May 18, 2022 - Pittsburgh City Paper

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MAY 18-25, 2022 VOLUME 31 + ISSUE 20 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Director of Advertising RACHEL WINNER-EBERHARDT Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD A&E Editor AMANDA WALTZ News Reporter JORDANA ROSENFELD Arts & Culture Writer DANI JANAE Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Editorial Designer LUCY CHEN Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Digital Editorial Coordinator HANNAH KINNEY-KOBRE Marketing + Sponsorships Manager ZACK DURKIN Sales Representatives OWEN GABBEY, MARIA STILLITANO Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, NATALIE BENCIVENGA, MIKE CANTON, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA Interns LADIMIR GARCIA, DONTAE WASHINGTON National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

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A rally and march to defend abortion rights takes place from the City County Building through the streets of Downtown Pittsburgh on Sat., May 14.

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NEWS

MARBLE MADNESS BY JORDANA ROSENFELD // JORDANA@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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AST WEEK at Phillips K-5 on Pittsburgh’s South Side, intrepid young mibsters approached a raised circu* 0 .* 2$-0+ 5'2& ʉ'12$3*1 -$ + 0 *#1 They crouched down to examine the marbles scattered within the ring, looking for which ones might be easiest to knock out of the circle. They compared shooters, the marbles used to push the other marbles around, "+'0',% 2&#'0 "'g#0#,2 !-*-01 ," sizes, getting ready for that day’s installment of the tournament.

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CP PHOTOS: JARED WICKERHAM

Anna Marie LaGamba and Dan LaGamba teach kids how to play marbles at Phillips Elementary School in the South Side on Wed., May 11.

It’s not spring in Allegheny County until the mibsters, or marbles players, appear. Allegheny County is a “marbles hotbed,” boasting an almost 50-year-old annual marbles program for kids 14 and under with a many-generation family legacy that goes along with it. “Around here, brothers teach brothers, cousins teach cousins, and, when they get old enough, they teach their kids,” says Ed Ricci, whose grandfather, Walt Lease, started the marbles program in the 1950s at Pittsburgh Citiparks. “He was a math teacher who played pool. He applied the physics of pool to marbles and came up with some of the styles of shooting we have today.” Beginning late March or early April each year, Allegheny County schedules week-long marbles tournaments all over the region, where kids aged 14 and under get to learn the game and compete for a spot in the county championship, which will take place from Thu., May 19 to Sat., May 21 in the courtyard of the Allegheny County Courthouse. Marbles is an individual game of skill that requires competing players to knock the most marbles out of a ring. The mibsters launch a marble, called the shooter, into 13 marbles already in the center of the circle. Whoever knocks the most marbles out is the winner. “I’ve been shooting marbles all of my life,” Ricci says. “My grandfather ran the city league in the ’50s, ’60s, and ’70s, so I grew up with marbles.”

Lease passed on his love of the game to each subsequent generation of his family, and he and his family have brought marbles to hundreds of kids in Allegheny County. Ed’s daughter, Amber Ricci, was the National Marble Tournament champion in 2008 at age 12. Their younger daughter, Sierra, won at nationals in 2017. Ed met his wife, Maureen Ricci, who does most of the organizing for the county marble programs, at the national competition in Wildwood, N.J., and his older sister, Denise Ricci, was the national runner-up in 1978.

ALLEGHENY COUNTY MARBLES TOURNAMENT Times vary. Thu., May 19-Sat., May 21. Allegheny County Courthouse Courtyard. 436 Grant St., Downtown. tinyurl.com/ACMarbles

