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Medical Marijuana Available for Anxiety

PITTSBURGH’S

Professionals have high hopes for new treatment in PA By Terpy Strain

BEST DISPENSARY

Do you suffer from anxiety?

Medical marijuana is now available as a treatment option for patients in Pennsylvania. Since it became an approved condition July 20, many are already seeking anxiety relief with this new plant-based choice also known as cannabis. “Anxiety is one of the only approved conditions that most can relate,” says Chris Kohan, co-founder of The Healing Center, the Pittsburgh area’s premier dispensary group. “We have all had anxiety at some point in our lives.” he says. “There is no doubt that cannabis can help treat anxiety, but it may take a little trial and error. The important part is to consult with your medical professional at the dispensary to determine proper strain, delivery method and dosage to start. Be diligent and record your results in a journal and you will soon find your personal, sweet spot.”

DOCTOR SAYS RESULTS WITH PTSD SHOW GREAT POTENTIAL FOR ANXIETY Dr. Bryan Doner, co-founder of Compassionate Certification Centers says, “I feel that the addition of anxiety to the qualifying conditions in Pennsylvania’s Medical Marijuana Program has the potential to help a tremendous amount of patients.” The five major types of anxiety disorders are Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), Panic Disorder, Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Social Phobia (or Social Anxiety Disorder). PTSD has been an approved condition since

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“There is no doubt that cannabis can help treat anxiety, but it may take a little trial and error.” — Chris Kohan, The Healing Center

plant which also communicates with receptors.

THE HEALING CENTER MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY the program was implemented. “We have already seen wonderful clinical results with so many PTSD patients and the anxiety component of their disorder,” Doner says. “This will also help provide a focus on medical cannabis research in the area of anxiety, which is a common symptom of so many disease entities.”

PHARMACIST BELIEVES CANNABIS MAY REPLACE ANXIETY MEDICINES Dr. Michael S. Butler, Pharmacist and General Manager at The Healing Center sees a lot of

potential for patients to find relief without the use of pharmaceuticals that have been traditionally prescribed before cannabis became an option for them. “I believe that high CBD forms of medical marijuana have the potential to replace the majority of benzodiazepine drugs prescribed for anxiety in the U.S. within the next 10 years. It is that effective” CBD is short for cannabidiol, an active ingredient found in the cannabis plant that communicates with receptors in the human body. THC is short for tetrahydrocannabinol, the psycho-active ingredient of the

AUTHOR SAYS A BALANCE OF CBD AND THC IS KEY

Nikki Furrer, author of A Woman’s Guide to Cannabis says, “It is wonderful to see anxiety added to the Pennsylvania qualifying conditions list.” “Small doses of cannabis can really improve our quality of life, and reducing anxiety is a great example of that.” In her book she writes about the importance of talking to your doctor and finding the right dose. If you suffer from anxiety and are interested in medical marijuana, the first step is to talk to a medical professional.

PITTSBURGH’S BEST DISPENSARY

thehealingcenterusa.com


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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FIRSTSHOT

BY JARED WICKERHAM

650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.685.9009 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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SEPT. 11-18, 2019 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 37 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Editorial Designer ABBIE ADAMS Graphic Designers JOSIE NORTON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Events and Sponsorship Manager BLAKE LEWIS Senior Account Executive JOHN CLIFFORD Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Events and Marketing Coordinator BRYER BLUMENSCHEIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, LISSA BRENNAN, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, CHARLES ROSENBLUM, JESSIE SAGE Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

Bicyclists ride by “The Village,” a public art installation by Njaimeh Njie, on the steps of the Hill House Kauffman Center in the Hill District.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2019 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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.NEWS.

FRACKING, EARTHQUAKES,

CP PHOTO: ABBIE ADAMS

AND PITTSBURGH BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

HEN A 5.8 MAGNITUDE EARTHQUAKE hit northern Virginia in 2011, the Pittsburgh area felt the tremors. It shook not only some Pittsburgh buildings, but some residents’ psyches. As far as many were concerned, earthquakes didn’t seem like something that could happen in Pittsburgh. And while naturally occurring earthquakes in the United States are rare outside of the West Coast and Pacific states like Hawaii and Alaska, there are other kinds of earthquakes, referred to as “induced seismicity,” that regions far from fault lines are susceptible to. Induced earthquakes refer to seismic activity caused by human activity, such as natural-gas drilling (“fracking”). Shaking can result from the process of expelling high-pressure liquid deep into the earth’s surface. These fracking-induced earthquakes have been documented in Oklahoma and Ohio. The Pittsburgh area has experienced a high volume of fracking over the last several years, but has yet to experience any major fracking-induced earthquakes. And natural-gas drilling could likely increase thanks to the creation of the cracker plant in Beaver County, which will refine the gas extracted by fracking wells. With natural earthquakes a rare possibility and a likely growing increase in fracking, what are the chances of Pittsburgh experiencing more tremors in the future? Thomas Pratt, a research geophysicist at the United States Geological Survey, says it is difficult to determine since the Pittsburgh region hasn’t been extensively studied, tectonically speaking. However, he says geologists don’t tend to rule things out. “I [shouldn’t] say you should never be concerned about earthquakes,” says Pratt. But, of what has been studied, the Pittsburgh region has an extremely low probability of damaging seismic activity from natural causes. According to a 2014 USGS map, the area around Pittsburgh is expected to get less than two damaging earthquakes

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in 10,000 years. For comparison, coastal sections of California are expected to get more than 250 damaging earthquakes in that time span and even Northeastern Ohio is expected to get between four and 10. Pratt says the East Tennessee seismic zone — about 300 or so miles south of Pittsburgh — is relatively active, as far as eastern U.S. seismic zones go. It has the potential to produce an earthquake with a magnitude near 7.0, but that has never been recorded. As for the Appalachian Mountains seismic potential, Pratt says it is still mainly a mystery to geologists. In fact, the mountains themselves are generally a mystery to experts, so their seismology is even harder to determine. “[Earthquakes] are likely related when you have an active mountain belt. That’s the tectonic process that creates the mountains,” says Pratt. “The Appalachian Mountains are a bit of mystery because they actually should

have eroded away by now.” But now that natural-gas drilling is booming in the area, what about fracking-induced earthquakes? Fracking has been known to cause minor earthquakes, and the disposing of the wastewater used to drill also likely causes shaking.

included.” Studies have shown fracking is likely the culprit of the earthquakes there, as Oklahoma had a major fracking boom in the mid-2010s. Concerns about fracking-induced earthquakes have spread to eastern Ohio since natural-gas drilling has increased there, but those concerns haven’t really

“I [SHOULDN’T] SAY YOU SHOULD NEVER BE CONCERNED ABOUT EARTHQUAKES.” Southwestern Pennsylvania has been extremely active in natural-gas drilling with thousands of wells drilled across the region over the years, especially concentrated in Washington and Greene counties. According to the 2014 USGS map, a large seismic zone sits over Oklahoma, but it is specified as an area “where suspected non-tectonic earthquakes are

surfaced in the Pittsburgh area. Pratt says an April earthquake in Northeastern Ohio wasn’t frackingrelated, but the USGS does believe areas east of there — where many fracking wells are located — are having frackingrelated seismic events. As for the Pittsburgh area, with its large quantity of fracking wells, Pratt says the lack of seismic activity induced

by natural-gas drilling could be the result of a number of factors. He says the types of rocks beneath the region are much older and much more solid than other areas. He says it could also be that in that area, fracking companies are using a different technique to cut down on potential earthquakes. “It may be different in the way the fracking is done or in the stress put into the crust, we just don’t know,” says Pratt. A request for comment from the Marcellus Shale Coalition, a Pennsylvania natural-gas consortium, went unreturned. Another possibility behind the lack of fracking-related earthquakes in the Pittsburgh area could be that Pennsylvania fracking companies ship most of their wastewater across the state border to Ohio, where there are less fracking-related regulations. Wastewater disposal is also linked to earthquakes, and with less of that happening in Pittsburgh, it could cut down on any potential shaking.

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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PHOTO: OFFICE OF REP. SARA INNAMORATO

Kenneth Aquiline

.PITTSBURGH FACES OF RECOVERY.

SOBRIETY THROUGH SELFLESSNESS BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

K

ENNETH AQUILINE doesn’t remember many of the times he had to be revived from a drug overdose, but he remembers the first. He recalls waking up in 2011 at his childhood home in Penn Hills, pinned to the ground in the front yard surrounded by paramedics and police officers. “I literally had no idea how I got there,” says Aquiline, who at the time

had recently returned home after serving for several years in the U.S. Marine Corps. “My first thought was that I had blacked out and went on a rampage. ... I’m like, ‘What happened?’... And [a police officer] was like, ‘You died, brother. ... You stopped breathing for a minute. We had to bring you back.’” Had a neighbor not seen him passed out in his front doorway, he believes he

almost certainly would have died. From there, he says, things went downhill fast. He had become addicted to alcohol and prescription pain medications to deal with a variety of emotional and physical pain stemming from what he calls a “violent” childhood and injuries suffered while he was deployed in the Middle East. When he was no longer able to

access pain medication, he found heroin. He overdosed a dozen or so times, including at his workplace. Sometimes he came back with a dose of NARCAN and was able to walk away. Other times required trips to the VA hospital. Then, in 2012, he was arrested for allegedly making terroristic threats against the police in what he says was a frustrated private Facebook message CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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BENEFITS:

September 21

NO BAD JUJU D N A T N E M A PONG TOURN SHIRT! E G E L L O C T S E B

FOOD, DRINKS & MUSIC UN TIL 11PM WALNUT STRE ET WILL SHUT DOWN AT 5PM NO PARKING ON WALNUT STREET DURING THE EVENT.

October 26 VELVEETA

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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SOBRIETY THROUGH SELFLESSNESS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

to his aunt. This was after a particularly bad time during which, among other things, he was stabbed by his brother and had to be hospitalized. Aquiline expressed remorse for his words and says the charges were withdrawn. These details of his life may seem surprising, considering that Aquiline now serves as an intern for Pennsylvania state Representative Sara Innamorato (D-Lawrenceville), who glowingly tweeted about him and his recovery on Aug. 27 during a harm-reduction event. He also works as the head of security at Spirit in Lawrenceville while pursuing a degree in political science at Duquesne University. Aquiline started his journey toward recovery in early 2017, but this came after years of avoiding treatment. Though he knew his drug use was killing him, he also feared withdrawal and the prospect of sobriety. “I literally couldn’t deal with life because I had so much trauma from growing up, to the military, to everything that happened after,” says Aquiline, adding that he suffered from posttraumatic stress disorder. “I couldn’t live one moment sober.” After attempting suicide twice in

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January 2017, he finally signed himself into the VA hospital with little more than a single bag of clothes and belongings. “I had nowhere to go,” says Aquiline. “I was homeless. I didn’t have any possessions to my name. Every day was filled with fear and anxiety and shame and guilt and depression.” Besides the recovery program at the VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System (he still attends meetings almost five days a week at the Oakland location and H.J.

Heinz campus), he attributes his recovery to his faith (a self-described Christian, he says he’s more spiritual than religious), the 12-step program, and the obligation to give back. “I had a lot of help along the way,” he says. “A lot of help from God, a lot of help from people, from organizations. A lot of help from the VA. By no means do I do this alone, and one of the greatest gifts of recovery is being able to give back.” He now has an apartment in

Wilkinsburg, where he has organized collection drives to donate clothes and toys to the neighborhood Free Store. While attending the Christ Community Fellowship church in Sarver, Pa., Aquiline volunteered for a mission to deliver feminine hygiene kits to Haiti, where he says women and girls often drop out of school because they lack access to basic necessities like menstrual pads and tampons. He’s also looking at ways to address issues that affect veterans like him, primarily homelessness and suicide. Inspired by the experience of his 2012 arrest, he has participated in talks with local police to help them better understand how to deal with veterans in crisis. He’s currently organizing a symposium taking place on Sun., Sept. 29 at Duquesne University, during which he says vulnerable veterans will be able to learn about available services at the local, state, federal, and nonprofit levels. Though the fear of relapse always looms, Aquiline says his faith and work with the community have been instrumental in keeping him sober. “Now I have an opportunity to make it better for people who are still sick and suffering,” says Aquiline. “It really couldn’t be any better.”


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FAILING EDUCATION BY TERENEH IDIA // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

Y SMALL HEAD and big eyes barely saw over the huge round wooden table. My five-year-old limbs could not reach the ground. They dangled off the floor, ungrounded, swinging, floating — looking in desperation for an anchor. But like my words, they were untethered and unmoored. I was in the library on Carson Street to give a book report as part of a summer reading program. I liked this book. I had selected it, checked it out, and read it to myself. I was excited to tell the librarian all about it. But that all changed when I was actually in front of her. I have both a shy and extroverted personality and it was shy Tereneh who showed up that day. I could not look up; I could not find the words to describe the book, to prove I understood. Here was a great time for the librarian to be patient and ask leading, open-ended questions. Instead, she snapped, “This book was too advanced for you; you should not have selected it.” Later, when I told my mother, she snapped, “You should have said you understood the book. Never let anyone intimidate you that way.” I am not sure if she admonished the librarian or just me, giving me some of the tough love that is supposed to make you stronger

in a country that hates Black children. That was the first time that I remember an adult who should have been my education advocate becoming a barrier, but it wasn’t the last. In elementary school, when we reached the one lesson on the transatlantic slave trade, our class was arbitrarily divided into two debating teams. One team had to defend slavery in the United States; the other team had to condemn it. Guess which team I was on? If you guessed the pro-slavery team, you are correct. When I told my dad, he said, “Well that is good, you need to learn how to debate all sides of an argument.” I cried. The next day, I went to class and defended slavery. I am not sure if it made me a better debater; the memory still makes me sick to my stomach. In high school, the topic of slavery made another appearance. Again, there was only one lesson, one chapter dedicated to this foundational pillar of the United States. The chapter was messy; the teacher ill-informed and uncomfortable. After the class, I was distraught. I went to talk to the teacher who said, “Well, it was not all bad. Imagine if you were still living in Africa?!” His incredulous tone was clear. “I mean, at least slavery got your people out of

Africa and into America.” At least. My people. Fast-forward just a few years and I was in college, getting a degree in business. In my labor relations course, I decided to write a paper about AfricanAmerican women in unions and the labor rights movement. My professor told me, “There is not enough to write about” and suggested I pick another topic. I wrote the paper anyway. He gave me a C. These experiences never made me hate school. I am too invested in the belief that education is essential. Heck, I even went on to get a graduate degree in Kenya. What I dislike is the miseducation we all receive when we are not taught the multicultural reality of these United States and the world. It makes us miss or devalue ourselves and others. We cannot see each other clearly with all the myths and fairy tales about each other flowing through our heads. This miseducation destroys. It could have destroyed the little girl in that library. But it didn’t. I am still here, still learning and fighting. No one should have to fight so hard to learn in a truthful and supportive way, especially not a small child who just wanted to talk about a book she read and really liked.

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152XX


.FOR THE WEEK OF SEPT. 12

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):

Novelist Wallace Stegner wrote, “Some are born in their place, some find it, some realize after long searching that the place they left is the one they have been searching for.” I hope that in the last nine months, Virgo, you have resolved which of those three options is true for you. I also trust that you have been taking the necessary actions to claim and own that special place — to acknowledge it and treasure it as the power spot where you feel most at home in the world. If you have not yet fully finished what I’m describing here, do it now.

