Lawrenceville. www.openstreetspgh.org

AUG. 04-07

AUG. 15-20 Lawrence County Fair. Lawrence County Fairgrounds, New Castle. 724-654-7745 or www.lawrencecountyfair.com

AUG. 18-21 Little Italy Days. Bloomfield. www.littleitalydays.com

AUG. 19-27 Westmoreland County Fair. Greensburg. 724-423-5005 or www.westmorelandfair.com

AUG. 20 Jam on Walnut. Shadyside. Live bands. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

634-5619 or www.somersetcountyfairpa.com

AUG. 05-07

AUG. 23-27

AUG. 20-SEPT. 25 Greater Pittsburgh Renaissance Festival. West Newton. Open Saturdays,

Downtown. www.yougottaregatta.com

Hookstown Fair. Hookstown, Beaver County. 724-573-4512 or www.hookstownfair.com

AUG. 06-07

AUG. 27-28

Moraine State Park. www.lakearthurregatta.org

AUG. 07-13 Greene County Fair. Waynesburg. 724-627-4752 or www.greenecountyfair.org

AUG. 08-13 Butler Farm Show. Butler. www.butlerfarmshow.com

AUG. 13 Annual Antique Gun Show. Harmony Museum, Harmony. www.harmonymuseum.org

AUG. 13-20 Washington County Agricultural Fair. Washington. 724-225-7718 or www.washingtonfair.org

AUG. 14 Black Family Reunion. Schenley Park Oval, Oakland. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

BuffaloExchange.com

Somerset County Fair. Meyersdale. 814-

Sundays and Labor Day. 724-872-1670 or www.pittsburghrenfest.com

Regatta at Lake Arthur. South Shore,

'%CTUQP5V CVVJ5V ĂŠ

AUG. 20-27

Flood City Music Festival. Johnstown. Roots music festival featuring 20 artists www.floodcitymusic.com Fort Armstrong Folk Festival. Riverfront Park, Kittanning. Arts and crafts, food, music and other entertainment. www.armstrongfestival.com EQT Pittsburgh Three Rivers Regatta.

NEW IN SOUTH SIDE FLATS!

The Arts Festival on Walnut. Shadyside. National, regional and local artists. 412-682-1298 or www.thinkshadyside.com

AUG. 27-SEPT. 03 Indiana County Fair. Indiana. www.indianacountyfair.com

SEPT. 01-05 Big Knob Grange Fair. Rochester, Beaver County. 724-752-5973 or www.bigknobgrangefair.org

SEPT. 02-05 Pennsylvania Arts and Crafts Labor Day Festival. Westmoreland County Fairgrounds, Greensburg. 724-863-4577 or www.familyfestivals.com

SEPT. 09-11 Pittsburgh Irish Festival. Riverplex at Sandcastle, West Homestead. www.pghirishfest.org

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CITY LIVING

YOUR GUIDE TO PITTSBURGH’S HOTTEST PLACES TO LIVE!

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice,

don’t drink and drive.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Mozart Management Apartment rentals in 27 buildings throughout the Shadyside, North Oakland, Squirrel Hill, Highland Park and Point Breeze sections of Pittsburgh. We’re the professionally trained and dedicated staff that will take care of your apartment living needs 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Our job is to ensure that living in your Mozart apartment is comfortable, convenient, and worry free. We’re plumbers, painters, maintenance professionals and landscapers who take extreme pride in our work. Let us make your life easier.

Our apartments feature: • Studio to 3 bedroom layouts • Some to all utilities included • Air Conditioning • Intercom entrance (most buildings) • Fully equipped kitchens • On-site laundry • Off-street parking (most buildings) • Elevators • Pitt, CMU, UPMC Area • Close to parks • On or near bus lines • 24/7 Emergency Maintenance Features vary by apartment building. Get more information about our availabilities on our website: www.mozartrents.com or call us at (412)682-7000 to schedule an appointment to see our apartments! Open Every Day 9am-6pm (except major holidays).


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

65


beginner-to-advanced sessions in hiking, backpacking, mountain-biking, rock-climbing, horseback-riding, canoeing, kayaking, yoga and much more. 412-255-0564 or www.ventureoutdoors.org

Dek Hockey. Available at outdoor rinks in Banksville Park; Marmaduke Playground, Brighton Heights; Lewis Playground, Hazelwood; Ormsby Playground, South Side; Bloomfield Park; and Brookline Memorial Park. City of Play. Try a smorgasbord of games from cards to Circle Rules Football, a team sport using a fitness ball and a circular field.Various locations around the city. Full schedule at www.cityofplay.org.

SUMMER OUTDOORS

BIG League Sports. Organized programs for kids include baseball, softball, soccer and hockey. Co-sponsored by Citiparks, Pirates Charities and Pittsburgh Penguins. 412-622-7353

ONGOING City Pools. Citiparks pools are open June 14 through Labor Day. Programs include swimming lessons and swim teams. Purchase seasonal pool tags or pay a daily entrance fee. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

Spray Parks. From May 28 until early fall enjoy the movement sensors that cause sprayers to turn on and off in Hazelwood East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Beechview. 412-323-7928

Summer Soul Line Dancing. Exercise to R&B tunes at area parks. 412-255-2493 or www.citiparks.net

Tennis. Regional tennis courts are open in Allegheny Commons, Arsenal, Frick, Highland, Moore, Schenley and Washington’s Landing. Summer programs include camps and lessons. 412-244-4188 Lawn Bowling. Open lawn bowling and league play, plus free lessons. Frick Park, Regent Square. 412-782-0848 or

www.lawn bowling pittsburgh.org

Skateboarding. Go boarding at these city-run skate parks: McKinley, West Penn and Sheraden. 412-255-2539

Kayak Pittsburgh. The city is known for its three rivers; Kayak Pittsburgh lets you play on them. Rentals and launch points in North Park and the North Side. Other rentals include stand-up paddleboards, rowboats, pedal boats and canoes. www.kayakpittsburgh.org Pittsburgh Sports League. Year-round adult co-ed sports, including basketball, kickball, volleyball, softball. Various city locations. 412-338-2133 or www.pump.org

Venture Outdoors. Venture Outdoors sponsors hundreds of outdoor events at area parks, including family-fun walks, plus

Inline Skating. Weekly through September. Offers beginner, intermediate and advanced skates throughout the week around the city and on the Eliza Furnace Trail. www.skatepittsburgh.com

MAY 27 Free Friday Walking Tour: Gateway Center. Each Friday at noon. Meet at the Gateway “T” Station, on Stanwix Street near Liberty Avenue, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations

MAY 29

JUNE 03-24 Free Friday Walking Tour: Market Square Area. Each Friday at noon. Meet at PNC Triangle Park in front of the Fairmont Pittsburgh Hotel, Downtown. Free. 412-471-5808, x527 or www.phlf.org for reservations, and to learn about walks in July, August and September.

JUNE 04 Walk to Cure Arthritis. South Side Works. arthritiswalkpittsburgh.kintera.org

JUNE 05 Rollercoaster Race. 10K race or 5K run/ walk at Kennywood Park. 412-951-8572 or rollercoasterrace.com

JUNE 05 Greenfield Glide. 5K run and walk over a cross-country course. Schenley Park Overlook. 412-255-2493 or www.greenfieldglide.com

JUNE 06–SEPT. 25 Yoga in the Square. The Pittsburgh Downtown Partnership and lululemon sponsor free yoga every Sunday morning. Market Square. www.downtownpittsburgh.com

JUNE 10 Riverview 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493 or www.riverview5k.com

JUNE 11 Pittsburgh Melanoma Foundation 5K. South Park. www.melanomapgh.org

Riverview Park Heritage Day. Free family fun includes games, crafts, refreshments and more. Riverview Park. 412-255-2493

JUNE 11-19

Open Streets. The city will close down

Bob O’Connor Summer Tennis Classic. Tennis tournament open to

selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

all ages and abilities. Schenley Park Tennis Center and Highland Park courts. 412-244-4188

THIS SUMMER

step out of the urban, and into our wilds #ALLEGHENYLANDTRUST #TAKEAHIKE

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


Western PA’s flattest 18 hole regulation course plus an exciting 9 hole executive course! We also have a driving range, practice green and picnic facilities. Ask about Senior Discounts (M-F) and Freebie 16 Card! MONDAY - FRIDAY

SATURDAY - SUNDAY

18 Holes•Walk $19 18 Holes•Walk $25 18 Holes•1/2 Cart $31 18 Holes•1/2 Cart $37

839 Ekastown Road• Sarver•724-353-2130 W E S T M O R E L AN D C O U N T Y Fun, FREE events for the whole family! Greenfield Glide, June 5 {PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

JUNE 12

AUG. 06

Annual Pittsburgh Walk NOW for Autism. Schenley Park.

Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-15. Pool, North Park.

www.walknowforautismspeaks.org

412-351-0512

JUNE 18

AUG. 13-14

Annual Rachel Carson Trail Challenge.

Pittsburgh Triathlon and Adventure Race. Compete in an international- or

A 34-mile endurance hike from North Park to Harrison Hills County Park. Two shorter events — the 18-mile Homestead Challenge and a 7-mile Friends and Family Challenge — also take place that day. www.rachelcarsontrails.org

JUNE 20-26 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Tennis tournament open to boys and girls 16 and younger. Frick Park. 412-244-4188

JUNE 26 Open Streets. The city will close selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

JULY 03-17 Paul G. Sullivan Championship. Tennis tournament open to players 16 and older. Frick Park Red Clay Courts. 412-244-4188

JULY 23 Habitat for Humanity Kids Triathlon. Ages 7-12. Wave Pool, South Park. 412-351-0512

JULY 30 Pittsburgh Pirates Fun Run/Walk for Epilepsy. 5K course. PNC Park. www.efwp.org Night Nation Run. A running music festival complete with lights, lasers, beats and celebration. North Shore Riverfront Park. www.nightnationrun.com

JULY 31 Open Streets. The city will close down selected streets in Pittsburgh for a day of walking, biking and other activities. www.openstreetspgh.org

sprint-distance triathlon, or the “Adventure” tri featuring a 2-mile paddle, 20K bike ride and 5K run. www.pittsburghtriathlon.org

AUG. 13 Brookline Breeze 5K Run and Fitness Walk. Plus non-competitive one-mile

Mammoth Fest

August Fun Fest

Sunday, June 5

Sunday, August 14

Mammoth Park, Mt. Pleasant

Cedar Creek Park, Belle Vernon

Labor United Celebration

September 4 & 5 Northmoreland Park, Apollo

www.co.westmoreland.pa.us/parks

Fallingwater.org Make reservations online, or call (724) 329-8501

“Mini-Breeze” fun run. Brookline Memorial Recreational Center. 412-571-3222 Re

AUG. 19-28 A Bikefest. A celebration of life on B two wheels in Pittsburgh. Various tw events and locations. www.bike-pgh.org

AUG. 27 Run Around the Square 5K Run/Walk. Henrietta Street and Milton Avenue, Regent Square. www.runaroundthesquare.com

SEPT. 10 Alphabet Trail and Tails. A free early-elementary interactive literacy event incorporating children’s books. Blue Slide Playground. Frick Park, Squirrel Hill. 412-655-3665

SEPT. 17 Dollar Bank Junior Great Race. One-mile fun run for kids under 12. Point State Park, Downtown. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

SEPT. 25 Richard S. Caliguiri Great Race. The annual 10K foot race grows every year, so register early. There’s also a 5K run/fitness walk. 412-255-2493 or www.RunGreatRace.com

“...Change the way you see the world.” -Travel+Leisure Magazine

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016


Eden Hall Campus Summer Series Richland, PA

The Eden Hall Campus Summer Series features activities

Fri., June 10, 7:30 p.m., Pittsburgh Opera

ranging from live theatre and music performances to

Sun., June 12, 1:00-5:00 p.m., KidsCan Festival

childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s events. At the center of it all is the Hilda M. Willis

Fri., July 15, 7:30 p.m., Classical Music Under the Stars

outdoor amphitheater, a one-of-a-kind outdoor performance space carved directly into the surrounding landscape. Events run from June through September. For more details and a full listing of events, visit chatham.edu/summerseries. All events are free unless otherwise noted.

Sun., July 24, 4:00 p.m., Pie & Pints (of Ice Cream) $10 Sat., July 30, 10:00 a.m., Madcap Puppets presents Aesop Classic Fables Sat., August 13, 7:00 p.m., Bluegrass Festival in partnership with Calliope

Eden Hall Campus, 6035 Ridge Road, Gibsonia, PA 15044

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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SUMMER KIDS ONGOING Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh. Branches of the library citywide offer kids’ and teens’ programs — from story time and puppet shows to gaming and literature discussions — throughout the summer. www.carnegielibrary.org

Carnegie Science Center. Lots of youthfriendly ongoing science exhibits, including roboworld, the Highmark SportsWorks and the traditional Miniature Railroad & Village. And H2Oh! explores the city’s rivers. North Side. 412-237-3400 or www.carnegiesciencecenter.org

Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. This season’s exhibit, beginning June 11, is Daniel Tiger’s Neighborhood: A Grr-ific Exhibit, an immersive tour into world of the popular TV series. There are also plenty of interactive programs. North Side. 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

Citiparks Dek Hockey. Full-size dek hockey rinks are open at Banksville Park, Brookline Memorial Park, Marmaduke Playground in Brighton Heights, Hazelwood’s Lewis Playground, Bloomfield Park and South Side’s Ormsby Playground. www.citiparks.net

Citiparks Recreation Centers. Ten rec centers offer sports and outdoor programs; Summer Food Service (start date TBD) programs provides breakfast, lunch and snacks to children up to age 18. Most centers are open 1-9 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Saturdays. www.citiparks.net Citiparks Swimming Pools and Spray Parks. The city offers 18 outdoor swimming pools from June 14 through Labor Day; swim lessons and swim-team events are available at each. Spray parks, where you can get soaked without opening a fire hydrant, open May 28 in Beechview, East Hills, Shadyside, Troy Hill, Beltzhoover and Hazelwood. 412-323-7928 or www.citiparks.net

Pittsburgh Toy Lending Library. Kids up to age 6 can hone their social and motor skills in this indoor art-and-play space, which also features a toy-lending program for members. Call or check online for hours. Shadyside. 412-682-4430 or www.pghtoys.org Pittsburgh Pirates Kids Days. Sundays are all about kids at PNC Park. There are special ticket and concession prices. There’s always great freebies like player wall-decals and, on June 26, an Andrew McCutchen jersey. North Side. www.pittsburghpirates.com

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. In addition to the hands-on Kids Kingdom area, the zoo offers family-friendly events all summer long. Themed programs take place on “Wild Wednesdays” from June 15Aug. 3. Highland Park. 412-6653640 or www. pittsburghzoo.org

Aug. 19, kids ages 4-12 can participate in half- or full-day sessions on a variety of themes, from engineering and robotics to the science in the popular video game Minecraft. North Side. 412-237-1637 or www.carnegiesciencecenter. org/programs/summer-camps/ Citiparks Roving Art Cart {PHOTO COURTESY OF CITIPARKS}

SUMMER CAMPS Assemble. This Garfield “community space

Heinz History Center. In addition to ongoing kid-friendly exhibits in the lobby, and the third floor’s Discovery Place exhibit, the center offers monthly “Hop Into History” events (the next is June 8), in which kids ages 2-5 can engage in hands-on exploration of history. Strip District. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

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for arts and technology” offers weekday camps from June 20-Aug. 12, utilizing STEAM curriculum (science, technology, engineering, arts and math) for kids ages 6-13. www.assemblepgh.org

Carnegie Museums. From June 13 through

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

Aug. 26, the museums of art and natural history hold camps for kids ages 4-13, with activities ranging from hands-on “dino digs” to art classes and a film camp. Kids 6-13 can also spend full-day sessions at the Carnegie’s Powdermill Nature Reserve in Rector, Pa. Oakland. 412622-3288 or www.artand naturalhistory.org/camps/

Carnegie Science Center. From June 6-

Tyke Hikes. Venture Outdoors presents relaxed, inexpensive weekday-morning nature hikes in city and county parks, for parents with childrenup to 5 years old. www.ventureoutdoors.org

National Aviary Summer Camps {PHOTO COURTESY OF NATIONAL AVIARY}

Citiparks Citicamp. Different themed emed adventures take place at Citipark recreation n centers across Pittsburgh. Adventure titles include “Space Station Pittsburgh,” “Scales and Tales” and “Time Travelers.” Programs run from June 20-Aug. 12. Call individual rec centers for details. pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/summer-day-camps

cooking,” “little builders” and “the wonders of nature.” Ages 4-6. 412-255-2539 or pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/summer-day-camps

Frick Art & Historical Center. Starting June 27, the Frick offers a week-long day camp for kids ages 8-12 exploring the world of antique cars. Beginning Aug. 15, a full-day program for kids entering grades 2-5 offers painting, printmaking and puzzles. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600 or www.thefrickpittsburgh.org Girls Rock! Pittsburgh. This camp, in which girls ages 8-18 learn to play in a rock band, is held from Aug. 1-5 at Winchester Thurston School. Girls will form bands that perform in a showcase on Aug. 6. Shadyside. www.girlsrockpittsburgh.org Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. Five week-long, half-day classes run four consecutive weeks beginning June 20. Classes, including circus camp, creative writing, dance and more, expose kids to creativity. For ages 6-12. 6 12 Bloomfield. www.irmafreeman.org

National Aviary. Camps run from June 20-Aug. 5 for ages 4-18, where kids ccan interact with birds and go on birdingphotography hikes. North Side. 412-2589439 or www.aviary.org/summer-camps

Phipps Conservatory. Kids ages 2-13 Citiparks Sports Academies. Six weeklong camps for kids ages 7-12 looking for a sport-specific experience with scrimmages, fun competitions and a real game. Sports include basketball, volleyball, flag football and tennis. Camps run from June 20-Aug. 8, 412-255-2539 or pittsburghpa.gov/citiparks/summer-day-camps

