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PITTSBURGH’S ALTERNATIVE FOR NEWS, ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT SINCE 1991

Dominique Scaife imagines a world beyond colorism with her sculptures

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AUG. 21-28, 2019


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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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FIRSTSHOT BY JARED WICKERHAM

Rich Thewes jumps over his friend, Dustin Klein, before diving into the Bloomfield pool on the last open day this summer.

650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.685.9009 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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AUG. 21-28, 2019 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 34 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Editorial Designer ABBIE ADAMS Graphic Designers JOSIE NORTON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Events and Sponsorship Manager BLAKE LEWIS Senior Account Executive JOHN CLIFFORD Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Events and Marketing Coordinator BRYER BLUMENSCHEIN Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, LISSA BRENNAN, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, CHARLES ROSENBLUM, JESSIE SAGE Interns SARAH CONNOR, JARED MURPHY, EMILY WOLFE Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2019 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

COVER PHOTO: JARED MURPHY READ THE STORY ON PAGE 14

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Gerald Dickinson, professor of law at the University of Pittsburgh and candidate for congress, speaks with Jackie Holloway and her family on the bus through the Oakland neighborhood.

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THE BIG STORY

PROGRESSIVE PULSE Gerald Dickinson wants to be a progressive megaphone, but will his campaign resonate with Pittsburghers? BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

NEW WAVE of progressive democrats is changing the

face of liberal politics in America. The best known is likely U.S. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), who defeated a longtime high-ranking Democrat in her Bronx district in 2018 with progressive ideas that have bucked the Democratic establishment. Locally, two progressive state representative candidates, Sara Innamorato (D-Lawrenceville) and Summer Lee (D-Swissvale), defeated moderate Democratic incumbents in 2018. The two women had dedicated groups of volunteers, and each were able to differentiate themselves from their opponents by highlighting incumbents’ conservative votes on immigration and abortion-access rights. Now, University of Pittsburgh law professor Gerald Dickinson is hoping to replicate that success in his run against incumbent U.S. Rep. Mike Doyle (D-Forest Hills). Dickinson’s platform is mostly to the left of Doyle on affordable housing, criminal justice, and the environment. But beating Doyle will be more difficult than Innamorato or Lee’s victories; there’s not much room to the left of Doyle to outflank him. Doyle’s voting record is generally progressive and he has a record of being active in his district, most recently holding a town hall on climate change. There appears to be little resentment of Doyle in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District. But Dickinson thinks being more vocal and active than Doyle, who is relatively mild-mannered, will benefit him and the district. “If you are underneath the radar, you aren’t always helping the progressive cause,” says Dickinson. “Being a loud voice is necessary to move the needle.” Political experts say to take down an incumbent like Doyle, Pittsburgh voters will need obvious signs that Doyle isn’t representing their interests. Right now, there aren’t really any. And so far Dickinson’s campaign doesn’t mirror the grassroots successes of Innamorato or Lee, and lacks the same network of volunteers. But that could change. Will Dickinson’s message resonate with Pittsburghers enough for them to dump Doyle? DICKINSON IS A Pitt law professor and has written about constitutional law in publications like The Atlantic and The Washington Post. He is a vocal proponent of immediately raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour and banning solitary confinement on the federal level. “There is a difference between passively progressive, and being vocal on the issues,” says Dickinson. “Why not have a progressive young leader, who is not worried about the district flipping.” The 18th district is one of the most solidly Democratic districts in the state — only two others are less vulnerable to Republican opponents. While Doyle supports many of the same policies Dickinson is CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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PROGRESSIVE PULSE, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

Eating Happily. Leaving with Smile.

The True Taste of Thai

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

2018 MURRAY AVE. PGH, PA 15217

412-422-6767

WWW.TOOKTOOK98.COM

Gerald Dickinson

advocating, one area Dickinson might have an advantage with the district’s urban residents is affordable housing. Early in his career, Dickinson practiced law in New York City and has represented many low-income clients in eviction cases. He recognizes the deck is often stacked against them. He says that if elected he would work to create legislation to incentivize municipalities to create affordablehousing fixes like Community Land Trusts. Dickinson supports increasing funds to the federal Housing Trust Fund, and also would use his bully pulpit to encourage cities like Pittsburgh to normalize their zoning code so dense development can more easily be built near public transit. He says this could help create affordable units for people who don’t own cars. Dickinson supports a federal refundable tax credit, in which renters can save hundreds or thousands in taxes each year. “For the working poor, that would be a huge deal,” says Dickinson. Dickinson’s fundraising levels are also significantly higher than Doyle’s previous Democratic challengers. He’s raised an impressive $105,000 so far. “It shows we are serious,” says Dickinson of his campaign. “We are not just a pilot project.” Even so, Dickinson hasn’t quite earned the same progressive chops as other successful challengers. About one-

third of his 119 individual donations are from Pittsburgh-area residents. He’s averaging about $825 dollars per donation. While not very high, it’s not as low as Innamorato, whose 2018 campaign had 264 individual donations and averaged about $262 each. This isn’t to say Doyle is getting a higher quantity of local and small-dollar donors. In 2019, Doyle has raised more than 83 percent of his funds from PACs, and has only garnered 43 individual donations. But Doyle is the incumbent, so Dickinson needs to build the groundswell to topple Doyle, not the other way around. So far, Doyle doesn’t seem very worried. On Aug. 12, when WESA asked Doyle about Dickinson’s candidacy for his seat, Doyle acknowledged the candidates, including Dickinson, who are interested in his seat, but noted no one has secured a spot on the ballot. “I don’t really pay much attention to [them],” Doyle told WESA of his potential opponents. “My job is to represent the people of the 18th Congressional district, and if I do my job, elections take care of themselves. I don’t waste a lot of my time worrying about what other people say who may or may not be on a ballot eight months from now.” Terry Madonna, political pollster at Franklin & Marshall College in Lancaster, says any Doyle challenger will have a tough road ahead, since voters need a

clear reason to believe incumbents don’t represent their interests — as Innamorato was able to do by highlighting incumbent Dom Costa’s history of support for anti-immigrant legislation. But right now, there seems to be little such frustration with Doyle. He was criticized by environmentalists over some of his more moderate stances during a climate-change town hall. Mike Stout of the Izaak Walton League, a national conservation group, told Pittsburgh City Paper he was “pretty upset” that Doyle rejected a speaker to advocate for the Green New Deal for his town hall. Even so, there didn’t appear to be enough opposition to catalyze substantial momentum against Doyle, as some other local environmental advocates publicly praised him for the town hall. Dickinson wants to be vocal and spread a progressive message, but it’s unclear if Pittsburghers actually think Doyle isn’t vocal enough. He supports starting an impeachment inquiry into Trump, has been a longtime advocate and cosponsor for Medicare for All, and is a leader in trying to restore the U.S. to Net Neutrality internet rules. Madonna also says Doyle has the backing of organized labor, has never had a large scandal, and isn’t a lazy incumbent. “When you go through all this, it is going to be hard to beat him,” says Madonna.

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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.NEWS.

CLEARING DEBT Advocacy project looks to eliminate millions in medical debt for Western Pennsylvanians BY EMILY WOLFE INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

IZELL HENDERSON can’t even remember the name of the infection that attacked his immune system and put him in the hospital for months, but he is constantly reminded of its financial burden because it saddled him with $42,000 of medical debt. “When they finished [the operation], I had holes in my body, rips and tears from where they were trying to get the infection out of my body,” Henderson says. Three years later, Henderson, 62, receives a monthly disability check from Social Security in the mail — but part of that check, he says, has already been taken away to pay for the bills from his time at UPMC Presbyterian. He is struggling to pay off his medical debt. Henderson’s story is one of many familiar to Ben Fiorillo, an organizer with the Pennsylvania-based humanrights organization Put People First! PA (PPF). More than 1.5 million Pennsylvanians have unpaid medical debt, according to the group. And in America, more than 35 percent of those with medical debt have difficulty paying for basic necessities like food, heat, or housing. “It’s one of the terrible symptoms of our for-profit health care system,” says Fiorillo. PPF recently partnered with the national debt-forgiveness group RIP Medical Debt to eliminate more than a million dollars in medical debt in Western Pennsylvania. Through a series of fundraisers, PPF raised $16,466, which RIP Medical Debt will use to purchase $1.6 million in medical debt for pennies on the dollar in 18 Western Pennsylvania counties, including Allegheny. Fiorillo says 875 people in those counties will have their debt forgiven. That’s a tiny fraction of the 1.5 million Pennsylvanians with unpaid medical

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bills, but RIP Medical Debt targets debt belonging to those most in need. The people whose debt will be forgiven have declared bankruptcy, make less than half the federal poverty level, or spend more than 5 percent of their income on medical bills. “It’s not every single person in Western Pennsylvania who’s in medical debt,” Fiorillo says. “It’s a subset of people who are facing the worst impact of it.” PPF organizers don’t know the personal information of the people whose debt they’ve bought, but the portfolios RIP Medical Debt purchases include personal information that allow them to contact patients. Fiorillo says RIP Medical Debt is in the process of informing the 875 Western Pennsylvania patients that

their debt has been forgiven. RIP Medical Debt functions like a debt-collection agency. Typically, health insurance companies are willing to transfer ownership of the debt for pennies on the dollar, since they don’t have the desire or resources to collect the debt for the original cost. But instead of hounding people to pay the debt like debt-collection agencies would, RIP Medical Debt just forgives it. And because it’s a nonprofit, the forgiven debt isn’t taxed. A few years ago, the process was popularized by talk-show host John Oliver, who paid about $60,000 on air to purchase more than $15 million in medical debt. PPF’s ongoing “health care is a human right” campaign attempts to

fight flaws in the state’s health care system. Ultimately, PPF’s goal is to push state lawmakers to pass a single-payer health care plan in Pennsylvania and take private insurance companies out of the equation entirely. “This is a long-term fight in order to win a universal single-payer health care system,” Fiorillo says. In the meantime, the group is pushing for legislation that would establish an office for a public health care advocate in the state government. “I think it’s important to put in context what’s actually happening around the issue of medical debt,” Fiorillo says. “What we have in our current health-care system is insurance companies that are incentivized to pay out as little as possible.”


