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might print dark enough, but ifIDIA not, add drop shadow header info -WORLD aa INSIDE: COLUMNIST TERENEH ENVISIONS A to DIFFERENT PITTSBURGH’S ALTERNATIVE FOR NEWS, ARTS + ENTERTAINMENT SINCE 1991

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APRIL 21-28, 2021

Pittsburgh musician

Konscious Kel focuses on the positive

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BY KAYCEE ORWIG

4 Smithfield Street, Suite 1210 Pittsburgh, PA 15222 412.685.9009 E-MAIL info@pghcitypaper.com

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APRIL 21-28, 2021 VOLUME 30 + ISSUE 16 Editor-In-Chief LISA CUNNINGHAM Director of Advertising JASMINE HUGHES Director of Operations KEVIN SHEPHERD News Editor RYAN DETO Senior Writer AMANDA WALTZ Staff Writers DANI JANAE, KIMBERLY ROONEY 냖㵸蔻 Photographer/Videographer JARED WICKERHAM Art Director ABBIE ADAMS Graphic Designer JEFF SCHRECKENGOST Digital Marketing Coordinator DARYA KHARABI Sales Representatives ZACK DURKIN, OWEN GABBEY, NICKI MULVIHILL Circulation Manager JEFF ENGBARTH Featured Contributors REGE BEHE, MIKE CANTON, LYNN CULLEN, TERENEH IDIA, CHARLES ROSENBLUM Interns COLLEEN HAMMOND, KAYCEE ORWIG National Advertising Representative VMG ADVERTISING 1.888.278.9866 OR 1.212.475.2529 Publisher EAGLE MEDIA CORP.

Visitors tour the newly renovated Carnegie Library Downtown on Sat., April 17.

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Through his own singles and collabs, Pittsburgh musician Konscious Kel focuses on the positive BY KIMBERLY ROONEY냖㵸蔻 // KIMROONEY@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

W

NOT JUST A RAPPER

ORK-LIFE BALANCES ARE DIFFICULT, but Konscious Kel takes

it up a notch. After a long day at a UPMC research lab, the research laboratory technician and musician often spends the evening mixing down some vocals or creating a new beat until it’s time to go to sleep. The grind might sound exhausting, but for Konscious Kel, it’s nothing new, and his hard, consistent work has resulted in an extensive discography, drawing from his personal experiences and filled with collaborations with artists both in and outside of Pittsburgh. “You don’t blow up overnight, you don’t get recognition overnight,” says Konscious Kel. “You don’t make fans or get love overnight. You have to actually put in the effort.” Konscious Kel’s origins as a music producer, rapper, and sound engineer began while hanging out with his brother in East Stroudsburg, Pa., where he grew up as one of six children. His brother was playing Nujabes, a Japanese hip-hop and jazz producer and sound engineer, and Konscious Kel rapped a few bars as a joke. But what he thought was funny, his brother considered “actually kind of fire,” says Konscious Kel, so he continued freestyling. He participated in rap battles in high school, inspired by Supa Hot Fire, a 2011 YouTuber who claimed he was “not a rapper” and best known for parody rap battles, which evolved into diss tracks. While some people got in trouble for the tracks that verbally insulted others, leading to an end to the practice, they also led Konscious Kel to making music on his own. He purchased the music production software FL Studio (used by pro DJs to mix, edit, and compose music), and began self-teaching himself using YouTube and his own experimentation with various FL Studio plugins. He came to Pittsburgh to attend the University of Pittsburgh, and by the time he finished his first year of college, he had released his first mixtape. “I remember I was gonna drop that first mixtape, and I thought I was gonna throw up and be, like, ‘I’m so nervous. What if no one likes it?’” says Konscious Kel. “After that I kind of got over that first slump and I was just, like, you know what, at the end of the day, people are gonna like what they like, for specific reasons because everybody’s different. You can’t please everybody.” He continued working on music throughout college, balancing two jobs and classes that would culminate in a double major in Africana studies and biology, along with a minor in chemistry. He says he strived to “get at least one thing done every other day” with his music, and while he had to intentionally carve out time if he wanted to socialize with friends, he also improved his speed and quality of mixing and producing. CONTINUES ON PG. 6 < CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERMAN

Konscious Kel poses for a portrait in front of a Baron Batch mural in Beltzhoover.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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NOT JUST A RAPPER, CONTINUED FROM PG. 5

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Konscious Kel

He graduated in 2020 amid the pandemic, cutting off momentum for performances, but he had already built a community and network of musical friends and connections to continue creating music with, including Charles Hussle, Blasto, Dante., Wali, Jermaine X, Andrew Chris, Live In Color, Kenny Greene, Solid Colors, WXZD, Jvggy Hendrix, Mistr Vibes, and Sean Harris. “There was a lot of house shows, venues, you know, people would open, I would go to a show and end up talking to someone ... And a whole lot of mutual friends too, when I was hanging out with people, they were, like, ‘Oh, I’ll put you onto my one homie,’” Konscious Kel says. “And they kind of just kept branching out when people started to see that I was actually taking stuff more seriously.” Working with others leads to some of Konscious Kel’s favorite moments: when the energy of a collaboration calibrates and opens up to connecting with the

music and each other. Especially as an engineer, he says, he gets a chance to watch the reactions and vibes of the room. “Those moments where everybody’s just getting lit and hype with it, you know, like someone’s recording or about to spit something, they’re rapping out loud, and people are catching the vibe ... that’s what it is, baseline, seeing people react and connect to the music in the most positive and joyous way. I love that,” Konscious Kel says. For the past two years, he has primarily worked on mixing and producing, although he still puts out his own music, typically at the end of every month. He plans on continuing to release singles each month for the rest of the year and a couple of EPs through the summer, fall, and winter, with a debut album planned for 2022. While Konscious Kel loves collaborating with others and discovering what each collaboration will sound like as he and

the other artists try to match each others’ energies, he also says he enjoys working alone because it allows him to fine-tune his projects until they fit what he wants them to sound like.

KONSCIOUS KEL solo.to/konsciouskel

What he considers his best work, though, comes from personal experiences of hardships and how he made it out of difficult situations. For him, his music seeks to channel those experiences in a positive way, creating layers of emotion through lyrics, melodies, and beats that may seem contradictory but come together to paint a fuller emotional picture of how people feel. “It’s like, OK, if I felt that way, how can I channel that in a way to give a positive twist and let people know that, Oh

Follow staff writer Kimberly Rooney 냖㵸蔻on Twitter @kimlypso

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yeah, I was down bad. But I’m doing OK now. And I’ll tell you why I’m doing OK. I’ll tell you what happened with me,” says Konscious Kel. “And hopefully you feel something in this.” His most recent single, “March Sadness,” featuring Kenny Greene and Hana Daisy and produced by THRD, fits this profile. It’s been met with increasing enthusiasm and engagement, but to Konscious Kel, the numbers matter less than people connecting with his music. He still has not received formal training in singing, music theory, or sound engineering, but consistent practice and selfteaching has created an ever-improving foundation for his music. While he plans to take his music to that level with more formal training someday, for now, he plans to keep working without it. “The biggest thing with a lot of people’s success stories is that they didn’t stop,” Konscious Kel says. “They kept going.”


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.NEWS.

EARTH-LOVING EVENTS Seven ways to celebrate Earth Day this year in Pittsburgh BY COLLEEN HAMMOND // INFO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

PHOTO: WIHA3

Garlic Mustard, one of the plants included in the Wild Edibles Hike with the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy

A

FTER MONTHS LOCKED indoors and huddled around space heaters, the weather

is finally warming up — just in time for Earth Day. This annual celebration of the birth of the modern environmental movement focuses on a full day of eco-friendly action and appreciation for Mother Nature, and Pittsburgh is joining in on the celebration. “For several years, the Parks Conservancy had hoped to move the annual Earth Day celebration beyond the Frick Environmental Center,” says Alana Wenk, spokesperson at the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy. “Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we were unable to hold the large yearly festival. However, this presented us with an opportunity to celebrate planet Earth all month long and across the City of Pittsburgh.” This year, the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy is hosting a variety of Earth Day events throughout the entire month, not just the April 22 holiday. They are catered to everyone, from the veteran outdoorsman to the novice nature lovers, and even those stuck in quarantine. Despite the changes in protocols over the past two Earth Days, the Parks Conservancy is hopeful for the future, guided by a sense of activism and ecological preservation. “As we continue combating climate activity nationally, we must honor, care for, and raise awareness for our planet not only on Earth Day, but every day,” says Wenk.

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From Slavery to Freedom Film Series: Urban Roots Wed., April 21. 5:30 p.m. heinzhistorycenter.com Wenk says that the Conservancy is “also excited to provide virtual events on Earth Day for those who aren’t comfortable with attending programs in person.” In partnership with the Frick Environmental Center of the Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy, From Slavery to Freedom seeks to examine the themes from the Heinz History Center’s award-winning exhibition. This installment of the virtual From Slavery to Freedom film series will take a look at Urban Roots, a 90-minute documentary about a group of citizens who are transforming urban life in Detroit

into an more environmentally friendly landscape. According to the Parks Conservancy, this film “speaks to a nation grappling with collapsed industrial towns and the need to forge a sustainable and prosperous future.”