Audre Lord identified herself as a black writer, lesbian, librarian, mother, feminist, civil rights activist, and many other descriptors. But as ardent as she was in working for the political causes she was passionate about; she didn’t want to be pigeonholed in a single identity. One of her central teachings was to celebrate all the different parts of herself. “Only by learning to live in harmony with your contradictions can you keep it all afloat,” she testified. These approaches should be especially fun and extra meaningful for you in the coming weeks, Pisces. I encourage you to throw a big Unity Party for all the different people you are.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Earth’s species are going extinct at a rate unmatched since the dinosaurs died out 65 million years ago. Among the creatures on the verge of being lost forever are birds like the cryptic treehunter and spix’s macaw, as well as the northern white rhino and the vaquita, a type of porpoise. So why don’t we clone the last few individuals of those beleaguered species? Here are the answers. 1. Cloned animals typically aren’t healthy. 2. A species needs a sizable population to retain genetic diversity; a few individuals aren’t sufficient. 3. Humans have decimated the homes of the threatened species, making it hard for them to thrive. Conclusion: Cloning is an inadequate stopgap action. Is there a better way to address the problem? Yes: by preserving the habitats of wild creatures. Inspired by this principle, Libra, I ask you to avoid trying halfway fixes for the dilemmas in your personal sphere. Summon full measures that can really work.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Though patched together and incomplete, the 2,200-year-old marble sculpture known as the Winged Victory of Samothrace is prominently displayed at Paris’s Louvre Museum. It’s a glorious depiction of Nike, the winged goddess of victory, and is regarded as one of ancient Greece’s great masterpieces. For hundreds of years it was missing. Then in 1863, an archaeologist discovered it, although it was broken into more than a hundred pieces. Eventually, it was rebuilt, and much of its beauty was resurrected. I see the coming weeks as a time when you, too, could recover the fragments of an old treasure and begin reassembling it to make a pretty good restoration.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “I’ve learned that I must find positive outlets for anger or it will destroy me,” said actor Sidney Poitier. That can be a dynamic meditation for you during the next three weeks. I think you will derive substantial power from putting it into action. If you’re ingenious and diligent about finding those positive outlets, your anger will generate constructive and transformative results.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1905, at the age of 30, Lucy Maud Montgomery wrote the novel Anne of Green Gables. It was a tale about an orphan girl growing up on Prince Edward Island. She sent the manuscript to several publishers, all of whom rejected it. Discouraged, she put it away in a hatbox and stored it in a closet. But two years later, her ambitions reignited when she re-read the story. Again she mailed it to prospective publishers, and this time one liked it enough to turn it into a book. It soon became a bestseller. Since then, it has sold over 50 million copies and been translated into 36 languages. I figure you Capricorns are at a point in your own unfolding that’s equivalent to where Anne was shortly before she rediscovered the manuscript she’d put away in the hatbox.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Toxorhynchites are species of large mosquitoes that don’t buzz around our heads while we’re trying to sleep and will never bite our skin or suck our blood. In fact, they’re our benefactors. Their larvae feast on the larvae of the mosquitoes that are bothersome to us. In accordance with astrological omens, I propose that you be alert for a metaphorically comparable influence in your own life: a helper or ally that might be in disguise or may just superficially seem to be like an adversary.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Hi, I’m your sales representative for UnTherapy, a free program designed to provide healing strategies for people who are trying too hard. Forgive me for being blunt, but I think you could benefit from our services. I don’t have space here to reveal all the secrets of UnTherapy, but here’s an essential hint: every now and then the smartest way to outwit a problem is to stop worrying, let it alone, and allow it to solve itself.

Celebrate the artists who inspire us.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): People in Northeast India weave long, strong suspension bridges out of the living roots of fig trees. The structures can measure up to 150 feet and bear the weight of hundreds of people. In accordance with astrological omens, let’s make these marvels your metaphors of power for the coming weeks. To stimulate your meditations, ask yourself the following questions. 1. How can you harness nature to help you to get where you need to go? 2. How might you transform instinctual energy so that it better serves your practical needs? 3. How could you channel wildness so that it becomes eminently useful to you?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If you climb to the top of Mt. Everest, you’re standing on land that was once on the floor of a shallow tropical sea. Fourhundred-million-year-old fossils of marine life still abide there in the rock. Over the course of eons, through the magic of plate tectonics, that low flat land got folded and pushed upwards more than five miles. I suspect you Geminis will have the power to accomplish a less spectacular but still amazing transformation during the next ten months. To get started, identify what you would like that transformation to be.

Vanessa German ARTIST OF THE YEAR

Roger Humphries, Sr.

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ARTS

Joe Negri

LIFETIME ACHIEVEMENT IN THE ARTS

Rock Lititz

CREATIVE INDUSTRIES

Mary Brenholts

ARTS LEADERSHIP & SERVICE

CANCER (June 21-July 22): In 1996, when Gary Kasparov was rated the world’s best chess player, he engaged in a series of matches with a chess-playing computer named Deep Blue. Early on in the first game, Deep Blue tried a move that confused Kasparov. Rattled, he began to wonder if the machine was smarter than him. Ultimately, his play suffered, and he lost the game. Later it was revealed that Deep Blue’s puzzling move was the result of a bug in its code. I’ll encourage you to cultivate a benevolent bug in your own code during the coming weeks, Cancerian. I bet it will be the key to you scoring a tricky victory.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): American hero Harriet Tubman escaped slavery as a young woman. She ran away from the wealthy “master” who claimed to “own” her, and reached sanctuary. But rather than simply enjoy her freedom, she dedicated herself to liberating other slaves. Nineteen times she returned to enemy territory and risked her life, ultimately leading 300 people out of hellish captivity. Later she served as a scout, spy, and nurse in the Union Army during the Civil War, where her actions saved another 700 people. In 1874, the U.S. Congress considered but then ultimately rejected a bill to pay her $2,000 for her numerous courageous acts. Don’t you dare be like Congress in the coming weeks, Leo. It’s crucial that you give tangible acknowledgment and practical rewards to those who have helped, guided, and supported you.

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 27 Learn more:

showclix.com/event/governors-awards PRESENTED BY

Go to realastrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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.JUST JAGGIN’.

TIPS ON TIPPING BY JOSH OSWALD // JOSWALD@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERE ARE A LOT of bad people out there. But not me. I’m a good person. A good person who believes giving good tips for a job well done, a coffee well-poured, and an Uber well driven. But who deserves said tips, and how much should they get? Glad you asked.

Coffee If it’s just single pour, not a long, drawnout order, no tip is necessary. Though, I encourage you to tip, because coffee people have to put up with some garbage humans. And that guy behind you is going to ask for 45 flavors, steamed milk, and probably a dusting of some kind of spice. Pay for the people. I only ever get black coffee or an Americano. I tip $1.

Pizza Delivery I’ve been doing $5 recently. I think that might be too small, but it’s more than a standard 20 percent for what we order. And though I’m sure pizza delivery has its ups and downs, these people aren’t trapped in a restaurant with awful customers. They can just motor away.

Garbage Collector I had no knowledge of tipping your garbage person until about 10 years ago. I gather that it is a yearly thing done around the holidays. A couple of years ago a garbage man left us a Christmas card on our garbage can, which I concluded was a plot to get a tip. So, we didn’t. I’m still not sure if that was the right or wrong decision. I have come to this conclusion in the time being: If the garbage person makes

more than you, don’t. If they do, use your discretion. According to U.S. News, “Garbage Collectors made a median salary of $36,160 in 2017. The best-paid 25 percent made $47,640 that year, while the lowest-paid 25 percent made $27,300.” If you’ve done some questionable garbage can practices (unbagged grass clippings, renovation demolition, dead body), throw a 20 their way during the holidays.

Taxi/Car Service Always tip in a regular taxi. These people are being robbed by the institution that sells them their licenses. I don’t car-share that frequently, but I try to give them 20 percent, because I’m sure they’re getting ripped off by Uber or Lyft, too. Tip more if you somehow made the ride more difficult: You smelled funny; they let you smoke in their car; you made multiple stops; they drove you through a drive-thru.

Wait Staff Twenty percent or more. No exceptions. I’ve never waited a table, but I’ve seen what these people go through, having had some more-than-awkward experiences dining with my father. The House Oswald owes your people a great debt. Unless you see your server ripping his vape outside for 20 minutes, whatever injustice you think you have suffered almost never has anything to do with their skill or attentiveness.

READ THE FULL LIST ONLINE AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Follow digital media manager Josh Oswald on Twitter @gentlemenRich

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.RESTAURANT REVIEW.

CORNBREAD BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ALMART IS NOT generally

known for culinary prestige. But at the superstore’s location in West Mifflin, this is changing, thanks to Adenah Bayoh and Elzadie “Zadie” B. Smith. Bayoh and Smith are the owners of Cornbread, a “farm to soul” restaurant that moved into the Pittsburgh Walmart in early July. The unexpected location for the partners’ New Jersey-based soul food eatery is planned to be part of a superstore trio, with locations in Greensburg and Tarentum coming soon. Until recently, a Walmart dining experience mostly involved fried fast food. But when the megastore was turned on to the fast-casual fad, things changed. Walmart began partnering with smaller, trendier restaurants, which opened the door for counter-service restaurants, like Cornbread, to move in. If I hadn’t been staring at a sign that read, “Save money. Live better.” while eating at Cornbread, it would not have been obvious that I was inside a Walmart. The space feels like a world away from the navy and yellow fluorescent aisles. Dark, hardwood floors give a cozy feel to turquoise-studded booths. The welcoming wall displays a mural filled with words the owners connect with the eatery: high quality, sustainable, farm, and soul. The menu is divided into combos, large and small, with a few special combinations running for $7.99. Each meal deal offers a different combination of meat — fried and barbeque chicken, ribs, fried fish — and sides, which included everything from yellow rice to cabbage (cornbread came with every option). Chicken and waffles, a fish po’boy, and peach cobbler finish off the list.

CP PHOTO: MAGGIE WEAVER

Top, left to right: collard greens, mac n’ cheese, and yams. Bottom: entrees of ribs and fried catfish, with cornbread on the side.

CORNBREAD 2351 Century Drive, West Mifflin. cornbreadsoul.com

The entire ordering process was completely automated; I didn’t speak to anyone until after my food was delivered, when I had to ask for a fork. The “fast” portion wasn’t quite there yet (which was partially due to my fish, which was fried to order). The line doubled in size while I waited for my food,

but soon enough, a giant tray of fried catfish, ribs, mac n’ cheese, and yams was delivered. The catfish was a picture-perfect image of what fried fish should look like. It wasn’t weighed down with grease, and the inside of the filet was flaky and moist, not overpowered by the spiced breading. No sauce was needed. Ribs, though a bit fatty, fell further off the bone the longer I let them sit and were drowning in a thick, sweet barbeque sauce.

FAVORITE FEATURES:

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Family Meals

Uptown

“It is well with my soul.”

If you’re in need of something bigger than a large combo, Cornbread has family-sized meals.

Cornbread had a selection of specialty drinks, including the Southern twang, sweet tea, and uptown. I went with the uptown, a cross between mint tea and lemonade.

This popular hymn lyric is both a pun and a testament to Bayoh and Smith’s fantastic soul food.

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

As a mac n’ cheese skeptic, I was pleasantly surprised by Cornbread’s version. It was seasoned well and peppered with pleasant pockets of baked cheese. The yams could have been a dessert; I nearly mistook the dish for pumpkin pie. Cornbread, Bayoh and Smith’s signature dish, came in puffed-up triangles. It was nothing out-of-the-ordinary, but simple and refined. Bayoh and Smith opened the first Cornbread — as a standalone restaurant — in 2017. Bayoh was not new to restaurant ownership (she purchased her first at 29) and Smith, who owns multiple early childcare centers, had always been passionate about soul food. The two self-starters built Cornbread on what was important to them: gathering with friends and family while eating good, authentic food that’s ethically and sustainably sourced.

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav


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N THE LAST PAGE of the menu at Mixtape, there’s a section set aside for non-alcoholic drinks. The Garfield bar doesn’t fill up the page with the typical choices of sodas and non-alcoholic beer; there are seven intricate, craft drinks, all made without booze. Spirit-free cocktails, aka mocktails, are becoming more popular in the bar scene. The trend, once made more or less exclusively for those in recovery, isn’t new to the U.S. (The Shirley Temple, known as the original mocktail, dates back to the 1930s.) But recently, demand for nonalcoholic options has been on the rise. The healthy-eating movement, along with a universal disdain for hangovers, has pushed mocktails into the spotlight. Non-alcoholic options have always been important for Katie Molchan and Elaina Holko, co-owners of Mixtape. Espresso, coffee, CBD-infused sodas, and zero-percent beer are available all night. “One of my favorite compliments is when a sober customer tells me how comfortable they feel at our place, even if they come with friends who are drinking for the night,” says Holko. In recent months, Molchan and Holko have revamped their spirit-free options. The Mixtape partners are wellseasoned bartenders, but creating a list of balanced mocktails has presented a new set of challenges. It’s important to the two mixologists that they “mimic the cocktail experience,” rather than just make a jazzed-up juice. Crafting a mocktail is similar to a cocktail, but Holko tackles it from a different

angle. “What’s the audience you’re going for? Do you think they’ll want something sweet? Tart? Sour? Savory? Dense? Light? Carbonated?” she says. A mocktail requires the same balance and craftsmanship as its alcoholic counterparts.

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To create their current menu of mocktails, Molchan and Holko swap liqueurs with non-alcoholic aperitifs, bitters, shrubs, and sodas. One example is the Saffron Sour, made with Everleaf (a non-alcoholic aperitif), citrus juices, and shaken with aquafaba. Many of the spirit-free cordials have high sugar contents, and the duo has to be aware of piling sugar on top of sugar. The “bite” of a spirit has been difficult to emulate, but it’s a necessary component. If the demand for mocktails continues to pick up, Holko plans to explore the realm of spirit-imitation (something the bartender has dipped their toes into with a spirit-free whiskey composed of spices, peppers, teas, and a walnut orgeat, a type of syrup). Until then, Holko and Molchan are simply playing a “brand new balancing game.” For more local mocktail menus, try Hidden Harbor in Squirrel Hill, Spork in Garfield, or Empath, a sober social bar with periodic pop-ups around the city. Holko’s best advice for the mocktailcurious is to “just have fun with it.”

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Eating Happily. Leaving with Smile.

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1366 OLD FREEPORT ROAD, FOX CHAPEL 412-963-0640, WWW.BAJABARGRILL.COM The Baja Bar & Grill is the perfect destination any time of the year for dancing to live bands and taking in great entertainment every weekend. In addition, there’s good food along with amazing views of the Allegheny River and the Fox Chapel Marina.

BEA’S TACO TOWN 633 SMITHFIELD STREET, DOWNTOWN 412-471-8361, WWW.BEATAQUERIA.COM Authentic Mexican cuisine in the heart of Downtown Pittsburgh! Bea Taco Town offers tacos, burritos, enchiladas, quesadillas, and much more all with traditional recipes. Slow cooked meats and fresh vegetables prepared daily will have you coming back to try it all.

THE CAFÉ CARNEGIE 4400 FORBES AVE., OAKLAND 412-622-3225 / THECAFECARNEGIE.COM An excellent dining experience from James Beard Semi-Finalist, Sonja Finn featuring a locally-focused menu, full service dining, and espresso and wine bar.

CARMELLA’S PLATES & PINTS 1908 EAST CARSON STREET, SOUTHSIDE 412-918-1215, CARMELLASPLATESANDPINTS.COM Featuring an upscale ambiance, Carmella’s is located in the heart of South Side, serving a variety of refined comfort cuisine for dinner and brunch. The décor features a lodge-like feel with a wood beamed cathedral ceiling, stained glass and open fireplace. A local purveyor delivers fresh ingredients daily, which are crafted into unique and inventive meals, served alongside a curated cocktail list and comprehensive wine selection.

COLONY CAFE 1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work

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drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-totable products.

ELIZA HOT METAL BISTRO 331 TECHNOLOGY DRIVE, PITTSBURGH 412-621-1551, ELIZAHOTELINDIGO.COM Set on the site of former iconic iron works, Eliza Furnace, Eliza is an American Bistro exploring classic Pittsburgh flavors, beloved by those that worked the furnaces, combined with the fresh perspective and seasonal sourcing that define what we eat in our region today. Relax with great food, cocktails, and enjoy live entertainment on the rooftop bar.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

PAD THAI NOODLE 4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But

don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history, and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOOK TOOK 98 2018 MURRAY AVE., SQUIRREL HILL 412-422-6767 / TOOKTOOK98.COM Eating Happily. Leaving with Smile. The True Taste of Thai. Our goal is to provide the highest customer satisfaction as well as offering authentic Thai street food with Thai environment. Therefore, we have been working hard to bring exceptional dine-in experience to you. We offer variety of authentic Thai food, drinks, and desserts including smiling full-service with BYOB.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. They also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.