Citiparks Tot Camp. Half-day camps held in one-week sessions from June 20-Aug. 4 with no camp the week of July 4. Themes include “kids

learn about conservation, ecology and healthy living in a series of camps throughout the summer. Oakland. 412-441-4442 x3925 or phipps.conservatory.org

Pittsburgh Center for the Arts. Camps from June 13-Aug. 26 in a range of disciplines are offered all summer long for kids ages 4-13, plus high school immersion camps (ages 14-18) that teach a wide array of subjects, from photography and ceramics to cosplay costume


design and an anime workshop. Shadyside. 412-361-0455 or www.pittsburgharts.org/ summerartcamps

branch beginning at 3 p.m. Homewood. 412-731-3080 or www.carnegielibrary.org

Pittsburgh Zoo and PPG Aquarium. Kids

Allegheny County Marbles Tournament. Since 2004, 10 National Marbles Champions have come from Allegheny County. The County Courthouse Courtyard hosts the finals for the county’s marbles competition. Winners head to the national competition, June 20-24 in New Jersey. Downtown. 412-260-7278 or www.alleghenycounty.us/parks w

ages 2-13 can attend half-day and full-day Animal Adventures summer zoo camps that run from June to August and range from story time for little ones to animal study and interaction. Highland Park. www.pittsburghzoo.org

Saltworks Theatre Company. From June 13-July 21, aspiring actors ages 4-16 can learn role-playing, movement, improv and other stage techniques at day camps held in Sewickley, the North Hills and Oakland. 412-621-6150 x205 or www.saltworks.org

Steel City Rowing Club Camp. Summer camps in rowing and other aquatic activities are offered to kids ages 8-18 in half- and full-day sessions from June 6-Aug. 8. Verona. 412-828-5565 or steelcityrowing.org

JUNE 02-04

JJUNE 14-AUG. 05 Citiparks Roving Art Cart. C The Th Art Cart: Celebrating Pittsburgh City i off Bridges offers free multi-media art projects for kids at different city parks each Tuesday through Friday, from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Opening celebration at Highland Park Super Playground June 14. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net

JUNE 20-26 Frick Park Red Clay Junior Open. Kids ages 16 and under can compete in this annual tennis tournament. There are three divisions — 16 and under, 14 and under and 12 and under. Regent Square. www.clayfricktennis.org

OTHER EVENTS

SEPT. 10 Alphabet Trails and Tales. Take a walk

MAY 21 Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank Presents Kids Cook. Kids will learn to measure, prepare and taste delicious desserts at this event at the Carnegie Library Homewood

through Frick Park and learn 26 awesome things to do on its Alphabet Trail. The interactive, free event promotes early-elementary literacy through a day of nature and reading. 412-665-3665 or www.citiparks.net

Looking for some fun and excitement for your kids this summer? Bring them to

Penn State Greater Allegheny for

Kids’ College 2016 Kids can take hands-on cooking lessons, try their hands at fun science experiments, build a robot, develop their sports skills, and so much more! Register today at

greaterallegheny.psu.edu/kids Kids College will be held on campus at Penn Pen State Greater Allegheny Œ 4000 University Drive Œ McKeesport, PA 15132 QuesƟons? Call 412-675-9040 Œ To register, visit greaterallegheny.psu.edu/kids PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SUMMER GUIDE 2016

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Proudly serving Pittsburgh’s communities since 1855.

Where To Find A Dollar dollarbank.com/locations DOWNTOWN

NORTH

FOURTH AVENUE 412-261-7538

BUTLER 724-283-3838

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HILL DISTRICT 412-471-8986

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NATRONA HEIGHTS 724-224-8500

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NORTH HILLS 412-366-2626

OLIVER 412-261-8400

PINE TOWNSHIP 724-933-6900

SOUTH SIDE 412-431-4157

RICHLAND 724-443-0250

EAST

SOUTH

BRADDOCK HILLS 412-271-8400

BRENTWOOD 412-881-3777

EAST LIBERTY 412-362-7638

LEBANON SHOPS 412-344-6626

GREENGATE 724-832-8139

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WEST

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CRAFTON 412-922-4208 MOON 412-262-1444 ROBINSON TOWNSHIP 412-788-1099

Equal Housing Lender. Member FDIC. Copyright © 2016, Dollar Bank, Federal Savings Bank. BRD328_16

SEWICKLEY 412-741-8310


E M O H G N I BR

! P U C E TH SUMMER PREVIEW DAYS JUNE 24 | JULY 15 | JULY 18 AUGUST 1 | AUGUST 8

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CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 23

REX THEATER. Fruition, The Bones of JR Jones. South Side. 412-381-6811. ROCKS LANDING BAR & GRILLE. Tony Campbell & the Jazz Surgery. McKees Rocks. 412-875-5809. STAGE AE. Steel Panther. North Side. 412-229-5483.

MON 23 ALTAR BAR. Berner, Kool John, Anonymous That Dude, Jon Scott, Courtesy. Strip District. 412-263-2877. HARVEY WILNER’S. Nik Sea. West Mifflin. 412-466-1331.

TUE 24 CLUB CAFE. Peter Case w/ Paul Luc. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. Six Speed Kill, Bud Bronson & The Good Timers, Yeesh, Calyx. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

WED 25 CLUB CAFE. Elizabeth & the Catapult w/ Royal Wood, The Wreckids. South Side. 412-431-4950. HOWLERS. The Urinals, Love Letters, JE Double F. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320. MR. SMALLS THEATER. The Vaccines w/ Nevada Color. Millvale. 412-821-4447.

DJS THU 19 MR. SMALLS THEATER. Centrifuge Thursdays. At the

Funhouse. Millvale. 603-321-0277. PERLE CHAMPAGNE BAR. Bobby D Bachata. Downtown. 412-471-2058.

FRI 20 ACE HOTEL PITTSBURGH. TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party. Rare Soul, Funk & wild R&B 45s feat. DJ Gordy G. & J.Malls. East Liberty. 412-621-4900. ANDYS WINE BAR. DJ Malls Spins Vinyl. Downtown. 412-773-8884. THE FLATS ON CARSON. Pete Butta. South Side. 412-586-7644. ONE 10 LOUNGE. DJ Goodnight, DJ Rojo. Downtown. 412-874-4582. REX THEATER. BUKU. South Side. 412-381-6811. RIVERS CASINO. DJ Digital Dave. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. RUGGER’S PUB. 80s Night w/ DJ Connor. South Side. 412-381-1330. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. Eye Jay the DJ, Pandemic, DJ Bamboo, Selecta. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. THUNDERBIRD CAFE. Man’DANCE, Slowdanger, C.Scott. Lawrenceville. 412-682-0177.

SAT 21 BRILLOBOX. Pandemic : Global Dancehall, Cumbia, Bhangra, Balkan Bass. Bloomfield. 412-621-4900. DIESEL. DJ CK. South Side. 412-431-8800. REMEDY. Push It! DJ Huck

Finn, DJ Kelly Fasterchild. Lawrenceville. 412-781-6771. RIVERS CASINO. VDJ Rambo. North Side. 412-231-7777. ROWDY BUCK. Top 40 Dance. South Side. 412-431-2825. SPIRIT HALL & LODGE. DJ Kelly. Tracksploitation. Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441.

HEAVY ROTATION

Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

Here are the songs Shani Banerjee of Empty Beings can’t stop listening to:

THE MEADOWS. Stampede. West Mifflin. 412-650-9000.

Rihanna

THE GOLDMARK. Pete Butta & Preslav. Reggae & dancehall. Lawrenceville. 412-688-8820. SMILING MOOSE. Rock Star Karaoke w/ T-MONEY. South Side. 412-431-4668. SPOON. Spoon Fed. East Liberty. 412-362-6001.

“Consideration”

Chelsea Wolfe

HIP HOP/R&B

“Flatlands”

FRI 20 1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254. ALTAR BAR. Jelly Roll, The 187 Mob, Morbid Sikosis, Rapper Pat. Strip District. 412-263-2877. SMILING MOOSE. Fam Ross, Middi, Bill Niels, Traxx, Heresy, K-Sanz, Doc Proto, William Weyes. FOURONETUBE x #ROSBOX presents The Return of Real Hip Hop. South Side. 412-431-4668.

Derider

“Rusty Nail”

Quintet. North Side. 412-904-3335. LEMONT. Mark Pipas. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. REVEL + ROOST. Funk + Soul Fridays. Downtown. 412281-1134.

SUN 22

SAT 21

ANDYS WINE BAR. Etta Cox. Downtown. 412-773-8884. CIOPPINO SEAFOOD CHOPHOUSE BAR. Roger Barbour Jazz Quartet. Strip District. 412-281-6593. LEMONT. Groove Doctors. MOONDOG’S. Chris Duarte. Mt. Washington. 412-431-3100. Blawnox. 412-828-2040. THE MONROEVILLE RACQUET CLUB. Jazz Bean Live. Every Saturday, a different band. Monroeville. w. w w ANDYS WINE er 412-728-4155. hcitypap g p BAR. Kelley SUPPER CLUB .com DeFade. Downtown. RESTAURANT. Frank 412-773-8884. Cunimondo, Patricia Skala. DOWNEY’S HOUSE. Bottom Greensburg. 724-850-7245. Floor. Robinson. 412-489-5631. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & SPEAKEASY. Roger Humphries SALEM’S EVENT CENTER. Jam Session. Ballroom. North Side. The Confluence Band. Tribute 412-904-3335. to Natalie Cole. Strip District. VALLOZZI’S PITTSBURGH. 412-706-1070. Eric Johnson. Downtown. 412-394-3400. BREW ON BROADWAY. Reggie Watkins, Tony DePaolis, Tom ANDYS WINE BAR. Bronwyn Wendt. Beechview. 412-437-8676. Wyatt Higgins. Downtown. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & 412-773-8884. SPEAKEASY. Becca Stevens Band. AUGUST WILSON CENTER. Sean North Side. 412-904-3335. Jones. Downtown. 412-258-2700. CARNEGIE LIBRARY, HILL DISTRICT. Jazz Surgery ANDYS WINE BAR. Tania Grubbs. w/ Tony Campbell. Hill District. Downtown. 412-773-8884. 412-281-3753. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB & GRILLE ON SEVENTH. Tony SPEAKEASY. Ken Karsh. In the Campbell & Howie Alexander. dining room. 412-904-3335. Tom Downtown. 412-391-1004. Wendt. North Side. 412-904-3335. JAMES STREET GASTROPUB RIVERS CASINO. Jessica Lee & & SPEAKEASY. Reggie Watkins Friends. North Side. 412-231-7777.

BLUES FRI 20

JAZZ

THU 19

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

CLASSICAL FRI 20 THE BRASS ROOTS & ORGAN SPRING CONCERT. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800. PITTSBURGH PHILHARMONIC. Masterpieces from Russia. Butler County Community College, Butler. 724-287-8711. RESONANCE WORKS. Mahler’s epic Song of the Earth w/ texts from ancient Chinese poetry, performed w/ Texture Contemporary Ballet. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-501-3330.

SUN 22

1LIVE STUDIO. DJ Goodnight: Open Elements. Avalon. 412-424-9254.

HOWLERS. Pittsburgh Hip Hop Showcase. Bloomfield. 412-682-0320.

SAT 21 FIRST NIAGARA PAVILION. Zac Brown Band. Burgettstown. 724-947-7400.

WED 25

SAT 21

FRI 20

ACOUSTIC THU 19 HOP FARM BREWING. The Shameless Hex. Lawrenceville. 412-726-7912. THE ROOTS CELLAR. Darrell Scott. Shadyside. 412-361-1915.

FRI 20 ARSENAL CIDER HOUSE & WINE CELLAR. Unknown String Band. Lawrenceville. 412-682-7699. BALTIMORE HOUSE. Sal Ventura Trio. Pleasant Hills. 412-653-3800. BOTTLEBRUSH GALLERY & SHOP. Steve Katz. Harmony. 724-452-0539. EAST END BOOK EXCHANGE. Morgan Erina. Bloomfield. 412-224-2847. ELWOOD’S PUB. Mary Lou Scherder. Rural Ridge. 724-265-1181.

WED 25 ALLEGHENY ELKS LODGE #339. Pittsburgh Banjo Club. Wednesdays. North Side. 412-321-1834. PARK HOUSE. Shelf Life String Band. North Side. 412-224-2273.

REGGAE FRI 20

THE PITTSBURGH YOUTH SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA. Afternoon of a Faun, Prokofiev’s March & Tomasi’s Concerto for Trumpet. Heinz Hall, Downtown. 412-392-4900. RESONANCE WORKS. Mahler’s epic Song of the Earth w/ texts from ancient Chinese poetry, performed w/ Texture Contemporary Ballet. Charity Randall Theatre, Oakland. 412-501-3330.

OTHER MUSIC THU 19 CHATHAM UNIVERSITY EDEN HALL CAMPUS. Eden Hall Bluegrass Jam. All acoustic instruments and ability levels welcome. Eden Hall Lodge dining area. Gibsonia. 412-365-1450.

FRI 20 ORIGINAL OYSTER HOUSE. Frankie Capri. Downtown. 412-566-7925. THE R BAR. Kare-e-o-kee. Dormont. 412-942-0882.

SAT 21 PITTSBURGH WINERY. AfroYaqui Music Collective Gizel Xanath w/ Castro-Crewe. Strip District. 412-566-1000.

MON 23

SAT 21

BLACK FORGE COFFEE HOUSE. Phantom Pop. Knoxville. 412-291-8994. HAMBONE’S. Ian Kane. Jazz Standards, showtunes & blues. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318.

CABARET. The Flow Band. Homewood. 412-241-1523.

WED 25

CAPRI PIZZA AND BAR. Bombo Claat w/ VYBZ Machine Intl Sound System. East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

COUNTRY THU 19 ELWOOD’S PUB. The Fiddlers.

PALLANTIA. Jon Bañuelos, flamenco guitarist. Shadyside. 412-621-2919. PITTSBURGH WINERY. Steve Poltz. Strip District. 412-566-1000.


What to do IN PITTSBURGH

May 18-24 WEDNESDAY 18

Texas Hippie Coalition

PAID ADVERTORIAL SPONSORED BY

THE 39 STEPS CABARET AT THEATER SQUARE MAY 19- AUGUST 14

THEATRE Downtown. Tickets: kinetictheare.org or 1-888-718-4253. Through May 29.

Sebastian Bach ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m.

HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. The 39 Steps Tickets: ticketfly.com or CABARET AT THEATER 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m. SQUARE Downtown. Tickets: pittsburghclo.org. SIXX:A.M. Prayers for Through August 14.

the Damned Tour

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

Highly Suspect ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

THURSDAY 19 Blue October

ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

COCK PITTSBURGH PLAYWRIGHTS

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DIIV SPIRIT Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

FRIDAY 20 21+ Night: Prom

CARNEGIE SCIENCE CENTER North Side. Over 21 event. Tickets: carnegiesciencecenter.org. 6p.m.

Mike Mains And The Branches HARD ROCK CAFE Station Square. 412-481-ROCK. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 10p.m.

Alice Cooper

Jerry Seinfeld

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 7p.m.

BENEDUM CENTER Downtown. 412-456-4800. Tickets: trustarts.org. 7p.m. & 9:30p.m.

SATURDAY 21

Food Truck-a-Palooza

SPIRIT Lawrenceville. 412-586-4441. Over 21 show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or

AUGUST WILSON CENTER Downtown. 412-456-6666.

TA S T E

Tickets: trustarts.org. 8p.m.

Zombi

Sean Jones: JazzMeetsGospel

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THE PUMP HOUSE AT THE WATERFRONT Munhall. Tickets: pghfoodtruckapalooza.com. 3p.m.

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ALTAR BAR Strip District. 412-263-2877. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 8p.m.

Shadyside Art & Craft Festival

BELLEFONTE STREET Shadyside. Free event. For more info visit artfestival.com. TUESDAY Through May 22. Dave Chappelle:

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SUNDAY 22 Steel Panther

STAGE AE North Side. Tickets: ticketmaster.com or 1-800-745-3000. Doors open at 6:30p.m.

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CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL Munhall. All ages show. Tickets: ticketfly.com or 1-877-4-FLY-TIX. 7p.m. & 10p.m.

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FLOWER POWER

ANY CRITICISM OF THE MACHINE IS SUBSUMED BY A PROCEDURAL INDICTING THE VILLAIN

{BY AL HOFF} The gist of Eiichi Yamamoto’s 1973 animated tale Belladonna of Sadness is straightforward: In some long-ago time, a poor peasant girl named Jeanne, after being raped and degraded, makes a pact with the devil to gain power over those who would subjugate her. (The film is a loose adaptation of Jules Michelet’s 1862 work Satanism and Witchcraft.) At first she resists the penis-shaped demon, but he proves too compelling. Once empowered, she leads the village into freaky flower orgies, and later — like her namesake Joan of Arc and other reputed witchy women — she is destroyed (or is she?) at the burning stake.

The color of sad

But you won’t be watching the avant-garde Belladonna for the story. Instead, it offers hand-drawn animation — ranging from trippy psychedelics and line drawings reminiscent of early 1970s advertising to lots of sexually suggestive illustration. (“Belladonna” is both a deadly flower and a beautiful woman, and the work’s female protagonist is frequently depicted erotically entwined with flowers.) There are nods to both traditional Japanese watercolors and the swirly, surrealistic rock posters of the late 1960s. The soundtrack veers from upbeat lounge to psych-rock, and the total experience is very midnight movie: Relax your mind and just let the sounds and images, some beautiful, some disturbing, swirl around you. Due to the film’s explicit sexual imagery (some of it violent), screenings are 18-and-older. In Japanese, with subtitles. 10 p.m. Fri., May 20; 9:30 p.m. Sat., May 21; and 7 p.m. Sun., May 22. Hollywood AHOFF@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

OVER THE TOP Check out the greatest movie ever made about arm-wrestling! Sly Stallone stars in Menahem Golan’s 1987 “classic.” Prepare your quips for these two RiffTrax screenings. 9:55 p.m. Fri., May 20 and 9:20 p.m. Sat., May 21. Row House Cinema

Bad money management: Kyle Budwell (Jack O’Connell) trusted TV.