Some of the Riccis’ marbles memorabilia includes the gauge Walt used to measure marbles and The Great American Marble Book, published in 1973 and held together by duct tape, as well as records of the national marble champions since 1922. In 1974, Citiparks had to cut the marbles program for budget reasons, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, and Lease was savvy enough to ask the !-3,27 2- 2 )# 2&# .0-%0 + -g 2&# !'27 1 hands. The county then hired his daughter and Ed’s mother, Caroline Lease (now Ricci), to run the program. Allegheny County’s marbles program has produced 33 national champions

since the tournament started in 1922, according to TribLive, and 14 since 2004. The Associated Press reports that Allegheny County is home to more national marbles champions than any other part of the country. But why Al legheny County has produced so many national marbles champions, no one really knows. Anne Madarasz, chief historian and director of the Western Pennsylvania Sports Museum at the Senator John Heinz History Center, compares Pittsburgh’s national success in marbles to other sports in which Pittsburgh teams habitually thrive, such as football and ice hockey. “After the national championships began in 1922, Allegheny County people started using coaching to develop champions,” Madarasz told TribLive in 2013. Ricci attributes some of the program’s success in the county to strong support from the parks department and Allegheny County Executive Rich Fitzgerald. “We’re lucky to have the sponsor that we have with the county parks and Rich Fitzgerald. A lot of areas don’t have that kind of support,” Ricci says. “It gives us a little bit of an advantage.” The marbles program is also free for participants, and all local winners from the county competition will head to the 99th National Marbles Tournament in Wildwood in June, with the winner taking home a $2,000 college scholarship, a marble watch, trophy, and plaque. Along with serious bragging rights. s

Follow news reporter Jordana Rosenfeld on Twitter @rosenfeldjb

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 11 - 18, 2022

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FASHION

CLOTHES MAKE ... MERYL FRANZOS BY TERENEH IDIA CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

How would you define your style? I’ve been trying to pin it down so it falls neatly into a definitive category for years, but that hasn’t worked. I’m a chameleon who leans toward edgy, bold, rock ’n’ roll, and countercultural stuff. Who are your style inspirations? Kate Moss, Kristen McMenamy, Melanie Kobayashi of Bag and a Beret, Carla Rockmore, @KarenBritChick, Gwen Stefani, Peggy Guggenheim, Vivienne Westwood, @Zadijo (I think she’s a French rockstar’s wife, she’s so cool it hurts), Victorian Coke, Justin Gossman, Lenny Kravitz. How has your style evolved through the years? It used to be very scattershot. My closet was bursting with cool, but disparate vintage items that had limited wearability because I didn’t have a good base of unifying basics. I’ve rectified that and further limited myself to certain flattering cuts (no more low-rise bottoms for me), and a limited color palette. If it’s not black, white, tan, ballet pink, red, neon, Calder orange, denim blue, etc., I don’t buy it. My style has become much more focused, striking, and versatile as a result of the limitations. Do you have a favorite designer? Who are they and what do you like about them? Iris Van Herpen is a sculptural genius. Her dresses are feats of engineering, but also manage to evoke a macabre sense of falling into a museum’s specimen cabinet. On the less fantastical side, I adore Halston’s drapey ’70s luxe designs, and anything Hedi Slimane touches oozes this louche rock ’n’ roll coolness that I strive for. How were you introduced to Iris Van Herpen’s designs? I was introduced to her designs through the Carnegie Museum of Art. They had an

Meryl Franzos Title

(SHE/HER)

Stylish woman about town

Job/work Writer, "nonprofit whisperer" Websites merylahfranzos.com, instagram.com/theicecreamsocialist

CP PHOTO: TERENEH IDIA

Meryl Franzos

exhibit of her work several years ago and my jaw was on the floor. I’ve been following her career ever since. When we met up today, we talked about going out, places we miss. What do you feel the overall going out and getting dressed up scene is like in Pittsburgh? I think a lot of us are ready to be out and peeping other cool people, but I’m not part of the optimistic majority playing pretend that it’s all over and behind us. Numbers are up again and climbing. If I go out, I’ll be that pariah still wearing a mask. Tell me about what you’re wearing today. I love it and love the color nod to the folks working all around us at Hazelwood Green. High visibility green! Everything I’m wearing today is secondhand or vintage. The blouse and skirt I got