Birds and Kites in the Plaza Thu., April 22. 4 p.m. Schenley Plaza, 4100 Forbes Ave., Oakland For the novice outdoor adventurers, be sure to visit Schenley Plaza for an afternoon of nature-loving fun. Open to all ages, this event features activities including kite-making and a scavenger hunt for common birds hidden around the plaza in the heart of Oakland.


PHOTO: COURTESY OF PITTSBURGH PARKS

More than Morels: Spring Mushroom Webinar

Hill Hike

Earth Month Concert in the Park

Sun., April 25. 11 a.m. August Wilson Park, 1803 Cliff St., Hill District For this historical hike, Pittsburgh Parks Conservancy is teaming up with Outdoor Afro Pittsburgh. Visitors will begin their journey in August Wilson Park, where they will discuss Pittsburgh playwriting legend, August Wilson. This three-mile hike will feature urban terrain and a series of educational stops to discuss the rich history of the Hill District. A historic center of jazz and a hub for Black culture, this stroll through the Hill will include stops at the August Wilson Home, Freedom Corner, New Granada Theater, the Crawford Grill, and several churches. “This is a unique hike that will offer Pittsburghers a fresh perspective of a beloved neighborhood park,” says Wenk.

Sun., April 25. 12 p.m. Frick Park Hollow, intersection of Fall Ravine and Tranquil trails Wrap up the Parks Conservancy’s celebration of Earth Month with a concert in Frick Park. This fully solar-powered concert will feature a slew of local artists. Due to COVID-19 prevention measures, space is limited and those wishing to attend are asked to pre-register at pittsburghparks.org. The Parks Conservancy is also requesting that all guests abide by social-distancing and maskwearing guidelines.

Wild Edibles Hike Sun., April 25. 11 a.m. Frick Environmental Center, 2005 Beechwood Blvd., Squirrel Hill Who knew that a world of fresh, wild cuisine could be found in Pittsburgh’s parks? On this Sunday morning hike, visitors will join Melissa Sokulski of Food Under Foot as she helps to identify wild, edible plants found across all of Pittsburgh’s parks. Participants will also learn how to sustainably harvest and use locally found plants in early spring. Be on the lookout for Japanese knotweed, garlic mustard, burdock, dandelion, and many more. This event, along with Sunday’s Riverview Mushroom Walk, are “opportunities that offer Pittsburghers connectivity and exploration,” according to Wenk.

Intro to Hatha Yoga Wed., April 28. 5 p.m. Riverview Park, 159 Riverview Ave., Squirrel Hill Hatha Yoga combines breathing, poses, and medication all into a calming, yet rigorous exercise session. This introduction to the yoga style will focus on sitting positions and the practice of nine yoga poses, followed by a 15-minute deep relaxation demonstration. Participants should meet at the field at the right-hand side of Frick Park’s southern entrance.

More than Morels: Spring Mushroom Webinar Wed., April 28. 6 p.m. pittsburghparks.org Mushrooms aren’t just for eating, though they can be delicious. During this Zoom virtual event, Pittsburghers can learn about the world of spring mushrooms they can find in woodlands across the area. Join naturalist educator Stephen Bucklin to learn about some of the different species of fungi in Pittsburgh parks.

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CP ILLUSTRATION: ABBIE ADAMS

.VIEWS.

THE TALK REIMAGINED BY TERENEH IDIA // CPCONTRIBUTORS@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

O

VER THE PAST FEW WEEKS, I have

been trying to envision a different world. Different versions of the conversations we heard growing. The conversations that, depending on who we are, were meant to prepare us for the reality of the world we are about to inherit and build together. Conversations in summary: “The Talk” given to Black and Brown children about interacting with so-called “law enforcement.” The conversations most women and femmes hear about how to dress and present ourselves, not as humans first but as female humans. We have also heard some heart wrenching or joyous stories of LGBTQIA+ “coming out” to family, friends, and co-workers.

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Furthermore, discussions from parents, family, teachers about a disabled youth entering a new space and how they are meant to “accommodate” or respond. The takeaway: “You, my child, are not really free in this ‘Land of the Free.’” This new world in my head and heart, reframes these conversations. “The Talk’’ wouldn’t occur because there would be no need to tell a Black or Brown child that they would experience anything but justice when encountering police. Innocent until proven otherwise with respect due for their humanity. That the police would not use force, disrespect, and intimidation unless people were in a life and death situation. Surely, a grown person whose profession is to

serve us and protect us would find every alternative to force when dealing with a child. That in any situation where a child is present, the utmost care would be taken with them, to serve them, and to protect them. Young women and femmes would understand the foundation of their existence is their humanity, not their narrowly-defined femininity. In fact, our femininity would be so broadly defined that it would include all manner of expressions including the masculinity present in all us, just as the feminine is in masculine. Biologically, chemically, culturally, and socially, femininity and masculinity is a circle, not a line. It is grey, not black and white. How we are

instructed to dress, to present ourselves to the world, is part of a limitless circle. There would be no need to tell us that our skirt is too low or too high. That we are “asking for it” or we are not asking for it, based on our appearance. I hope for a world where any “coming out” would be something all of us would do. That sexuality and sensuality like the galaxy itself would be, yes, also a circle. That the default would not be heterosexuality but a word that would mean you’re attracted to human beings. One word I found was ambiphilia, being attracted to both masculinity and femininity. If you still want “teams,” the term “androphilia,” being attracted to men or masculinity and “gynephilia,”


SURELY, A GROWN PERSON WHOSE PROFESSION IS TO SERVE US AND PROTECT US WOULD FIND EVERY ALTERNATIVE TO FORCE WHEN DEALING WITH A CHILD. THAT IN ANY SITUATION WHERE A CHILD IS PRESENT, THE UTMOST CARE WOULD BE TAKEN WITH THEM, TO SERVE THEM, AND TO PROTECT THEM.

attraction to women or femininity. But is there a purely male or female person on this earth given that we all have both testosterone and estrogen? I think heterosexuality is a ridiculous concept. I am an ambiphilia-androphilia, however any man I love would have the ability to express his femininity as well as he should love my masculinity. This is not an attempt to erase queerness or queer culture, but I think heterosexuality and all of its narrow, binary, violent ways of dictating human sexuality is far too toxic to continue. So if anything, let’s erase heterosexuality as an idea and a term. Following the idea of human sexuality and sensuality as a circle and not a line, the idea of “coming out” if you identify as LGBTQIA+ would be met with a joyous celebration of personal expression and fullness. Expressions of sexuality and attraction to humans are natural, varied, beautiful, and filled with many examples throughout history. Heteronormativity has created a world where we are less human. The glorious multifaceted spectrum of queerness is one of the most beautiful things about our species. I am also imagining a classroom, office, boardroom, or athletic field where a disabled person is welcomed completely as a full human being entering a learning

and working circle. That word again, yes. A learning circle where the student, the class, and the teacher gets to learn with, not from, but with someone with a disability, in the same way any real classroom is a shared learning with everyone. This would apply to any and all spaces where there are people with disabilities seen and unseen. Not an attempt for everyone to conform to a narrow prescribed way of being “normal.” A few years ago, I was listening to a parent talking about her autistic child saying, in summary, that we as a society have to broaden our definition of “normal.” Something that we already do to a lesser degree with children. As a five-year-old child, I would grab a parents’ or siblings’ hand, swing it, and start to skip down the street, and it was considered normal behavior depending on where we were. In my 30s, I started doing this with boyfriends to see their reaction, and if they dropped my hand, I would drop them. In my head and heart. Conversations in summary: You are precious, loved and important, we are so happy you’re part of this community and world. The takeaway: “I am loved, I will be celebrated and protected in this community and this world, and my role is to love, celebrate, and protect others.”

Follow featured contributor Tereneh Idia on Twitter @Tereneh152XX PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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.FOOD.