THAT’S ENTERTAINMENT {BY AL HOFF}

T

HE FINANCIAL crash of 2008 was too

big, too complex and, perhaps, too painful to be transformed into popular but probing entertainment. Sure, we got some good stern-talking Frontlines and similar-style docs, and last year’s The Big Short found the sweet spot between pitchblack hilarity and righteous outrage. One problem was that there were just so many culpable players in the meltdown. When I saw the previews for Jodie Foster’s Money Monster, I thought: “Ah, now somebody’s calling bullshit on the financial ‘news’ entertainment sector.” Lee Gates (George Clooney) is the slick, smug host of a cable-TV show called Money Monster, and his shtick is hyperbolic drivetime. But Gates’ previous on-air hyping of a “hot” stock pick (since tanked) has driven an everyman, Kyle Budwell (Jack O’Connell), to barge onto the live show to hold Gates accountable. Budwell straps Gates into a bomb vest and weepily recounts his money matters (a.k.a. “lost everything”), all while Gates’ producer, Patty Fenn (Julia Roberts),

keeps the show on the air. Money Monster unfolds in real time, and is fairly entertaining as a basic madman-hostage-cops genre piece. There are some jumps to seemingly random spots beyond Manhattan (Iceland, South Africa, South Korea) that eventually make sense. And though we get the requisite reaction shots of folks gathering around TVs to

MONEY MONSTER DIRECTED BY: Jodie Foster STARRING: George Clooney, Julia Roberts, Jack O’Connell

watch the craziness unfold, Foster chooses not to rigorously interrogate the viewers’ role. (Naturally, Budwell demands the cameras stay on, and naturally, the global TV village watches.) Monster occasionally veers into dark comedy, and I hoped perhaps this would be Foster’s avenue into sharper critique … of something.

But in the end, any criticism of the machine, be it the financial sector or its media handmaidens, is subsumed by a procedural indicting the villain (singular — just one bad guy!). Bomb-toting Budwell and soulless-rich-jerk Gates get rehabilitated via basic movie tropes. Heroes! The overwhelming ethos of Money Monster isn’t “Wall Streets sucks,” “you bet, the little guy is angry” or even “too much information is just making us dumber,” but the show must go on. Perhaps not surprising from a director who has been a steady presence in show biz since she was 7. The film rallies most fiercely around Fenn’s admirable ability to produce a TV show on the fly — while sitting next to a bomb — and juggling a dozen off-site sources to craft a breaking-news narrative on a complex topic. Oh, and keep a guy on live TV from shooting the host or himself. Or as Gates lovingly says to her immediately before airtime: “Just point the camera in my direction and we’ll figure it out together.” Great show, people! A H OF F @ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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BLOODSPORT. It’s Jean-Claude Van Damme for the win in Newt Arnold’s 1988 actioner about a potentially deadly martial-arts tournament. May 20-22 and May 24-26. Row House Cinema

FILM CAPSULES CP

= CITY PAPER APPROVED

THE YEAR THAT WAS: 1948. Celebrate the Hollywood Theater as it was in 1948, with a program of comedy shorts, cartoons and serial chapters from that year, as well as a feature presentation: Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein. Ticket prices are also from 1948: 40 cents for adults, 25 cents for kids. And refreshments range from 15 to 25 cents. Noon, Sat. May 21. Hollywood

NEW THIS WEEK THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE. You’ve played the app, now see the backstory. It’s pigs and birds that don’t get along, and buildings that fall down, and golden eggs and all that. Clay Kaytis and Fergal Reilly direct this animated tale; Peter Dinklage, Jason Sudeikis and Danny McBride provide the bird voices. In 3-D, in select theaters. Starts Fri., May 20

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE. Brian De Palma directs this 1996 reboot of the 1960s TV spy show. Tom Cruise kicks off a new franchise as Ethan Hunt, the spy who must work outside of the law to get impossible things done. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 25. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5

DOUGH. John Goldschmidt directs this comedy about an elderly Jewish baker who finds his profits soaring after his young Muslim apprentice adds weed to the dough. Starts Fri., May 20. Manor THE MEDDLER. Marnie (Susan Sarandon) is warm, generous and means well, but she simply can’t resist the urge to get up in other people’s business. She is, admittedly, at loose ends since the recent death of her husband. This has prompted her to relocate to Los Angeles, so she can micromanage the life of her screenwriter daughter (Rose Byrne). The film, written and directed by Lorene Scafaria (Seeking a Friend for the End of the World), mostly serves as a showcase for Sarandon, who ably cycles through a series of low-key sit-com and rom-com scenes. There are some light points to be made about mother-daughter relationships (and the boundaries thereof), and the difficulties of moving on from loss. But at least Marnie, like Sarandon herself, is undaunted by her age: She’s lively and colorful, fully embracing new experiences, new gizmos and new friends. Starts Fri., May 20. AMC Loews and Galleria 6 (Al Hoff) NEIGHBOR 2: SORORITY RISING. Turns out the new sorority house next door causes a young family more trouble than the fraternity on the other side. Nicholas Stoller directs this raucous sequel starring Seth Rogen, Zac Efron and Rose Byrne. Starts Fri., May 20 THE NICE GUYS. Ryan Gosling and Russell Crowe star in Shane Black’s private-eye comedy set in 1970s Los Angeles. Starts Fri., May 20 OUR LAST TANGO. Maria Nieves Rego and Juan Carlos Copes met as teenagers in an Argentine milango, or tango dance hall. For the next 50 years, they performed as a dance couple — internationally renowned as masters of the tango. They also maintained a romantic, if rocky, relationship, until a personal and professional split late in life. German Kral’s documentary profile lets the two — now in their 80s — recount their life stories, using the conceit of young tango dancers preparing a tribute production about the couple. (These younger performers also “act out” scenes from the couple’s past through stylized dance routines.) Of the two, Copes is more guarded in his recollections, and his history reflects his more privileged status in the male-dominated culture. For Rego, the past is infinitely more painful, marked with betrayals and regrets, but she remains feisty in spite of her trials, and even pragmatic: Tango may be the dance of love, but she makes a strong argument for the creative energy of hate. The film is an intimate look at a seemingly intimate dance, an illusion maintained through the hard work of its talented practioners. In Spanish, with subtitles. Starts Fri., May 20. Parkway, McKees Rocks (AH)

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Tale of Tales

The Angry Birds Movie

TALE OF TALES. This lush, if slowly paced, production from Matteo Garrone presents three somewhat intertwined stories, inspired by the fairy tales of Giambattista Basile. In one, a queen (Salma Hayek) is so desperate for a child that she sends her husband (John C. Reilly) to the bottom of the sea in search of a sea monster’s heart, as part of a magical pact to conceive. Another royal person (Toby Jones) disregards the needs of his teenage daughter when he becomes obsessed with a giant flea. And a libertine nobleman (Vincent Cassel) is enchanted by an overheard song, which, alas, is sung by an old crone, prompting assorted subterfuges. Among all the parties there are bad bargains, secrets, violent ends and forays into the magical and just plain freaky. None of the tales are that remarkable on paper, but the production values are top-notch, with fantastic sets and costumes, and the slate of committed actors keeps this affair watchable. Starts Fri., May 20. Harris (AH)

will be followed by a discussion. 7 p.m. Fri., May 20. Botany Hall Auditorium, Phipps Conservatory, Oakland. Free with regular admission ($11-15). phipps. conservatory.org

REPERTORY INDIANA JONES AND THE TEMPLE OF DOOM. It’s whip-crackin’ adventure in India as the be-hatted Jones (Harrison Ford) searches for a mystical stone. Steven Spielberg directs this 1984 hit, the sequel to Raiders of the Lost Ark. 7:30 p.m. Wed., May 18. AMC Loews Waterfront. $5 FOSSIL FREE. This recent hour-long documentary from the Dutch group VPRO Backlight looks at activists around the world working to convince universities, banks, governments and big investment firms to disinvest in gas, oil and coal companies. The film kicks off a monthly Environmental Film Series, and

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OVER THE TOP. Check out the greatest movie ever made about arm-wrestling! Sly Stallone stars in Menahem Golan’s 1987 “classic.” Prepare your quips for these two RiffTrax screenings. 9:55 p.m. Fri., May 20, and 9:20 p.m. Sat., May 21. Row House Cinema

FOOD SYSTEMS, CHAPTER 3: THE ECOSYSTEM. This third chapter of local filmmaker David Bernabo’s series about the local food scene examines the ecosystem in which food production occurs. Continuing the style of previous chapters — documentary meets art film — this installment jumps between long shots of Pennsylvania countryside and subject interviews, cut with montages of dancing foods or explanatory illustrations. Bernabo focuses on the impact of industrial farming’s monoculture crops, as well as other issues faced by small Pennsylvania growers, such as land cost, climate change and nearby fracking. This wellresearched work presents the voices of the people who dedicate their lives to maintaining a healthy and sustainable food system. 7 p.m. Thu., May 26. Wigle Whiskey Barrelhouse, 1055 Spring Garden Ave., North Side. Free. www.foodsystemsfilm.com (Celine Roberts) LOST IN THE HYPE: AFRICAN-AMERICANS IN A SUPER SPORTS TOWN. This locally produced 45-minute 2009 documentary examines racism in sports, and how it can be perpetuated by players, fans, owners, media and even how tax dollars are spent. Pitt history professor Rob Ruck and Aisah White, the film’s executive producer, will lead a discussion after the screening. 7:30 p.m. Thu., May 26. Pump House, 880 E. Waterfront St., Munhall. www. battleofhomestead.org. Free VELVET SMOOTH. A crime lord hires a lady detective to find out who’s ripping him off in this 1976 blaxploitation feature from Michael Fink. 8 p.m. Thu., May 26. Hollywood

BULLITT. Steve McQueen is police detective Frank Bullitt in Peter Yates’ classic 1968 action flick. Moody, detached, iconoclastic, Bullitt finds his own way to capture some killers. That his way involves hurtling his Mustang GT390 for many glorious crash-bang minutes up and down San Francisco’s steep hills in a chase with a Dodge Charger 440 is just what actionfilm junkies still come out to see. May 20-24 and May 26. Row House Cinema MACHETE. The highlight of 2007’s Grindhouse was the fake trailer for Machete, a bloody revenge tale about one angry hombre from South of the Border. Just as trees grow from seeds, in 2010, Machete became a fully realized film starring Danny Trejo as the titular avenger. Robert Rodriguez and Ethan Maniquis direct. May 20-23 and May 25-26. Row House Cinema RAMBO: FIRST BLOOD PART 2. After his release from prison, troubled vet John Rambo (Sylvester Stallone) returns to Vietnam on a secret mission to rescue POWs. George P. Cosmatos directs this 1985 actioner. May 20-25. Row House Cinema

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A Night At The Movies: Princess Bride (1987) – 5/19 @ 6:30pm - A benefit for the National

Pancreas Foundation Western PA chapter. __________________________________________________

Bad Moon

(1996) - 5/20 @ 7:30pm Half man. Half wolf. Total Terror! With writer and director Eric Red in person for Q & A after the film. __________________________________________________

Belladonna of Sadness (1973) – 5/20 @

10pm, 5/21 @ 9:30pm, 5/22 @ 7pm A new restoration of this animated Japanese erotic

film. __________________________________________________

The Year that Was: 1948

– 5/21 @ 1pm Cartoons, comedy shorts, and a screening of Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein. Tickets are only $.25 for kids! __________________________________________________

Reckless

(2016) – 5/21 @ 6pm The premiere of this new indie short! __________________________________________________

Rocky Horror Picture Show

5/21 @ Midnight - With live shadowcast by the JCCP!

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[ART REVIEW]

BEHOLDERS

“I LOVE WRITING ABOUT MACHINES.”

{BY NADINE WASSERMAN}

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THE SEEN AND THE UNSEEN continues through May 27. Neu Kirche Contemporary Art Center, 1000 Madison Ave., North Side. 412-322-2224 or www.neukirche.org

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[BOOKS]

FRACK AND FICTION THE ARTIST}

{BY BILL O’DRISCOLL}

Matthew Conboy’s “Picturing me picturing you picturing me …” {PHOTO COURTESY OF

In her curatorial statement for The Seen and the Unseen, at Neu Kirche Contemporary Art, Hannah Turpin says that the show exposes “the manipulatable and transitory reality of position and placement.” The exhibition includes works by three artists exploring space and place. Matthew Conboy’s installation “Picturing me picturing you picturing me …” at first seems like a one-liner, but it is also a clever take on the current state of photography itself. On one wall, a monitor mimics an iPhone’s vertical rectangular shape. On it plays a video of Conboy swiping left through the many iPhone images taken of him using a camera to photograph each person who is simultaneously taking a photo of him with Conboy’s own iPhone. On the opposite wall, a horizontal monitor shows him scrolling through the portraits on his digital camera of people taking his picture while he takes theirs. He is shown with the camera obscuring his face while the images he has taken with a more traditional camera show people concentrating on the task of taking a photograph with a cell phone. The location, recognizable as Beijing’s photogenic Forbidden City, takes a back seat, thus refuting the typical tourist experience. Conboy focuses on the experience between two observers, each simultaneously photographer and subject. If Conboy’s piece is a type of triangulated selfie, Jimmy Riordan’s “Point A, Point B, Point C” is a different exercise in triangulation. Riordan places three viewfinders on three pedestals, each pointing at the others. Nearby is a triangular floor projection, itself broken up based on the Sierpinski model of continually subdivided, recursively smaller equilateral triangles. Images in the video were gathered from a search for three viewpoints in Pittsburgh where from each the other two are visible. Lori Hepner’s abstracted Arctic landscapes are similarly convoluted. They are long-exposure “light paintings” that she creates using a multi-step process that includes photographs taken on hikes; LEDs; and movement in a darkened interior space that is barely visible in the background. The resultant images are meditations on climate change, memory, and digital vs. physical experience. All three artists use closed-loop methods to alter our understanding of location or situation and destabilize our notions of a fixed reality. Interpretation is based on our particular position in space, and even that is inexact and immeasurable.

J

ENNIFER HAIGH grew up in smalltown Cambria County — coal country, though as a teenager in the 1980s she witnessed the region’s economic decline as mining faded. While Haigh now lives near Boston, she frequently returns to Western Pennsylvania in her critically acclaimed fiction, such as the 2005 novel Baker Towers and the 2013 short-story collection News From Heaven. The advent of hydrofracturing for natural gas — fracking — brought Haigh back again. Her stellar new novel, Heat & Light (Ecco), tracks a large and diverse cast of complex, flawed characters through the first years of fracking in fictional Bakerton. They range from a gascompany leasing agent and a prison guard hoping to cash in on drilling to a lesbian dairy farmer and her partner; an environmental activist; the Texas-based head of a drilling firm; and the prison guard’s wife, who fears fracking’s health impacts. Money gets made; water gets contaminated; and relationships are threatened. On May 23, Haigh’s book tour hits Pittsburgh. She recently spoke with CP by phone.

FRACKING’S DIVISIVE. DO READERS WANT TO KNOW YOUR “POSITION”? Yes, and this is a novel that is bound to disappoint everybody who wants that. That’s

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

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Jennifer Haigh

not what I do. That would make for some terrible, terrible fiction. Whatever personal feelings I have about fracking were constantly changing as I wrote this book. It’s the magic of point of view. As a fiction writer, you inhabit one character at a time, and you see the world through that person’s eyes. … So the sections I wrote from the point of view of Kip the Whip, the CEO of the gas company, I’m looking at the world through his eyes, and I’m suspending any other judgments and contradictory views I might have. … And that happened

again and again because there are so many points of view in this novel. HOW DO YOU APPROACH YOUR RESEARCH? I think of writing novels as an exercise in empathy. It’s deep empathy. So what I’m trying to get at is, “What does it feel like to be this person?” … When I talk to a guy who works on a drill rig, I’m not looking for verifiable facts so much as, “How do you feel at the end of the day? Does your back hurt?” YET, YOU DO INCLUDE TECHNICAL DETAILS. If you work in that industry, it’s all about the equipment. The guys have a lot to say about the equipment, a lot of opinions


about the equipment, and that’s endlessly interesting to me. I love writing about machines. … There’s a section that deals with [1979’s] Three Mile Island [nuclear] accident, and I got really absorbed with learning everything I could learn about how that reactor worked.

JENNIFER HAIGH

D R ISC OLL@ PGHC ITY PAP ER.CO M

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THE BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS

{BY COURTNEY LINDER}

Toys of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, at Heinz History Center {PHOTO COURTESY OF RACHELLYNN SCHOEN}

6:30 p.m. Mon., May 23. Penguin Bookshop, 417 Beaver St., Sewickley. Free. 412-741-3838 or www.penguinbookshop.com

WHAT ABOUT THE NOVEL’S MOTIF OF ADDICTION? That was a complete surprise to me. It developed as I wrote the story. It’s true that a lot of these towns that have fallen on hard times have drug problems. They also have a thriving bar culture from way back. … Recently the methamphetamine thing and the opiate thing has hit rural America very hard and this region in particular very hard, so that is a piece of the story. As I wrote, I thought a lot about [characters from] the Devlin family. Dick Devlin owns the commercial hotel, the tavern. He’s in the addictions business, you could say — he’s a coal-miner who lost his job, went into the addictions business, bought a tavern. His older son is a corrections officer at a prison full of drug offenders. His younger son is a recovering heroin addict who’s a counselor at a methadone clinic. They’re all now in the addictions business. A generation ago, they would have been a mining family.