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FALL GUIDE 2019

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM ILLUSTRATIONS BY ABBIE ADAMS


100 PLAYS, PARTIES, MOVIES, CONCERTS, AND EVENTS TO SPICE UP YOUR FALL 1. STAGE

One-Man Star Wars Trilogy

One man — Canadian actor and “uber geek” Charles Ross — tells the entire Star Wars trilogy in 60 minutes … BY HIMSELF. And he does this with no costumes, props, or sets. May the force be with him. Thu., Sept. 12-Sun., Sept. 29. Pittsburgh CLO at Greer Cabaret Theater, 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $31.25-59.75 pittsburghclo.org

2. EVENT

Hilltop Food Truck Round-Up

All summer, nonprofit 25 Carrick has invited visitors out for nights spent eating at food trucks, hearing live music, and hanging with neighbors. Now, as summer comes to an end, so does this series. Come out for a final hurrah and food from Steer & Wheel, Brisketburgh, and Revival Chili. 4:30-7:30 p.m. Thu., Sept. 12. 25 Carrick Ave., South Hills. Free. 25carrickave.com > Hilltop Food Truck Round-Up PHOTO: DANIELLE MASHUDA

3. STAGE A Few Good Men “You can’t handle the truth!” is how a lesser publication would introduce this Aaron Sorkin-penned play coming to Pittsburgh Public Theater. But since we’re journalists of the people, and the people are from Pittsburgh, we’d like to highlight the fact that both Steelers-great Rocky Bleier and KDKA-great Larry Richert are part of the terrific cast. Yinz gonna order that code red? Thu., Sept. 12Sun., Oct. 13. The O’Reilly Theater, 621 Penn Ave., $30-80. ppt.org

4. STAGE True West Sam Shepard’s classic play chronicles the sibling rivalry between two estranged brothers who come together in their mother’s suburban home. It’s also a favorite of Patrick Jordan, barebones productions’ founder and artistic director, so expect this to be directed with no shortage of passion and intensity. Continues through Sun., Sept. 29. barebones productions, 1211 Braddock Ave., Braddock. $35-40. barebonesproductions.com CONTINUES ON PG. 6

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FALL GUIDE STAFF PICK

PHOTO: FRANK WALSH

DANCE The World As We Know It BY LISA CUNNINGHAM

Watching Corningworks’ artistic director, choreographer, and dancer Beth Corning perform on stage is like observing an artist paint a picture. She is as breathtaking in creativity as she is in movement. Five nationally and internationally acclaimed female dance soloists join Corning for The World As We Know It, the latest Glue Factory Project series, with original productions showcasing performing artists over the age of 45. All six dancers will perform original solo works taking on the #MeToo movement, woven together with Corning’s choreography. The performance promises a bold take on the proverbial glass ceiling. How bold? A warning comes attached to this performance: “This program contains nudity.” Wed., Oct. 23Sat., Oct. 27. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $25-30. corningworks.org

PHOTO: PJ ROUP

^ The Setup by PJ Roup appearing as part of Program A of Pittsburgh New Works Festival

5. The Magic Parlour MAGIC

by 12 regional companies, ranging from talented local college theater groups to seasoned pros. Thu., Sept. 12-Sun., Sept. 29. Genesius Theater, Duquesne University, 600 Forbes Ave., Uptown. $15-20 single tickets; $50 festival pass. pittsburghnewworks.org

Dennis Watkins in

Chicago-based entertainer Dennis Watkins describes himself as a “third generation mind-reader and magician,” which might be more impressive than any trick he could pull during his run at Liberty Magic. Touted as downtown Chicago’s longest-running magic show, The Magic Parlour is an old-fashioned, elegant night of up-close trickery. Thu., Sept. 12Sun., Sept. 29. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40-75. trustarts.org

6.

ART 8. Resurgence — Rise Again: The art of Ben Jones and Amani Lewis: Subjective Nature

ART

In-Formed by Nature Art Exhibit N Jo the Frick Environmental Join Ce Center for an exhibit of mixedme media artworks inspired by nat nature and created in a workshop desi designed for seniors to explore their crea creativity and memories of nature. Cont Continues through Wed., Oct. 16. 2005 Beechwood Blvd., Squirrel Hill. Free. pittsburghparks.org

^ Dennis Watkins in The Magic Parlour

7. STAGE

Pittsburgh New Works Festival Four weeks of adventurous new one-act plays are being produced

Two exhibits of contemporary African-American artwork are opening simultaneously. Ben Jones creates colorful, large-scale work “inspired by African spiritualism and ritual, and revolutionary struggles;” Amani Lewis’ gorgeous mixed-media portraits frame the people closest to her in an intimate, affectionate light. Fri., Sept. 13-Sun., Dec. 15. August Wilson African American Culture Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. aacc-awc.org CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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ARTWORK: BEN JONES’ SHANGO

^ Resurgence — Rise Again: The art of Ben Jones

DANCE 9. Some Assembly Required Performed in over 25 different museums and galleries since 1995, this still-evolving performance piece from modern dance company Attack Theatre merges dance with art, music, and improvisation. Fri., Sept. 13Sat., Sept. 14. Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Pay what you can. attacktheatre.com

10.

FESTIVAL Renaissance Festival

There are only two weekends left to rollick through medieval times with your favorite wenches while biting into a gigantic, roasted turkey leg.

Added bonus: on the last weekend, the festival doubless as an Oktoberfest celebration. 10:30 a.m.6:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14-Sun., Sept. 15 and Sat., Sept. 21Sun., Sept. 22. 112 Renaissance Lane, West Newton. $10-23. com pittsburghrenfest.com

VAL 11. FESTIVAL

2019 Pittsburgh Chinese Culture Festival

The annual celebration of Chinese

heritage returns for its fifth year with another unmissable lineup of dance, music, vendors, and food from local favorites, including Everyday Noodles, Sesame Inn, and Chengdu Gourmet. 11 a.m. Sat., Sept. 14. Mellon Park, 1047 Shady Ave., Shadyside. Free. chineseculturalfestival.org

12.

PARTY

Forever Young Adult Prom Whether you want to relive high school or get a do-over, this is your chance to put on your snazziest outfit and go to the prom you’ve always dreamed of with music, catered food, and the best part — no teenaged angst.

7-11:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. Union Project, 801 N. Negley Ave., East Liberty. 21 and over. $45-85. unionproject.com

13. BURLESQUE Thick! Appreciating the Body Beautiful

“All bodies are good bodies!” is the guiding rule at Thick! Created by Viva Valezz and hosted by Sarah Rose, both of the queer performing arts troupe The Velvet Hearts, the show includes belly dancing, burlesque, and more. 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. The Irma Freeman Center for Imagination, 5006 Penn Ave., Garfield. $12-15. irmafreeman.org CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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Join us to learn about serving, benefits and how to make your application stand out.

PEACECORPS.GOV/HACKTHEAPP

HACK the APPLICATION Peace Corps Application Workshop Tuesday, Sept. 17, 2019 • 4:00 - 5:00 P.M. University of Pittsburgh • William Pitt 5th Floor Room 527 • Pittsburgh, PA 15260 For more information contact Ryann Stannard at rstannard@peacecorps.gov If you require reasonable accommodations when attending a Peace Corps event, please email Ryan Stannard at rstannard@peacecorps.gov and provide details of the reasonable accommodations you are requesting.

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PHOTO: PRISCILLA ZHU

5326 Butler Street • Upper Lawrenceville TUE-THUR 5PM–12AM • SAT-SUN 5PM–1AM

^ Steel City Improv Festival

STAGE 14. Cambodian Rock Band Is it a theater performance? Is it a rock concert? Nope, it’s the best of both worlds. Lauren Yee’s award-winning play features the Cambodian surf rock tunes of Dengue Fever and delivers a tale of family, love, music, and heritage. Sat., Sept. 14-Sun., Oct. 6. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $15-65. citytheatrecompany.org

15. EVENT

RADical Days

This annual event gives back to the public with free admission to organizations funded by the Allegheny Regional Asset District (RAD). This year, to celebrate 25 years of RAD, the event spans 25 days and includes an amazing list of over 65 participating galleries, museums, and cultural institutions. Thu., Sept. 19-Sun., Oct. 13. Various locations around Pittsburgh. Free. radworkshere.org

16. COMEDY

Steel City Improv Festival Local and national talent converge to celebrate the art of the ad-lib

and there is a lot of talent to go around. Pittsburghers can check in with local teams, including Some Kind of Felony, The Butch and the Bi, and Classy and Relevant, as well as tune up their own improv skills with workshops throughout the weekend. Say yes. Thu., Sept. 19-Sun., Sept. 22. Steel City Improv Theater, 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $10-15. steelcityimprov.com

17. MUSIC

Highmark Blues and Heritage Festival Jimi Hendrix once said that the Blues is easy to play but hard to feel; at this festival, hear a lineup that does both at the highest level. Join your fellow blues lovers for a weekend of great music from Jimmy Adler, Soulful Femme, Kingfish, and more. While many of the performances are free, tickets can be purchased for CeCe Winans, Charles Musselwhite, and a barbecue-centric Taste of Blues party. Fri., Sept. 20-Sun., Sept. 22. August Wilson African American Cultural Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. aacc-awc.org CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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FALL GUIDE STAFF PICK

PHOTO: ASPIRATION ENTERTAINMENT

FILM Strange Negotiations BY HANNAH LYNN

Musician David Bazan rose to prominence with his indie rock band, Pedro the Lion. The group didn’t necessarily describe themselves as a Christian rock band, but they certainly attracted a lot of Christian fans, due to Bazan’s openness talking about his faith. When the band split in 2006, it was partly due to the fact that Bazan was starting to lose his religion. The documentary Strange Negotiations follows Bazan through this journey as he grapples with what it means for his career, and his life. Director Brandon Vedder and producer Ty Morose (a Pittsburgher) will join audiences for a screening at Regent Square Theater. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. $12. cinema.pfpca.org

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PHOTO: SHAUNA MILLER

^ Ladyfest

18. MUSIC

Pitt Gets Alternative

What happens when two indie music sites and a booking company get together? Pitt Gets Alternative. The Alternative, The Grey Estates, and Don’t Let the Scene Go Down on Me! Collective are bringing 15 local and national acts together for two days of music-filled fun. Fri., Sept. 20- Sat., Sept. 21. The Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $20-30. Search “Pitt Gets Alternative” on Facebook

ART

19. Pretty Ugly

Opening Reception “Art Brut” (aka outsider art, aka folk art) is the inspiration for this

group show that toys with the notion of “prettiness” in art. What does that mean? A lot of clashing colors and textures that may not fit traditional aesthetics, but it’s sure as hell evocative and interesting. 4 p.m. Fri., Sept. 20. Continues through Sat., Nov. 2. James Gallery, 413 S. Main St., West End. jamesgallery.net

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MUSIC

Thrival Music Festival In its seventh year, Thrival Music Festival gathers vendors, makers, and artists to woo attendees with wares, made things, and art. This year’s festival

ffeatures electronic artist Buku and bassthundering funk act Beauty Slap. 4:30 p.m. Fri., Sept. 20. Schenley Plaza, 41 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. h Free. thrivalfestival.com.

21. ART

Artist of the Year / Emerging Artist of the Year Opening Reception

Join Pittsburgh Filmmakers/Center for the Arts for a reception celebrating sculptor Dee Briggs, PF/PCA Artist of the Year, and sculptor/welder Saige Baxter, Emerging Artist of the Year. Both artists will have an exhibit of work on display. 6 p.m. Fri., Sept. 20. Exhibit continues

through Sun., Nov. 3. Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. pfpca.org

22.MUSIC

Ladyfest

Breaking the monotony of maledominated shows and festivals, Ladyfest is back with three days of killer lineups, starting at The Shop. Featured acts include local talent like Ky Vöss and Murder for Girls, as well as traveling acts like Philadelphia’s Ellen Siberian Tiger and Brooklyn’s True Dreams. Proceeds benefit the Women’s Center & Shelter of Greater Pittsburgh. Fri., Sept. 20Sun., Sept. 22. 3520 Charlotte St., Lawrenceville. $10. facebook.com/ LadyfestPittsburgh CONTINUES ON PG. 14

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^ Project Amelia

23. STAGE Project Amelia Bricolage Theater Company is staying tight-lipped on its upcoming technology-themed immersive theater experience to keep audiences on their toes. But if past shows are any indication, expect to have your mind blown. The tagline includes cryptic references to stress and obligation. “What if you could let go without letting anyone down? What if responsibilities weren’t yours alone?” Fri., Sept. 20-Sun., Nov. 3. South Side (exact location to be disclosed in email in advance of performance date). 18 and over. $50-70. bricolagepgh.org

24. DANCE VIVA MOMIX The innovative choreography of the dancers and illusionists behind MOMIX, recently seen on PBS’ Dance in America, brings a surreal artistic show of bodies gracefully moving in mind-blowing positions and scenes. Fri., Sept. 20- Sat., Sept. 21. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $10-65. trustarts.org

25. FILM

Fashion Film Fest

Celebrate the beautiful, weird, messy, and funny world of fashion with a lineup of films at Row House

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Cinema, featuring cult favorites like Zoolander and Clueless, as well as documentaries The True Cost, about the fast fashion industry; Westwood, about designer Vivienne Westwood; and Halston, about designer Halston. Fri., Sept. 20-Thu., Sept. 26. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. rowhousecinema.com

26. MUSIC

Descendants of CROM III Three days, three stages, celebrating three years of great hardcore punk and metal in Pittsburgh. This year’s lineup includes ASG, Riparian, Action Camp, Killer of Sheep, Foghound, White Alice, and Night Vapor. Fri., Sept. 20-Sun., Sept 22. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. cattivopgh.com

27. DRINK

Oktoberfest

Hundreds of years ago, Germans invented a holiday to justify excessive drinking and cased-meat consumption and it caught on in America, because of course it did. Come guzzle local beers and nosh Bavarian snacks without fear of judgment at Penn Brewery’s Oktoberfest. Fri., Sept. 20-Sun., Sept. 22; Fri., Sept. 27-Sun., Sept. 29. Penn Brewery, 800 Vinial St., North Side. VIP Packages from $45-65. pennbrew.com


FALL GUIDE STAFF PICK

PHOTO: RORY HIGGINSON

MUSIC GWAR — Use Your Collision Tour BY ALEX GORDON

“The crowd literally looks like they’re bathed in their own blood, writhing and dying with glee. It was the best thing I had ever seen in my life.” That’s from a 2015 post on Reddit from a person who saw their first GWAR show, and it might qualify as the best litmus test for whether or not you’d enjoy seeing the band live. GWAR is, as they say, not entirely of this world and probably one of the only bands with a “mythos” tab on their website. But all the myth-making sometimes obscures that they’re a badass metal band with killer riffs and fabulous drumming. If you only know about GWAR from the outfits and stories, treat yourself to some writhing and dying hen of your own when GWAR lands at Mr. Smalls Theatre with d Sacred Reich and n. Against the Grain. 7 p.m. Fri., Sept. 13. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25-28. mrsmalls.com

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^ VIVA MOMIX

28.

GAME Broadway Bingo!

“B-I-N-G-Oooooooklahoma, where the wind comes sweepin’ down the plain ...” Instead of checking off numbers, players will mark off their Bingo cards by listening to 10-second clips of Broadway musicals. Mamma mia! 7-9 p.m. Fri., Sept. 20. Trust Arts Education Center, 807 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $20. trustarts.org

29. CLEANUP

Garbage Olympics

This alluringly named event is not referring to a terrible Olympics, but a day-long competition held all over Pittsburgh to see who can collect

the most trash. Prizes are awarded for quantity and the strangest item found during cleanup. 9 a.m. Sat., Sept. 21. Neighborhoods all over Pittsburgh. Free. “2019 Garbage Olympics” on Facebook

30. FOOD

Pittsburgh Mac and Cheese Festival Pay homage to humanity’s crowning culinary achievement with more than 30 variations on this classic dish and plenty of wine and craft beer to wash it down. Plus live music from Elias Khouri and the Right Turn Clyde Band. 12 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. Sat., Sept. 21. Highmark Stadium, 510 W. Station Square Drive., South Side. $20-55. highmarkstadium.com

31. MUSIC

Steel City Ska Fest 2019 Third-wave ska, two-tone ska, traditional ska — listen to all the ska until the word ska starts to sound weird. Featuring Mephiskapheles, The Independents, The Burnrides, Catbite, and more, Steel City Ska Fest 2019 will have a type of ska for every ska lover. 5 p.m.-12 a.m. Sat., Sept. 21. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $25. steelcityskafest.bpt.me

32. ART

Etna Art Tour

Just 10 minutes from Downtown Pittsburgh, the borough of Etna is evolving into a hub for local artists. CONTINUES ON PG. 18

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222 MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN IRWIN 724-367-4000 • LAMPTHEATRE.ORG

Established in 1937, The Lamp Theatre tre m boasts a variety of entertainment from movies to concerts and everything inn hat at between. A true community project that ghh was built and currently staffed through volunteer efforts. We look forward too hosting our neighbors and friends att aar! r! The Lamp Theatre throughout the yea year!