CALIFORNIA DREAMIN’ BY RYAN DETO RYANDETO@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

C

AL-MEX IS A CUISINE that Pittsburghers probably haven’t heard much about. Like how Tex-Mex combines Texan and Mexican cuisines, Cal-Mex is a combination of authentic Mexican fare and California flavors. Unlike Tex-Mex, which has a strong focus on hearty and gut-busting dishes, Cal-Mex is about highlighting the fresh produce that proliferates in the Golden State. But luckily for Pittsburghers, those West Coast flavors are making their way to the Steel City, and California Taco Shop in Shaler is offering some delicious examples. The taqueria opened in 2019 and quickly became a local favorite. Though less popular than bigger restaurants like local Mexican food chains Condado or Mad Mex, people were reaching out to me about California Taco Shop anytime I mentioned authentic Mexican cuisine on social media. When I finally visited the small restaurant located in a strip mall off of Route 8, my expectations were high. Authentic Mexican taquerias are in pretty short supply in Pittsburgh. Beechview, with its small but growing Mexican community, has some solid choices, but, as a native Californian, it’s not always easy to find those authentic flavors here in Pittsburgh. California Taco shop has those in spades, with the perfect laid-back taqueria atmosphere I’ve been missing: order at the counter, agua frescas and Mexican sodas in the fridge, and an extensive menu. Being in a nostalgic mood, I ordered everything that looked to be Cal-Mex inspired. This included a rolled taco special, a fried fish taco, a shredded chicken tostada, churros, and a California burrito. Pittsburghers will probably enjoy the California burrito because it is stuffed with french fries, just like the city’s famous Primanti Bros. sandwiches. But this burrito is San Diego-inspired, and comes with grilled steak, black beans, pico de gallo, and plenty of guacamole. It’s filling, flavorful, and incredibly satisfying. The rolled taco special is another

CP PHOTO: KAYCEE ORWIG

A selection of tacos from California Taco Shop

Southern California specialty. Corn tortillas are stuffed with shredded chicken, then rolled into a cigar shape, and deep fried until crispy. They are then topped with creamy guacamole and shredded cheddar cheese. The rolled tacos were very crispy, but not overcooked. The restaurant even serves Carne Asada Fries, a San Diego treat which covers french fries in grilled, marinated steak, topped with cheese, pico de gallo, guacamole, and sour cream. The guacamole was a standout on the rolled tacos, and every other dish it graced. California Taco Shop’s guac is super smooth, almost fluffy, and packed with good garlic, savory flavor. It will keep you coming back for more. And, of course, I had to order the fish taco, which was invented and popularized in Southern California. The shop’s fish taco was a bit different than I was used to, using yellow corn tortillas

instead of white flour tortillas, but everything else was spot on. The fish was crispy fried and light, and the cabbage slaw was crunchy, topped with a tangy lime crema sauce.

CALIFORNIA TACO SHOP 890 Butler St., Shaler. californiatacoshoppittsburgh.com

Nothing at the taqueria was overly spicy or hot, but those craving that heat and kick should try the shop’s green and red salsas, especially the salsa roja. Pour that salsa over the tostada, which is the best example of this classic Mexican dish I have had in Pittsburgh. Its base is a double tortilla, fried to crispy perfection, covered in meat of

Follow news editor Ryan Deto on Twitter @RyanDeto

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your choosing, shredded lettuce, cotija cheese, pico de gallo salsa, and sour cream. Even under that pile of ingredients, the fried tortillas still broke with a loud audible crunch. This dish really highlighted the focus on fresh produce that Cal-Mex is known for. To finish the meal, I ordered some churros, which were the kind I’ve been searching for since I was a kid. Straight, crispy, with just enough softness in the center. Perfection. California Taco Shop became a favorite relatively quickly, and it’s understandable why. The shop is bridging that gap in between Mexican-American chains and authentic Mexican joints that have dishes Pittsburgh isn’t quite accustomed to yet. Its location in Shaler is also perfect for those in the North Hills or Allegheny River Valley who don’t want to have to visit Beechview for some great south of the border flavors.


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CBD vs. Medical Marijuana? By Susan Merenstein, Pharmacist/Owner LabNaturalsCBD usan Merenstein, Pharmacist and Owner of LabNaturals CBD has over 40 years of Holistic Clinical Pharmacy experience and has always prided herself on being open to new and innovative ways to help her clients, both people and pets, lead healthier lives. That’s why Susan developed LabNaturals CBD, a line of People and Pet friendly, easy-to-use, low cost CBD products including Oils, Pain Balms, Capsules, and Gum! LabNaturals Broad Spectrum CBD products are rich in CBD and contain NO detectable (0.0%) THC, heavy metals, pesticides, or residual solvents. Each product is independently tested to prove the products’ potency, purity, and consistency. Certificates of Analysis are readily available. At LabNaturals CBD, we take a holistic approach to CBD supplementation by gathering the appropriate information from each of our clients to make individualized serving suggestions. We check medication interactions, conditions being supplemented, and encourage practitioner engagement. Our dedication to client wellness makes routine follow-ups an integral part of the client experience at LabNaturals CBD. All of our LabNaturals CBD Hemp Oil products are available Over-the-Counter (OTC) and do not require a Medical Marijuana card. Given the myriad of laws and regulations affecting hemp extract and CBD products to purchase from reputable sources and trusted brands like Pharmacist approved and owned LabNaturalsCBD. One of the biggest misunderstandings is the difference between Hemp and Marijuana. The two plants are both of the genus and species Cannabis Sativa, but have different arrays of active components and varying physiologic effects. Hemp is also confused with CBD, which is just one of over 100 Phytocannabinoids found in the plant along with important Terpenes to create an “Entourage Effect”. All of these plants’ active compounds influence various receptors in the body-some of which are part of the endocannabinoid system (ECS). Marijuana is a form of Cannabis Sativa that has been cultivated over the years to increase the levels of its main cannabinoid THC (Tetrahydrocannabinol). THC is intoxicating and has only been used medically in recent years. Hemp is a form of Cannabis Sativa that is grown mostly for agricultural applications. Hemp contains a full spectrum of the plants naturally occurring actives called Phytocannabinoids like CBD and available as an herbal supplement. The US government mandates that products labeled as Hemp contain less than 0.3%

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THC by weight. Phytocannabinoid rich hemp extracts are derived from the aerial parts of the plant (leaf/ flower/bud/stalk). CBD (Cannabidiol) is the main cannabinoid in hemp. BEWARE of CBD isolates! Based on studies, CBD isolate has been shown to be inferior to wholehemp plant extracts. I have summarized the major differences between CBD and THC (found in Medical and Recreational Marijuana) below:

CBD (Cannabidiol) • Hemp contains CBD and other “entourage” cannabinoids (CBN, CBG, CBC) • CBD is not psychotropic and does not cause a “high” effect • CBD does not impair psychomotor and cognitive performance • CBD is Anxiolytic by affecting the Serotonin receptor directly • CBD does not cause increased heart rate or dry mouth (“Cotton Mouth”) • CBD is legal under PA State Law per the 2018 Farm Bill • CBD is generally regarded as safer for pets and children (under practitioner guidance) • CBD requires no card, Rx, or certification.

Medical Marijuana (THC) • Marijuana naturally contains much higher levels of THC than CBD-80% vs 0.3% Hemp • THC causes psychotropic or “high” effect. • THC impairs psychomotor and cognitive performance • THC may cause increased anxiety over the long term • THC may cause increased heart rate and dry mouth (“Cotton Mouth”) • THC is illegal under Federal Law (DEA Schedule 1) • THC negatively affects children and pets (toxic to dogs) • THC needs approval and people must register with the state Type “buy CBD” into Google and be prepared to be Bamboozled, misled, and deceived by product claims. Pharmacist expertise is crucial to “weed out” bad low-quality products that are flooding the market. At LabNaturalsCBD.com or calling Murray Avenue Apothecary where LabNaturalsCBD is exclusively sold, we can educate you and help you make the best decision regarding product choice, potential drug interactions, and how CBD can help you feel better today! Visit our website at www.LabNaturalsCBD.com LEARN more, READ client testimonials, and SHOP! Limited time offer! Discount code: FREESHIP PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM


WESTERN PA LOCAL FOOD GUIDE 2021


The Ultimate Guide to Pittsburgh Farmers Markets

Spring is officially here, and that means one thing – Pittsburgh Farmers Markets are coming back!

SATURDAYS SEWICKLEY FARMERS MARKET

Every Saturday, April 10 – Nov. 20 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: St. James Parking Lot, 200 Walnut St., Sewickley, PA. The Farmers Market at St. James Church of the Divine Redeemer Parish features vendors that sell meat, locally-grown fresh vegetables, local honey, organic farms products, pierogies, pasta.

THE TERMINAL FARMERS MARKET

Every third Saturday of the month starting April 17 – October 16 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: The Terminal in the Strip District, between the 18-20 Street Passageways The newly-opened Terminal in the Strip District is launching a brand new farmers market on the third Saturday of every month from April through October. Each market will feature local farmers and artisans, such as Cherry Valley Organics, City Grows, Kingfly Spirits, The Pickled Chef, Primrose Farm and more.

BEAVER FARMERS MARKET

Every Saturday, April 24 – Nov. 27 Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: Beaver Courthouse Parking Lot, 4th & Market Streets. One of five Beaver County Markets open this season, including markets in Ambridge, Beaver Falls, Chippewa and New Brighton. They feature locally-grown agricultural products including plants, fruits, vegetables, meats, eggs and honey, along with wine, baked goods, hot prepared meals, bagels and breads.

FARMERS MARKETS OF GREENSBURG

Every Saturday, April 24 – November Hours: 9:00 a.m. – Noon Location: Lynchfield Recre-

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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

ation Park & Rt 66N Offering local produce, breads, eggs, plants, cookies, salsa.

BRADDOCK FARM STAND

Saturdays starting April 24 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: 1000 Braddock Avenue, Braddock From Grow Pittsburgh, the Braddock Farm Stand features their own locally-grown produce. Grow Pittsburgh markets accept Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program checks, EBT/SNAP payments, and Food Bucks. Produce is priced affordably or on a sliding scale.

