September 21, 2022 - Pittsburgh City Paper

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SEPT. 21-28, 2022 VOLUME 31 + ISSUE 38 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Director of Advertising RACHEL WINNER Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD News Editor JAMIE WIGGAN A&E Editor AMANDA WALTZ News Reporter JORDANA ROSENFELD Art Director LUCY CHEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Digital Editorial Coordinator HANNAH KINNEY-KOBRE Senior Account Executive OWEN GABBEY

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COVER PHOTO: SEAN EATON; COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART READ THE STORY ON PAGE 4


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ART

EVERYTHING EVERWHERE IN PITTSBURGH ALL AT ONCE BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE LEAD CURATOR of the latest Carnegie International, renowned as one of the largest and longest-running contemporary art exhibitions in the world, set out to create a “really artist-driven” show. That extends to the name of the 58th installment, Is it morning for you yet?, which came from featured artist Édgar Calel.

Mohebbi adds that, during a gathering at his current home in Polish Hill, Calel explained that, in his community in Guatemala, “they don’t say ‘Good morning,’ rather they say, ‘Is it morning for you yet?’” “And it was a way to account for different people’s internal clocks, and each person’s feelings and place in life, and how they can relate to each

“How are we sharing time? Are we on the same time? Are we contemporary?” “I more refer to it as a catchphrase rather than a theme,” says Sohrab Mohebbi, who was appointed as the Kathe and Jim Patrinos Curator of the 58th Carnegie International in 2019, and has since worked with a team to build on the Carnegie Museum of Art’s signature exhibition, which dates back to 1896.

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other,” Mohebbi explains during a phone interview with Pittsburgh City Paper. He says the phrase conjured the questions, “How are we sharing time? Are we on the same time? Are we contemporary?” “And that was how I started thinking about this, as a way to sort of address some of the questions that


come with the Carnegie International, but also this relationship between the present moment and contemporary history,” says Mohebbi, an Iranianborn curator, art critic, and writer whose resume includes curating the SculptureCenter in New York City. The 58th Carnegie International, debuting on Sat., Sept. 24 and running through April 2023, will present works by artists and art collectives from across the world. It will also engage with audiences through what Mohebbi calls a “very rigorous public program” that includes an opening weekend featuring a new work by New Orleans-based multidisciplinary artist Malcolm Peacock, and performances by Ali Eyal and

Christian Nyampeta. From there, CMOA will connect audiences with artists through the Refractions: 58th Carnegie International Conversation Series, and present a film program at Row House Cinema in Lawrenceville, curated by catalog contributor Rasha Salti. Also on the schedule are docentled tours, concerts, and other activities open to visitors of all ages. A museum statement says the show “unfolds along two conceptual overlapping currents: historical works from the collections of international institutions, estates, and artists, alongside new commissions and recent works by contemporary artists.” The commissions include

on-site and local off-site works, first and foremost a sculpture by Cuban American artist Rafael Domenech already on view in the museum’s courtyard. The Berlin-based collective terra0 will plant a tree on land donated by the Community College of Allegheny County in response to “broader environmental concerns,” particularly in regard to Pennsylvania, where the logging industry devastated forests in the 19th and 20th centuries. Pittsburgh artist James “Yaya” Hough will paint a mural in the Hill District, set to be unveiled later this year, while works by Tony Cokes will be seen on four digital billboards along Route 28, in addition to a video installed at CMOA. CONTINUES ON PG. 6

PHOTO: SENA EATON

Thu Van Tran, Installation view of Colors of Grey, 2022, in the 58th Carnegie International, Courtesy of the artist and Carnegie Museum of Art

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PHOTO: SEAN EATON

Dala Nasser, Installation view of Tomb of King Hiram, 2022, in the 58th Carnegie International, Courtesy of the artist and Carnegie Museum of Art

Another highlight of the show includes the Museo de la Solidaridad Salvador Allende, a prominent museum of modern and contemporary art in Chile that will, for the first time in the United States, present a selection of their extensive collection of more than 2,800 artworks.

think it will be an exhibition that you can think about formally, think about historically, and think about aesthetically, and I think these things need to go hand in hand for it to make a great exhibition,” says Mohebbi, who, as one statement puts it, hoped to use the show to “connect local

“I think it will be an exhibition that provides for an aesthetic experience, and it has a lot of historical ground. Mohebbi describes the Carnegie International offerings as “very abundant,” with everything from more traditional paintings and sculptures to nonfungible tokens and balloons. “It’s quite cross-disciplinary and across any kind of mediums you can imagine.” In a museum statement, Mohebbi says the 58th Carnegie International artists, many of whom are showing art in the U.S. for the first time, “combine a practice of reconstitution, reminding us that not only do our histories of pain and longing bind us, but furthermore, our narratives of resistance and survival help us reimagine the world.” “I think it will be an exhibition that provides for an aesthetic experience, and it has a lot of historical ground. So I