PRESENTS...

TOY STORIES

WHY ALL THE TMI STUFF? The fact is, Pennsylvania has always been an energy state. This goes back to the 1850s, the first oil well being drilled in Venango County. … This has everything to do with how people in Pennsylvania have responded to the fracking opportunity or debacle, depending on which side you’re on. … [Three Mile Island is] really another example of Pennsylvania being on the forefront of energy, and reaping the benefits and also being affected by the consequences.

SO PENNSYLVANIA’S AN OUTLIER? People in Boston — to a one, every person I’ve talked to here — thinks fracking is a terrible idea. It’s an environmental disaster waiting to happen; why would any community ever consent to that? When I go back home, people see it in black-andwhite terms also, but they look at it from the other side: “Well, if I have this piece of land, and I’m not doing anything with it, and someone’s going to pay me a lot of money, and I get to keep the land, why would I not do it?”

M C KEESPORT LITTLE THEATER

[EXHIBITS]

a Musical comedy, Book by Larry L. King and Peter Masterson; Music and Lyrics by Carol Hall

A woman and her young daughter face a retro 1960s “Slick Chick” pinball machine. “This is pinball, do you want to see what that is?” the mother asks. The child picks up a token and shows it to her mother, hoping to catch a glimpse of the games she enjoyed as a child. The Heinz History Center facilitates this type of interaction with its exhibit Toys of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s, featuring more than 500 of the nation’s most popular playthings. The 8,000-square-foot exhibit, developed in partnership with the Minnesota Historical Society, breaks the space into “toy living rooms” that evoke each generation’s obsessions and icons. The brightly colored 1960s living room is painted a shocking pink, with zebraprint carpeting and a geometric orange-and-pink upholstered couch, modeling a Barbie Dreamhouse. Also included are spacethemed toys, indicative of the space race against the Soviet Union, and the world’s first action figure, 1964’s G.I. Joe. A Mr. Potato Head display illuminates the spud’s somewhat rotten start. George Lerner developed the toy in 1949 in hopes of keeping children from wasting food. The original kit (one of which is on display) allowed children to stick eyes, noses, ears and other features into real fruits, vegetables and, of course, potatoes. However, the foods tended to rot, so in 1964 Hasbro invented the plastic potato body. There’s also a salute to a local outfit, The Wolverine Toy Company, which originally produced kitchen implements and other household supplies but went on to produce toys that would be sold in major department stores across the U.S. Namely, it manufactured a line of sturdy, mechanical tin construction-style boys’ toys. Later it produced Sunny Suzy, a line marketed to girls, which included toy irons and ovens. Then there are those pinball machines, courtesy of the Replay Foundation, a local nonprofit that houses the world’s largest collection of vintage pinball games. Toys of the ’50s, ’60s and ’70s draws not just a younger crowd, says History Center spokesman Ned Schano, but multi-generational families who can experience the displays with both nostalgia and discovery. “It’s been exactly what we had hoped for, bringing families together and hearing their stories,” says Schano. “We joked that we should have called it the ‘I Had That’ exhibit.”

MAY 20, 21, 22, 2016

Friday and Saturday performances at 8:00 p.m.; Sunday matinees at 2:00 p.m. TICKETS ARE $18.00, $10.00 FOR STUDENTS. GROUP RATES AVAILABLE. HANDICAPPED ACCESSIBLE. WWW.SHOWCLIX.COM/EVENT/MLTBEST OR 412.673.1100 FOR RESERVATIONS

1614 COURSIN STREET • McKEESPORT • 412.673.1100

CP readers save $5 with CPRoars at checkout.

MAY 14 – JUNE 5

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

TICKETS ON SALE NOW!

412.431.CITY (2489) / CityTheatreCompany.org

TOYS OF THE ’50s, ’60s and ’70s continues through May 31. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $6.50-16. 412-454-6000 or www.heinzhistorycenter.org

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[PLAY REVIEWS]

BEST SHOTS

FOUR PLAY

{BY GERARD STANLEY HORNBY}

{BY TED HOOVER} SOME WRITERS strive to put real life on

stage. British playwright Mike Bartlett probably uses those scripts to light his cigarettes. His aggressively-titled 2009 play Cock, now at Kinetic Theatre, is about as provocatively manufactured as they come and your enjoyment of this brisk, bitter comedy will depend largely on how willing you are to be a playwright’s plaything. At its heart, Cock is one of the oldest stories in the book. A young man, John, dumps his long-term partner to take up with a new one, and eventually the three come together to hash out loyalties and futures. Barlett’s been very clever decking out the play in such outlandish drag you might not realize how many times you’ve seen it before. For starters, the long-term partner is a man (known as “M”) and the piece on the side is a woman (“W”). Bartlett sets up this dynamic but deliberately tramples notions of sexual orientation, behavior and identity. Then, taking a few pages from the David Mamet stylebook, he fills the play with brittle elliptical dialogue spat out by a clutch of characters too intelligent for their own good. And he employs abrupt, cinematic jump-cuts, jerking the story from one confrontation to the next.

COCK continues through May 29. Kinetic Theatre at Pittsburgh Playwrights Theater, 937 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20-40. www.kinetictheatre.org

On the whole it’s an intriguing evening of theater. Yes, you realize you’re being manipulated and yes, you can see him building, winding up and releasing his clockwork theatrical gizmo. But that he’s done it with such precision and polish provides its own reward. Like a dog-sled captain, director Andrew Paul drives the play’s quartet (M’s father also shows up) with brutal efficiency; this is a furious and ferocious foursome. Ethan Hova (M) turns passive aggression into a chilling blood sport. Erika Strasburg does amazing work rooting W’s feral attacks in a sick sort of kindness, and Sam Tsoutsouvas turns the father’s condescension and hidden-agenda solicitude into something silently radioactive. As John, Thomas Constantine Moore has the hardest job; Bartlett requires the actor to make ambivalence and self-protective inaction the fuel of the play. But Moore’s

{PHOTO COURTESY OF KINETIC THEATRE}

Ethan Hova (left) and Thomas Constantine Moore in Kinetic Theatre’s Cock

performance is constantly compelling. Though enjoyable, this Cock could leave a bitter taste in your mouth. I NF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

STILL GIVING {BY STUART SHEPPARD} PRIME STAGE Theatre has created a new kind of experience that should be called “Intelligent Family Drama.” Its production of The Giver is just as challenging and entertaining for children as it is for adults. This isn’t “children’s theater”; it’s theater that speaks to an entire family, without condescension. The imagination and intelligence that went into this show is clearly evident, starting with Eric Coble’s 2006 adaptation of the Newbery Award-winning novel by Lois Lowry.

THE GIVER continues through Sun., May 22. Prime Stage Theatre at the New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $10-25. 724-773-0700 or www.primestage.com

Director Melissa Hill Grande doles out the action slowly, building a picture of what could be a perfect 1950s family, except for the monochromatic clothing everyone wears, similar to the conformist garb of Maoist China. Uh oh — dystopia alert! But shrewdly, Grande avoids hitting us with any didactic hammers.

Ricardo Vila-Roger plays the kind of father every kid would love to have, in an impressive, understated manner. The way he brings an orphaned baby into the household is touching, until we find out what lies beneath his altruistic persona. Will Sendera is remarkable as his son Jonas, who at age 12 is designated the “Receiver” of memories in the Community, and carries the play’s action forward with uncommon authority. In fact, all of the child actors are excellent, and share the acting burden equally with the adults. This is a world where “it’s rude to point out differences,” and “inappropriate to use imprecise words like ‘love.’” Lines like these are slipped into mundane conversations, and we are lulled by their innocence, until their implications start to have life-and-death repercussions for Jonas and his family. Joe Spinogatti’s stunning video projections are played across of 26 panels hung on the back wall of the stage like a hip 1960s TV variety show, and become increasingly crucial to the impact of the performance, right to the ending. And what a sublime ending we are given. Astonishingly, here is a play that can enlighten kids without slam-dunk platitudes, or purple dinosaurs sermonizing in sugary language. Producing artistic director Wayne Brinda and his team pay the highest compliment to the audience by leaving the work of interpretation up to us. Imagine that! INF O @PGH C IT YPAPE R . C O M

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

ONE OF Stephen Sondheim’s numbers in Assassins contains the line, “Every now and then the country goes a little wrong. Every now and then a madman’s bound to come along.” First performed in 1990, in the musical based on John Weidman’s book, the line couldn’t frame the sentiment of the piece any better. But there’s also a little something extra in director Nick Mitchell’s new production at Stage 62, as we are drawn to the normalcy of these figures from history. We are shown the hidden thoughts and footnotes of infamous assassins and attempted murderers such as Lee Harvey Oswald, John Wilkes Booth and John Hinckley Jr. “Attention must be paid,” the characters refrain in a nod toward Arthur Miller’s tragic Willy Loman. But these people aren’t to be glorified; far from it. Instead, we should understand that they are amongst us, “voiceless without violence,” as Mitchell writes. The performers do well in conveying this, and clearly have a good time. Stanley Graham’s Booth was enjoyable to watch, aided by an admirable Nathan Hough as the Proprietor. Elsewhere, Corwin Stoddard and Kassie Doherty, as Hinckley and Lynette “Squeaky” Fromme, were remarkably unnerving in their ballad. The stage work is impressive, the players working with a grand set design, complemented by the booming live orchestra. It’s something that the Andrew Carnegie Music Hall was designed for, and it adds oomph to the production.

ASSASSINS continues through Sun., May 22. The Andrew Carnegie Free Library and Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. $15-20. 412-429-6262 or www.stage62.org

From the off, the piece is dynamic and entertaining. The rousing opening ensemble piece ends with Booth’s gunshot and distant cries of “sic semper tyrannis,” followed by hearty musical numbers, interspersed with witty and sometimes intense soliloquies alongside fast pieces of dialogue. Finally, I’m not sure who deserves credit, the costume department or the gene pool, but some of these people were worryingly convincing in their portrayals. Wannabe Nixon-killer Samuel Byck is played by Rob James (who’s also the vice president of Stage 62), and his monologues to a tape recorder were highlights for the audience, both frightening and funny. Really, those scenes had their finger on the pulse of the play: hilariously absurd, somewhat terrifying, but fueled with real pathos. I N F O@ P G HC I T Y PA P E R. C OM


[BOOK REVIEW]

VOCAL LOCAL {BY FRED SHAW} The title poem in Ann Curran’s new collection, Knitting the Andy Warhol Bridge (Lummox Press), alludes to the 2013 “yarn-bombing” of that local span. Curran writes: “loop troopers make tight blocks of magic / … The pattern pulls like a blanket in a shared bed.” Deft similes aside, Pittsburgh locales often serve as her backdrop while speakers explore emotional and physical landscapes over 133 pages. The book strives to balance Pittsburgh’s sometimes-outdated image with its newfound national charm; Mount Washington overlooks, the Strip and an oversize rubber ducky all make appearances. A member of the Squirrel Hill Poetry Workshop, Curran is a local in the best sense of the word, utilizing a keen eye and an unwillingness to pull punches. She’s written for local publications and edited Carnegie Mellon Magazine for decades. She’s also a council member at the iconic St. Mary of the Mount, whose church is utilized here for its powerful setting. In Knitting, a religious gathering serves as an opportunity to view humanity. In “Midmorning at St. Mary of Mercy,” Curran lists attendees at the Downtown parish: “Early Mass is over. In a back pew / a disheveled woman appears passed out: / head on chest. A business dude rushes in, / lights his candle … / A scruffy guy heads out for Red Door food. / A devout fashionista strolls the aisle.” Curran’s focus lands on “a woman with thigh-sized upper arms” who “oozes fast fury … / stands, hands on hips, / like she’s giving hell to Mary and Son.” This plainspoken description casts no stones but rather highlights an eclectic congregation emphasizing inclusion. “At Fifth and Smithfield” displays more locals, flaws and all, with Curran observing, “Even old men in Depends eye up girls / with shorts so brief, they are beyond belief. / A mom falls asleep feeding her baby. / Methadone, a cop says. Helps her head home. / A drug-dealer girl insists on more cash. / The desperate buyer digs deep, finds green.” The internal rhyme here (and sometimes elsewhere) might be distracting for some, weakening the gritty reality of the image. However, the poem’s POV harkens to William Carlos Williams’ speaker in his epic Paterson, seeking to understand the world through the microcosm of one small corner. At its core, Knitting is Curran’s observant valentine to a city, and more importantly, the people whose lives make it both unique and universal.

TOMORROW, May 19:

Celebrate a New Exhibition & Live Music at CMOA! 6–8 p.m.

8–11 p.m.

CELEBRATION RED: FREE Alison Knowles Exhibition Opening

THIRD THURSDAY: CELEBRATE 18 and over $10 ($8 members, $5 students)

For all ages

Kick off outdoor concert season with The Garment District, Mars Jackson, and Meeting of Important People in the museum courtyard. Participate in Homage to Each Red Thing, explore the galleries, indulge in a late night café and bar menu, and jam out.

Bring a red object to the museum to participate in artist Knowles's performance artwork Homage to Each Red Thing. Meet the artist and watch the Hall of Sculpture transform throughout the evening!

Third Thursday is sponsored by:

Media support provided by:

INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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… h g r u b s t t i P Who has the ? r e g r u B t s e B

FOR THE WEEK OF

05.1905.26.16

FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO SUBMIT LISTINGS AND PRESS RELEASES, CALL 412.316.3342 X161. {PHOTO COURTESY OF JIMMY KATZ}

MAY 20

Sean Jones

+ THU., MAY 19 {EXHIBIT}

G to www.budburgercontest.com for Go p participating locations.

Step 2:

T Taste their burger while enjoying a B Budweiser special.

Step 3:

G Go back to www.budburgercontest.com tto vote for your favorite and you will be rregistered to win a Budweiser Prize Pack: G Grille, BBQ Sauces and Cooler!

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

{ART} Alison Knowles is seeing red — er, rather, she wants to see the color red. Tonight, the pioneering conceptual artist presents Celebration Red, a reprise of her 1962 work that asks visitors to contribute a red item to a large grid taking up the Carnegie Museum of Art’s entire Hall of Sculpture. Visitors can meet Knowles and

MAY 19

{TALK} One of the world’s most influential proponents of environmental sustainability visits the Green Building Alliance’s Inspire Speakers Series. Paul Hawken, internationally known author of books including Natural Capitalism, is known for pursuing social justice in tandem with environmental activism. Tonight, at the

+ FRI., MAY 20

TapeScape ape peS Scape Scap e 2.0 2

{PHOTO COURTESY OF RENEE ROSENSTEEL}

Step 1:

Artist Eric Lennartson has made some Office Depot manager very happy. Stretching more than 10 miles of packing tape over steel frames, Lennartson has yet again designed a maze of translucent, kid-sized tunnels, dubbed TapeScape 2.0, for visitors to explore at the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh. After a successful run at the Children’s Museum in 2013, this second iteration of the two-story, surprisingly un-sticky structure (Lennartson double-sides the tape) returned this past winter and closes this weekend. Be sure to bring socks. Tyler Dague 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Exhibit continues through Sun., May 22. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-14 (children under 2 are free). 412-322-5058 or www.pittsburghkids.org

Kaufmann Center, he’ll discuss Project Drawdown, his new approach to reducing greenhouse gas emissions. The program Planet & People: Connecting Climate Change, Social Innovation and Inspiration, also features local climate activist and educator Joylette Portlock. A booksigning with Hawken follows. Bill O’Driscoll 5:30 p.m. (4:30 p.m. reception). 1825 Centre Ave., Hill District. $15-40. www.inspirespeakersseries.com


{PHOTO COURTESY OF UNCUMBER THEATRICS}

sp otlight Uncumber Theatrics — known for smart interactive and immersive shows like Her Things and Professor Eldritch’s Asylum for Uncanny and Extraordinary Women — takes its latest production into the real world, after a fashion. Serpentine is an alternatereality game styled after film noir and inspired by an actual Pittsburgh cold case from 1921. But the setting is contemporary: At their appointed hours, ticketholders enter a private eye’s office (whose location you learn upon buying your ticket) and get 45 minutes to snoop, gathering clues. Then, with information gleaned from a city map, gamers head to designated locations — mostly in the East End and Downtown — to find more clues or to track down other characters who’ll further develop this choose-your-own-adventure work. The show’s femmes fatale and underworld informants, lurking in bars or public spaces, might even ask participants to pass messages to other characters. But in any case, after their initial appointments, gamers proceed at their leisure, over the course of up to four weeks. “Once you enter the game, you are as much in it as you want ’till the end,” says Uncumber’s Ayne Terceira, who devised Serpentine with Aaron Tarnow. “The game keeps on evolving ’till you reach a conclusion, which is in June.” Serpentine offers about 75 initial time slots, a few of which are already sold out. Bill O’Driscoll Thu., May 19-June 11. $35 (21 and over). www.uncumbertheatrics.com

discuss the work as it grows and changes. Celebration Red launches a new exhibit spanning Knowles’ several decades’ of work transforming perspectives on ordinary items such as wind-up toys, beans and clothing. TD 6 p.m. (free). Exhibit continues through Oct. 24. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. 412-622-3131 or www.cmoa.org

{MUSIC} It’s not often that dance, poetry, voice and live chamber music come together. But that’s just an average day for Resonance Works | Pittsburgh, a company driven by artistic collaboration and audience interaction. Its season-closing concert, The Song of the Earth presents works by Mahler and Schoenberg with performances by local troupe Texture Contemporary Ballet. Mezzo-soprano Brooke Larimer and tenor Robert Frankenberry will accompany the orchestra, singing seven works of poetry from Hans Bethge’s “The Chinese Flute.” TD 8 p.m. Also 3 p.m. Sun., May 22. Charity Randall Theater, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-35. 412-501-3330 or www.resonanceworks.org