BLOOMFIELD SATURDAY MARKET

Every Saturday, May 8 – Nov. 20 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: 5050 Liberty Avenue The market features fresh fruit, vegetable, and locally-made goods. Vendors include Freedom Farms, Who Cooks for You Farm, Sturges Orchards, Cutting Root Farm and Apothecary, Old Time Farm, Twin Brook Dairy, Paul Family Farms, and Sol Patch Garden. The Bloomfield Saturday Market also hosts a winter market from December through March on the first and third Saturday of each month. The market is a program of Bloomfield Development Corporation.

MONROEVILLE LIONS FARMERS’ MARKET

Every Saturday, May 8 – Nov. 20 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Location: Monroeville Community Park, 2399 Tilbrook Road. Vendors selling local produce, baked goods, meats and preserves. Vendors in the past have included: Pitaland, Paul’s Apple Orchard, McKinney Family Farm, Larry Musser’s Produce, Mish Meats, McElhinny Farm, Ruk’s Preserves and Harvest Valley Farms and Bushy Run Winery.

LIGONIER COUNTRY MARKET

Saturdays starting May 15 Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.

Location: West Main Street & Route 30, Ligonier Offering all kinds of fresh picked produce, flowers, farm beef, poultry and eggs, specialty breads, pastries, hot cooked foods, honey, maple syrup, jewelry, purses, country crafts and much more.

BUTLER CITY FARMERS MARKET

Saturdays, May 29 through October Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: 205 S. Chestnut Street, Butler The Butler City Farmers Market takes place in an open-air space, featuring local produce, baked goods, crafts and more.

ELLWOOD CITY FARMERS MARKET

Every Saturday, June 5 – October 9 Hours: 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Location: Beaver Avenue Municipal Parking Lot, 500 Block of Beaver Avenue, Ellwood City, PA Part of the Ellwood City Revitalization (ECR) project, the Ellwood City Farmers Market features locally-grown fruits and vegetables, along with flowers, baked goods, snacks, live music and kids activities.

SWISSVALE FARMERS MARKET

Every Saturday, June 5 – October 30 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: 2036 Noble Street You’ll find locally-grown produce, baked goods, prepared foods, plus a variety of hand-made crafts and gift items. Vendors include: Jodikinos Farms, Growing Groceries PGH, Catchfly Gardens, Pitaland, Great Harvest Bread, Sugar Mama’s Sweets and Treats and Just Harvest. Live music is also at the market.

FARMERS MARKET COOPERATIVE OF EAST LIBERTY

Every Saturday Hours: 5:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m. Location: 344 Sheridan Avenue The Farmers Market Cooperative of East Liberty is the city’s only

year-round market operation, offering locally-grown meat, fresh produce and more.

SUNDAYS CITY OF PITTSBURGH SQUIRREL HILL

Sundays, May 16 – Nov. 21 *no market July 4 Hours: 9:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. Location: Beacon/Bartlett parking lot Features farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese and baked goods. All City of Pittsburgh farmers’ markets accept food stamps (SNAP), credit and debit cards as part of Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program, where food stamp shoppers will receive a special match at the farmers markets.

CARNEGIE FARMERS MARKET

Every Sunday July 11 – Sept. 26 Time: 12:00 p.m. – 3:00 p.m. Location: East Main Street between Broadway and Mary Streets in Carnegie Featuring vendors such as Primrose Farm, D&O Wine Cellars, Hey Tabouli!, and Mediterra Bakehouse. The Carnegie Farmers Market is also participating in Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program this year.

MONDAYS BEAVER FALLS FARMERS MARKET

Every Monday, May 3 – November 22 Hours: 3:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m. Location: The market is in the parking lot behind Brodhead Apartments, 712 12th Street, Beaver Falls Features fruits and vegetables, baked goods, meat, honey, freshcut flowers and bedding plants. Vendors change regularly, and include Enon Country Gardens, Oakspring Farm, and PJ’s Deli.

CITY OF PITTSBURGH EAST LIBERTY Mondays,

May 10 – November 22 *no market May 31 and September 6 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: N. Euclid Ave. & Broad St. Features farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese and baked goods. All City of Pittsburgh farmers’ markets accept food stamps (SNAP), credit and debit cards as part of Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program, where food stamp shoppers will receive a special match at the farmers markets.

ROBINSON FARMERS MARKET AT HOLY TRINITY

Every Monday, starting May 24 – October Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Holy Trinity, 5718 Steubenville Pike, McKees Rocks Features produce, dairy, ice cream, hummus, wine, whiskey, kettle corn, shaved ice, honey, baked goods, pasta, coffee, pressed juice, smoothies, goat cheese, gyros, jerky, olive oil, bread, and more.

ZELIENOPLEHARMONY FARMERS MARKET

Every Monday, June 7 – October Hours: 3:30 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Zelienople Community Park Fresh fruits, vegetables from McKinney Family Farm, along with a rotating list of vendors, such as Awesome Acres, Becky’s Baked Goods, Belle Fleur Gardens, The Enchanted Olive and Harkins Mill Wines.

TUESDAYS BETHEL PARK FARMERS MARKET

Every Tuesday, May 4 – Sept. 28 Hours: 3:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. Location: South Park VIP Parking Lots, directly off Corrigan Drive. Offering fresh produce and baked goods, like cookies and breads, along with items like gyros, sal-

ads, sandwiches, hummus, milk, cheese, yogurt and more.

LAWRENCEVILLE FARMERS MARKET

Every Tuesday, May 18 – Dec. 14 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Arsenal Park, between 39th and 40th Streets, and between Butler and Penn Streets. The Lawrenceville Farmers Market will feature vendors such as Harvest Valley Farms, Sturges Orchards and Wildom Farm.

CHIPPEWA FARMERS MARKET

Every Tuesday from May 4 – November 23 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Chippewa United Methodist Church 2545 Darlington Road, Beaver Falls Features locally-grown plants, fruits and vegetables, along with food products like biscotti, baked goods, and hot prepared meals. Hosted by Beaver County Farmers Markets.

LATROBE FARMERS MARKET

Every Tuesday from June 1 – September 28 Hours: 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Location: Legion Keener Park Latrobe’s farmers market features local vendors with produce, baked goods, popcorn, crafts and more.

NEW BRIGHTON FARMERS MARKET

Every Tuesday, from June through October Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: 5th Avenue & 12st Street, New Brighton, PA Hosted by Beaver County Farmers Markets, features fresh fruit, vegetables, plants, baked goods, and prepared foods.

WEDNESDAYS CITY OF PITTSBURGH CARRICK DAIRY DISTRICT Every Wednesday, May 12 – November 24

Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Carrick Dairy District, 1529 Brownsville Road Features farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese and baked goods. All City of Pittsburgh farmers’ markets accept food stamps (SNAP), credit and debit cards as part of Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program, where food stamp shoppers will receive a special match at the farmers markets.

ROSS TWP. FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday from May 12 through October Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: St. John’s Evangelical Lutheran Church parking lot, 920 Perry Hwy. Vendors will include farms and greenhouses, prepared foods, baked goods, and local businesses. Vendors include Leeper Meats, Yvonne’s Handmade Pasta, Mazur’s Greenhouse & Farm, Sam’s Gyros, Daugherty Orchards, Yoder’s Amish Baked Goods, Colombino Farms and The Flame BBQ.

MOON TOWNSHIP FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday June 2 – October 27 Hours: 3:00 – 6:30 p.m. Location: Moon Park, 1350 Joe DeNardo Way, Coraopolis The Moon Township Farmers Market is a producer-only market, and all vendors grow or make at least 75% of their own products for sale. Vendors in 2021 will include Graeter’s Ice Cream, Tree Cup Tea, Tommy’s Jerky, Butler Maple Farms, Wigle Whiskey, Mediterra Bakery, Simmons Farm and more.

MT. LEBANON LIONS FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday June 2 – October Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Mt Lebanon United Lutheran Church at 975 Washington Rd in Mt. Lebanon Find local produce, fresh-baked breads and other food products. Vendors in previous years have included Mediterra Bakehouse,


M

arkets across western Pennsylvania will be opening in the coming weeks, offering local produce, fresh-baked breads, sweet treats, prepared foods, flowers, and more. As we have in years past, we’ve rounded up a dayby-day guide to all of the markets that we could find. This year, we’re excited to partner with the Pittsburgh Food Policy Council and Farm to Table Western PA on our 2021 list, featuring more markets than we ever have before.

Dillner’s Family Farm, Nellie’s Middle Eastern Foods, Paul’s Orchard, Logan Family Farm, Salsa Sam’s, LVIV European Pierogies, Dock to Table Seafood, Costello Honey, Sand Hill Berry Farm, Bad Azz BBQ and Next 7 Organic Farm.

PETERS TOWNSHIP FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday, June 2 – October 27 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: St. David’s Episcopal Church, 905 E. McMurray Rd., Venetia, PA. Vendors in previous years have included City Fresh Pasta, Cherish Creamery, Fresh From the Farm Juices, Hello Hummus, Jose Quiroz Farm, Kern Farms, Loafers Bread, Logan Family Farms, the Olive Tap, P3 Grain Free, the Pie Place, Simmons Farm, Swopes Honey, Wild River Kettle Korn, Wu’s Shaved Ice, Bad Azz BBQ, Pitaland, Wood Stoked Oven Pizza and Caustelot Creamery. In 2021, the market will bring back live music, and on-site dining.