JJOIN US FOR THESE UPCOMING SHOWS! U

oct 19 - 8pm

Sept 27 8pm

The PettyBreakers Tickets: $28

Hollywood Nights A Bob Seger Experience Tickets: $35

Sept 28 - 8pm

Nov 2 7:30pm

American Idol

Tristan McIntosh with The Linda

Pure Gold in Concert

Ronstadt Experience

Tickets: $23

Tickets: $27

Oct 6 5PM & 8pm

TW O SHOWS!

Jim BrEuer Live and Let Laugh Tour Tickets start at $49.50

JAN 10 - 8pm

Phil Vassar Stripped Down Tickets: $49

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PHOTO: SJR PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Belinda Adam of Michiyaya Dance

Explore the charming neighborhood with live painting, art exhibits, studio tours, and live music at this fifth annual art tour. 5-9 p.m. Sat., Sept. 21. Butler Street, Etna. Free. “Etna Art Tour 2019” on Facebook

33. ART

Fringe Benefits

The artist-run, woman-owned CDCP Project Space presents a collection of artwork by its staff members. Curated by Casey Lee Droege, the show includes works by Candace Opper, Corrine Jasmin, Eriko Hattori, and Nicole Czapinski. Sat., Sept. 21Oct. 20. 317 S. Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg. caseydroege.com

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34.

FAIR

Bitchcraft Fair Pittsburgh Like to dabble in the occult? Wish you were BFFs with Sabrina or Hermione? Embrace your resting witch face for a festival full of likeminded artists, mystics, and (alcoholic) spirits. Costumes are encouraged. 11 a.m.-7 p.m. Sun., Sept. 22. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $10. bitchcraftfair.com

35. ART The FTR is BLK For one night only, an interactive

art and fashion show at Glitter Box Theater will showcase the work of Black artists with a fashion show (and competition), live mural painting, raffles, food, drinks, and more. 8 p.m.-1 a.m. Thu., Sept. 26. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. theglitterboxtheater.com

36. HAUNTED Phantom Fright Nights

Is there anything scarier than riding a roller coaster in the dark? Pittsburgh’s beloved amusement park goes dark for Halloween, bringing goblins, cobwebs, fog, and ghoulish treats to the popular attractions. Fridays


PHOTO: KHA LIFESTYLE PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Bitchcraft Fair Pittsburgh

and Saturdays, Sept. 27-Oct. 26, and Sundays Oct. 13 and 27. Kennywood, 4800 Kennywood Blvd., West Mifflin. $20-50. kennywood.com

39. PARTY

37.

New York-based dance company MICHIYAYA Dance will bring its multimedia show Gurih to The Andy Warhol Museum for one night. The show, which focuses on the “queering of our senses through a multicultural lens,” will feature dancer Belinda Adam. 8 p.m. Fri., Sept. 27. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $12-15. warhol.org

Shed your inhibitions and more when There Ultra Lounge presents this body-positive, clothing-optional party. Hosted by Pittsburgh Area Naturists, a local group that embraces nudity in social and recreational settings, the event celebrates all body types in a safe, welcoming environment. 8 p.m.-2 a.m. Fri., Sept. 27. 931 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. Registration required. facebook.com/THEREUltra

DANCE 38. When Birds

STAGE 40. Evil Dead the Musical

Renowned dancer and choreographer Olivier Tarpaga brings a new dancetheater work focused on (and scored by) the Burkina Faso group Super Volta Orchestra, a band that “evoked the transforming energies that surged across African nations” in the 1960s. Fri., Sept. 27-Sat., Sept. 28. Kelly Strayhorn Theater, 5941 Penn Ave., East Liberty. Pay what makes you happy. kelly-strayhorn.org

If you combine the Evil Dead movies and Army of Darkness, you get a chainsaw, a handful of one-liners, and lots of blood. If you add music to that cornucopia of the macabre, you get Evil Dead the Musical. Sit in the first few rows if you’re brave enough to handle “the splash zone.” Fri., Sept. 27-Sat., Oct. 19. Gargaro Theater, 327 S. Main St., West End. $40. pittsburghmusicals.com.

DANCE MICHIYAYA Dance

Olivier Tarpaga’s

Refused to Fly

The Garden of Eden: A Body Positive Party

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FILM Plan 9 From Outer Space with Swampwalk BY AMANDA WALTZ

Bad cinema and live music collide when Spirit celebrates the 60th anniversary of the schlocky, Atomic Age alien invasion film, Plan 9 From Outer Space. Presented by Matthew Buchholz of Alternate Histories, the evening will include a screening of cult movie director Ed Wood’s 1959 sci-fi classic with an all-new score performed live by Pittsburgh musician, Swampwalk. Buchholz says he choose Swampwalk because he thought the “haunting but playful music,” sense of humor, and electronic tones were perfectly suited to Plan 9. New and limited-edition posters will also be for sale at the event. 9 p.m. Tue., Oct. 29. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $12 in advance/ $15 at the door. spiritpgh.com

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PHOTO: WILLIAM C. MILLER

^ Festival of Combustion

41. Beatles & Bach DANCE

Modern rock meets ballet when New Hazlett Theater presents Beatles & Bach. The show includes allnew choreography by Texture Contemporary Ballet and original live musical accompaniment by the symphonic Pittsburgh-based rock group, Cello Fury. Fri., Sept. 27-Sun., Sept. 29. 6 Allegheny Square, North Side. $20-30. newhazletttheater.org

42. ART

Factory Installed 2019 In Th series will highlight pieces from This the archives of late transgender artist Gre Greer Lankton. Also included are new, site site-specific installations by Jon Rubin, Tra Bouscaren, Naomi Draper, Nathan Hall Hall, Patte Loper, Pepe Mar, Adam Miln Milner, and Patrick Robideau. Opens Fri., SSept. 27. Continues through 2020. Matt Mattress Factory, 500 Sampsonia Way, North Side. $10-15. mattress.org

43.

FESTIVAL

Festival of Combustion Pay homage to Carrie Furnace’s roots with a celebration of all things fiery, metallic, and hot. Hands-on demos will teach guests skills like glassblowing, iron casting, and welding. If you’re more of a hands-off combustion fan, enjoy food trucks, beer, a maker marketplace, and music from Nikki Lane. 1 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. Carrie Blast Furnaces, Carrie Furnace Blvd., Rankin. $30. riversofsteel.com

STAGE 44. Mystery Science Theater 3000 LIVE: The Great Cheesy Movie Circus Tour

Grab your red jumpsuit and join the crew of Gizmonics Institute to revel in the absurdity of JeanClaude Van Damme’s ninja-ghost movie No Retreat, No Surrender.

Show creator and longtime host Joel Hodgson will appear with robots Tom Servo, Crow, and Gypsy, to riff on cinematic sculch at the Byham Theater. 7 p.m. Sat., Sept. 28. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35-55. trustarts.org

45. RACE

Great Race

Pittsburgh has a lot of pretty good races, but only one that’s truly Great. Since 1977, the annual fun-run has brought locals together for scenic runs across Pittsburgh neighborhoods. Options include a 5K, 10K, and more. 6 a.m. Sun., Sept. 29. Three Gateway Center, 401 Liberty Ave., Downtown. rungreatrace.com

46. FEST

Pittsburgh Latino Festival

To celebrate Pittsburgh’s Latino community, all of the Latin-inspired food trucks in the ‘Burgh will gather


PHOTO: DAN BARTOW

^ Food from Cool Beans Food Truck at Pittsburgh Latino Festival

in one place for a day of delicious fun. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. Strip District. Free. “Pittsburgh Latino Festival” on Facebook

47. MARKETPLACE Sneaker Convention

The experts all agree: Feet are important and should be treated with respect. And there’s no better way to show them love than with a new pair of fresh kicks courtesy of VizDaGenius’ sneaker convention at Spirit, featuring music from DJ Spillz and vendors happy to trade/ sell/buy to your heart’s content. 11 a.m. Sun., Sept. 29. Spirit, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10. spiritpgh.com

48. GAMING

Super Smash Bros. Tournament Melee for a mural as Roboto hosts a Super Smash Bros. tournament to help fund an upcoming painting at the venue. If altruism isn’t your thing, don’t

worry: the top three contenders will split a prize pot. 12 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. The Mr. Roboto Project, 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. therobotoproject.com

49. FOOD

Western PA Lamb Cook-off Thanks for mutton. This year’s Western PA Lamb Cook-off is sure to be a blaaaaaast, featuring a cook-off between 10 collaborative chef teams from Pittsburgh’s most celebrated restaurants. Attendees get unlimited tastings, giveaways, and a swag baaaaaaag. 2 p.m. Sun., Sept. 29. 26th St., between Railroad and Smallman St., Strip District. $65-100. tablemagazine.com/ lamb-fest-1

50. LECTURE

John Kerry at Pittsburgh Speaker Series

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^ Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble

former United States Secretary of State John Kerry. The series features a lineup of influential personalities, and future events include Susan Rice, Bob Woodward, and Jason Alexander. There are seven lectures in total and tickets can only be purchased as a package. 8 p.m. Wed., Oct. 2. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. pittsburghspeakers.org

51. E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial MUSIC

John Williams has literally written every film score in existence. Look it up. See the Pittsburgh Symphony

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Orchestra take on one of his classics, E.T. The ExtraTerrestrial, performed live and synced to the Stephen Spielberg film on a huge HD screen. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 3. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave. $25-105, pittsburghsymphony.org

52.

KIDS

A Magical Night at the Zoo Bring the whole family for a night of music, food, and, most importantly, animals. Meet costumed characters, go to a dance party, and get up close

and personal with some furry a and feathered friends during this special event. 5-9 p.m. Fri., Oct. 4. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, 7370 Baker St., Highland Park. $ $25-60. $5 for kids 12 and un under. pittsburghzoo.org

53. DANCE

Cleo Parker Robinson Dance Ensemble Inspired by the African-American experience, the modern dance ensemble brings 12 dancers to the stage, performing bodies of work inspired by traditional ethnic dances

from around the world. Fri., Oct. 4Sat., Oct. 5. August Wilson African American Cultural Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $38.75-48.75. aacc-awc.org

54. MUSIC

Respect: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin Come hear vocalists Blaine Krauss, Tamika Lawrence, Coco Smith, and the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra pay R-E-S-P-E-C-T to the Queen of Soul’s greatest hits. Fri., Oct. 4Sun., Oct. 6. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. Starting at $25. pittsburghsymphony.org


PHOTO: UNIVERSAL STUDIOS

^ E.T. The Extra-Terrestrial

55. ARTWhat

ARTIST 57. Cuando El Rio Suena

Group A, the oldest continuing Guild of the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, celebrates its 75th anniversary with What Deepest Remains. Inspired by Walt Whitman, the juried exhibition showcases works “exploring memory, identity, and the human spirit.” Fri., Oct. 4-Sun., Nov. 3. Brew House Gallery, 711 S. 21st St., South Side. Free. brewhousearts.org

Pittsburgh Glass Center (PGC) takes a look at the ongoing refugee crisis in the United States with Cuando el Río Suena, a solo exhibition by award-winning artist and sculptor Jaime Guerrero. With new glassworks created during his residency at PGC, Guerrero explores the harsh, sometimes deadly reality of the country’s crackdown on immigration. Fri., Oct. 4-Jan. 2020. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free or $5 suggested donation. pittsburghglasscenter.org

Group A Presents:

Deepest Remains

56. STAGE Not Medea In playwright Allison Gregory’s work Not Medea, a working mother enters a theater and in a desperate attempt to avoid watching the play, manipulates the show and its audience. Off the WALL Productions delivers this personal story, as a “fierce slap-down about love, lust, motherhood, and forgiveness,” to the Carnegie Stage. Fri., Oct. 4-Sat., Oct. 19. 25 W. Main St., Carnegie. $5-35. insideoffthewall.com

58. EVENT

Stroll the Strip

Eat, drink, and party your way through one of Pittsburgh’s most famous business districts. Choose from a number of options, including a family-friendly day tour or more adult-oriented after-parties at Cake Pittsburgh and Audi Pittsburgh’s Rooftop Terrace. 1-9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. Osteria 2350, 2350 Railroad St., Strip District. $20-100. stripdistrictneighbors.com/stroll CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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MUSIC Aqueous BY JORDAN SNOWDEN

Headlining at the Rex Theater for a special Halloween performance is Buffalo-based quartet Aqueous. If the band’s previous Halloween shows are any indication of this year’s event, the rock and groove powerhouse will have a theme woven into its set that night. During Aqueous’ 2018 performance at the Knitting Factory in Brooklyn, the group went with a Nick Toons theme, incorporating music from the TV channel while dressed as characters from Doug, Rocko’s Modern Life, Ren & Stimpy, and Rugrats. 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 31. Rex Theater, 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $16. rextheater.net

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PHOTO: CHRISTOPHER SPROWLS

^ TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party

59. PARTY

Big Art Party — Peace. Love. Art. Break out your favorite tie-dyed shirts and rainbow-colored sunglasses for The Westmoreland Museum of American Art’s coolest party of the year, featuring special guest John Van Hamersveld, whose iconic psychedelic artwork has adorned the museum’s walls all summer. 7:30-11 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. The Westmoreland Museum of American Art, 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. $60-75. thewestmoreland.org

60.

MUSIC

Roger Zahab Portrait Concert P Si Since 1990, members of the University of Pittsburgh music department ha have championed experimental, adv adventurous music with the Music on the Edge concert series. Now, it’s cele celebrating the career of composer/ Pitt lecturer/violinist Roger Zahab, who who’s no stranger to experimental and adventurous music. 8 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. Bellefield Hall, 315 S. Bellefield Ave., Oakland. music.pitt.edu

61. MUSIC

TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party 10 Year Anniversary

In 2009, TITLE TOWN Soul & Funk Party began throwing monthly parties at the Shadow Lounge in East Liberty, playing 45s with a focus on rare and obscure soul, funk, ‘50s R&B, and disco. Shadow Lounge is gone, but TITLE TOWN is still going strong and celebrating 10 years with a party at Spirit. 9 p.m. Sat., Oct. 5. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. facebook.com/pg/titletownpgh

EXHIBIT 62. Mummies of the World Feast your eyes on the largest collection of mummies ever assembled with this massively popular exhibit that boasts artifacts from Europe, South America, and, yes, Egypt. Sat., Oct. 5-Sun., April 19, 2020. Carnegie Science Center, 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. carnegiesciencecenter.org

63. TOUR

Doors Open Pittsburgh From bank vaults to historic theaters, Doors Open Pittsburgh takes you on a weekend tour of some of the city’s most iconic spaces. Take a look inside and learn about the fascinating history behind dozens of buildings throughout Downtown and the North Side, including the Union Trust Building, Teutonia Mäennerchor, and more. Sat., Oct. 5. and Sun., Oct. 6. Various locations. Tickets cost up to $20. doorsopenpgh.org

64. HISTORY

Italian Heritage Day

This annual, all-ages event welcomes families from all backgrounds to explore and celebrate Italian-American culture and history. Get to know local Italian organizations and learn about the history of Italians immigrating to Southwestern Pennsylvania. 10 a.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. heinzhistorycenter.org


Kick off October the FRIGHT way!