THIS WEEK ONLINE AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CP PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ

CARNEGIE LIBRARY OF PITTSBURGH VOTED TO UNIONIZE — NOW WHAT? “This is a big step toward making the library more fair and equitable for the workers that keep it thriving.”

JENSORENSEN

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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.RESTAURANT REVIEW.

BLUE SPARROW BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

L

UKE CYPHER didn’t want to own a restaurant. After a decade of cooking back-of-house, the chef was tired of hiding behind kitchen walls. He wanted to see his customers and interact with the people eating his food. Now, Cypher meets his diners faceto-face from the window of his mobile eatery, Blue Sparrow. It’s the perfect blend of front- and back-of-house, simultaneously serving and cooking. Blue Sparrow hit Pittsburgh streets in 2016 from an old Duquesne Light truck Cypher bought on Craigslist. Soon after its debut, Blue Sparrow had a crowd of loyal followers. Cypher was one of the first mobile chefs to bring Asian fusion into the spotlight and Pittsburghers were drawn in almost immediately. Just two years after launching the truck, Cypher was ready to expand. And instead of going stationary, Blue Sparrow added a vintage Greyhound bus to its fleet. The 35foot, 1950s-era bus is able to hold three times the amount of food, has three service windows, and is outfitted with a tap system for beer collaborations. Cypher describes his menu as “global street food.” The blanket term allows him to “flex his culinary muscle” and tap into all cuisines for inspiration. His menu carries a heavy Asian — specifically Korean — influence. There’s madefrom-scratch kimchi on the menu every day, along with bulgogi, a traditional Korean barbeque beef. True to his word, Cypher pulls inspiration from all over the globe. A Mediterranean-Mexican infusion, the falafel burrito, sits next to a traditional Cubano and Vietnamese banh mi.

CP PHOTO: JARED MURPHY

Inside Blue Sparrow’s Greyhound bus

BLUE SPARROW

bluesparrowpgh.com

I could have stared at Cypher’s menu all day and made no decisions. So, outside of Eleventh Hour Brewing Company in Lawrenceville, where the truck often sits, I let Cypher and his partner take the lead. The duo gave me four dishes: a ramen burger, banh mi, japchae

(glass noodles), and bibimbap (a Korean rice dish). At first glance, I was unconvinced by the ramen burger. I wrongly assumed that it was a gimmick for Instagram, and therefore couldn’t taste nearly as good as it looked. But the burger was fantastic. Cypher topped a thick burger with mozzarella, sparrow sauce (creamy garlic miso), mozzarella, and micro greens, then served it between two baked ramen patties. The

FAVORITE FEATURES: Desserts

Sparrow

Food truck forever

Cookie. Sandwiches. No need to say more.

Sailors have historically tattooed themselves with sparrows to represent the journeys they’ve made. Blue Sparrow is Cypher’s journey.

Though Cypher will “never say never,” he has no plans to open a stationary restaurant. Blue Sparrow will remain a food truck indefinitely.

ramen was better than a bun because it absorbed some of the juices from the burger and the spice packet (yes, the spice packet is part of the baking process). Cypher nailed it: the burger made a great picture and had the taste to match. The bowls — one spicy and one sweet — were topped with vibrant, pickled veggies and fresh herbs. The banh mi, filled with pickled carrots, cilantro, spicy pork, and cucumber, stood out on Cypher’s handmade focaccia. Today, Blue Sparrow is a little less mobile than it used to be; the eatery is locked in a semi-permanent spot at Eleventh Hour Brewing. This, to Cypher, is what running a food truck is all about. He doesn’t want people looking for Blue Sparrow because it’s convenient, he wants people to come back because of his food.

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav

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FRESH HANDMADE FOOD LOCAL CRAFT BEER DAILY SPECIALS

CRAFTYJACKALOPE.COM

CP PHOTO: JARED MURPHY

Lincoln Avenue Brewery

.ON THE ROCKS.

UNPROHIBITED BY MAGGIE WEAVER // MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

N JANUARY 2018, in 4-degree weather, Bellevue broke ground on its first brewery, Lincoln Avenue Brewery. Owners Grant Saylor, Lisa Saylor, Joel Haldeman, and Amy Haldeman were joined by community members to transform a 110-year-old building into a modern place to grab a pint. The completed Lincoln Avenue Brewery opened its doors less than a month ago, but it’s packed every day. Bellevue, a neighborhood notorious for keeping Prohibition-era laws until 2015, isn’t wasting any time. The brewery can’t make beer fast enough.

LINCOLN AVENUE BREWERY 538 Lincoln Ave., Bellevue facebook.com/lincolnavebrew

Currently, head brewer Grant is working off of a two-barrel system he jokes is “painfully slow.” It’s slow enough that he’s already looking to expand into a five-barrel system, as his small setup is constantly working to produce the beer (about 12-18 days, depending on the style). On tap, there’s a mix of traditional beers, like IPAs, porters, lagers, and pilsners. The end goal is to have seven house-made beers on tap at all times, but for now, the brewery is just trying to keep up with demand. He’s supplementing with products from other local brewers, distilleries, and vineyards.

Once things settle down, he plans to branch into “trendier” beers, like sours. Grant may call his brews traditional, but the beers themselves say otherwise. The I Don’t Get It, a blonde cream ale Grant describes as a blend of a lager and ale, is malty and floral. Sa’wheat, another hazy brew, is rich and crisp. His 511 NEIPA, the brewery’s most popular beer, is mild, but hazy and juicy. The brewery also has a small, curated list of Pittsburgh-fresh snacks and sandwiches. Grant makes tri-weekly trips to the Strip District for meats and cheeses to fill the charcuterie board and sandwiches (made with bread from Mediterra Bakehouse). One of his favorite items is a huge – and undeniably delicious – soft pretzel from the Bakehouse, with beer cheese and mustard made from Lincoln Avenue beers. Grant already has big plans for the brewery’s future. He’s working an alllocal SMASH (single-malt-and-singlehop) brew, using malt from Fenelton and hops from the local organization Hops on Lots. There will be two taps reserved for home brewers, which Grant will brew in-house and donate one dollar of each pour to charity. For Grant, Lincoln Avenue Brewery is about more than just good beer. His space is a place to put phones away and meet the strangers sitting next to you. “You can go anywhere and get a two-dollar Coors Light,” says the brewer. “We’re brewing community.”

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CP PHOTOS: JARED MURPHY

Left: Dominique Scaife at The Spinning Plate Gallery

.ART . .

A CELEBRATION OF HUE BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

B

Y

HER

OWN

ADMISSION,

sculptor Dominique Scaife only started taking her art seriously a few years ago, but she already has a distinct style. She makes clay busts that explore the diversity of Black life, paying special attention to details like hair, jewelry, and makeup. On Sat., Aug. 17, Scaife’s show World Melanation: A Celebration of Hue opens at the Spinning Plate Gallery. The exhibit will consist of 20 sculptures, all Black women, dedicated to exploring and celebrating varieties in skin tone and appearance. The phrase “world melanation” came to Scaife during meditation and she decided to apply it to multiple art projects. But “celebration of hue” was a deliberate choice of words to emphasize all the shades in her sculptures. “We have a long history of colorism within our culture and I want to see what this world looks like beyond colorism, within our individual group, and with the

rest of the world,” says Scaife. “Instead of having the old conversation of what colorism is, where our hurts are, what if we ascended beyond that and just celebrated each other and loved each other?” In addition to the bust sculptures, Scaife will have 2D drawings of the pieces on paper that visitors can color themselves, which will then become part of the exhibit. The idea stems from an incident that happened when Scaife’s daughter was little, and a cousin told her she couldn’t color with the brown crayon because she was lighter-skinned. “I want the youth to come in, I want them to see art, and I want them to see a representation of themselves that they could also color like that,” Scaife says. She says she didn’t grow up around art, but liked the ceramics class she took in high school. When Scaife wanted to find a creative outlet, she gravitated towards clay or, as she puts it, “clay chose me.” When her daughter graduated from high school, Scaife began working more

with clay. Her daughter was impressed with her sculptures and threatened that if her mom didn’t do something with them, she would do it for her.

WORLD MELANATION: A CELEBRATION OF HUE

Opening reception Sat., Aug. 17 from 4-8 p.m. Continues through Sat., Sept. 14. Open Saturdays 12-4 p.m. or by appointment. Spinning Plate Gallery, 5821 Baum Blvd., East Liberty. facebook.com/SpinningPlateGallery

The sculptures all have distinctive faces, but share certain qualities. There’s heavy emphasis on the eyes, nose, and lips. The eyes are often closed, with the eyelids resting in a serene and peaceful way. The clay has a handmade quality to it, not in a way that looks amateur, but one that honors the marks from the hands that touched and molded it. They often have distinct statement jewelry. Scaife pays special attention to the hair,

styling some in locs, Bantu knots, and twist outs. She says the faces are not based on any one woman in particular but a collection of features she’s noticed from extensive people-watching. “It’s not any specific person, but it’s just these images that I see and hold in my mind and when I’m sculpting, they come out,” she says. “Maybe you’ll see a part of you. It doesn’t have to be the whole you, maybe you’ll say, ‘Oh, I have that nose’ or ‘I have that hairstyle’ or ‘I have those lips.’” The exhibit is a celebration of bodies, faces, skin colors, and personalities, and ultimately Scaife just wants visitors to see and appreciate something they don’t often see depicted in art around Pittsburgh. “In this world in my mind that I’m creating with my sculptures, I just want us to be celebrated, because often Black women are not celebrated,” she says. “No matter what skin tone you come in, you matter.”