BELLEVUE FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday, June 2 – October 27 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Bayne Park, 34 North Balph Avenue, Bellevue, PA A variety of fresh, locally-grown food as well as hand-crafted items sourced from local ingredients.

HAMPTON TOWNSHIP FARMERS MARKET

Every Wednesday, June 2 – October 13 Hours: 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. Location: Community Park, 3101 McCully Road, Allison Park The Hampton Township Farmers Market will have local produce, honey, baked goods, spices, and much more. Keep an eye out for occasional food truck days throughout the season, too.

MIDWEEK MARKET AT SOUTHSIDE WORKS

Every other Wednesday, starting July 14 through October Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.

Location: The Town Square Area of SouthSide Works SouthSide Works is launching a mid-week farmers and artisan market with Buy Fresh Buy Local of Western PA and I Made It! Market beginning in July. The Midweek Market will be open to the public, and will offer popular prepared foods vendors, local produce, meat, cheese, dairy, and wares from local artists. The market will also feature live music.

THURSDAYS SHILOH FARM STAND

Thursdays starting April 22 Hours: 2:30 – 6:30 p.m. Location: 7209 Thomas Blvd. From Grow Pittsburgh, the farm stand at Shiloh features their own locally-grown produce. Grow Pittsburgh markets accept Farmer’s Market Nutrition Program checks, EBT/SNAP payments, and Food Bucks. Produce is priced affordably or on a sliding scale.

AMBRIDGE FARMERS MARKET

Every Thursday, May 6 through November 18 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: St. Mary’s Byzantine Catholic Church, 624 Park Road, Ambridge Features fruits and vegetables, baked goods, meat, honey, freshcut flowers and bedding plants. Hosted by Beaver County Farmers Markets.

MARKET SQUARE DOWNTOWN FARMERS MARKET

Every Thursday, May 13 – October 23 Hours: 10:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Location: Market Square The Downtown Market Square Farmers Market has been a summertime staple for more than 15 years. Over 30 weekly vendors sell fresh fruit, vegetables, organic milk and cheese, honey, breads, cakes, fresh-pressed juices, and other homemade food products are available for sale in Market Square every Thursday. The market also includes free afternoon concerts from 11:30 a.m. to 1:30

Select farmers markets accept food stamps (SNAP), credit and debit cards as part of Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program. The Fresh Access program enables shoppers to use their food stamps, as well as credit and debit cards, to buy fresh, nutritious, and locally-grown food. Food Bucks give Fresh Access food stamp shoppers extra money to spend on fruits and vegetables. You can find the most updated information on which markets accept food stamps, Food Bucks, SNAP benefits and more here. p.m., and special events, like a free bulb giveaway during the first market of the season from Western PA Conservancy.

WASHINGTON MAIN STREET FARMERS MARKET

Every Thursday, May 20 – October Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Location: 139 S. Main Street, Washington, PA. Now in its 18th year, the Washington Main Street Farmers Market offers fresh, locally-grown produce, including organic options, meat, eggs, dairy products, breads, pastas, salsas, and other prepared foods. Live music is also scheduled for more weeks. In the past, vendors have included BadAzz BBQ, Bread Spreads by Susan, Conover Organic Farms, Headacres Farm, Jodikinos Farms, Kern’s Farm, Peanut Butter Bones and more. For every $1 of SNAP benefits redeemed at the market, benefit holders will receive $2 in tokens to spend at the market.

MURRYSVILLE FARMERS MARKET

Every Thursday, June 3 – September 30 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Murrysville VFC Field, 3235 Sardis Road, Murraysville, PA The Murrysville Farmers Market offers local produce vendors, baked goods, pantry items, dairy products, fresh flowers and plants, honey and herbs, and hot foods, such as wood-fired pizzas, food trucks, and also live entertainment.

VERONA FARMERS MARKET

Every Thursday, June 3 – November 18 Hours: 2:00 – 7:00 p.m. Location: 736 E. Railroad Avenue, Verona At the Verona Farmers Market, find local produce, sweets, artisan products and more. Vendors include Chocolate Moonshine, Schramms Farms and Orchards, Crafted Creations, Gary’s Gourmet Produce, Caruso Farms, Carter Farms and more.

Markets that accept SNAP through Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program: • Bloomfield • Monroeville • Swissvale • Squirrel Hill, • Carnegie • East Liberty • Forest Hills • Lawrenceville, • Carrick • Bellevue • Market Square • Wilkinsburg • North Side

WILKINSBURG THURSDAY MARKET

Every Thursday, June 17 – October 14 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Location: Harold Young, Sr. Parklet, 700 block of Penn Avenue, Wilkinsburg The Wilkinsburg Thursday Market offers fresh, locally grown produce, homemade preserves, baked goods, prepared foods and more. The Market accepts EBT/SNAP payments, and Food Bucks. Produce is priced affordably or on a donation basis.

FRIDAYS THE ORIGINAL FARMERS MARKET (BRIDGEVILLE AREA)

Every Friday in May starting May 7, then open every Monday, Wednesday and Friday starting in June. Hours: Starting at 5:30 p.m. Location: 151 Parks Road, McDonald, PA Vendors include Bayer Farm, Simmons Farm, Janoski Farms, George Bartkus Cheese, Debbies Deluxe Cookies & Cakes, Tim Wu Shaved Ice, Victoria’s Fudge-ALicious, and more!

CITY OF PITTSBURGH NORTH SIDE

Every Friday, May 14 – November 19 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Allegheny Commons Park, East Ohio St. & Cedar Ave. Features farm-fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, cheese and baked goods. All City of Pittsburgh farmers’ markets accept food stamps (SNAP), credit and debit cards as part of Just Harvest’s Fresh Access program, where food stamp shoppers will receive a special match at the farmers markets.

FOREST HILLS FARMERS MARKET

Every Friday, May 21 – October 29 Hours: 4:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: Forest Hills Presbyterian Church parking lot,

1840 Ardmore Blvd., Forest Hills, PA. Features home grown produce, baked goods, and unique products for sale. Previous vendors have included: Cherish Creamery, Bates & Hayes Concessions, Billy’s Country Smokehouse, Harvest Valley Farms, Hello Hummus, Logan Family Farms, Monroe’s Coffee, McElhinny Farm, Olive & Marlowe, Pasta Bill, Sandhill Berries, and Wood Street Bread Company.

CRANBERRY TOWNSHIP FARMERS MARKET

Every Friday, June 4 – October 1 Hours: 3:00 – 7:00 p.m. Location: Cranberry Township Municipal Center Front Parking Lot, 2525 Rochester Road, Cranberry Township The Cranberry Twp. Farmers Market will feature special events on select market days throughout the season. The market provides everything from fresh fruit and produce, artisan gifts, baked goods, live music, food trucks, and hour hours featuring local brews and libations.

FARMERS MARKET AT THE BLOCK NORTHWAY

Every Friday, June 4 – October 29 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m. Location: The Block Northway, near DSW Shoe Warehouse in the South Atrium, Upper Level Market vendors include farmer’s market sellers, artisan booths, food trucks, live music and more.

MONONGAHELA FARMERS MARKET

Every Friday from June 11 – October 29 Hours: 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Location: Set up on the side street that runs along the side of Chess Park in Monongahela’s Main Street District Previous vendors have included: Aunt Kims Jellies, Gimme Some Sugar cupcakes, Jimmy’s Italian Ice, Sam’s Gyro, Harden Farm, Triple B Farm, and more!

Green Grocer

The Greater Pittsburgh Community Food Bank’s Green Grocer mobile farmers market provides fresh food options at affordable prices at 20 different market stops in 20 different neighborhoods. Everyone is welcome to shop at the market, and Green Grocer accepts multiple forms of payment, including SNAP/EBT and FMNP & SFMNP checks. Green Grocer runs from April 1 – November.

2021 SCHEDULE: 1st & 3rd Mondays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Spring Hill, Three Rivers Manor, 125 Rhine Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Millvale, Yetter’s Candy parking lot, 504 Grant Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15209 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Sharpsburg, Sharpsburg Community Library, 1212 Main St, Pittsburgh, PA 15215

2nd & 4th Mondays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Mt Oliver, Clock Tower, Brownsville Road & Hays Ave., Mt. Oliver, PA 15210 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. Clairton, Family Dollar parking lot, 533 Miller Ave., Clairton, PA 15025 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Glassport, Glassport Honor Roll Park, 440 Monongahela Ave., Glassport, PA 15045

1st & 3rd Tuesdays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Woods Run, Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh – Woods Run, 1201 Woods Run Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15212 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Oak Hill, UPMC Matilda H. Theiss Health Center, 373 Burrows St., Pittsburgh, PA 15213 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Rankin, A Child’s World Daycare Center, 300 Rankin Boulevard, Rankin, PA 15104 11 – 12:00 p.m.