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concerns rooted in Pittsburgh’s past to current issues prompting national and international debate today.” His research set out to “explore how we reconstitute our lives after upheavals caused by colonialism, imperialism, and environmental disaster.” Unlike previous shows, which typically take three to four years to organize, the 58th Carnegie International had the added hurdle of the pandemic. The worldwide event encompassed much of the show’s planning period, affecting the travel and in-person meetings usually required to put together an exhibition of this scale. Mohebbi says that, while COVID-19 did impede some of the freedoms afforded to past Carnegie International curators,


PHOTO: SEAN EATON

LaToya Ruby Frazier, More Than Conquerors: A Monument For Community Health Workers of Baltimore, Maryland (detail), 2021–22, in the 58th Carnegie International, Courtesy of the artist and Carnegie Museum of Art

he credits his team for being able to pull off the groundwork necessary in finding the show’s many artists. This includes associate curator Ryan Inouye, curatorial assistant Talia Heiman, and the International Curatorial Council, which includes members Freya Chou, Renée Akitelek Mboya, Robert M. Ochshorn, and Pablo José Ramírez. Curatorial advisors Thiago de Paula Souza, Arlette QuỳnhAnh Trần, and Renan Laru-an also had a hand in planning the exhibition. The team was able to cover Southeast Asia and the Middle East, Hong Kong and Taiwan, and South Africa, among other regions. “While I do believe that it’s been a challenge for everybody in any line of work, one thing I’ve been thinking about is, quite frankly, I feel travel and research are two different things,” says Mohebbi. “And I feel also there are ways that these large-scale exhibitions are done, which is usually about how many miles are traveled, how many places you can go, which I do believe being in a place and walking down the street and sharing time with an artist in studio is really important. Unfortunately, we didn’t have as much of that as we were hoping for, but we did bring a lot of existing knowledge to the project.” The pandemic did, as expected, inform some of the show’s key themes. Like Calel, Mohebbi says fellow Carnegie

International artist Tishan Hsu also acted as a driving force by pointing out how the pandemic played into the questions surrounding Is it morning for you yet?, including how “access to vaccine information and health care” differed in communities around the world. Mohebbi, who previously worked at REDCAT and Hammer Museum in Los Angeles and the Queens Museum in New York, admits that the Carnegie International marks the largest project he has ever undertaken, and he has already been applauded by publications like Artforum for being what they call “the first Western Asian person to helm the contemporary art survey in its 124-year history.”

CARNEGIE 58THINTERNATIONAL

Sat., Sept. 24-April 2, 2023. Carnegie Museum of Art. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Included with museum admission. cmoa.org

The show also allowed Mohebbi to return to Pittsburgh, where he performed in 2008 as a musician with 127, a group described in the Carnegie Museum of Pittsburgh magazine as mixing punk, dance, jazz, and Iranian music. “I have old friends in Pittsburgh,” says Mohebbi. “So it was a beautiful moment for me to be back here and to reconnect.” •

Follow a&e editor Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPTEMBER 21 - 28, 2022

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To read the complete investigation, visit spotlightpa.org/unimpaired.

WEED

WEED AT WORK

SPOTLIGHT PA ILLUSTRATIONS: LEISE HOOK

Vague legal protections in Pennsylvania's medical marijuana law force some workers to choose between their job and a doctorapproved drug.

Pa. law protects workers who are approved for medical marijuana — but once they use it, it’s a different story. BY ED MAHON OF SPOTLIGHT PA // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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AGUE LEGAL SAFEGUARDS for medical marijuana users in Pennsylvania are forcing patients to choose between their job and a drug they say has changed their life, and leaving skittish employers vulnerable to lawsuits, according to a three-month Spotlight PA investigation. While state law protects workers from being fired or denied a job just for having a doctor’s permission to use marijuana, those protections become opaque when people actually take the drug — regardless of whether they do it in their personal time. “It essentially makes no sense,” Pittsburgh attorney John McCreary Jr., who represents employers, told Spotlight PA. Some jobs are specifically regulated by state and federal drug testing rules, but

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most fall into a gray area that leaves the interpretation of the rules up to employers and the courts. That leads to inconsistency and what employers see as a lose-lose scenario: Either risk a wrongful termination suit, or potentially allow an unsafe work environment. Despite widespread demands for clarity from businesses, cannabis advocates, attorneys, and at least one judge, the legislature and governor have so far failed to explicitly outline the rights of scores of workers and employers. A review of more than a dozen state and federal lawsuits by Spotlight PA highlights the law’s ambiguity, showing the ramifications faced by legal marijuana users. Among them: A worker at a Northumberland County distribution center was sent home and

demoted after his medical marijuana card fell out of his wallet at work, his attorneys claimed in a lawsuit. They said the demotion came with a nearly 50% pay cut, leaving him no choice but to quit. A worker from Mifflin County lost his job directing traffic after he asked for information on his company’s medical marijuana policy, a conversation in which he voluntarily revealed that he used the drug outside of work. That led the company’s president to flag his marijuana use as a “public safety issue” and issue him an ultimatum: pass a drug test or lose his job. An Allentown company fired a warehouse worker after he tested positive for marijuana use. The company then filed a lawsuit to challenge the fired worker’s ability to collect unemployment benefits. “ Taxpaying medical marijuana