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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THE LOCAL 913: CHAD SIPES STEREO BY LIZ FELIX // LIZ@WYEP.ORG

Chad Sipes got a taste of national attention as a part of the band Sodajerk in the late ’90s. When the band picked up and moved to Atlanta in 2005, Sipes stayed in his hometown and started making power pop under the name Chad Sipes Stereo. “It’s funny,” he says. “I did name [the band] after myself because I never imagined I’d be able to hold a lineup down — the same lineup STAY UP-TOof guys — so DATE WITH THIS I said it will WEEK’S LOCAL always be MUSIC NEWS revolving, and WITH CP MUSIC I’ll just keep WRITER JORDAN my name on SNOWDEN it to keep AND WYEP it consistent. Fifteen years EVENING MIX later, it’s pretty HOST LIZ FELIX much the Listen every same lineup.” Wednesday The band’s at 7 p.m. on sound has been consistent 91.3FM WYEP too. Chad Sipes Stereo’s new EP, Dig, channels the crunchy, catchy rock of bands like Old 97’s and Weezer. Of his songwriting, Sipes says, “I like to write from the point of view of different people and different kinds of people. I try to get inside them a little bit. Mostly, I’m a storyteller.” The EP’s opener “Extinct” tells a story that many will identify with in an era of environmental destruction. “It’s sort of about the environment and people making decisions to dump a giant load of tires in a landfill in a town,” Sipes says. “You can’t bury tires. They always come to the surface. It’s just impossible. It’s sort of a unique thing to write a song about, but it works. I promise.” •

CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

.MUSIC.

VENUE GUIDE: THIS IS RED BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

N ADVERTISING AGENCY by day and event space by

night (and weekends), THIS IS RED occupies the former St. Michael’s Slovak Roman Catholic Church building in Homestead. When the company moved in during the summer of 2016, they decided to keep church features like the 54-foot hand-built mahogany ceiling, 18foot Corinthian-topped solid marble arches, and 50-foot parabolic mirror with a herringbone-patterned half dome. At the same time, they modernized the inside by recycling and integrating many of the materials left behind by the church into their renovations. The result is stunning, and since the THIS IS RED team are music nerds, they felt they had to share their beautiful office space with Pittsburgh, renting it out for events ranging from live music to weddings. (They drew the line at wresting.)

THIS IS RED

605 E. Ninth Ave., Homestead. livefromthisisred.com

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The first floor is home to THIS IS RED’s workspace, equipped with a full-size kitchen — former home of the church commissary — laundry room, and even showers. In addition, there is a gift shop where visitors can buy CDs from MCG Jazz artists and others who have previously performed at THIS IS RED. Jeff Myers, owner of THIS IS RED, either paints or creates digital art for MCG Jazz’s album covers. The middle floor, or altar level, is where most of the events take place. This is where the original altar with parabolic mirror is found, allowing sound to be amplified in a way not found in newer buildings. On the top floor, along with a mini library, movie theater, and guitar collection (courtesy of Myers), is a handmade bar, fully stocked with whiskey and beer.* This area is not always open. Bands, musicians, or companies pay for the space they use, and not everyone rents the bar. But that’s what is magical about THIS IS RED; it’s extremely flexible. Those who use the space can customize the event to their heart’s desire.


HEADING TO A VENUE for the first time can be anxiety-inducing or at the very least

cause inconveniences. Where’s will call? Is there parking? Will you have to hide your expensive bag behind a tree because it’s too big to pass security? Pittsburgh City Paper wants to help make attending shows as comfortable as possible. So, welcome to our venue guide, where you can find out what to wear, where to smoke, and everything in between. CP will detail the ins and outs of venues in Pittsburgh, so you can fully enjoy the experience and not worry about little nuisances like not knowing the bar was cash-only.

ROOM

SMOKING • Non-smoking venue (this includes vapes) • Smoking is allowed outside in the garden, located to the right of the altar level

FOOD & BEVERAGE • Depends on show*

TICKETING • Visit livefromthisisred.com to purchase tickets • Tickets can be purchased at the door (if not sold out)

BATHROOMS • Two bathrooms located on altar level • For big shows, VIP or regular portapotties are typically rented and located outside • No bathrooms inside are ADA compliant (with porta-potties, the space can be handicap accessible)

AGE RESTRICTIONS • Depends on show*

SECURITY • Coat check available in the colder months • Security around for shows with over 150 occupants

• Standing and seated room (depends on show)*

TRANSPORTATION • Free parking on E. Ninth Ave. and surrounding streets • Uber and Lyft can drop off/pick up in front • 52L, 53, 59, and 61C buses get within walking distance • Walkable to those living in or visiting the Homestead area • Valet available for some shows

ACCESSIBILITY • Ramp on side of building can take you to the altar level. • Only steps are available to take guests to the lower or top levels

FUN FACTS • There’s an indoor grotto on the lower level that features a huge mural along with faux stalactites at the top of the stone altar. • On the top level is a cinema used to preview and create THIS IS RED’s video content • Many of the pieces in THIS IS RED were crafted from leftover church materials – the marble on the upstairs bar is from the side altars.

*Because the events at THIS IS RED are completely customizable for the artist/band/company throwing the performance, food and beverage, age restrictions, and more are chosen by the event host. Check livefromthisisred.com come for more information about specific events, or contact info@thisisredagency.com with questions and concerns. Follow staff writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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PHOTO: SETH JOHNSON/ROADSIDE ATTRACTIONS AND ARMORY FILMS

Zack Gottsagen and Shia LaBeouf strike up an unlikely friendship in The Peanut Butter Falcon.

.FILM.

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

OLLYWOOD HAS ALWAYS struggled with portraying people with disabilities in a way that doesn’t seem condescending or cliched. The Peanut Butter Falcon is the latest attempt at breaking the mold, but the movie is too convoluted to really make a point. Zak (Zack Gottsagen) is an adult with Down syndrome who lives in a North Carolina nursing home, despite his young age, because he was abandoned by his family and the state has nowhere else to put him. He dreams of running away and learning to become a wrestler at a school run by his wrestling hero, The Salt Water Redneck (Thomas Haden Church). After a few attempts at running away, Zak is deemed a flight risk by his supervisor Eleanor (Dakota Johnson). When he eventually does escape, in his underwear with no shoes or money, Eleanor is sent on a manhunt to retrieve him. Meanwhile, Zak wanders around until he meets Tyler (Shia LaBeouf), an illegal fisherman who’s on the run (due to arson). Despite his initial annoyance, Tyler takes Zak under his wing and promises to get him to the wrestling school. They have no car or money, so travel mainly by foot or makeshift boat. They catch fish, get drunk, camp on the beach, and go through a wrestling training montage. When Eleanor finally

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catches up with the duo, they’ve already bonded over their fugitive status, and she gets pulled into the adventure (and a romance). But she is there to take Zak back to the nursing home, and Tyler thinks Zak can handle himself. Eleanor and Tyler spar and flirt and everyone learns lessons about friendship, family, and other related topics.

THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON

Directed by Tyler Nilson and Michael Schwartz. Opens Fri., Aug. 23 at Regent Square Theater, 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. cinema.pfpca.org

The movie is set in a hot and humid North Carolina and is filled with a gaggle of southern caricatures. Along their journey, the gang encounters a convenience store owner who keeps homemade moonshine behind the counter, a blind Baptist preacher, and men with thick accents who sneer at Eleanor because she has a college degree. The movie tries using the South as a character, but it doesn’t fully blend with the rest of the story. While there are several conflicts in the movie, like Tyler’s confrontation with mean and vengeful fishermen and Zak’s wrestling journey, the main point of tension is how Zak should be allowed

to live. The state wants to send him to a more restrictive living situation, Eleanor wants to take him back to the nursing home, and Tyler just wants to let him be. Zak wants to continue on his adventure, but as Eleanor points out, he needs specific care and medical treatment and Tyler has no idea what he’s doing. Still, the movie plays into the tropes of Eleanor as an uptight rule-follower and Tyler as the free-spirit who really knows how to live, man. It’s an annoying dichotomy, made even more so when the two spark up a romance after roughly one day. There are some sweet and touching scenes in the movie; LaBeouf and Gottsagen do have a natural chemistry and brotherly rapport. Gottsagen is probably the strongest and most captivating actor of the three, with LaBeouf doing a perfectly fine job with his underdeveloped character. Dakota Johnson is forgettable, but as with every movie she’s in, it’s hard to tell if that’s because of the material or her acting skill. The movie comes to an excessively complicated climax at the end, when the wrestling, the fishing drama, the nursing home debacle, and Zak’s birthday all combine into an unenjoyable soup. In the end, Zak still feels like a prop to teach Tyler and Eleanor their respective lessons and to bring them together. It’s a story that’s been done before, and not really worth doing again.


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19


CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

.ARCHITECTURE.

ELEVATING STANDARDS BY CHARLES ROSENBLUM // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

EVELOPERS ARE BUILDING so much bad architecture in Pittsburgh and doing it so rapidly that we seem to be numb to it. Everywhere, three-dimensional revenue diagrams are under construction with pointless motifs unrolled in cheap material, stopping only for the end of the property line. Such

buildings are not simply ugly; they willfully abdicate the obligation to connect themselves to the city, its neighborhoods, and people. When a good building does come along, suddenly it’s remarkable to see the power of architecture to enhance a sense of place and community through competent design.

Krause Commons, at the corner of Forward and Murray Avenues in Squirrel Hill, on the site of the former Poli’s Restaurant, is such a building. The more you look at it, the more you sense that it improves its tricky setting. The six-story building is a project of Action Housing, designed by FortyEighty

Follow contributing writer Charles Rosenblum on Twitter @CharlzR

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

Architects of Pittsburgh. The 33 units of affordable housing in its upper floors are made possible by state tax credits. Jewish Residential Services (JRS) offices are on the second floor, and the Levin Clubhouse, which provides vocational training for people with mental disabilities, including 17 building residents,


SO MANY BUILDINGS DO LESS THAN WHAT THEIR ARCHITECTS CLAIM. THIS ONE DOES MORE. under the auspices of JRS, occupies the first floor. Action Housing bought the site at a sheriff’s sale after the closure of the restaurant. Squeezing a building into the site presented certain challenges, with a large back-of-lot smokestack remaining in place on a narrow plot bounded by Maeburn Road winding behind. But Director of Housing and Neighborhood Development for Action Housing Linda Metropulos commented, “We thought it was such a prime location, and we were interested in building housing there.” But both architect and developer emphasized an effective working relationship and a desire to produce a design blending a sense of the neighborhood with as built architecture. “We wanted to respond to the scale and the materials of the Morrowfield,” said FortyEighty principal architect Jeff Gannon of the nearby gentle giant of an apartment. To match such scale, a big building wing was suitable, clad here in terra cotta colored panels of fiber cement board, with a bit of intentional color variation. Lifted two floors off the ground, the terra cotta panels transition to all glass to better reveal interior activity along the street and to match the height of the base on the adjacent building. To match nearby material, Krause Commons has a narrower building wing in buffcolored brick rising above its one-storyhigh entry and receding slightly from the big red wall. Somewhere in this experience, you realize that the terra cotta wall curves slightly. Even with a tight budget that might have eliminated it, says Gannon, “We really felt that maintaining that

curve in response to the context of the street was really valuable.” So many buildings do less than what their architects claim. This one does more. The compositional rhythm with the existing buildings is just right, even when mixing modern asymmetry with traditional symmetry next door. Though lots of architects talk about matching the heights of adjacent structures, this design reflects a keen sense of how to pull it off. The windows of the façade give a description of the different things taking place inside the building, even as they, crucially, come from a consistent family of shapes that relate to each other. These issues are not simply about taste. They are about the capacity of new buildings to relate richly to the old, while providing visual clues about what people do in and around them. In a singular odd contrast, the side of the building currently facing Forward Avenue is not so great (where did the fiber cement panels go?). Except that a new structure will shortly cover it up, as was originally anticipated. No harm, no foul. Another project is on the way by Action Housing with more affordable rental units. Designs come from BCJ Architects, another firm which, judging by track record and preliminary designs, will deliver thoughtful, responsive, and substantive architecture. The opportunity to praise good buildings should embolden viewers to call out the onslaught of architectural garbage, not simply as mockery, but in a broader dialogue that looks at good buildings in detail, identifies their successes, and then demands that other buildings elevate their standards along similar lines.

