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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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650 Smithfield Street, Suite 2200 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.685.9009 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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MAY 22-29, 2019 VOLUME 28 + ISSUE 21 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Associate Publisher JUSTIN MATASE Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD Managing Editor ALEX GORDON Senior Writers RYAN DETO, AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers HANNAH LYNN, JORDAN SNOWDEN Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Digital Media Manager JOSH OSWALD Editorial Designer ABBIE ADAMS Graphic Designers JOSIE NORTON, JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Events and Sponsorship Manager BLAKE LEWIS Sales Representatives KAITLIN OLIVER, NICK PAGANO Office Coordinator MAGGIE WEAVER Advertising Sales Assistant TAYLOR PASQUARELLI Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, GAB BONESSO, LISSA BRENNAN, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, CHARLES ROSENBLUM, JESSIE SAGE, STEVE SUCATO Intern JARED MURPHY Office Administrator RODNEY REGAN National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

David Klecha, 12, laces up his roller skates under the Bloomfield Bridge

FIRSTSHOT BY JARED MURPHY

GENERAL POLICIES: Contents copyrighted 2019 by Eagle Media Corp. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced without written permission of the publisher. The opinions expressed in Pittsburgh City Paper are those of the author and not necessarily of Eagle Media Corp. LETTER POLICY: Letters, faxes or e-mails must be signed and include town and daytime phone number for confirmation. We may edit for length and clarity. DISTRIBUTION: Pittsburgh City Paper is published weekly by Eagle Media Corp. and is available free of charge at select distribution locations. One copy per reader; copies of past issues may be purchased for $3.00 each, payable in advance to Pittsburgh City Paper. FIRST CLASS MAIL SUBSCRIPTIONS: Available for $175 per year, $95 per half year. No refunds.

COVER ILLUSTRATION: SOPHIA MARIE PAPPAS OUR SUMMER GUIDE PULL-OUT BEGINS ON PAGE 25

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

Above: A woman looks at the names of 743 western Pennsylvanians killed in the Vietnam War Left: A portrait of former Pittsburgh Steeler and Vietnam veteran Rocky Bleier and his bronze star

THE BIG STORY

REMEMBERING VIETNAM Looking back at the Pittsburgh’s region role in the Vietnam War BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

P

ENNSYLVANIA IS HOME to more than 296,000 Vietnam War veterans,

and the Southwestern region in particular played an important role in opposing, supporting, documenting, and prolonging the conflict between North and South Vietnamese. Whether it was groups providing aid and entertainment to American soldiers, protesting the government’s involvement, or fighting on the front lines, Pittsburgh’s role with the Vietnam War was diverse and complicated. The Heinz History Center’s exhibit The Vietnam War: 1945-1975 takes a deep dive back into the conflict, both on the national scale and locally. The exhibit is on display now and serves as a Memorial Day reminder that honoring armed services members goes beyond celebrating their victories and sacrifices. CONTINUES ON PG. 8

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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REMEMBERING VIETNAM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 7

SERVICES Services are offered to everyone, regardless of identity, income, or insurance status. • Full medical practice • Mental health services • Community health Navigator program • Transportation program • Food box program Quotes to local Pittsburgh media in response to the war protests

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THE VIETNAM WAR: 1945-1975 Veterans Free Day. Sat., May 25, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. Guided tours will also be given out throughout the day. Exhibit continues through Sept. 22. heinzhistorycenter.org

“This exhibit tells the deeply personal stories of the men and women who were impacted by the Vietnam War, from the home front to the front lines,” says Samuel Black, African American Program director at the History Center and the lead curator of the Vietnam War exhibit. “We examine Western Pennsylvania’s role and impact on the war and feature the stories of Pittsburghers who fought in the war, served in support services, were conscientious objectors, and participated in political protests and humanitarian initiatives during and after the war.” The timeline begins in the aftermath of World War II. With the allied powers splitting up responsibilities of the losing countries and their conquered territories, two political ideologies started to come to a head. The U.S. wanted to spread its capitalistic, democratic system, and the Soviet Union wanted to

spread communism. As so, a strong anti-communist movement grew in the U.S. The Heinz exhibit details President Harry Truman’s anti-communism efforts in Asia post WWII, which teed up America’s involvement in Vietnam. President Dwight Eisenhower sent U.S. troops into the war in 1955 and each successive administration escalated U.S. involvement in Vietnam, parlaying the threat of communism as justification. The exhibit showcases the gear and uniforms of Pittsburgh-based soldiers like Glenn Mahone, John Clark, and the well-known Pittsburgh Steeler Rocky Bleier. Museum-goers can attempt to lift up a 70-pound rucksack commonly carried by U.S. soldiers. There’s also a room designed to emulate the typical 1960s living room, showcasing how the American public was viewing the war through media. It includes a TV showing

newsreel footage of the war, as well as a 1966 Chatham College commencement speech given by Robert McNamara, the secretary of defense under President John F. Kennedy. This speech not only highlights the evolving opposition to the war, as McNamara references the ongoing protests undertaken by Chatham students, but also the federal government’s consistency in belittling the grassroots movements of young Americans. McNamara says he respected the rights of the students to organize, but he criticizes the efforts and calls them “extremist protests” in his speech. Even with the growing opposition to the conflict, Pittsburgh never ignored the roles of individuals. Donna Giordani of Westmoreland County is highlighted as the first woman in position with the 1st Aviation Brigade. She earned a Bronze Star and went on to become CONTINUES ON PG. 10


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REMEMBERING VIETNAM, CONTINUED FROM PG. 8

part of the first integrated class of Pittsburgh Police officers in 1976. Aid efforts from New Kensington residents are also displayed. The growing fatigue and disillusionment with the war are chronicled as the exhibit goes on. In 1972 a large Stop the War banner was unveiled during the Pirates Opening Day at Three Rivers Stadium. Washington & Jefferson College in Washington County helped anti-war protests. Anti-war sentiment started to combine with the Civil Rights movement of that era, and the Heinz exhibit shows how that splintered folks in Southwestern Pennsylvania. Union leaders joined anti-war and civil rights protests, but the exhibit notes how few white, working-class union members followed suit. The 1968 election further exemplifies the region’s problematic history with race, as Allegheny County supplied a fairly large portion of votes to opensegregationist and third-party presidential candidate George Wallace. Allegheny County voted for Democratic candidate Hubert Humphrey, who vowed to quickly end the war, but Wallace tallied almost 80,000 votes in Allegheny County, about

“IT WAS IMPORTANT TO SHOW THAT A COMPLEX WAR HAD SUCH A GREAT IMPACT ON WHO WE ARE AS AMERICANS AND WHAT WE THINK AS A DEMOCRATIC SOCIETY.” 11 percent of the county’s vote. The exhibit hints at how this realignment of white-working class,

labor-affiliated voters might have shifted following the 1968 election. In 1972, President Richard Nixon, who historians

Follow senior writer Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto

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note used race to appeal to white voters, easily won Pennsylvania and flipped Allegheny County and several other Southwestern Pennsylvania counties. Black says it was important to note America’s and Pittsburgh’s conflicted views on race and freedom during the Vietnam War. “The Vietnam War came at a time when America and the world were challenged with upholding the reigns of freedom,” says Black. “The Vietnam War exposed America’s confusion and hypocrisy about freedom at a time when it was denying freedom to its own Black and Brown citizens. It was important to show that a complex war had such a great impact on who we are as Americans and what we think as a democratic society.” In the end, the exhibit showcases the Pittsburgh region’s strong desire to memorialize veterans and fallen soldiers. It’s noted that McKeesport was the first city in America to create a wall to honor local soldiers who died in the war. The final room of the exhibit is complete with a wall listing 752 Southwestern Pennsylvania fallen soldiers from Vietnam.


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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.NEWS.

HOUSE RULES BY RYAN DETO RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

N 2017, the year before Magisterial

District Judge Mik Pappas took office, 90 percent of landlord-tenant cases in his East End district sided with landlords. This means that 379 out of 421 cases in the district — encompassing East Liberty, Highland Park, Morningside, Stanton Heights, Garfield, Friendship, and Bloomfield — the tenant or renter was forced to pack up and move out, often with little to no financial assistance. Not all these cases were evictions in the legal sense, but these decisions still deeply affect people lives. Once tenants lose access to a home, finding another can be difficult thanks to a record that blacklists them to other landlords. The vicious cycle means scrambling to find shelter, usually combined with all the other struggles of poverty. But things are turning around in the 31st District. According to Pappas, in 2018, landlord-tenant cases that sided with landlords dropped 39 percent. Thanks in large part to landlords and tenants reaching settlements out of court, only 51 percent of cases ruled in the landlord’s favor. These settlements allow tenants to move out on mutually agreed-upon terms. Pappas ran his campaign on changing how justices typically handle landlord-tenant cases, and he says his first year in office is about providing fairness and “[carrying] out the rules with a mind to the rights and humanity of the parties involved.” Pappas heard 363 landlord-tenant cases last year, and about 100 of those

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Mik Pappas

“THESE CASES ARE ALL VERY UNIQUE AND VERY COMPLEX AND WHAT THEY TAKE IS A LOT OF LISTENING.” were settled, usually with encouragement from Pappas. These settled cases are usually best for both parties, says Pappas, and they tend to take a bit more massaging than just determining who was in the right according to current law. “These cases are all very unique and

very complex and what they take is a lot of listening,” says Pappas. Pappas acknowledges he ran into some road bumps at the beginning of his term. In January 2018, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported on complaints made by some prosecutors and police officers

that Pappas was running hearings late into the evening and alleging he lacks an understanding of the law. Pappas says the transition from former District Judge Ron Costa to his administration was frantic at first, and Pappas had to play catch up. “We had to start from scratch,” says Pappas. “We didn’t have permanent staff. Everything was brand new. There were some frustrations the first couple of months.” But Pappas says things are running more smoothly now, and he thanks the constables in his district for making extra efforts. Moving forward, Pappas hopes to continue making landlord-tenant relationships in his district less combative and to ensure residents have affordable places to live. He has a goal of eliminating lock-out ejectments, where evicted tenants are locked out of their apartments with their belongings still inside, by 2020. “If an eviction is established, then we want to give them enough time to move,” says Pappas. He also says the affordable-housing crisis in Pittsburgh won’t be solved without landlords, and he hopes that mom-and-pop landlords will organize and try to secure funds from the Pittsburgh affordable-housing trust fund. Pappas says mom-and-pop landlords take great pride in providing non-subsidized affordable housing for Pittsburghers, but they often lack the capital funding to comply with Section 8 housing vouchers. He says the affordablehousing trust fund could provide them with money for capital improvements, which could then make it easier for them to create Section 8 housing. He says this kind of advocacy could continue to improve landlord-tenant relationships. “These are the possibilities I am excited about,” says Pappas.


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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THIS WEEK ONLINE AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM

THIRD-PARTY LAB TESTED FOR POTENCY, PURITY, & CONSISTENCY! PHOTO: @ THELOVELIESTCO

IS THIS THE MOST INSTAGRAMMABLE SPOT IN PITTSBURGH? This shop’s printable coffee foam is taking over the gram. CP ’s favorite foodie Maggie Weaver’s got the scoop in this week’s food and drink news.

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Welcome to Metro. “Whole People, All People.” Metro Community Health Center (MCHC) exists to serve the needs of our patients. As a non-profit organization, MCHC has provided health care for 20 years, with medical providers who specialize in family practice, geriatrics, women’s health as well as holistic and integrative care and HIV and LGBT comprehensive care.

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Julius Boatwright

.VOICES.

STEEL SMILING BY GAB BONESSO // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

J

ULIUS BOATWRIGHT, founder of local

mental-health advocacy group Steel Smiling, was the first person who actually heard me when I spoke of loss. We met soon after I had released my comedy album Everyone’s Dead, named after I lost both my mother and brother within 13 months of each other. Boatwright stopped the conversation when I told him about it and asked thoughtful follow-up questions about my wellbeing, not the album. It was the first time in a year where I felt like someone actually saw me. In honor of Mental Health Awareness Month, I talked to Boatwright about his advocacy work and what makes it so important. WOULD YOU DO ME A FAVOR AND EXPLAIN STEEL SMILING FOR ANYONE WHO IS UNFAMILIAR WITH YOUR ORGANIZATION? Steel Smiling bridges the gap between community members and mental health support through education, advocacy, and awareness. A vital component of our grand vision is to expose every Black adult in the city of Pittsburgh to at least one mental health experience that improves their quality of life by 2030. Ideally, we’d love to perfect our community-

based model to exceed this goal in Allegheny County and ultimately grow it to scale throughout the country. Answering one specific question is at the core of our daily efforts: “How can we honor the humanity of each human being that we encounter through Steel Smiling?” We want our organizational partners, program participants, and trusted community members to know that they’re loved, valued, appreciated, heard, and not judged for being themselves. People can typically expect great food, chill music, intimate peer support, and a one-of-a-kind organic vibe when they come to our events and educational experiences. We’re striving to make mental health cool and comfortably accessible, especially for our Black and brown neighbors. WHAT IS YOUR ADVICE TO SOMEONE WHO HAS A FRIEND STRUGGLING WITH SEVERE DEPRESSION AND IS EXPRESSING SUICIDAL THOUGHTS? When I think about the word “advice,” it almost makes it seem like I’m granting an individual access to something that they don’t already possess deep within themselves. The reason I’m highlighting this is because I always try my best to meet people exactly where they are,

when they’re experiencing mental health growth moments. I genuinely empathize and therapeutically align with folks in a way that seeks to harness their own autonomy. If they’re experiencing a crisis and need immediate emergency support, I’d acknowledge their wants and do my due diligence to get them connected with the appropriate resources, as welcomed by them. In my personal experiences with community members who express that they’re struggling, by simply acknowledging their freedom to process pain authentically, it helps them to reconnect with their own reasons for wanting to live and experience joy in life. Simply being present and not trying to force others to feel better can be magical too. I’ve had hundreds of instances when people have said to me, “This is the first time that someone has really listened to me.” WHAT MENTAL HEALTH ADVICE WOULD YOU GIVE YOUR YOUNGER SELF NOW KNOWING WHAT YOU KNOW AS AN ADULT? It’s definitely challenging to answer this question justly because hindsight is often 20/20. I’m a very spiritual person who believes that everything happens for a divine reason in our lives. I’m sure

Follow featured contributor Gab Bonesso on Twitter @gabbonesso

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the adult Julius could tell the younger me that I shouldn’t feel depressed about being on welfare and growing up in public housing. I suppose that a wiser Julius could tell the youthful me that I shouldn’t consider completing suicide because there are people in the world who have it much worse than me. I guess the “grown” version of Julius could tell the teenage me that being anxious about life is completely within my control to cope with and resolve.

STEEL SMILING steelsmilingpgh.org

However, I don’t think that any of this advice would have served a productive purpose because my current self only wants to “fix” what I see as a problem. To be completely honest, I wouldn’t share any of this with my younger self. I’d actively listen, honor the humanity of our conversation, and acknowledge his beauty as a vulnerable human. To me, that’s what nurtures our mental health, wellness, and healing.

FULL INTERVIEW ONLINE AT PGHCITYPAPER.COM


PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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.JUST JAGGIN’.

HOW TO GO TO THE BATHROOM ( AT WORK ) BY JOSH OSWALD // JOSWALD@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

ALKING INTO the office bath-

room is like happening upon a crime scene while the crime is taking place. The less you see, the safer you are. Coworker pulling pants up outside of stall? Avoid eye contact. Two people bad mouthing someone you know? Didn’t happen. An office veteran quips about some noises no polite person would talk about? Your response is “Haha, yeah,” at best. In the office bathroom, ignorance is bliss. It’s like Tyler Durden said, “The first rule of Fight Club is you don’t talk in the bathroom.” But no matter how many precautions you take to escape the communal toilet unscathed, you will inevitably experience some awkwardness. Your eyes are bound to drift to that seam between the door and the stall and make eye contact with a coworker, who, against all odds, is just trying to not have a horrifying bathroom experience. The chances are slim, but it does happen. It’s like winning whatever the opposite of the Powerball is. The worst thing about the office bathroom, and public bathrooms in general, is that the design hasn’t changed over the course of our 200-year history as a nation. The only things keeping us from holding hands while we go are reclaimed plastic, faulty hinges, and broken locks. We’d be better hidden with a Daddy Warbuckslike bathroom attendant shielding us by holding up a Taz beach towel. It’s 2019, we have wristwatch telephones, and we still call our pooping technology a “stall.” We file uncomfortably into tiny rooms to navigate the unknown,

just to embarrass ourselves further with pungent aromas, noises, and erratic urine streams. We’re like cattle being herded to slaughter. And there’s no Toilet Temple Grandin to assuage our fears. If I were president, my Day One task would be fixing American’s bathroom infrastructure. If I couldn’t simply make every bathroom a unisex, single-seater, which would solve all of our global and domestic problems, I would require stall doors to go all the way to the floor. Like I can’t tell it’s John from sales taking a hungover growler at 10 a.m. on Friday by spotting his signature white K-Swiss. Who still buys K-Swiss, John? At the least, I would mandate every bathroom offered shoe cozies to hide their identities. Then, I’d ban any extracurricular bathroom activities. I don’t know what type of person thinks they’re improving their hygiene by brushing their teeth in a communal bathroom filled with stranger danger, but that will be banned. Flossing? Same. Phone calls? No! Internet browsing? Mandatory. No sound, though. Unless you are playing Snake. I want to be aware of anyone playing Snake. Long, meeting-like conversations? Outlawed! Get a conference room. If you have to operate in a threestall bathroom, choosing the middle stall when the other two are not in use means you lose door privileges for a year. You now use the toilet with your stall door open. Finally, every bathroom would have a moderate level of white noise, because your wiping rhythm is your own business.

Follow digital media manager Josh Oswald on Twitter @gentlemenRich

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222 MAIN STREET • DOWNTOWN IRWIN 724-367-4000 • LAMPTHEATRE.ORG

Established in 1937, The Lamp Theatre tre m boasts a variety of entertainment from movies to concerts and everything inn hat at between. A true community project that ghh was built and currently staffed through volunteer efforts. We look forward too hosting our neighbors and friends att aar! r! The Lamp Theatre throughout the yea year!

JJOIN US FOR THESE UPCOMING SHOWS! U

Cash Unchained The Ultimate

Experience Janis With CC coletti

June 8 - 8pm

Aug 16 - 8pm

Johnny cash Tribute A Weekend of Pathological discussion with

Cyril Wecht July 26 thru 28 8pm & 2pm

Hard Days Night Beatles tribute Aug 17 - 8pm

Peace Frog A Tribute to the doors

Aug 9 & 10 8pm

Into The Mystic A Tribute To van Morrison Sept 14 - 8pm PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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.RESTAURANT REVIEW.

HUNAN BAR BY MAGGIE WEAVER MWEAVER@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE ORIGIN of the hot pot dates back a thousand years to some very hungry Mongolian horsemen. These Mongol riders, en route to China and on the brink of invasion, turned their shields into grills and their helmets into soup pots. Boiling broth over the fire, they cooked pieces of meat one-by-one, staving off chills and hunger and, as legends say, giving China its first taste of hot pot. Though Mongolian rule of China fell around 1260, the hot pot stuck. It spread through the country and continent, appearing in different forms, and is now a time-honored tradition across Asia. Chinese iterations of hot pot vary considerably by province. Sichuan hot pot, perhaps one of the most wellknown versions, is mouth-numbingly spicy, where its Cantonese counterpart is seafood-focused and mild. The Hunan province, on the other hand, is famous for a two-sided pot that gives the best of both worlds. This divided pot is a mainstay at Hunan Bar, a small Oakland restaurant on Atwood St. On the weekends, there’s a hot pot buffet and during the week a fixed menu (around $54 for two people), with a set of ingredients to start: prosciutto thin lamb and beef, Spam, prawns, tofu, bok choy and cabbage, rice noodles, and bean sprouts. Addons, like lotus root, fresh mushrooms, and eggs, are available a la carte. The concept is comparable to fondue, but with no cheese and more flavor. One pot on a hot plate or singleburner stove sits in the middle of a table, surrounded by diners armed with chopsticks, sauce bowls, and in some cases, rice. To eat, dip or drop an ingredient from the endless plates of meat, noodles, or vegetables, into the pot and wait. The broth does its job quickly,

CP PHOTO: MAGGIE WEAVER

Hot pot at Hunan Bar

cooking and infusing flavor. As a hot pot first-timer, I made sure to do my research first, and found countless articles listing dos and don’ts. Do: drink lots of cold beer to balance out the heat, load up on vegetables, and try everything. Don’t: double dip (though I quickly threw this advice to the wind), burn the noodles, or steal food from tablemates. After a few etiquette

tips — don’t be “that guy” who dumps everything in the broth at once — I was ready to go.

HUNAN BAR 239 Atwood St., Oakland. 412-621-2326

The pot came first, raised on a portable gas burner and divided in half — one

FAVORITE FEATURES:

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Spice

Golden Rule

Cook & leave

Sichuan peppers bring serious heat. Thankfully, my dining companion has a high tolerance, because a two-second dip in the spicy broth brought tears to my eyes. And the peppers really do make your mouth go numb.

A writer for Serious Eats brings up the golden rule: “You don’t hot pot with people you don’t like.” Not only are you eating at a big, communal table, you’re also cooking in one pot. It’s not the best environment to interact with mortal enemies.

Leftovers? Don’t worry. Hunan Bar lets you take the remains of the hot pot ingredients — as long as they’re cooked — home.

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

side angry with red chilies, the other almost clear. My server then directed me to a mix-and-match sauce station featuring fresh green onions, parsley, maskingtape labeled bottles of soy sauce and vinegar, and three mystery sauces. Initially, my technique was bumpy, but after the first few splashes and almost-burnt bean sprouts, I relaxed. It was a completely new way to eat — less about food, more about community. Hot pot, by nature, evokes conversation and connection whether it’s because you’re yelling about how spicy the broth is or questioning the flavor of Spam. It’s an experience and celebration, one that’s worth seeking out in one of the few Pittsburgh restaurants that keep this centuries-old tradition alive.

Follow staff writer Maggie Weaver on Twitter @magweav


Thai & Burmese Specialties!

DINING OUT

Pad Thai

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

SPONSORED LISTINGS FROM CITY PAPER ’S FINE ADVERTISERS

Noodle

THIS WEEK’S FEATURED RESTAURANT

4770 Liberty Ave 412.904.1640 padthainoodlepittsburgh.com

LEON’S CARIBBEAN 823 E WARRINGTON AVE., ALLENTOWN / 412-431-5366 LEONSCARIBBEAN.COM Family owned and operated since December 2014. Here at Leon’s, we take pride in our recipes and quality of dishes. Simple menu with all the traditional dishes! Leon Sr. has been a chef for 30+ years, mastering the taste everyone has grown to love and can only get at Leon’s.