cardholders are finding really no safe harbor on the job, which should be guaranteed under existing Pennsylvania law,” Todd Eachus, a member of the pro-cannabis legalization group Perfectly Normal, told lawmakers last year. For the more than 400,000 medical marijuana patients in the state, the stakes are high. Losing a job over a positive drug test can put unemployment benefits at risk. It’s expensive and time-consuming to fight these cases in court — and the outcome is uncertain. The lack of clarity is frustrating for employers too. More than 30 employer groups, including the Pennsylvania Chamber of Business and Industry, have urged the legislature to provide clear guidance on marijuana and workplace safety issues.


“Employers in general are not opposed to medical marijuana,” Alex Halper, director of government affairs for the chamber, told Spotlight PA. “They just want to know what the rules are when they’re hiring for safety-sensitive positions.” The safety question is a complex one. Marijuana can impair a person’s judgment, coordination, and balance, according to a report from the National Institute on Drug Abuse. But multiple studies show that commonly used urine drug screens might indicate that someone used marijuana days or weeks ago. The tests don’t tell you whether an employee was impaired at work. When Pennsylvania lawmakers successfully passed a medical marijuana bill in 2016, they set specific blood limits for users working in a few jobs: ones that require people to operate certain chemicals, high-voltage electricity, or any other public utility. But restrictions on other workers — such as those working at heights or in confined spaces — are more vague. The law also allows employers to prevent workers “from performing any duty which could result in a public health or safety risk while under the influence of medical marijuana,” a provision that can be interpreted many ways. And while the law states that employers can’t discriminate against an employee “solely on the basis of such employee’s status as an individual who is certified to use medical marijuana,” Spotlight PA has found that protection has significant limits. Pennsylvania’s law doesn’t specifically address the rights of patients to use the

drug when they aren’t at work, and unlike some other states, it doesn’t include protections for them if they fail a drug test but are not impaired. “[The law] kind of gives with one hand and takes it away with the other hand,” said Judith Cassel, a Harrisburg attorney who specializes in cannabis issues. “So employers and employees are both left with a lot of ambiguity.” Some places have found a way to reduce uncertainty. Pittsburgh’s firefighters union worked out a deal with city officials that protects medical marijuana cardholders who use the drug off duty. 331661_4.75_x_4.75.indd In Philadelphia, elected officials passed a ban on pre-employment marijuana screenings for many jobs. And some states offer stronger protections. Laws in Arizona, Minnesota, and Delaware, for instance, say employers can’t discriminate against patients based solely on a positive drug test for marijuana metabolites or components. But so far, Pennsylvania lawmakers haven’t done the same, and attempts to change protections have run into obstacles. The Pennsylvania Supreme Court also has not issued an opinion that specifically clarifies protections for workers. Businesses don’t want to have to guess which positions are appropriate for medical marijuana patients and which ones are off limits, said McCreary, the Pittsburgh attorney who has represented employers in these disputes. “They took what was a bright line rule … and they completely muddied it up in a way that nobody can really make any sense out of,” McCreary said of lawmakers. •

Spotlight PA is an independent, nonpartisan newsroom powered by The Philadelphia Inquirer in partnership with PennLive/The Patriot-News, TribLIVE/Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, and WITF Public Media. Sign up for our free newsletters.

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CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

Denise Zellous, director of Zellous Hope

BLACK-LED SPOTLIGHT

THE SURVIVOR BY KAHMEELA ADAMS // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ENISE ZELLOUS IS A SURVIVOR, there’s no doubt about it. She has survived abuse, drug addiction, incarceration, and homelessness. Now, 22 years after a surprise chance helped turn her life around in 2000, she says she has made sure not to waste a single moment, making it her mission to help others. “The magistrate said he wanted to give me an opportunity to make a different choice,” Zellous recalls of her lifechanging event. “He was going to dismiss my case … and give me an opportunity to get clean.” The stigma of drug addiction and homelessness can be difficult to overcome, and some people never get a

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chance to see the other side. It’s for that reason Zellous doesn’t mind retelling her story of trauma to anyone who asks, seeing it as “sending a message of hope for somebody else.” After getting clean and finding personal stability, Zellous formed the Hope Project in 2011. But having lived a life full of tribulations is just a part of what makes Zellous suited for the crusade she has taken on. Starting as a grassroots community project, the Hope Project was created at the place she once found refuge and recovery, local nonprofit Bethlehem Haven, which cares for homeless individuals and leads them towards

self-sufficiency. Working with the organization’s transitional living program, her project focused on providing 19 homeless women with basic necessities to help get them back on their feet.

ZELLOUS HOPE

412-722-6611 or zelloushope.com

This all came to Zellous as a result of her own experience transitioning from homelessness. “When I got my children back after 11 months of recovery and getting my own place, I had forgotten to buy towels and washcloths,” she says. “I felt so defeated that I wanted to use again.”