PHOTO: PAULIUS MUSTEIKIS

^ Kate Wisel

65. MUSIC

67. LIT

Treat yourself to some of the best pop-punk acts around with the return of this much loved festival. Acts include The Offspring, Simple Plan, Anberlin, Real Friends, Knuckle Puck, and more. Four chords is more than enough. 1:30 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Highmark Stadium, 510 W. Station Square Drive, South Side. $59-140. fourchordmusicfestival.com

The Perks of Being a Wallflower helped put Pittsburgh on the map for teenagers all over the world when author Stephen Chbosky’s popular coming-of-age novel, set in the city’s suburbs, was brought to the big screen. Now, the author returns with his second novel, Imaginary Friend, as a guest of the Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures series. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 7. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $10. pittsburghlectures.org

Four Chord Music Festival 6

66.

FEST

Stephen Chbosky

Pigtoberfest: A Fall Community Festival

68. LIT

A reference to the history of Rialto Street, which was used for transporting pigs between stockyards and slaughterhouses located in Spring Hill and Herrs Island, Pigtoberfest will take place in Troy Hill and feature a pig roast by Rolling BBQ, free entertainment, and great times. 2-7 p.m. Sun., Oct. 6. Troy Hill Citizens Park, 1619 Lowrie St., North Side. Free. troyhillpittsburgh.com

Alphabet City at City of Asylum presents a night of literature with authors Kate Wisel and Irina Reyn. Wisel will read from her collection Driving in Cars with Homeless Men, winner of the 2019 Drue Heinz prize from University of Pittsburgh Press. Reyn will read from her novel Mother Country. 7 p.m. Mon., Oct. 7. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. RSVP required. alphabetcity.org

Kate Wisel

Coming Soon!

SCREAM QUEENS #3 SATURDAY OCTOBER 26TH COSTUME PARTY & DRAG SHOW CASH PRIZES! 1RST • 2ND • 3RD PLACE

Hosted by Cindy Crotchford 5115 BUTLER ST. PGH, PA 15201

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PHOTO: KAREN PIKE

^ The Moth Pittsburgh GrandSLAM Story Championship

69. FILM Punk the Capital From 1976 to 1985, punk had an explosive moment in D.C., and that period had a monumental impact that reached far beyond its city limits. Pittsburgh will get a chance to experience that moment when al the documentary Punk the Capital plays for one night at Union Project as part of an international r. screening tour. 7 p.m. Tue., Oct. 8. Union Project, 801 N. Negley Ave., Highland Park. dcpunk rockdoc.info

70.

COMEDY

Bianca Del Rio’s It’s JesterJoke RuPaul’s Drag Race champion Bianca Del Rio brings her new comedy show, It’s JesterJoke, to Pittsburgh. While it is touted as the “biggest ever solo drag show tour in North America,” Del Rio says it’s more of a standard stand-up comedy show than a drag show. Love her or hate her, it’s hard not to be entertained.

8 p.m. Tue., Oct. 8. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $40.75-204.25. trustarts.org

DANCE 71. Catapult: The Amazing Magic of Shadow and Dance A dance performance like no other, Catapult tells a story using the art of shadow dancing, where dancers perform from behind a screen to produce silhouettes of various landmarks, animals, and objects. 7:30 p.m. Thu., Oct. 10. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $30-50. trustarts.org

72. LIT

The Moth Pittsburgh GrandSLAM Story Championship The Moth takes the stage at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall for a battle of words with the Pittsburgh GrandSLAM Story Championship. A handful of storytellers will compete to see who can tell the most compelling tale. 7:30-9:30 p.m. Fri., Oct. 11. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $27. librarymusichall.com CONTINUES ON PG. 30

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MUSIC Rancid with special guest Pennywise BY JOSH OSWALD

Black coat? Check. White shoes? Got it. Black hat? Right here. Cadillac? I’ll call an Uber. There’s really no wrong way to get to Sandcastle to see Rancid, Pennywise, Suicidal Tendencies, and more power-chord punishers. Just make sure you wear your spiked leather and not your Speedo. 10 a.m., Sat., Sept. 14, The Lots at Sandcastle, 1000 Sandcastle Drive, Homestead. $39.50–$45, drusky entertainment.com

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FEST Pittsburgh Monster Pumpkins Festival BY MAGGIE WEAVER

It isn’t an exaggeration to call the Pittsburgh Monster Pumpkins Festival “pumpkinsanity.” Some of the season’s largest gourds — weighing up to 2,500 pounds — take center stage at the city’s second monster pumpkin fest. Competitive growers from across the country gather to showcase their fall giants during the weekend-long event. But that’s only one part of the weekend. Watch master carvers etch into gourds, see a 2,000 pound pumpkin smash into a ball pit, and cheer on the brave as they dive headfirst into a pieeating contest, no hands allowed. This year’s biggest attraction (besides the pumpkins) is the Great Pumpkin Paddle, a rowing regatta of real gourds-turned boats racing down the river. Sat., Oct. 19-Sun., Oct. 20. North Shore Riverwalk, North Side. Free. monster pumpkin.com

^ Catapult: The Amazing Magic of Shadow and Dance

73.

MUSIC

Tributefest 10 Friday Night Head to Cattivo for the first night of Tributefest 10, an annual event featuring live bands performing as legendary music acts. This year’s participants will play as The Kinks, Blondie, Simple Minds, and more, all while raising money for Humane Animal Rescue. Fri., Oct. 11- Sat., Oct. 12. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $10. cattivopgh.com

COMEDY 74. That Golden Girls Show! A Puppet Parody

S Sophia, Rose, Blanche, and Dorothy a are back ... in puppet form! Pay tribute to the hit comedy about the lives an and loves of four women in Florida wi with a night out at this touring OffBro Broadway production. Fri., Oct. 11-Sat., Oct Oct. 12. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Dow Downtown. $25. trustarts.org

75. ART This Skin of Ours Curated by Liz Park, this show

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focuses on the largest and most exposed human organ: the skin. On view at Miller ICA at Carnegie Mellon University, the group exhibition includes photography, painting, installation work, and silkscreen on paper. Sat., Oct. 12Sun., Nov. 17. 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. miller-ica.cmu.edu

76. FAIR

Darksome Art & Craft Market: Every Day is Halloween If you start looking for Halloween decorations as soon as the fireworks go off in July, this event was made for you. Paintings, jewelry, clothing, and more will be available to purchase from about 50 “weird and spooky” artists. 12-5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Union Project, 801 N. Negley Ave., East Liberty. darksomecraftmarket.com

77. FAIR

Dormont Street Fair

Hang out with your neighbors and make new friends while perusing craft vendors, stuffing your face with local food, and listening to live music at one of the city’s most down-to-

earth neighborhood parties. 3-10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 12. Potomac Avenue, Dormont. Free. boro.dormont.pa.us

78. DRAG

RuPaul’s Drag Race World Tour Based on the hit reality competition series, the show goes on a wild journey with intergalactic queens and drag performers Asia O’Hara, Aquaria, Detox, Monet Exchange, Naomi Smalls, Plastique, Violet Chachki, and Yvie Oddly. 8 p.m. (6 p.m. for VIP guests) Sat., Oct. 12. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $57.75-167.75. pittsburghsymphony.org

ART 79. An Art of Changes: Jasper Johns Prints, 1960-2018 Explore six decades of work from one of the country’s most influential artists, known best for helping to usher in the modern pop era with his minimalistic but colorful images of flags and targets. Sat., Oct. 12Sun., Jan. 19. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $12-20. cmoa.org


80. Don Giovanni

covering politics for decades, giving her an understanding of the current state political turmoil. She’ll speak about her career and experiences at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center. 7 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $42.50. aacc-awc.org

OPERA

What better way for Pittsburgh Opera to open its 81st season than with Mozart’s legendary Don Giovanni? The timeless tale focuses on the eventual comeuppance of a smooth-talking jerk named Don Juan and, fun fact, marks the very first use of a trombone in opera (whoa!). Sat., Oct. 12- Sun., Oct. 20. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh Ave., Downtown. $14. pittsburghopera.org

MUSIC 84. A Fire on Venus

Brittney Chantele:

at Brillobox last spring, has two more runs. 8 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. 4104 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $5. 12peers.org

Brittney Chantele is taking her album A Fire on Venus beyond the typical concert performance when she kicks off the 2019-2020 season of the New Hazlett Theater Community Supported Art Performance Series. The performance will include visual art, live back-up musicians, and dancers. 8 p.m. Thu., Oct. 17 and Fri., Oct. 18. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. newhazletttheater.org

83. LECTURE

85. HAUNTING

81. FOOD

Taste of Lawrenceville: Harvest Fest Similar to the summer and spring editions of Taste of Lawrenceville, enjoy vendor booths from Lawrenceville breweries and restaurants, along with live music and family-friendly entertainment — except this time around there might be a pumpkin, or two. 12-5 p.m. Sun., Oct. 13. Bay 41, 4107 Willow St., Lawrenceville. Free. “Taste of Lawrenceville: Harvest Fest” on Facebook

PHOTO: CORY WEAVER

^ Don Giovanni

82.

STAGE Mythburgh

Do you know what makes Pittsburgh creepy? Weird? Unique? The crew at Mythburgh does, and they take stories about Pittsburgh, told by Pittsburghers, and adapt them into short plays and digital content. Season three, which played

TRUTHSayers: April Ryan

Haunted Museum After Dark

White House correspondent and political analyst April Ryan has been

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activities, festive signature cocktails, a costume contest, and more, all within the confines of the museum’s many exhibits. Spooky! 6-10 p.m. Fri., Oct. 18. Carnegie Museum of Natural History, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $15-32.50. carnegiemnh.org

the beloved Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood than a museum celebrating kids in Fred Rogers’ hometown. See artifacts from the original TV series — including his iconic sweater! — exhibited in honor of Rogers’ 30-year relationship with the museum. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19-Jan. 12, 2020. Pittsburgh Children’s Museum and MuseumLab, 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $13-16. pittsburghkids.org

86. STAGE Good Grief This heartbreaking coming-of-age story follows Nkechi, a young woman mourning the death of her childhood crush, revisiting different stages in her life as she remembers her friend. Fri., Oct. 18-Sun., Oct. 27. Rauh Theatre at Pittsburgh Playhouse, 350 Forbes Ave., Downtown. $13-20. pittsburghplayhouse.com

90. FLOWERS

Fall Flower Show: Phipps Conservatory

^ Owl-o-Ween

87. KIDS

Owl-o-Ween

Dress in your best Halloween get-up to meet and take photos with raptors, owls, and other creatures of the night at the National Aviary. There’s also candy, crafts, and more. Sat., Oct. 19 and Sat., Oct. 26. 700 Arch St., North Side. Included with regular admission. aviary.org

88.

KIDS ZooBoo

Treat yourself to a family-friendly Halloween party full of cool creatures, tasty treats, pumpkin patches, and more. Collect candy on the new Trick-Or-Treat Trail, hear spooky tunes at the Monster Mash Dance Off, or take a tour through a haunted

house. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19Sun.,Oct. 27. Pittsburgh Zoo & PPG Aquarium, 7370 Baker St., Highland Park. Included with regular admission. pittsburghzoo.org

89. KIDS

Fred Rogers & Us

There’s no better place to celebrate

Phipps Conservatory and Botanical Gardens continues its traditional, long-running Fall Flower Show with Japanese Inspirations. The three-week show highlights the art, culture, and botanical beauty of Japan, with giant origami peace cranes, floating lanterns, and vibrant parade dragons, as well as an interactive rock garden, and more. Sat., Oct. 19-Sun., Nov. 10. 1 Schenley Park, Oakland. Included with regular admission. phipps. conservatory.org CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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PHOTO: DUANE RIEDER

^ Giselle with the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Orchestra

91. STAGE

EQT Young Playwrights Festival Pittsburgh middle and high school students are the stars as six one-act plays are professionally produced on City Theatre’s stage, the winning scripts chosen from around 400 submissions. Tue., Oct. 22-Thu., Oct. 31. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $10-15. citytheatrecompany.org

92.

MAGIC

The Life and Death of Harry Houdini Lee Terbosic, Pittsburgh’s most well-known magician and one of the advisors of the city’s popular new magic venue, will explore the mysteries surrounding Harry Houdini’s death and demonstrate some of his most magical moments. Wed., Oct. 23-Sun., Nov. 23. Liberty Magic, 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40-65. trustarts.org

93. KIDS

Jurassic World Live

The terrifying dinosaurs of the Jurassic Park films are coming to life once more — this time in the form of life-sized robotic replicas at PPG Paints Arena. The show takes

audiences on a journey to the island of Isla Nublar with state-of-the-art projected displays, 3D technology, and live stunts. Thu., Oct. 24Sun., Oct. 27. PPG Paints Arena, 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. $40-100. ppgpaintsarena.com

94.DANCE Giselle

with the Pittsburgh Ballet Theatre Orchestra A girl dies of a broken heart after discovering the deceit of her lover in this breathtaking supernatural romantic ballet telling a tale of love, death, and revenge. Fri., Oct. 25Sun., Oct. 27. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $28-112. pbt.org

STAGE 95. The Rocky Horror Show Damnit, Janet. It’s a rite of passage for folks to celebrate Halloween at least once in their lives by watching The Rocky Horror Picture Show in a theater. Stage Right elevates the experience with a live musical version of the famous cheesy horror flick. 8 p.m. and midnight. Fri., Oct. 25-Sat., Oct. 26. Lamp Theatre, 222 Main St., Irwin. $20-25. lamptheatre.org CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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FALL GUIDE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 34

PHOTO: JOAN MARCUS

^ Mean Girls

96.

BIKE 2019 Dirty Dozen

Test your bicycling mettle with Dirty Dozen, a challenge for riders of all levels. The race begins at the Rhododendron Pavilion in Highland Park and takes competitors up and over 13 of the city’s steepest hills. 8 a.m. Sat., Oct. 26. Lake Drive, Highland Park. Registration fees apply for riders. bikereg.com/43625

97. MUSIC

Hall-O-Scene

The Smiling Moose invites ghouls to haunt floors for an alternative Halloween bash with dancing, drink specials, and more. Monster mash away to tunes by DJ Adam and a special performance by Melissa Marie Green of the reality TV show Bad Girls Club and the electronic music duo Millionaires. 10 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $15-30. smiling-moose.com

98. FAIR

Pittsburgh h Zine Fair Support the local DIY publishing scene when the Pittsburgh Zine Fair comes to the Ace Hotel. See self-published works by a diverse array of artists, writers, and activists

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from across the region. 12-6 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. Free. pghzinefair.com

99. STAGE Mean Girls Get in, loser. We’re going to the Benedum. The iconic film turned hit Broadway musical brings everyone’s favorite mean girls to the stage. Brace yourself for angst, wisecracks, and wicked insults. Tue., Oct. 29-Sun., Nov. 3. Benedum Center, 237 Seventh St., Downtown. $40-125. trustarts.org

100.ART Novi, Dear

Leonard Suryajaya:

An exhibition of photography from artist Leonard S Suryajaya, this show e will explore issues of fam family and migration w “elaborately with staged photographs bursting with patterns and colors,” in which Suryajaya — an Indonesian citizen of Chinese descent — creates “absurd and a affectionate tableaux featuring fa his family, strangers, and friends.” Thu., Oct. 31-Sat., Jan. 11. Silver Eye Center for Photography, 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. silvereye.org •


FALL GUIDE 2019

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GET OUT OF TOWN ADVERTORIAL

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ALPINE RETREAT Our bed and breakfast rental property is located in the beautiful Laurel Highlands of Pennsylvania. The Alpine Retreat was built in 1980 as a rustic cabin and renovated in 2017 to accommodate modern amenities with a rustic, mountain feel. Our house includes 5 bedrooms, 3 full and 3 half bathrooms. Each bedroom has their own private commode and vanity. Three bedrooms have king beds while two bedrooms have a queen and a pull-out twin sofa – perfect for a small family or group!