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1366 OLD FREEPORT ROAD, FOX CHAPEL 412-963-0640, WWW.BAJABARGRILL.COM The Baja Bar & Grill is the perfect destination any time of the year for dancing to live bands and taking in great entertainment every weekend. In addition, there’s good food along with amazing views of the Allegheny River and the Fox Chapel Marina.

1125 PENN AVE., STRIP DISTRICT 412-586-4850 / COLONYCAFEPGH.COM Whether stopping in for a weekday lunch, an afternoon latte or after-work drinks with friends, Colony Cafe offers delicious house-made bistro fare in a stylish Downtown space.

4770 LIBERTY AVE, BLOOMFIELD 412-904-1640 PADTHAINOODLEPITTSBURGH.COM This new café in Bloomfield features Thai and Burmese specialties. Standards like Pad Thai and Coconut Curry Noodle are sure to please. But don’t miss out on the Ono Kyowsway featuring egg noodle sautéed with coconut chicken, cilantro and curry sauce.

BEA’S TACO TOWN 633 SMITHFIELD STREET, DOWNTOWN 412-471-8361, WWW.BEATAQUERIA.COM Authentic Mexican cuisine in the heart of Downtown Pittsburgh! Bea Taco Town offers tacos, burritos, enchiladas, quesadillas, and much more all with traditional recipes. Slow cooked meats and fresh vegetables prepared daily will have you coming back to try it all.

THE CAFÉ CARNEGIE 4400 FORBES AVE., OAKLAND 412-622-3225 / THECAFECARNEGIE.COM An excellent dining experience from James Beard Semi-Finalist, Sonja Finn featuring a locally-focused menu, full service dining, and espresso and wine bar.

CARMELLA’S PLATES & PINTS 1908 EAST CARSON STREET, SOUTHSIDE 412-918-1215, CARMELLASPLATESANDPINTS.COM Featuring an upscale ambiance, Carmella’s is located in the heart of South Side, serving a variety of refined comfort cuisine for dinner and brunch. The décor features a lodge-like feel with a wood beamed cathedral ceiling, stained glass and open fireplace. A local purveyor delivers fresh ingredients daily, which are crafted into unique and inventive meals, served alongside a curated cocktail list and comprehensive wine selection.

EIGHTY ACRES 1910 NEW TEXAS ROAD, MONROEVILLE/PLUM 724-519-7304 / EIGHTYACRESKITCHEN.COM Eighty Acres Kitchen & Bar offers a refined, modern approach to contemporary American cuisine with a strong emphasis on local, farm-totable products.

ELIZA HOT METAL BISTRO 331 TECHNOLOGY DRIVE, PITTSBURGH 412-621-1551, ELIZAHOTELINDIGO.COM Set on the site of former iconic iron works, Eliza Furnace, Eliza is an American Bistro exploring classic Pittsburgh flavors, beloved by those that worked the furnaces, combined with the fresh perspective and seasonal sourcing that define what we eat in our region today. Relax with great food, cocktails, and enjoy live entertainment on the rooftop bar.

MERCURIO’S ARTISAN GELATO AND NEAPOLITAN PIZZA 5523 WALNUT ST., SHADYSIDE 412-621-6220 / MERCURIOSGELATOPIZZA.COM Authentic Neapolitan pizza, artisan gelato, and an inviting atmosphere are just a small part of what helps create your experience at Mercurio’s Gelato and Pizza in Pittsburgh. It’s not your standard pizza shop; in fact, this isn’t a “pizza shop” at all.

SUPERIOR MOTORS 1211 BRADDOCK AVE., BRADDOCK 412-271-1022 / SUPERIORMOTORS15104.COM Thoughtfully prepared food, drawing inspiration from Braddock, its people, its history, and its perseverance. The cuisine best represents the eclectic style which has become a trademark of Chef Kevin Sousa. Fine dining in an old Chevy dealership with an eclectic, farm-to-table menu and a community focus.

TOTOPO MEXICAN KITCHEN AND BAR 660 WASHINGTON ROAD, MT. LEBANON 412-668-0773 / TOTOPOMEX.COM Totopo is a vibrant celebration of the culture and cuisine of Mexico, with a focus on the diverse foods served in the country. From Oaxacan tamales enveloped in banana leaves to the savory fish tacos of Baja California, you will experience the authentic flavor and freshness in every bite. They also feature a cocktail menu of tequila-based drinks to pair the perfect margarita with your meal.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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412 Brewery welcomes you to our newest taproom on Pgh’s historic Northside.

Dog-Friendly taproom with outdoor seating, firepits, games and more!

847 WESTERN AVENUE

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The Rum Dole Whip cocktail

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.ON THE ROCKS.

DOLE WHIP

angeliasitaliangrille.com

BY RYAN DETO // RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

F YOU LOVE Disneyland or used to

live in Southern California like I did, you are likely well aware of the sweet treat known as Dole Whip. It’s basically just soft-serve ice cream combined with fresh pineapple juice, and it is tart, super sweet, and a fun treat on a hot and sunny California day. It was invented at Disneyland in the 1950s and is still served at the Happiest Place on Earth (probably by some underpaid, overworked employee). Local award-winning distillery Maggie’s Farm Rum has brought that pineapple flavor to Pittsburgh, with the welcome addition of their 50/50 Pineapple Rum. The Strip District distillery has a new seasonal menu and a Rum Dole Whip cocktail is front and center. The fruity beverage combines fresh banana, crushed pineapple, powdered sugar, and coconut milk whipped together with the 50/50 Pineapple Rum. The rum is made by macerating fresh pineapple into Maggie’s Dark Rum and mixing it with a white rum that is then vaporized through pineapple barks to capture the fruit’s oils. The Rum Dole Whip cocktail is as refreshing as a smoothie, but much lighter because it’s whipped. The banana helps to mellow out the strong sweetness of the pineapple and coconut, as well as diminish some of the strong spiciness from the rum. The result is so drinkable, you’ll have to force yourself to slow down

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so you can actually enjoy it. Maggie’s also recently created a whole line of seasonal cocktails inspired by flavors more accustomed to the tropics. The Fassionola combines white rum and fresh-squeezed lime juice with a syrup made from berries, passion fruit, and hibiscus. The tiki drink is sour, sweet, and has a nice kick.

MAGGIE’S FARM RUM 3212a Smallman St., Strip District. Open Wed.-Sun. Hours vary. maggiesfarmrum.com

A Coco Mojito is a twist on the classic mint-infused Cuban cocktail, with coconut water replacing soda water. Peach on the Beach is sort of a tiki drink meets Northern flavor — warm tastes of vanilla and maple syrup meld with peaches and passion fruit. To really tie one on, try the #TAF. The drink is strong; Maggie’s will only serve two per person. It combines dark and white rums with a bevy of tropical and temperate fruits into a powerful punch. Get the Rum Dole Whip while it lasts. Maggie’s says that it will only be available for another week or so. And all of Maggie’s rums, including the 50/50 Pineapple Rum, are for sale by the bottle at the distillery and many local Fine Wines and Good Spirits stores.


.FOR THE WEEK OF MAY 23

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY BY ROB BREZSNY // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

CANCER (June 21-July 22): “People will choose unhappiness over uncertainty,” writes Cancerian author and entrepreneur Timothy Ferriss. He doesn’t do that himself, but rather is quite eager to harvest the perks of dwelling in uncertainty. I presume this aptitude has played a role in his huge success; his books have appeared on bestseller lists and his podcasts have been downloaded more than 300 million times. In telling you this, I’m not encouraging you to embrace the fertile power of uncertainty 24 hours a day and 365 days of every year. But I am urging you to do just that for the next three weeks. There’ll be big payoffs if you do, including rich teachings on the art of happiness.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Many eighteenth-century pirates were committed to democracy and equality among their ranks. The camaraderie and fairness and mutual respect that prevailed on pirate ships were markedly different from the oppressive conditions faced by sailors who worked for the navies of sovereign nations. The latter were often pressed into service against their will and had to struggle to collect meager salaries. Tyrannical captains controlled all phases of their lives. I bring this to your attention, Leo, with the hope that it will inspire you to seek out alternative approaches to rigid and hierarchical systems. Gravitate toward generous organizations that offer you ample freedom and rich alliances. The time is right to ally yourself with emancipatory influences.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t wait around for fate to decide which decisions you should make and what directions you should go. Formulate those decisions yourself, with your willpower fully engaged. Never say, “If it’s meant to be, it will happen.” Rather, resolve to create the outcomes you strongly desire to happen. Do you understand how important this is? You shouldn’t allow anyone else to frame your important questions and define the nature of your problems; you’ve got to do the framing and defining yourself. One more thing: don’t fantasize about the arrival of the “perfect moment.” The perfect moment is whenever you decree it is.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll regularly give yourself to generous, expansive experiences. I

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If there were a Hall of Fame for writers, Shakespeare might have been voted in first. His work is regarded as a pinnacle of intellectual brilliance. And yet here’s a fun fact: The Bard quoted well over a thousand passages from the Bible. Can you imagine a modern author being taken seriously by the literati if he or she frequently invoked such a fundamental religious text? I bring this to your attention so as to encourage you to be Shakespeare-like in the coming weeks. That is, be willing to draw equally from both intellectual and spiritual sources; be a deep thinker who communes with sacred truths; synergize the functions of your discerning mind and your devotional heart. hope you’ll think big, funny thoughts and feel spacious, experimental emotions. I hope you’ll get luxurious glimpses of the promise your future holds, and I hope you’ll visualize yourself embarking on adventures and projects you’ve been too timid or worried to consider before now. For best results, be eager to utter the word “MORE!” as you meditate on the French phrase “joie de vivre” and the English phrase “a delight in being alive.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to Popular Mechanics magazine, over three million sunken ships are lying on the bottoms of the world’s oceans. Some of them contain billions of dollars’ worth of precious metals and jewels. Others are crammed with artifacts that would be of great value to historians and archaeologists. And here’s a crazy fact: fewer than one percent of all those potential treasures have been investigated by divers. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope it might inspire you to explore your inner world’s equivalent of lost or unknown riches. The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to go searching for them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Some days you need God’s grace,” writes poet Scherezade Siobhan. “On other days: the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed

by fire.” I’m guessing, Sagittarius, that these days you might be inclined to prefer the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire. But according to my astrological analysis, those flashy phenomena would not motivate you to take the corrective and adaptive measures you actually need. The grace of God — or whatever passes for the grace of God in your world – is the influence that will best help you accomplish what’s necessary. Fortunately, I suspect you know how to call on and make full use of that grace.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford articulated some advice that I think you need to hear right now. Please hold it close to your awareness for the next 21 days. “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk,” he wrote. “Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” By practicing those protective measures, Capricorn, you will foster and safeguard your mental health. Now here’s another gift from Stafford: “Things you know before you hear them — those are you, those are why you are in the world.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Love is an immoderate thing / And can never be content,” declared poet W. B. Yeats. To provide you with an accurate horoscope, I’ll have to

argue with that idea a bit. From what I can determine, love will indeed be immoderate in your vicinity during the coming weeks. On the other hand, it’s likely to bring you a high degree of contentment — as long as you’re willing to play along with its immoderateness. Here’s another fun prediction: I suspect that love’s immoderateness, even as it brings you satisfaction, will also inspire you to ask for more from love and expand your capacity for love. And that could lead to even further immoderate and interesting experiments.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): You will know you are in sweet alignment with cosmic forces if you have an impulse to try a rash adventure, but decide instead to work on fixing a misunderstanding with an ally. You can be sure you’re acting in accordance with your true intuition if you feel an itch to break stuff, but instead, channel your fierce energy into improving conditions at your job. You will be in tune with your soul’s code if you start fantasizing about quitting what you’ve been working on so hard, but instead, sit down and give yourself a pep talk to reinvigorate your devotion and commitment.

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will have the wisdom to criticize yourself in constructive ways that will at least partially solve a long-standing problem. Hallelujah! I bet you will also understand what to do to eliminate a bad habit by installing a good new habit. Please capitalize on that special knowledge! There’s one further capacity I suspect you’ll have: the saucy ingenuity necessary to alleviate a festering fear. Be audacious!

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): What standards might we use in evaluating levels of sexual satisfaction? One crucial measure is the tenderness and respect that partners have for each other. Others include the ability to play and have fun, the freedom to express oneself uninhibitedly, the creative attention devoted to unpredictable foreplay, and the ability to experience fulfilling orgasms. How do you rate your own levels, Taurus? Wherever you may currently fall on the scale, the coming months will be a time when you can accomplish an upgrade. How? Read authors who specialize in the erotic arts. Talk to your partners with increased boldness and clarity. While meditating, search for clues in the depths.

GO TO REALASTROLOGY.COM TO CHECK OUT ROB BREZSNY’S EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES AND DAILY TEXT-MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. THE AUDIO HOROSCOPES ARE ALSO AVAILABLE BY PHONE AT 1-877-873-4888 OR 1-900-950-7700

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MAY PAGE 6 • JUNE PAGE 16 JULY PAGE 36 • AUGUST PAGE 46

Some of the events we’ve highlighted span multiple days — be sure to check the websites we’ve included to see more options if our choice doesn’t work for you!

COVER ILLUSTRATION: SOPHIA PAPPAS

for even more event recommendations all summer long!

*Check pghcitypaper.com 4

100 DAYS, MORE THAN 200 CURATED SUMMER EVENTS


RED, WHITE & BREWS

MAY 25 TH JUSTIN FABUS

FOOD, DRINKS & MUSIC / SHADYSIDE UNTIL 11PM WALNUT STREET WILL SHUT DOWN AT 5PM (ALL CARS MUST BE OFF THE ROAD OR THEY WILL BE TOWED)

6/22

Dancing queen

7/20

The Delaneys

8/17

My So Called 90s Band

9/21

No Bad Juju

10/28

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MAY

^ Sat., May 25: Water Lantern Festival

THURSDAY

MAY 23

the Jason Greenlaw & John O’Brien jazz guitar duo. 6:30-8 p.m. 4106 Howley St., Bloomfield. Free. g1cw.com

MUSIC

MUSIC

Have a song, poem, stand-up routine, or haunting confession you’d like to share with an audience? Check out That Was Dope!, an open-mic night and jam session at Enix Brewing Company, featuring live music. 6:30 p.m. 337 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. enix.beer

Catch Pittsburgh’s favorite folk/punk DIY songwriter Derek Zanetti, aka Homeless Gospel Choir, at the Roboto Project, the perfect venue to hear his intimate, funny, open-hearted music. Opening things up are Jon Snodgrass and Space Buns Forever. 7 p.m. 5106 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $12. therobotoproject.com

EVENT The Bloomfield Corner Store, an arts and music pop-up event created by Bankrupt Bodega, holds its closing night event at Gallery One | Collective Works. The event includes a performance by

ART Wine and paint nights are all the rage, but The Art Trap: Paint Night is for wannabe artists who like to keep the blood flowing while they create. Get

a painting lesson while dancing to local rap, trap, and R&B. BYOB. 7 p.m. BOOM Concepts, 5139 Penn Ave., Garfield. $20. Search Facebook for “Art Trap Paint Night”

FRIDAY

MAY 24 TALK Celebrated local chef Jamilka Borges visits the Pittsburgh Center for the Arts for Creative Mornings. Hear about Borges’ career in the Pittsburgh food scene at restaurants like the Independent Brewing Company, Hidden Harbor, and Lorelei, and working with the organization 412 Food Rescue. 8:30 a.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shadyside. Free. Registration required. center.pfpca.org CONTINUES ON PG. 8

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PHOTO: VANIA EVANGELIQUE

^ Thu., May 23: The Art Trap: Paint Night

STAGE Front Porch Theatricals brings Bright Star, the award-winning musical by Steve Martin and Edie Brickell, to New Hazlett Theater. Directed by Nick Mitchell, the show transports audiences to 1945 for a love story set in the Blue Ridge Mountains. 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 26. Allegheny Square East, North Side. $12-35. newhazletttheater.org

DANCE Lightlab 17 at Space Upstairs presents a diverse lineup of experimental dance and performance artists, including Nick M. Daniels of the D.A.N.A. Movement Ensemble and Minnesota-based dance duo, Hiponymous. 8 p.m. 214 N. Lexington St., Point Breeze. thespaceupstairs.org

SATURDAY

MAY 25

down to South Korean pop music. 4 pm. 2260 Babcock Blvd., North Side. $15-100. yanlaidanceacademy.com

FOOD

EVENT

At the Exit4Pizza First Annual Eating Contest, try to eat as much pizza as you can in 20 minutes, and whoever consumes the most wins $250. All the proceeds to the Osteogenesis Imperfecta Foundation. 12-2:30 p.m. 183 Butler St., Etna. $10 minimum donation. exit4pizza.com

Lake Elizabeth is already one of Pittsburgh’s most photographed landmarks, but it’s about to become even more photogenic when the Water Lantern Festival fills the North Side lake with hundreds of sparkling lights. Everyone gets a lantern kit, and ticket price includes clean-up, so the park will be left in good shape. 5:30 p.m. Allegheny Commons Park West, W. Ohio St., North Side. $35. waterlanternfestival.com

DANCE Melt some hearts with the fresh moves you learn from the K-Pop Dance Class at Yanlai Dance Academy. Lucy Chen will teach you the best ways to get

MUSIC The newest album from The Gotobeds,

Debt Begins at 30, has an optimistic title. Forget all your financial woes, before or after 30, at the band’s album release party at Babyland, also featuring Positive No and Bat Zuppel. 9 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $8. facebook.com/thegotobeds

ART Despite some progress, Black Americans are still suffering racial and economic inequality, and Race and Revolution: Still Separate seeks to lay those realities bare. The exhibit has traveled across the Northeast and is now at August Wilson African American Cultural Center. Continues through July 21. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. aacc-awc.org CONTINUES ON PG. 10

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EAT HEALTHY FIND PRODUCE AND OTHER LOCALLY-MADE GOODS ALL SUMMER AT THESE PITTSBURGH FARMERS’ MARKETS ALL FARMERS’ MARKETS ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS + GET $2 TO SPEND ON PRODUCE FOR EVERY $5 SPENT IN FOOD STAMPS. SQUIRREL HILL SUNDAYS 9 A.M.-1 P.M. MAY 12-NOV. 24

EAST LIBERTY MONDAYS 3-7 P.M. MAY 13-NOV. 25

SOUTH SIDE PHOTO: DEANA MURO PHOTOGRAPHY

TUESDAYS 3-7 P.M. MAY 14-NOV. 26

CARRICK WEDNESDAYS 3-7 P.M. JUNE 19-NOV. 27

BEECHVIEW THURSDAYS 3-7 P.M. JUNE 20-SEPT. 12

DOWNTOWN FRIDAYS 10:30 A.M.-1:30 P.M. MAY 10-OCT. 25

NORTH SIDE FRIDAYS 3-7 P.M. MAY 17-NOV. 22 FOR MORE INFO, VISIT PITTSBURGHPA.GOV/EVENTS

^ Fri., May 24: Bright Star

SUNDAY

feature a series of short DIY plays from local playwrights. 7 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. $5. theglitterboxtheater.com

MAY 26 EVENT

FILM

Pittsburgh’s cutest gorilla Frankie is turning one! You’re invited to celebrate with the Western Lowland baby gorilla as he opens birthday presents at the Pittsburgh Zoo. 11 a.m. Gorilla Exhibit, 7370 Baker St., Highland Park. Included with admission. pittsburghzoo.org

Regent Square Theater will screen the biopic Future Language. Directed by Pittsburgh native Lori Felker, the film presents a portrait of VON LMO, a musician/artist and self-proclaimed alien-hybrid who became part of the late-’70s No Wave music scene in New York. 8 p.m. 1035 S. Braddock Ave., Regent Square. $8. cinema.pfpca.org

EVENT Dance your way into summer at the Big Gay Picnic, an all-day, buffet-style, outdoor party. This year, picnic organizers have re-enforced the dance floor, so seriously, DANCE. 12-6:30 p.m. North Park Lodge, 303 Pierce Mill Road, Allison Park. $25-30. pittsburghpride.org

FOOD Kaya celebrates the start of summer with KayaFest, a block party full of live music by local bands and DJs, Caribbean-inspired food and grilling favorites, drinks, and the best vibes. 12-10:30 p.m. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. kaya.menu

STAGE Just when Laura thinks she has left her military past behind, it comes back to

MONDAY PHOTO: PAUL A. SELVAGGIO

^ Sun., May 26: Frankie

haunt her when a journalist starts asking tough questions about her past. We Are Among Us reveals what happened on that one unforgettable night in Afghanistan. 2 p.m. Continues through June 2. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $44. citytheatrecompany.org

STAGE In 10 minutes, you could run a slow mile, make pasta, take a shower, or even see an entire play. The Ten Minute Play Festival at Glitter Box Theater will

MAY 27 MUSIC Apocolyptica is Finland’s — and possibly the world’s — first metal cello band (Pittsburgh has Cello Fury, but the Fins have them beat by a few years). Known for its cello quartet covers of metal albums (previously Faith No More, Rammstein), Apocolyptica takes on Metallica at Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. Not too many details yet, but it’s four cellos playing Metallica. Nothing else matters. 6:30 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $29.50-59.50. librarymusichall.com CONTINUES ON PG. 12

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friday, june 21, 2019 6:00-11:00pm Mattress Factory Contemporary Art Museum Hosted by the Mattress Factory + the Factory Fellows

Tickets on sale now at mattress.org Let’s dance the midsummer night away with visions of fairies, druids, centaurs and all things mystical!