Not wanting anyone else to have that same moment of despair, Zellous formed a plan. The Hope Project would supply household essentials like kitchen and bathroom necessities, bedding, and cleaning supplies. These may seem like small things to most of us, but they help to make a home comfortable and to make a person feel human. In 2013, the Hope Project grew into the nonprofit Zellous Hope Project. While a lot of people would call what Zellous does “giving back to her community,” Zellous is also making sure to build a strong community as well. The assistance provided by the Zellous Hope Project, an all-volunteer organization, doesn’t stop


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at pots and pans. They supply transportation for those in need and pay for driver’s licenses, clothing, and vehicle repairs. They make sure to connect people with the resources that they may not know already exist. Zellous, who’s been honored with multiple awards, including the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Jefferson Award, the Pittsburgh Dress for Success Women Rock Award, and a 2013 City of Pittsburgh proclamation, keeps an open dialogue with community members by asking what they need.

Headquartered in McKees Rocks, Zellous Hope also finds some benefit in socializing, hosting an annual formal affair that gives people a chance to dress up, as well as a Christmas party where every child in attendance gets a gift. Building and keeping deep relationships is an important part of the job that Zellous doesn’t take for granted. “Communication is, like, my superpower,” Zellous chuckles. “It’s easy for me to relate to people. Not too much I haven’t been through or done.” It’s the ability to relate to the struggle

“There was a time I thought I was going to die out there on those streets because nobody related to me.” “We realize that, without the input of the people that we are serving, we are only giving out cookie-cutter approaches,” she says. Today, the Zellous Hope Project serves hundreds of individuals and families throughout Allegheny County. In the spirit of community, they also collaborate with other organizations and programs to further help meet the needs of those it serves. Zellous can be seen on the organization’s YouTube channel having discussions with community members and leaders on her show, Things To Know. “I give a report on what events are happening in the neighborhood or what’s being discussed on the news,” she says.

that helped her in her own recovery. Zellous found it difficult to talk to counselors and others who hadn’t walked in her footsteps. “There was a time I thought I was going to die out there on those streets because nobody related to me.” She says she found her saving grace at Bethlehem Haven, which has counselors who know firsthand the pain of getting one’s life back on track. She became a certified peer specialist and received national credentials in family development. Having based the structure of Zellous Hope Project on her own lived experiences, she has found what works: empathy. “Empathy turns into hope,” she says, “and that ripple effect just keeps growing.” •

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CP ILLUSTRATION: LUCY CHEN

VIEWS

"SAFE" SPACES

BY TERENEH IDIA CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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H

OW MANY TIMES have you been in a room and been asked, “Is this a safe space?” Or been told that the space you are in is, in fact, safe. Now, how many times was that space actually safe for you? “Is this a safe space?” is beginning to feel more like a call for the troll patrol to gather than to provide care. “This is a safe space!” A declaration I have heard all too often, but rarely proven true. In fact, these are often the spaces, even if — especially if — they include colleagues, friends, and family members who create an unsafe environ-

ment by expecting you to leave some of yourself out. “Safe” and “safety,” like “love” and “loving,” are defined through so many parameters and social mores. But, more often than not, our public way of showing and providing safety and love depends on the things we decide are valuable, and depends on the people we think are worth keeping safe. A quick trip through the neighborhoods of the city of Pittsburgh will show you whom we really value. I, for one, remember what it was like to go from being a child in Manchester to

visiting the home of a friend in Shadyside. It was not the homes, if I am being honest. The homes in Manchester are some of the most beautiful in the city. It was everything around the homes that let me know that my friends, neighbors, family, and I weren’t considered important enough for nice streets, sidewalks, and a clear, safe, and loving passage to the places we wanted to go. “This is a safe space!” A declaration that I have heard all too often, but rarely with a follow-up as to how this safe space is being provided, what it looks like, or what one is to do if they do not, in fact, feel safe.


On the first day of an artist retreat and gathering before COVID times, we began with what I thought was a promising discussion: “What thing or things would make this space unsafe to you?”

moving. As we do. A year or so later, the head of the organization emailed me. “I am so sorry I finally understand what you were saying.” All I could do is say, “Thank you. I have

And if our safe space is breached, we’re told it’s because of something we’ve done. That we deserve our precarious position, especially when we challenge or question the white patriarchal capitalism we're all swimming in. Safe spaces are created when we provide the most for the least safe among us. But the way we live and suffer now are because the policies have been shaped by those who benefit the most from the injustice. Or from those low-income, disabled, Black, Brown, women, and queer folks who support the injustice with the hope of trickle-down benefits. Spoiler alert: those “benefits” aren’t coming. When you continue to harm the most in the name of safety for the few, you are saying very clearly, “Actually, we like it this way. We like that people are in constant trauma due to state violence. We want to perpetuate that in this office, this museum, this school, this organization, on this block, in this city, in this home, in our hearts and minds, yes, we love this unsafe space.” And then you publicly say, “This is a safe space!” •