from thredUP. The medical back brace is vintage and bought off Etsy — it’s one of my favorite, off-kilter pieces to weave into outfits. My bag is by Danse Lente and my lucite heels are Cult Gaia — both scored on The RealReal. My chandelier earrings belonged to my mother-in-law, and my square sterling ring and plastic level ring were bought at Dargate years ago. Do you have a gift to yourself that you wear often? My shoes are always my gift to myself. Summer is coming. What are you looking forward to in terms of style, activities, events? Since hybrid work has become de rigueur, I’ve gotten to explore my personal summer style outside of the office more, which is fun. As a result, denim has

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @TerenehIdia

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probably doubled in my closet. Real estate season is in full swing during the spring and summer; my husband and I have been looking for a country cottage to invest in as a getaway with our dogs, family, and friends. I would love for us to find something this year and get to enjoy it. If you could pick an outfit you’ve seen, either historic or something fresh off the runway, what would it be, why, and where would you wear it? I’m haunted by a 20-year-old memory of a middle-aged Joan Jett wearing a black pin-striped suit, that upon closer inspection, the pin stripes were small, fine metal zippers. It was the most exquisite punk suit I’d ever seen, and I can’t for the life of me find that picture or that suit on the internet anywhere. I would wear the heck out of that everywhere.


MUSIC

SOULSHOWMIKE'S ALBUM PICKS Robert Glasper's Black Radio III BY MIKE CANTON // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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HIS MONTH of Soulshowmike’s Album Picks revives the gradual transition to, or coexistence of, The Soul Pod, my podcast exploring conversations with musicians and music lovers. Pittsburgh City Paper has hosted several soft launch episodes over the past year, and we look forward to building this multimedia presence together. First, the meat and potatoes: Robert Glasper’s Black Radio III is a tasty and familiar meal, with Glasper’s trademark ivory tickling underneath the voices of both veteran and new members of the guest cast. An early single with H.E.R. and Meshell Ndegeocello hinted at the new personnel. I must admit that Gregory Porter and Esperanza Spalding were

a total surprise, proving that Glasper’s calling card is as strong as ever. “Black Superhero,” featuring Killer Mike, BJ the Chicago Kid, and Big K.R.I.T, is thick and nasty. “Forever,” with India Arie and PJ Morton, is Wonder-esque. Least favorite is the cover of Tears For Fears’ “Everybody Wants To Rule The World.” Black Radio I excelled with its renditions of Bowie and Nirvana, and I just can’t get past them. Now about The Soul Pod … With the outdoor festival season spooling up quickly, I collaborated with friends and event producers Shelley Johannson, of Flood City Music Festival, and Amy Constantine, of Dormont Arts, to present tips on musician success in live

Mike Canton on The Soul Show

performances. This month’s edition of The Soul Pod is a primer worthy of any artist’s time. We focus on promotional material communications. Check out our conversation online at pghcitypaper.com, and come back next month for more.

Mike Canton is the longtime host and producer of The Soul Show on WYEP 91.3FM. He recently launched a syndicated edition of the program, now airing in four markets. Both are produced in his Electric Basement Studios. Canton is also a Pittsburgh-area voice artist.

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CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Chariot Fade members Jonathan Chamberlain, Jesse Ley, and Stephen Gallo

MUSIC

CHARIOT UNFADING BY JORDAN SNOWDEN // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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T’S MARCH 7, 2020, and Pittsburgh psychedelic pop group Chariot Fade is getting ready to open for popular indie band of Montreal at Mr. Smalls Theatre. Chariot Fade — made up of Jesse Ley, Jonathan Chamberlain, and Stephen Gallo — has heard rumblings about some possible new virus, but it’s not something that’s causing them to worry. They’re just getting started. They released their first two singles, “Spotless Century” and “Witness To A Lover,” the previous fall and have a plan, an objective to be deliberate with their approach to live performances. In addition to opening for of Montreal, the band also previously opened for alt/indie group Yip Deceiver.