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CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY POWDERMILL NATURE RESERVE Powdermill Nature Reserve is Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center. Located 55 miles southeast of Pittsburgh in Rector, Pennsylvania, Powdermill is a field station and laboratory where researchers do long-term studies of natural populations in western Pennsylvania. In addition to being positioned for Appalachian-specific studies in ornithology, ecology, invertebrate zoology, and botany, Powdermill is a great place to spend a fun-filled day outdoors with the family. Explore the beautiful woodlands around Powdermill, or visit the nature center, which features exhibits that highlight local wildlife, an indoor stream, and a marsh machine that uses a living greenhouse to purify waste water. Admission to Powdermill Nature Reserve is free.

LINCOLN CAVERNS Come experience the horror of the 36th Edition of Ghosts & Goblins - 2019. With 35 years of haunted tour experience and expertise behind them, Lincoln Caverns and Whisper Rocks, near Huntingdon, is busy with preparations for their greatest haunt ever, featuring 90 minutes of fun and terror in the caves, through the woods and on the wagon! “Pennsylvania’s ultimate haunted experience” provides scares, laughs, and even some cave education to thousands of visitors each year. Ghosts & Goblins Tours are open to the public Friday and Saturday, October 5th through 26th. From 11:00 AM till 5:00 PM on Saturdays visitors enjoy a very special one hour tour through two beautiful crystal caverns, one featuring family-friend Ghosts & Goblins and one natural, with just the right mix of surprises and cave information along the way, followed by a family friendly hayride. On Friday and Saturday nights, tickets are sold from 6:00 PM till 9:30 PM for the all haunted edition of Ghosts & Goblins, featuring a new spine-tingling cave


tale, followed by the terrifying trail and horrifying hayride. New for 2019 – evening visitors may choose their haunts – above (trail & hayride), below ground (caves only) or both! Daytime and evening tours provide visitors with three unique experiences for the price of one. Advance tickets for the annual fun-filled Halloween adventure go on sale September 4. Regular guided tours of the decorated and natural caverns are available 9:00 A.M. till 4:00 P.M. Sunday through Friday throughout the fall season.

SPRING FOLK FESTIVAL The Springs Folk Festival invites you to join in the celebration of the arts, skills and labors of our forefathers. Watch the men and women baking bread and weaving, the men hewing logs and threshing grain and the children enjoying themselves on an old-time hayride. The lilting notes of blue grass groups, gospel music - as well as old-time music and dance - fill the air with continuous performances in the enclosed program building and on stage along the Woods Trail. Of course, the Mountain Anthems singing close harmony is always a thrill. An exceptional array of quality handcrafted items - truly one-of-a-kind shopping adventure - paintings, baskets, wood-crafted furniture, quilts and dulcimers - over 100 juried artisans demonstrating their craft. Everyone will enjoy the feeling of being a kid again as they sample the apple fritters, kettle corn, candy apples and homemade pies. Pennsylvania Dutch sausage meals, pancakes and sausage, bean soup, homemade bread baked in an outdoor kiln, doughnuts fried as you watch. 2019 Folk Festival Fri. & Sat., Oct. 4 & 5. Hours: 9:00 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.

Bed & Breakfast 5 bedroom house available for WHOLE HOUSE RENTAL or BED AND BREAKFAST during the week or selected weekends. THE LAUREL HIGHLANDS IS FILLED WITH ACTIVITIES FOR ALL: Skiing and tubing, whitewater rafting, hiking, biking, ATV trails. Close proximity to festivals, wineries, antiquing, Hidden Valley, 7 Springs, Flight 93 Memorial and more! Visit 3 different Frank Lloyd Wright homes including Fallingwater, Kentuck Knob and Polymath Park. Visit our website and Follow us on Facebook for more information and schedule.

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OCTOBER 4 - 13 Join BikePGH and the Office of Public Art for a new event series to celebrate city steps and neighborhood connections.

Learn more at

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Event updates on Facebook @BikePGH

OfďŹ ce of Public Art


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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THE LOCAL 913: AFRO YAQUI MUSIC COLLECTIVE BY LIZ FELIX // LIZ@WYEP.ORG

.MUSIC.

FIRST OF HIS NAME BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Afro Yaqui Music Collective is possibly the most ambitious musical project in Pittsburgh. The group is difficult to describe in a few words; the sprawling ensemble performs music that flows easily between jazz, funk, hip hop, Latin, and indigenous music in multiple languages. The name of the project and the variety of sounds they encompass are inspired by singer Gizelxanath Rodriguez’s background in both Mexican and American culture. “We were interested in mixing some of the Latin American music STAY UP-TOthat Gizel knows DATE WITH THIS inside and out WEEK’S LOCAL with Native American MUSIC NEWS indigenous music WITH CP MUSIC — she has Yaqui WRITER JORDAN heritage — and SNOWDEN mixing that with AND WYEP funk and free EVENING MIX jazz and seeing what happens,” HOST LIZ FELIX says Afro Yaqui Listen every composer and saxophonist Ben Wednesday Barson. “Here we at 7 p.m. on 91.3FM WYEP are a few years later, and we just released an album.” That album is Mirror Butterfly: The Migration Liberation Movement Suite, a jazz opera that addresses the crisis of climate change and the resulting displacement of those affected by it through The Story of the Sword, a Mayan parable. The group’s live performances, which include dancers in addition to the band, are often connected to social justice causes. Rodriguez sums up the collective’s philosophy: “Music can change the world, and it has always changed the world. That’s why we make music — everyone can understand it!” •

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PHOTO: TODD COLES JR.

Linwood

L

INWOOD THINKS HIS name sounds

odd. The Pittsburgh-based rapper .and producer, born Linwood Lee Randolph Jr., is one of the rare solo artists that uses his real first name as his moniker. “I don’t have the most marketable name, it sounds weird,” says Randolph. “It rolls off the tongue weird. It sounds like an old name.” Yet, the artist chose not to change it when getting his start in the local music scene. Well, initially, Randolph went by his initials, LR, before settling on Linwood. “I couldn’t really think of anything else because it wasn’t really me,” he says. “I don’t think of myself as someone who needs an extra name. But I think that helped shape me in a way. Me saying, ‘I gotta go by my name’ kind of makes me stick more to myself. I’m trying to stay close to who I already am.”


And who is Randolph? His social media profiles sometimes have gaps of a few months between postings. A quick search of “Linwood” on Google results in realty listings and maps for Linwood Avenue. A “Linwood Randolph” search corrects to “Lynwood Cafe,” a bar in Randolph, Mass., which is, coincidentally, the state where Randolph was born. The bottom of that search page is where Randolph’s sparse Twitter account pops up, along with his YouTube channel and an In The Rough article about the artist from June 2018. But what Randolph lacks in online presence, he makes up for in human interactions and connections, which have resulted in performances with the likes of Migos, Father, and Shoreline Mafia. He was even brought in to try out producing tracks for a Gucci Mane album. The latter happened thanks to E. Dan, owner of ID Labs in Etna and an A&R representative for Rostrum Records. Although none of the music Randolph made was chosen for the record, he says he made even more connections through the process. Recently, the rapper set out on a West Coast tour with Wifisfuneral, which

“I WANT PEOPLE TO BE ABLE TO EXPRESS THEMSELVES IN RAW WAYS.” was backed by DJ Femi. The tour was an opportunity presented to Randolph through another ID Labs member, DJ Afterthought. They hit major cities such as Sacramento, San Francisco, Berkeley, Calif., and Denver, Colo. “Every show was a great learning experience in how to gain fans and really

connect with the audience [during and] after the show,” says Randolph. “When I do my shows, I try to really connect with the audience. Whether that’s making them laugh or jumping up and down, doing high energy things to give them an experience that they’re definitely going to remember, because they don’t

know me, and perception is everything.” Whether that perception is positive or negative, however, doesn’t matter to Randolph, as long he has been as transparent as his ego allows, a mentality inspired by Kanye West. When people listen to Randolph’s music, he wants them to think, “OK, he’s human.” “You can look at [West] and be like ‘Wow, he’s really a jerk’ or ‘He’s this’ or ‘He’s that,’ but the fact is that he opened up to give it to you in that straight way. It’s a message on its own.” West, in addition to Travis Scott, also influenced the way Randolph produces his own music. He prefers to auto-tune his vocals, which can be heard in the artist’s most recent song, “Rocket Power.” Named after the popular Nickelodeon TV show, the new track is a melodic, guitar-driven composition with a strong West Coast sound. It dropped shortly after his return from the tour. “What I want people to get from my music is that it’s OK to be yourself.,” says Randolph. “Finding different ways to express yourself is important. I want people to be able to express themselves in raw ways.”

Follow staff writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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THREADSONCARSON.COM 64

PHOTOS: ISHKA MICHOCKA

Alfonso Barón and Luciano Rosso

.STAGE.

UN POYO ROJO BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A SOUTH SIDE _________ MONROEVILLE MALL PGHCITYPAPER.COM

COMMON STEREOTYPE of dance is that it’s a deeply serious art .form, one that people can develop a strong distaste for based on concept alone. Randal Miller, director of dance programming at the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust, hopes to change that perception with Un Poyo Rojo, a two-man show from

Argentina that combines dance, comedy, and wrestling into an acrobatic show, which will have its U.S. debut at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center on Sat., Sept. 14. “I think that dance is one of those genres of performance that people don’t hesitate to make assumptions

UN POYO ROJO 8 p.m. Sat., Sept. 14. August Wilson African American Cultural Center, 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10-30. trustarts.org

about, or feel that they know what it is about [in] one or less experiences,” says Miller. “I think people are hard-set and make assumptions without any real experience or exposure. That’s why I work so hard to try to push people to challenge themselves.” Miller first saw Un Poyo Rojo — which translates to “a red stone bench” — at a dance festival in Bogotá, Colombia. It wasn’t the show he went there to see, but it was the one he thought was


most worth bringing to audiences back home. The show consists of performers Alfonso Barón and Luciano Rosso donning tiny shorts and kneepads, and a minimal set with a row of lockers, a bench, a working radio, and some small props like water bottles and cigarettes. As audience members enter the theater, Barón and Rosso are already on stage, stretching before their performance. The show combines themes of athletics, masculinity, competition, and sexuality with physical comedy and humorous dancing. Barón and Rosso play characters engaging in playful one-upmanship that slowly builds sexual tension between the two as they appear to mock the world of athletics that upholds rigid standards of (heterosexual) masculinity, even in a sport like wrestling. “The commentary on masculinity is this whole relationship in which they’re trying to outdo each other in this locker room,” says Miller. “But then it kind of flips on its head when you see this romantic spark happen.” The Cultural Trust put a “sexual content” warning on the show, due to some of the aggressive horniness of the

318178_4.75_x_4.75.indd characters, though Miller doesn’t think it’s especially necessary; the raciest bits are a flash of a performer’s butt when he gets his shorts pulled down. After Pittsburgh, the show will go to Philadelphia for three performances, then Canada, Spain, and Serbia. The location actually factors into the show, as one improvisational aspect involves tuning the radio to a local station live onstage. The stop in Pittsburgh is one of the only chances to see it in the U.S. for the foreseeable future, and Miller says the encore alone, which features a crazed lip-sync bit Rosso developed for a South American variety show, is worth the price of admission on its own. While Miller says the Cultural Trust has only had a handful of previous performances that combine dance and humor at a similar level, including drag ballet company Les Ballets Trockadero de Monte Carlo last April, there is always room to keep expanding the public understanding of dance. “When I’m working on curating our dance offerings here,” says Miller, “broadening perceptions of what dance can be is always at the center of everything.”

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Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID

Tigers Are Not Afraid

BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ITHIN THE FIRST five minutes

of the fantasy horrordrama Tigers Are Not Afraid¸ a young kid wields a handgun, and there is a shooting that shuts down an elementary school. The two events happen independent of each other, but they’re both rooted in the violence spawned by the drug war in Mexico. The film follows a group of kids orphaned by the violence as they try to survive the chaos. As she crouches in fear at the sound of nearby gunfire, young student Estrella (Paola Lara) is comforted when her teacher hands her three pieces of chalk and says they are her three wishes. When she gets home from school, Estrella finds that her mother is nowhere to be found. Realizing she was likely taken by the cartels, Estrella uses a wish to bring her back, but the result is haunting. She sets off to join a group of orphan boys squatting on a nearby roof. They don’t immediately accept her, both because she’s unfamiliar and because she’s a girl, but when she uses a wish to kill a cartel member, Estrella gains their trust. The death of one violent man is not the end of their problems, as the kids are hunted by more men trying to retrieve

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a cell phone filled with incriminating images. Estrella and the orphans camp out in an abandoned hotel, and have spurts of joy in between the darkness, like kicking around a soccer ball or putting on a talent show for themselves. They have a terrible life, but they still dance when a music video comes on the TV.

TIGERS ARE NOT AFRAID Directed by Issa López. Opens Fri., Sept. 13 at Regent Square Theater, 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. cinema.pfpca.org

Tigers Are Not Afraid — first released in 2017 with the title Vuelven, meaning “they come back” — is not exactly a horror film, though there are certainly spooky elements. It veers closer to fantasy, with magical realism woven in throughout, including the repeated image of a tiger, sometimes as a stuffed animal come to life, or as a straight-up tiger in an abandoned spa. There’s a line of blood that follows Estrella around, mapping deaths. Estrella keeps hearing her mother’s voice and seeing little black birds, reminiscent of those on her mother’s bracelet. The symbolism is sometimes overwrought, but the fantasy elements provide the levity, or at least imagination, needed to

cut through the darkness of the film. That the kids are young — roughly between the ages of 4 and 10 — doesn’t dissuade director/writer Issa López from showing heavy violence, often aimed at the kids themselves. Multiple kids are shot and killed, and multiple kids shoot and kill others, and the camera doesn’t look away. Tens of thousands of people have died since the drug war began in Mexico in 2006 and there’s no doubt that there are many orphaned kids who have witnessed heinous things, but the film approaches this with a flippancy that is sometimes unnerving. The kids are almost peers to the cartel members hunting them down, plotting and aiming guns with the confidence of hardened criminals who have been there before, despite their young age. The attempt to depict the realities of the drug war’s violence and its effect on the children stretches into melodrama in a setting that is not wholly grounded in reality. Even with its flaws, the movie still leaves a mark; the ghosts of people who fell victim to the war are haunting, but not as much as the lives of the people they left behind. It’s an intensely bleak way to live, and it seems like it would be impossible to find joy, but the kids always know how.


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.LITERATURE.

LIFE BY THE DROP BY REGE BEHE // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

S

TEVIE RAY VAUGHAN was barely a

teenager when he started playing for adults in roadhouses and clubs in his native Texas. Blues guitarist Albert King, notoriously particular about sharing stages with or praising musicians, recognized Vaughan as a sublime talent. Other musicians, including Jackson Browne, Dr. John, and Billy Gibbons of ZZ Top, were gobsmacked by his playing. But Vaughan struggled for years, his career nearly derailed by drug abuse, before he was finally recognized as one of the world’s best guitarists. “John Hammond [the legendary Columbia Records record producer] said sometimes it’s the most obvious ones who take the longest,” says Alan Paul, co-author of Texas Flood: The Inside Story of Stevie Ray Vaughan (St. Martin’s). “It’s as good an explanation as any, which is to say ultimately there is no explanation. ... But once people did see him, it did seem to be completely obvious to them.” With co-author Andy Aledort, Paul — a Squirrel Hill native and graduate of Allderdice High School — interviewed Vaughan’s former bandmates and fellow musicians, friends, and family members over three decades. Stevie Ray moved to Austin, Texas, at the age of 17 in 1971 after dropping out of high school. He was immediately embraced as a wunderkind, but also cut a strange figure around Austin. Vaughan rarely had a permanent mail address, lived out of boxes, and slept on couches; for a while, his main method of transportation was a moped. Vaughan’s musical maturation wasn’t fully realized until he joined with drummer Chris Layton and bassist Tommy Shannon to form Double Trouble in 1978.

“His talent was always there, that was obvious,” Paul says. “But I’m not sure that his originality was fully locked in place. And then the experience and the process of every single thing he went through, all together, added up to this incredible thing. That sounds sort of mystical, but it took all these ridiculous, extensive, convoluted things, that path, to get where he had to be.”