How many of them actually provide safety? And to whom? I expressed that, as the only Black artist there, I was concerned that anti-Blackness would impact me either from the artists, the staff, or from people who would come to see our work. That first day, folks nodded in agreement and understanding, convinced, like so many non-Black folks, that they were, in fact, not one ounce a racist. Well, of course, slowly, surely, the anti-Blackness came out — once, twice, three times, more. When I presented my concerns, reminding folks of my earlier comments about what would make this experience unsafe for me, well, then came the white tears. I, of course, finished the residency, did the work, and kept on

been waiting so long for you to say it.” This, of course, did not improve the experience I already had. But maybe, just maybe, it would be better for the next Black artist. “This is a safe space!” There are whole entire organizations and elements of society who even have “safety” in their name. How many of them actually provide safety? And to whom? Because, you see, too many of us — low-income, disabled, Black, Brown, women, queer; basically, anyone whose presence as a lead in a Marvel or Disney production would bring out the troll patrol — are not deemed worthy of being safe. Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @TerenehIdia

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PHOTO: COURTESY OF COUCIL OF THREE RIVERS AMERICAN INDIAN CENTER

2021 Pow Wow hosted by Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center

EVENT

OH (POW) WOW! BY LUCY CHEN // LUCYCHEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE COUNCIL OF THREE RIVERS American Indian Center has been hosting a pow wow in the greater Pittsburgh area for years, celebrating their culture and inspiring younger generations. What started out as a small gathering of local people has now expanded to almost 2,000 yearly attendees after a dance contest was added about 12 years ago to pull in a larger crowd, according to Krisa Spangler, a head judge at the pow wow. Traditionally, a pow wow is a sacred s o cia l ga th e ri n g b e twe e n Na t ive American tribes to form alliances, conference together, and share their culture. The first recorded pow wows are from the late 1800s. Contemporary pow wows are now usually public events to dance, sing, and recognize Native American cultures. They often include dance contests and happen all over the country. “Pow wows for us are like a gathering of friends and family,” says Pittsburghnative Michael Simms, who has been the pow wow coordinator for the past 12 years. “We come together from all different tribes and share our dances and songs.”

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Simms says he started pow wowing when he was a month-and-a-half old and still pow wows to this day. Both Simms and Spangler say they travel every year for the pow wows in the summer and fall. “Yup, we got on a plane and went to a pow wow,” says Simms about a pow wow they went to in Florida.

COUNCIL OF THREE RIVERS 43RD ANNUAL POW WOW Sat., Sept 24-Sun., Sept 25. Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center. 120 Charles St., Dorseyville. cotraic.org/pow-wow

This year, the pow wow will be held from Sat., Sept. 24 to Sun., Sept 25 at the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center. At the pow wow, you’ll get to experience the dance competition as well as food and market vendors from both locally and as far away as Canada. They sell handcrafted items, clothing, and jewelry as well as food booths, featuring traditional Native American food like Buffalo burgers, fry bread, and chili. At the COTRAIC pow wow, there will


be an all-ages contest in different dance categories from seniors to those younger than six years old. “I love watching our youth come out and participate in their culture,” says Spangler. “Growing up with that culture, I think it’s really important to praise our youth that want to continue the tradition.” Simms says that COTRAIC’s pow wow is one of the last held in the year for Western Pennsylvania, which means a number of different people and tribes come to visit and compete. “It’s nice to see our pow wow thriving. We’ve built this pow wow to where dancers and tribes come from all over to visit,” Simms says, adding that they’ve even pulled dancers all the way from Ontario, Canada.

Head Start programs, which help lowincome children through classrooms, education centers, and their partners of local childcare places. Spangler says she’s recently been working with their Speakers Bureau, as well as at local universities like the University of Pittsburgh and Carnegie Mellon University, to talk about Native American culture. Spangler and Simms shared some tips with Pittsburgh City Paper for firsttime visitors to the pow wow. Spangler says, “Just come and enjoy yourself.” There will be an emcee who will lead the pow wow and inform the audience on what’s being performed or who can join in. She says that is definitely a familyfriendly event and not to be afraid to ask questions and engage in conversation

“Growing up with that culture, I think it’s really important to praise our youth that want to continue the tradition.” “I love to watch the dance competitions,” says Spangler. “It’s unique, even if you don’t know what you are looking for.” She says the regalias, the outfits worn by dancers, are all individualized for that specific person and what they like. Besides the pow wow, the Council of Three Rivers American Indian Center provides for those in the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan area and hopes to promote the socio-economic development of the Native American community and others who experience similar types of economic difficulties. Founded in 1969, they host many different programs, the largest being their Head Start and Early

with vendors, dancers, singers, and other participants. Simms suggests that if you come out, try to stay as long as you can because so many different things happen throughout the day. “We start out with some intertribal dancing.” This is dancing where everyone is invited to join in. After that, stay to watch the kids’ contest in the afternoon, and the adults’ contest in the evening. And more contesting happens on Sunday though they wrap up earlier in the day. “It’s a great experience to experience the tip of another culture,” Spangler says, “through dance, food, and music.” • PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPTEMBER 21 - 28, 2022

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PHOTO: SHERVIN LAINEZ

Brooke Annibale

MUSIC

SONG SPOTLIGHTS BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

ALL (PUN VERY MUCH INTENDED) in love with these new-ish local music releases.