Pittsburgh Cultural Trust program at the August Wilson Center features Jones’ original compositions combining his gospel roots with modern jazz. BO 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $38.35-48.25. 412456-6666 or www.trustarts.org

{ART} This year’s round of the Mattress Factory’s Factory Installed series kicks off with four new room-sized installations by artists with international résumés in the museum’s annex. Duluth, Minn.-based David Bowen “creates mechanisms that produce drawings, sounds and responses to inputs from the natural environment.” Pittsburgh’s Kevin Clancy makes work that involves viewers and changes perceptions about social space. Wendy Judge, from Dublin, Ireland, creates installations that explore armchair travel. And Lauren Kalman, of

Fifth Ave., Oakland. $30. www.tedxpittsburgh.org

{MUSIC}

MAY 21

Venture Outdoors Festival

{PHOTO COURTESY OF VENTURE OUTDOORS}

Detroit, uses video and other media “to investigate beauty, adornment, body image and consumer culture.” An opening reception is tonight. BO 6-8 p.m. 1414 Monterey St., North Side. $15 (free for 15212 residents). 412-231-3169 or www.mattress.org

MAY 24

Dave Chappelle

{MUSIC} Whether you know it or not, you listen to gospel music: Arguably there’s no sound more foundational to popular music than what came out of the black church. Trumpeter, composer and bandleader Sean Jones grew up singing in the church choir in his hometown of Warren, Ohio. A career of international renown awaited, including a stint in Pittsburgh. Now head of the brass department at Boston’s Berklee College of Music, Jones returns for tonight’s Jazz Meets Gospel. The

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features Aaron Kleiber, Andy Picaro, Day Bracey, Holly Price, Alex Stypula and Shannon Norman. The host is Sean Collier, and the show will be recorded for future airing on DVE. BO 10:30 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. 412-4314950 or www.clubcafelive.com

{OUTDOORS} Kayaking, fishing, rock climbing and even dragon-boating Downtown? It must be the Venture Outdoors Festival, celebrating its 15th anniversary at Point State Park. With activities ranging from guided bike rides and yoga to performances by members of the Pittsburgh Songwriters Circle and local a capella ensemble Pitch Please, and games from the 1800s, the festival continues to offer a variety of opportunities to try something new. Equipment is provided for all activities, but you are welcome to bring your own. TD 11 a.m. (for members) and noon- 6 p.m. 101 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. 412-255-0564 or www. ventureoutdoors.com/festival

+ SUN., MAY 22 {TALK} Activate: Ideas in Motion is the theme of this year’s TEDxPittsburgh. The allday event, at Soldiers & Sailors Memorial Hall, features 13 local speakers who came up with an idea to overcome a challenge. On the roster: Mike Capsambelis of Google and Awesome Pittsburgh; artist and arts programmer Casey Droege; Gisele Fetterman, of Braddocks’s Free Store; Steve Hackman, of Pittsburgh Symphony’s Fuse Series; self-driving-car engineer Raj Rajkumar; author David Petrovic; and singer Jasmine Tate. Your ticket includes lunch and the post-event reception. BO 11 a.m.-6 p.m. 4101

{COMEDY} Pittsburgh now officially has three comedy festivals, but if you miss them there’s always stuff like tonight’s The Loaded Show. WDVE and Club Café present this smorgasbord of top local standup talent, which

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The Long Song runs two hours. But it also is pretty long — one mile’s worth. Today, artist Jennifer Nagle Myers stations each of 21 performers or small groups on a corner of Penn Avenue between Main Street and Highland Avenue, and has each interpret a verse of her lyric tackling racial injustice, economic injustice and environmental degradation. Cellists, vocalists, rappers, dancers, percussionists and more chime in. Start your visit at either end, or in the middle. “It’s gonna be evolving,” promises Myers. Her collaboration with BOOM Concepts, part of the Pittsburgh Festival of New Music, is supported by Awesome Pittsburgh, The Heinz Endowments and the Pittsburgh Foundation. BO 4-6 p.m. Penn Avenue between Main Street (Bloomfield) and Highland Avenue (East Liberty). Free. www.jennefire.com

+ TUE., MAY 24 {COMEDY} Dave Chappelle likes to surprise us. In November 2014, he did a show here with like one day’s notice. Now the celebrated comedian offers a little more slack — two weeks’ notice — for a three-night, six-show standup stint at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Tickets ain’t cheap for that many performances in a hall that size, but Chappelle’s fans will tell you that the man’s talent for dissecting society in general and race in particular merit the coin. BO 7 and 10 p.m. Also 7 and 10 p.m. Thu., May 26 and Fri., May 27. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $62. 877-435-9849 or www.librarymusichall.com

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{ALL LISTINGS MUST BE SUBMITTED BY 9 A.M. FRIDAY PRIOR TO PUBLICATION}

TO SUBMIT A LISTING: HTTP://PGHCITYPAPER.COM/HAPPENINGS 412.316.3388 (FAX) + 412.316.3342 X165 (PHONE)

THEATER THE 13TH OF PARIS. Vincent takes a spontaneous trip from his life in Chicago to the 13th arrondissement of Paris, carrying only a suitcase filled w/ the surprising love letters of his late grandparents. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 4. South Park Theatre, Bethel Park. 412-831-8552. ASSASSINS. Presented by Stage 62. Assassins lays bare the lives of nine individuals who assassinated or tried to assassinate the President, in a one-act historical “revusical” that explores the dark side of the American experience. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 p.m. Thru May 24. Andrew Carnegie Free Library Music Hall, Carnegie. 412-429-6262. THE BEST LITTLE WHOREHOUSE IN TEXAS. A comedic musical about Chicken Ranch. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 22. McKeesport Little Theater,

McKeesport. 412-673-1100. CHILDREN OF EDEN. A joyous & inspirational musical about parents, children & faith. Adam, Eve, Noah & the “Father” who created them deal w/ the headstrong, cataclysmic actions of their respective children. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. and Sun., May 22, 3 p.m. Thru May 22. Old Schoolhouse Players, Hickory. 724-344-7467. COCK. A dinner party where the menu includes identity & sexuality presented by Kinetic Theatre Company. Sun, 2 p.m. and Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 29. Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre, Downtown. www.pghplaywrights.com. THE DINNER DETECTIVE INTERACTIVE MURDER MYSTERY DINNER SHOW. Sat, 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Marriot City Center, Downtown. 720-271-2996. THE GIVER. Presented by Prime Stage. 12 year old Jonas discovers his special gifts & his special purpose w/ the aid of the

Giver in a world of Sameness. Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. and Sun, 2:30 p.m. Thru May 23. New Hazlett Theater, North Side. 724-773-0700. JEEVES INTERVENES. Adapted by Margaret Raether from the stories of P.G. Wodehouse. Thru May 21. Little Lake Theatre, Canonsburg. 724-745-6300. THE MUSICAL OF MUSICALS (THE MUSICAL). One story becomes five musicals, each written in the distinctive style of a different master of the form: Rodgers & Hammerstein, Stephen Sondheim, Jerry Herman, Andrew Lloyd Webber & Kander & Ebb. Presented by Off the Wall Productions. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 21. Carnegie Stage, Carnegie. www.insideoffthewall.com. PICNIC. The Pulitzer-prize winning play by William Inge presented by the Heritage Players. Sun, 2 p.m. and Fri, Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 22. Seton Center, Brookline. 412-561-5511.

[COMEDY]

Comics artist Wayno tells us about his new City Paper feature, and we also speak to CP’s Bill O’Driscoll about a novelist’s take on fracking

POINT PARK UNIVERSITY FESTIVAL OF NEW WORK. At George Rowland White Theater. Readings from 2016 inaugural MFA Writing for the Screen & Stage class & Q&A w/ the writers. Thru May 21. Point Park University, Downtown. 412-392-4216. SERPENTINE: AN ALTERNATE REALITY GAME. A film-noir style Alternate Reality Game that examines a true Pittsburgh cold case. Be prepared to travel to different Pittsburgh locales in search of clues, meet up w/ different characters, collaborate w/ fellow participants & influence an unfolding month-long story whose conclusion will be based on your discoveries. Presented by Uncumber Theatrics. Thu-Sun. Thru June 11. 349 Cedarville Street, Bloomfield. www.uncumbertheatrics.com. STEEL MAGNOLIAS. The classic play about loving your friends, living your life & teasing your hair. Fri, Sat, 7:30 p.m. Thru June 4. Comtra Theatre, Cranberry. 724-773-9896. STONE SOUP. Retells the classic children’s story about sharing. Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru May 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. TALES OF A FOURTH GRADE NOTHING. Sun, 2 p.m. and Sat, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru May 22. Pittsburgh Playhouse, Oakland. 412-392-8000. TRU. A one-man play based on Capote’s words and works presented by Pittsburgh Public Theater. Wed-Fri, 8 p.m., Sat, 2 & 8 p.m. and Sun, 2 & 7 p.m. Thru May 22. O’Reilly Theater, Downtown. 412-316-1600. TWO TALES OF TERROR. Two short stories by Edgar Allan Poe presented by Pittsburgh Irish & Classical Theatre. Thu-Sat, 8 p.m. Thru May 20. Stephen Foster Memorial, Oakland. 412-624-7529.

COMEDY THU 19

Legendary comedian Jerry Seinfeld has forged a career out of making the mundane funny. After a long run playing a semi-fictional version of himself on TV’s Seinfeld, he’s kept on producing material that has won him fans the world over. His web series Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee has taken his observational sense of humor to new heights even as he continues touring his standup nationally. 7 and 9:30 p.m. Sat., May 21. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $50.50-175.00. www.ticketmaster.com

COMEDY OPEN MIC. Hosted by Derick Minto. Thu, 9 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. IMPROV POP-UP NIGHT. Try out improv comedy without making a commitment to a 8-week class. Third Thu of every month, 5:30 p.m. Arcade Comedy Theater, Downtown. 412-339-0608. JOE BRONZI, DAVID KAYE. 8:30 p.m. Longue Vue Country Club, Verona. 412-793-2232. CONTINUES ON PG. 109

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Army of the Republic served local Civil War veterans for over 54 years & is the best preserved & most intact GAR post in the United States. Carnegie. 412-276-3456. BAYERNHOF MUSEUM. Large collection of automatic MATT BERGMAN, MATT roll-played musical instruments & STANTON, DAVID KAYE. music boxes in a mansion setting. 9 p.m. Allenport Municipal Call for appointment. O’Hara. Building, Allenport. 412-782-4231. www.slapsticksproductions.com. BOST BUILDING. Collectors. MIXED DOUBLES: AN Preserved materials reflecting IMPROVISED SET. 10 p.m. the industrial heritage of Arcade Comedy Theater, Southwestern PA. Homestead. Downtown. 412-339-0608. 412-464-4020. BRADDOCK’S BATTLEFIELD HISTORY CENTER. French & AARON KLEIBER, ANDY Indian War. The history of the PICARRO, DAY BRACEY, HOLLY French & Indian War w/ over PRICE, ALEX STYPULA & 250 artifacts & more. Braddock. SHANNON NORMAN. Hosted 412-271-0800. by Sean Collier. 10 p.m. Club Cafe, CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF South Side. 412-431-4950. NATURAL HISTORY. Pterosaurs: THE CURIOUS THEATER. Two Flight in the Age of Dinosaurs. Rare improvisers, equipped w/ wireless fossils, life-size models & hands-on mics roam the bar performing interactives to immerse visitors in a completely improvised show. the winged reptiles’ Jurassic world. Third Sat of every month, Dinosaurs in Their Time. Displaying 8 p.m. Hambone’s, Lawrenceville. immersive environments spanning 412-212-7061. the Mesozoic Era & original fossil DAVID KAYE, AUGGIE COOK, specimens. Permanent. Hall of ERIC THOMPSON. 7:30 p.m. Minerals & Gems. Crystal, gems & St. Catherine of Sweden, precious stones from all over Allison Park. 412-486-6001. the world. Population JERRY SEINFELD. Impact. How humans 7 & 9:30 p.m. Benedum are affecting the Center, Downtown. environment. Oakland. 412-456-6666. 412-622-3131. JOHN EVANS, www. per CARNEGIE SCIENCE pa TOM MUSIAL, pghcitym .co CENTER. H2Oh! LISA DAPPRICH. Experience kinetic 8 p.m. St. Kilian Parish water-driven motion & School, Cranberry. discover the relations between www.slapsticksproductions.com. water, land & habitat. How do MIKE ARONIN, MATT GEORGE, everyday decisions impact water COLLIN CHAMBERLIN. supply & the environment? South Park Museum Bldg. Ongoing: Buhl Digital Dome 6 p.m. South Park, South Park. (planetarium), Miniature www.slapsticksproductions.com. Railroad & Village, USS Requin STAND UP COMEDY submarine & more. North Side. RUMBLE. 10 p.m. Hambone’s, 412-237-3400. Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. CENTER FOR POSTNATURAL STEVE SABO, DEREK HISTORY. Explore the complex KNOPSNYDER, JUSTIN interplay between culture, nature MARKUSS. 8 p.m. The & biotechnology. Sundays 12-4. Rose Bar, McKeesport. www. Garfield. 412-223-7698. slapsticksproductions.com. CHILDREN’S MUSEUM OF PITTSBURGH. TapeScape 2.0. A play exhibit/art installation, COMEDY SAUCE SHOWCASE. designed by Eric Lennartson, Local & out-of-town comedians. that uses more than 10 miles of Mon, 9 p.m. Pleasure Bar, tape stretched over steel frames to Bloomfield. 412-682-9603. create twisting tunnels & curving UNPLANNED COMEDY walls for children to crawl JAMBONE’S IMPROV. through & explore. North Side. Hosted by Woody Drenen. 412-322-5058. Mon, 9:30 p.m. Hambone’s, COMPASS INN. Demos & Lawrenceville. 412-681-4318. tours w/ costumed guides feat. this restored stagecoach stop. North Versailles. 724-238-4983. ALLEGHENY CITY HISTORIC DEPRECIATION LANDS GALLERY. Historical images & MUSEUM. Small living history items forcusing on the North Side museum celebrating the of Pittsburgh. North Side. settlement & history of the 412-321-3940. Depreciation Lands. Allison Park. ALLEGHENY-KISKI VALLEY 412-486-0563. HERITAGE MUSEUM. Military FALLINGWATER. Tour the artifacts & exhibits on the famed Frank Lloyd Wright house. Allegheny Valley’s industrial heritage. Tarentum. 724-224-7666. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. ANDREW CARNEGIE FREE FIRST PRESBYTERIAN LIBRARY MUSIC HALL. Capt. CHURCH. Tours of 13 Tiffany Thomas Espy Room Tour. The Capt. stained-glass windows. Thomas Espy Post 153 of the Grand Downtown. 412-471-3436.

THU 19 - SAT 21

VISUALART

BILLY GARDELL. May 19-21, 8 p.m. Monroeville Convention Center, Monroeville.

FRI 20

SAT 21

“Donguri [Acorn, Quercus Linnaeus, Fagaceae]” (acrylic, gouache and pencil on paper, 1982), by Kieta Yonezu. From the exhibition Great Expectations, at Hunt Institute for Botanical Documentation, Oakland.

NEW THIS WEEK ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. What They Say, What They Said. A collaboration between The Andy Warhol Museum, BOOM Concepts & Artists Image Resource (AIR). D.S. Kinsel’s mural is the project’s introductory iteration of prints installed on the Rosa Villa, a shuttered building across the street from The Warhol. North Side. 412-237-8300. HEALING MOTION PHYSICAL THERAPY & WELLNESS CENTER. Patricia Chiacu Apuzzo. Artist meet & greet on May 20, 11 a.m. - 1 p.m. Shadyside. 412-363-4050.

ONGOING 28 WEST SECOND GALLERY & STUDIO SPACE. The 6th Annual Women’s Exhibition. Exhibiting works will include mixed media, painting, photography & sculpture by Suzanne Andrews, Saige Baxter, Stacy Butera, Christine Davis, Sarah Hunter, Nicolena Loshonkohl, Megan Merz, Roberta Myers, Moira Richardson, Hudson Rush, Sue Seyak, Lauren Stanley, Bequie Soike & Sandra Zulawinski. Greensburg. 724-205-9033. 937 LIBERTY AVE. Humanae/ I AM AUGUST. A series of photographs of everyday Pittsburghers by Angelica Dass. Downtown. 412-338-8742. AMERICAN JEWISH MUSEUM. Sanctuary & Sustenance: The Story of Many Journeys. A multimedia presentation by Julia Rendleman w/ images & music & a photography exhibition offering a glimpse into the lives of refugees from around the world. Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8011 x105. ANDY WARHOL MUSEUM. Exposures: Hanging Fruit. An original installation by Zhiwan Cheung. Permanent collection. Artwork & artifacts by the famed Pop Artist. North Side.