Allegheny General Hospital Staff • All in Good Taste Productions • Central Outreach Wellness Center • Cozen O’Connor • PJ Dick Trumbull • PNC Buchanan Ingersoll & Rooney PC • Federal Home Loan Bank Pittsburgh • First National Bank of Pennsylvania • Jones Day • Scott and Sue Lammie John and Deb Lantz • Leech Tishman Fuscaldo & Lampl, LLC Nancy and Woody Ostrow • Plantscape • Rectenwald Brothers • Reed Smith LLP • S&T Bank Schell Games • Walnut Capital

The Mattress Factory 500 Sampsonia Way

mattress.org

412.231.3169 SUMMER GUIDE 2019

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PHOTO: SHAWN BRACKBILL

^ Sat., May 25: The Gotobeds

ART Artist Richard Claraval brings The Lord of the Rings to life. J R. R. Tolkien’s vivid stories are inspiration for Claraval’s etchings and drawings, on display at Espresso a Mano through June 30. 3623 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. richardclaraval.net

TUESDAY

MAY 28 COMEDY British stand-up comedian and actor Eddie Izzard, who first came out as transgender over three decades ago, calls himself “a lesbian trapped in a man’s body.” Come for the political jokes; stay for the lipstick. 8 p.m. Byham Theatre, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $64.25-78.75. trustarts.org

WEDNESDAY

MAY 29 FILM A Moment in the Reeds tells an intimate story of connection between a young

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Finnish man and a Syrian asylum seeker. The Alphabet City screening is hosted by ReelQ, Pittsburgh Lesbian & Gay Film Society’s annual film festival. 7 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free. reelq.com

MUSIC Thundercat, known for his longtime collaborations with the late Mac Miller, performs at the newly opened Roxian Theatre. The funky, contemporary R&B singer/bassist has also worked with Flying Lotus, Erykah Badu, and wrote much of Kendrick Lamar’s 2015 album, To Pimp a Butterfly. 8 p.m. 425 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. $25-35. roxianlive.com ^ Wed., May 29: Thundercat

THURSDAY

MAY 30 LIT Listen to author Adam Ehrlich Sachs talk about his new critically acclaimed novel The Organs of Sense, which humorously chronicles the tale of blind astronomy in 1666 Europe. 6 p.m. Carnegie Library Main, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free with registration. pittsburghlectures.org

MUSIC Women Who Rock features soul singer Lindsey Smith and a cappella group Sounds of Pittsburgh Chorus. Legendary percussionist Sheila E. headlines the

benefit concert for women’s health, with proceeds going to Magee-Womens Research Institute. 6:30 p.m. Stage AE, 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $55-125. womenwhorockpgh.com

MUSIC Vocalist Anqwenique Wingfield brings her project Sirens and Queens to East Liberty’s Wallace’s Whiskey Room and Kitchen to celebrate the works and lives of Black women composers. All ages are welcome at the Chamber Music Pittsburgh and BOOM Concepts event. 7 p.m. Hotel Indigo, 123 N. Highland Ave., East Liberty. Pay what you wish, $15 suggested. chambermusicpittsburgh.org

STAGE City Theatre stages burnbabyburn, a Pittsburgh tale by former Young Playwrights Festival winner, a.k. payne. Set in Homewood, the play is described as weaving a tale of two women “bound by legacy, history, and a search for their own voice.” 7 p.m. 1300 Bingham St., South Side. Free. RSVP required. citytheatre.culturaldistrict.org CONTINUES ON PG. 14


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GO FOR A RIDE RENT A BIKE HEALTHY RIDE A BIKE-SHARE COMPANY WITH MORE THAN 100 STATIONS THROUGHOUT PITTSBURGH HEALTHYRIDEPGH.COM

RENT A KAYAK VENTURE OUTDOORS KAYAKS ARE AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL STARTING MON., MAY 27 AT 1 FEDERAL ST., NORTH SIDE VENTUREOUTDOORS.ORG

PHOTO: ERIN MCCANDLESS

^ Fri., May 31: Liss Victory of The Girlie Show

COMEDY

FOOD

Sometimes the world can feel so dark, you don’t know whether to laugh or throw your money at charity. You can do both rty y comedy show at the Laughs for Liberty oceeds benefit at Arcade Comedy. Proceeds ania. 8 p.m. the ACLU of Pennsylvania. ntown. $25. 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. 16+. arcadecomedytheater.com eater.com

Get back to the roots of American cuisine with a talk from Chef Sean Sherman at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center. Sherman is from the Pine Ridge re reservation and the founder of The SSioux Chef. He emphasizes using indigenous foods to redefine N North American cuisine. 7 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Do Downtown. $38.75. aacc-awc.org

FRIDAY

RENT A PADDLE BOARD STAND-UP PADDLE BOARDS ARE NOW AVAILABLE FOR RENTAL

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MAY 31 MUSIC The New Respects, a eNashville-based, femaleg fronted band consisting of four young family members, brings its ck soulful, pop-infused rock sound to the Smiling Moose. 6:30 p.m. 1306 E. Carson St., South Side. $13-15. smiling-moose.com

3RIVERSOUTDOOR.COM > Fri., May 31: Trevor Noah

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STAGE STAG The Dus Dust s People, a new w play from Catherine Trieschmann, Tries explores expl the world of traditional t farming far clashing cla with renewable re energy e in a rural ru town. Everything Ev gets g s more get dramat dra dramatic matic ic w when a murder

occurs. 7 p.m. Lester Hamburg Studio, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. Free (RSVP required). citytheatre.culturaldistrict.org

MUSIC Like the one on 30 Rock with Jenna Maroney and Liz Lemon, but musical and not fictional, The Girlie Show is a series founded by, booked for, and featuring women musicians. At Hambone’s, the lineup includes Liss Victory, Liz Berlin, Tai Chirovsky, and Amy Mmhmm. 8 p.m. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. hambonespgh.com

COMEDY Now settled into his gig as host of The Daily Show, Trevor Noah has managed the impressive balancing act of keeping the show on track without relying too much on old tricks. Catch Noah in his original comfort zone, when he brings his standup tour Loud & Clear to Petersen Events Center. 8 p.m. 3719 Terrace St., Oakland. $46. peterseneventscenter.com CONTINUES ON PG. 16


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JUNE

PHOTO: XXXX

^ xxx

PHOTO: KITOKO CHARGOIS

^ Wed., June 5: pearlPRESENTS Dance Festival

SATURDAY

and more. 12 p.m. Downtown. Free. highmarkstreatfestpgh.com

6 p.m. 350 Forbes Ave., Downtown. $25. wildandscenicfilmfestival.org

FOOD

DANCE

Checkmate! Join regional chess enthusiasts at the Pittsburgh Chess Conference, an all-day event at Alloy 26 featuring a chess tournament and a fundraising dinner later in the evening. 9 a.m.-10 p.m. 100 S. Commons Suite 102, North Side. $15. tqgchess.institute

Who’s got the best taco in town? No need to argue when you can find them all in one place at Pittsburgh Taco Festival. The event returns to Highmark Stadium for the third year with live music and more than 30 vendors. Two sessions: 12 p.m. and 4 p.m. 510 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $10. pghtacofest.com

Enjoy an evening of classical and contemporary works from students at various levels when the Bodiography Center for Movement presents its Spring Concert at the Byham Theater. 7 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $31.50. trustarts.org

FOOD

FILM

Spanning two days, Highmark’s International StrEAT Festival fills Penn Avenue between Seventh and Stanwix with vendors from all over the Southwestern Pennsylvania Region. Stick around for live performances, eating contests, cooking demonstrations,

If summer is something you like more in concept than up close and personal, check out the Wild & Scenic Film Festival at Pittsburgh Playhouse. The touring festival aims to inspire “environmental activism and a love for nature through film.”

Explore the hilltop’s burgeoning neighborhood at the Allentown Night Market, and enjoy artisan crafts, food from local restaurants, and beer. More than 10 Allentown businesses are participating. 7-11 p.m. 800 block of Warrington Ave., Allentown. Free. Facebook search “The Weeping Glass”

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PHOTO: EASY STREET PROMOTIONS

^ Sat., June 1: Pittsburgh Taco Festival

COMEDY

at Row House Cinema. For one week, the theater honors Alfred Hitchcock with a bill of four classics: The Birds, The Wrong Man, Foreign Correspondent, and North by Northwest. Various times. Continues through Thu., June 6. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $8-10. rowhousecinema.com

Warning: this listing contains spoilers. Just kidding. Or are we? Congratulations. You complained so much that Game of Thrones decided to end itself. But you can still get the last laugh at The Roast of Jon Snow hosted by Burning Bridges Comedy Club. Get your neighbor to walk your dire wolf and head out for some pointed comedy. 8 p.m. 4207 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $15. burningbridgescomedyclub.com

TUESDAY

JUNE 4 MUSIC

SUNDAY

JUNE 2

vendors, and lots more. 12 p.m. Bay 41, 4107 Willow St., Lawrenceville. Free. grlpwrpgh.com

featuring some of opera’s greatest hits. 7:30 p.m. 4000 Middle Road, Allison Park. Free. pittsburghopera.org

L7 has been a keystone of the grunge scene since its formation in 1985. Thirty-four years later, they’re still kicking and will bring their spirited live show to the Rex Theater, along with Le Butcherettes. 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $29.50-35. rextheater.net

MUSIC

MONDAY

MUSIC

PHOTO: @ROYAL.VISION

^ Tue., June 4: Toots and the Maytals

EVENT Explore the planet Mars in Mars, Pa., at the town’s semi-annual Mars Exploration Celebration, featuring NASA exhibits, food, live music, and science professionals. 11 a.m. Downtown, Mars. Free. marsnewyear.com

EVENT Take self-love Sunday to the next level with Grlpwrpgh and Ladyhood Journey’s Self-Love Sunday: The Fest. Expect an entire day of live music, yoga, on-site activities, dancing, food and drinks, local

Pittsburgh Opera goes beyond the stage when it performs at Hartwood Acres Amphitheater as part of the Allegheny County Summer Concert Series. Expect a 90-minute program

JUNE 3 FILM Experience the “Master of Suspense”

Check pghcitypaper.com for event updates all summer long.

54-46 was the Toots and the Maytals’ number, and 6-4 is yours because that’s the day the Jamaican group hits the stage at the Roxian Theatre. Formed in the early 1960s, Toots and the Maytals were key in making reggae popular in America. 8 p.m. 425 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. $35-129. roxianlive.com CONTINUES ON PG. 20

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PHOTO: THE RANGOS GIANT CINEMA

^ Sat., June 7: Purple Rain

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 5 DANCE

The weeklong pearlPRESENTS Dance Festival at the New Hazlett Theater will bring together local and national dancers, including STAYCEE PEARL dance project, slowdanger, Island Moving Company, Maree ReMalia, and more. Continues through Sun., June 9. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $15-50. pearlartsstudio.com

THURSDAY

JUNE 6 MUSIC AIDS Free Pittsburgh kicks off the Pittsburgh PrideFest at Ace Hotel with Hotter Than July. Hosted by drag performer, moon baby, the street party features rapper Leikeli47, DJ collective New World Dysorder, HUNY, and a vogue battle by True T Entertainment. 6-11 p.m. 120 S. Whitfield St., East Liberty. Free. acehotel.com/pittsburgh

ART Photographers Tim Carpenter and Rebecca Arthur are bringing their works to the Silver Eye Center as winners of its Fellowship 19 exhibit, an international juried photography competition chosen from more than 200 submissions. 7 p.m. 4808 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. Free. silvereye.org

STAGE Part-Black Mirror Domhnall Gleeson episode, part-Blade Runner, Marjorie Prime is a futuristic story in which beings known as “primes” are designed to “look, sound, and smile” like our deceased loved ones. Orange is the New Black writer Jordan Harrison’s play comes to Pittsburgh Public Theater. 8 p.m. O’Reilly Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30. ppt.org

FRIDAY

JUNE 7 MARKET DIY vendors at the Punk Rock Flea Market 666 include SKULL Records, Blasphemy CONTINUES ON PG. 22

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Clothing, Nicole Morrow, and Cobra Cakes. 6 p.m. The Rock Room, 1054 Heron Ave., Polish Hill. Free. Search “Pittsburgh Punk Rock Flea Market 666” on Facebook

ART Help your LGBTQ+ community and grab some food truck snacks, refreshments, and enjoy a selection of DJs at a fundraiser for Proud Haven. Oh, and there is a wig dance party! 6 p.m. Workshop PGH DIY, 5135 Penn Ave., Garfield. Free Admission. proudhaven.org

MUSIC Music and technology collide at the Phillter International Music Fest when bands, live loopers, and solo innovators — any artist that fuses live music and tech — come together for education and outreach. 7 p.m. Hard Rock Cafe, 230 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $15-200. fest.phillter.com

FILM Prince and his music were larger than life. Now, in his passing they’ve become giants —– literally! Come celebrate Prince’s b-day at The Rangos Giant Cinema in the Carnegie Science Center, where they will screen the iconic film Purple Rain. 7:30 p.m. One Allegheny Ave., North Side. $9.95. carnegiesciencecenter.org

MUSIC The legendary funk master George Clinton is making his last stop in Pittsburgh at Rivers Casino, as part of his farewell One Nation Under a Groove Tour. Fishbone and Miss Velvet & The Blue Wolf will also perform. 8 p.m. 777 Casino Drive, North Side. $50-225. riverscasino.com/Pittsburgh

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

^ Sat., June 8: Brittney Chantele

SATURDAY

stages. The theme is #WeAreOne. 12 p.m. Fort Duquesne Blvd. and Seventh St., Downtown. Free. pittsburghpride.org

Three Rivers Arts Festival’s main stage. 4 p.m. Point State Park, Downtown. Free. traf.trustarts.org

EVENT

MUSIC

FILM

Pittsburghers come together for Pridefest 2019 — for the first time at its new location on the Andy Warhol Bridge. As always, expect vendors, food, and entertainment on a number of

Social justice activist, artist, and poet Brittney Chantele has yet another title on her impressive repertoire of talents: pop artist. See Pittsburgh’s own perform her emotional hits on

“If all computers can do is calculate, then what is artificial intelligence?” That’s one of the core ideas at play in Andrew Bujaski’s fictional film Computer Chess, about a competition

JUNE 8

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GET ON THE WATER THIS SUMMER! Kayak & Stand-Up Paddleboards Rentals available Daily, Weekend & Weekly Rates

1130 S. Braddock Ave. www.3riversoutdoor.com 22

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POOL TIME! OUTDOOR CITIPARKS POOLS OPEN WED., JUNE 12 TO FIND A POOL NEAR YOU, VISIT PITTSBURGHPA.GOV/ CITIPARKS DAILY PASSES FOR CITY RESIDENTS: $3 FOR YOUTH AGES 3-15 $5 FOR ADULTS AGES 16+ SEASON PASSES FOR CITY RESIDENTS: FREE FOR KIDS 2 AND UNDER $15 FOR YOUTH AGES 3-15 $30 FOR ADULTS 16+ $20 FOR SENIORS 60+ $60 FOR FAMILY OF FOUR

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^ Mon., June 10: Comics in Translation

WANT A BIGGER SPLASH? SANDCASTLE OPENS SAT., MAY 25 PITTSBURGH’S WATER PARK HAS 15 WATERSLIDES AND LOTS MORE ATTRACTIONS TO HELP YOU COOL OFF THIS SUMMER. LOCATED NEAR THE WATERFRONT IN HOMESTEAD: 1000 SANDCASTLE DRIVE SANDCASTLEWATERPARK.COM

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between programmers to see whose software can call check-mate first. Features Wiley Wiggins of Dazed and Confused and Waking Life fame. 7 p.m. Rangos Giant Cinema, 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $9.95. carnegiesciencecenter.org

SUNDAY

JUNE 9 ART WHAMglobal highlights pregnancy and motherhood for Birthing a Movement, a pop-up art exhibit at the William Pitt Union featuring some of Pittsburgh’s leading women artists. On this day, WHAMglobal sets up at Carnegie Library’s Reading Extravaganza with an interactive familyfocused art project. 12-5 p.m. William Pitt Union. 3959 Fifth Ave., Oakland. Free. whamglobal.org

EVENT Rapper and star Big Freedia, aka The Queen of Bounce, headlines People’s Pride 2k19. This year’s celebration,

presented by SisTers Pgh and True T Pittsburgh, is taking a step back in time. It’s a Pride of the Ages! 12 p.m. Freedom Corner, Crawford St., Hill District. sisterspgh.org

COMEDY

translator of over 300 French graphic novels. 7 p.m. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free with registration. alphabetcity.org

TUESDAY

JUNE 11

Arcade Comedy Theater thanks you for being a friend with Golden Girls Live, a drag tribute to the popular sitcom about four older women living the single life in Miami. Join Sophia, Rose, Blanche, and Dorothy for a show about sex, cheesecake, and friendship. 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. 943 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $15. arcadecomedytheater.com

It’s hard to be in a bad mood when the Three Rivers Arts Festival descends on Downtown, bringing out locals and visitors alike for ten days of food, music, and art. If crowds aren’t your thing, a Tuesday stroll to Point State Park might be your best option. All day. Downtown. Free. traf.trustarts.org

MONDAY

STAGE

JUNE 10 TALK Ever wondered how onomatopoeias get translated into other languages? Find out at Comics in Translation, a talk at Alphabet City featuring Edward Gauvin,

EVENT

Summer loving is in full swing when Grease takes the stage at the Benedum Center. Hear all your favorite song-and-dance numbers from the live production of the movie musical about teen romance in the 1950s. 7:30 p.m. Seventh St. and Penn Ave., Downtown. $26.25-76.25. pittsburghclo. culturaldistrict.org


PHOTO: MATT POLK

^ Tue., June 11: Grease

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 12 MUSIC Revisit ’90s grunge when The Lemonheads play at Mr. Smalls Theatre. The act is joined by former bassist for The Replacements, Tommy Stinson. 7 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $25. mrsmalls.com

THURSDAY

JUNE 13 FILM Celebrate the 140th birthday of groundbreaking filmmaker and North Side native Lois Weber at the Heinz History Center with Lois Weber: Film Pioneer, featuring TCM host Illeana Douglas and film historian Dr. Shelley Stamp. 7 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $20. heinzhistorycenter.org

MUSIC No more waiting in vain for legendary

reggae to come to McKees Rocks. The Wailers, featuring a number of the original members, are at the newly opened Roxian Theater. 7 p.m. 425 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks. $23-30. roxianlive.com

ART One of Pittsburgh’s most highly regarded poetry events, the Cave Canem Poets at Alphabet City is a must-see. This year will feature acclaimed poets Cornelius Eady, Ruth Ellen Kocher, and Matthew Shenoda. 7:30. 40 W. North Ave., North Side. Free with RSVP. alphabetcity.org

FRIDAY

JUNE 14 FILM Follow along as Los Angeles teenagers try to start a punk band in 1989’s low-budget film Sir Drone. Sonic Youth’s Kim Gordon, who selected the film as part of her exhibition Lo-Fi Glamour, calls it “epic.” 6:30 p.m. The Andy Warhol Museum, 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free. warhol.org CONTINUES ON PG. 26

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PHOTO: SESAME WORKSHOP/RICHARD TERMINE

^ Sat., June 15: Sesame Street Road Trip

MUSIC New Orleans group Tank and the Bangas brings its soul, hip-hop, R&B, and jazz-infused sound to the Dollar Bank Main Stage at Point State Park for the Three Rivers Arts Festival. 7:30 p.m. Point State Park. 101 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. traf.trustarts.org

STAGE The film adaption of Gone with the Wind is so storied that it has inspired new works just based on its creation. Moonlight and Magnolias, a play loosely based on the chaotic behindthe-scenes making of the film, will run at Apple Hill Playhouse. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., June 16. 275 Manor Road, Delmont. $15-20. applehillplayhouse.org

MUSIC The legacy of solo Paul McCartney (Wings, The Fireman) is too much to appreciate in a single event, so the organizers are getting the band back together for another iteration of Pittsburgh Plays: Sir Paul McCartney,

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featuring some of the sharpest musicians and most entertaining performers in town. 8 p.m. Jergel’s, 103 Slade Lane, ane, Warrendale. $21. pittsburghplays.com m

COMEDY Seth Meyers may be ea New Hampshire native ive (fun fact: Adam Sandler dler and Sarah Silverman n are also from the same town), but the Late Night host has deep Pittsburgh ties and serious love for the Pens, Pirates, and d Penguins. Expect that at to come up when Meyers ers performs at Carnegie e of Homestead Musicc Hall. 8:45 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $39.50-59.50. librarymusichall.com m > Fri., June 14: Seth Meyers eyers PHOTO: LLOYD BISHOP HOP

SATURDAY

JUNE 15 KIDS Even Big Bird needs a vacation sometimes. Join your favorite characters for the Sesame Street Roa Road Trip p at Flagstaff Hill for a stage show, milk and cookies, a treasure hunt, an and more. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Schenley Park, Oakland. sesamestreet.org

ART “Sporting art” is more than just painti paintings of horses, thou though there are a lo lot of those, a and the Frick Art Museum has some of the premier prem works work of the genre ge on display disp

through Sept. 8. If you’re into bucolic pastures populated with animals, well-dressed English people (and horses), don’t miss A Sporting Vision. 10 a.m. 7227 Reynolds St., Point Breeze. $15. thefrickpittsburgh.org

TALK Come out, open your ears, and learn a thing or two as TEDxPittsburgh welcomes some of the city’s finest thinkers and talkers to share their ideas. Speakers include an artificial intelligence technologist, a space entrepreneur, and a baker. 11:30 a.m. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $35. tedxpittsburgh.org

TALK See a reading and short talk by author Mark Craven during a release for his new book Karyeator at the Waterfront Barnes and Noble. This is the first fiction work for the Pittsburgh native, whose previous four books all focus on self-improvement. 7-10 p.m. 100 West Bridge St., Homestead. $12. iammarkcraven.com


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^ Fri., June 14: Tank and the Bangas

MUSIC Daughters’ 2003 debut Canada Songs is a blistering 11 minutes of relentless hardcore perfection (not to mention really good song titles like “Pants, Meet Shit” and “I Slept with the Daughters and All I Got Was This Lousy Song Written About Me”). They’ve gone on to expand their horizons a bit, but the intensity hasn’t wavered. Check in with Daughters at the Rex Theater. 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $20. rextheater.net

DANCE A project that began with letter writing, A Letter Compiled From All Letters’ contemporary dance work merges live performance and video projection to comment on the evolution of communication. 8 p.m. New Hazlett Theater, 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $15-20. newhazletttheater.org

SUNDAY

JUNE 16 EVENT Kennywood joins forces with Steel City

Con for a special Father’s Day event. Head to the Kennywood Comic-Con, where, in addition to the usual rides and fun treats, you can interact with comic book creators and browse merchandise fit for any fatherly fan. 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. 4800 Kennywood Blvd., West Mifflin. $27. kennywood.com

EVENT Nothing better to share with pops than brisket and birds. The National Aviary is hosting Father’s Day BBQ Brunch in the Rose Garden. Birds of prey will pay you a visit, so guard your meat. Two separate seatings. 10:30 a.m. or 12:30 p.m. 700 Arch St., North Side. $19.50-44. aviary.org

EVENT This year marks the 60th anniversary of the Three Rivers Arts Festival, Pittsburgh’s annual 10-day fest of art and music. Catch the festival’s last act of 2019, the wildly energetic rock band J. Roddy Walston and the Business. 12 p.m. Point State Park, 601 Commonwealth Pl., Downtown. Free. traf.trustarts.org CONTINUES ON PG. 28

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MONDAY

JUNE 17 TALK New York Times bestselling author Neal Stephenson brings his dramatic sci-fi chops to Pittsburgh Arts & Lectures. Admission includes a hardcover copy of the writer’s newest thriller, Fall; or, Dodge in Hell, which you can get signed following the lecture. 7 p.m. Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $40. pittsburghlectures.org

TUESDAY

JUNE 18 MUSIC Though there’s no shortage of harmonizing folk duos with acoustic guitars, few pack the punch of melancholic, sharp songwriting of Milk Carton Kids. Start with “Snake Eyes” from their debut and move on from there. 8 p.m. Mr. Smalls Theatre, 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $20. mrsmalls.com

MUSIC Don’t miss this diamond in the rough. Norah Jones’ Come Away with Me has sold over 27 million copies (diamond certified). And she’s coming to Heinz Hall (the rough?) to jam out her one-of-a-kind jazz fusion, country, pop smorgasbord. 8 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $60.25-80.25. pittsburghsymphony.org

PHOTO: ROCKY RACO/KINETIC THEATRE

^ Thu., June 20: The Speckled Band

THURSDAY

JUNE 20 STAGE

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 19 EVENT The Magic Mike XXL Tribute Show might not star Channing Tatum, but these male dancers will charm and woo you all the same. 9 p.m. The Linden Grove, 1100 Grove Road, Castle Shannon. $25-50. Search “Magic Mike XXL” on Eventbrite

Treat yourself to one of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s lesser known Sherlock Holmes stories when Kinetic Theatre stages The Speckled Band. It’s a locked-room mystery featuring Pittsburgh favorites David Whalen as Holmes and Sam Tsoutsouvas as a “dastardly stepfather.” 8 p.m. Charity Randall Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $42. kinetictheatre.org

MUSIC The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival kicks off with a can’t-miss performance

from percussionist/composer Makaya McCraven at August Wilson African American Cultural Center. If you’re new to McCraven, start with the irresistible “Gnawa” from 2016’s In The Moment. 8 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $13.75. aacc-awc.culturaldistrict.org

Adults can help later in the day when the painting event turns into a party with food trucks, booze, and live music. 10 a.m. kids; 3 p.m. adults. 3339 Penn Ave., Strip District. Free. clementemuseum.com

EVENT

FRIDAY

The Jewish Family and Community Services center of Pittsburgh wants to make refugees feel welcome in the Steel City, so it’s holding a celebration on World Refugee Day to do just that. Food, crafts, and performances will highlight the talents of Pittsburgh’s refugee community. 11 a.m.-2 p.m. 1 Market Square, Downtown. Free. jfcspgh.org

JUNE 21 ART Area youth are invited to join MLK community mural project founder Kyle Holbrook as he paints a largerthan life mural of Roberto Clemente on the side of the Clemente Museum.