“The goal was to be very judicious about what we wanted to take on,” says keyboardist and sampler Ley. Little did they know, they wouldn’t even be given a choice.

SOUND SERIES:

JENS LEKMAN with special guest CHARIOT FADE 8 p.m. Wed., May 18. The Andy Warhol Museum. 117 Sandusky St., North Side. $20-25. warhol.org.

Fast forward to 2022, and Chariot Fade is preparing for its first live show in over two years. The band is opening for Swedish musician Jens Lekman at The Andy Warhol

Museum on Wed., May 18, an opportunity for Chariot Fade to reintroduce themselves and one that Ley set up himself when he noticed Lekman had a tour gap between Chicago and Philadelphia. “I just sort of sent him a message — we had met a couple of times very briefly, but he probably didn’t know who I was at all,” says Ley. He asked if Lekman would be interested in playing in Pittsburgh, and Lekman said yes. “This is special in a lot of ways, having taken a more proactive approach of bringing in an artist that we love, which was a very satisfying thing to see that happen. We’re really excited about the opportunity to get back on stage and perform.”


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Derek White

PHOTO: BRYAN PARKER

Lukas Truckenbrod

“JUST SEEING THESE TWO DUDES ELEVATE THE MATERIAL AND BRING IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL HAS BEEN INCREDIBLE.” An opportunity to perform actually arose last year when Ley received a message from of Montreal’s tour manager, Eric Carter. The band was setting out on tour in the fall and they wanted Chariot Fade to open for them again. “It was like somebody called time out after a year and a half, and we just picked up right where we left off,” says Ley. “What a perfect return … it just made sense. We had the show on the books; it was set for November 2021, then Omicron or Delta? One of the variants was on the loose, and they canceled their whole tour.” But maybe it wasn’t meant to be because now, Chariot Fade, who had empty bass and drum spots, has finalized their lineup. Now joining Ley, Chamberlain on guitar and keyboard, and Gallo on guitar, is Mystic Seers’ multiinstrumentalist Derek White on drums and Lukas Truckenbrod of the psych-rock band Sluggs playing bass.

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“These two ridiculous heavy hitters have joined the lineup, and every practice has been so inspiring,” says Ley. “Just seeing these two dudes elevate the material and bring it to the next level has been incredible.” This fully-formed, enhanced version of Chariot Fade will be debuting two brand new songs during their upcoming performance. One of the tracks is fittingly inspired by Lekman. It’s a samplebased, groovy pop tune that fits in with the musical styling that made Lekman famous. The other, Ley says, is a highenergy rocker. One of the songs will most likely be released as a single, while one is set to be part of Chariot Fade’s debut album, which should be dropping this fall. So if you want to hear what Chariot Fade has been up to the past few years, your one chance before the album release is at their forthcoming show.

Follow featured contributor Jordan Snowden on Twitter @snowden_jordan

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PHOTO: TARA ANTILL

Rehearsals for DEMASKUS Theater Collective's production of Song from the Uproar: The Lives and Deaths of Isabelle Eberhardt

OPERA

HEAR ME UPROAR BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

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ONG FROM THE UPROAR: The Lives and Deaths of Isabelle Eberhardt will mark a few firsts for the Pittsburgh-based DEMASKUS Theater Collective. Besides being the first opera produced by DEMASKUS, it will also be the first time a Black woman will take on the lead role with the casting of Amanda Van Story. The chamber opera, staging Sat., May 21 at the August Wilson African American Cultural Center, presents a musical take on the extraordinary real life of a Swiss explorer and writer, who, over the course of her tragically short life, defied conventions and carved out her own path. This particular production will also showcase the various incredible women of color working in Pittsburgh, not only in opera but in art, fashion, music, and more. It will also serve as the premiere work from the August Wilson Center’s Build, Utilize, Inform, Lead, and Develop — or B.U.I.L.D. — residency, a program launched in 2021 to support Pittsburghbased emerging artists of color. For DEMASKUS founder and executive producer, Shaunda McDill, the connection to Song from the Uproar goes way back. McDill remembers bumping into fellow Yale School of Drama graduate Gia