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In 1986, recognizing he needed help, Vaughan sought treatment. Fortunately, he thrived in rehab. After getting clean, Vaughan never wavered from sobriety, attending 12-step meetings and reading self-help books and pamphlets while on tour, always signing autographs and greeting fans after concerts. And then, after playing with Eric Clapton at the Alpine Valley Resort in Wisconsin, Vaughan’s life ended when the helicopter he was riding in crashed during foggy conditions in the first hour of August 27, 1990. Vaughan was only 35. “If he had died three or four years earlier because he OD’d, it would have been tragic,” Paul says. “The fact that he came through that and in the end was living the life he was supposed to and playing the way he was ... I think it makes it an extra level of head-scratching, befuddling tragedy. There’s no other way to put it.”

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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SEVEN DAYS OF CONCERTS AARON COHEN AND CHELSEA REJECT SAT., SEPT. 14 Hailing from Queens and Brooklyn, respectively, Aaron Cohen and Chelsea Reject are two up-and-coming rappers with a taste for the weird and off-beat. Both have fast flows and aggressive energy but underneath their hard rhymes are introspective lyrics and self-awareness. While the two artists are co-headlining a performance at Cattivo, Cohen is on tour promoting his album, RAW and his stop in Pittsburgh is the only one where Reject joins him. Local support includes Abstract Theory, Back Alley Sound, and Zende. 7:30 p.m. 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $15. cattivopgh.com PHOTO: SEN FLOYD

Chelsea Reject

FULL LIST ONLINE pghcitypaper.com

THURSDAY SEPT. 12

COUNTRY

ELECTRONIC

JAZZ

METACARA. Wigle Whiskey Barrelhouse. 5:30 p.m. North Side.

MAC POWELL AND THE FAMILY REUNION. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

ANTOINETTE. Enix Brewing. 8 p.m. Homestead. MARA ROSENBLOOM & FLYWAYS. City of Asylum. 7 p.m. North Side.

STEVE IPPOLITO’S ELECTRIC SAMBA BAND. Wallace’s Whiskey Room + Kitchen. 7 p.m. East Liberty.

ALTERNATIVE/INDIE

COVERS

FOLK

JEFF BERMAN, ANTHONY AMBROSO, ELI NARAGON. Kingfly Spirits. 7 p.m. Strip District.

DEREK WEBB. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

COVERS

MINNESOTA. Roxian Theatre. 8 p.m. McKees Rocks.

ROCK EMILY WOLFE. Moondog’s. 7:30 p.m. Blawnox. ZACH NUGENT’S DISCO DEAD. Rex Theater. 8 p.m. South Side.

GRACE ELIZABETH AFFELTRANGER. Portogallo Peppers N’AT. 7 p.m. Braddock. VALENTINO & THE AVENGERS. SouthSide Works. 6 p.m. South Side.

ANDREW BIRD, CHICANO BATMAN. Roxian Theatre. 8 p.m. McKees Rocks. THE TONY JANFLONE JR. BAND. Baja Bar and Grill. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel.

BLUES BILLY PRICE. Moondog’s. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox.

ELECTRONIC SEAN 2:16, NATIVE IMPULSE. Cattivo. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

BLUEGRASS

ROCK/PUNK THAT ARENA ROCK SHOW. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 9 p.m. Whitehall.

PUNK

COUNTRY

RANCID. Sandcastle. 5 p.m. Homestead.

JASON ALDEAN. KeyBank Pavilion. 7:30 p.m. Burgettstown.

JON LANGSTON. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

ROCK

BRASS

STONE THROWERS, SIX DEMON BAG, STICKY TICKET. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

SUNDAY SEPT. 15

COUNTRY

REBIRTH BRASS BAND. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

POP THE REAL SEA, NATURAL RAT, SIDE SLEEPER. Brillobox. 9 p.m. Bloomfield.

SATURDAY SEPT. 14

METAL

TRIBUTE

NF. Stage AE. 6:30 p.m. North Side.

FRIDAY SEPT. 13

THE PITTSBURGH LEGENDS. The Palace Theatre. 7 p.m. Greensburg.

ALTERNATIVE/INDIE

JAZZ

BALLOON RIDE FANTASY, UGLY BLONDES, BIKINI ISLANDS. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

MATTHEW AND THE ATLAS. Spirit. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

COFFEE LOVE TRANE. Atria’s Restaurant & Tavern. 6 p.m. O’Hara.

BIG BRAVE, WISTERIA. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

BONEY JAMES. Byham Theater. 8 p.m. Downtown.

GWAR. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

SURFER JOE. Howlers. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

HIP HOP

ELEMANTRA, WAVE TRAILS, NORM. Gooski’s. 8 p.m. Polish Hill.

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ZOE SORRELL. Carnegie Stage. 8 p.m. Carnegie. LANG LANG. Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra. 7 p.m. Downtown.

WEST HILLS ALL-STARS. Wallace’s Whiskey Room + Kitchen. 7 p.m. East Liberty.

ACOUSTIC

CLASSICAL

THE RICH ZABINSKI QUARTET. Cioppino Restaurant & Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District. SMASH YOUR WAGON. The Space Upstairs. 8 p.m. Homewood.

MURDERBOAT, BEFORE YOU LEAVE. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

MICHAEL LINDNER. Spoonwood Brewing Co. 7 p.m. Bethel Park.

DIRTY ROTTEN IMBECILES. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 7 p.m. Whitehall.

JAZZ

PITT FLOYD. Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. LET’S GROOVE TONIGHT (EARTH, WIND, & FIRE). Green Tree Borough Community Festival. 6:15 p.m. Green Tree.

BILL TOMS AND HARD RAIN. Moondog’s. 8 p.m. Blawnox.

WORLD

LATECOMER, KILLER OF SHEEP, ROCKY DENNIS FACE. Enix Brewing. 12 p.m. Homestead.

PHILIPPINE-AMERICAN PERFORMING ARTS: SARI-SARI. Kelly Strayhorn Theater. 4:30 p.m. East Liberty.

STARSET. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

LOS WEMBLER’S DE IQUITOS. 25 Carrick Ave. 7 p.m. Carrick.

DUDE ZORK, THE ZELLS, BOTHERSOME. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

POP

POP DRAUVE, KY VÖSS. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale. PETER KING AND HIS BAND OF FAST FRIENDS. Tavern in the Wall. 9 p.m. Aspinwall.

COVERS ARTRISTREE BAND. Baja Bar and Grill. 8 p.m. Fox Chapel.

FRANKIE AVALON, LOU CHRISTIE. The Palace Theatre. 6 p.m. Greensburg.

JAZZ MYRA MELFORD, NICOLE MITCHELL. City of Asylum. 6 p.m. North Side.

ROCK RECKLESS KELLY. Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.


PHOTO: DENNIS LEUPOLD

BACKSTREET BOYS: DNA WORLD TOUR

Backstreet Boys

SAT., SEPT. 14 Is it 1999? Because “Backstreet’s back, alright!” Hitting the road with their biggest tour in 18 years, the Backstreet Boys are bringing the nostalgia during their DNA World Tour, which boasts a hearty 33-song setlist. The tour comes in support of the band’s new album, DNA, and opened in Europe in May before coming to the states in July. According to online reviews of the show from other cities, out of the 33 songs the band performs, only nine are from DNA — so there’s a pretty good chance of hearing your favorite BSB hit. 8 p.m. PPG Paints Arena, 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown. $37.50-166.75. ppgpaintsarena.com SUPERSUCKERS. Hard Rock Cafe. 8:30 p.m. South Side. DRIVE-BY TRUCKERS. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

PUNK DESCENDENTS. Roxian Theatre. 8 p.m. McKees Rocks. CLOUD RAT, MEDIUM UGLY. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

HIP HOP/RAP UGLY GOD. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 7 p.m. Whitehall.

FOLK JOSIAH JOHNSON, STRING MACHINE. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale. MARK DIGNAM. Kingfly Spirits. 2 p.m. Strip District.

BLUES C.W. STONEKING. Spirit. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville.

MONDAY SEPT. 16 BLUES JENNIFER HARTSWICK, NICK CASSARINO. Thunderbid Café & Music Hall. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

PUNK COMEBACK KID, ABUSEOFPOWER, PLASMID. Rex Theater. 7 p.m. South Side. BERLIN. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

ROCK 68. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 7 p.m. Whitehall. BOYSCOTT, BUDDIE. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

THEM FANGS, GLAM HAND, LUXURY MACHINE. Gooski’s. 10 p.m. Polish Hill. CHARLY BLISS. Spirit. 6:30 p.m. Lawrenceville.

BLUES BLACK CAT MOAN. Wolfie’s Pub. 6 p.m. Downtown.

WEDNESDAY SEPT. 18

TUESDAY SEPT. 17

ROCK

JAZZ

DELI KINGS, DUMPLINGS, HARDAC. Gooski’s. 8 p.m. Polish Hill.

BILLY COBHAM. Roxian Theatre. 8 p.m. McKees Rocks. CROSS/CURRENT FEATURING: MAX LEAKE MUSIC, JOHN HALL, MARK LUCAS, & TIMOTHY WOODRUFF. Katz Plaza. 5 p.m. Downtown.

ROCK SHEENA, ANIKA & AUGUSTA. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. BUILT TO SPILL. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 8 p.m. Millvale.

LOW CUT CONNIE. Rex Theater. 8 p.m. South Side.

POP THE GIPSY KINGS. Carnegie Library Music Hall. 8 p.m. Homestead.

ELECTRONIC ILLENIUM. Stage AE. 5:30 p.m. North Side.

FOLK THE STAPLETONS. Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall. 7 p.m. Carnegie.

These listings are curated by Pittsburgh City Paper’s music writer Jordan Snowden and include events from our free online listings. Submit yours today at www.pghcitypaper.com/submitevent PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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.ART . .

BACKSTAGE BY LISSA BRENNAN CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NAME: Matthew Newton, Churchill WORK: Director of Publishing, Carnegie Museum of Art

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Matthew Newton

WHAT DO YOU DO? I’m charged with working on all ingallery texts, from introductory panels and section texts to wall labels, as well as any appropriate gallery guides or brochures for an exhibition. I’m also in charge of the book program, publishing from one to three books a year. I’m editor-in-chief of Storyboard, the museum’s online journal that bridges the gap between the museum, its collections, its ethos, and the community. IS YOUR BACKGROUND IN ART, WRITING, OR BOTH? Kind of a mix. I don’t have an art history background, but I’ve been a freelance writer and journalist — culture journalist, arts journalist — for over 15 years. I’ve also always had a job in publishing one way or another. I’ve mainly written about photography and more social practice art over the years, but here we do a wide spectrum. WITH THESE VARIED RESPONSIBILITIES

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AND PROJECTS, WHAT DOES A TYPICAL DAY LOOK LIKE? Pretty much everything is happening at once, all the time. An average day can be two or three meetings planning for exhibitions, all the way up to 2022. Editing for a few hours, with a lot of writing in the process. As far as writing longform pieces, which is my interest, that’s usually three to five a year, but I try to make them more substantial pieces. You might be getting a gallery walkthrough from a curator to show you where the artwork is going to be placed, get a sense of how many labels you need, what you’re grouping together. A working session with the education department trying to figure out how best to talk about a program. It’s an interesting mix. HOW DO YOU BEGIN APPROACHING AN EXHIBITION? We have early planning sessions where we work on something called “The Big Idea”: What is the crux of this, the general

idea behind the exhibition? We work to make sure that it’s always a thread throughout the introductions. We want the writing to be smart and accessible; at the same time, we don’t want to abandon scholarship. It’s treading this fine line a lot of times, trying to make sure we’re not alienating visitors who don’t know about a certain type of art, but at the same time, not speaking too generally and simplistically. It’s a very challenging thing to do. IS THE TONE THE SAME THROUGHOUT ALL THE VARIED WAYS TEXT COMES IN? It depends on what the publication is and what its goal is. For exhibitions, we try our best to present texts with that smart and accessible idea; in a catalog, it can be far more scholarly. We’ve had beautiful essays that are very lyrical, in-depth research-based essays, and everywhere in between. That’s the great thing about Storyboard, this multiplicity of voices.

And the pieces that use an exhibition as a point of departure, I think readers really like that idea of writing about a grassroots art initiative or profiling artists in the community, as opposed to giving them a treatise on the enlightenment or something. WHAT’S IN THE FUTURE THAT EXCITES YOU? The direction I’d like to take the book program. My goal is to occasionally publish books not tied to an exhibition that can essentially stand on their own. I like the idea of doing something inspired by the collection, using that as a point of departure to write about whatever it might be and go from there. With Storyboard, each issue has a digital cover. We commission a local artist, then that artwork is available as downloadable wallpaper and in actual prints in the store. I think that’s a nice extension, to actually work with local artists, be able to pay them, and then get their work out to a larger audience.


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WED., SEPT. 25 THE BLASTERS 7 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFÉ STATION SQUARE. Minors must be accompanied by a guardian. $18. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

WED., SEPT. 25 GIRLS GOTTA EAT 7 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $30-$60. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

FRI., SEPT. 27 TOBY KEITH

WED., SEPT. 25 THE FAIM & STAND ATLANTIC

HIGHMARK STADIUM STATION SQUARE.

7 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTHSIDE. All-ages event. $16. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

6:30 P.M. HIGHMARK STADIUM STATION SQUARE. All-ages event. $59-$150 . 412- 224-4900 or ticketmaster.

WED., SEPT. 25 SHAWN JAMES - THE DARK & LIGHT TOUR 2019

SUN., SEPT 29 FELIX PASTORIUS AND THE HIPSTER ASSASSINS

FRI., SEPT. 27 SEWICKLEY ART & MUSIC FESTIVAL

7 P.M. CLUB CAFÉ SOUTHSIDE. 21+ event. $13. 412-431-4950 or ticketweb.com/opusone.

8 P.M. THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS MILLVALE. All-ages event. $15. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

THU., SEPT. 26 TELEHOPE W/ SNOWDONIA & BLUE SHIFT 7:30 P.M. THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS MILLVALE. All-ages event. $8. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

THU., SEPT. 26 BROADSIDE 6:30 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. All-ages event. $13-$25.50. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com.

THU., SEPT. 26 FRANKIE COSMOS 8 P.M. SPIRIT HALL LAWRENCEVILLE. All-ages event. $17. 412-586-4441 or ticketmaster.

THU., SEPT. 26 COM TRUISE

5 P.M. BROAD STREET SEWICKLEY. All-ages event. Free

SUN., SEPT 29 ADAM EZRA GROUP

FRI., SEPT. 27 THE COMPLETE SABBATH EXPERIENCE

7:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFÉ STATION SQUARE. Minors must be accompanied by a guardian. $12. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

7 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. Minors must be accompanied by a guardian. $18. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., SEPT 29 SEBASTIAN BACH - 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF SKID ROW

SAT., SEPT. 28 NATE BARGATZE : GOOD PROBLEM TO HAVE 6 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $38-$88. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

SAT., SEPT. 28 STREETLIGHT MANIFESTO -THEIVES IN THE NIGHT TOUR 8 P.M. ROXIAN THEATRE MCKEES ROCKS. All-ages event. $26-$36. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com.

8 P.M. REX THEATER SOUTHSIDE. All-ages event. $20. 412-381-1681 or greyareaprod.com.

SAT., SEPT. 28 EVERYONE HATES EVERYTHING

FRI., SEPT. 27 TOBY KEITH

8 P.M. THE FUNHOUSE AT MR. SMALLS MILLVALE. All-ages event. $17-$27. 412-421-4447 or mrsmalls.com.

6 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM AND GRILLE WARRENDALE. $23-$35. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., SEPT 29 TACO MANIA FOOD TRUCK FESTIVAL 11 A.M. MILLVALE RIVERFRONT PARK MILLVALE. All-ages event. Free

TUES., OCT. 1 JOSH A / JAKE HILL 6 P.M. SMILING MOOSE SOUTHSIDE. All-ages event. $15-$60. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com.

TUES., OCT. 1 SUM 41 7 P.M. ROXIAN THEATRE MCKEES ROCKS. All-ages event. $58-$150. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com.

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PHOTO: PULLPROOF STUDIO

Mirror, Mirror

.ART . .