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PHOTO: KAITLYN CLEM

^ Tue., June 25: Van Gogh in Bloom

DANCE

Everyday Cafe, 532 North Homewood Ave., Homewood. Free. Search “Ridin’ with the Mayor” on Eventbrite.

Spend the longest day of the year dancing with visions of fairies, druids, centaurs, and all things mystical at the Mattress Factory’s Urban Garden Party: Solstice. This isn’t a midsummer’s night dream; it’s a midsummer’s night reality! 7:30 p.m. Mattress Factory, 505 Jacksonia St., North Side. $75-360. mattress.org

MONDAY

JUNE 24 MUSIC Club Cafe welcomes singer-songwriter and prominent ’90s indie music figure, Juliana Hatfield. She’s joined by special guest, Bird Streets, a project from rocker John Brodeur. 7 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $35. clubcafelive.com

SATURDAY

JUNE 22 EVENT The ultimate Shadyside block party returns with Jam on Walnut. Join cover band Dancing Queen on a blocked-off Walnut Street for a concert to benefit the Humane Animal Rescue. Get there early to visit local bars and restaurants. 6 p.m. Walnut St., Shadyside. thinkshadyside.com

MUSIC The Pittsburgh International Jazz Festival presents a special performance by TV and stage star Tamara Tunie at the August Wilson Center African American Cultural Center. Tunie will be followed by the Paul Jost Quartet. 9 p.m. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $28.75. trustarts.org

TUESDAY PHOTO: ANNIE O’NEILL PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Fri., June 21: Urban Garden Party: Solstice

SUNDAY

JUNE 23 EVENT Get to know your Mayor on wheels! Grab a Healthy Ride bike and join Wilkinsburg Mayor Marita Garrett on a trip from Homewood to Wilkinsburg. 10 a.m.

JUNE 25 ART To many, the work of Vincent Van Gogh nearly rivals the beauty of nature. So the Phipps Conservatory decided to combine the artwork with the outdoors in Van Gogh in Bloom. Look for garden recreations of some of the artist’s most famous paintings. 9:20 a.m.-5 p.m. One Schenley Park, Oakland. $12-18. phipps.conservatory.org CONTINUES ON PG. 34

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PHOTO: GAIL MANKER

^ Sat., June 29: Juneteenth Celebration

WEDNESDAY

JUNE 26 STAGE “Look, Simba, everything the light touches is our kingdom.” This time, the light is touching Little Lake Theatre in Canonsburg for a performance of The Lion King Jr. Be prepared! 11 a.m. 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $10. littlelake.org

THURSDAY

JUNE 27 TALK Everyone knows a James Patterson book, even if they’ve never read one. Join the wildly successful author of over 100 books — including Alex Cross, Along Came a Spider, and Witch and Wizard — for a conversation at Carnegie Library Lecture Hall, hosted by Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures. 7 p.m. 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. $35. pittsburghlectures.org

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MUSIC Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra, you better werk! Thorgy and the Thorchestra pairs classical musicians with RuPaul’s Drag Race alum Thorgy Thor. If you can’t love the symphony in drag, how in the hell are you gonna love anything else? 7:30 p.m. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $35-150. pittsburghsymphony.org

of the Stonewall riots. To commemorate the occasion, The Warhol Museum plays award-winning documentary, Before Stonewall, which will be followed by a Skype Q&A with co-director and producer Robert Rosenberg and a late-night, queer dance party hosted by Jellyfish. 8 p.m. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. Free with registration. warhol.org

FRIDAY

SATURDAY

COMEDY

EVENT

He drove for Clay Davis on The Wire, gave us a dozen unforgettable characters on Chappelle’s Show (and co-hosted after Chappelle’s departure), and now Donnell Rawlings brings his standup to Pittsburgh Improv. 7 p.m. 155 E. Bridge St., Homestead. $20. improv.com/pittsburgh

Honor Black lives and the emancipation of slaves during Western Pennsylvania’s Juneteenth Celebration. March from the Hill District to Downtown in the Jubilee of Freemen Parade in the morning, then party all day with live music, a Soul Food BBQ Competition, and more at the Martin R. Delany Freedom Day Festival at Point State Park. 10 a.m. Downtown. Free. facebook.com/WPAJuneteenth

JUNE 28

ARTS June 28, 2019 marks the 50th anniversary

JUNE 29

Check pghcitypaper.com for event updates all summer long.

MUSIC The solstice is technically June 21, but everyone knows the season doesn’t truly change in Pittsburgh until WYEP’s annual Summer Music Festival at Schenley Plaza. In addition to the marketplaces, food, and sunshine is, of course, the music and this year’s lineup doesn’t disappoint. DeVotchka headlines (if your knowledge doesn’t go beyond “How It Ends,” please rectify that) along with Cautious Clay and his expertly produced, experimental R&B; indie rockers Nevada Color; neo-soul artist Clara Kent; ubiquitous rock-guitar prodigy Elias Khouri; and blues guitarist Pierce Dipner. Now summer can really start. 3-10 p.m. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. wyep.org

MUSIC Local metalheads Lady Beast presents Metal Immortal Festival at Mr. Smalls Theatre. Headbang to a day full of music from nine local, national, and international acts, including Pittsburgh band Legendary, Night Demon from California, and Razor from Canada. 4-11 p.m. 400 Lincoln Ave., Millvale. $40-65. mrsmalls.com


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^ Thu., June 27: Thorgy and the Thorchestra

SPORTS Pittsburgh plays host to 32 soccer teams representing countries from around the world during the Steel City World Cup. Over 60 games will be played across two days, all culminating on this final day with a tournament at Highmark Stadium. 7-11 p.m. 510 W. Station Square Drive, Station Square. $11.50-38.50. steelcityworldcup.com

EVENT You haven’t seen a fight until you’ve seen a waffle tackle a can of chicken soup. Check it out when Kaiju Big Battel brings its zany universe of monster fighting to the Benedum Center. 8 p.m. 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $25. trustarts.org

FOOD PNC Park turns into a massive bar at the All-Star Craft beer and Wine Festival. Breweries and wineries cover stadium grounds with over 250 samples ready for you to taste. Various times. 115 Federal St., North Side. $24.95-79.95. ballparkfestival.com

SUNDAY

JUNE 30 EVENT Penn Avenue and Butler Street belong

to pedestrians when OpenStreetsPGH takes over Downtown, the Strip District, and Lawrenceville. Walk, run, bike, or skate your way to tons of fun activities provided by local business and organizations during this annual outdoor event. 9 a.m.–1 p.m. Various locations. Downtown, Strip District, and Lawrenceville. Free. openstreetspgh.org

ART Are you an art lover low on funds? Pittsburgh Center for the Arts’ 11th annual yART Sale features about 70 local artists with affordable art, supplies, jewelry, you name it — giving artists a venue to sell inventory and materials. 10 a.m. 6300 Fifth Ave., Shady Side. Free. center.pfpca.org

MUSIC Some of Pittsburgh’s finest R&B acts head to Hartwood Acres Park for Pittsburgh’s Homegrown, featuring Mars Jackson, Benji., Clara Kent, and Starship Mantis. Food trucks and Hop Farm Brewing Company are on hand to round things out. 8 p.m. 200 Hartwood Acres, Allison Park. Free. alleghenycounty.us/ specialevents CONTINUES ON PG. 36

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JULY

PHOTO: LIZ CAPUANO

^ Sat., July 13: Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest

MONDAY

JULY 1 EVENT The Big Butler Fair has everything: truck pulls, rabbit showmanship, free concerts, and anything battered and fried you could possibly want. Don’t miss Western PA’s biggest fair! Continues through Sat., July 6. 1127 New Castle Road, Prospect. $8-20. bigbutlerfair.com

EVENT Everyone’s seen the famous photo of Fred Rogers flipping two birds with a big smile on his face (it was inadvertent), but there are far more candid behindthe-scenes shots that you should know.

Dig in with Pittsburgh photographer Jim Judkis’ trove of Rogers at work with The Loving Kindness of Fred Rogers. Continues through Tue., July 30. American Jewish Museum at the Jewish Community Center of Greater Pittsburgh, 5738 Forbes Ave., Squirrel Hill. Free. jccpgh.org

TUESDAY

JULY 2 MUSIC Frampton came alive in 1976, and, now, he’s going away. Retirement we assume. Come see Peter Frampton and his talking guitar say farewell to fans at the Benedum Center during his final tour. All of our guitars are gently weeping. 7:30 p.m. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. Starting at $49.50. trustarts.org

WEDNESDAY

JULY 3 ART

Head to Black Forge Coffee House for an evening of art, poetry, and spoken word at Strange Enchantments: A Night of Poetry and Spoken Word. The coffees won’t be the only servings that are enchanted, dark, and marvelous. 7 p.m. 1206 Arlington Ave., Allentown. Free. blackforgecoffee.com

THURSDAY

JULY 4 EVENT Pittsburghers love their fireworks, and there is no better time to enjoy them then at CONTINUES ON PG. 38

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PHOTO: WHITNEY LERCH

^ Sat., July 13: Deutschtown Music Festival

Flashes of Freedom firework show at Point State Park. An all-day celebration starts at 12 p.m. and then fireworks cap off the night. 9:35 p.m. 601 Commonwealth Place, Downtown. Free. celebrateamericapgh.com

FRIDAY

JULY 5 STAGE Mrs. Stancliffe has a successful bed and breakfast. She also has an elderly neighbor they call “Bud the Stud.” There are rumors why her female guests keep returning. Throw in some experimental sex-drive pills, and you got yourself the wickedly funny Sex Please, We’re Sixty. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., July 14. 275 Manor Road, Delmont. applehillplayhouse.org

SATURDAY

JULY 6 EVENT It’s prime people-watching season Downtown as thousands of furries return for Anthrocon, the annual convention for folks who like to dress up as animals. The fursuit parade is not to be missed, and many furries are happy to pose for pics — just make sure you ask first. Consent also

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applies to those in costumes. Continues through Sun., July 7. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. anthrocon.org

SUNDAY

JULY 7 FOOD Pittsburgh’s finest Caribbean restaurants come together to pay homage to Jamaica’s favorite marinade: jerk sauce. Sample jerk dishes of meat and shellfish from Mama Rose, Linton’s, Leon’s, 3 Sisters, Richie’s and Keisha’s as DJs, and live reggae from The Flow Band serenade you at Jerk Fess. 10:30 a.m.10:30 p.m. Rhododendron Shelter, Lake Drive., Highland Park. Free. “Pittsburgh Jerk Fess” on Facebook

HANDS The hand-holding is optional, but a friendly, welcoming attitude is mandatory at the Peaceful Gathering of Hands at Schenley Park. Bring some food for the potluck, join a drum circle, or just hang back and enjoy a nice day at the park. Wear your red jumpsuit and get tethered! 12 p.m. Schenley Park Skating Rink, 10341 Overlook Drive, Oakland. Free. “Peaceful Gathering of Hands” on Facebook

MONDAY

JULY 8 KIDS What do birds, bees, and spiders have in common? Let your young naturelover find out at Allegheny Land Trust’s Pre-K camp, Animal Architects: Using Nature’s Builders to Teach STEAM. 10 a.m. Continues through Fri., July 12. Audubon Greenway, 160 Magee Road, Sewickley Heights. $18. alleghenylandtrust.org

TUESDAY

JULY 9 MUSIC Philadelphia rock band Hop Along stand out for the singularly sharp and piercing voice of lead singer Frances Quinlan. Catch them at Rex Theater along with indie pop from Kississippi. 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. 21+. $18.50. rextheater.net

WEDNESDAY

JULY 10 ART 707 Gallery presents the exhibit Darkest Dark by artist Oreen Cohen, a series


CP PHOTO: MIKE SCHWARTZ

^ Sat., July 6: Anthrocon

of large-scale charcoal works on paper made through aggressive automatic drawing while thrashing to heavy metal music. Continues through July 14. 707 Gallery. 707 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. trustarts.org

THURSDAY

JULY 11 STAGE Any event that comes with a “strong sexual content and profanity” disclaimer is our kind of show. The Vaudevillians, “a vintage cabaret with a twist of drag,” stars RuPaul’s Drag Race veteran Jinkx Monsoon and Richard Andreissen. Expect a night of raunchy comedy, a bizarre plot, and fun tunes. 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., July 13. O’Reilly Theater, 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $30-60. ppt.org

FRIDAY

JULY 12 ART The monthly Downtown Gallery Crawl returns with new exhibitions and other exciting happenings at businesses and Cultural Trust art galleries, including Wood Street Galleries, SPACE, 707 Penn Gallery,

and 937 Liberty. 5:30-10 p.m. Cultural District, Downtown. Free. trustarts.org/crawl

EVENT Everyone should race to the Pittsburgh Vintage Grand Prix for 11 days of carrelated fun. Touted as one of the nation’s largest vintage street races, the event includes classic car shows, parties, parades, and motorsport events. Continues through Sun., July 21. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Schenley Park, 3898 Boulevard of The Allies, Oakland. Free or suggested donation. pvgp.org

ART Head to Glitter Box Theater for a night of performance art entitled Not ur Average B*tch, featuring “female identifying creatures presenting their abstract works deemed too provactive for the general public.” 7:05 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. theglitterboxtheater.com

ART It’s back! For the 15th year, SouthSide Works Exposed brings three days of local art, food, music, and fun. And this year, Sidney Street, along with 27th, will be closed from 27th to 28th to allow for a seamless vendor area. 5 p.m. Continues through Sun., July 14. SouthSide Works, S. 27th St., South Side. Free. southsideworks.com CONTINUES ON PG. 40

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JOHANNA K. W. HAILMAN, JONES AND LAUGHLIN MILL, PITTSBURGH (DETAIL) / CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF ART

^ Sat., July 13: Breathe Better Day

SATURDAY

JULY 13 MUSIC The North Side becomes a music destination when over 350 bands play at more than 30 indoor and outdoor stages at the annual Deutschtown Music Festival. There are also tons of food trucks and all-ages activities for the entire family. Various times. Various locations, North Side. Free. deutschtownmusicfestival.com

MUSIC Nothing is better than B&B — bass and barbeque — in the sun. Get ready for The Bassburgh BBQ, a beats-filled day at Enix Brewing and its fresh outdoor stage and

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dance area. After the sun goes does, the party continues upstairs in the bowling alley. 5 p.m. 337 E. Eighth Ave., Homestead. enix.beer

EVENT Inhale, exhale. There, isn’t breathing nice? Breathe Better Day, a collaboration between Carnegie Museum of Natural History and the Breathe Project, explores how the rise of industry has affected works of art. Plus, learn about local environmental advocacy. 12 p.m. Carnegie Museum of Art, 4400 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free with admission. cmoa.org

FOOD 125 breweries come together at Stage AE for the Pittsburgh Summer Beerfest, the

city’s two-night craft beer extravaganza. Get your pretzel necklaces ready! Various times. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $20-65. pittsburghbeerfest.com

SUNDAY

JULY 14 COMEDY Patton Oswalt is making his return to Pittsburgh at the Carnegie of Homestead Music Hall. The veteran comedian has been booed off a San Francisco stage for being anti-hippie and also booed off a Pittsburgh stage for an unfavorable bit on George W. Bush. 6 p.m. 510 E. 10th Ave., Munhall. $55.75-65.75. librarymusichall.com

MONDAY

JULY 15 STAGE You’ll wonder what your damage is when you see The Theatre Factory’s production of Heathers: The Musical, a live show based the ultra-dark 1989 comedy about teen angst, high school, and murder. Continues through Sun., July 21. 8 p.m. 235 Cavitt Ave., Trafford. $18-20. thetheatrefactory.org

TUESDAY

JULY 16 EVENT View work by more than 40 artists during


PHOTO: MATT POLK

^ Thu., July 18: Peter Pan

the Idea Furnace Retrospective at the Pittsburgh Glass Center. The exhibition showcases pieces by various participants in the Idea Furnace program dating back to 2013. Continues through Mon., July 29. 10 a.m.-4 p.m. 5472 Penn Ave., Friendship. Free. pittsburghglasscenter.org

WEDNESDAY

JULY 17 EVENT Are you thinking about bubbles? No? Well, We’re not mind readers, but Mark Toland is. So much so that’s he been on NBC, WGN, FOX, ABC, NPR, and TEDx. Get your mind blown at Liberty Magic when Toland comes to town. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $45-60. trustarts.org

THURSDAY

JULY 18 STAGE Ever dream you had no responsibilities, could lavish yourself with fun and gifts, and answered to no one? No, we’re not talking about being a U.S. congressperson! We’re talking Peter Pan at the Benedum Center. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., July 21. 237 Seventh St., Downtown. Starting at $26.25. pittsburghclo.org

FRIDAY

JULY 19 MUSIC If your angst doesn’t match up with the sunshine and rainbows of summer, release it

all at Sad Summer Festival at Stage AE. The lineup features rock, indie, and emo acts, including The Wonder Years, Mom Jeans, Mayday Parade, and more. 12-11 p.m. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $35-37. sadsummerfest.com

STAGE Winning the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1983, ’night, Mother tells the story of Jessie, who details the planning of her own suicide to her mother (and the audience) later that night. The drama slowly builds as the play comes to a stunning conclusion. 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., July 27. 115 57th St., Lawrenceville, $20. throughlinetheatre.org

SATURDAY

JULY 20 STAGE Not a fan of Elizabethan prose? Maybe you just aren’t drunk enough. Watch the Capulets and Montagues battle it out in a whole new light in Sh!tfaced Shakespeare: Romeo and Juliet, where one of the cast members is seriously inebriated. Get tipsy yourself in the lobby after the show with DJ Inception and local brews. 8 p.m. Byham Theater, 101 Sixth St., Downtown. $20-25. trustarts.org

FOOD Everybody in the ‘Burgh is brunching at GoodFoodPittsburgh’s second annual brunch fest. Indulge in doughnuts, beer-mosas, and breakfast pizza all morning. 9:30 a.m. Hitchhiker Brewing, 2541, 1500 S. Canal St., Sharpsburg. $25. goodfoodpittsburgh.com CONTINUES ON PG. 42

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SUNDAY

JULY 21 MUSIC Do or do not. There is no try(ing) to make it out for the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra’s performance of the Star Wars: The Empire Strikes Back score. The event features a screening of the film, complete with a live performance of composer John Williams’ iconic score. 2:30 p.m. Heinz Hall. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-105. pittsburghsymphony.org

EVENT Celebrate creativity at the Polish Hill Arts Festival, now in its 12th year. The festival includes musical acts, artists, craftspeople, and cooks, many of which live right in the Polish Hill neighborhood. 12-8 p.m. 3060 Brereton St., Polish Hill. Free. phcapgh.org

MONDAY

JULY 22 EVENT Come and flex that green thumb with a variety of volunteer opportunities through Grow Pittsburgh. Check out urban farming at Shiloh Farm or help out the kiddies with the School Garden Program. Times vary. 6587 Hamilton Avenue #2W. Larimer. growpittsburgh.org

CP PHOTO: KRISTA JOHNSON

^ Fri., July 26: Picklesburgh

WEDNESDAY

TUESDAY

JULY 24

JULY 23 EXHIBIT

ART

Are you a fledgling genius inventor with no money or supporters? Commiserate at Carnegie Science Center’s Da Vinci the Exhibition, featuring sketches and notes of inventions that were too complicated or too expensive to make happen in real life. 10 a.m. Continues through Mon., Sept. 2. $19.95. 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. carnegiesciencecenter.org

Pittsburgh artist Brett Yasko invited 87 local artists to take photographs for his current avant-garde exhibit “_ _ _ _ _ _ .” The catch? Everyone had to return the rolls of film to him undeveloped, and not even they will see what they captured until they’re hanging in the gallery. 11 a.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. SPACE Gallery,

812 Liberty Ave., Downtown. Free. spacepittsburgh.org

Henry Heymann Theatre, 4301 Forbes Ave., Oakland. kinetictheatre.org

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

STAGE

MUSIC

Kinetic Theatre calls its newest performance of Scapino “a Godfather twist” on playwright Molière’s famous comedy. Expect laughs as the mafia convenes in Naples. Naples, Florida, that is. 8 p.m. Through July 28. $20-45.