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

21


.MUSIC.

ELECTRONIC DANCE MOMENT(S) BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THREADSONCARSON.COM

T

22

SOUTH SIDE _________ MONROEVILLE MALL PGHCITYPAPER.COM

HIS WEEK, three new recurring

EDM events kick off in Pittsburgh, providing a diverse taste of subgenres for every kind of electronic music fan. Starting Thu., Aug. 22 is Bassburgh’s The Back Room. Every other Thursday, the Bassburgh team will bring “the best” local and regional DJs to TFS Bar & Grill, with a “bangin’” sound system, immersive lighting, and more. Ivan Rojas, Mike V, Kinetik, Kped, Nick Johnson, and Zach Ross are DJing the opening night. “We decided to do The Back Room [in] an effort to bring EDM back to the South Side strip on Thursday night and feature some of the underground talent in Pittsburgh,” says Chris Stankay, one of Bassburgh’s owners. “We’ll be booking a lot of different DJs to play a lot of different styles. In one night, you might hear house, dubstep, drum and bass, trap, funk, et cetera, and then the next one could be totally different.” Friday at Cattivo in Lawrenceville is the grand opening of DUB N BASS, put on by Flux-Capacitor. As the title implies, expect to hear dubstep and drum and bass. Playing the first edition on Aug. 23 are local DJs Kilo, Eryn Evans, Doverspike, Soyka, and Byngi. Then on Sat., Aug. 24, Longturn Music’s Reverie takes place in Downtown on Market Street Grocery’s newly renovated third floor. Curated by Brendan Barstow and CJ Cooper, Reverie is an “opportunity to explore the melodic side of dance music,” according to the event’s Facebook page. “Soul-stirring, evocative productions are blended to keep the dance floor moving and the mind musing.” Flux-Capacitor is also the team behind re:vision, a house and techno

night which saw a six-week run at Cattivo over the summer. Justin Sheppard, along with his partner, Keith Patrick, says that the initial every-week run was a way to gauge the temperature of Pittsburgh’s interest in electronic music. “And it turned out fantastic,” says Sheppard. Both DUB N BASS and re:vision will be taking place monthly. Compared to re:vision, which has a tropical theme, Patrick says DUB N BASS will have a darker, edgy vibe. Additionally, the duo plans to bring in a new set of speakers. Dubstep and drum and bass, which are categorized by heavy bass and sub-bass frequencies, call for a different sound system than house or techno. For hardcore electronic lovers, the culmination of these nights means an eclectic mix of EDM can be heard up to three nights in a row, without having to leave the city. “There’s a lot of different crews hosting electronic music nights now, each with their own sound and style,” says Stankay. “There’s a little bit for everyone, no matter what specific genre of electronic music you’re into.” But that’s not always been the case

in Pittsburgh, with EDM fans having to travel to festivals and shows outside to see their favorite artists. The hope is that these nights will help grow the scene locally while also making Pittsburgh a destination for larger acts to make tour stops. Specifically, Sheppard and Patrick plan on utilizing their connections and experience in the electronic world to bring national and international artists to Pittsburgh after getting DUB N BASS and re:vision off the ground. “Bringing in global talent is more beneficial to the city and the scene,” says Sheppard. Regardless of who’s playing, it’s a good time for electronic music in Pittsburgh, and there’s little sense of competition between the different promotions groups. “As a collective, it’s a very good thing for the city,” says Sheppard, who booked Stankay to play at re:vision. “It’s only going to help the scene in general and bring even more people out into this community of music — whatever genre it may be — and also expose new music to people [who] might not understand different genres or different types of electronic music. … That’s what we’re here for.”

THE BACK ROOM

DUB N BASS

REVERIE

9 p.m. Thu., Aug. 22. TFS Bar & Grill, 2515 E. Carson St., South Side. $2. facebook.com/bassburghpromo

9 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23. Cattivo, 146 44th St., Lawrenceville. $12. facebook.com/ FluxCapacitorProductionsLLC

9 p.m. Sat., Aug. 24. Market Street Grocery, 435 Market St., Downtown. longturnmusic.com

PHOTO: MOONGLADE MEDIA

DJ Joe Farkas at Bassburgh’s monthly event at The Goldmark - G’d Up & Teched Out


Elizabeth Jeffries PHOTO: MARK BROSIUS

.LITERATURE.

CELLULAR LEVELS BY REGE BEHE // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

E

LIZABETH JEFFRIES grew up in a

strict evangelical family in which almost every action was guided by the bible. Her social life, her hobbies, and even her diet were determined by an evangelical community. “[They] taught me my vocabulary, my ways of thinking, and my ways of behaving,” she writes in Through the Kaleidoscope: How Exploring Cell Biology Transforms My Relationship with God (Epiphany). When the North Side resident started to study cellular biology in college, her relationship with Christianity became “complicated.” The stories and narratives she grew up with are still deeply ingrained in her consciousness, but “I’ve had to deconstruct a lot of that in order to navigate the world as an adult,” she says. “But even with this complicated love/ hate relationship with Christianity, you see a lot of Christian principles [in the world] about community, about lifting each other up, about the oneness we that all share. I also see in nature, having studied biology, the power of diversity — this drives at the heart of [the] kaleidoscope image in the book. When there are multiple images you see through a kaleidoscope, diversity only enhances the beauty.” Exposure to pop culture was limited during Jeffries’ childhood, but one icon seemed to affirm her religious training. Jeffries writes, “Britney Spears’ lyrics told me a boyfriend would be all I’d ever need.” Her parents promoted a similar principle: Her faith would be affirmed

through marriage and obedience to a Christian man. “A big part of our church’s structure was gender roles,” Jeffries says. “It wasn’t something that I was taught, it was just something that I always knew. It was in the water that we drank. It was very pervasive in our community. I knew very few adult women whose identities were not bound up in their husband’s identities.”

ELIZABETH JEFFRIES

7 p.m. Thu., Aug. 22. Riverstone Books, 8850 Covenant Ave., McCandless Crossing. riverstonebookstore.com

In cellular biology, Jeffries found a counterpoint to the strictures of her religious teaching with facts that seemed irrefutable. Until then, anything at odds with the bible or creationist theory was rejected without question. Evolutionary science was a lie and it was sinful to believe in a world that wasn’t based on biblical scholarship. Cellular biology and its imperfections provided Jeffries with permission to be human, fallible. “Imperfection is baked into nature,” she says. “And not only is it baked in, it’s a mechanism for creatively and sensitively addressing and working with that imperfection. … Danger is all around, risk is all around, in things that will damage ourselves. So the point is not to maintain perfection, but to address [imperfection]: We have this damage, but how are going to continue our important work in this world?”

d e h c Brun h g r u b s t t i The P t n e v E h c Brun . r a e Y e h t f o www.brunchedpittsburgh.com

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

23


SEVEN DAYS OF CONCERTS AN EVENING WITH GLADYS KNIGHT FRI., AUG. 23

The “Empress of Soul” is touching down in Pittsburgh. Gladys Knight, a seven-time Grammy Award-winner with No. 1 hits in pop, R&B, gospel, and adult contemporary, released her first album in 1960 at just 16 with her band, The Pips. Fifty years later, you’ll be hard-pressed to find someone who doesn’t know at least one of her songs. Tracks like “I Heard it Through the Grapevine,” “Midnight Train to Georgia,” “If I Were Your Woman,” and “Every Beat of My Heart” have made Knight an icon: a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Hear those hits and more when she performs at Heinz Hall. 8 p.m. 201 Wood St., Downtown. $49-$189. pittsburghsymphony.org PHOTO: DEREK BLANKS

Gladys Knight

FULL LIST ONLINE pghcitypaper.com

THURSDAY AUGUST 22 COVERS THE DOUG EDGELL TRIO. Cioppino Restaurant & Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District. THE CLINTONES. Spoonwood Brewing Co. 7 p.m. Bethel Park.

JAZZ TONY CAMPBELL AND THE JAZZ SURGERY. Dorothy Six Blast Furnace Cafe. 8 p.m. Homestead.

ROCK

JAZZ

METAL

CLAP YOUR HANDS SAY YEAH. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

THE ACES FEATURING HELENE MILAN. Cioppino Restaurant & Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District.

KNOTFEST ROADSHOW. KeyBank Pavilion. 5:30 p.m. Burgettstown.

ROGER HUMPHRIES. Wolfie’s Pub. 5 p.m. Downtown.

GYPSY STRINGZ. Dorothy 6 Cafe. 7 p.m. Homestead.

BLUES TAB BENOIT. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale. PIERCE DIPNER & THE SHADES OF BLUE. Railyard Grill & Tap Room. 6 p.m. Bridgeville. REBEL REVOLVER. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 8 p.m. Whitehall.