412-237-8300. ARTDFACT. Artdfact Gallery. The works of Timothy Kelley & other regional & US artists on display. Sculpture, oil & acrylic paintings, mixed media, found objects, more. North Side. 724-797-3302. ARTISTS IMAGE RESOURCE. dontsaythatshitoutloud. New work by resident artist, Vanessa German. Taller 99: Exhibition. Artists: Ximena Lecaros & Fernanda Gaete for a residency involving studio research, exploration of new work & cultural exchange. Pittsburgh based artists Maritza Mosquera & Tresa Varner will travel to Chile in June 2016. North Side. 412-321-8664. THE ARTSMITHS OF PITTSBURGH. Celebrating a Legacy. Presented by Women of Visions, Inc., an AfricanAmerican women’s art collective. Mt. Lebanon. 412-341-2299. AUGUST WILSON CENTER. With I Wish I Knew How It Felt to Be Free. Work by Hebru Brantley. Vanessa German, Introspective. An ambitious hybrid of multidisciplinary work curated to highlight the dimensions of German’s life & work as a citizen artist & activist. Downtown. 412-258-2700. BARCO LAW LIBRARY. Oracles & Vesicles, Drawings & Prints by Michael Walter. Oakland. 412-648-1376. BOXHEART GALLERY. That was the River, This is the Sea. Paintings by Joshua Hogan, sculpture by James Shipman & a window installation by Daria Sandburg. Floodgates for Hydra. Paintings by Jennipher Satterly. Reception w/ the artist on May 21, 5 - 8 p.m. Bloomfield. 412-687-8858. CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART. Associated Artists of Pittsburgh. Work from 56 regional artists. Oakland. 412-622-3131. CHRISTINE FRECHARD GALLERY. Summer Series.

Work from Artur Vasilevich. Michael Lies, painter/filmmaker will exhibit a few paintings. Squirrel Hill. 412-421-8888. CHROMOS EYEWEAR. Exposures: A Photo Montage by Artist Ruthanne Bauerle. Capturing the past w/ haunting black & white imagery. Lawrenceville. 412-477-4540. CRAZY MOCHA COFFEE COMPANY. Human Nature: Portraits of Animals Making Bad Decisions. Work by T. Wesley Snead. Bloomfield. 412-681-5225. EAST OF EASTSIDE GALLERY. Creative Journeys. Work from Jerome D’Angelo, Alexis Dillon & Maura Keeney. Forest Hills. 412-465-0140. ECLECTIC ART & OBJECTS GALLERY. 19th century American & European paintings combined w/ contemporary artists & their artwork. The Hidden Collection. Watercolors by Robert N. Blair (1912- 2003). Hiromi Traditional Japanese Oil Paintings The Lost Artists of the 1893 Chicago Exhibition. Collectors Showcase. Emsworth. 412-734-2099. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Permanent collection of European Art. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. FUTURE TENANT. Creative Byproducts. A dual exhibition by Anna Brewer & Sam Berner. Downtown. 412-325-7037. GALLERIE CHIZ. Narratives: Reveries of Reality. Work by Lindsay Feuer, Elizabeth Fortunato & Brian Sesack. Shadyside. 412-441-6005. THE GALLERY 4. 2016 Salon Show. Work from Jeff Aziz, Jennifer Brinkle, Tony Cavalline, Larry Cuddy, Dino Deluliis, Sara Diesel, Sam Foreman, Gerardo Garduño, TA Gray, Gary Henzler, Lauren Jo, Kid Gazelle, Zhenya Koreshkoff, Lesla, Michael Lies, Lena Loshonkohl, MouseBones, Dawn Pogany, Sarah Schneider, CONTINUES ON PG. 111

FULL LIST ONLINE

MON 23

EXHIBITS

FORT PITT MUSEUM. Captured by Indians: Warfare & Assimilation on the 18th Century Frontier. During the mid-18th century, thousands of settlers of European & African descent were captured by Native Americans. Using documentary evidence from 18th & early 19th century sources, period imagery, & artifacts from public & private collections in the U.S. and Canada, the exhibit examines the practice of captivity from its prehistoric roots to its reverberations in modern Native-, African- & Euro-American communities. Reconstructed fort houses museum of Pittsburgh history circa French & Indian War & American Revolution. Downtown. 412-281-9285. FRICK ART & HISTORICAL CENTER. Ongoing: tours of Clayton, the Frick estate, w/ classes & programs for all ages. Point Breeze. 412-371-0600. HARTWOOD ACRES. Tour this Tudor mansion & stable complex. Enjoy hikes & outdoor activities in the surrounding park. Allison Park. 412-767-9200. KENTUCK KNOB. Tour the other Frank Lloyd Wright house. Mill Run. 724-329-8501. KERR MEMORIAL MUSEUM. Tours of a restored 19th-century, middle-class home. Oakmont. 412-826-9295. MARIDON MUSEUM. Collection includes jade & ivory statues from China & Japan, as well as Meissen porcelain. Butler. 724-282-0123. MCGINLEY HOUSE & MCCULLY LOG HOUSE. Historic homes open for tours, lectures & more. Monroeville. 412-373-7794. NATIONAL AVIARY. Masters of the Sky. Explore the power & grace of the birds who rule the sky. Majestic eagles, impressive condors, stealthy falcons and their friends take center stage! Home to more than 600 birds from over 200 species. W/ classes, lectures, demos & more. North Side. 412-323-7235. NATIONALITY ROOMS. 29 rooms helping to tell the story of Pittsburgh’s immigrant past. University of Pittsburgh. Oakland. 412-624-6000. OLD ST. LUKE’S. Pioneer church features 1823 pipe organ, Revolutionary War graves. Scott. 412-851-9212. OLIVER MILLER HOMESTEAD. This pioneer/Whiskey Rebellion site features log house, blacksmith shop & gardens. South Park. 412-835-1554. PENNSYLVANIA TROLLEY MUSEUM. Trolley rides & exhibits. Includes displays, walking tours, gift shop, picnic area & Trolley Theatre. Washington. 724-228-9256. PHIPPS CONSERVATORY & BOTANICAL GARDEN. The Butterfly Forest. An interactive exhibit w/ 21 species of butterfly & the elusive Luna moth. Summer Flower Show. From whirligigs & water fountains to rotundas & Rube Goldberg machines, Playgardens for guests CONTINUES ON PG. 110

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*Stuff We Like SUMMER EDITION

Gardening It’s time to plant those seedlings, so you can enjoy a bountiful harvest come summer and fall. Nothing says “local” like food grown in your backyard.

We Were Liars E. Lockhart’s 2014 novel relates a summer family holiday gone very wrong. For starters, the teenage narrator has amnesia. A pageturner, and a reminder that your vacation could be worse.

Out-of-Season Beer A winter lager tastes fine in warm weather, and even more so when marked down to 66 cents a can.

Washington Wild Things Minor-league baseball means intimate ballparks, reasonable ticket prices, the carnival-like atmosphere and players who are playing because they love the game, not because they’re making a trillion dollars. Season opens May 20. www.washingtonwildthings.com

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BIG LIST, CONTINUED FROM PG. 109

of all ages w/ interactive elements. 14 indoor rooms & 3 outdoor gardens feature exotic plants & floral displays from around the world. Tropical Forest Congo. An exhibit highlighting some of Africa’s lushest landscapes. Oakland. 412-622-6914. PHOTO ANTIQUITIES MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC HISTORY. Glass Lantern Slides. Glass lantern slides from 1890 to 1920. Displaying 660 different movie cameras, showing pictures on glass, many hand-painted. The largest display of 19th Century photographs in America. North Side. 412-231-7881. PINBALL PERFECTION. Pinball museum & players club. West View. 412-931-4425. PITTSBURGH ZOO & PPG AQUARIUM. Home to 4,000 animals, including many endangered species. Highland Park. 412-665-3639. RACHEL CARSON HOMESTEAD. A Reverence for Life. Photos & artifacts of her life & work. Springdale. 724-274-5459. RIVERS OF STEEL NATIONAL HERITAGE AREA. Exhibits on the Homestead Mill. Steel industry & community artifacts from 18811986. Homestead. 412-464-4020. SENATOR JOHN HEINZ HISTORY CENTER. Toys of the ‘50s, ‘60s and ‘70s. More than 500 toys. From Slavery to Freedom. Highlight’s Pittsburgh’s role in the anti-slavery movement. Ongoing: Western PA Sports Museum, Clash of Empires, & exhibits on local history, more. Strip District. 412-454-6000. SEWICKLEY HEIGHTS HISTORY CENTER. Museum commemorates Pittsburgh industrialists, local history. Sewickley. 412-741-4487. SOLDIERS & SAILORS MEMORIAL HALL. War in the Pacific 1941-1945. Feat. a collection of military artifacts showcasing photographs, uniforms, shells & other related items. Military museum dedicated to honoring military service members since the Civil War through artifacts & personal mementos. Oakland. 412-621-4253. ST. ANTHONY’S CHAPEL. Features 5,000 relics of Catholic saints. North Side. 412-323-9504. ST. NICHOLAS CROATIAN CATHOLIC CHURCH. Maxo Vanka Murals. Mid-20th century murals depicting war, social justice & the immigrant experience in America. Millvale. 412-407-2570. WEST OVERTON MUSEUMS. Learn about distilling & coke-making in this pre-Civil War industrial village. West Overton. 724-887-7910.

DANCE FRI 20 - SAT 21 SPRING PERFORMANCE 2016. More than 200 Pittburgh Ballet Theater students, ages 8 to 22,students performing George Balanchine’s “Serenade” as well as excerpts from other full length

EVERYONE IS A CRITIC EVENT: Welcome to Here: A Sensory Friendly Adventure, at Bricolage for the EQT Children’s Theater Festival, Downtown CRITIC: Ken Baker, 38, a sports-mediarelations specialist from Cranberry Township WHEN: Fri.,

May 13

It was an all-enveloping sensory adventure, at your own pace and explore-at-your-own-will. I’ve got to say, I was a little apprehensive at first. I thought it might have been a little too touchy-feely and artsy for me, but seeing how much [my daughter] enjoyed it and how much she got into it, it made me a little more comfortable and made me enjoy it as well. I thought they did a wonderful job; [the character] Don Key was her favorite. He really got into it. And at the end, with Queen Orya, with the way that she let you out [of the experience], it was all really well done. How the characters got into their roles and how they directed it more to the kids was the most important to me. She bought into it, and as a parent, that made it fun for me. BY TYLER DAGUE

ballets & original contemporary works. 7 p.m. and Sat., May 21, 2 p.m. Byham Theater, Downtown. 412-456-6666.

Princess Bride, food, drink & personal accounts. 6:30 p.m. Hollywood Theater, Dormont. 412-344-1245.

FUNDRAISERS

FRI 20

THU 19

COCKTAILS & CUISINE 2016. Live music, silent auction, more. Benefits Crisis Center North. 6 p.m. The Woodlands, Wexford. www.crisiscenternorth.org.

ARTRAGEOUS! An evening of art, food &drinks w/ Rick Sebak. Money raised through this event with be dedicated to helping the Wesley Spectrum Schools. 6 p.m. The Society for LAUGHS FOR LINDA. Stand Contemporary Craft, Strip District. up comedy to benefit comedian 412-261-7003. Linda Duty. 7 p.m. Shaler DEPAUL SPEAKEASY. North Hills Library, Glenshaw. A prohibition style event to 412-486-0211. benefit DePaul School for Hearing & Speech. 6:30-9:30 p.m. Union BEERS FOR BABES: Project, Highland Park. NOT YOUR TYPICAL . 412-363-4550. w w w BABY SHOWER. paper ENGINEERS pghcitym Supporting Global Links .co WITHOUT BORDERS maternal/infant PGH. CHAPTER GOLF health initiatives. Play FUNDRAISER. Helping to some games, pack a bag of fund their project that will filter valuable essentials for a new mom & pump clean water from the & learn about Global Links. 3 p.m. spring onto the hillside where Bayardstown Social Club, Strip the people in the community of District. www.bayardstown.com. Curingue Ecuador reside. 12 p.m. HOPE GROWS TEA & TEE Village Green Golf Club, Hickory. TIME FUNDRAISER. Funds 724- 356-4653. raised will enable Hope Grows - a EVENING OF HOPE. Benefits non-profit organization focused Girls of Hope Pittsburgh. on caregiver support - to continue www.girlshope.org. 6:30-8:30 p.m. providing support services & Pittsburgh Field Club, Fox Chapel. educational training to help 412-963-8500. family caregivers in the Greater NATIONAL PANCREAS Pittsburgh region. Shadow Lakes, FOUNDATION, WESTERN PA CHAPTER. A showing of the Aliquippa. 724-375-5511.

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MON 23 CITY THEATRE’S ANNUAL GALA & AUCTION. East Club Lounge. 5:30-10 p.m. Heinz Field, North Side.

LITERARY THU 19 BOOKS IN THE AFTERNOON. Lively discussions of contemporary fiction. Third Thu of every month, 1 & 6 p.m. Carnegie Library, Oakland. 412-622-3114. ENGLISH LEARNERS’ BOOK CLUB. For advanced ESL students. Presented in cooperation w/ the Greater Pittsburgh Literacy Council. Thu, 1 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. THE HOUR AFTER HAPPY HOUR WRITER’S WORKSHOP. Young writers & recent graduates looking for additional feedback on their work. thehourafterhappyhour. wordpress.com Thu, 7-9 p.m. Lot 17, Bloomfield. 412-687-8117. LAST CHANCE SLAM. For more info, www.pghpoetry.org. 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250. ZIGGY EDWARDS, TIMONS ESAIAS, LISA PANEPINTO, BRI GRIFFITH, MIKE LAMBERT. Hour After Happy Hour Spring Launch Reading. 7 p.m. Piccolo Forno, Lawrenceville. 412-622-0111.

FRI 20 JAMES R. FORD. Book signing. 7:30 p.m. Brew on Broadway, Beechview. 412-563-6456.

SUN 22 WRITING AWAY THE STIGMA READING & CONVERSATION. Brief readings from Writing Away the Stigma fellows will be followed by a discussion & conversation about the role of creative writing in fostering mental health. http:// www.creativenonfiction.org/stigma 12:30 p.m. East Liberty Presbyterian Church, East Liberty. 412-441-3800.

MON 23 POETRY WORKSHOP W/ DR. SAM HAZO. Dr. Samuel Hazo for a two-part poetry workshop. For this first session participants will be introduced to several works of poetry that have the ability to replicate the immediacy of our senses through language. Participants are asked to bring a poem of their own to this class to be reviewed by Dr. Hazo in the following session. Mon, 2:30 p.m. Thru May 23 Mount Lebanon Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. 412-531-1912. WHAT’S YOUR STORY? An adult writing group for light-hearted stories. Second and Fourth Mon of every month, 12:30-2:30 p.m. Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

TUE 24 PAUL HERTNEKY. Reading from his new memoir, Rust Belt Boy. 7 p.m. City Books, North Side. 412-481-7555.


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Seth Storck, LJ Swiech, Patty Tran, Theodore Bolha, Marion Di Quinzio, Shervin Iranshahr & Ben Patterson. Shadyside. 412-363-5050. GALLERY ON 43RD STREET. Domestic Detritus. Watercolors & acrylic paintings by Joseph Shepler. Lawrenceville. 412-683-6488. GLENN GREENE STAINED GLASS STUDIO INC. Original Glass Art by Glenn Greene. Exhibition of new work, recent work & older work. Regent Square. 412-243-2772. GREENSBURG ART CENTER. Expired Mills: Inspired Landscapes. Oil paintings by Claire Hardy. Greensburg. 724-837-6791. HILLMAN LIBRARY. 1989 China/Avant-Garde Exhibition: Reflections. Materials from the archive of Gao Minglu, research professor, Pitt Department of History of Art & Architecture & a leading scholar of Chinese contemporary art. Thornburgh Room. www.humanities.pitt. edu. Oakland. 412-648-3330. HOLOCAUST CENTER OF PITTSBURGH. In Celebration of Life: Living Legacy Project. A photographic/ multimedia exhibit honoring & commemorating local Holocaust survivors. Hazelwood. 412-421-1500. HOYT INSTITUTE OF FINE ART. His Stories & Her Stories. The work of illustrators John Manders & Stacey Hogue. Kathleen Zimbicki. A solo exhibition of watercolors. New Castle. 724-652-2882. HUNT INSTITUTE FOR BOTANICAL DOCUMENTATION. Great Expectations. There is great expectation in the promise & energy held within a bud or a seed, & phases of this continuous cycle of plant development are beautifully illustrated w/ collection items. Oakland. 412-268-2434. JEWISH COMMUNITY CENTER OF THE SOUTH HILLS. Pittsburgh 10 + Friends. The exhibit includes 12 professional artists w/ extensive exhibition experience. The works are contemporary in character & run the gamut from abstract expressionism to realism & represent unique perspectives, including painting, photography, fiber, mixed media & more. Scott. 412-278-1975.

STEEL CITY SLAM. Open mic poets & slam poets. 3 rounds of 3 minute poems. Tue, 7:45 p.m. Capri Pizza and Bar, East Liberty. 412-362-1250.