Pittsburgh country-folk singer Molly Alphabet performs with Cello Fury and Bindley Hardware Co. as part of her Broken Record album release party at Thunderbird Café & Music Hall. 7 p.m. 4053 Butler St., Lawrenceville. $10. thunderbirdcafe.net

JULY 25

JULY 26

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KIDS Nerf guns cause mayhem when used in the house, which is why they should be used in a bouncy house. Safari Camp at Planet Bounce North includes a safari wildlife Nerf battle, basic survival skill training, and of course, bouncing. 10 a.m.-3 p.m. 4025 Alpha Drive, Allison Park. $85. planetbouncepgh.com

EVENT

GO TEAMS! PITTSBURGH IS THE CITY OF CHAMPIONS AND SUMMER IS A GREAT TIME TO ROOT FOR YOUR FAVORITE TEAMS

PITTSBURGH PIRATES BUY SOME PEANUTS AND CRACKER JACK AND ENJOY THE VIEW FROM PNC PARK 115 FEDERAL ST., NORTH SIDE MLB.COM/PIRATES

PITTSBURGH RIVERHOUNDS SC THE VIEW FROM THE OTHER SIDE OF THE CITY WHILE WATCHING PITTSBURGH’S PROFESSIONAL SOCCER TEAM PLAY AT HIGHMARK STADIUM IS PRETTY SPECTACULAR TOO 510 W. STATION SQUARE DRIVE, STATION SQUARE RIVERHOUNDS.COM

STEEL CITY ROLLER DERBY WHEN YOU’RE SICK OF SITTING OUT IN THE SUN, GO INDOORS AT PITTSBURGH INDOOR SPORTS ARENA 22 RICH HILL ROAD, CHESWICK STEELCITYROLLERDERBY.ORG

If you want to earn your hardcore street cred, you have to be In on the Dill Maker. OK, that joke was a less than kosher. You see where we’re going with this? Picklesburgh is a culinary celebration that goes beyond the dill pickle to include international dishes, prepared foods, and artisan cocktails. 12 p.m. Roberto Clemente Bridge, Downtown/ North Side. Free. picklesburgh.com

COMEDY Laugh, maybe cry (we don’t know your life) when Opus One Comedy presents Pittsburgh’s Finest at Club Cafe. James J. Hamilton, Holly Price, T-Robe, and James Phelps take the stage at this 21 and over late-night comedy show. 10 p.m. 56 S. 12th St., South Side. $10. clubcafelive.com

SATURDAY

JULY 27 EVENT Wham! Boom! Kapow! Embrace your inner wizard at Wizard World when comics, sci-fi, movies, gaming, and the like collide for a one-of-a-kind comic convention environment. 10 a.m. David L. Lawrence Convention Center, 1000 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $50-100. wizardworld. com/comiccon/Pittsburgh

PHOTO: BRETT YASKO

^ Wed., July 24: “_ _ _ _ _ _”

KIDS

STAGE

What does a crawfish say about water health? Find out as you wade through the creeks at Wingfield Pines, rain or shine. 10 a.m. 1560 Mayview Road, Upper St. Clair. $5. alleghenylandtrust.org

Attention dancing queens: Grab your bell bottoms and get ready to sing along to hits by ABBA at Mamma Mia! The “jukebox musical” pairs a story about a young woman’s search for her birth father with songs from the Swedish pop stars. 2 p.m. Andrew Carnegie Free Library & Music Hall, 300 Beechwood Ave., Carnegie. stage62.org

KIDS Treat your kid (or your kid at heart) to a day at the movies. The Pittsburgh International Children’s Festival is taking over Row House Cinema with new, old, and unseen family-friendly films. Various times. Continues through Thu., Aug. 1. 4115 Butler St., Lawrenceville. cffpgh.org

SUNDAY

JULY 28 MUSIC Fans of the band Now, Now, clean guitar, and smart melancholic pop should not miss Snail Mail at Rex Theater. If this is the first you’re hearing that name, start with “Heat Wave” from 2018’s Lush. 8 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $18. rextheater.net

MONDAY

JULY 29 MUSIC Top Billboard artist Khalid brings his ultra-cool, smooth, R&B style to PPG Paints Arena during his Free Style World Tour. Hear his new releases and chart-topping hits, including “Location” and “Better.” 7:30 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Uptown. Tickets start at $37. ppgpaintsarena.com

KIDS What’s your superpower? Create, engineer, and harness your super alter-ego story, costume, and gadgets at Superheroes

Assemble! day camp for ages 6-7. Continues through Fri., Aug. 2. 4824 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. assemblepgh.org

TUESDAY

JULY 30 MUSIC The Brooklyn-based rock band Lake Street Dive has a powerful sound that stretches from Southern rock to indie pop to folk. Enjoy their tunes at Stage AE on a hot summer night. 7 p.m. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $29.50. promowestlive.com

WEDNESDAY

JULY 31 STAGE Remember John Cusack’s character in Being John Malkovich? This is nothing like that. Puppet Karaoke at Boom Concepts is really just karaoke using puppets. Don’t have a great voice? Not sure about karaoke? Puppets make all of that go away! 6 p.m. 5139 Penn Ave., Downtown. $5. pgop.org CONTINUES ON PG. 46

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Season 33 = Ben Vereen + Joey Alexander + World Music & Food Festival + Jonathan Butler + John Pizzarelli Trio & Catherine Russell + A Peter White Christmas + Jane Bunnett Latin Christmas + Cécile McLorin Salvant & Sullivan Fortner + Kenny Werner & Patricia Barber + Ann Hampton Callaway & Tierney Sutton SFJAZZ Collective + Nicole Mitchell + Yellowjackets + Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra & Wynton Marsalis + Herb Alpert & Lani Hall = Celebrate. Collaborate.

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For concert information call 412.322.0800 or visit us at MCGJazz.org. Follow us @mcgjazz.

Come check out our Summer Specials on flowers!

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Off Butler Street. Across from Goodwill. SUMMER GUIDE 2019

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AUGUST

CP PHOTO: KRISTA JOHNSON

^ Sun., Aug. 4: Three Rivers Regatta

THURSDAY

AUG. 1 EVENT ReplayFX might be the only place in the world where you can see and play over 1,000 pinball machines and arcade games. Held at the David L. Lawrence Convention Center, it’s a gathering for casual play and competition with all kinds of games, including esports. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. 100 Fort Duquesne Blvd., Downtown. $20-100. replayfx.org

STAGE Things don’t always go exactly as planned in A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, a musical romp through Rome featuring love, schemes, and unexpected

twists at every turn. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. Apple Hill Playhouse, 275 Manor Road, Delmont. $15. applehillplayhouse.org

FRIDAY

AUG. 2 MUSIC Relive the magic of author J.K. Rowling’s creation when the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra plays music from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets. Watch the second entry in the film franchise as PSO provides live musical accompaniment of John Williams’ score. 7 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 4. Heinz Hall, 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $25-105. pittsburghsymphony.org

SATURDAY

AUG. 3 FOOD August is peak pink wine season, and what better way to celebrate than drinking it all day? Sip on a glass at Rosé All Day, Pittsburgh’s first rosé festival with over 20 wineries, cocktails, beer, and cider. 1-5 p.m. Nova Place, 100 S. Commons, North Side. $45-89. rosealldaypgh.com

MUSIC Get ready for pickin’ and grinnin’ at Chatham University’s Bluegrass Night at Eden Hall Campus. The Shameless Hex and Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers bring a range of knee-slappin’ tunes, from traditional CONTINUES ON PG. 48

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TOUR DE FORCE/ A CAST OF THOUSANDS PRESENTS AT

FRIDAY, JUNE 21 7PM / $15 Misaligned Mind feat.Zack Wiesinger (toured with Steve Vai) + Special Guests SATURDAY, JUNE 22 8PM / $10 Staley’s Comet (Alice in Chains) Tribute WEDNESDAY, JULY 03 7PM / $20 Michael Glabicki + Dirk Miller of Rusted Root+ Special Guests SATURDAY, JULY 27 7:30PM / $10 Black Sabbath Lives (Tribute Band) SATURDAY, AUGUST 03 7PM / $15 Guitar Blues Legend Chris Beard + Special Guest TBA SUNDAY, AUGUST 11 5PM / $30 “The Artimus Pyle Band” feat. legendary drummer of Lynyrd Skynyrd, Special Guest Marcel Anton (guitar Virtuoso) + The Shiners UPCOMING: SATURDAY, JUNE 29 Billy the Kid + The REgulators, The Matt Barranti Band UPCOMING: TBA Bon Journey, AXTION, Silk 9 + more . . . TICKETS: EVENTBRITE.COM VEnue: 1633 Saxonburg BLVD, Curtisville, PA 15084 * Free Parking * Chairs Welcome * No Tailgating *

PHOTO: MINNESOTA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM

^ Thu., Aug. 8: Curious George: Let’s Get Curious!

bluegrass to swingin’ rockabilly. 6:30 p.m. Willis Amphitheater, Eden Hall Campus, 6035 Ridge Road, Gibsonia. $10.50. edenhall.chatham.edu

THURSDAY

AUG. 8 KIDS

SUNDAY

AUG. 4

Grab a big yellow hat and your little one and head to Pittsburgh Children’s Museum for Curious George: Let’s Get Curious! STEM-based adventures help kids learn while having fun helping the adorable monkey navigate his way through scenes from the popular PBS TV series. 10 Children’s Way, North Side. $14-16. pittsburghkids.org

EVENT Pretend you’re at the beach with a staycation at Point State Park for the EQT Three Rivers Regatta. Whether you like watching speed boats or stuffing your face while people-watching on the lawn, the popular festival has something for everyone. Along the Allegheny River at Point State Park, Downtown, and North Side. yougottaregatta.org

^ Fri., Aug. 2: Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra plays music from Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets

STAGE Ever feel like mocking Lin-Manuel Miranda? No, because you are not a loose cannon like Gerard Alessandrini, the creator of Spamilton. Come see Hamilton and a host of other musicals get roasted in this musical parody at Greer Cabaret Theater. 7:30 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 25. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. $31-59.75. pittsburghclo.org

TUESDAY

AUG. 6 MUSIC Make sure to grab some SPF 50 so you

AUG. 9 MUSIC

MONDAY

AUG. 5

FRIDAY

don’t blister in the sun for this Stage AE outdoor banger, as Ben Folds and Violent Femmes take the stage to finally give representation to awkward white guys. 6:30 p.m. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $35. promowestlive.com

Start your Friday night off right at The Warm Up with some deep, funky, and disco-inspired house music from DJ Samuel Andres’ personal collection at The Goldmark. 7 p.m. 4517 Butler St., Lawrenceville. Free. thegoldmark.com

WEDNESDAY

SATURDAY

TALK

EVENT

Expert curator Marcie Reaven will delve into how and why she created the Vietnam War exhibit now on display at the Heinz History Center. The exhibit spans the entire history of the decades-long war that cost millions of lives. 7-9 p.m. 1212 Smallman St., Strip District. $20. heinzhistorycenter.org

Get out to the annual Brookline Breezefest to explore the neighborhood with local vendors, food, music, and community organizations. The festival also coincides with the Brookline Breeze 5k and Fitness Walk. 10 a.m.–4 p.m. Brookline Blvd., Brookline. brooklinetogether.org

AUG. 7

AUG. 10

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FREE CONCERTS THE CITY OF PITTSBURGH’S SUMMER CONCERT SERIES INCLUDES 40 FREE EVENTS

WEDNESDAY NIGHT CONCERT SERIES WEDNESDAYS JUNE 5-AUG. 28 SCHENLEY PARK

STARS AT RIVERVIEW JAZZ SERIES SATURDAYS JUNE 8-AUG. 31 RIVERVIEW PARK

BACH, BEETHOVEN AND BRUNCH CONCERT SERIES

PHOTO: CITY OF PITTSBURGH OFFICE OF SPECIAL EVENTS

^ Sat., Aug. 17: The UpHill 5K

SUNDAYS JUNE 16-AUG. 11 MELLON PARK

RESERVOIR OF JAZZ CONCERT SERIES SUNDAYS AUG. 4-SEPT. 1 HIGHLAND PARK FOR MORE INFO, VISIT PITTSBURGHPA.GOV/EVENTS

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SUNDAY

FOOD

AUG. 12

Vegetarians and vegans, rejoice! Try new meatless foods, adopt a pet from a local shelter, and watch live cooking demonstrations at VegFest. The popular day-long event also features live music and lots of local vendors for eco-friendly shopping. 11 a.m.-5 p.m. Allegheny Commons Park, North Park. Free. pittsburghvegfest.org

STAGE 12 Peers Theater presents Everybody, a modern riff on a 15th-century morality play where no two performances are the same. Be sure to see the production of this unique, Pulitzer Prize-nominated play. 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., Aug. 18. Richard E. Rauh Studio Theatre, 4200 Fifth Ave., Oakland. $5. 12peers.org

DRINK FreshFest — the nation’s first Black brew festival — returns to Nova Place with a fantastic line-up of 3,000 craft beer industry veterans, connoisseurs, and novices from across the country. In addition to the beer, festivalgoers can enjoy food trucks and live music. 12 p.m. 100 S. Commons, North Side. $25-150. freshfestbeerfest.com

TUESDAY ^ Sat., Aug. 10: VegFest

SUNDAY

AUG. 11

FOOD

MUSIC

Tired of stuffy art galleries? Head to the least-pretentious exhibit around. Pancakes & Booze features free allyou-can-eat pancakes, local art, music, and live painting. 8 p.m. Spirit Hall, 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $10-13. 21+. pancakesandbooze.com

After over 40 years, Black Flag is still flying. The pioneers of hardcore punk, known for anti-authoritarian messages and that logo popular on college dorm posters, will play Rex Theater with The Linecutters. 7 p.m. 1602 E. Carson St., South Side. $28-30. rextheater.net

AUG. 13 ART Contemporary Craft and the Brew House Association play host to Fiberart International, an exhibition presenting the best in contemporary fiber art. See works by 55 artists from the U.S. and abroad at two great venues. Continues through Sat., Aug. 24. 2100 Smallman St., Strip District and 711 South 21st St., South Side. Free. fiberartinternational.org

MUSIC More fleshed out than The White Stripes


PHOTO: ROGER MASTROIANNI

^ Mon., Aug. 5: Spamilton

but less gnarly than the Dead Weather, The Raconteurs is the Jack White happy medium for the Goldilocks in all of us. Expect straightforward rock pop with a Jack White edge when they play at Stage AE. 6:30 p.m. 400 N. Shore Drive, North Side. $65. promowestlive.com

WEDNESDAY

AUG. 14 EVENT Explore the universe and discover new planets with the weeklong Galaxy Girls’ Space Camp. This Assemble camp for kids looking to join their own space crew runs through Fri., Aug. 16, and discounted rates are available for Garfield residents. 9 a.m. 4824 Penn Ave., Bloomfield. $225 per week. assemblepgh.org

THURSDAY

AUG. 15

maintenance done, and do a little shopping. 6 p.m. 1981 Beechwood Blvd., Point Breeze. Free. “MTB Ride” on Facebook

FRIDAY

AUG. 16 STAGE The New Hazlett Theater presents Fun Home, the groundbreaking coming-of-age musical based on Alison Bechdel’s best-selling graphic memoir. The show follows the author through three stages of her life, as she discovers her sexuality and explores the mysteries surrounding her deceased father. Continues through Sat., Aug. 24. 8 p.m. Allegheny Square East, North Side. $12-35. newhazletttheater.org

SATURDAY

AUG. 17

EVENT

EVENT

Join the MTB ride at Frick Park to hone your biking skills, meet new friends, and have an outlandishly fun time. Each night ends at Trek bicycle shop in Shadyside, where you’ll enjoy free refreshments and the opportunity to discuss bikes, have some

Spotting birds is difficult in the wild, so the National Aviary wants to take you on a Riverboat Birding trip to make it easier. Watch birds from open vistas of the rivers, with expert help from ornithologist Robert Mulvihill. Includes brunch. 8 a.m. Near the Carnegie Science Center, 1 Allegheny Ave., North Side. $65-75. aviary.org

> Fri., Aug. 9: DJ Samuel Andrews at The Warm Up

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PHOTO: ZOSXAVIUS PHOTOGRAPHY

^ Sat., Aug. 24: Squirrel Hill Night Market

EVENT Created to increase the health and well-being of Black Pittsburghers, as well as to bring awareness to disparities that exist in the Hill District and beyond, The UpHill 5k takes participants along Centre Avenue. 8:30 a.m. Hill District. $20-25. hww19th.com

MUSIC Sure, you could tune that old acoustic of yours to drop-D and belt out some “Everlong,” but why not leave it to the pros? No, not Foo Fighters, we’re talking My So Called 90s Band, Pittsburgh’s premier cover band dedicated to one of the top-ten decades of all time. Check them out at Jam on Walnut. 7 p.m. Walnut St., Shadyside. Free. mysocalled90sband.com

MUSIC You’ll run to the hills when Iron Maiden makes Pittsburgh a stop during its Legacy Of The Beast tour. Experience the legendary metal band live at the PPG Paints Arena. 7:30 p.m. 1001 Fifth Ave., Downtown. Tickets start at $47. ppgpaintsarena.com

SUNDAY

TUESDAY

EVENT

ART

Shutting down almost all of Liberty Avenue in Bloomfield, the Little Italy Days festival has dozens of food vendors and tons of music. But the best thing is the old-timers playing bocce. 12-6 p.m. Liberty Avenue, Bloomfield. Free. littleitalydays.com

AUG. 19

See another side of Kim Gordon with Lo-Fi Glamour at The Warhol, the first solo art exhibition from the musician most noted for her time with Sonic Youth. Includes painting, sculpture, figure drawings, and a commissioned score for Andy Warhol’s 1963–64 silent film Kiss. Continues through Sun., Sept. 1. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $10-20. warhol.org

EVENT

WEDNESDAY

AUG. 18

MONDAY

Save the hassle of parking on the North Side by biking to the Pirates game. With the Bike to the Ballgame Tour, peruse the best parts of the city before enjoying the beautiful view at PNC Park. Plus, everyone 21+ receives a free beer. 3 p.m. Bike the Burgh Tours, 1049 Penn Ave., Downtown. $20-29. biketheburgh.com

AUG. 20

multidisciplinary pop artist, John Van Hamersveld. Continues through Sun., Oct. 20. 221 N. Main St., Greensburg. Free. thewestmoreland.org

THURSDAY

AUG. 22 ART

AUG. 21

You won’t believe your eyes when magician and America’s Got Talent finalist, Eric Jones, returns to Liberty Magic with his show, Impossible. This show has previously sold out, so get your tickets before they disappear. Continues through Sun., Sept. 8. 7:30 p.m. 811 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $40-65. trustarts.org

ART

FRIDAY

Westmoreland Museum of American Art presents Era of Cool, a selection of album covers, poster designs, drawings, mural designs, photography, and paintings by

Check pghcitypaper.com for event updates all summer long.

AUG. 23 COMEDY What do Mike Myers, Steve Carell, Stephen Colbert, Tina Fey, and Amy Poehler CONTINUES ON PG. 54

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have in common? They got their comedic start at The Second City improv theater. Witness the next generation of comedy superstars put a spin on classic sketches when they visit the O’Reilly Theater. 8 p.m. Continues through Sat., Aug. 24. 621 Penn Ave., Downtown. $35-60. ppt.org

TUESDAY

AUG. 27 ART Take back “us” at An Atlas of Commoning. This project aims to take back the words “community,” “sharing,” and “us” and strip them down to their original meanings, which promotes a positive social agenda. Head to Miller ICA at CMU if you “like” what you hear. 6-8 p.m. 5000 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. miller-ica.cmu.edu

MUSIC Get swept away by one of music’s greatest voices when Heinz Hall presents An Evening With Gladys Knight. Hear some of the singer’s biggest hits spanning pop, gospel, R&B, and adult contemporary. 8 p.m. 600 Penn Ave., Downtown. $49-189. trustarts.org

WEDNESDAY

AUG. 28

SATURDAY

AUG. 24

EVENT Pittsburgh’s favorite free yoga series, Yoga in the Square, is back and bringing two free one-hour yoga classes to Market Square with some of the city’s best yoga instructors. 5:30–6:30 p.m. Downtown. Free. downtownpittsburgh.com

EVENT More than 60 artists will sell their wares when I Made it! Market comes to the Squirrel Hill Night Market. Food trucks and live music join the fun to make it an all-out block party. 6 p.m. Murray Avenue, between Forbes Avenue and Beacon Street. Free. imadeitmarket.com

Things kick off at noon and run until 2 a.m. at Spirit’s fourth annual Summer Recess, so there’s no excuse to miss this one. Carve out a couple of hours and head down for DJs and dancing, mural painting, skating, screen printing, and, more than likely, some pizza. 12 p.m. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. Free. spiritpgh.com

EVENT Celebrate Caribbean music and culture in Pittsburgh with Rock, Reggae & Relief, a two-day music festival benefiting ovarian cancer research. Headliners at the festival in Market Square include Gavin DeGraw and Michael Franti & Spearhead. Continues through Sun., Aug. 25. 4-10 p.m. $39-290. rockreggaerelief.com

^ Sun., Aug. 25: Pedal PGH

SUNDAY

AUG. 25 EVENT Grab your bike, some friends, and your love of exploring Pittsburgh for Pedal PGH’s annual ride. Haven’t ridden in a while? No problem. There are four different routes to choose from (10, 25, 40, and 62 miles), and it is not a race. Pedal PGH is billed as a casual ride for people of all fitness levels and ages. 7 a.m. 1 S. 18th St., South Side. $50-140. pedalpgh.org

EVENT Shadyside is the go-to place for shopping in the city, but the Art Festival on Walnut Street opens up the neighborhood to a

AUG. 29 FOOD

more eclectic variety beyond the traditional clothing and boutique stores that normally fill shopping bags. Meet painters, jewelry makers, photographers, and more. 10 a.m.-7 p.m. 739 Bellefonte St., Shadyside. Free. artsfestival.com

Pack your appetites and plenty of napkins. The Heinz Field Kickoff and Rib Festival brings the best ribs in the country and familyfriendly entertainment to Art Rooney Avenue and surrounding streets. 12 p.m. North Side. Free. heinzfield.com/ribfest

MONDAY

FRIDAY

EVENT

EVENT

Relax and reconnect at the Millvale House during Monday Mindfulness Mediation, a weekly session led by Michael Hartigan, a practitioner of Tibetan Buddhism and Siddha Mahayoga with over 20 years of meditation experience. 6 p.m. 22 Butler St., Millvale. $5 suggested donation. themillvalehouse.com

Leave the baking soda and vinegar at home — this Science Fair goes beyond children’s volcanoes. Glitter Box Theater hosts the judged event, featuring “smoking beverages” (whatever that may mean). Also, if you want to make a volcano, go for it! Who are we to judge? 8 p.m. 460 Melwood Ave., Oakland. Free. theglitterboxtheater.com •

AUG. 26

AUG. 30

Adult Cooking Classes: • Super Summer Salads • Summer Desserts • Cook Out Time Class. Visit our website for a complete list of classes

309 EAST CARSON STREET • PGH, PA 15219 412.325.2703 • GAYNORSSCHOOLOFCOOKING.COM 54

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From 3-8pm, enjoy food trucks, sidewalk sales, pop-up markets, specialty cocktails and more.

http://lvpgh.com/summersaturdays/

MUSIC

THURSDAY


Presents...

e k o a r a K e k o e i edd

t a h T g Ba ! Drag heel andes! w t a h t in p S ated Prizy, l e r g a r D Win s, Jewelr

. . . y b d e t s o h

Every FRIDAY 9:30 - 1:30! ALL PERFORMERS ARE WELCOME!