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Forakis, who was directing the show for its 2012 premiere at The Kitchen in New York City. Years later, McDill and DEMASKUS received a “blessing” from the opera’s composer, Missy Mazzoli, to put their own spin on it, including casting both a Black and Latina woman (Zuly Inirio of the Afro-Latinx Song and Opera Project) in the role of a traditionally white Swedish woman.

SONG FROM THE UPROAR: The Lives and Deaths of Isabelle Eberhardt 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. Sat., May 21. August Wilson African American Cultural Center. 980 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $32.25. awaacc.org

“She gave us carte blanche to put our spin on our Isabelle and what the story should look like,” says McDill, adding that Mazzoli has always envisioned the show as something creators and audiences “would embrace in their own way.” The show draws from the salvaged journals of Eberhardt, who lived during the late 1800s and early 1900s, dressing as a man and publishing short stories under a male pseudonym. Eberhardt moved to

French-occupied Algeria in 1897, converted to Islam, joined a Sufi order, and, according to a highly romantic description, “roamed the desert on horseback, and fell in love with an Algerian soldier.” Viewed as a spy by the French administration, she survived an attempted assassination, as well as “a failed suicide pact” with her lover, before drowning in a desert flash flood at age 27. A statement says the production "looks at how universal Isabelle’s story is to any woman who wants to live as her authentic self while facing the realities of the constraints placed on her by society.” McDill sees Song for the Uproar as coming at “an amazing moment in time” when women’s rights are under attack, namely by the threat of the U.S. Supreme Court overturning the landmark abortion rights law Roe v. Wade. She also believes the production will help “highlight inequity” in an industry that overlooks contributions by women, particularly women of color. The representation does not stop at Van Story, as DEMASKUS recruited a long list of local Black women creators. This includes celebrated artist Alisha B. Wormsley as the director of production photography and video design,


curator and FashionAFRICANA founder Demeatria Boccella as the costume designer, and recording artist INEZ, among many others. McDill says that, in order to be truly equitable, DEMASKUS also had to make sure not to “replicate the offenses” usually perpetrated against women in creative industries. She points out that Van Story recently gave birth, and wanted the chance to perform while still recovering. Instead of dropping out, Van Story decided to take on the evening program, while her understudy, Inirio, will perform during the 2 p.m. matinee. “We’re not going to be punitive because you’re bringing life into the world,” says McDill. “[W]hat’s most important is that she has the opportunity in her life to fulfill something that she’s wanted to do as a Black woman in opera.” McDill says part of breaking down barriers also includes giving opportunities to performers who may not otherwise have access to audiences. In addition to the one-act opera, the evening will feature the Pittsburgh-based Kassia Ensemble performing a work inspired by its namesake, the 9th-century Byzantine abbess, poet, and hymnographer regarded as the

PHOTO: LOUIS DAVID/PUBLIC DOMAIN

PHOTO: COURTESY OF AUGUST WILSON CULTURAL CENTER

Isabelle Eberhardt

Amanda Van Story

only woman whose hymns are included in the Eastern Orthodox liturgy. A reception for the show on Thu., May 19 will feature a one-night-only multimedia performance of “Free Within Ourselves: Phenomenal Women’’ by Duquesne University graduate student, Candace Burgess, which will showcase selected vocal works of Maud Cuney Hare and Cynthia Cozette Lee.” McDill believes that, while pointing out the lack of representation in the industry is important, fighting to stage shows like Song from the Uproar does more to demonstrate why having a variety of voices only makes the region’s arts scene stronger. “It’s an amazing opportunity to showcase what people haven’t seen, and sometimes showing you what you haven’t seen is better than condemning the people who don’t show you,” says McDill. She also stresses the importance of programs like B.U.I.L.D. as “giving artists a place to experiment and to try new things, and to challenge themselves.” “I think something exceptional is about to happen, and I just would love for people to have to be able to witness it,” says McDill. •