2nd & 4th Tuesdays

East Hills, East Hills Community Center, 2291 Wilner Dr., Pittsburgh, PA 15221 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Lincoln-Larimer-Belmar, Corner of Lincoln Ave. & Lemington Ave., 1433 Lincoln Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15206 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Hill District, Centre Heldman Plaza, 1850 Centre Ave., Pittsburgh, PA 15219

1st & 3rd Thursdays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Homewood, Alma Illery Medical Center, 7227 Haimlton Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15208 1:30 – 2:30 p.m. East Pittsburgh, Across from East Pittsburgh Community Center, 509 Bessemer Ave., East Pittsburgh, PA 15112 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Wilmerding, Wilmerding Apartments on Station St., 314 Commerce St., Wilmerding, PA 15148

2nd & 4th Thursdays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. McKees Rocks, 5 Generation Bakers, 1100 Chartiers Ave., McKees Rocks, PA 15136 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. Sheraden, Pavilion, Hillsboro St. & Sheraden Blvd. Pittsburgh, PA 15204 3:30 – 4:30 p.m. Northview Heights, 533 Mt. Pleasant Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15214

1st & 3rd Fridays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Monview Heights, 48 Midway Dr., West Mifflin, PA 15122

2nd & 4th Fridays

11:00 – 12:00 p.m. Duquesne, Route 837 & Grant Ave., 35 Grant Ave, Duquesne, PA 15110

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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Local Food Drop Sites ALLEGHENY COUNTY BLACKBERRY MEADOWS

www.Blackberrymeadows.com

BLUE GOOSE FARM

www.bluegoosefarmnicktown.com

BRENCKLE’S ORGANIC FARM & GREENHOUSE www.brencklesfarm.com

FRIENDS FARM

www.facebook.com/friendsfarmmarket

BUTLER COUNTY www.brencklesfarm.com

www.bluegoosefarmnicktown.com

DREAM THYME

THE FAMILY COW

www.cherryvalleyorganics.com

DILLNER FAMILY FARMS

FIVE ELEMENTS FARM

www.dillnerfamilyfaarms.com

www.fiveelementsfarm.com

DREAM THYME

FREEDOM FARMS

www.facebook.com/dreamthymefarm/

www.freedomfarmspa.com

EDIBLE EARTH FARM

www.harvestvalleyfarms.com

FOOTPRINTS FARM

(South Butler) www.mediumrarefoods.com

HARVEST VALLEY FARMS

www.harvestvalleyfarms.com

HARVIE FARMS PITTSBURGH www.harvie.farm

MEDIUM RARE FOODS

www.mediumrarefoods.com

NORTHWEST PA GROWERS COOPERATIVE www.Nwpagrowers.com

THE FAMILY COW

www.yourfamilyfarmer.com

INDIANA COUNTY BLUE GOOSE FARM

www.facebook.com/dreamthymefarm/

www.footprintsfarm.com

www.farmofpeace.com

BRENCKLE’S ORGANIC FARM & GREENHOUSE

CHERRY VALLEY ORGANICS

www.edibleearthfarm.com

FULTON COUNTY FARM OF PEACE

HARVEST VALLEY FARMS MEDIUM RARE FOODS

NORTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA GROWERS COOPERATIVE www.nwpagrowers.com

THE FAMILY COW

www.yourfamilyfarmer.com

CAMBRIA COUNTY BLUE GOOSE FARM

www.bluegoosefarmnicktown.com

CRAWFORD COUNTY LINK’S HERITAGE FARM

www.yourfamilyfarmer.com

MERCER COUNTY DREAM THYME

www.facebook.com/dreamthymefarm

EDIBLE EARTH FARM

www.Edibleearthfarm.com

NORTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA GROWERS COOPERATIVE www.nwpagrowers.com

SOMERSET COUNTY BLUE GOOSE FARM

www.bluegoosefarmnicktown.com

VENANGO COUNTY NORTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA GROWERS COOPERATIVE www.nwpagrowers.com

PLOT TWIST FARM

www.plottwistfarm.com

…4NBMMBOEMBSHFTIBSFT

THE MARKETPLACE AT EMERALD VALLEY

…0SHBOJDPS$FSUJGJFE/BUVSBMMZ(SPXO

www.nwpagrowers.com

ARMSTRONG COUNTY

www.plottwistfarm.com

www.themarketplacevfs.square. site

FIVE ELEMENTS FARM

STRAWBERRY LANE PRODUCE

EDIBLE EARTH FARM

harvie.farm/profile/strawberry-lane-produce

www.fiveelementsfarm.com

WHO COOKS FOR YOU FARM www.whocooksforyoufarm.com

BEAVER COUNTY CHERRY VALLEY ORGANICS

www.cherryvalleyorganics.com

CONFORTI FAMILY FARM

www.confortifamilyfarm.com

DILLNER FAMILY FARMS

www.dillnerfamilyfarms.com

MEDIUM RARE FOODS

www.Mediumrarefoods.com

THE FAMILY COW

www.yourfamilyfarmer.com

BLAIR COUNTY BLUE GOOSE FARM

PLOT TWIST FARM

ERIE COUNTY BURCH FARMS

www.burchfarmscountrymarketandwinery.com

MASON FARMS

www.Masonfarms.com

CSAs have gained popularity over the years and farms have responded by offering a variety of options: …8FFLMZ CJXFFLMZPSNPOUIMZTIBSFT

WHO COOKS FOR YOU FARM www.whocooksforyoufarm.com

Customers pick a designated site such a home, business or church for pick up.

WASHINGTON COUNTY

www.lisksheritagefarm.com

NORTHWEST PENNSYLVANIA GROWERS COOPERATIVE

n a CSA (Consumer Supported Agriculture), customers pay for “shares” and receive a percentage of the products harvested from local farms. “Shares” are available from farms and farm cooperatives throughout Western PA.

CHERRY VALLEY ORGANICS

THE MARKETPLACE AT EMERALD VALLEY

Themarketplacevfs.square.site

I

What is a CSA?

www.cherryvalleyorganics.com

www.Edibleearthfarm.com

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PHOTO: FUTURE TENANT

.ARTS.

Future Tenant gallery in Downtown Pittsburgh, 2012

PAST TENANT BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

UTURE TENANT, WHICH describes

itself as “the flagship experiential learning initiative of the Masters of Art Management program at Carnegie Mellon University,” revealed on its website that it is “sunsetting.” The announcement goes on to read, “In early May, all Future Tenant assets, including our website and social media, will close.” A spokesperson for the project says the Future Tenant gallery located in Downtown Pittsburgh has been closed since April 2019. Future Tenant was founded in 2002 as a joint project of the Pittsburgh Cultural Trust and CMU’s Master of Art Management College of Fine Arts program. Since then, it has provided opportunities to arts management graduate students and emerging artists and performers interested in “exploring the limits of the creative expression, presentation, and interpretation of various art forms,” according to the Trust website. Its offerings have included everything from

guest curator and residency programs to open mics and play festivals.

A LONG-RUNNING ART PROJECT IN PITTSBURGH HAS ANNOUNCED IT WILL SHUT DOWN AFTER NEARLY 20 YEARS OF OPERATION. “Future Tenant drew its name from its original purpose — to activate unused downtown space to promote the arts,” says a Facebook post from April 1. This includes the Downtown Pittsburgh gallery Future Tenant has occupied at 819 Penn Ave., made to resemble an unfinished storefront and distinguished with a bright, highly photographable neon sign. The project has expanded beyond

Downtown, however, by partnering with Bakery Square in Larimer, the Children’s Museum of Pittsburgh, and the arts program at Pittsburgh International Airport. The Future Tenant gallery also presented groundbreaking work like Lucky After Dark: Gay and Lesbian Nightlife in Pittsburgh, 1960-1990, the first exhibition for The Pittsburgh Queer History Project, an initiative launched to preserve images of the city’s bygone LGBTQ after-hours party scene. The post goes on to claim that Future Tenant’s programming has benefitted “hundreds of students and artists.” Future Tenant does not go into detail as to why the decision was made, only saying, “Between a considered evaluation of the initiative’s goals and a shift in student interests, the time is right to reimagine how students in the MAM program can best support local artists and their communities.” Dane Horvath, a local artist, UX designer, and founder of the blog My City

Anthem (formerly Steeltown Anthem), remembers working with Future Tenant and sees its retirement as a major loss for the local arts community. “I feel sad that we will be losing such an important art space,” says Horvath. “It’s provided me with creative inspiration from the exhibits they have put together over the years and gave me the opportunity to curate a collage show back in 2016.” While Future Tenant might be leaving for good, the project wants to leave a legacy behind in the form of an archive. The current Future Tenant team is compiling past programming to “exist as a publicly accessible artifact and resource for future students and artists,” all of which will be available online at CMU’s Kilthub at kilthub.cmu.edu Those who have worked with Future Tenant and would like to submit something for the archive in the form of image, video, or audio files can do so via an online submission form at tinyurl.com/FutureTenantArchive.

PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

19


CP PHOTO: KAYCEE ORWIG

Anna Weber, events manager at White Whale Bookstore

.LITERATURE.