Brooke Annibale — “Be Around”

Ahead of her new album Better By Now, set to drop Fri., Sept. 30, local folk singer Brooke Annibale recently shared the LP’s final single “Be Around,” a hazy indie-pop tune that follows “What if You,” “5 AM,” and the title track, “Better By Now.” The four songs preview the new sonic direction Annibale is heading, one that’s more popleaning than ever before, and one which she describes as a “spectrum of emotions.” “The album is basically half about falling in love and half about mental health,” she says. “Be Around,” for example, uses a simpler thematic approach and pop sensibilities to create a swelling, captivating tune. Annibale adds more layers of sound that swirl together as the song progresses and carries you away on its cloud of synths, keys, guitar, and airy vocals.

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Zack Keim — “Canyon”

the little things in life, and try, if we can, to become less jaded and bogged down by unnecessary pressures. “‘Into the Sun’ is set within the parameters of the harsh realities that we have imposed upon ourselves, those which we all face the consequences of, whether or not choose to believe in them,” Ross told Afro Punk when the single premiered earlier this year. “As we all collectively fall ‘Into the Sun,’ the song serves to remind us to shrug off the trivial and find moments to enjoy the beauty around us. And in such times looking towards and learning from elements around us that have stood the test of time.”

Fall may be right around the corner, but “Canyon” by Zack Keim is a tune that will have you rolling down the windows, turning the volume all the way up, and reveling in bright, light-filled days. Apparently, the ear-worm-inducing hook where Keim sings “Cannn-yooon” was born while he was making food deliveries in Washington, D.C. “I was delivering Uber Eats, and I wrote that on my phone — just a voice memo,” Keim says. The bubbly pop tune is sunshine in a bottle, as infectious as it is upbeat. If an impromptu road trip happens after listening to “Canyon,” I don’t blame you …

Recommended Throwback:

Notorious Bastards — “Get Loose II”

Jack Swing — “Into the Sun”

OK, throwback might not be the right word. “Get Loose II” is from Notorious Bastards’ 2020 LP Trifecta. But the track feels like it time hopped out of the ’90s hip-hop era and made a baby with Run the Jewels. •

“I’m tired / The kid inside me is getting old,” lead vocalist Isaiah Ross sings in Jack Swing’s latest release. The buoyant rock song reminds us to find pleasure in

Follow featured contributor Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPTEMBER 21 - 28, 2022

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SATURDAY

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MARKET PAPER STAGE SATURDAY

SEPTEMBER 24

MUSIC

MIKE'S SOULSHOW ALBUM PICKS Remembering Philip Price BY MIKE CANTON CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HIS MONTH’S COLUMN departs from the regular theme. I’m paying tribute to Philip Price, affectionately known as “Flip,” bassist for Pittsburgh’s great Bill Henry Band. Philip suffered fatal injuries from a Wilkinsburg motorcycle accident last week. We are a close musical family here in the Pittsburgh area, and many people knew Flip. He was a gentle giant who mentored younger musicians like Brandon Terry of Funky Fly Project.

Having worked with a number of groups around the city, Mr. Price contributed to the well-deserved trajectory of the Bill Henry Band. I was fortunate to interview all four members of the band right after their freshman album’s release. When you hear the excerpts at soulshowmike.org, the booming voice is Flip’s. Bill Henry Band will play the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust’s Gallery Crawl on Fri., Sept. 23. Come out, pay homage, and help soothe the band when they need it most.

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PHOTO: MIKE CANTON

The late Philip Price of the Bill Henry Band

Back to The Soul Show: In another time, The Soul Show would have honored Philip Price during the Three Rivers at Three segment. I’d like to thank my listeners for all of the support and patience through the post-WYEP platform changes. Some things change,

and some stay the same. What’s different is that The Soul Show’s national audience will get to know our friend: On-demand at soulshowmike.org, Thu., Sept. 22, and streaming at WTJX.org, Sat., Sept. 24 at 7 p.m. (Other stations are listed at soulshowmike.org.)

Mike Canton is the longtime host and producer of The Soul Show, which now airs in five markets and is produced in his Electric Basement Studios. Canton is also a Pittsburgh-area voice artist.