Follow a&e editor Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 11 - 18, 2022

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SEVEN DAYS IN PITTSBURGH

IRL / IN REAL LIFE EVENT VIRTUAL / STREAMING OR ONLINE-ONLY EVENT HYBRID / MIX OF IN REAL LIFE AND ONLINE EVENT

PHOTO: JOHN ALTDORFER

^ Hand to Hand by Squonk Opera

THU., MAY 19 ART • IRL The Associated Artists of Pittsburgh continues its Performance Series with local artist and curator Tara Fay. The AAP website says Fay will present a “durational performance,” during which she will read from the 2019 “Pittsburgh’s Inequality Across Gender and Race” report while balancing a steel beam across her shoulders. According to Fay, “This act of labor and endurance is a reference to what Black women in this city have to fight against every day; the marginalization, racism, lack of opportunities, and discrimination.” 6 p.m. 100 43rd St., Unit 107, Lawrenceville. Free. aapgh.org/performance-series

FRI., MAY 20 THEATER • IRL Pittsburgh Playwrights Theatre Company returns to the stage with the local premiere of The Double V at the Trust Arts Education Center. Written by Carole Eglash-Kosoff and directed by Mani Bahia, the story promises to take

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audiences back to 1942, when “AfricanAmerican soldiers fought for our country while struggling for equality at home,” according to a statement. The show will also highlight how the Pittsburgh Courier, one of the nation’s leading Black newspapers, played a crucial role in the history of the Double V campaign, which involved flashing double peace signs for victory not only over “aggression, slavery, and tyranny,” but also “for a victory over racial inequality” in the United States. 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 29. 805 Liberty Ave. Fourth floor, Downtown. $20-27.50. pghplaywrights.org

COMEDY • IRL

MUSIC • IRL

THEATER • IRL

Get ready for a robust, two-day schedule of live music, art, and more spread across various venues when the Millvale Music Festival returns. The popular event will showcase over 300 acts representing a wide array of genres at Millvale-based spaces like Mr. Smalls Theatre, Whisper Nest, Gap Park, Curated Flame, and many more. There will also be comedians, poets, and spoken word artists, as well as work by a long list of local visual artists. Showtimes vary. Continues on Sat., May 21. Multiple locations, Millvale. Free. millvalemusic.org

Steel City Improv Theater wants you to enjoy a night of comedy when it presents The Draft. The monthly show creates teams from a mix of Steel City students, veterans, and teachers, giving newbies a chance to perform alongside experienced improv performers. Show up to support these emerging comedians and get ready to laugh. 8-9 p.m. 5950 Ellsworth Ave., Shadyside. $10. steelcityimprov.com

SAT., MAY 21 Front Porch Theatricals continues its 10th anniversary season with the musical A Man of No Importance. Directed by Robyne Parrish at the New Hazlett Theater, the play follows the leader of an amateur theater group in 1960s Dublin as he tries to stage a version of Oscar Wilde’s play Salome at his church, despite opposition from church authorities. As he struggles to put on the production, he also confides in an imagined Wilde over a secret regarding his own sexuality. The show, which was adapted into a 1994 film starring Robert Finney, is described by Front Porch as a

“tender and timely story of family, friendship, and acceptance that teaches us that it really is a wonderful thing to ‘love who you love.’” 8 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 29. 6 Allegheny Square East, North Side. $23-38. frontporchpgh.com

KIDS • IRL The kids have been cooped for far too long. Get them outside and having fun when Schenley Plaza participates in National Kids to Parks Day. Presented by Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, the day will include a number of free activities for children and their families, including a storyboard and a special performance of the Squonk Opera production Hand to Hand, which encourages audiences to interact with two giant hands. The PNC Carousel will also be open. The event is part of a national day of outdoor play celebrated on the third Saturday in May. 12-5 p.m. 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland. Free. pittsburghparks.org