FOLK MIKE FLAHERTY. SouthSide Works. 6 p.m. South Side.

PAUL CONSENTINO TRIO. Kingfly Spirits. 7 p.m. Strip District.

ELECTRONIC

HIP HOP

SWAMPWALK. Bierport. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

BONE THUGS-N-HARMONY. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale. GREENPOOL (ALBUM RELEASE). Spirit. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

PUNK TED LEO AND THE PHARMACISTS. Spirit. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville. HARD JOB, PEOPLING, POLAR BODY. Gooski’s. 9 p.m. Polish Hill.

FRIDAY AUGUST 23 INDIE PAT COYLE (EP RELEASE). The Government Center. 8 p.m. North Side. HELL’S OASIS. The Frick. 6 p.m. Point Breeze.

ROCK/PUNK THE BORSTAL BOYS. Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. GARTER SHAKE, GOD’S GREEN APPLES. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

INTERNATIONAL

SATURDAY AUGUST 24 JAZZ

SOME KIND OF ANIMAL, SUPER LOW, LOFI DELPHI. Howlers. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. JIM DONOVAN & THE SUN KING WARRIORS. Rivers Casino. 9 p.m. North Side. KNOWN UNKNOWNS. The Smiling Moose. 5:30 p.m. South Side.

ACOUSTIC ROGER GELIK. Knucklehead’s Bar. 9 p.m. Ross.

THE RICK MATT TRIO. Cioppino Restaurant & Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District.

ELECTRONIC REVERIE. Market Street Grocery. 9 p.m. Downtown.

BLUES

OLGA WATKINS BAND. NOLA On The Square. 8 p.m. Downtown.

THE NICOLE BELLI BAND. Moondog’s. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox.

ROCK

THE HOMELESS GOSPEL CHOIR. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

THE FINAL SOUND, HONEY PRISM, EYESTONES. Hambone’s. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

COUNTRY THE CADILLAC THREE. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale. REBECCA HAVILAND & WHISKEY HEART. South Park Amphitheater. 7:30 p.m. South Park.

WORKING BREED (ALBUM RELEASE). Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville. VENUS MONOLITH. Moondog’s. 9 p.m. Blawnox. LORENZO’S OIL, J. TRAFFORD, THE CREECHERS. The Government Center. 7 p.m. North Side.

J.R CLARK, NOAH SVEC. Hot Mass. 12 a.m. Downtown.

PUNK COUNTRY CHRIS YOUNG. KeyBank Pavilion. 7:30 p.m. Burgettstown.

BLUES MARK BROWNING (CD RELEASE). Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

POP DOPAMINE (GOING AWAY SHOW). Mr. Roboto Project. 6 p.m. Bloomfield. NICK BARILLA (ALBUM RELEASE). Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

FESTIVAL ROCK, REGGAE & RELIEF. Market Square. 2 p.m. Downtown.

SUNDAY AUGUST 25 ROCK LIVE, BUSH, OUR LADY PEACE. Stage AE. 6 p.m. North Side. KARABAS BARABAS, LEM. Howlers. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. THE BACON BROTHERS. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

FESTIVAL ROCK, REGGAE & RELIEF. Market Square. 2 p.m. Downtown. CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

25


SEVEN DAYS OF CONCERTS, CONTINUED FROM PG. 24

HIEROGLYPHICS’ THIRD EYE VISION TOUR

PHOTO: GALEN DRIVER

Del the Funky Homosapien

FRI., AUG. 23

It was almost 30 years ago that Del the Funky Homosapien assembled the rap collective Hieroglyphics and it’s still one of the most unique, innovative hip-hop groups ever to do it. There are a few comparable peers — A Tribe Called Quest, Black Star, Jurassic 5 — but none as experimental, idiosyncratic, and sometimes just flat out strange as Hieroglyphics could be (Del’s later work with Deltron 3030 and Gorillaz owes a lot to these early records). To mark the 21st anniversary of the crew’s debut, 3rd Eye Vision, the group (Del, Casual, Pep Love, Domino, DJ Toure, Souls of Mischief) is celebrating with a tour stopping at The Smiling Moose. Selecta opens. 7 p.m. The Smiling Moose, 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $25. smiling-moose.com

JAZZ

PUNK

TONY CAMPBELL. Thelma Lovette YMCA. 5:30 p.m. Hill District.

EL ESCAPADO, LATECOMER. Gooski’s. 9 p.m. Polish Hill.

THE MANHATTAN TRANSFER. Hartwood Acres Park. 7:30 p.m. Allison Park. RESERVOIR OF JAZZ. Highland Park. 5 p.m. Highland Park.

INTERNATIONAL CHEICK HAMALA DIABATE. Weather Permitting. 5 p.m. Shadyside.

ELECTRONICORE I SEE STARS. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 7:30 p.m. Whitehall.

FOLK THE LIVING STREET. Kingfly Spirits. 2 p.m. Strip District.

COUNTRY VANDOLIERS. Hard Rock Cafe. 7:30 p.m. South Side. THE DEAD TONGUES. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

MONDAY AUGUST 26 ROCK RAMONDA HAMMER, LISS VICTORY, THE NERD HERDERS. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

POP JIMMY MOWERY. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 8 p.m. Whitehall.

WEDNESDAY AUGUST 28 ELECTRONIC BIG FREEDIA. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

METAL NORTHLANE, ERRA. Rex Theater. 6 p.m. South Side. MAC SABBATH. Crafthouse Stage & Grill. 6:30 p.m. Whitehall.

TUESDAY AUGUST 27

ROCK

ROCK ROB THOMAS. Benedum Center. 7 p.m. Downtown.

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET. Jergel’s Rhythm Grille. 8 p.m. Warrendale.

JAZZ

JAZZ

KENNY PEAGLER TRIO. Katz Plaza. 5 p.m. Downtown.

THUMBSCREW. City of Asylum. 7 p.m. North Side.

IDENTITY X. Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville.

These listings are curated by Pittsburgh City Paper’s music writer Jordan Snowden and include events from our free online listings. Submit yours today at www.pghcitypaper.com/submitevent

26

PGHCITYPAPER.COM


.FOR THE WEEK OF AUG. 22

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): The American idiom “stay in your lane” has come to mean “mind your own business,” and usually has a pejorative sense. But I’d like to expand it and soften it for your use in the coming weeks. Let’s define it as meaning “stick to what you’re good at and know about” or “don’t try to operate outside your area of expertise” or “express yourself in ways that you have earned the right to do.” Author Zadie Smith says that this is good advice for writers. “You have to work out what it is you can’t do, obscure it, and focus on what works,” she attests. Apply that counsel to your own sphere or field, Leo.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Yisrael Kristal was a Polish Jew born under the sign of Virgo in 1903. His father was a scholar of the Torah, and he began studying Judaism and learning Hebrew at age three. He lived a long life and had many adventures, working as a candlemaker and a candy-maker. When the Red Army liberated the Auschwitz concentration camp in 1945, Kristal emerged as one of the survivors. He went on to live to the age of 113. Because of the chaos of World War I, he had never gotten to do his bar mitzvah when he’d turned thirteen. So he did it much later, in his old age. I foresee a comparable event coming up soon in your life, Virgo. You will claim a reward or observe a milestone or collect a blessing you weren’t able to enjoy earlier.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sailors have used compasses to navigate since the 11th Century. But that tool wasn’t enough to guide them. A thorough knowledge of the night sky’s stars was a crucial aid. Skill at reading the ever-changing ocean currents always proved valuable. Another helpful trick was to take birds on the ships as collaborators. While at sea, if the birds flew off and returned, the sailors knew there was no land close by. If the birds didn’t return, chances were good that land was near. I bring this to your attention, Libra, because I think it’s an excellent time to gather a number of different navigational tools for your upcoming quest. One won’t be enough.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What do you want from the allies who aren’t your lovers? What feelings do you most enjoy while you’re in the company of your interesting, non-romantic companions? For instance, maybe you like to be respected and appreciated. Or perhaps what’s most important to you is to experience the fun of being challenged and stimulated. Maybe your favorite feeling is the spirit of collaboration and comradeship. Or maybe all of the above. In any case, Scorpio, I urge you to get clear about what you want — and then make it your priority to foster it. In the coming weeks, you’ll have the power to generate an abundance of your favorite kind of non-sexual togetherness.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As the CEO of the clothes company Zappos, Sagittarius entrepreneur Tony Hsieh is worth almost a billion dollars. If he chose, he could live in a mansion by the sea. Yet his home is a 200-square-foot, $48,000 trailer in Las Vegas, where he also keeps his pet alpaca. To be clear, he owns the entire trailer park, which consists of 30 other trailers, all of which are immaculate hotbeds of high-tech media technology where interesting people live. He loves the community he has created, which is more important to him than status and privilege. “For me, experiences are more meaningful than stuff,” he says. “I have way more experiences here.” I’d love to see you reaffirm your commitment to priorities like his in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. It’ll be a favorable time to do so.

coming weeks will be a favorable time to celebrate and cultivate your own intuition. You may generate amazing results as you learn to trust it more and figure out how to deepen your relationship with it.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian environmentalist Edward Abbey once formulated a concise list of his requirements for living well. “One must be reasonable in one’s demands on life,” he wrote. “For myself, all that I ask is: 1. accurate information; 2. coherent knowledge; 3. deep understanding; 4. infinite loving wisdom; 5. no more kidney stones, please.” According to my analysis of the astrological omens, now would be an excellent time for you to create your own tally of the Five Crucial Provisions. Be bold and precise as you inform life about your needs.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “We may be surprised at whom God sends to answer our prayers,” wrote author Janette Oke. I suspect that observation will apply to you in the coming weeks. If you’re an atheist or agnostic, I’ll rephrase her formulation for you: “We may be surprised at whom Life sends to answer our entreaties.” There’s only one important thing you have to do to cooperate with this experience: set aside your expectations about how help and blessings might appear.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): It’s not cost-efficient to recycle plastic. Sorting and processing the used materials to make them available for fresh stuff is at least as expensive as creating new plastic items from scratch. On the other hand, sending used plastic to a recycling center makes it far less likely that it will end up in the oceans and waterways, harming living creatures. So in this case, the short-term financial argument in favor of recycling is insubstantial, whereas the moral argument is strong. I invite you to apply a similar perspective to your upcoming decisions.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): African American slaves suffered many horrendous deprivations. For example, it was illegal for them to learn to read. Their oppressors feared that educated slaves would be better equipped to agitate for freedom, and took extreme measures to keep them illiterate. Frederick Douglass was one slave who managed to beat the ban. As he secretly mastered the art of reading and writing, he came upon literature that ultimately emboldened him to escape his “owners” and flee to safety. He became one of the nineteenth century’s most powerful abolitionists, producing reams of influential writing and speeches. I propose that we make Douglass your inspiring role model for the coming months. I think you’re ready to break the hold of a certain curse — and go on to achieve a gritty success that the curse had prevented you from accomplishing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): For twenty-five years, businessman Don Thompson worked for the McDonald’s fast food company, including three years as its CEO. During that time, he oversaw the sale and consumption of millions of hamburgers. But in 2015, he left McDonald’s and became part of Beyond Meat, a company that sells vegan alternatives to meat. I could see you undergoing an equally dramatic shift in the coming months, Gemini: a transition into a new role that resembles but is also very different from a role you’ve been playing. I urge you to step up your fantasies about what that change might entail.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19):