PHOTO: PITTSBURGH PARKS CONSERVANCY

Frick Environmental Center

ART

DESIGNING PITTSBURGH BY JORDANA ROSENFELD // JORDANA@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ITTSBURGH IS getting a new event celebrating the city’s unique architecture. The inaugural Pittsburgh Architecture Week, hosted by AIA Pittsburgh, the local chapter of the American Institute of Architects, and the Pittsburgh Architecture Foundation, will take place from Mon., Sept. 26 to Mon., Oct. 2. Organizers say they plan for it to be “a yearly public celebration to increase awareness and appreciation of architectural design while fostering the recognition of the vital role design plays in our community and in our daily lives,” according to a press release. The week-long event will feature 16 programs produced in collaboration with 14 partner organizations, including Preservation Pittsburgh, Assemble, and

the Urban Land Institute, and includes family and kid-friendly activities. “Other cities celebrate the power and excellence of design, and I thought, 'Why not Pittsburgh?'” says Michelle Fanzo, executive director of AIA Pittsburgh and the Pittsburgh Architecture Foundation. “Pittsburgh has a breadth and quality of architecture found in few U.S. cities — from the Fort Pitt Block House to cutting-edge living buildings like the Frick Environmental Center to innovative adaptive reuse like MuseumLab,” Fanzo says in the release. “We want to develop a culture in our region that values design excellence in everyday life like you see in Chicago and Los Angeles.” Fanzo tells Pittsburgh City Paper that she hopes the week will create space for

“a conversation in our city about what design excellence means to people.” This conversation is vital, Fanzo says, because “we haven't had a lot of discussion about architecture or the built environment, while so much change in our built environment is going on [in Pittsburgh].”

PITTSBURGH ARCHITECTURE WEEK

Sept. 26 - Oct. 2. Free. aiapgh.org/ aia-programs-events/announcingpittsburgh-architecture-week-2022

“Buildings and the design of interior spaces and public spaces physically, emotionally, and psychologically have an impact on human beings,” she says. The line-up of Architecture Week

programs, including an already sold-out talk by an MIT professor of planning and urban studies titled “If Cities Were Built By Women,” will explore the impact of architecture on the human experience. Festivities will also include the annual Design Pittsburgh awards presentation, featuring the reveal of the People’s Choice Award winners. Individuals are invited to vote for their favorite architectural projects to win a People’s Choice Award until Mon., Sept. 26 at 11:59 p.m. Fanzo says that she hopes one day people will think of appreciating the city’s architecture alongside cheering for our sports teams, eating Primanti Brothers sandwiches, and roaming our unique topography as an essential Pittsburgh activity. •

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPTEMBER 21 - 28, 2022

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IRL / IN REAL LIFE EVENT VIRTUAL / STREAMING OR ONLINE-ONLY EVENT HYBRID / MIX OF IN REAL LIFE AND ONLINE EVENT

SEVEN DAYS IN PITTSBURGH

SUN., SEPT. 25

PHOTO: AMANDA KING

^ Bitchcraft at David L. Lawrence Convention Center

THU., SEPT. 22 CLIMATE • IRL

Hear from local and national leaders on environmental, racial, and climate justice issues when Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens presents the Clean Energy Justice Roundtable. Presented as part of a larger, multi-day event that includes tours, kayaking, and more, the conversation will cover what a clean energy future looks like for future generations, inviting panelists ranging from Indigenous elders representing the Pacific Northwest to advocates from rural Appalachia and the Gulf South. 6 p.m. Reception at 5:30 p.m. 1 Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. Registration required. cleanenergyjustice.com/events

SPORTS • IRL

Cozy Pittsburgh bar and venue Bottlerocket Social Hall is hosting the Thursday night Steelers vs. Browns game so you don’t have to. Come out for the Super 70s Stillers Party, an eclectic night that promises an old-school

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experience so that you can “watch ’em like your daddy did!” Expect live polka music at halftime, games during commercial breaks, and a potluck-style buffet that even your old man would approve of. 7-10 p.m. 1226 Arlington Ave., Allentown. Free. Extra charge for buffet. bottlerocketpgh.com

FRI., SEPT. 23 DANCE • IRL

Celebrate two new works by Texture Contemporary Ballet founder and artistic director Alan Obuzor when the company presents Momentum at the New Hazlett Theater. “Flow” will explore the ebb, flow, and beauty of movement, while the high-energy “B.E.P” will be set to the music of the Black Eyed Peas. Favorites like “Another Story,” “Ding,” “Hollowed,” and “Still From Italy” will also return to the stage. A special children’s performance is suggested for those 10 and under, but all are welcome. 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Sept. 25. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $20-30. textureballet.org

MUSIC • IRL

Marjani Forté-Saunders and Everett Saunders of 7NMS — a collaboration described as a “revolutionary commitment to the Black radical imagination” — take the stage at Kelly Strayhorn Theater for the premiere of PROPHET: The Order of the Lyricist. By combining visuals and a multi-channel audio installation with live dance and vocal performances, the show sets out to illuminate the “distinctive practices, systems, philosophies, and political ideologies” that have shaped hiphop emcees. 8 p.m. Continues on Sat., Sept. 24. 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay What Moves You $15-35. kelly-strayhorn.org