SUN., MAY 22 EVENT • IRL Pittsburgh Anglophiles should don their most opulent hat and get ready for sipping


PHOTO: COURTESY OF IFC FILMS

^ Happening at Harris Theater

when Britsburgh presents a Victorian Tea to celebrate the platinum jubilee of Queen Elizabeth II. Taking place at the Omni William Penn Hotel, the event will include a traditional authentic British afternoon tea complete with finger sandwiches, pastries, scones, sliced fruit, and berries. There will also be a presentation by Stephen Shandor described as “comparing and contrasting the reigns of the United Kingdom’s two longestserving monarchs,” Queen Elizabeth II and Queen Victoria. 2:30-4 p.m. 530 William Penn Place, Downtown. $58. britsburgh.com

THEATER • IRL Little Lake Theatre Company brings a Tony Award-winning play to the stage with a production of The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-time. Based on the best-selling 2003 novel by Mark Haddon, the story follows Christopher, a British teen described as being “exceptional at mathematics but ill-equipped to interpret everyday life.” After being accused of killing his neighbor’s dog, he tries to solve a mystery that “takes him on a thrilling journey that upturns his world.” 2 p.m. Continues through Sun., May 29. 500 Lakeside Drive South, Canonsburg. $15-25. littlelake.org/curiousincident

MON., MAY 23 ART • IRL See a number of innovative sculptures at James Gallery during the space’s latest exhibition reFORMED. A statement describes the show as strongly emphasizing “contrasts — in material, process, form, and emotional response,” showcasing works by local and national sculptors. Expect to see

pieces incorporating a range of materials, from aluminum, steel, wood, and marble, to reclaimed book paper and woven fiber. Continues through June 24. 413 S. Main St., West End. Free. jamesgallery.net

TUE., MAY 24 MUSIC • IRL Settle in for a night of live jazz when the Backstage Bar at Theater Square welcomes E². The performance marks the JazzLive debut of the group, led by Roby “Supersax” Edwards on saxophone and Brian Edwards on drums, and featuring keyboardist Michael Bernabe, bassist Eli Naragon, and vocalist Carolyn Basilia. Expect music described as an eclectic mix of jazz, jazz-fusion, experimental, soul, funk, and electronica. 5 p.m. 655 Penn Ave., Downtown. Free. trustarts.org

WED., MAY 25 FILM • IRL Harris Theater will screen Happening, a new French drama that won the Golden Lion award at the 2021 Venice Film Festival. Helmed by writer/director Audrey Diwan, and adapted from prizewinning author Annie Ernaux’s semiautobiographical novel, the film follows Anne, a bright young student in 1963 France who must make some risky, lifealtering decisions when her future is threatened by an unwanted pregnancy. 5:30 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Continues through Thu., June 2. 809 Liberty Ave., Downtown. $11. trustarts.org PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 11 - 18, 2022

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46. Nasty look 48. Trench tool 49. Bird with a weak and wobbly flight 51. Core muscles 52. College GameDay channel 53. Sideways movement between the jungle gym and the swings? 57. Whatever author Gore meant to say? 58. City known for beignets, for short 59. Latin lover’s phrase 60. Sault ___ Marie 61. Annoying pest

DOWN 1. Meat in an 8-Down 2. Allies of the Cheyenne 3. Warhead unit 4. That je ne sais quoi of the cleaning staff? 5. Government org. turning 75 this year 6. Costs of getting with the Times 7. Cuffe Owens vis-a-vis Joe Biden 8. Italian ___ (Subway sandwich) 9. Storyteller’s stuff 10. Monotonic 11. Very consequential 12. Code for Australia’s Kingsford Smith Airport

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER MAY 11 - 18, 2022

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