WED 25 LOOK FOR THE HELPERS. Author Talk & book signing w/ The-

MAGGIE’S FARM DISTILLERY. Braddock Tiles. New work in artists prints & ceramics by Caledonia Curry, aka Swoon. Strip District. 724-322-5415. MATTRESS FACTORY. Ongoing Installations. Works by Turrell, Lutz, Shiota, Kusama, Anastasi, Highstein, Wexler & Woodrow. North Side. 412-231-3169. MORGAN CONTEMPORARY GLASS GALLERY. teapots!10. Celebrating 10 years of sculptural teapots w/ its largest exhibition to date 13 regional plus 50 international artists. Shadyside. 412-441-5200. MOST WANTED FINE ART GALLERY. Jason Mendez, Hoesy Corona & Greg Garay. Garfield. 412-328-4737. NEU KIRCHE CONTEMPORARY ART CENTER. The Seen & The Unseen. New works by local artists Matthew Conboy, Lori Hepner & Jimmy Riordan. North Side. 412-322-2224. PANZA GALLERY. James P. Nelson: paintings & works on paper. Millvale. 412-821-0959. PERCOLATE. You Only Live Twice. Solo show by Rick Bach. Wilkinsburg. 412-606-1220. PITTSBURGH CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Arts in Education. Large scale fiber art works by students. Marcellus Shale Documentary Project: An Expanded View. New photography & video works by Noah Addis, Nina Berman, Brian Cohen, Scott Goldsmith, Lynn Johnson, Martha Rial, and Joe Seamans & graphics by FracTracker Alliance that document the social & environmental effects of natural gas drilling in the region. Shadyside. 412-361-0873. ROBIN HILL CENTER. West Hills Art League 49th Annual Art Exhibit. Work from WHAL members. www.westhillsart. org. Moon. 412-264-2630. SEWICKLEY PUBLIC LIBRARY. Giselle Potter. The art work of a well known children’s book & editorial illustrator. Original artwork produced for children’s books, as well as sketches & unfinished art that will highlight the illustrator’s process. Sewickley. 412-741-6920. THE SOCIETY FOR CONTEMPORARY CRAFT. Pattern & Place: Art Quilts by Valerie Goodwin. Fiberart

resa Brown, RN. 7 p.m. Dormont Public Library, Dormont. 412-531-8754. PITTSBURGH POETRY EXCHANGE. Book discussion hosted by the Pittsburgh Poetry Exchange. This month’s meeting focuses on Jan Beatty’s “The Switching/Yard.” Fourth

International 2016. The 22nd in a series of triennial juried exhibitions sponsored by the Fiberarts Guild of Pittsburgh, Inc, featuring works by established & emerging artists the exhibition provides a unique opportunity to see current trends & innovations in this constantly evolving medium. Strip District. 412-261-7003. SOUTHERN ALLEGHENIES MUSEUM OF ART. The Light in Nature & Time: Paintings by Fred Danziger. Ligonier. 724-238-6015. SPACE. Degrees of Seperation. Works by Tamara Cedré, Nicole Herbert, Michael Dax Iacovone, Nate Larson, Carlene Muñoz, Daniel Pillis, Derek Reese, Scott Turri & Barbara Weissberger span spiritual, mental & physical distance. Downtown. 412-325-7723. SWEETWATER CENTER FOR THE ARTS. Interwoven States Exhibition. Juried exhibition highlighting the diverse textile practices of our regional fiber arts community & the creativity in which artists express contemporary aesthetics & concepts. Sewickley. 412-741-4405. TUGBOAT PRINT SHOP. Tugboat Printshop Showroom. Open showroom w/ the artists. By appt. only. Lawrenceville. 412-980-0884. UNSMOKE SYSTEMS ARTSPACE. You Are Warming Weather. A solo show by Katie Ford. Braddock. WESTMORELAND MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART. Telling Tales: Stories & Legends in 19th Century American Art. 53 pieces that portray themes of American ambition, pride & the spiritual elements of American life. Greensburg. 724-837-1500. WOOD STREET GALLERIES. All Around Us: Installations & Experiences Inspired by Bugs. Works by Jennifer Angus, Daniel Campos, Garnet Hertz, Ivana Adaime Makac, Robin Meier & Andre Gwerder, Nathan Morehouse, Daniel Zurek& Sebastian Echeverri, Matthijs Munnik, Stephanie Ross, Jeff Shaw, Susana Soares, Bingrui Tang & CMU CREATE Lab. Downtown. 412-471-5605.

MAY 18, 20 & 21

CHEERLEADERS PITTSBURGH

Wed of every month, 7:30 p.m. Coffee Tree Roasters, Shadyside. 412-928-9891.

3100 Liberty Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15201

KIDSTUFF THU 19

412-281-3110

WEDO ROBOTICS. A robotics class using LEGOs. Thu, 7-8:15 p.m.

cheerleaderspittsburgh.com

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Thru May 19 Shaler North Hills Library, Glenshaw. 412-486-0211.

FRI 20 YOUTH MAKE (10+). Explore the space & activities w/ the opportunity to go in-depth w/ independent projects of choice under the guidance of MAKESHOP Teaching Artists. 5-7 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

SUN 22 DJ KELLY MOM. Dance to your hearts content to artists like; The Cure, Jawbreaker, English Beat, The Ramones, La Tigre, New Order, Vampire Weekend, The Clash, Bob Marley, The Pixies, the White Stripes & more. 1-3 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

MON 23 MAKER STORY TIME. Explore tools, materials & processes inspired by books. Listen to stories read by librarian-turned-Teaching Artist Molly. Mon, 11 a.m.-12 p.m. Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, North Side. 412-322-5058.

OUTSIDE

SAT 21

ACTIVIST PRINT COMMUNITY DIALOGUE & PROJECT LAUNCH. The community dialogue focuses on artist D.S. Kinsel’s mural “What They Say, What They Said” & includes panel members Pittsburgh Police Chief Cameron McLay, Pittsburgh Police Commander Eric Holmes & D.S. Kinsel & the discussion is moderated by The Warhol’s Director Eric Shiner. 12 p.m. Andy Warhol Museum, North Side. 412-237-8300. BEGINNER TAI CHI CLASSES. Sat, 9 a.m. Friends Meeting House, Oakland. 412-683-2669. THE CITY SPREE: 5K. NO COURSE. The City Spree is a city-wide race..without a course. Runners & walkers create their own path through the city to discover its secret places & hidden gems. www.cityspreerace.com. 7 a.m.-12 p.m. Schenley Plaza, Oakland. 412-682-7275. DANCES OF UNIVERSAL PEACE. Meditative circle dances that emphasize universal connection between all people, based on Sufi principles. This month the dance group will celebrate Sky Bear, aka Daniel Turock Fecko, long time Pittsburgh resident & dance leader. www.dancesof universalpeacena.org. 6 p.m. ALLEGHENY COUNTY MARBLES Waldorf School of Pittsburgh, PROGRAM. Tournaments, game Bloomfield. 412-302-5628. play & learning to play marbles. LINK ON PENN. Live music, local Free to children ages 14 & under. flavor, passport to Wilkinsburg. Various locations. For a full Penn Ave. & Center Ave. 1-4 p.m. schedule, visit www.allegheny Penn Ave., Garfield. county.us/parks/about/programs/ PITTSBURGH RIVERHOUNDS VS marbles-program.aspx. TORONTO F.C. II. 7 p.m. Highmark Stadium, Station Square. SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. AFRICAN DANCE CLASS. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing Second and Third Fri of every follows. No partner needed. month and Fourth and Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Last Fri of every month Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. Irma Freeman Center 412-683-5670. for Imagination, SOUL LINE DANCING Garfield. 412-924-0634. PARTY. Dancing w/ ARTIST MEET & Maestro Roland Ford. GREET. Patricia Chiacu www. per pa For more information pghcitym Apuzzo. 11 a.m.-1 p.m. .co francescamm@outlook. Anti-aging and Longevity com. 7 p.m. Salem’s Center of Pittsburgh. Event Center, Strip District. Shadyside. 412-477-4540. SOUTH HILLS SCRABBLE CLUB. CAFÉ CON LECHE ARTIST TALK. Free Scrabble games, all levels. Greg Garay discusses his work. Sat, 1-3 p.m. Mount Lebanon 7 p.m. Most Wanted Fine Art Public Library, Mt. Lebanon. Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. 412-531-1912. FRIDAY NIGHT CONTRA DANCE. STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY. A social, traditional American 7 p.m. Romp n Roll, Glenshaw. dance. No partner needed, 412-486-4117. beginners welcome, lesson at SWING CITY. Learn & practice 7:30. Fri, 8 p.m. Swisshelm Park swing dancing skills w/ the Jim Community Center, Swissvale. Adler Band. Sat, 8 p.m. Wightman 412-945-0554. School, Squirrel Hill. 412-759-1569.

Rennick Steele & the Bell School of Dance. Presented by The Gaelic Arts Society. For more info, 412758-5446. 1 p.m. Fairhaven United Methodist Church. 412-882-2544. FAMILY/FRIENDS OF SUBSTANCE USERS/ABUSERS SUPPORT GROUP. Non 12-step support group exchanging experiences & ideas as a means to provide resources & suggestions that can help those struggling to support the recovery journey of a close relative or friend. Second and Fourth Sun of every month, 4:30 p.m. Bethany Lutheran Church, Bethel Park. 412-853-3189. STEEL CITY BOOGIE CLUB. Carolina Shag/Swing Dance. 3 p.m. East Pittsburgh VFW, East Pittsburgh. 724-728-7222.

walks of life to improve their communication & leadership skills. For any questions email Sallieboggstm@gmail.com or call 412-365-5803. Tue, 6:30-8 p.m. C.C. Mellor Memorial Library, Edgewood. 412-731-0909.

WED 25 FLEET FEET SPEED SQUAD. At the track. Coach Alex from Fleet Feet Sports Pittsburgh hosts weekly Wednesday night speed workouts. The workouts are free & open to the public. Anyone who wants to improve their speed & form are encouraged to join. Wed, 7 p.m. Jefferson Elementary, Mt. Lebanon. 412-851-9100. GLASS ART LECTURE SERIES. Internationally renowned

[VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITY]

TEACH TECH TO TEENS

The Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh in Beechview is seeking volunteers ages 18-25 to help facilitate its creative technology programs. Volunteers should be comfortable working with teens and have enthusiasm for art, music or technology. For more information or to register, visit www.carnegielibrary.org.

THU 19 - WED 25

THU 19 THURSDAY ADULT NATURE WALK. Free & open to ages 18 & older. Meets rain or shine every Thursday of the year. Naturalists guide these walks. Thu, 10 a.m.12 p.m. North Park, Allison Park. 724-935-1766.

WED 25 WEDNESDAY MORNING WALK. Naturalist-led, rain or shine. Wed Beechwood Farms, Fox Chapel. 412-963-6100.

OTHER STUFF THU 19 A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. THE CANNABIS CURE. Dr. Cass Ingram fshares insights on how raw cannabis extract helps vulnerability & management of cancer, heart disease, diabetes, inflammation, more. 7 p.m. American Slovenian Citizens Association, Enon Valley. 724-274-9997. DEPRESSION BIPOLAR SUPPORT GROUP. Thu, 6 p.m. C.C. Mellor Memorial Library, Edgewood. 412-708-9423. INTERNATIONAL WOMEN’S ASSOCIATION OF PITTSBURGH. Social, cultural club of American/ international women. Thu First Baptist Church, Oakland. iwap. pittsburgh@gmail.com. JEWISH FAMILY & CHILDREN’S SERVICE ANNUAL MEETING. Diversity & inclusion themed, music by Machete Kisumontao & multi-media art exhibit on refugees. 6:30 p.m. Jewish Community Center, Squirrel Hill. 412-521-8010.

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MARKET SQUARE FARMERS MARKET. Thursdays. Market Square, Downtown. 412-471-1511. PRINTMAKING OPEN STUDIO. Experienced screen printers can utilize studio equipment to make films, burn screens & complete a run of posters, t-shirts or prints. A volunteer-driven environment designed for short-run projects that can be completed in one evening for a small materials fee. Tue, Thu, 6-10 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664. SALSA NIGHT. Free dancing lessons w/ host & instructor DJ Bobby D from 9:30-10 p.m. Thu, 9:30 p.m.-2 a.m. Perle Champagne Bar, Downtown. 412-471-2058. A TASTE OF JUDAISM. Three 1 hour-plus sessions, hosted by Senior Rabbi Mark Mahler. Each session is equal parts instruction & conversation, question & answer, engagement & connection. Topics include Jewish ethics, spirituality, rituals, practice & Torah. The first section will be at Panera, followed by Mt. Lebanon Main Park & Temple Emanuel of South Hills. Thu, 7 p.m. Thru May 26. RSVP to Temple Emanuel at 412-279-7600.

FRI 20

FULL LIST ONLINE

FRI 20 - SUN 22 3 RIVERS SCREENWRITERS CONFERENCE. Attendees will learn aspects of story development, filmmaking and writing for both screen & stage. Panelists will share their stories & experiences of working in the industry w/ events, Q & As, more. For more info, visit 3rsconference.com. May 20-22 David Lawrence Convention Center, Downtown. 412-565-6000.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER 05.18/05.25.2016

WIGLE WHISKEY BARRELHOUSE TOURS. Sat, 12:30 & 2 p.m. Wigle Whiskey Barrel House, North Side. 412-224-2827.

SUN 22 CAFÉ CON LECHE ARTIST TALK. Jason Mendez discusses his work. 1 p.m. Most Wanted Fine Art Gallery, Garfield. 412-328-4737. A CELEBRATION OF IRISH CULTURE. A night of music, dance & poetry featuring Jim Lamb,

TONY GASKINS JR. The Real Love Tour from this motivational speaker. 2 p.m. Kelly-Strayhorn Theater, East Liberty. 412-363-3000.

MON 23 SCOTTISH COUNTRY DANCING. Lessons 7-8 p.m., social dancing follows. No partner needed. Mon, 7 p.m. and Sat, 7 p.m. Grace Episcopal Church, Mt. Washington. 412-683-5670. TRIVIA NIGHT. Hosted by Pittsburgh Bar Trivia. Mon, 7 p.m. Carnivore’s Restaurant & Sports Bar, Oakmont. 412-820-7427.

TUE 24 4 MOMS: A MT. LEBANON SUCCESS STORY. Speaker Rob Daley, a Mt. Lebanon entrepreneur, will tell the story of how he & partner Henry Thorne founded 4moms, a maker of high-tech strollers, swings & other baby-care gear using robotics technology. 7 p.m. Mount Lebanon Public Library, 412-531-1912. A SOTO ZEN BUDDHIST SITTING GROUP. http://city dharma.wordpress.com/schedule/ Tue, Thu Church of the Redeemer, Squirrel Hill. 412-965-9903. PRINTMAKING OPEN STUDIO. Experienced screen printers can utilize studio equipment to make films, burn screens & complete a run of posters, t-shirts or prints. A volunteer-driven environment designed for short-run projects that can be completed in one evening for a small materials fee. Tue, Thu, 6-10 p.m. Artists Image Resource, North Side. 412-321-8664. SALLIE BOGGS TOASTMASTERS CLUB. Helping people from all

artists, Martin Janecky & Nathan Sandberg, will present images, videos & informal discussions about contemporary glass art. 6 p.m. Pittsburgh Glass Center, Friendship. 412-365-2145. THE PITTSBURGH SHOW OFFS. A meeting of jugglers & spinners. All levels welcome. Wed, 7:30 p.m. Union Project, Highland Park. 412-363-4550.

AUDITIONS ACTORS & ARTISTS OF FAYETTE COUNTY. Open auditions for the upcoming Summer musical “9 to 5.” Sing 32 bars of an upbeat song & be prepared to do a short dance routine. Cold readings. May 22, 1 - 5 p.m. & May 23, 6 - 10 p.m. Geyer Performing Arts Center, Scottdale. 724-887-0887. COMMUNITY MEN’S CHOIR. Looking for male-identified singers interested in joining community men’s choral ensemble. Volunteer role, 1 2.5 hr rehearsal/week, 2 concerts a year. For more information, visit www.steel citymenschorale.org. Thru Aug. 6. First Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, Oakland. 412-683-4121. THE HERITAGE PLAYERS. Auditions for “Alice in Wonderland.” Seeking children & adults from ages 7 +. Please prepare a one minute dialogue & 32 bars of a song. Cold readings from the script available on request. May 22 & 23 6 - 9 p.m. Seton Center, Brookline. For more info, visit www.bphp.org or call 412-254-4633. PITTSBURGH SHAKESPEARE IN THE PARKS. “Auditions for “Comedy of Errors.” Eight positions available, union &

non-union. Prepare one comedic Shakespearean monologue. Dress to move & be outside. Clowning experience a bonus but not required. June 4, 1 - 4 p.m. Frick Park, Blue Slide Playground, Squirrel Hill. Email hmmeade@ pittsburghshakespeare.org or call 412-818-3548.

SUBMISSIONS BOULEVARD GALLERY & DIFFERENT STROKES GALLERY. Searching for glass artists, fiber artists, potters, etc. to compliment the exhibits for 2015 & 2016. Booking for both galleries for 2017. Exhibits run from 1 to 2 months. Ongoing. 412-721-0943. INDEPENDENT FILM NIGHT. Submit your film, 10 minutes or less. Screenings held on the second Thursday of every month. Ongoing. DV8 Espresso Bar & Gallery, Greensburg. 724-219-0804. THE NEW YINZER. Seeking original essays about literature, music, TV or film, & also essays generally about Pittsburgh. To see some examples, visit www. newyinzer.com & view the current issue. Email all pitches, submissions & inquiries to newyinzer@gmail. com. Ongoing. PITTSBURGH WATERCOLOR SOCIETY AQUEOUS INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION. Open to any artist 18 or older working in water-based media. Works submitted for consideration to PWS Aqueous Open must be primarily water based media on an unvarnished paper surface. Work must have been completed within the last two years & not previously shown in a PWS exhibit. Thru July 11. Spinning Plate Gallery, Friendship. For more information visitww.pittsburghwater colorsociety.com. THE POET BAND COMPANY. Seeking various types of poetry. Contact wewuvpoetry@hotmail. com Ongoing. RE:NEW FESTIVAL CALL FOR ARTISTS- PROJECT PROPOSALS. Open to any artist or performer living in the U. S., working in any medium or genre. Work should address festival themes of creative reuse, transformation & sustainability. Performance, video, outdoor artworks, costumes, mobile sculpture, social practice work..what would you like to do at Re:NEW? Maximum project budget: $3,000. Proposals will be reviewed on a rolling basis. Proposals will be accepted until May 31, 2016. To apply, visit renewfestival.com. RE:NEW FESTIVAL JURIED EXHIBITION. Seeking painting, drawing, sculpture, photography, video and installation from Southwestern PA artists that address creative reuse, transformation, or sustainability. Deadline to apply is May 31, or when 300 entries are received. To apply visit www.renewfestival.com. 412-391-2060 x248.