ART • IRL

More than 15 art galleries will open their doors for the latest installment of the Gallery Crawl in the Downtown Cultural District. Make an evening out of it with a plethora of new exhibitions at galleries like SPACE and 707, and outdoor art installations such as the Umbrella Sky Project at Trust Oasis. Don’t want the night to end? Dance to the beat in your head at a

silent disco from 10 p.m. to midnight at the Backyard. 5:30-10 p.m. Various locations, Downtown. Free. crawl.trustarts.org

SAT., SEPT. 24 STAGE • IRL

Pull up a chair for a play on restorative justice and the healing power of food. City Theatre presents Clyde’s, a Tony-nominated performance by Lynn Nottage that tells the story of a truck stop kitchen staff in a small Pennsylvania town. Comprised of formerly incarcerated people, the staff comes together to learn about life and how to make the perfect sandwich. “The unique, Pennsylvanian themes of this play will surely resonate with a Pittsburgh audience,” says director Monteze Freeland in a press release. 5:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Oct. 16. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $20-32. citytheatrecompany.org/play/clydes

EVENT • IRL

Join the Pittsburgh Chinese Cultural Center for a day of Asian cuisine, performances, and


PHOTO: MARK SIMPSON

Texture Contemporary Ballet's Momentum at New Hazlett Theater

FRI., SEPT. 23

art. Taking place in Mellon Park, the Pittsburgh Chinese Cultural Festival helps further the Center’s mission of promoting awareness of Chinese culture and immigrant communities in Pittsburgh. Included in the festivities are traditional musical and dance performances, food from the city’s best Chinese restaurants, handcrafted items, and more. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 6518 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. pghccc.org

SUN., SEPT. 25 MARKET • IRL

Spooky season is upon us, as proven by Bitchcraft Fair, an “annual celebration of makers, mystics, and the magick of the community” coming to the David L. Lawrence Convention Center. Browse a marketplace filled with rare oddities from local artists, get a tarot card reading, and connect with fellow mystics at meet-and-greets. Don’t be scared off — kids under 10 get in for free, and adults can enjoy witch-themed cocktails at the bar. 12-6 p.m. 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd, Downtown. $15. bitchcraftfair.com

MUSIC • IRL

Experience two drastically different depictions of romance with Symphonie Fantastique at Heinz Hall. Symphonie Fantastique illustrates 19th-century French composer Hector Berlioz’s obsession with a woman he only saw once from afar, leading to his opium-inspired composition of festive balls and dancing witches. The evening also includes the Pittsburgh premiere of A New Day, a piece about composer Joan Towers’ final chapter with her older husband. 2:30 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-98. pittsburghsymphony.org/production

LIT • IRL

Local authors will gather at Riverstone Books to celebrate The Long Way Home, a new release from Tom Montgomery Fate. The travel memoir follows Fate as he journeys to various locations around the globe, from canoeing in Canada to teaching English in a Filipino village. Joining Fate are Chatham University writing faculty members Sheila Squillante and Marc Nieson, and Mexican-Colombian writer, critic, and performance poet Adriana E. Ramírez. 5 p.m. 5841 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. RSVP required. riverstonebookstore.com

MON., SEPT 26 LGBTQ • IRL

B-I-N-G-Oh my! The euphemisms are on fire on the Facebook page for Bad Boy Bingo, which promises a chance to win “a huge load … of money.” The weekly event at local gay bar Brewer’s Bar features “resident bad boy” JW of male revenue J.W.’s Playhouse “pulling his balls” as patrons compete to win a cash drawing. No need to bring your own dauber, but lucky charms are all you. 7:30 p.m. 3315 Liberty Ave., Lawrenceville. $10 for 10 games. facebook.com/brewersbarpgh

TUE., SEPT. 27 LIT • IRL

Mystery Lovers Bookshop presents Amazing Women of Arlington: Lives of Adventure, Bravery, Fame and Sacrifice by first-time author Donna Brand. The book chronicles the lives of notable women buried in Arlington National Cemetery. The first person to ever be buried in Arlington was a woman, and she is accompanied by Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Jacqueline Kennedy, and Helen Taft, as well as astronauts, spies, and famous actresses. Interested readers can purchase a copy through the bookshop ahead of the event. 7 p.m. 514 Allegheny River Blvd., Oakmont. Free. mysterylovers.com/event

WED. , SEPT 28 TALK • HYBRID

By the time Mieczyslaw “Melvin” Goldman emigrated to Pittsburgh from Poland in 1950, he had already suffered devastating losses at the hands of the Third Reich. Despite this, he managed to build a life as a successful jeweler in Squirrel Hill and raise a family. His daughter, Lee Kikel, honored her father with the book Perseverance: One Holocaust Survivor’s Journey from Poland to America. Hear more about her father’s inspiring life when the Holocaust Center of Pittsburgh and Chatham University welcome Kikel as part of the Generations Speaker Series. 6:30 p.m. Woodland Road, Shadyside. Free. Registration required. hcofpgh.org/events

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPTEMBER 21 - 28, 2022 PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MARCH 14-21, 2018

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