G if t c a rudp & M O R E ! Make

Hosted by: Cindy Crotchford & Veronica Lust t

Every Thurs @ Midnight!

412-781-1119 5115 Butler St Pgh, PA 15201 SUMMER GUIDE 2019

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You don’t need to buy a plane ticket to escape from the city. Gather your family or friends together and visit any of these drivable d estination ns. Flip the pag ges to find your next vaca ation spot... destinations. pages vacation

Get out of town and experience something new! 38TH ANNUAL WINE COUNTRY HARVEST FESTIVAL The 38th Annual Wine Country Harvest Festival opens September 27 – 29 in beautiful and historic North East, PA. This three day celebration features wine tastings, winery tours, live entertainment with over 20 bands, cruise-in car show, hand crafters, artisans, exhibitors, a variety of food vendors and much more. Hop on the free festival shuttle to experience activities taking place in two parks. Pre-sale

tickets are available online at www. nechamber.org. While you are in North East, bike along meandering country lanes and farms, hike scenic trails, fish in clear, cold streams or relax on the beach. Tour the many wineries the region has to offer and visit the shops and restaurants in and around North East. History buffs should stop by the Historical Museum or Lake Shore Railway Museum. Call the North East Area Chamber of Commerce at 814-725-4262 or visit

www.nechamber.org for a complete port coal and timber, to the reinvention schedule of activities and lodging in- of six historic towers as the skywalk following the 2003 tornado. Free admisformation. sion. Open daily seven days a week. Scenic beauty awaits in the lush, ALLEGHENY NATIONAL FOREST green Allegheny National Forest. Rent REGION & KINZUA SKY WALK a cabin, bring your tent or RV. Enjoy Visit the amazing Kinzua Sky Walk, “One miles of multi-use trails. Charming of the Top 10 most scenic skywalks in small towns offer lodging, restaurants, the world,” located in the Kinzua Bridge and libations. State Park in Mt. Jewett. Pennsylvania. Escape to the beautiful forestlands of The fascinating interpretive center tells Trail Central. Phone 800-473-9370 for the stories of the mighty Kinzua Viayour free travel guide. duct, first constructed in 1882 to trans-

continues on page 58

SEPTEMBER 27-29 3 DAYS OF

WINE, FOOD, MUSIC & FUN tickets & more information at

www.nechamber.org

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RELAX & ENJOY

Breathtaking Views & Adventure

Shenango River Water Trail

John C. Oliver Multi-Purpose Trail at Maurice K. Goddard State Park

Mercer County Golf Trail

Explore Mercer County PA’s Exciting Trails!

Wine & Brew Trail

Mercer County Golf Trail Mercer County is one of America’s Top Golf Destinations offering a great selection of middle to high end courses, low green fees and a variety of accommodations centrally located to the courses. To request a golf package quote, go to GolfMercerCountyPA.com.

Upper Shenango River Water Trail The scenic Upper Shenango River Water Trail provides 23 miles of easy canoe and kayak paddling or inner tube floating. There are seven nonmotorized boat launches so paddlers can choose several different lengths for their float. To help visitors enjoy the river, two companies, Carried Away Outfitters and Pymatuning Rentals and Information Center, make planning your water adventure easy. John C. Oliver Multi-Purpose Trail Maurice K. Goddard State Park features a 12.2 mile scenic multi-use paved trail that loops around Lake Wilhelm. There is a lot of nature to view from this trail so don’t be surprised to see Bald Eagles, Osprey or Trumpeter Swans. For more information, go to VisitMercerCountyPA.com, then click on Outdoor Adventure.

VisitMercerCountyPA.com / 724-346-3771

Wine & Brew Trail For groups looking for a different and fun way to celebrate birthdays, bridal parties or other special occasions – or would just love a relaxing weekend away – Mercer County, PA offers a Wine and Brew Trail in picturesque settings. With eight wineries, five breweries and two distilleries in the area, this Trail experience is tailored to each group’s wishes and includes a customized itinerary, transportation, free wine tastings, entertainment and assistance in arranging an overnight stay and dinner. Getaways to Mercer County mean leaving the city behind and enjoying the beauty of lakes and scenic countryside. Visitors can enjoy a unique experience on the Wine and Brew Trail, stay at fabulous accommodations and dine at great restaurants. For more information, go to VisitMercerCountyPA.com, then click on Wine & Brew Trail.

YOUR SOURCE FOR TRAVEL PLANNING

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CARNEGIE MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY POWDERMILL NATURE RESERVE Powdermill Nature Reserve is Carnegie Museum of Natural History’s environmental research center. Located 55 miles southeast of Pittsburgh in Rector, Pennsylvania, Powdermill is a field station and laboratory where researchers do long-term studies of natural populations in western Pennsylvania. In addition to being positioned for Appalachian-specific studies in ornithology, ecology, invertebrate zoology, and botany, Powdermill is a great place to spend a fun-filled day outdoors with the family.

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Explore the beautiful woodlands around Powdermill, or visit the nature center, which features exhibits that highlight local wildlife, an indoor stream, and a marsh machine that uses a living greenhouse to purify waste water. Admission to Powdermill Nature Reserve is free.

CRAWFORD COUNTY, PA. Come up and see us sometime! Affordable vacation in Crawford County, PA. Pymatuning State Park features a 17,088-acre lake and has 19 miles of trails. The Park was named in the Top 10 in the Nation for the best family fishing vacations. A must see in the Park is “Where the ducks walk on the

fish”. We have two-member Amusement Parks, Conneaut Lake Park and Waldemar. Love bird watching visit Erie National Wildlife Refuge with an observation deck and many hiking trails. Canoe or kayak our Upper or Lower French Creek Water Trail or boat on one of our 7 lakes. Boat Rental are available. Delight your taste buds and visit our; Frozen custard stand, Eddie’s Foot-long Hot dogs, Brew Pubs, Wineries, New distillery, Meandry, Cidery, and our Outdoor Farmers Markets. Crawford has miles of scenic Hiking and Biking Trails. Golf on challenging, or fun golf courses. Our courses feature rolling hills with tree and water lined holes. You can play 18 holes of golf with a cart for $28 (seasonal). Hotel/Golf packages are available. Visit Drake Well Museum in Titusville. Edwin L. Drake drilled the first successful commercial oil well in 1859 which launched the modern oil industry. After your visit, take a ride on the Oil Creek and Titusville Railroad

“Through the Valley that changed the World” and spend the night in a Caboose Motel. The OC&T hosts many fun events, like murder mystery dinner theatres, to Peter Cotton Tail and Santa runs. Titusville’s Annual Oil Festival is held in August. Events: Maple Taste and Tour, Thurston Classic Hot Air Balloon Event, Pymatuning Waterfowl Festival, Fishing Tournaments, Crawford County Fair is the largest agriculture Fair in PA, Fall Pumpkin Fest, Antique Wood Boat Parade, Haunted Ghost Lake and so much more. Call and request our Visitors Guide, which includes a map, so you can find our member businesses. We have trail maps for hiking, biking, Taste and Touring for our brew, wine, distillery, cidery and Mead. You can also request our Events guide. All FREE just for you! Call 800-332-2338 or visit our website www.visitcrawford.org continues on page 60


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MERCER COUNTY WINE & BREW TRAIL For groups looking for a different and fun way to celebrate birthdays, bridal parties or other special occasions – or would just love a relaxing weekend away – Mercer County, PA offers a Wine and Brew Trail in a picturesque setting. With eight wineries, six breweries, and a distillery, this Trail experience is tailored to each group’s wishes, and includes a customized itinerary, transportation, free wine tastings, entertainment, and assistance in arranging an overnight stay and dinner. Getaways to Mercer County mean leaving the city behind and enjoying

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the beauty of scenic countryside. Joal Wolf, owner of Conneaut Cellar Winery and Distillery comments… “You can get away from the city and enjoy the countryside surroundings here, including woods, lakes, and the peacefulness of the Shenango River. Our backdrop is a big part of why people enjoy visiting our wineries and breweries. There’s also plenty to keep everyone busy, like great shopping and outdoor activities.” In addition to Conneaut Cellars Winery, area wineries include Fractured Grape, Knoggin Noggin, Lago Winery, Nova Cellars Winery, Volant Mill Winery, Webb Winery and Wilhelm Winery. Breweries on the trail have also be-

come a major draw. Brewtus Brewing Company knows that customers are always looking for a great place to sit, relax, enjoy a couple beers, and have a delicious meal. Over the years, this family-owned business has grown to include a menu that includes favorites continued pagethat’s 58 and craftfrom beer great for those who love to try homegrown drafts. The meticulous brewing process includes a seven-barrel brew system that creates the perfect in-house craft beer that can be changed through the seasons. “Besides our amazing brews, we focus on having a from-scratch kitchen that serves delicious farm-to-table meals. Our 1920s décor provides a friendly atmosphere, and we’re known for our fresh burgers,” says Brewery Manager Gabby Rahn. Other breweries in the area also have plenty to offer on the Brew Trail. Stone Church Pizza House & Brew Pub in Hermitage is housed is a vacant church, and is surrounding by spar-

kling stained glass windows. They take pride in using traditional and non-traditional processes to create an American take on classic European beer styles. Plus, their menu of Neapolitanstyle wood-fired pizza draws locals and out-of-towners. TimberCreek Tap & Table in the Grove City area has four flagship beers on tap year-round, plus seasonal selections. If you’re new to craft beer, they also carry lighter selections so that your introduction is smooth. Besides Black Angus burgers, they also feature fresh seafood, steaks, and ribs. Barley House Brewing Taproom & Grill is a nano brewery offering a fresh variety of craft beer made onsite, as well as a full service restaurant. Brew 32 features 10 beers on tap from traditional stouts, unique shady and even Jalapeno Mango. Enjoy live music every Friday night. Located on the shores of Pymatuning Lake, Mortals Key Brewing Company continues on page 62


DOG DAYCARE * GROOMING DOG AND CAT BOARDING

Dog-Friendly Cuban Cafe Enjoy Cuban pastries, specialty Cuban coffee drinks, as well as American coffee provided by Grounds & Hounds on our riverfront deck.

Located in Lawrenceville 12 McCandless Ave. Pittsburgh, Pa. 15201 www.tbeah.com • 412-908- 9301 SUMMER GUIDE 2019

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relies on innovative recipes to produce its beer. The brewery, located in a tractor barn that the owners refurbished with repurposed materials, welcomes live entertainment and welcomes visitors with an outside area. To book a tour contact Peggy at 724-346-3771 or go to www. VisitMercerCountyPA.com, click on Wine and Brew Trail.

PALACE OF GOLD New Vrindaban, Land of Krishna and Home to the Palace of Gold. Hidden just an hour south of Pittsburgh is one of West Virginia’s most magnificent treasures.

Deep in the rolling hills just outside of Moundsville, West Virginia, lies New Vrindaban, Land of Krishna and home to the Palace of Gold, a spiritual Hare Krishna community and place of pilgrimage. It was established in 1968 by Srila Prabhupada (founder and spiritual master of ISKCON) who envisaged a tranquil society communing with nature while spreading the teachings and ideals of Bhakti Yoga or Krishna Consciousness. Now celebrating 50 years in the Ohio Valley, New Vrindaban is a wellestablished part of the local community, welcoming some 50,000 tourists annually from all walks of life and all parts of the globe.

Bed & Breakfast 5 bedroom house available for WHOLE HOUSE RENTAL or BED AND BREAKFAST during the week or selected weekends. THE LAUREL HIGHLANDS IS FILLED WITH ACTIVITIES FOR ALL: Skiing and tubing, whitewater rafting, hiking, biking, ATV trails. Close proximity to festivals, wineries, antiquing, Hidden Valley, 7 Springs, Flight 93 Memorial and more! Visit 3 different Frank Lloyd Wright homes including Fallingwater, Kentuck Knob and Polymath Park. Visit our website and Follow us on Facebook for more information and schedule.

Call Juliann now to plan your next getaway or event! 412-401-2041

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When you begin your journey at Prabhupada’s Palace of Gold (coined “America’s Taj Mahal”) and tour its breathtaking gardens and landscape, you will feel as if transported to mystical India. Although you will see the Palace with over 8000 square feet of 22karat gold, antique teak-wood carvings, one of a kind artwork, and more than 250 tons of marble, the real beauty is in the unalloyed love and devotion that built this stunning memorial. No expert architects or experienced artisans were employed in the construction but young men and women who built it without blueprints and who were inspired to create a home for their spiritual teacher, Srila Prabhupada. It now stands as a memorial shrine dedicated to carrying on his loving spirit and universal message. Next you may take a short walk or drive to the main temple complex, which hosts various attractions, including a traditional Hindu temple, Govinda’s vegetarian/vegan restaurant, guest lodging, a newly constructed yoga pavilion, shops, nature trails, and much more. This unique experience will allow you to step outside of the ordinary and escape the hustle and bustle of modern urban life. New Vrindaban hosts a wide range of festivals all year long, so you will surely catch something that fans the fire of the soul. Whether it’s one of the daily gatherings in the main temple with dance and song, or a fireworks display over the lake (Saturday nights in the summer), or whatever way you end up spending your time, you will surely leave with happy memories that you would want to share with friends and family. Take time out for yourself this summer, kick off your shoes and feel the grass beneath your toes, milk a cow, photograph a peacock, or watch the swans swimming in one of the many lakes. New Vrindaban is here for you,

a haven of peace and harmony. Please visit us online at www.palaceofgold.com or www.newvrindaban.com, and plan your trip today.

VISIT BEAVER COUNTY There is so much to see and do, only minutes from Pittsburgh. We invite you to visit and share a lifestyle that is second to none. We’re a countryside location surrounded amid rolling hills, hardwood forests, river valleys, and streams. Our collection of parks and outdoor activities can satisfy any outdoor enthusiast. Looking for fun and interesting things to do? You will find plenty of them in Beaver County. We are blessed with a number of historical and heritage points that will peak your interest. In addition to attending any one of the dozens of cultural events and ethnic festivals held throughout the year, you can take a nostalgic trip through the history of air travel, specifically relating to WWII at the Air Heritage Museum or step back in time to Old Economy Village. Feel the speed, beauty and excitement of polo matches held on Friday evenings during the summer in Darlington or possibly a vintage car race or Professional Motorcycle Championship at Pittsburgh International Race Complex in Wampum. Enjoy viewing an Eagle’s nesting area in via a viewfinder or walk the selfguided Underground Railroad tour through the beautiful town of New Brighton. Savor award-winning restaurants and our regional cuisine. Relax at one of our charming bed & breakfasts or national hotel brands. Sit back and enjoy world-class and local entertainment at Lincoln Park Performing Arts Center. We have unlimited opportunities for antiquing, golfing, boating, museums, historical sites, concerts, festivals and more! www.VisitBeaverCounty.com


Experience New Vrindaban, “Land of Krishna� and home to

Take a one-tank trip an hour south, and join us for an afternoon out of the ordinary. This spiritual retreat will allow you to dive into the traditional culture of Vedic India and delight your senses with tastes, sights, and sounds that

newvrindaban.com

will leave you refreshed, focused, and above all, happy!

palaceofgold.com

New Vrindaban, Palace of Gold 3759 McCrearys Ridge Rd, Moundsville, WV 26041 | Phone: 304-843-1600 SUMMER GUIDE 2019

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.MUSIC.

A HELPING HAND BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

E

ARLIER THIS YEAR, The Pittsburgh Downtown Community Development Corporation announced plans to have more places to hear live music downtown. As part of the initiative, the group’s executive director brought on Kevin Saftner, former owner of James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy, to help book for venues that desired live entertainment. Now, as the talk turns to action, Saftner and Downtown restaurant Wolfie’s Pub are using the initiative to help those interested in the music scene learn the ins and outs of the industry. One person who’s fully embraced Saftner’s tutelage is Point Park University student Tracy Randall. In 2015, after working in health care for years, 41-year-old Randall decided to pursue her dream of working in the music industry and went back to college. She started taking classes at CCAC Allegheny that summer. “Shortly thereafter, I was diagnosed and treated for breast cancer,” says Randall. “It was just a bump in the road, but I got back off the ground, dusted myself off, and charged forward. I wanted to make whatever life I have left something that I enjoy, something that has a passion.” Randall transferred the credits she earned and, in 2017, began studying Sports, Arts and Entertainment Management at Point Park University. When she shared her love of blues — Randall has been a member and volunteer for the Blues Society of Western Pennsylvanian for many years — with her professor Ed Traversari, he gave her Saftner’s contact information.

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“She came to me and said, ‘Hey, I want to start [booking],’” says Saftner. “So I help her, I teach her how to book, promote, market, help her make the posters, everything I do.” Randall now books Tuesday Blues Day at Wolfie’s. While owning and operating James Street Gastropub and Speakeasy with his mother, Saftner booked the shows at the North Side venue. It was known for its strong jazz programming, and he booked about 400 shows a year during its seven years in operation. This was nothing new to Saftner, who has been booking shows since he was about 14 when his mom would drive him around in a minivan full of DJ gear to proms, weddings, and birthday parties. “I’ll always try to help as many people start booking as I can because I don’t want to do this forever,” says Saftner. “I want someone to be able to take over for me one of these days. Hopefully, I’ll find that in one of these college students.” Aside from Randall, Saftner assists younger musicians with The Attic Music Group. The program gives monthly residencies to Pittsburgh bands and musicians, helping them learn all they can in hopes that they can find repeat paying gigs elsewhere.

CP PHOTOS: JARED MURPHY

Tracy Randall and Kevin Saftner at Wolfie’s Pub

TUESDAY BLUES DAY is held before every Pirates home game that falls on a Tuesday. 5 p.m. Woflies’ Pub, 274 Forbes Ave., Downtown. Free. 412-232-3001

On Thursdays, Pioneer Records, a Point Park University-operated record label managed by Sports, Arts and Entertainment Management students,

hosts an open mic night. Like Randall, the students learn how to book musical acts with Saftner’s assistance. However, Randall, Saftner says, is a

Follow staff writer Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

unique situation and Tuesday Blues Day is Randall’s baby. “After the first two shows were booked, she was like, ‘Alright I’ll call you when I’m done [with the rest.]’ And then she came back [soon after] and said look they’re all booked.” Randall says that when Saftner let her have free reign, it was incredibly empowering. “I learned a lot going through Point Park’s Sports, Arts, and Entertainment Management program, but I was never able to apply it anywhere else.” She was also able to learn invaluable knowledge not taught in the classroom, like networking and to never bad mouth anyone. “It’s the golden rule,” says Randall, “because someday you could be working next to that person, or that person could be your boss.” The first Tuesday Blues Day took place on May 7 with Charlie Barath, Jimmy Adler, and John “The Junkman” Burgh. “I’ve never seen that kind of life in Wolfie’s Pub,” says Randall. “There were people dancing, and the doors were opened up to Forbes Avenue. With the foot traffic, it was kind of like the music was drawing people in. I felt like I was in a different place for a minute.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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AFTER TILLER BY HANNAH LYNN HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: YES AND NO PRODUCTIONS

Dr. Susan Robinson

There’s no better way to understand the importance of reproductive rights than by hearing from abortion providers and people who receive them, which is relevant as ever with new laws introduced in Alabama, Georgia, and other states. After Tiller, a documentary about doctors in America who perform third-trimester abortions, came out in 2013, but it’s an essential piece of media for understanding the issue. There are only a handful of doctors in the U.S. that perform third-trimester abortions (four at the time of the documentary). The film is named for third-trimester abortion provider George Tiller, who was assassinated in 2009. The doctors carrying on the legacy of his work, many of Streaming whom trained with on Amazon him for years, do so Prime and with the constant Kanopy threat of violence against them, their clinics, and their families. The doctors always stress that the patients are the reasons for risking their lives to do this work. Anonymous patients provide intimate, detailed stories about their experiences – some are getting a third-trimester abortion because of the discovery of a rare and fatal fetal anomaly, others because the pregnancy was the result of rape. And some are there because they just don’t want a baby, and that’s enough. As Dr. Susan Robinson, one of the providers in the documentary, says, “What I believe is that women are able to struggle with complex ethical issues and arrive at the right decision for them and their families. They are the world’s expert on their own lives.” • 92

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PHOTO: NEON

Director/farm owner John Chester and his pig, Emma.

.FILM.

FARM TO THEATER BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

T’S EASY TO make fun of city folk

who suddenly move to the country to fulfill a dream of being a farmer. They don’t know what they’re doing and will surely run into their fair share of hiccups because they’re from the city, dangit! Bless This Mess, a new ABC sitcom, is making a whole series from the premise that a couple from New York has no clue how to run a farm in Nebraska. But in the documentary The Biggest Little Farm, a couple follows through on their idealism, building the farm of their dreams, and capturing the whole thing on film over the course of nearly a decade. John and Molly Chester are living in a cramped apartment in Santa Monica, Calif., when they get evicted because their new rescue dog won’t stop barking. Molly, a chef, has always dreamt of having a perfect farm to grow her own food, and since they want a place for the dog to run free, they bought an old, rundown farm. The soil was dry and unusable, the aquifer empty, and there was little sign anything there had ever been alive. But their dream for a farm was utopian, the opposite of the abandoned corporate farms that surround theirs. They wanted to revive the ecosystem to include all the animals that would naturally thrive in pre-industrial farms. Chickens, cows, and pigs would live in harmony with

the gophers, snakes, and coyotes. Their vision was almost too utopian. They also have no money (until an unnamed investor pitches in) or farming experience (until a wise old farmer pitches in). They dive in head first, encountering all kinds of failures, from a snail infestation, to murdered chickens, to a feverish pig. They learn as they go and eventually, nature balances itself out to create a harmonious farm (though, like everything in California, still prone to drought and wildfires).

THE BIGGEST LITTLE FARM Directed by John Chester. Opens Fri., May 24 at The Manor Theatre.

The film is not so much about John and Molly as it is about the farm itself, Apricot Lane Farms. John, who directed the movie, was a filmmaker before he got into farming (he adopted the aforementioned barking dog from the location of a dog-hoarding documentary on which he was working). He didn’t know on day one that he’d make a full-length documentary about it, but filmed the process nonetheless. Once he realized it would be a real movie, he brought in expert nature cinematographers who capture the farm in vivid detail, like something out of

Planet Earth. The way newborn maggots crawl around in manure, how a lone rooster befriends a pig, when masses of birds swarm above the peach trees all come together to make something visually beautiful but also revealing about the complexities of farming and what it really takes to grow food. The film sometimes relies too much on the natural beauty of the farm, glossing over important details that might be of use to the audience. They don’t, for example, mention where they got their funding or how much money they received. Money is obviously a major part of farming and the reason many farmers are struggling, so it’s a bit questionable not to get into details. When they get to the farm, John and Molly also quickly mention the immigrant workers they hired that had been working that farm for decades, through five different owners. In California, where immigrant farm labor is such a significant issue, it feels a little irresponsible not to spend more time on it. Still, the film is mesmerizing, especially for those who didn’t grow up on or near a farm like Apricot Lane. It would be a useful teaching tool, if not exactly for a wannabe farmer, then for people to understand the benefits of healthy, sustainable farming. Because without it, the farm industry is deeply endangered.