Savage Love {BY DAN SAVAGE}

Over the years, I have consumed what I believe to be an average amount of porn for a 44-year-old hetero guy. I have never paid for it, and I am now facing a troubled conscience for that fact. I could obviously just subscribe to some site or other now, but that would benefit only one company and/or set of performers. Is there a Dan Savage–approved charity relating to the adult film industry to which I could donate? SEEKS PENANCE AND NEEDS KNOWLEDGE

“Porn performers almost never get royalties for their scenes when they work for big studios,” said Conner Habib, a writer, activist and porn performer. “If you buy into the trickle-down theory of things, then more money for the studio should mean more money for the performers. If you don’t buy into that — and not everyone does — there are other options.” To get your money directly to the performers whose work you’re currently enjoying/stealing, SPANK, you can patronize smaller studios run by performers, book time with independent webcam models, and purchase porn created by performers on sites like Clips4Sale.com. To atone for your years of freeloading, SPANK, you can and should make large donations to two organizations. “The Adult Performer Advocacy Committee (APAC) (apac-usa.com) is the largest performer-based organization in the world, and its membership is made up entirely of performers,” said Habib. “Full disclosure: I’m the vice president, but no donation money goes to me or any board member. It all goes to the organization, which works to improve the working conditions, quality of life, and safety of performers, as well as to fight anti-porn laws and stigma.” Habib also recommended donating money to the Sex Workers Outreach Project (swopusa.org). “This isn’t a porn-specific organization,” said Habib, “but it works to protect and fight for the rights of all sex workers. Since many performers are doing other forms of sex work, donations go a long way to help porn performers.” You can — and you should — follow Habib on Twitter @ConnerHabib.

“Dad! It creeps me out when you make comments about women you wanna fuck. I realize you’re a sexual person, and I honor that, and blah de blah blah blah. But these are thoughts you share with friends, Dad, not with your adult children. There’s no need to go into your ohso-sorry routine, Dad, we just need to change the subject.” My husband and I have been married for 16 years. We have been polyamorous for the last five years. We are a bit mismatched sexually in many ways. Polyamory was our solution. For much of this time, my husband had a girlfriend. Before I go on, let me say that I adore my husband in all ways except sex. We are raising a child together and are a good fit otherwise. I no longer have any desire to have sex with my husband. Lots of men and women write in to complain about their partner’s low libido. This is not the case. My libido is fine. I just don’t want to have sex with my husband. Whenever we would have sex in the past, I would get anxious and try to avoid it. We each have our issues. Being a poly woman dating in my 40s has been incredibly empowering and sexy. But my husband’s experiences have been different. He is frustrated because it is hard for him to meet women, and his frustration is made worse by the fact that I don’t want sex with him either. When he had a girlfriend, our sex life wasn’t as much of an issue. What should I do? He’s unhappy. I’m frustrated. Neither of us wants to divorce. Should I force myself?

Food and beve purchased 5/2 rage helps us suppo4-5/28 Pittsburgh cen rt the creative reuse ter for . us out on the Check fa book for detail ce s.

#PiecesOfPittsburgh #MountWashington #Pittsburgh

“DAD, WE JUST NEED TO CHANGE THE SUBJECT.”

I didn’t talk to my nearly-70-year-old dad for most of my 20s. Now that I’m back trying to maintain relationships with my parents, I am struggling. My dad is the king of the overshare. He makes creepy comments about women who are about 30 to 40 years younger than him — including women who were kids when he met them but are now grown-ups. Not something I want to hear. I don’t think he is abusing anyone, just being creepy. He makes about one creepy comment per phone conversation. If he were a person at work, I would be able to stand up for myself and say, “That is not appropriate.” But when he says creepy stuff, Dan, I’m a deer in the headlights. I go silent, it’s awkward, and I keep hoping he’ll understand how weird he’s being. I would say something, but bringing up things that anger me causes him to act overly sorry, and that routine is annoying too. Any suggestions on what to say? SEEKING HELP REGARDING UNPLEASANT GUY

pghcitypaper

1720 Lowrie Street 412.251.0822

LADY IN BALTIMORE ISN’T DESIRING OBLIGATORY SEX

It is a truth universally acknowledged — in the poly universe anyway — that a married poly woman will have an easier time finding sex partners than a married poly man. Some men in open/poly relationships present themselves as dishonest cheaters rather than honest nonmonogamists because women would rather fuck a married man who’s cheating on his wife than a married man who isn’t cheating on his wife. Go figure. Anyway, the answer to your question — should you force yourself to fuck your husband? — depends on your answer to this question: How badly do you want to avoid divorce? Because your refusal to fuck him could wind up incentivizing divorce. So to save your marriage you might wanna fuck your husband once in a while. Forcing yourself to fuck someone is tiresome and dispiriting, I realize, but you can always close your eyes and think about someone you’d rather be fucking. And since you’re off the hook when your husband has a girlfriend, you might wanna do everything you can to help him find a new one. Help him craft messages to women he contacts online, go to play parties and poly mixers with him, and vouch for him to women he’s interested in.

blogh.pghcitypaper.com

The first hit is free. Actually, so are all the others.

Jillian Keenan, author of Sex with Shakespeare, on the Savage Lovecast: savagelovecast.com.

SEND YOUR QUESTIONS TO MAIL@SAVAGELOVE.NET AND FIND THE SAVAGE LOVECAST (DAN’S WEEKLY PODCAST) AT SAVAGELOVECAST.COM

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Free Will Astrology

FOR THE WEEK OF

05.18-05.25

{BY ROB BREZSNY}

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): The short attention span is now enshrined as the default mode of awareness. “We skim rather than absorb,” says author James Lough. “We read Sappho or Shakespeare the same way we glance over a tweet or a text message, scanning for the gist, impatient to move on.” There’s a problem with that approach, however. “You can’t skim Shakespeare,” says Lough. I propose that we make that your epigram to live by in the coming weeks, Taurus: You can’t skim Shakespeare. According to my analysis, you’re going to be offered a rich array of Shakespeare-level information and insights. To get the most out of these blessings, you must penetrate and marinate and ruminate.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “There are situations in life when it is wisdom not to be too wise,” said Friedrich Schiller. The coming days may be one of those times for you. I therefore advise you to dodge any tendency you might have to be impressed with your sophisticated intelligence. Be suspicious of egotism masquerading as cleverness. You are most likely to make good decisions if you insist on honoring your raw instincts. Simple solutions and uncomplicated actions will give you access to beautiful truths and truthful beauty, especially if you anchor yourself in innocent compassion.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): To prepare you for the coming weeks, I have gathered three quotes from the Bulgarian writer Elias Canetti. These gems, along with my commentary, will serve you well if you use them as seeds for your ongoing meditations. Seed No. 1: “He would like to start from scratch. Where is scratch?” Here’s my addendum: No later than your birthday, you’ll be ready to start from

scratch. In the meantime, your task is to find out where scratch is, and clear a path to it. Seed No. 2: “All the things one has forgotten scream for help in dreams.” My addendum: Monitor your dreams closely. They will offer clues about what you need to remember. Seed No. 3: “Relearn astonishment, stop grasping for knowledge, lose the habit of the past.” My addendum: Go in search of the miraculous.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “There are friendships like circuses, waterfalls, libraries,” said writer Vladimir Nabokov. I hope you have at least one of each, Leo. And if you don’t, I encourage you to go out and look for some. It would be great if you could also get access to alliances that resemble dancing lessons, colorful sanctuaries, lion whisperers, prayer flags and the northern lights. Right now you especially need the stimulation that synergistic collaborations can provide. The next chapter of your life story requires abundant contact with interesting people who have the power to surprise you and teach you.

get your yoga on!

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

“Perfection is a stick with which to beat the possible,” says author Rebecca Solnit. She is of course implying that it might be better not to beat the possible, but rather to protect and nurture the possible as a viable option — especially if perfection ultimately proves to have no value other than as a stick. This is always a truth worth honoring, but it will be crucial for you in the weeks to come. I hope you will cultivate a reverence and devotion to the possible. As messy or maddening as it might be, it will also groom your powers as a maker.

Fifth-century Christian theologian St. Jerome wrote that “it requires infinite discretion to look for gold in the midst of dirt.” Ancient Roman poet Virgil on one occasion testified that he was “searching for gold in dung.” While addressing the angels, 19th-century French poet Charles Baudelaire bragged, “From each thing I extracted its quintessence. You gave me your mud, and I made gold out of it.” From what I can tell, Caprciorn, you have been engaged in similar work lately. The climax of your toil should come in the next two weeks. (Thanks to Michael Gilleland for the inspiration: tinyurl.com/ mudgold.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): An invigorating challenge is headed your way. To prepare you, I offer the wisdom of French author André Gide. “Through loyalty to the past,” he wrote, “our mind refuses to realize that tomorrow’s joy is possible only if today’s joy makes way for it.” What this means, Libra, is that you will probably have to surrender your attachment to a well-honed delight if you want to make yourself available for a bright new delight that’s hovering on the frontier. An educational blessing will come your way if and only you clear space for its arrival. As Gide concludes, “Each wave owes the beauty of its line only to the withdrawal of the preceding wave.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):

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“How prompt we are to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our bodies; how slow to satisfy the hunger and thirst of our souls!” Henry David Thoreau wrote that, and now I’m passing it on to you just in time for a special phase of your long-term cycle. During this upcoming interlude, your main duty is to FEED YOUR SOUL in every way you can imagine. So please stuff it with unpredictable beauty and reverent emotions. Cram it with mysterious adventures and rambling treks in the frontier. Gorge it with intimate unpredictability and playful love and fierce devotions in behalf of your most crucial dreams. Warning: You will not be able to rely solely on the soul food that has sustained you in the past. Be eager to discover new forms of nourishment.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Here’s how every love letter can be summarized,” says Russell Dillon in his poem “PastPerfect-Impersonal”: “What is it you’re unable to surrender and please may I have that?” I bring this tease to your attention because it may serve as a helpful riddle in the coming weeks. You’re entering a phase when you will have an enhanced ability to tinker with and refine and even revolutionize your best intimate relationships. I’m hoping Dillon’s provocation will unleash a series of inquiries that will inspire you as you imagine how you could supercharge togetherness and reinvent the ways you collaborate.

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AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “At this time in my life,” says singer Joni Mitchell, “I’ve confronted a lot of my devils. A lot of them were pretty silly, but they were incredibly real at the time.” According to my reading of the astrological omens, Aquarius, you are due to enjoy a similar grace period. It may be a humbling grace period, because you’ll be invited to decisively banish worn-out delusions that have filled you with needless fear. And it may be a grace period that requires you to make strenuous adjustments, since you’ll have to revise some of your old stories about who you are and how you got here. But it will also be a sweet grace period, because you’ll be blessed again and again with a visceral sense of liberation.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): More than halfway through her prose poem “A Settlement,” Mary Oliver abruptly stops her meandering meditation on the poignant joys of spring’s soft awakening. Suddenly she’s brave and forceful: “Therefore, dark past, I’m about to do it. I’m about to forgive you for everything.” Now would be a perfect moment to draw inspiration from her, Pisces. I dare you to say it. I dare you to mean it. Speak these words: “Therefore, dark past, I’m about to do it. I’m about to forgive you for everything.”

ARIES (March 21-April 19): “An oar moves a boat by entering what lies outside it,” writes poet Jane Hirshfield. You can’t use the paddle inside the boat! It’s of no value to you unless you thrust it into the drink and move it around vigorously. And that’s an excellent metaphor for you to keep in mind during the coming weeks, my friend. If you want to reach your next destination, you must have intimate and continual interaction with the mysterious depths that lie outside your known world. What’s the one thing you would change about yourself if you could? And why can’t you? Go to Relastrology.com and click “Email Rob.”

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700


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1. One leading you down the aisle 6. Japanese noodles 10. Relaxed strut 14. Supermodel Hilary 15. Numbers on the books? 16. Kind of air filter 17. Blondie’s view from within? 19. Hacker’s cry 20. Closed off 21. Gas or elec. 22. Ballsy solver’s solving technique 23. Elf’s orgasms? 26. Greenwich Village sch. 27. Rapa ___ 28. Tomboy Pataki of “Hey Arnold!” 31. Cost of a server system? 37. Prior to, in poems 38. Sunlight and smoking 39. Country duo ___ + Shay 40. Transmit an image of a thumb? 43. Feature made by glaciers 45. Peet’s container 46. Guesstimate that tells you roughly when in-flight entertainment is shut off: Abbr. 47. Dessert that

makes you itchy? 54. Temperature numbers 55. Wild west lawman Wyatt 56. Actor Cumming 59. Showy bloom 60. Endless booty? 62. Jeans man Strauss 63. Bit of this, bit of that 64. Native Kiwi 65. Brainstorm session output 66. Actor Noah 67. Squelch

DOWN 1. Cities, slangily 2. Mid-east tyrant 3. Utter rotgut 4. Changing your story? 5. Did a 5K 6. :54 7. “Hamlet” courier 8. Hoops 9. “Pick one” 10. Where magicians pull things from, seemingly 11. Dance version of a song 12. Write an editorial 13. Deliberately loses 18. Wizard 22. “Shut that alarm off!” 24. “I’m off,” in texts 25. “Devil Inside” band

28. Playboy’s name 29. Pitcher’s stat 30. Superman villain Luthor 31. Boot from Australia 32. Maiden name clarifier 33. “As-is” letters 34. Marrying words 35. Roller coaster component 36. Conclusion 38. Paris mayor Hidalgo 41. Dark reddish-purple 42. Really bothers 43. Pre-Dropbox uploading protocol

44. Cesta sport 46. New product event 47. Dish measured in alarms 48. On staff 49. “You stumped me” 50. NHL legend Cam 51. Antidepressant drug 52. “Friend ___?” 53. Poet T.S. 57. Do that’s hard to wear a cap with 58. German rejection 60. Toss around the farm 61. Hotel units: Abbr. {LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS}


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COMIC-BOOK HERO {BY CHARLIE DEITCH}

WHEN THE PHILADELPHIA Comicon opens in a couple weeks, it will feature actors portraying Captain America, Thor, Falcon, Winter Soldier and other actors who play characters in the Marvel Universe. There will also be tons of other actors from television and film. If you want to know what actual comics content the convention will offer, you’ve got to scroll way down to the bottom of the page. In the past several years, comicons have turned more toward big-name and iconic celebrity guests than han toward the actual comics and the artists and writers who make them. Dimension Comics and its six Todd McDevitt, who owns New D region, is hoping to change all of that locations across the Pittsburgh region Comicon. May 20 and 21 with the 3 Rivers Com “There are other shows around here that focus on celebrity McDevitt says. “But when guests and they’re great. Fans love them,” the small number of comics vendors. I go to these shows, I see a very smal “What we want to do with this show is focus on comics and comics artists. We’re putting the comic back in comicon.” co

called Dark Dawn Stout, featuring a label drawn by Joseph Michael Linser, the creator of the comic “Dawn.” “The beer-release party on Saturday should be a great event,” McDevitt says. “You’ll get a sample of the beer, a bottle of your own to take home, admission for both days of the event and all of the other giveaways.” “I’m a fan of beer and I thought this would be a great way to celebrate the comicon,” says McDevitt. Part of the batch was aged in a barrel from Wigle Whiskey and added to the main batch for a distinct flavor. “This beer will taste better as it ages. I’m really excited about it.” McDevitt is no stranger to working with things that sell better with age. He started collecting comics as a kid, although he quickly found he was more interested in the business side than in collecting for the thrill of reading comics. McDevitt and a friend began selling their own books to friends, and through the mail, while in high school. In June 1986, while a junior in high school, McDevitt opened his first New

“COMICS ARE ENOUGH.” The two-day show will feature appearances by comf many of them local. They will be ics artists and writers, man meeting fans as well as selling their work and speakartist Mark Wheatley — ing on panels. For example, exam who has worked on titles including “Dr. Strange,” “The Flash,” “Tarzan,” “Green Hornet” and “Doctor Who” nding the art in licensed prop— will speak about “fin Banks and Justin Jordan will diserties,” and Darryle Ban drawing “Green Lantern.” Dozens of cuss writing and drawin attendance including Jim Rugg other artists will be in a Coffman (“Hero by Night,” “Hulk (“Afrodisiac”), DJ Coffm #100”), Christina Rice (“My Little Pony”) and Ron Frenz, who has worked on several titles for DC and Marvel Comics in his more than 30 years in the special events include kid’s day on business. Other speci and younger get in free with Sunday (children 8 a an adult), featuring a kid’s cosplay contest offering There will also be plenty of $1,000 in prizes. T comics and other merchandise. vendors selling comi several levels of admission that There are sever includes a free graphic novel. VIP start at $10 and incl T-shirts and free comics with an packages include T-s Comicon cover variant. McDevitt, exclusive 3 Rivers Co craft beers, had a special beer also a lover of cra event by Helltown Brewing. It’s brewed for the eve

Dimension shop in Ellwood City for a summer. He enrolled in Washington and Jefferson University’s Entrepreneurial Studies Program even as his brother continued to run the business back home. After college, McDevitt opened another store in Cranberry Township, and from there expanded. For his part, artist DJ Coffman says a convention focused on comics is long overdue, and he isn’t surprised that McDevitt is the one to start it. Coffman also says it’s important to know where your favorite television shows and movies actually got their start.

3 RIVERS COMICON 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Sat., May 21, and 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sun., May 22. 3075 Clairton Road, West Mifflin. $10-$40. www.3riverscomicon.com

“Nobody treats creators better than Todd and the New Dimension comics crew, so I’m not surprised that Todd’s real mission is to focus on comics first,” says Coffman. “While I enjoy the traffic big stars can bring, it’s often too expensive for the common fan. It’s important to educate the public that you wouldn’t have Walking Dead or Preacher television shows or Avengers and Batman without the comics. Comic creators are really driving media and culture now, but often not focused on at mainstream conventions. “My girlfriend actually summed it best when she said, ‘Comics are enough.’” C D E I T C H@ P G H C I T Y PA P E R. C OM

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Summer Guide 2016 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Volume 26 Issue 20

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