THE VIRTUAL BOOK TOUR BY DANI JANAE // DANIJANAE@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

F

OR MANY AUTHORS, going on a book tour is the highlight of getting published. They get to meet fans, sign copies of their books, and have moving conversations with readers on what they have written. But the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic caused a problem: How do you go on a book tour when it’s not safe to be in the same room with so many people? Publishers and writers alike have risen to the occasion over the past year by creating virtual book tours, allowing authors to safely “travel” from city to city. But can they fill the same experiences and needs as a pre-pandemic tour?

Deesha Philyaw, author of the awardwinning and National Book Award finalist The Secret Lives of Church Ladies, says that readings in the virtual space are “good work,” but work nonetheless. “I don’t feel like anything is missing during the event,” she says. “But afterwards, there’s no going out for dinner or drinks; it’s not celebratory. It’s just me sitting on my couch trying to get motivated to get up and go to bed.” Despite the lack of socializing around the book, Philyaw felt she was able to reach her intended audience, and beyond. “I connected with Black women,

my primary audience, and many other folks who aren’t Black women, in large part because my book tour has been online,” Philyaw says. “By connecting with so many people, I’ve come to see my book in new lights. Each conversation is fresh and new.” The Secret Lives of Church Ladies isn’t Philyaw’s first book, but like many authors, it’s her first time promoting and touring with a book completely online. Stephanie Cawley, author of the poetry collection My Heart but Not My Heart (Slope Editions), echoes that excitement. Cawley was notified their book was going to publication in

September 2019, and the book was slated for a March 2020 release at an Association of Writers & Writing Programs (AWP) Conference. There was a lot of talk about whether the conference would happen as the pandemic got more serious, Cawley says. AWP ended up going on as planned, letting individuals, presses, and publishers decide whether they wanted to come or not. Cawley did not go, so their book launch slowly became an online affair. Inhabiting the virtual space feels different for a poet, according to Cawley. “In some ways it feels more intimate. I’m seeing people’s faces up really close CONTINUES ON PG. 24

22

PGHCITYPAPER.COM


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THE VIRTUAL BOOK TOUR, CONTINUED FROM PG. 22

CP PHOTO: JARED WICKERHAM

Deesha Philyaw

in a way that is different than when you’re in a room even. But it is also lonelier in a certain way. There’s no hugging,” Cawley says. “The thing that’s strangest is there’s no feedback from the audience. You don’t hear people laugh or make a sound, you can’t feel the energy of the room to know, ‘Maybe I should wrap this up now’ or ‘Are we doing OK? Can I keep going?’ It feels much more like a sort of solo performance.” A similar sentiment was echoed by Lucia LoTempio, author of Hot With the Bad Things (Alice James Books). “It’s really nice because you have an expanded audience in the virtual space. You also have a wider variety of people that you can read with which is nice,” LoTempio says. “On the flip side, there isn’t that same sort of comradery before and after readings. I think readings can be really social events.” LoTempio was elated in the fall of

2018 when she found out her book was getting published, but she also felt like it was a hoax. Traditionally for poetry collections to get published, poets will send their manuscripts to contests and open reading periods hosted by presses and publishers. In LoTempio’s case, the editor-in-chief of Alice James Books reached out directly to her after finding some of her poems and solicited the manuscript that way. Despite the virtual book launch, LoTempio says she feels like she reached her intended audience, but there were challenges. In Hot With the Bad Things, LoTempio uses a symbol in place of a name for a particular person. When she’s reading these poems in person, she signals to the audience and has them clap. In the virtual space, this wasn’t possible. LoTempio had her book launch party through Bloomfield’s White Whale

Bookstore, a popular site for readings, workshops, and book launches. Since April 2020, White Whale has hosted more than 7,000 people, including attendees from around the world, in 141 virtual events, including 19 workshops. White Whale hosts their events using Zoom, and uses the site Eventbrite to run ticket sign-ups, which has helped with security. They are able to look at the list of attendees and weed out spam that way. This prevents notorious “Zoom bombers” from ruining events. White Whale didn’t jump into the virtual event space from the start, but after canceling their in-store events and closing the store to foot traffic, they reassessed. “We really didn’t know if we were going to start them up again in some capacity, but we were watching other bookstores — really shout out to other bookstores — putting on virtual events.

Follow staff writer Dani Janae on Twitter @figwidow

24

PGHCITYPAPER.COM

WHITE WHALE BOOKSTORE whitewhalebookstore.com

DEESHA PHILYAW deeshaphilyaw.com

STEPHANIE CAWLEY stephaniecawley.com

LUCIA LOTEMPIO lucialotempio.com

I said to Adlai [Yeomans, co-owner of White Whale], ‘Should we give it a try? And he was like, ‘Sure, let’s see how it goes for a couple of weeks,’” says Anna Weber, White Whale events manager. As of April 2, White Whale has hosted a full year of virtual events, and they have more to come for the foreseeable future.


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PGHCITYPAPER.COM

BY AMANDA WALTZ // AWALTZ@PGHCITYPAPER.COM

A

FTER BEING CANCELED last spring due to concerns surrounding the COVID-19 outbreak, the JFilm Festival returns to immerse audiences in the Jewish experience with virtual screenings, panel discussions, and more. This year, the festival also has a clear mission of highlighting how communities can acknowledge and work together against social injustice and corruption. Kathryn Spitz Cohan, executive director of Film Pittsburgh, the nonprofit that organizes JFilm and other major film events in the city, believes addressing these issues is central to their mission. “I would say we’re really trying, through the films that we curate, to move people from point A to point B, meaning bringing people together to understand that we’re more alike than different regardless of our skin color, our religion, our political beliefs,” says Spitz Cohan. “We’re really trying to help people to realize that that is indeed the case. And that, you know, racism, anti-Semitism, these ills that the world

is challenged by, that they’re not for anybody’s good. Nobody benefits.” That sentiment comes across in the theme of the 28th JFilm Festival, which invites audiences to “See How We’re Different, Discover How We’re the Same.” One film exemplifying this is Shared Legacies, a documentary highlighting the history of Jewish and Black communities banding together to battle racism and anti-Semitism in the United States. Directed by Dr. Shari Rogers, the film looks at how Black and Jewish leaders found common cause during the turbulent Civil Rights movement, with figures like Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel walking alongside Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. during the 1965 Selma marches. Similarly, the documentary A Crime on the Bayou looks at the bond formed between a young Jewish attorney and the Black man he defends against a wrongful, racially motivated conviction in 1960s New Orleans. Besides these two films, the festival — taking place virtually from Thu.,

April 22 though Sun., May 2 — will also screen a documentary about funnyman and game show host Howie Mandel, and Sublet, a narrative feature about a gay, middle-aged travel writer and a young filmmaker who share a pad in Tel Aviv. In total, audiences can expect 18 stories from around the globe encompassing an array of cultures and experiences, ranging from Leona, a Mexican film about a Syrian Jewish woman finding love, to Misha and the Wolves, a baffling documentary about a Holocaust orphan who claims to have been raised by wild animals. Spitz Cohan says that one of the reasons they chose films like Shared Legacies and A Crime on the Bayou is to revisit significant moments or movements that have become lost to time. She believes doing so demonstrates how alliances are key to fighting against hate in a time when that is needed more than ever. To punctuate this, Spitz Cohan points out how Shared Legacies includes footage of the local Tree of Life synagogue that, in


TOP PHOTO: MENEMSHA FILMS / BOTTOM PHOTO: BELL MEDIA

Top: Shared Legacies at JFilm Festival; Bottom: Howie Mandel: But, Enough About Me at at JFilm Festival

JFILM FESTIVAL Thu., April 22-Sun., May 2. $15 general admission/$75 six packs/$136 all festival passes. filmpittsburgh.org

2018, became the site of the worst antiSemitic attack in U.S. history. “So it’s just a way to teach people history, and also, take a look at what we can do today,” she says. That awareness extends to the dysfunction within our government, especially when looking back at the recently ended, unprecedented term of former President Donald Trump. This comes through in the festival selection Kings of Capitol Hill, a documentary examining how the American Israel Public Affairs Committee, considered one of the most influential lobby organizations in the U.S., went from an idealistic, liberal group to embracing Trump. The development is an odd one given how Trump is credited with empowering a new wave of anti-Semitism and white supremacy. “I think that when a film makes a statement, and gives you food for thought, I think it’s really valuable to look at,” says Spitz Cohan. “And I think people are interested right now in how things

work much more so than they were five years ago. They’re much more interested in, how does the government really work? And how does it affect me? And who does it benefit? And we’re much more aware of it now. And so, for that reason, it makes the forum really attractive, because it exposes something that we don’t really get to learn about otherwise.” Besides screenings, Spitz Cohan says the festival offers other opportunities for audiences to engage with the films, including post-screening parties over Zoom, pre-recorded Q&As with filmmakers, and “Film Schmooze” — live, casual discussions presented in partnership with the University of Pittsburgh Jewish Studies Program. Spitz Cohan adds that, while the pandemic has taught Film Pittsburgh a lot and opened the organization up to a wider audience, she looks forward to returning to in-person events. “We are hopeful,” she says, “that this will be our last all-virtual festival.”