G REFRAMING MING REFRA FRAMING REF NG REFRAMIN AMING REFR EFRAMINGRE REFRAMING RAMING REFR G REFRAMING AMING REFRA FRAMING RE NG REFRAMI Annual Convening RAMING REFR REFRAMING R Not just any Annual Convening, the Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council invites all artists, arts administrators, and arts and culture advocates for a daylong networking and learning experience. The evening ends with live music from Beauty Slap and Soy Sos.

PHOTO: KRISTI JAN HOOVER

Jo Mei and Nilanjana Bose in We Are Among Us

.STAGE.

WE ARE AMONG US BY ALEX GORDON // ALEXGORDON@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HE PROGRAM FOR We Are Among

Us includes a two-page history on the relationship between Afghanistan and the United States. Written by Clare Drobot, City Theatre’s director of new play development, the essay starts in 1953 with the allegiance between Afghanistan and the Soviet Union and chronicles the relationship up to its tumultuous present day. “Two disparate lands irrevocably linked by a close to two decades old conflict,” Drobot writes. “We Are Among Us explores the inherent cost of war by tracing the ripple effects of a single night in Wardak Province, a remote area southwest of Kabul, highlighting our country’s intertwined relationship in the process.” The essay is well-written, informative, restrained, and nuanced in all the ways that, unfortunately, Stephen Belber’s script for We Are Among Us is not. A game cast and a rich subject aren’t enough to save the play from its worse impulses, which are alternately heavyhanded, cheap, and patronizing. The production isn’t completely without bright spots, but mostly I found myself wishing that I was just reading more of Drobot’s history. Its plot revolves around five people connected by the aforementioned “single night in Wardak Province.” Eight years earlier, Laura (Lisa Velten Smith), a contractor working with the American military in Afghanistan, overheard the violent interrogation of an Afghan man suspected of working with the Taliban. He was later found dead; the military quietly swept it under the rug and took the witnesses’ words at face value. Now,

one of the soldiers involved is running for office, spurning an investigation by a Harper’s reporter named Shar (Jo Mei). Thus Laura has to relive the evening, reconnect with one of the other soldiers, Taylor, (Kyle Haden), and explain some murky, questionable thoughts on ethics to her teenage son, Beau (Eric Weigand). Eventually, things lead to the murdered man’s daughter, Khadija (Nilanjana Bose), who’s settled down in California and works at Whole Foods.

WE ARE AMONG US

continues through Sun., June 2. City Theatre, 1300 Bingham St., South Side. $29. citytheatre.culturaldistrict.org

A number of factors cause the promising premise to fall short, the most apparent being the minimalist set design and unorthodox stage direction. The set, which is circular, completely bare, and about 20 feet in diameter, takes up only part of the stage. Outside of it are four chairs for the actors to sit when they’re not part of a scene. It’s hard to say what its desired effect was, but it mostly ends up being distracting. That, plus the lack of set dressing, puts this worldly story at odds with its cerebral staging. We Are Among Us is a respectable endeavor, but simply falls short of its lofty ambitions. The actors — particularly Bose and Wiegand — do their best to liven up some of the drearier dialogue, but in the end, it’s not enough. If you’re interested in the nuanced complexities of Afghanistan/U.S. relations, maybe just stick with Drobot’s intro, then hit the library.

Follow managing editor Alex Gordon on Twitter @shmalexgordon

GREATER PITTSBURGH ARTS COUNCIL TUESDAY, JUNE 18, 2019 at NOON

DAVID L. LAWRENCE CONVENTION CENTER

Register at PittsburghArtsCouncil.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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SEVEN DAYS OF CONCERTS KAYAFEST 2019 SUNDAY, MAY 26

Memorial Day is the unofficial start of the summer season and summer means outdoor festivals. Unofficially kick off the festival season with KayaFest, a block party that fills Smallman Street with music and Caribbean-inspired food. Performers cover a lot of ground, including folk, (Bindley Hardware Co.), rock (Chase and the Barons), soul (Elias Khouri), reggae (Tropidelic), and more. The one thing the acts have in common? Good vibes and irresistible rhythms. 12-10:30 p.m. 2000 Smallman St., Strip District. Free. facebook.com/KayaPittsburgh CP PHOTO: ANNIE BREWER

Elias Khouri

FULL LIST ONLINE pghcitypaper.com

THURSDAY MAY 23 DJS DJ NIN. Rivers Casino. 6 p.m. North Side.

THE HOMELESS GOSPEL CHOIR. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. LIVE AT THE FILLMORE (ALLMAN BROTHERS TRIBUTE). Hard Rock Cafe. 8 p.m. Station Square.

COVERS

THE CLARKS. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side.

CLASH OF THE DECADES: 90S. Cioppino Restaurant and Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District.

BAD LUCK. Black Forge Coffee House. 6:30 p.m. McKees Rocks.

JAZZ MICHAEL FORMANEK ELUSION QUARTET. City of Asylum. 7 p.m. North Side. VIRGIL WALTERS, ERIN BURKETT, ERIC SUSOEFF. Eighty Acres Kitchen and Bar. 5:30 p.m. Monroeville. JEFF BERMAN TRIO. Kingfly Spirits. 7 p.m. Strip District.

ROCK/PUNK THE FORTY NINETEENS. LiveBurghStudio. 7 p.m. Glenshaw.

PRIMITIVE MAN, ASEETHE. Brillobox. 7 p.m. Bloomfield. RIVER CITY BLUES. Crafthouse Stage and Grill. 8 p.m. Whitehall.

HIP HOP/RAP

MILLY RACCOON. Hambones. 9:30 p.m. Lawrenceville.

POP WALK OFF THE EARTH. Stage AE. 6:30 p.m. North Side.

ROCK/BLUES FORTY NINETEENS, LOS VAMPIROS AMARILLOS. Club Cafe. 7 p.m. South Side. SHOT O’ SOUL. Good Time Bar. 8 p.m. Millvale. SAWYER (RUSH TRIBUTE). Oaks Theater. 8:30 p.m. Oakmont.

FRIDAY MAY 24

SELWYN BIRCHWOOD. Moondog’s. 8:30 p.m. Blawnox.

JAZZ JESSICA LEE. Wolfie’s Pub. 5 p.m. Downtown. RICK MATT. NOLA On the Square. 8 p.m. Downtown.

MURDER JUNKIES, BUSBY DEATH CHAIR. Cattivo. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

KEN AND BILL. Enix Brewing Co. 7 p.m. Homestead.

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

DARYL SHAWN. Backstage Bar. 5 p.m. Downtown.

STEVIE STONE, MADCHILD. Rex Theater. 7 p.m. South Side.

JUNGLE OF THIEVES. Wolfie’s Pub. 8 p.m. Downtown.

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JAMES DRAKES AND FRIENDS. Wolfie’s Pub. 8 p.m. Downtown.

ACOUSTIC

THE CONTENDERS. Cioppino Restaurant and Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District. LEGENDARY ALBUM SERIES: LITTLE FEAT. Rex Theater. 8 p.m. South Side.

CLASSICAL

CLASSICAL

COVERS

THE BRASS ROOTS. East Liberty Presbyterian Church. 7:30 p.m. East Liberty.

PITTSBURGH CELLO FEST. Carnegie Mellon University. 10 a.m. Oakland.

HOT METAL HORNS. Downey’s House. 8:30 p.m. Robinson.

ELECTRONIC

ROCK/METAL

THE RUSSIAN WHITE, VENUS IN FURS, KOMRADS. Cattivo. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

SUAVITY’S MOUTHPIECE, THE PETALS. Black Forge Coffee House. 6 p.m. Allentown.

JAGTIME MILLIONAIRE, AARON LEFEBVRE. Scratch Food and Beverage. 7 p.m. Troy Hill.

THE WARM UP. The Goldmark. 7 p.m. Lawrenceville.

BREWERS ROW, CADILLAC DONUTS, BRYAN MCQUAID. Moondog’s. 8 p.m. Blawnox.

METAL/PUNK RACETRAITOR, HIRS, COHERENCE. Mr. Roboto Project. 7:30 p.m. Bloomfield. HATRED RISING, CARNIVORA. Black Forge Coffee House. 6 p.m. Allentown. SISTER ANNE, DETAINEE. The Rock Room. 8 p.m. Polish Hill. OSSUARY, TUBAL CAIN, ENFILADE. Howlers. 7:30 p.m. Bloomfield.

INTERNATIONAL GYPSY STRINGZ. Dorothy 6 Cafe. 6 p.m. Homestead.

THE READLINES. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale.

SATURDAY MAY 25

DJS

COVERS

DJ GROVER. Baja Bar and Grill. 7 p.m. Fox Chapel.

HOT METAL HORNS. Downey’s House. 8:30 p.m. Robinson.

GOTOBEDS. Babyland. 9 p.m. Polish Hill. BILL TOMS. Kollar Club. 6 p.m. South Side Slopes. HAVEN STATE, THE FALL DOWN. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 7 p.m. Millvale. KING CATFISH, BLUE CLUTCH. Howlers. 8:30 p.m. Bloomfield. THE YJJ’S (FINAL SHOW). Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

JAZZ

ACOUSTIC

THE GOOD GUYS. Mike’s Beer Bar. 10 p.m. North Side.

HOP HIP MICHAEL WAVVES. Smiling Moose. 5 p.m. South Side.

ELECTRONIC TRACKSPLOITATION. Spirit. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville.

SUNDAY MAY 26 REGGAE THE FLOW BAND. Baja Bar and Grill. 2 p.m. Fox Chapel.

MERRY MAKERS TRIO. Cioppino Restaurant and Cigar Bar. 7 p.m. Strip District.

ROCK/METAL

ERIN BURKETT, VIRGIL WALTERS, DANIEL MAY. Andys Wine Bar. 8 p.m. Downtown.

HOZIER. Benedum Center. 8 p.m. Downtown.

OLGA WATKINS BAND. NOLA On the Square. 8 p.m. Downtown.

UP FROM HERE. Black Forge Coffee House. 5 p.m. Allentown.

TALLAH, DEADCULTURE. Mr. Smalls Theatre. 6:30 p.m. Millvale.


Cel

ic!

an American g n Cla ti a r ss eb Save the Date :

BURGER BASH* JUNE 30

PHOTO:: B BEN EN PRISBYLLA

Flower Crown Fl n

FLOWER CROWN SUNDAY, MAY 26

Pittsburgh dream-pop band Flower Crown follows up its serene, melodic debut,, Glow, w with Sundries. The new album, out May 24 via Crafted Sounds, artfully alternates te es between heavy guitar-based tracks and lush, pop-leaning songs. Flower Crown celebrates with a show at Spirit alongside fellow Pittsburgh acts Bat Zuppel and d The Zells. Sundries will be available as a CD or cassette. Additionally, there will be 100 00 0 limited edition random color and 200 black vinyl. 9 p.m.-1am. 242 51st St., Lawrenceville. $5. facebook.com/flowercrownmusic

ALTERNATIVE/INDIE

DJS

CHASMS, DINOSOUL. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

ONEWAVYBABE. Ace Hotel. 9 p.m. East Liberty.

SCRATCHY BLANKET, NATURAL SWAY. Cafe Verona. 4 p.m. Verona.

DJ ARVIN CLAY. Belvederes. 10 p.m. Lawrenceville.

FESTIVAL

HARD CHARGER, BETON. The Rock Room. 8 p.m. Polish Hill.

MEMORIAL WEEKEND MUSIC FEST. Rex Theater. 5 p.m. South Side.

JAZZ/FUNK BOWTANK, SEEDY PLAYERS, SAFARI WILLIAMS. Howlers. 9 p.m. Bloomfield. GEORGE HEID III. Wallace’s Whisky Room and Kitchen. 7 p.m. East Liberty.

MONDAY MAY 27 COVERS TOLD YA SO. Baja Bar and Grill. 2 p.m. Fox Chapel. APOCALYPTICA (METALLICA ON FOUR CELLOS). Carnegie Music Hall. 7:30 p.m. Homestead.

POP HIT LIKE A GIRL, WARRINGTON. Mr. Roboto Project. 7 p.m. Bloomfield.

ROCK/METAL

WEDNESDAY SDAY MAY 29 ALTERNATIVE/INDIE /INDIE SOCIAL CIRCLE, THOUSANDZZ OF BEEZ, ERIC WEIDENHOF. The Government Center. 7 p.m. North Side.

TUESDAY MAY 28

FOLK

HIP HOP/ RAP

NAMELESS IN AUGUST, JOSH CORCORAN, JOHNNY WALYLKO. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

JUICE WRLD. Stage AE. 6:30 p.m. North Side.

JAZZ

KRUGER BROTHERS. The Roots Cellar. 7:30 p.m. Shadyside.

ROGER HUMPHRIES AND RH FACTOR. Backstage Bar. 5 p.m. Downtown.

JAZZ

DJS

FUNKY FACTORY JAM SESSION. Wolfie’s Pub. 7 p.m. Downtown.

DJ JOANIE B. Howlers. 8 p.m. Bloomfield.

COUNTY LOLO, GARRISON STARR. Club Cafe. 8 p.m. South Side.

ELECTRONIC ULTRAWORLD BEATS. Spirit. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

TAKE THE DONKEY DOWN, SALT PEOPLE, SADIE POWERS. Spirit. 8 p.m. Lawrenceville.

ROCK/PUNK BODEGA, GUSTAF. Babyland. 9 p.m. Polish Hill. THE EXITS, THE VICS. Gooski’s. 8:30 p.m. Polish Hill. WAR STREETS. Arsenal Bowl. 9 p.m. Lawrenceville.

These listings are curated by Pittsburgh City Paper’s music writer Jordan Snowden and include events from our free online listings. Submit yours today at www.pghcitypaper.com/submitevent

Burger Month JULY 2019

SPONSORED BY

A MONTH LONG CELEBRATION OF UNIQUE CUSTOM BURGERS BY PITTSBURGH’S BEST RESTAURANTS * B U R G E R B A S H W I L L B E J U N E 3 0 T H A LO N G S I D E O P E N S T R E E T S I N L AW R E N C E V I L L E . FO R M O R E I N FO V I S I T P G H B U R G E R M O N T H .C O M PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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PHOTO: JAMES GALLERY

#468, Stars on the Water by Janice Lessman-Moss

..ART .. .

MULTIPLICITY BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

J

AMES GALLERY, a space specializing in artwork

for residential and corporate clients, is itself a work of art. Housed in a former stable district — a past alluded to with the occasional horseshoe or riding tack wall hanging — it boasts high ceilings, plenty of natural light, and an inviting sculpture garden. But that architectural beauty serves a purpose, in this case to best showcase the impressively diverse collection of art in Multiplicity. On view until June 29, the show features 29 local

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and national artists working in different mediums with a diverse range of styles. There are traditional paintings, most notably Concertanti, a rich pointillist landscape by Gil Gorski; a lively abstract water scene entitled Blue Rock Rapids by Susan Morosky; and I’ll Be Your Key by Scott Turri, a bright acrylic work with pop sensibility. Somewhat related is See the Boys by Pittsburgh-based artist David Wallace, a mixed-media piece that recalls, to some degree, Roy Lichtenstein. But more prominent are the pieces that experiment

with new techniques. Works like Arrière Pensée by Michael Smithhammer catch you off guard with unexpected details. Made through a process involving acrylic and paper, the large panel pops with countless, painstakingly cut seed-like dots, all swept up in a flourish of autumnal colors. Winter Hemlocks by Paul Chojnowski seems like a fairly standard nature scene until a closer look reveals that the thick of forest trees was achieved through wood-burning


CP PHOTO: AMANDA WALTZ

Zoffe by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze

on a piece of plywood. Fire reappears in Christine Aaron’s Vestiges II, a map-like “burnt drawing” beautifully composed with flame-produced holes in deep blue, handmade abaca paper and accented with yellow threading.

MULTIPLICITY Continues through June 29. 413 S. Main St., West End Village. jamesgallery.net

And the Deities Lost Face by Craig Dongoski dazzles with a psychedelic burst of earthy colors in oil, pencil, and ink. Retired Carnegie Mellon University professor Pat Bellan-Gillen comes through with History/Inheritance, two jagged birch panels featuring a toilelike scene with warped and stretched rabbits and cherubs. Most astounding is Stardust, a polished, black acrylic night scene by Carla Ciuffo that comes alive through an enchanting augmentedreality animation, made possible by a nearby tablet. Adding to the intrigue is how Ciuffo made the work as a visiting artist at Harvard University, where she collaborated with the Disease and Biophysics Group to create abstract artwork using nanofiber technology. Beyond the canvas and wood panels are plenty of 3D curiosities, including the textured blown glass of Ben Johnson, the thin wooden curlicue of “Untitled” by Jeremy Holmes, and various industrial-

inspired pieces by contemporary sculptor John Van Alstine. There’s also the coral-like quality of “Inner View, Nexus III Cellular,” a shimmery, white marble sculpture by Caroline Ramersdorfer, and “Zoffe” by Elizabeth Whyte Schulze, an unassuming basket work made of pine needles and raffia and covered in bright red paint, primitivist drawings, and Chinese characters. Keeping with the exhibit’s explicit mission of “offering contrasts in material and content,” textiles make an appearance with Janice Lessman-Moss’ #468, Stars on the Water, a tapestry created with computer design and woven on digital electronic looms, and Split Personality by Jan Myers-Newbury, a quilt dyed using shibori, a Japanese process similar to tie-dye. Entering into a wider range of materials and approaches are pieces made with wax (Participants Within the Vast Imagination by Lorraine Glessner) and aluminum, mylar, and Plexiglas (Double Bond by Carrie Seid), as well as the Magic Eye-level optical illusions characterizing the Tree Dynamics monoprints by Texas artist, Orna Feinstein. While James Gallery may initially lull guests with its pleasantly serene environment (while giving the tour, director Paul Cicozi rarely spoke above a whisper), the exhibit showcased within its walls will wake you up again with its stimulating selection of bold patterns, colors, and textures, and techenhanced art.

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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CP PHOTO: JARED MURPHY

Farooq Ameen Al-Said

..ARTS .. .

BACKSTAGE BY LISSA BRENNAN // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NAME: Farooq Ameen Al-Said, Churchill WORK: Director of Operations, 1Hood Media WHAT DOES YOUR TITLE MEAN WITHIN THIS ORGANIZATION? We are an arts and education program dedicated to activism and education through the lens of hip hop. I handle the logistics, artist management, day to day. HOW DID YOU GET INVOLVED? I was in a lot of trouble as a kid — locked up, almost deported. The law took an interest in me, so why can’t I take an interest in the law? That led me into different forms of activism through the arts. I’ve known Jasiri [1Hood co-founder and chief executive officer] a third of my life so coming to work for and with 1Hood was an organic companionship. DO YOU SEPARATE THE ARTISTIC AND ACTIVIST? We use the word “artivist” — art is our

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activism, and activism is our art. We are the intersection. We put our boots on the ground. During the Michael Rosfeld trial, we didn’t sleep. We had 24-hour days. These are things we’re emotionally invested in. I think a lot of people in these spaces get enamored with, “This can get me on CNN, on Fox News.” That’s not even in the scope of what we do. We’re like, “We live here. Let’s change some shit.” Sorry. HOW DOES THAT AFFECT YOUR INVOLVEMENT WHEN YOU’RE NOT AT WORK? Sometimes you don’t get a decompression. It’s not a regular job. This is a lifestyle. It is dope, but at the same time, you’re always on the clock. I’m an immigrant, I’m a Muslim, I’m Black, and I’m Arabic. Every time I turn on the TV, I’m targeted. So I try not to turn on the TV. I love hip hop. Then sometimes I find myself in spaces where I [have] to defend hip hop when I’m not working. Sometimes

we become mouthpieces when we don’t even want to because of how tied in we are to the community. We don’t get the luxury of turning off our phone, shutting off the computer and saying, “I’m done for the day.” DOES IT CHANGE HOW YOU LOOK AT ART THAT DOESN’T INCLUDE ACTIVISM? I personally think there’s a balance between righteousness and ratchetness. I appreciate technicality and finesse and rhyme scheme — not always talking about the most socially conscious things. I’m socially conscious all day, sometimes I’m just like, “Put that on. That’s the type of time I want right now.” But overall, I absolutely look at the impact the artist has on the culture. I can differentiate the artist trying to get that paycheck, or get out of that contract. I get it. You might not want to make that music, but you’ve got three albums left on that deal. But if you’ve invested in programs and things in the

streets and community, I totally dig it. Get your money. WHAT ARE LONG-TERM GOALS, BOTH HERE AND PERSONALLY? Put roots in a lot of cities, create more solid partnerships so we can have more likeminded people moving forward, marching, mobilizing — really just trying to make better places, corny as that sounds. Individually, I’ll be honest. This is the first time that I’ve given a lot of thought to, “Do I want the house with the picket fence? Do I want the 3.5 kids? Do I want all these things?” Right now my long-term goal is just to find stability and comfort, trying to exist in a world that isn’t welcoming to me. DO YOU HAVE A FAVORITE PART OF THIS WORK? I’ve had people come up to me and say, “Thank you for making us feel safe.” That, that feels good. I would say that’s the best thing.


.LITERATURE.

FRIENDLY COMPETITION BY JORDAN SNOWDEN JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

H

OW FAR WOULD you go to make your wildest dreams come true? Bright Burning Stars, the debut from Pittsburgh author, A.K. Small, examines the risks one will take for the greatest reward. Split between two points of view, the young adult novel follows best friends Marine Duval and Kate Sanders during their final year as students at the elite Paris Opera Ballet School. At the end of the year, one boy and one girl are selected to receive the “ultimate prize” – a spot in the prestigious Paris corps de ballet. Naturally, both girls want this honor for themselves. Marine, a mildmannered French native, is motivated by the death of her twin brother who was an effortlessly gifted dancer but passed away before getting to attend the school. Throughout the book, it’s unclear whether she actually wants the prize for herself, or if she is has

PHOTO: BECKY THURNER BRADDOCK

A.K. Small

BRIGHT BURNING STARS BOOK LAUNCH Fri., May 24. 7-9 p.m. White Whale Bookstore, 4754 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. aksmallwords.com

taken on her brother’s dream and is pursuing it out of obligation. Kate, an eccentric American whose mother disappeared at a young age, seems to have more pure talent than Marine, but her constant need for attention and deep-seated insecurities cripple her focus on ballet.