CANCER (June 21-July 22):

Medical researcher Jonas Salk developed a successful polio vaccine, so he had a strong rational mind. Here’s how he described his relationship with his non-rational way of knowing. He said, “It is always with excitement that I wake up in the morning wondering what my intuition will toss up to me, like gifts from the sea. I work with it and rely on it. It’s my partner.” I bring this up, Capricorn, because the

“The learning process is something you can incite, literally incite, like a riot,” wrote author Audre Lorde. As an astrologer I would add this nuance: although what Lourde says is true, some phases of your life are more favorable than others to seek deep and rapid education. For example, the coming weeks will bring you especially rich teachings if you incite the learning process now.

Go to realastrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s expanded weekly audio horoscopes and daily text-message horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

27


PHOTOS: VIGILANCE THEATER GROUP

Welcome to Moonside

.STAGE.

WELCOME TO MOONSIDE BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

V

IGILANCE THEATER’S first production, the supernaturally tinged murder

mystery Hollow Moon, was staged at a private residence, with an address fittingly kept secret until attendees bought tickets. The sophomore effort from the theater group, founded in 2018 by Sean Collier, Dana Custer, Ariella Furman, and Renee Rabenold, is taking a different approach. For Welcome to Moonside — running Aug. 22-Sept. 8 — they chose an equally unique but more public venue in the space formerly occupied by Lava Lounge in South Side, known for its uniquely designed, volcano-themed interior. “Last year, because someone owned the house, it was better to keep it secret,” says Rabenold, who’s directing the show with a script by Collier. “This year, because it’s a public space, it’s easier to announce.” But while they take place in distinctly different locations and neighborhoods, the shows share a connection via two characters introduced in Hollow Moon — a figure known simply as The Spirit and a slain woman, played by returning cast members Ashley McKinney and Karen Forney, respectively. The show will follow them into the titular Moonside, a surreal pseudo afterlife inhabited by other spirits both welcoming and hostile. Audience members enter this world at a time of crisis and are invited to help the characters make things right.

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While Rabenold describes Moonside as a dark, surreal, sci-fi follow-up to the first Vigilance show, she feels audience members will relate to its very human themes. “It plays with how we deal with memory, how we deal with loss, and how we interact with each other,” says Rabenold. For the remaining cast members, all of whom are women, Vigilance brought in a group of people from the city’s improv comedy scene and theater community, including Hazel Leroy, a local stage veteran who plays the villainous ruler of Moonside.

WELCOME TO MOONSIDE

Thu.–Sun., Aug. 22 – Sept. 8. 2204 E. Carson St., South Side. $50. vigilancetheater.com

Moonside performer Saige Smith believes the varied cast has helped her grow as an actor, especially one who has little experience in immersive theater, which, unlike conventional plays, incorporates both scripted and unscripted scenes and requires performers to interact with the audience. “When it comes to the improvisational scenes, I really have to look to the other ladies to show me how to do things and how to stay natural, and how to stay strong in your character and also interact with someone,” says Smith, who studied acting at Point Park University. She’s joined by fellow performers Bevin Baker, Jennifer Dallas, Tamara Siegert, Vanessa St. Clair, and Anna

Failla, who will act alongside Smith as Dawn, a spirit split into two bodies. “Together, we make one spirit and we kind of have this synergy where we know what the other one is thinking and we can finish each other’s sentences,” says Smith, adding that the high-concept character is tasked with handling “all the sociopolitical relations on Earth.” But Lava Lounge will surely steal some of the spotlight with its distinct layout and fiberglass details meant to look like flames and molten lava. Rabenold says that while she was initially intimidated by the former bar, she has come to enjoy directing in it, as it offers more space, levels, and weird features to play with compared to the Hollow Moon location. For example, one of the sunken seating areas will serve as a pitlike home for a Moonside creature. “It really helps give us this otherworldly feel that we were looking for,” says Rabenold. “We’re playing with the general strange inside of a volcanoslash-on the moon aesthetic it brings us and trying to transform it a little bit, but trying to go with the flow of what it’s telling us it wants to be.” After hearing stories about all the “crazy” things audience members did during Hollow Moon, Smith is eager to see how groups react to the show and its unconventional setting. “I’m just really excited to stay on my toes and pretty much just do whatever needs to be done to keep the show running,” she says. “I’m just really interested to see what the audience is going to do.”

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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F

OOTBALL SEASON is approaching,

and you know what that means: Catholic masses will be shortened by half and hundreds of Erric Pegram and Lethon Flowers jerseys will emerge from their dens to descend upon North Shore parking lots like 17-year cicadas. While I love watching the Steelers, I prefer my vantage point to be from the safety of my couch, where I’m offered every angle of the action, including that intolerable NBC SkyCam, the only beer spilled on me comes from my own drunken hands, and I can enjoy a fancier selection of foods, like Aldi’s Little Salad Bar Hummus Quartet. So, I’m not exactly sure what five hours of tailgating consists of. I know there is alcohol, cased meats, and topless guys throwing their arms out while trying to connect with 60-yard passes. (And you know they walked out the yardage to make sure their competition was official.) There are people arguing about things they both agree and disagree on. There are women wearing official Touch by Alyssa Milano Lace-up Tanks. There is smoke coming from every direction: grills, Parliament Menthols, vapes, generators. There is a lot of cornhole being played, and the best cornholers have the Steelers logo on their boards. Someone has brought an airhorn. Half of the fans “are overdressed, and half are under-

dressed, because it is impossible to get it right. At least one vehicle has a Steelerslogo custom paint job. There’s a baby unattended somewhere in the parking lot, but he’ll be okay, because Steelers Nation looks out for its own. Am I close? I found a handful of companies online that offer tailgating services. One in particular offers a package that includes six-foot tables with linens, three cocktail tables, and a DISH Media Package. I don’t know a ton about Pittsburgh tailgate culture, but I do know this city will not stand for linens involved in any gathering, outside a handful of Shadyside weddings. This is the Steel City. The City of Bridges. And according to one strange and poorly cited Wikipedia entry, “The City of Knowledge,” where “Google, Apple Inc., Bosch, Facebook, Uber, Nokia, Autodesk, Microsoft and IBM are among 1,600 technology firms generating $20.7 billion in annual Pittsburgh payrolls” (also from Wikipedia). And Pittsburgh was named Food City of the Year by restaurant and hospitality consultants af&co. But have you seen the Monday Night Football promotional packages for games in Pittsburgh? We pour molten steel here, America! And that’s all we’ve been doing since the extinction of our steel industry almost 40 years ago. Stay gritty out there, yinz tailgaters.

Follow digital media manager Josh Oswald on Twitter @gentlemenRich

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.MUSIC.

TAKING CUES BY ALEX GORDON ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

FTER FIVE VERY busy years

living in Pittsburgh, Pat Coyle is moving on. The songwriter and multi-instrumentalist of bands like IT IT, Blød Maud, Soft Gondola, and more, is moving to California this fall to pursue his music career further and be closer to family (he was born in Oakland, and his sister recently moved back as well). But before the move, Coyle is releasing a seven-track solo EP that serves as a something of an epilogue for his life here. Iridescent Cue is layered with found sound captured with Coyle’s field recorder around Pittsburgh, voicemails and conversations with his family, home movies, as well as excerpts from videos on Incognitube, a site that plays a randomized selection of YouTube videos with fewer than 100 views (Coyle says they are frequently just kids playing Fortnite). But it’s in the more personal samples that Iridescent Cue —

PHOTO: SHAUNA MILLER

Pat Coyle

PAT COYLE IRIDESCENT CUE EP RELEASE SHOW W/ NATURAL RAT, ANTHONY HEUBEL, AND THE CHILDLIKE EMPRESS 8 p.m. Fri., Aug. 23. The Government Center, 519 E. Ohio St., North Side. $5-10 suggested donation. patcoyle.bandcamp.com

released Fri., Aug. 23 with a show at the Government Center with Natural Rat, Anthony Heubel and the High Lonesome Band, and The Childlike Empress — that Coyle’s ideas come to life. “Emerald Call,” the first song released from Cue, introduced this approach with a music video (directed by Andre Pavlenko and Coyle) that mixed home movies

with present-day footage of Coyle and his friends. On the recently released single “Long Soft Life,” Coyle layers in samples recorded of members from his immediate family — voicemails, quick conversations, a loop of what sounds like children wishing their grandfather a happy birthday. But mostly, the samples are chopped into imperceptible blips of

Follow managing editor Alex Gordon on Twitter @shmalexgordon

sound, more percussive than emotive, but the effect is powerful. Mixed with Coyle’s melancholic voice and smart songwriting (LIYL: The Antlers, Sufjan Stevens), “Long Soft Life” captures that bittersweet feeling of becoming your own person at the cost of being distant from your family, geographically or otherwise. It’s about the regret and guilt of not calling back a loved one and finding a way to forgive that feeling and get better. This all may seem like a heavyhanded guilt-trip, but it’s lighter than it sounds. Coyle isn’t as much fingerwagging as he’s allowing himself to thoughtfully explore these feelings of guilt vs. growth, bitter vs. sweet. Take the album art, illustrated by April Zhu, which features an old fashioned TV whose screen doubles as a windowsill, the wind blowing in the curtains. A person leans on top of it, hands folded, looking away from the screen, more contemplative than sad, as if they’re just enjoying the summer sounds of the street below. It looks like the moment before a nap. Above their head is a thought-bubble that says, “Iridescent Cue.” As Coyle puts it, the album may be about vague ideas, but the emotions are strong.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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SEVEN DAYS OF ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT

PHOTO: LEIGH YOCK/SPIRIT

^ Sat., Aug. 24: Spirit Summer Recess

THURSDAY AUG. 22 ART

Five Canadian artists come together for Allsorts, a new exhibition at BoxHeart Gallery described as showcasing the “unconventional merging of materials with traditional art forms.” Presented by guest curator Natalie Shahinian, the show includes works by Carmelo Arnoldin, who weaves tapestries from aluminum strips cut from recycled soda and beer cans, and Robert Davidovitz, who creates by

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piping acrylic paint from a pastry bag. Also showing is Andrew Ooi and collaborators John Armstrong and Paul Collins. Allsorts coincides with fellow BoxHeart Gallery exhibit, Arabella Proffer: Soft Sugars. 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Continues through Fri., Aug. 23. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. boxheartgallery.com

FRIDAY

AUG. 23 DRAG

School of Drag at The Andy Warhol

Museum is a free summer program where teens learn everything about drag — history, culture, performing — from drag queens themselves. The program offers a way for interested teens to explore and express gender nonconformity in a creative way. See them show off what they’ve been working on over the past seven weeks at the School of Drag Showcase at The Warhol. 7 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free. warhol.org

STAGE

Tales about charismatic fraudsters are as old as time, or at least as old as the 1660s, as evidenced by Moliére’s Tartuffe

(“The Imposter”). The title character is a huckster whose gift for pious oration inspires some of the play’s dimmer characters to worship and depend entirely on him. Others don’t buy a word of his schtick, and try fruitlessly to convince the believers that they’re being duped. It’s very funny, but also dark in the sense that these power dynamics are so universal and timeless. Pittsburgh’s Cup-A-Jo Productions takes a swing at this classic (“with a unique twist”) at Irma Freeman Center for Imagination. 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., Aug. 31. 5006 Penn Ave., Garfield. $20. cupajoproductions.com


318178_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

8/13/19 4:0

PHOTO: KEN KERR

^ Fri., Aug. 23: Tartuffe

SATURDAY AUG. 24 PARTY

For decades, Groceria Merante has provided fresh produce and Italian staples to the residents of Oakland. It’s been an essential for longtime residents and Pitt students alike, especially since there’s no full-scale grocery store in the neighborhood. The Groceria Merante 40th Anniversary Celebration will commemorate the store’s longevity with street vendors, cooking demonstrations, music, games, and more. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 3454 Bates St., Oakland. 412-683-3924

FESTIVAL

Shadyside has a reputation as a neighborhood where out-of-towners with money to burn visit for shops like Roberta Weissburg Leathers, Maxalto, Weisshouse, and Sephora. This weekend, shoppers looking for more personalized wares will fill the sidewalks as the 23rd annual Shadyside Art Festival on Walnut Street brings 150 national and regional artists to the neighborhood. See and be

seen with fans of incredibly detailed handcrafted jewelry, exquisite glasswork, unique pottery, and more. We recommend heading over early and grabbing a seat at Pamela’s Diner to prep before the festivities begin. 10 a.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 25. Walnut Street, Shadyside. Free. “The Art Festival on Walnut Street” on Facebook

ART

Community Supported Art, or CSA PGH, is a keystone program of Casey Droege Cultural Productions that brings together artists and cultural consumers. With the slogan “Do you know where your art comes from?,” the organization creates shares of art to help buyers understand where and how art is created. This fall, the Casey Droege Cultural Production Project Space in Wilkinsburg will host a gallery show from CSA PGH. The opening reception features past and present artworks of CSA PGH, as well as brand new 2019 shares. 12-5 p.m. 317 S. Trenton Ave., Wilkinsburg. Free. csapgh.com

FEST

It’s back-to-school for the kids, but it’s still break-time at the Spirit Summer CONTINUES ON PG. 34

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

33


SEVEN DAYS OF ARTS+ENTERTAINMENT, CONTINUED FROM PG. 33

PHOTO: PAUL G. WIEGMAN

^ Sun., Aug. 25: Tomato and Garlic Day

Recess. The venue’s self-dubbed “biggest and best party of the year” offers a food and music festival for all ages. During the day, enjoy a DJ booth and dance area on Spirit’s patio, four outside bars, and food, crafts, and art vendors, as well as a live mural painting, screen printing, and record swaps. When night falls, adults can head inside for two floors of live stage performances from Benji., Jack Swing, edhochuli, Lady Beast, and more. 12 p.m.-2 a.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. Free/$7 after 9 p.m. spiritpgh.com

FEST

P.R.I.D.E., or Positive Racial Identity Development in Early Education, is an organization that supports young African-American children in the Pittsburgh community. One way the non-profit reaches out to the community is through its block party-style art festivals, which occur multiple times per year in different neighborhoods. The P.R.I.D.E. Pop Up Mini Art Festival is a free event

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created specifically for children in elementary school. This time, the festival will take place at the Homewood YMCA and feature artists and educators, as well as food and DJs. 12-4 p.m. 7140 Bennett St., Homewood. Free. racepride.pitt.edu

COMEDY

It’s no secret that comedy is a bit of a boys’ club (see CP’s recent coverage of the local scene for some perspective). So support local female comedy performers with Lady Business at Steel City Improv, an event dedicated to the venue’s non-cishet-male performers. Enjoy an hour of improvisational humor without all that pesky testosterone. 6-7 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $5. steelcityimprov.com

MARKET

A stroll down Murray Avenue could take you from sipping tea at Dobra to catching a movie at the Manor Theatre. However, for three nights each summer, the bustling

street opens up to the Squirrel Hill Night Market, a free, outdoor festival featuring handmade art for sale, local live bands, food from neighborhood restaurants, and over 15 food trucks. This event marks the second Night Market of the season, with the third scheduled for mid-September. 6-10 p.m. Intersection of Forbes Ave. and Murray Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. uncoversquirrelhill.com

FILM

The iconic career of rapper Bushwick Bill came to an end in June when he died from a heart attack at the age of 52. But his influence, though at times controversial, isn’t going anywhere soon. He came up with the Geto Boys as a dancer known as “Little Billy” (he had dwarfism), before becoming a full member of the group as a rapper and lyricist. The albums represent early incarnations of “horrorcore rap,” which were criticized for being excessively violent and morbid. That didn’t bother Bill. Or, to put it differently, “He stands about

4’2”, is a gangsta rapper, lost his eye to gun violence and doesn’t compromise for anyone,” as it’s stated in the new documentary about his life, Bushwick Bill: Geto Boy. Go beyond the headlines and controversies of this enigmatic artist with a one-night screening of the documentary at Harris Theater. 8 p.m. 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $10. filmmakers.pfpca.org

SUNDAY AUG. 25 FOOD

The two best parts of summer, fresh tomatoes and garlic, are finally ready for harvest. Celebrate these two bountiful crops at Phipps Conservatory’s 15th annual Tomato and Garlic Day. Shop for fresh produce, olive oils, pastas, and a variety of other local specialty


DY GH; © THE AN. M, PITTSBUR RHOL MUSEUFOR THE VISUAL ARTS, INC THE ANDY WA FOUNDATION

: School of Drag

^ Fri., Aug. 23

goods at the festival’s outdoor market, taste a garlic lovers soup, ask gardening questions, and plant tomatoes of your own. Bring a donation of fresh produce for the Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank and explore the conservatory for free. 11 a.m. 1 Schenley Park, Oakland. Free. phipps.conservatory.org

MONDAY AUG. 26 PANEL

Do you get excited at the mention of urban planning? Does the idea of improving the city’s economic and environmental future get you frothing at the mouth? Man, you’re going to love Our Next 75! The free panel, an initiative of the Allegheny Conference, is being held in conjunction with the 75th anniversary of the first “Pittsburgh Renaissance,” when local leaders also joined together to work on ideas for the city’s future. This iteration features local notables including Dr. Joylette Portlock, executive director of Sustainable Pittsburgh, and Farnam Jahanian, president of Carnegie Mellon University, who will discuss shaping the next 75 years in Pittsburgh, moderated by Pittsburgh Post-Gazette’s editor emeritus, David Shribman. 6 p.m. Heinz History Center, 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. ournext75.org

WARHOL

Showcase

TUESDAY AUG. 27 BEER

Lots of breweries have pumpkin beers; few have a whole family of pumpkin beers with names and personalities and cartoon avatars. Southern Tier is in the latter category. Its Pumking is the flagship, but there’s also Warlock (pumpkin stout), Rum Barrel Aged Pumking, and Cold Press Coffee Pumking. This September marks the release of a new family member, the Pumking Nitro, but while you’re waiting, head over to Southern Tier’s taproom for the Pumking Family Reunion as the 2019 series hits the taps. 11 a.m. 316 North Shore Drive, North Side. stbcbeer.com

WEDNESDAY AUG. 28 MOVIE

Take your dog to the movies! The summer film series at Flagstaff Hill in Schenley Park is opening its outdoor cinema to all dogs and owners this Wednesday. Cuddle up to your pup and watch Chris Pratt tromp around with dinosaurs in Jurassic World. The showing starts at sundown, after live music from Seventh Nova. 7 p.m. Frew St. and Schenley Drive, Oakland. Free. pittsburghpa.gov • PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

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EARLY WARNINGS SPONSORED UPCOMING EVENTS FROM CITY PAPER’S FINE ADVERTISERS

WED., SEPT. 4 RICHIE RAMONE 7:30 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $12-24.50. 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com.

WED., SEPT. 4 BRITSBURGH: SPECIAL MANSION & GARDEN TOURS 10 A.M. HARTWOOD MANSION Ages 8 and up. $8-10. alleghenycounty.us/parks

SAT., SEPT. 7 LE CRÈME MUSIC FESTIVAL

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7:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $27. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

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FRI., SEPT. 6 RED

9:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $16. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

7:30 P.M. HARD ROCK CAFE STATION SQUARE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $17-20. 412-481-ROCK or ticketfly.com.