Follow senior writer Amanda Waltz on Twitter @AWaltzCP

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PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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SEVEN DAYS IN PITTSBURGH

ARTWORK: CAROLYN REED BARRITT

^ Symbols by Carolyn Reed Barritt, part of Nicole Renee Ryan’s Experiments in Reality and Carolyn Reed Baritt’s Puppet Show at Boxheart Gallery

THU., APRIL 22 FRI., APRIL 23 LIT • VIRTUAL The story of American Reconstruction is often oversimplified and focuses on the American South. Pitt professor of history Alaina E. Roberts seeks to change that with a discussion of her book I’ve Been Here All the While: Black Freedom on Native Land for Pittsburgh Arts and Lectures. A description from the University of Pennsylvania Press website says the book explores the tensions surrounding the origins of modern-day Oklahoma, when Native American land was given to Black settlers as reparations for slavery, fulfilling the so-called “40 acres and a mule” promise. Roberts draws from archival research and her own history as a descendant of the African Americans, Indigenous Chickasaw peoples, and white settlers about whom she writes. 7 p.m. Free. pittsburghlectures.org

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FILM• IRL Drive-in theaters have seen a boost in popularity during the pandemic, as people are able to watch a movie from the safety of their own vehicles. Now horror fans can enjoy this benefit for a whole weekend when the Riverside Drive In Theatre presents its April Ghouls Super Monster-Rama. The latest edition of this annual event takes viewers back to the 1980s with two nights of teen slashers, werewolf films, and more. Go for a night or pack a sleeping bag for overnight on-site camping. Concessions, as well as lunch and breakfast meals, will be available. Continues through Sat., April 24. $10 each night. $10 camping fee. riversidedrivein.com/special-events

MUSIC • IRL Expect plenty of good old fashioned hootin’ and hollerin’ during local band Jakob’s Ferry Stragglers’ outdoor performance at Kingfly Spirits. The self-proclaimed “Appalachian Bluegrass” five-piece is a fun mix of rockabilly, swing, and bluegrass music, featuring vocals, fiddles, guitars, and a mandolin. Masks will be required, and any tickets purchased separately from other guests who want to be seated together must email events@kingflyspirits. com at least 24 hours in advance. 7:30 p.m. 2613 Smallman St., Strip District. $20. kingflyspirits.com/events

SAT., APRIL 24 ART • VIRTUAL For the second year in a row, Art All Night, one of the city’s most popular arts festivals, returns to an online format after a successful

move last year due to the pandemic. The 24th annual festival will feature an online exhibit with works from hundreds of local artists and 22 hours of entertainment, including interactive activities, films, musical performances, and more. Pro tip: Don’t delay checking out the artwork just because the festival is on the web. Art All Night’s virtual form stays true to its longtime in-person events; once the 22 hours are over, the entire event gets wiped from online. 4 p.m. Continues through Sun., April 25. Free. artallnight.org

SUN., APRIL 25 ART • IRL BoxHeart Gallery presents two dynamic shows with Experiments in Reality by Nicole Renee Ryan in the main gallery, and Puppet Show by Carolyn Reed Barritt in


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FILM STILL: TWILIGHT’S KISS (SUK SUK)

^ Twilight’s Kiss (Suk Suk), hosted by City of Asylum and presented by ReelQ

the upstairs gallery. Experiments in Reality presents a series of landscapes made abstract by the artist’s unreliable memory. Puppet Show came about as a meditation on the things lost to the pandemic, the paintings described on the BoxHeart website as containing colors, forms, and repetitions that “reflect not only the desire for a return to the ordinary but also the longing for the extraordinary.” Continues through May 21. 4523 Liberty Ave., Bloomfield. Free. boxheartgallery.com

MON., APRIL 26 WORKSHOP • VIRTUAL Vocalist Anqwenique Kinsel wants to teach people how to use singing to de-stress, build confidence, and more in Just Sing! Singing for Self-Care with Anqwenique Kinsel, presented by Greater Pittsburgh Arts Council. Kinsel specializes in opera, classical music, jazz, and soul, and she has performed with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra and is on faculty for the CLAZZ International Music Festival. She will teach vocal and breathing exercises from her career on stage. 6 p.m. $10. pittsburghartscouncil.org/ events-and-workshops-etc

TUE., APRIL 27 DIY • VIRTUAL The Frick Pittsburgh has launched a new monthly artmaking workshop, Studio at Home: Mindful Artmaking, a series of online workshops hosted by artist Stacey McSorley. Once a month, McSorley will guide viewers through an hour of artistic practice that is informative and calming. The first workshop in the series is Art Journaling, and various other art forms will be covered in future months. Participants will be able to engage with each form no matter their experience level, and each workshop comes with an inexpensive materials list. 7 p.m. $15. $10 students. Free for members. thefrickpittsburgh.org

Socially-distancing herself but still broadcasting LIVE Every Monday thru Thursday at 10 a.m. Listen in at lynncullen.pghcitypaper.com

WED., APRIL 28 FILM • VIRTUAL ReelQ, Pittsburgh’s International LGBTQ Film festival, presents Twilight’s Kiss (Suk Suk), a film by Byray Yeung. The movie, hosted by City of Asylum, tells the story of PAK and HOI, two closested married men in their twilight years. After their initial meeting, a spark is lit, and despite the traditional families they have built, the two men must contend with their desire for each other. 7 p.m. Free. alphabetcity.org • PITTSBURGH CITY PAPER APRIL 21-28, 2021

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DINER T/F TEST

BY BRENDAN EMMETT QUIGLEY // BRENDANEMMETTQUIGLEY.COM

ACROSS

9_4.75_x_4.75.indd 1

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1. It contained some face-melting shit in an Indiana Jones movie 4. Relative key 4/16/21 1:58 PM to D minor 10. Big game catcher? 14. Outrageous neckpiece 15. Senior ___ 16. Singer Paul with the autobiography My Way 17. French peer 18. Seafood you’ll almost epically get wrong? 20. Disgusted sounds 22. Insignificant problem 23. Word with a facepalm 24. With 26-Across, ordering beef and broccoli but getting egg foo young instead? 26. See 24-Across 29. Bluefin et al. 30. Amphibians used in witches’ brews 32. Tease mercilessly 33. Navy lead by Lysander 35. Comic routine 36. Brings home 37. Drink in Aesop’s The Crow and the Pitcher? 40. Some pens 43. Blade in the river 44. Coffee server 48. Hosp. section for heart patients 49. One might have an RSVP button

51. Top Gear topics 52. With 54-Across, guitars played in a coop? 54. See 52-Across 56. Instrument that an orchestra tunes to 57. Sister from another mother, briefly 58. Sign of hard work? 59. Dessert served while flirting? 63. Letters after Senator Todd Young’s name 64. Sch. that holds an annual Commissioning Week 65. Fashionista Lauren 66. Hail Mary’s trajectory 67. Brightly colored 68. ___ Berry Farm (California theme park) 69. Clap back?

DOWN 1. Snatches 2. Throw a couple of punches, say 3. Spirit of the Hopi culture 4. “Can this day get any worse?” initially 5. Offers some buns? 6. Insomnia medicine 7. Frivolity 8. Its license plate reads “Yours to Discover” Abbr. 9. Way to go: Abbr. 10. At Eternity’s Gate actor Willem

11. Pig’s spot 12. Bunny’s coat? 13. Computer that can play chess and read lips 19. GIs : US :: ___ : South Korea 21. Gobbles (down) 25. “¿___ encendido este micrófono?” (Spanish mic check) 26. Text qualifier 27. Insulated room 28. Chief points? Abbr. 31. “Your Movie Sucks” critic Roger 34. Ranking higher than 36. Alturas de Macchu Picchu poet Pablo 38. Past participle that pretty much everybody gets wrong 39. Bread baked

in a tandoor 40. Include discreetly in Outlook 41. Decider’s phrase 42. “Who stands to gain?” in legalese 45. Accepted poor treatment 46. Rentable 47. Petal extract 49. Scrimps, with “by” 50. Elbow grease 53. Trig function that is cos/sin 55. Black key on the right of a pair on a piano 57. City on the Svitava and Svratka rivers 59. “Well, that was ___!” 60. “Dees-gusting” 61. Eternity, seemingly 62. Book of Mormon rel. LAST WEEK’S ANSWERS


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IN The Court of Common Pleas of Allegheny County, Pennsylvania: No. GD-21-2394. In re petition of Jacob Michael Gill for change of name to Jacob Michael Crook. To all persons interested: Notice is hereby given that an order of said Court authorized the filing of said petition and fixed the 20th day of May , 2021, at 9:00 a.m., as the time and the Motions Room, City-County Building, Pittsburgh, PA, as the place for a hearing, when and where all persons may show cause, if any they have, why said name should not be changed as prayed for.

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Profile for Pittsburgh City Paper

April 21, 2021 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly featuring a cover story on Pittsburgh musician Konscious Kel, the return of JFilm fes...

April 21, 2021 - Pittsburgh City Paper  

Pittsburgh's leading arts and entertainment newsweekly featuring a cover story on Pittsburgh musician Konscious Kel, the return of JFilm fes...

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