MIRROR, MIRROR BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

T THE UNBLURRED gallery crawl

on Penn Avenue, PULLPROOF Studio opened Mirror, Mirror, a salon-style group exhibition featuring female and non-binary illustrators from Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Cincinnati, and Kansas City. Run by a team of artists, the venue operates as a gallery in the front and as a membership-based workspace

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with a silkscreen printing facility in the back. With two walls of art flanking a table in the center laid out with various zines, art objects, and clothing and accessories for sale, the show — curated by Emma Vescio and PULLPROOF communications director Christina Lee — comes with a distinctively laid-back, unpretentious

feel. Much of this is owed to the focus on combining so-called high-brow and low-brow aesthetics, with conventional approaches to art happily coexisting with bright, plastic, Lisa Frank-like flash. Works are hung in a deliberate way to communicate this, with some instances being more apparent than others. On one wall, two ink drawings by Pittsburgh-

based artist Eriko Hattori, It’s Britney and Close to You, play with imagery familiar to traditional Japanese art and mythology, including a half spider-half woman yōkai spirit known as Jorōgumo, to explore fetish, sexuality, and perceptions of femininity. Surrounding these works are three pop-art pieces by Lizzee Solomon, Gag Reflex, Malparido, and


FALL - SEPTEMBER 27-29 • HOLIDAY - NOVEMBER 22 & 23 At the old Kinsey Electric Warehouse 7237 Noblestown Road, Oakdale, PA

55+ antique, vintage & artisan vendors CP PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ

Asia Lae Bey, Untitled 2

MIRROR, MIRROR AT PULLPROOF STUDIO Continues through Sat., Sep. 28. 5112 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free. pullproof.studio

Ransom, spelling out various messages in bright, shiny vinyl, and two screenprints by Ellissa Schatz titled with plastic toy letters affixed to noticeably cheap frames. The show blossoms into a frisky cornucopia of soft sculptures, prints, paintings, and illustrations that capture the beautiful, experimental messiness of youth, where juvenile attachments bump against the sophistication of adulthood. This comes across in a trio of storybook-like illustrations, two by Lacey Hall and one by Alexandra Lakin, depicting girlhood fantasy scenes with magical rooms and friendly dogs. Illustrator Xiola Jensen (a former Pittsburgh City Paper intern) offers conflicting views of young womanhood with two small, delicate pen-and-ink portraits, The Fairest of Them All and Long Live the Kween. In The Fairest of Them All, a girl remains seated in a rigid traditional pose, much like the sweet little princess suggested in its title, while in Long Live the Kween she’s clearly more relaxed, taking a selfie in her bedroom as if to suggest that this is her true self. In terms of style, Justine Kelley’s screenprints evoke the amateurish charm of early teen art with its neon Crayola marker scribbles and nostalgic imagery, including depictions of the comic strip character Garfield with uncharacteristically long, seductive eyelashes. Meanwhile, After Potty and Go Baby Go! by Allison DiPofi look more

suited to a nursery with their clean, white frames adorned with stickers, fur, and fuzzy trim, until a closer look reveals the odd prints encased within. Even with its cute, child-like style, After Potty could be viewed as a distressing morning after a night of binge drinking. In line with this is Famous Last Words, a cheeky illustration by Lee featuring a tombstone with the engraving “I’ll Have A Double Vodka Soda.” Among the most striking works are lively untitled screenprints by Asia Lae Bey, which draw the eye to various figures eating and drinking in modernday Picasso-like scenes, one at a restaurant, the other at a house party. Also impressive is Saint Sebastian by Jacque Beas, an ink and watercolor piece that uses ultra-black lines and rich red blood droplets to re-imagine the Christian saint who survives being tied to a tree and shot through with arrows. By putting over 50 pieces on display, Mirror, Mirror makes for an ambitious effort from PULLPROOF to, as the event description puts it, “highlighting the voices of visual storytellers who are underrepresented by the art world and the world at large.” With its frills, soft textures, and blasts of hot pink, the show elevates what patriarchal culture defines as frivolous or superficial (or, feminine) by giving value, both creatively and monetarily, as most of the pieces are for sale, to the experiences of the chosen artists.

Farmhouse-industrial-farm finds-cottage style-painted furniture-local winerymoonshire-chocolate-candies

KINSEYEVENTS.COM

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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.MUSIC.

QUESTIONS ABOUT SLEEPING

THE

DO YOU NEED WHITE NOISE OR SILENCE TO FALL ASLEEP? How much I rely on white noise depends on how my life is currently going. If I’m working on a project and find myself obsessing, my head being really loud at night, then the white noise helps me wash out the head noise.

BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WHAT DOES YOUR BEDTIME ROUTINE LOOK LIKE? Do the teeth, do the moisturizer, do the deep breathing. Relax with Frank, Marvin, and Chuch. ARE YOU A BACK, SIDE, OR STOMACH SLEEPER? I’m a hybrid. If I had to choose one for eternity, it would be side. FAVORITE THING IN YOUR BEDROOM? I would say the bed because without that it would just be a room.

QUESTION ABOUT MUSIC PHOTO: WWOMAN

wwoman

T

HE MUSIC VIDEO for wwoman’s

new song “Chuchi,” which drops on Fri., Sept. 13, opens with the buzzing sound of neon, and a young girl standing outside of a supermarket. Once she enters and picks up a shopping basket, the dreamy, bedroom pop track kicks in, and viewers are transported into a shopping fantasy fueled by the girl’s sweet-toothed desires. “It follows a young triangle who doesn’t fit into the round hole,” says wwoman of the video. “It’s awkward. And at the end of the sequence — at the end of

the dream — I wanted to make sure that you get no resolution from the awkwardness of not fitting in, just like real life.” Floating around the store, the girl ditches leafy greens for Pocky. She fills her basket with candy and chips, strips off her jean jacket, and dances up and down the aisles before cracking open a bubbly beverage and chugging the entire can. But at every turn, there is a cashier or weird older man, attempting to snap her out of her daydream. “Chuchi” is a commentary on the pleasures in life, and the guilt of indulging,

imposed by outside influences. “You can smash yourself into the afforded hole, which is what everyone else wants you to do, or you can understand that you don’t need the hole,” says wwoman. “The track and video stand apart thematically, but complement each other texturally. They are both very neon, and they are both triangles.” Ahead of the music video’s release, Pittsburgh City Paper chatted with wwoman for The 412, CP’s music section where local musicians give updates, as well as fun tidbits about their lives.

WHAT’S YOUR ALL-TIME FAVORITE ALBUM? I can’t even think of one album that I like.

QUESTIONS ABOUT ANIMALS IF YOU COULD HAVE ANY ANIMAL AS A PET, KNOWING IT WOULDN’T HURT YOU, WHAT WOULD YOU CHOOSE? I would clone myself in an attempt to be more productive. WHAT WOULD YOU NAME IT? g2. •

The 5th Judicial District of Pennsylvania and Allegheny County Pretrial Services urges you to enjoy your weekend out in Pittsburgh but

make the right choice, SHOP • SHOOT • TRAIN • ENTERTAIN

Indoor range • Self Defense • Brazilian Jiu Jitsu • Fitness • Full Retail store

L i v e Wi th C o n f i d e n ce . co m

724.759.7571 74

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don’t drink & drive.


Black Magic Manor Halloween Party! Fri, Oct 25, 2019, 9:00 PM Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel

$25 General Admission $100 VIP (3 hour open bar) Tickets available at EventBrite.com Renaissance Pittsburgh Hotel 107 6th Street Pittsburgh, PA 15222 (412) 562-1200

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER SEPT. 11-18, 2019

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FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

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ASSISTANT TEACHING PROFESSOR OF MEDIA CREATION AND MULTICULTURAL STUDIES The Department of Modern Languages in Dietrich College of Humanities & Social Sciences at Carnegie Mellon University seeks an Assistant Teaching Professor of Media Creation & Multicultural Studies in Pittsburgh, PA to serve as curator of tech-rich space on campus to promote global & intercultural capability of campus community & visitors thru immersive, interactive culture & language learning experiences. Any interested applicant may send resume to Media Creation & Multicultural Studies Search Committee, Dept. of Modern Languages, 160 Baker Hall, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213.

AUGMENTED REALITY/ VIRTUAL REALITY (AR/VR) DEVELOPER

Drummer needed for a Punk Band. Must have own equipment. Serious inquires only. Contact Marty at 412-400-5067

to Lose Weight. 30-day money back guarantee. Herbal Program. Also opportunity to earn up to $1,000 monthly. 1-800-492-4437 www.myherbalife.com

HELP WANTED PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIAN Allegheny Clinic seeks Primary Care Physician to work in Pittsburgh, PA to help treat and prevent diseases and injuries that commonly occur in the general population. Send CV/cover letter with salary requirements and references to Annette. Fetchko@AHN.ORG with “Primary Care Physicians” in the subject line.

OFFICIAL ADVERTISEMENT

THE BOARD OF PUBLIC EDUCATION OF THE SCHOOL DISTRICT OF PITTSBURGH Sealed proposals shall be deposited at the Administration Building, Bellefield Entrance Lobby, 341 South Bellefield Avenue, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15213, on October 1, 2019, until 2:00 P.M., local prevailing time for:

PGH. LANGLEY K-8 s#ORRIDOR#EILINGSAND,IGHTS AND #LASSROOM#EILINGSAND,IGHTS $EDUCT!LTERNATE s'ENERAL %LECTRICALAND!SBESTOS !BATEMENT0RIMES PGH. GREENFIELD K-8 s2EPLACE%LECTRICAL$ISTRIBUTION 3YSTEM s'ENERALAND%LECTRICAL0RIMES Project Manual and Drawings will be available for purchase on September 3, 2019 at Modern Reproductions (412-488-7700), 127 McKean Street, Pittsburgh, Pa., 15219 between 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. The cost of the Project Manual Documents is non-refundable. Project details and dates are described in each project manual. We are an equal rights and opportunity school district.

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YinzCam Inc. seeks an Augmented Reality/Virtual Reality (AR/VR) Developer in Pittsburgh, PA, to be responsible for developing new augmented (AR) & virtual reality (VR) experiences for professional sports teams/stadiums to be promoted in their official apps by analyzing user needs & software requirements. Apply at www.yinzcam.com

NAME CHANGE

STUDY Alcohol & Smoking Research Lab at the University of Pittsburgh is looking for men to participate in a research project. Must be between 21 and 28 years old and be a social drinker. Must be willing to drink alcohol. Earn up to $90 for participating in a two-session study. For more information, call: 412-624-8975, or email: asrl@pitt.edu

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-012758, In re petition of Reuven Gelfand parent and legal guardian of Garrett Jenkins, for change of name to Garrett Gelfand Jenkins. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 7th day of October, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

NAME CHANGE

NAME CHANGE

NAME CHANGE

NAME CHANGE

NAME CHANGE

NAME CHANGE

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-10843. In re petition of Evelyn Lucanish for change of name to Evelyn Vargas Manes Lucanish. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 20th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-11395. In re petition of Stephanie Frances King for change of name to Stephanie Frances King-Lingenfelter. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 7th day of October, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-11761, In re petition of Michelle Martin parent and legal guardian of Mekhi Martin-Younger, for change of name to Mekhi Martin. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 26th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-16-12908. In re petition of Kevin Lashaye Hardy Jr. for change of name to Kevin Lashaye Smith. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 25th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-11450, In re petition of Elizabeth Marie Platt parent and legal guardian of Angelina Larissa Kuhn, for change of name to Angelina Larissa Platt. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 19th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-11355. In re petition of Lorena Patricia Leal Rodriguez for change of name to Lorena Leal. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 2nd day of October, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for


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clue heading 57. Finger-licking meal that usually comes with a wetnap, for short 59. “Like, immediately!” 60. Hoppy beer selection 61. “Like, duh!” 65. Mississippi River explorer 67. Casserole morsel 68. Scene of bedlam 70. Release, as a bra 71. Corny entertainer 72. Dory’s friend 73. “Heartsand-minds” military missions 74. “Yo, yo, yo” 75. Snifter part

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21. “Sunday Night Football” channel 22. Chairman name 26. Ennui vibe 27. Frat letter 28. Scraps 29. “Succession” channel 30. Jeff Lynne’s ___ (rock band) 32. Admiral’s rear 35. Craggy hill 37. Didn’t say anything 38. Pennsylvania city on its’ namesake lake 40. Seemingforever stretch 41. Nuke quickly 42. Strong arm? 43. Smidge

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44. See 5-Across 49. Project Gutenberg archives 50. Corp. acquisition 52. Prefix with “glottis” 53. Decorates 54. Decorated 55. Hits theaters 56. Wishy-___ 58. 19th letters in the Hebrew alphabet 61. Convertible roof 62. Boyfriend 63. Femme fatale 64. A handful 66. “Wheels” in the theme answers that support meals 69. Holland who plays Spider-Man LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

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77


PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

T

HE FIRST TIME I remember having images of my body drastically altered was right after my first wedding. As a gift, my husband’s mother had a couple of our wedding pictures airbrushed. I was shocked when the pictures came back — not because they were bad, they actually came out nicely — but because they gave me a glimpse, for the first time, into what someone else saw as my flaws. My face was slightly narrower, my skin clearer, and my breasts fuller. While this was shocking to me in the late ’90s when I didn’t have the skills or the means to alter my own photos, it has now become commonplace. As someone who has done a fair amount of nude modeling, I have learned what parts of my body get “fixed” through the editing process, cellulite being one of the most common. It is estimated that up to 90 percent of women have cellulite, but representations of cellulite in art, photography, and advertisements are relatively few and far between. Smoothing tools in photo editing apps like FaceTune easily wipe it out. But this isn’t without consequences. When it is impossible to see images that represent what your body actually looks like, it is easy to feel like natural features are problems. Artist Jaymie Delight, who creates sexy and kinky cartoon pinups (and

cutekink.com

recently launched a comic book, The Dress) is working to actively put into her images those “flaws” which are so often smoothed out. Most recently, she has been working on drawing realistic looking cellulite and making it sexy. As someone who often felt selfconscious about her own cellulite, she has felt compelled to normalize it. “Cellulite is just part of being a human with skin. We have to stop hating ourselves,” she says. Delight started her artistic career

wanting to make fun cartoon porn, she has come to see her work as a larger political project. “I just can’t create something that doesn’t have an activist mindset behind it,” says Delight, whose activism focuses on body and sex positivity. “I want to give women porn [so] that they will look at it and feel attractive in themselves.” The medium is part of the message: Her drawings are colorful, sexy, and fun. It would be hard not to think of the bodies that she represents as

anything but desirable, and this is very intentional. About reflecting on her work, she says, “In creating porn that is so fun, so cartoony, I am really sending the message that diverse bodies are not just smooth, one size, and one color. All of these bodies are desirable; your body is desirable.” Delight admits that it wasn’t easy to start drawing cellulite. “Cellulite is still a really scary thing for people,” she says. “If you look at images of plus-size models, they are curvy but perfectly smooth. Cellulite throws people off.” And yet, the reception she got was really positive. She recalls, “I was scared the first time I drew cellulite, but those posts got even more traction than regular cute pinups. People want and need this.” Ironically, while thinking about this piece, I was also going through my own images, thinking about which ones to post and was forced to confront my own biases. While I find the bodies that Delight draws to be very sexy, I have a hard time extending that same love to my own body, which looks very similar to many of those that she depicts. It is not easy to undo years of programming that dictates for us what is hot and what is not. But thankfully, Delight’s work also pushed me to question those biases and think of my body in a new light. She is right, I want and need her work; you may, too.

JESSIE SAGE IS CO-HOST OF THE PEEPSHOW PODCAST AT PEEPSHOWPODCAST.COM. HER COLUMN PEEPSHOW IS EXCLUSIVE TO PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @PEEP_CAST. HAVE A SEX QUESTION YOU’RE TOO AFRAID TO ASK? ASK JESSIE! EMAIL INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM. QUESTIONS MAY BE CONSIDERED FOR AN UPCOMING COLUMN.

Pittsburgh’s lone liberal talkshow host for 30+ years Listen live Monday thru Thursday at 10 a.m. at lynncullen.pghcitypaper.com 78

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79


Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

September 11, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly. On the cover this week: Fall Guide, featuring 100 plays, parties, movies, concerts,...

September 11, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly. On the cover this week: Fall Guide, featuring 100 plays, parties, movies, concerts,...