SUN., SEPT. 8 OZOMATLI

THU., SEPT. 5 40 OZ TO FREEDOM A TRIBUTE TO SUBLIME 6:30 P.M. CRAFTHOUSE SOUTH HILLS. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $15-27.50 412-653-2695 or ticketfly.com.

THU., SEPT. 5 ROGER KABLER THE ULTIMATE ROBIN WILLIAMS EXPERIENCE 6 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $25-40. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

THU., SEPT. 5 FUNKY MIRACLE: AN ART NEVILLE CELEBRATION OF LIFE 7 P.M. THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ & MUSIC HALL LAWRENCEVILLE. 21 and up. $10. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com

THU., SEPT. 5 MAX WEINBERG’S JUKEBOX 7 P.M. ROXIAN THEATRE MCKEES ROCKS. All-ages event. $35-40. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com

FRI., SEPT. 6 COLD 6 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $22-79.

ALLENTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT

FRI., SEPT. 6 POUR AT THE PARK 5:30 P.M. NORTH PARK ALLISON PARK. 21 and up. $55. alleghenycounty.us/parks

SAT., SEPT. 7 DOWNTON ABBEY THEMED TEA AND TOUR

5 P.M. JERGEL’S RHYTHM GRILLE WARRENDALE. Minors must be accompanied by an adult. $20-30. 724-799-8333 or ticketfly.com.

SUN., SEPT. 8 DANNY GONZALEZ AND DREW GOODEN - WE ARE TWO DIFFERENT PEOPLE TOUR

10 A.M. HARTWOOD MANSION 12 and up. $33-41. alleghenycounty.us/parks

6 P.M. CARNEGIE OF HOMESTEAD MUSIC HALL MUNHALL. All-ages event. $30-165. 412-462-3444 or ticketfly.com.

SAT., SEPT. 7 ANDRE COSTELLO & THE COOL MINORS

MON., SEPT. 9 SAMSARA/ A SENSE OF PURPOSE

7 P.M. THUNDERBIRD CAFÉ & MUSIC HALL LAWRENCEVILLE. 21 and up. $12. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com

6 P.M. SMILING MOOSE SOUTH SIDE. All-ages event. $10-12. 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com.

SAT., SEPT. 7 LE CRÈME MUSIC FESTIVAL FEATURING WHITE DENIM

MON., SEPT. 9 THE NOISE PRESENTS PERIPHERY - HAIL STAN: NORTH AMERICA 2019

12 P.M. ALLENTOWN BUSINESS DISTRICT All-ages event. $13. druskyentertainment.com

SAT., SEPT. 7 RODNEY CARRINGTON: LIVE

6 P.M. ROXIAN THEATRE MCKEES ROCKS. All-ages event. $27.50-35. 412-331-1050 or roxianlive.com

6 P.M. METROPOLITAN THEATRE MORGANTOWN. 18 and up. $39.75-209.75 morgantownmet.com

TUE., SEPT. 10 SKELETAL REMAINS/ MORTA SKULD

SAT., SEPT. 7

6 P.M. SMILING MOOSE SOUTH SIDE. Allages event. 12 412-431-4668 or ticketfly.com.

FOR UPCOMING ALLEGHENY COUNTY PARKS EVENTS, LOG ONTO WWW.ALLEGHENYPARKS.COM 36

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER

CLASSIFIEDS FOR INFORMATION ON HOW TO PLACE A CLASSIFIEDS ADVERTISEMENT, CALL 412-316-3342

WANTED Drummer needed for a Punk Band. Must have own equipment. Serious inquires only. Contact Marty at 412-400-5067

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NAME CHANGE

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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-10638, In re petition of Tonya Essex parent and legal guardian of Kenya Mickens Jr. and Kenaisha Alee Mickens, for change of name to Kenya Robert Tench and Kenaisha Alee Tench. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 20th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-8807, In re petition of Mohamed Abdullah Hasan Alareqi parent and legal guardian of Adel Mohamed Alareqi, Jumana Mohamed Alareqi, Lujain Mohamed Alareqi, Hasan Mohamed Alareqi, And Yazan Mohamed Alareqi, for change of name to Mohamed Hasan Ali, Adel Hasan Ali, Jumana Hasan Ali, Lujain Hasan Ali, Hasan Hasan Ali,and Yazan Hasan Ali. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 4th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-10171. In re petition of Kristina Alia-Rafat Ogron for change of name to Alia Rafat Ogron. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 12th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-19-10675. In re petition of Heather Marie Groelsema for change of name to Jade Calluna Groelsema. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 24th day of September, 2019, at 9:45 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for

EDGE OF THE WORLD

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS

1. ___ Vecchio (Firenze bridge) 6. Iraq city on the Tigris 11. Quick shut eye 14. Get a goal 15. Westernmost of the Lesser Antilles 16. “Out of the Blue” rock group 17. Feminist/activist hashtag starting in 2014 19. Grp. that gives people a puncher’s chance 20. Contract part 21. “The Voyage of the Dawn ___” (C.S. Lewis book) 23. Ian of “Time Bandits” 24. Winnings 27. Hand sanitizer target 28. The turf of surf and turf 30. Grammy-winning band for the song “Wax Simulacra” 33. Maybe yes, maybe no 35. When doubled, Robert Kennedy’s assassin 36. Disneyland attraction 40. Fire starters

41. Res ___ loquitur 42. “Mad Men” star Hendricks 44. Western wolves 49. Speedway rival 50. Army ranks: Abbr. 52. Mistreat 53. Barcelona’s coach Valverde 56. Spain’s peninsula 58. Louis XV, e.g. 59. Band with the power ballad “Sister Christian” 62. Nothin’ at all 63. Spoken 64. Will ___ (special agent in Karin Slaughter stories) 65. Takes too much 66. Lav sign 67. Networks: Abbr.

11. Home to the India Gate and the Lotus Temple 12. Big Oilers fan, likely 13. Pauper 18. Chair umpire’s call 22. Ancient marketplace 25. Radio letters 26. Sending to the canvas 29. Fun, so to speak 31. W-2 IDs 32. Crucial 34. Wild party 36. Earth is an oblate one 37. Winter root vegetables

38. Take a stand? 39. “___ the crack of dawn” 40. Fast-paced musical piece 43. Figure with equal angles 45. Twisted author 46. Canal boats 47. Point in the right direction 48. Street knowledge 51. Man with a title 54. Challenge 55. Kitchen wall material 57. Completely mad 60. Lean-to 61. Jets sometimes make them: Abbr. LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS

DOWN

1. Pumps (up) 2. Forest feline 3. Draweropening button 4. Emotional shock 5. Some hydroelectricity sources? 6. Big trap 7. Cortes’s gold 8. South Carolina fort 9. Company that provides the Jump electric scooters and bikes 10. Turkeys can be found here

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER AUG. 21-28, 2019

37


PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

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38

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

M

Y FIRST ENCOUNTER with financial domination came by way of an instant message on the phone sex platform where I work. A new client introduced himself, asked if he could call me Mistress, and told me that he has been fantasizing about having me drain his wallet. Fortunately for me, I am in the business of turning fantasies into reality and after a couple hours of (non-sexual) online banter, I had grocery money for the month. In a capitalist society, it should be no surprise that money is equated with power and that power is eroticized. It should also be no surprise, then, that financial domination — or “findom” — has emerged as a kink within BDSM that many professional dominatrices have incorporated into their work. While these relationships can take different forms, it is not unusual for a findom to have access to their sub’s — or “pay piggies” — bank accounts, credit cards, and paychecks. I talked to two financial subs about what motivates them to enter into these relationships. David, a 47-year-old lawyer in New York City, says that while a lot of financial domination takes place online, his experiences have also been in-person. “I definitely met some people in NYC who I would just be generous with, I would take them shopping,” he says. The first time he remembers spending big was on one of these shopping trips, during which he spent $17,000 on expensive shoes, clothes, and jewelry. This experience was a rush for David. “I felt exhilarated and turned on,” he says. “That part of it made me hard.” For David, the rush is deeply tied to giving up control. “It is a sense of being carried away. This woman has overpowered me; she can take whatever, do whatever.” He has since moved into a longterm findom relationship. His entire paycheck is deposited into an account

... MONEY IS EQUATED WITH POWER AND THAT POWER IS EROTICIZED. he and his domme share, and she gives him an allowance. Like many relationships, this one has moved from the initial thrill into something that is more sustained. “Over time, it becomes more about the other person’s benefit, I enjoy the servant aspect of it,” he says. Though he also admits it is masochistic, “Humiliation and denial is part of it, I will be depriving myself of the money I give her.” Russ, a 48-year-old salesman in Washington, D.C., is also in a long-term findom relationship with someone he originally started following on a cam site. While they don’t have a joint bank account, his domme has access to all of his accounts and three of his credit cards. “She has access to my money, she could easily just buy herself what she wants,” he says. “But 90 percent of the time she asked me to make

the transactions.” Part of their dynamic, in other words, involves him actively giving her what she desires. This was never truer than when he gave her $49,000, a number that she dictated “That big give affected me spiritually, to have her call the shots,” he says. It was an act of submission. For Russ, this submission is about her happiness, but it is also about the feeling that he gets when he makes her happy. “[Findom] is where I get that feeling of appreciation, that feeling of success,” he says. “By giving my money to someone, I am succeeding.” While it can be emotionally difficult to get that sort of validation in these transactional relationships, but as he puts it, “When a [domme] reaches out to me and asks for something I can give her, I do it in a heartbeat, and my heart skips a beat.”

JESSIE SAGE IS CO-HOST OF THE PEEPSHOW PODCAST AT PEEPSHOWPODCAST.COM. HER COLUMN PEEPSHOW IS EXCLUSIVE TO PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @PEEP_CAST.HAVE A SEX QUESTION YOU’RE TOO AFRAID TO ASK? ASK JESSIE! EMAIL INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM. QUESTIONS MAY BE CONSIDERED FOR AN UPCOMING COLUMN.


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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

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Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly, featuring local artist Dominique Scaife, political candidate Gerald Dickinson, a ven...

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