Their relationship gets more complicated following Kate and Marine’s pact by moonlight – when they first become friends, they vow that if one girl won the prize, the other would decline unless both girls can be chosen. To initiate this pact, Kate and Marine snuck out of their shared room after-hours. When the girls

are caught outside of their room — an expellable offense — Kate immediately runs away, leaving Marine trailing behind wondering why her moon sister abandoned her. This moment, which happens early on in the book, defines their relationship. The question throughout is, will Kate backstab Marine in the end? Moreover, if Marine wins, would she sabotage her dream for Kate? Aside from Kate and Marine’s toxic relationship, Bright Burning Stars tackles heavy themes like eating disorders, mental illness, suicide, and the cut-throat world of competitive ballet. As someone who has never been exposed to professional ballet, the dynamism of that world is fascinating. Small, now based in Pittsburgh, was born in Paris, studied at the Parisian ballet school Académie Chaptal, and then danced with ballet companies across the U.S. Her experience comes through in her writing, and Bright Burning Stars was inspired by the dancers from her childhood. However, while the book is a quick, thrilling read, the content is what would be expected about a school for young ballet dancers. With movies like Black Swan, the mentally and physically draining world of ballet is far from a mystery.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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CP PHOTOS: JARED MURPHY

Phil Ortmann

.MUSIC.

POP GOES THE SYNTH BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // JSNOWDEN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

OUNTRY MUSIC and Phil Ortmann’s

first full-length album, POP — an electronic, synth-soaked collection of songs about poppers — have more in common than meets the eye or nose. “When I started [writing the album], there was a risk of it just being sort of a breezy ‘let’s party tonight, let’s do pop-

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pers or something,’” says Ortmann, who releases music under the moniker Ultravapours. “And I tried to force some themes on it that didn’t really work. I ended up, in a lot of the songs, kind of treating poppers the way that a lot of old country musicians would treat alcohol, as like an attempt to escape regret,

pain, for a brief period of time, whether successfully or not.” A liquid chemical sold in a small bottle, poppers are historically linked to the LGBTQ+ club/rave scene. When inhaled, users feel an instant, euphoric head high. Effects include dizziness, warm sensations, tingling, and an


increased heart rate. Poppers are also used to aid in sexual acts. The chemical, often amyl nitrate, dilates the blood vessels and relaxes the anal sphincter. The high, however, is fleeting, only lasting a few seconds to minutes. “My friend texted me once as a joke and said, ‘You should make an album about different poppers brands,’” says Ortmann. “I took it as a joke, but also at the time I was reading Peter Hook’s memoir about New Order. So, I just went with it.” Because poppers are sold recreationally, they come marketed as video head cleaners, polish removers, or room deodorizers. This makes way for a plethora of poppers brands. Each of the songs found on POP — “Amsterdam,” “Flexxx,” “Locker Room,” “Hard Wave,” “Pig Sweat,” “Jungle Juice,” “Bolt,” and “Plain Brown” – is named after a different brand of popper. For the album, Ortmann tried every kind except Flexxx. “In a lot of cases it didn’t influence the song that much,” says Ortmann. “But in a couple cases, it certainly did.” Like with “Pig Sweat.” The track ends with the lyrics, “The pop was slow / the pop was long and smooth / and I’m living in its ghost.” Ortmann says those words were directly inspired by what that popper feels like — the high was long-lasting. Mostly, however, POP’s overall theme is regret and longing. When Ortmann started working on the album he was going through a breakup. Once he realized the theme that was emerging, Ortmann just went with

it. But while the album is, on the surface, about a drug, he doesn’t intend for POP to act as an advertisement for poppers in any way.

315656_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

5/15/19 8:17

“I hope at least lyrically speaking that [the theme] comes through,” says Ortmann. “It’s a little more nuanced than just go out, have fun, do poppers. That said, it’s far from an antipoppers album. When Merle Haggard or some country music star from 40 or 50 years ago talks about drowning their sorrows in whiskey or something, it’s just a story. It’s not an endorsement or saying it’s the wrong thing to do.” While POP was intended to be a one-off project, Ortmann realized that he enjoyed making electronic, synthpop dance music with poppers as the focal point. About five songs were cut from the album for length reasons, and he has many more written. POP is just the first of more popper-related tracks coming from Ultravapours.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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.LITERATURE.

PRIVATE HISTORY BY REGE BEHE CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

D

AVID MCCULLOUGH has won two Pulitzer Prizes and was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2006, the highest civilian award a U.S. citizen can receive. The Point Breeze native’s illustrious career is not a product of happenstance or fate, but the inspiration for his latest book, The Pioneers: The Heroic Story of the Settlers Who Brought the American Ideal West, (Simon & Shuster) is due to “immense good luck and accelerating curiosity,” says McCullough in a recent interview. During a speaking engagement at Ohio University a few years ago, McCullough wondered about the provenance of Cutler Hall on the campus. Finding out it was named after Manasseh Cutler, one of the founders of the university, led McCullough to Marietta, Ohio, where he discovered “one of the great collections of letters and diaries and unpublished memoirs that I have ever encountered in more than 50 years of writing books,” in the school’s library. Manasseh Cutler’s advocacy for the Great Northwest Ordinance — passed by Congress in 1787, prior to the election of George Washington as the country’s first president — led to the establishment of Ohio as the gateway to the west. The ordinance, which included an emphasis on education and a determination that the region would be free of

David McCullough

slavery, is now mostly forgotten, further whetting McCullough’s desire to write The Pioneers with the treasure trove of documents that illuminated the forgotten episode. “It wasn’t just the quantity of the collection, which numbers in the thousands, literally, but the quality of the writing,” says McCullough. “And, of course, that also means the quality of the thinking and their values were superbly delineated by their stories and writing that is so greatly in need in our time.” One of the disappointments for McCullough is the lack of writing from women of the era. The only pieces he could find were letters to family members,

Follow featured contributor Rege Behe on Twitter @RegeBehe_exPTR

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as it was considered “not seemly, not approved of, for women to complain. And they had so much to complain about,” McCullough says, noting the hardships most women had to endure as primary caretakers of children and the endless responsibilities of maintaining households. McCullough had better luck finding writing that drew a darker picture of the settlements. Notably, Charles Dickens — yes, the author of A Tale of Two Cities and Bleak House — and Frances Trollope (Domestic Manners of the Americans) were less than enamored of the settlers, and Americans, in general. The main characters in The Pioneers include Cutler and his son Ephraim, who

became a farmer, educator, judge, and politician who got up from his sickbed to cast the deciding vote that banned slavery from Ohio. There’s Rufus Putnam, a Revolutionary War general who was one of the founders of Marietta, the first established settlement along the banks of the Ohio River, and Joseph Barker, another early settler and home builder; and Samuel Hildreth, a physician whose many interests included science, history, and geology. McCullough, whose previous books include John Adams (winner of a Pulitzer Prize for biography in 2002), 1776, and The Johnstown Flood, his 1968 debut, uses an effective and simple literary device to illuminate the people he writes about. He allows his subjects to take center stage instead of trying to interpret their intentions. “I like to let them talk as much as possible,” he says. “I like to have them express in their words and in their way what they were feeling privately and publicly, and what the impact of their sufferings had on them. All of that. It’s all there. “People often say to me, ‘Are you working on a book?’ I say yes, but what I really feel like saying is `I’m working in a book.’ You get inside their lives, inside their times, inside their private thoughts and private aspirations and disappointments, and you become connected to them.”

Editor’s note: A number of historians and critics have accused The Pioneers of “romanticizing white settlement.” McCullough and his publisher are not addressing the criticism or giving comments on it at this time.


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CP PHOTO: TERENEH IDIA

Imani Jahaan

.FASHION.

CLOTHES MAKE ... BY TERENEH IDIA // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

NAME: Imani Jahaan WORK: Imani Jahaan Vintage Shop, imanijahaan.com SELF-DESCRIPTION: A Black creative making her way in Pittsburgh. I feel like I am on a global scale but happy to be serving the local community of Pittsburgh. WHAT ARE YOU WEARING TODAY? Today I gave you the trifecta. [Laughs] I gave you cheetah from the head to the toes! I am giving you a cheetah bodysuit, cheetah turtleneck, and a cheetah bathrobe that I am wearing as a duster! And then I come down to my shoes — I am wearing my Safari hype sneakers with cheetah socks! [Laughs] THE CHEETAH PRINT NIKE AIR MAX! Yes, the Safari Pack collab. I am loving

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prints, and I am loving them. So I am showing you today I am not afraid of anything or prints. [Laughs] ARE YOU WEARING ANYTHING THAT IS A SPECIAL GIFT TO YOURSELF? I think everything I am wearing is a special gift to myself. When I shop, I think of special events. I think of how I want to present myself in the world. So when I shop, I try to be super intentional. Even though I am getting things at a lower cost, it doesn’t mean, “Buy everything.” So I am thinking about outfits as I am shopping, and this morning I was able to throw this on with the grace of God. ARE YOU WEARING A GIFT FROM SOMEONE ELSE? This ring is an ankh ring. My grandmother

loved ankhs. So this was not from her, but it just screams “Anna Mae Wilson!” And she named me. She kind of gave birth to Imani Jahaan Vintage by taking us to swap meets and flea markets as a young kid, just being drug along. Now I am the one dragging my partner around. [Laughs] So it’s generational, what I am doing. The ankh is a symbol of the feminine and masculine energy coming together — divinity. Those are things that lead my moral compass. I am proud to wear it. HOW DO YOU GET ALL OF YOUR AMAZING VINTAGE FINDS? That is the question of the day. OK, I go where you don’t want to go. You don’t want to go to a small, dirty, uncleaned basement … digging and finding a treasure … I am going to less desirable

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152XX

places and bringing it to you, presenting it in a beautiful way. People ask why vintage is more expensive sometimes than thrift. It is our expertise, our travel time, it’s our dedication. We dig, we curate. … We bring it to you in a beautiful way, minus all of the other stuff. WHAT ARE YOU EXCITED ABOUT FOR LATE SPRING/SUMMER? I am excited about expanding, my partner and I, Darren Talent … We’re growing, we’re traveling. He is out of New York City, I am here in Pittsburgh. … We show love here and in New York. I am excited to do more pop-ups in New York. And just get our name out there. Do more styling clients. I am a stylist as well and a make-up artist. I like to do anything creative and make things beautiful.


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Empty Beings

.MUSIC.

DEAD AND PATHETIC

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BY EDWARD BANCHS // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

I

CELANDIC FJORDS DON’T usually figure into origin stories of bands in Pittsburgh. Yet, it was while Shani Banerjee was working on the island nation during a photography residency in 2015 that she received an email from drummer Dave Rosenstraus asking her to join a punk band back home in Pittsburgh. Rosenstraus — whom Banerjee knew from previous encounters with their respective bands —was working alongside guitarist Nick Leombruno on rough versions of early songs for what would become Empty Beings. Banerjee agreed, and Rosenstraus sent her a collection of “sparse sounding” music for a demo they wanted to record when she got home, which she felt was appropriate considering the landscape that surrounded her. “I wrote my parts on a fjord in Iceland, sang them into my shitty computer mic, and sent them to him until I could get back to the States to record,” says Banerjee. Four years later, filled out with bassist Adam Thomas, Empty Beings is a big part

of Pittsburgh’s punk community. With two releases — 2015’s Demo and 2016’s EP Confront the Living — Empty Beings is set to release its LP Dead and Pathetic in the coming months. Written over the course of 2018, the album represents a step forward from previous releases. “It’s more melodic. Sound-wise, it’s definitely different,” says Leombruno. Dead and Pathetic will be released through the upstart Pittsburgh-based label Play Alone Records. Label co-founder Aaron Grey says part of what drew him to Empty Beings was the way they incorporate post-punk into more formal, structural punk. The album’s new sound is a result of Leombruno’s push to step away from the “colder” side of post-punk, which he feels was growing stagnant. The warmer side, which invokes more sentiment and melody, allows Banerjee to shine through, adding that the music allowed her to push toward “more pop sensibility.” For Banerjee, writing lyrics has become the pathway for her reflect of her lived experience as a queer woman

EMPTYBEINGS.BANDCAMP.COM

of color in Pittsburgh — far away from the fjords of Iceland. Fans in the punk community don’t blink twice at her identity, Banerjee adds, noting that the local punk community is a safe haven for her, a place for her to be who she is without judgment. And, in part, this is what led her to the punk scene. Banerjee insists that while her lyrics are not solely centered around aspects of her identity, she has not shied away from the topic either: “being someone of color visibly you can’t really shy from that … but I do bring it up in some songs.” Explaining that while in previous musical endeavors she relied heavily on allegory, she has recently taken on an autobiographical approach to songwriting. Banerjee cites three songs on Dead and Pathetic — “Growing Boys,” “In Between,” and “Better Way”— as those that best reflect her personal experiences as a queer woman of color. “I think punk has always been a place to exercise extremes and exorcise a lot of doubt. … I’m by no means a mouthpiece or representative of a whole, but if people can connect to some aspect of what I’m doing and how I conduct myself physically, artistically, and intellectually, then I guess I consider it a positive push.”

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

105


CP ILLUSTRATION: JOSIE NORTON

.CULTURE.

EXTRA BAGGAGE BY HANNAH LYNN // HLYNN@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

T

HERE COMES A POINT in every child’s life when they realize that one M&M is way hotter than the other one. I’m obviously talking about the green M&M. Her tall white boots, her winged eyeliner, her suggestive pucker. She is designed to make you horny for candy-coated chocolate. Advertising teams tend to gender everything, whether it makes sense or not. In 2017, Schick razors ran an ad for a women’s razor that featured an anthropomorphic razor with arms and legs, and blades for a head. It also had boobs and a sculpted booty. The “Great Pierogy Race” began as mid-game entertainment for the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1999, sponsored by Mrs. T’s pierogies. The lineup originally featured Potato Pete, Sauerkraut Saul, and Cheese Chester. Jalapeno Hannah was added soon after. She remained the lone girl pierogi until 2017, when the Pirates introduced Pizza Penny. Hannah and Penny both have lipstick, mascara, earrings, and a purse. The male pierogies wear only baseball hats and sneakers (except Oliver, who wears a bowtie and glasses and Burt, who has a mustache).

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This is such a silly problem that it’s hardly even a problem at all. It’s meaningless, but it also might mean something. Why do the female pierogies carry purses, aside from “women be shoppin’”? What, theoretically, is in the purse? Does Penny need to touch-up her lipstick mid-run? Does Hannah carry pierogi tampons? Why do the pierogies have a gender in the first place? If the girl pierogies have additional accessories, couldn’t the boy pierogies have drawstring backpacks or whatever it is men use? Some of these questions might be answerable, but neither of the Pirates employees nor a pierogi runner I contacted for this story would respond to any request for comment. The easiest thing to do would be to ignore the pierogi purses, because, again, they are purses carried by a person in a pierogi outfit at a baseball game. But Hannah and Penny and their male pierogi peers exist in the context of a larger debate about mascots and advertising. According to the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, 25.4 percent of female mascots “are presented as gender stereotypes” (compared to 15.9 percent of male mascots). They also note


CP PHOTO: LUKE THOR TRAVIS

that male mascots outnumber female mascots two-to-one. Because I couldn’t decipher my own thoughts about the pierogi purses, I made a Twitter poll soliciting opinions — an informal but still useful way to gauge the situation. “Do you care about the purses?” I asked. Of the 366 people who voted, 41 percent said “the purses are silly,” 11 percent said “the purses are good,” and 48 percent said “couldn’t care less.”

human woman would be if she had to run with a purse. @Huffakingit replied saying “the purses aren’t bad per se, but the others should have purses too,” calling for “tote bag boy representation.” At its most basic, a purse serves no different purpose than the deep pockets so generously provided to men’s pants and jackets, but it’s used as a signifier to make women frivolous and needy for wanting to carry around a wallet, keys, makeup, tampons, etc. (By contrast,

purses as another dumb manifestation of gender, but when I really think about it, it makes me sad to picture some board room full of Pirates employees drafting an image of the new lady pierogi, laughing as they draw her lipstick. A 2010 article in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette mentioned that there were women runners in the past but none that season. I’d guess there are none this season either (though, again, no one would confirm this).

“IT FEELS LIKE THEY GAVE THE PIEROGIES PURSES AND JEWELRY BECAUSE IT’S HOW UNPREPARED THEY IMAGINE WOMEN TO BE TO TAKE ON ANY SPORT.” Several people replied saying they support the purses because they are sometimes used as weapons against the other pierogies, giving the girls an advantage. Sometimes the pierogies are even declared a winner when the purse crosses the finish line before their pierogi body. But as @PghAdventurer pointed out, the accessories make the pierogies “less aerodynamic.” They’re weighed down by the purses, just like a real

men with purses or any kind of bag are frequently used as easy punchlines in movies, TV shows, and ads — shorthand for not being masculine.) It feels like they gave the pierogies purses and jewelry because it’s how unprepared they imagine women to be to take on any sport. It feels like Hannah and Penny are a small byproduct of how women aren’t taken seriously in athletics. I mostly laugh off the pierogies’

I don’t know if there is a solution to this non-problem. My nightmare is that someone reads this and starts the hashtag #BanThePurses. I don’t think getting rid of the purses would solve any gender inequalities or mistreatment of women in professional sports. I just think if I went to a game and saw Hannah and Penny’s outfits when I was a young girl playing softball, it would’ve made me feel small.

Follow staff writer Hannah Lynn on Twitter @hanfranny PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 22-29, 2019

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QUIET CHANGE

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // WWW.BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

LIVE WEDNESDAYS IN ACROSS 1. Pork sandwich from the Golden Arches 6. Ne plus ___ 11. “A date which will live in infamy” speaker, briefly 14. Amorous text 15. It means nothing to the Pope 16. Rustic field 17. Jimmy Garoppolo, for short 18. Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally and Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge, e.g. 20. Invoice no. 21. Daughter of Mnemosyne 23. Each 24. James Holzhauer, famously 28. Ploy 29. Lobe’s home 30. “Chernobyl” channel 33. ___ buco 36. Better than fine 38. “Au contraire, mon frere” 40. Ceiling attachment 41. Dispensary unit 42. Thought up 44. Ren Faire beverage 45. Rocky ridge 46. Primus guitarist LaLonde 47. Spock crewmate

50. Totally unacceptable 56. “Didn’t catch that” 58. Flooded 59. Totally chill 60. Bribe, and a hint to certain letters in the first words of the theme answers 63. Mediterranean tourist destination 65. Half-and-half? 66. Move obliquely 67. Judge’s prop 68. Green lights 69. Read the riot act 70. Experiment with mushrooms?

DOWN 1. Singer Nicki 2. Environment 3. Reach, as a total 4. “___ seen the future” 5. News room 6. Like a bed sty 7. Full of fluff 8. Led Zeppelin song with a nautical name 9. Edge 10. Acapulco greeting 11. Dumb way to call 12. Art ___ 13. Laryngitis tone 19. Second Indochina War theater, for short 22. Some Xing crossers 25. Fork part

26. Western omelet meat 27. Florentine flower 31. ___ Raton 32. Had too much, briefly 33. Passing words 34. It’s big in Japan 35. Settings in some science fiction 36. Allowance provider 37. Make a mess of 39. Greasy 40. Abba ballad with a male’s name 43. New beginning? 47. Stuck around 48. “I’m thinking” sounds

49. University of Bethlehem 51. Biblical verb ending 52. Fixate (on) 53. Still with us 54. Does nothing 55. Hold in high regard 56. “This is THE BEST!” 57. Studmuffin 61. Ed’s. pile 62. Texter’s letters that phonetically show sudden understanding 64. Cricket equipment

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PEEPSHOW A sex and social justice column BY JESSIE SAGE // PEEPSHOWCAST@GMAIL.COM

F

OR A TIME, social media promised

to be an open space that would allow for diverse representations of both bodies and ideas — a digital arena where marginalized folks could build platforms, audiences, and communities. Today, however, regulations are tightening across social media platforms, narrowing these possibilities and pushing content creators who do not fall into very specific norms further to the margins. One group being affected is fat people. This week, I asked fat models, activists, and bloggers to share their stories about how increasing regulation on social media — Instagram, in particular — is impacting their lives. A common problem fat people face on the platform is aggressive overpolicing and deletion of their posts. Model Lyla Layne says that she has had several of her pictures deleted from Instagram despite the fact that they didn’t violate any Terms of Service. “No nudity, nothing advertising illegal sex work, just some pretty modest lingerie and some booty,” she says. This is not unique to her. Fat activist and plus-size fashion model who is going by MLM says, “Myself and so many of my plus size blogger friends have experienced censorship and image deletion while we are following all the terms of service.” It is not just individual pictures that

are being taken down. Plus size model and photographer Carina Shero has had her Instagram account completely deleted seven times and deactivated twice. She says, “On Instagram I would get to 60k and 110k and then they would delete me.” Even when fat models’ accounts or content are not deleted, they still have concerns that it is being made invisible to other people — a phenomenon sometimes referred to as a “shadowban.” Roxi Adore explains, “My Instagram used to grow at a large rate, usually several thousand new followers a week, but now it’s stagnant.” It’s not entirely clear what mechanisms are responsible for the

increased policing of fat bodies, whether it’s algorithms, real people reviewing posts for the company, or other users reporting posts. Sex worker, model, and artist Ramona Flour points out that the method by which this censorship happens is opaque. “We can only speculate as to whether it is Instagram itself or user submission because if users see something they don’t like they can report it,” says Flour. Adore sees these things as connected. “Unfortunately, most of our society doesn’t want to see fat people in a positive light,” says Adore. “Thus, companies like Facebook/Instagram want to feed their mainstream crowd.”

While the models and influencers are being harmed in very direct ways by having their platforms shut down or pushed to the margins, this has broader implications. When fat bodies are shown in a sensual light, when they are normalized, fat people can more easily accept and love their own bodies. Flour comments, “When I was camming I got so many love letters from couples [who told me] that it is really hard seeing these tiny bodies everywhere.” “Everything I do is a mission to transform representations of fat bodies,” says Shero. The internet has created a space where a lot of people have managed to be successful influencers. But as platforms have gotten into the business of increasingly regulating content, one of the consequences is that fat bodies are being overly policed. If Instagram is doing this with the belief that this is what users want, they are mistaken. As Pittsburgh-based plus-size figurative artist Ashley Ramos points out, “Marginalized bodies cannot and will not be erased no matter how hard these platforms try. The demand for representations is greater than any algorithm [that erases them].” Let’s just hope she is right and that we are able to work around these systems before we lose the progress that we have made in terms of positive representations of fat bodies.

JESSIE SAGE IS CO-HOST OF THE PEEPSHOW PODCAST AT PEEPSHOWPODCAST.COM. HER COLUMN PEEPSHOW IS EXCLUSIVE TO PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER. FOLLOW HER ON TWITTER @PEEP_CAST. HAVE A SEX QUESTION YOU’RE TOO AFRAID TO ASK? ASK JESSIE! EMAIL INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM. QUESTIONS MAY BE CONSIDERED FOR AN UPCOMING COLUMN.

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

MAY 22, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly, featuring our Summer Guide Pullout.

MAY 22, 2019 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly, featuring our Summer Guide Pullout.